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Sample records for chagas cardiomyopathy

  1. Rapidly Progressing Chagas Cardiomyopathy.

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    Hollowed, John; McCullough, Matthew; Sanchez, Daniel; Traina, Mahmoud; Hernandez, Salvador; Murillo, Efrain

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasiteTrypanosoma cruzi, can cause a potentially life-threatening cardiomyopathy in approximately 10-40% of afflicted individuals. The decline in cardiac function characteristically progresses over the course of many years. We report a case of Chagas disease in which the patient experienced an atypical rapid deterioration to severe cardiomyopathy over the course of 16 months. This case argues the need for increased routine surveillance for patients with confirmedT. cruziinfection, who are determined to be at high-risk for worsening cardiomyopathy. PMID:26856912

  2. Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy: Immunopathology and Genetics

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    Edecio Cunha-Neto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in Latin America and affects ca. 10 million people worldwide. About 30% of Chagas disease patients develop chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC, a particularly lethal inflammatory cardiomyopathy that occurs decades after the initial infection, while most patients remain asymptomatic. Mortality rate is higher than that of noninflammatory cardiomyopathy. CCC heart lesions present a Th1 T-cell-rich myocarditis, with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and prominent fibrosis. Data suggest that the myocarditis plays a major pathogenetic role in disease progression. Major unmet goals include the thorough understanding of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic targets and identification of prognostic genetic factors. Chagas disease thus remains a neglected disease, with no vaccines or antiparasitic drugs proven efficient in chronically infected adults, when most patients are diagnosed. Both familial aggregation of CCC cases and the fact that only 30% of infected patients develop CCC suggest there might be a genetic component to disease susceptibility. Moreover, previous case-control studies have identified some genes associated to human susceptibility to CCC. In this paper, we will review the immunopathogenesis and genetics of Chagas disease, highlighting studies that shed light on the differential progression of Chagas disease patients to CCC.

  3. Chagas cardiomyopathy in the context of the chronic disease transition.

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    Alicia I Hidron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with Chagas disease have migrated to cities, where obesity, hypertension and other cardiac risk factors are common. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study included adult patients evaluated by the cardiology service in a public hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Data included risk factors for T. cruzi infection, medical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and contact 9 months after initial data collection to ascertain mortality. Serology and PCR for Trypanosoma cruzi were performed. Of 394 participants, 251 (64% had confirmed T. cruzi infection by serology. Among seropositive participants, 109 (43% had positive results by conventional PCR; of these, 89 (82% also had positive results by real time PCR. There was a high prevalence of hypertension (64% and overweight (body mass index [BMI] >25; 67%, with no difference by T. cruzi infection status. Nearly 60% of symptomatic congestive heart failure was attributed to Chagas cardiomyopathy; mortality was also higher for seropositive than seronegative patients (p = 0.05. In multivariable models, longer residence in an endemic province, residence in a rural area and poor housing conditions were associated with T. cruzi infection. Male sex, increasing age and poor housing were independent predictors of Chagas cardiomyopathy severity. Males and participants with BMI Chagas cardiomyopathy remains an important cause of congestive heart failure in this hospital population, and should be evaluated in the context of the epidemiological transition that has increased risk of obesity, hypertension and chronic cardiovascular disease.

  4. Interferon-γ and other inflammatory mediators in cardiomyocyte signaling during Chagas disease cardiomyopathy

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    Ludmila; Rodrigues; Pinto; Ferreira; Amanda; Farage; Frade; Monique; Andrade; Baron; Isabela; Cunha; Navarro; Jorge; Kalil; Christophe; Chevillard; Edecio; Cunha-Neto

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease cardiomyopathy(CCC), the main consequence of Trypanosoma cruzi(T.cruzi) infection, is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in up to 30% of infected individuals. The heart inflammation in CCC patients is characterized by a Th1 T cell-rich myocarditis with increased production of interferon(IFN)-γ, produced by the CCC myocardial infiltrate and detected at high levels in the periphery. IFN-γ has a central role in the cardiomyocyte signaling during both acute and chronic phases of T.cruzi infection. In this review, we have chosen to focus in its pleiotropic mode of action during CCC, which may ultimately be the strongest driver towards pathological remodeling and heart failure. We describe here the antiparasitic protective and pathogenic dual role of IFN-γ in Chagas disease.

  5. Interferon-γ and other inflammatory mediators in cardiomyocyte signaling during Chagas disease cardiomyopathy.

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    Ferreira, Ludmila Rodrigues Pinto; Frade, Amanda Farage; Baron, Monique Andrade; Navarro, Isabela Cunha; Kalil, Jorge; Chevillard, Christophe; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2014-08-26

    Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), the main consequence of Trypanosoma cruzi (T.cruzi) infection, is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in up to 30% of infected individuals. The heart inflammation in CCC patients is characterized by a Th1 T cell-rich myocarditis with increased production of interferon (IFN)-γ, produced by the CCC myocardial infiltrate and detected at high levels in the periphery. IFN-γ has a central role in the cardiomyocyte signaling during both acute and chronic phases of T.cruzi infection. In this review, we have chosen to focus in its pleiotropic mode of action during CCC, which may ultimately be the strongest driver towards pathological remodeling and heart failure. We describe here the antiparasitic protective and pathogenic dual role of IFN-γ in Chagas disease. PMID:25228957

  6. Chagas Cardiomyopathy: Usefulness of EKG and Echocardiogram in a Non-Endemic Country.

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    Adrián Sánchez-Montalvá

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD is a major cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America, and migration movements have now spread the disease worldwide. However, data regarding Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC and the usefulness of echocardiography in non endemic countries are still scarce.We selected 485 patients in the chronic phase of CD from two Spanish settings. Data from physical examination, electrocardiogram (EKG, x-ray, and two dimensional transthoracic echocardiogram were recorded. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was assessed by PCR in peripheral blood. Patients were stratified according to the Kuschnir classification and a combination of echocardiogram and electrocardiogram findings. Patients mainly came from Bolivia (459; 94.6%. One hundred and forty three patients (31.5% had at least one electrocardiogram abnormality. Twenty seven patients (5.3% had an abnormal echocardiography. Patients with abnormal echocardiography were older (47 (IQR 38-57 years vs 41 (IQR 38-57 years; p = 0.019 and there was a greater proportion of males (66.7% vs 29.7%; p<0.001. Among echocardiographic variables, diastolic dysfunction was associated with poor cardiac status. In the multivariate analysis, abnormal EKG and gender were associated with abnormal echocardiography. Echocardiography may be spared for males under 30 and females under 45 years old with normal EKG as the likelihood of having an abnormal echocardiography is minimal. Association between T. cruzi DNA in the peripheral blood and cardiac involvement was not observed.CC rates in the studied population are low. Age and sex are important determinants for the development of CC, and with the EKG should guide echocardiogram performance.

  7. Total Artificial Heart as Bridge to Heart Transplantation in Chagas Cardiomyopathy: Case Report.

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    Ruzza, A; Czer, L S C; De Robertis, M; Luthringer, D; Moriguchi, J; Kobashigawa, J; Trento, A; Arabia, F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is becoming an increasingly recognized cause of dilated cardiomyopathy outside of Latin America, where it is endemic, due to population shifts and migration. Heart transplantation (HTx) is a therapeutic option for end-stage cardiomyopathy due to CD, but may be considered a relative contraindication due to potential reactivation of the causative organism with immunosuppression therapy. The total artificial heart (TAH) can provide mechanical circulatory support in decompensated patients with severe biventricular dysfunction until the time of HTx, while avoiding immunosuppressive therapy and removing the organ most affected by the causative organism. We report herein a patient with CD and severe biventricular dysfunction, who had mechanical circulatory support with a TAH for more than 6 months, followed by successful orthotopic HTx and treatment with benznidazole for 3 months. The patient had no evidence of recurrent disease in the transplanted heart based on endomyocardial biopsy up to 1 year post-transplantation, and remains alive more than 30 months after insertion of a TAH and 24 months after HTx. PMID:26915885

  8. Deficient regulatory T cell activity and low frequency of IL-17-producing T cells correlate with the extent of cardiomyopathy in human Chagas' disease.

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    Paulo Marcos Matta Guedes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardium damage during Chagas' disease results from the immunological imbalance between pro- and production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and has been explained based on the Th1-Th2 dichotomy and regulatory T cell activity. Recently, we demonstrated that IL-17 produced during experimental T. cruzi infection regulates Th1 cells differentiation and parasite induced myocarditis. Here, we investigated the role of IL-17 and regulatory T cell during human Chagas' disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, we observed CD4(+IL-17(+ T cells in culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from Chagas' disease patients and we evaluated Th1, Th2, Th17 cytokine profile production in the PBMC cells from Chagas' disease patients (cardiomyopathy-free, and with mild, moderate or severe cardiomyopathy cultured with T. cruzi antigen. Cultures of PBMC from patients with moderate and severe cardiomyopathy produced high levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ and low levels of IL-10, when compared to mild cardiomyopathy or cardiomyopathy-free patients. Flow cytometry analysis showed higher CD4(+IL-17(+ cells in PBMC cultured from patients without or with mild cardiomyopathy, in comparison to patients with moderate or severe cardiomyopathy. We then analyzed the presence and function of regulatory T cells in all patients. All groups of Chagas' disease patients presented the same frequency of CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T cells. However, CD4(+CD25(+ T cells from patients with mild cardiomyopathy or cardiomyopathy-free showed higher suppressive activity than those with moderate and severe cardiomyopathy. IFN-γ levels during chronic Chagas' disease are inversely correlated to the LVEF (P = 0.007, r = -0.614, while regulatory T cell activity is directly correlated with LVEF (P = 0.022, r = 0.500. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that reduced production of the cytokines IL-10 and IL-17 in association with high levels of IFN-γ and TNF

  9. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease.

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    Paola Rosa Luz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL, a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32. Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003. Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23, compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07. Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031. These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy.

  10. Chagas cardiomyopathy: the potential of diastolic dysfunction and brain natriuretic peptide in the early identification of cardiac damage.

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    Ana Garcia-Alvarez

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chagas disease remains a major cause of mortality in several countries of Latin America and has become a potential public health problem in non-endemic countries as a result of migration flows. Cardiac involvement represents the main cause of mortality, but its diagnosis is still based on nonspecific criteria with poor sensitivity. Early identification of patients with cardiac involvement is desirable, since early treatment may improve prognosis. This study aimed to assess the role of diastolic dysfunction, abnormal myocardial strain and elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP in the early identification of cardiac involvement in Chagas disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fifty-four patients divided into 3 groups--group 1 (undetermined form: positive serology without ECG or 2D-echocardiographic abnormalities; N = 32, group 2 (typical ECG abnormalities of Chagas disease but normal 2D-echocardiography; N = 14, and group 3 (regional wall motion abnormalities, left ventricular [LV] end-diastolic diameter >55 mm or LV ejection fraction 37 pg/ml were noted in 0%, 13%, 29% and 63% in controls and groups 1 to 3, respectively. Half of patients in the undetermined form had impaired relaxation patterns, whereas half of patients with ECG abnormalities suggestive of Chagas cardiomyopathy had normal diastolic function. In group 1, BNP levels were statistically higher in patients with diastolic dysfunction as compared to those with normal diastolic function (27 ± 26 vs. 11 ± 8 pg/ml, p = 0.03. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, the combination of diastolic function and BNP measurement adds important information that could help to better stratify patients with Chagas disease.

  11. Association of IL17A gene variants with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy

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    Daniel Arturo León; Luis Eduardo Echeverría; Clara Isabel González

    2015-01-01

    Human host genetic factors have been suggested to be determinants of the prevalence and clinical forms of Chagas disease. In this regard, IL-17A is believed to control parasitemia and protect against heart disease. In this work, we assessed whether IL17A gene polymorphisms are related to infection and/or development of the cardiac form of Chagas disease by genotyping for five IL17A SNPs (rs4711998, rs8193036, rs3819024, rs2275913 and rs7747909) in 1171 individuals from a Colombian region ende...

  12. Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: current concepts of an old disease Cardiomiopatia chagásica: conceitos atuais de doença antiga

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    Angelina M.B. Bilate

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease continues to be a significant public health problem, as ca. 10 million people are still infected with T. cruzi in Latin America. Decades after primary infection, 30% of individuals can develop a form of chronic inflammatory cardiomyopathy known as Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC. Data from both murine models and human studies support the view that an autoimmune response as well as a parasite-driven immune response involving inflammatory cytokines and chemokines may both play a role in generating the heart lesions leading to CCC. This review aims to summarize recent advances in the understanding of the immunopathogenesis of Chagas disease cardiomyopathy.A doença de Chagas continua sendo importante problema de saúde pública uma vez que cerca de 10 milhões de indivíduos ainda estão infectados pelo T. cruzi. Décadas após a infecção primária, aproximadamente 30% dos indivíduos podem desenvolver uma cardiomiopatia inflamatória crônica, a chamada Cardiomiopatia Chagásica Crônica (CCC. Dados de modelos murinos e de estudos em humanos apóiam a visão de que tanto respostas auto-imunes como as determinadas pelo parasita em conjunto com citocinas e quimiocinas inflamatórias participam da geração das lesões cardíacas típicas da CCC. A presente revisão tem como objetivo sumarizar os recentes avanços no entendimento da imunopatogênese da Cardiomiopatia Chagásica Crônica.

  13. Cardiomyopathy

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    Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or ... tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have ...

  14. Defective production of interleukin 2 in patients with Chagas' disease: purified IL-2 augments in vitro response in patients with chagasic cardiomyopathy

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    Luis Briceno

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available The production of interleukin 2 (IL-2 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, from patients with different clinical forms of Chagas disease and healthy controls, was evaluated after stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigen, PPD and PHA. PHA induced higher production of IL-2 in infected patients than healthy controls. No diferences were found between infected groups. With PPD the trend was similar, the only difference was that asymptomatic infected patients (INF showed higher levels of IL-2 production than patients with cardiomyopathy (CDM. With T. cruzi antigen, most patients showed little or no IL-2 production at 24 hr, a peak at 48 hr and an abrupt fall at 72 hr. A similar pattern of IL- 2 production was observed in INF and CDM. To evaluate the physiologic relevance of the deficit in IL-2 production, we studied the effect of non-mitogenic concentratios of IL-2 in the proliferative response to specific antigens. The addition of IL-2 only enhanced the proliferative response of CDM patients. These observations suggest that patients suffering Chagas' disease, particularly CDM, have a significant reduction in the capacity to produce IL-2. These findings could be of importance in the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  15. Estudo de fatores pró-trombóticos e pró-inflamatórios na cardiomiopatia chagásica Study of pro-thrombotic and pro-inflammatory factors in chagas cardiomyopathy

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    Leila Maria Magalhães Pessoa de Melo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A relação entre atividade inflamatória e pró-trombótica na cardiomiopatia chagásica e em outras etiologias é obscura. OBJETIVO: Estudar o perfil de marcadores pró-trombóticos e pró-inflamatórios em pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca chagásica e compará-los com os de etiologia não chagásica. MÉTODOS: Coorte transversal. Critérios de inclusão: fração de ejeção do VE (FEVE um mês. Os pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos: grupo 1 (G1 - sorologias positivas para Chagas - e grupo 2 (G2 - sorologias negativas para Chagas. Fator pró-inflamatório: PCR ultrassensível. Fatores pró-trombóticos: fator trombina-antitrombina, fibrinogênio, antígeno do fator de von Willebrand, P-selectina plasmática e tromboelastograma. Amostra calculada para poder de 80%, assumindo-se diferença de 1/3 de desvio-padrão; p significativo se BACKGROUND: The relationship between inflammatory and prothrombotic activity in chagas cardiomyopathy and in other etiologies is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To study the profile of pro-thrombotic and pro-inflammatory markers in patients with Chagas' heart failure and compare them with patients of non-chagas etiology. METHODS: Cross-sectional cohort. Inclusion criteria: left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF one month. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (G1 - seropositive for Chagas - and group 2 (G2 - seronegative for Chagas. Pro-inflammatory factor: Ultra-sensitive CRP. Pro-thrombotic factors: thrombin-antithrombin factor, fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor antigen, plasma P-selectin and thromboelastography. Sample calculated for 80% power, assuming a standard deviation difference of 1/3; significant p if it is < 0.05. Statistical analysis: Fisher's exact test for categorical variables; unpaired Student's t-test for parametric continuous variables and Mann-Whitney test for nonparametric continuous variables. RESULTS: Between January and June 2008, 150 patients were included, 80 in G1

  16. Ventricular arrhythmias in Chagas disease

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    Marco Paulo Tomaz Barbosa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sudden death is one of the most characteristic phenomena of Chagas disease, and approximately one-third of infected patients develop life-threatening heart disease, including malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Fibrotic lesions secondary to chronic cardiomyopathy produce arrhythmogenic substrates that lead to the appearance and maintenance of ventricular arrhythmias. The objective of this study is to discuss the main clinical and epidemiological aspects of ventricular arrhythmias in Chagas disease, the specific workups and treatments for these abnormalities, and the breakthroughs needed to determine a more effective approach to these arrhythmias. A literature review was performed via a search of the PubMed database from 1965 to May 31, 2014 for studies of patients with Chagas disease. Clinical management of patients with chronic Chagas disease begins with proper clinical stratification and the identification of individuals at a higher risk of sudden cardiac death. Once a patient develops malignant ventricular arrhythmia, the therapeutic approach aims to prevent the recurrence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death by the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators, antiarrhythmic drugs, or both. In select cases, invasive ablation of the reentrant circuit causing tachycardia may be useful. Ventricular arrhythmias are important manifestations of Chagas cardiomyopathy. This review highlights the absence of high-quality evidence regarding the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias in Chagas disease. Recognizing high-risk patients who require specific therapies, especially invasive procedures such as the implantation of cardioverter defibrillators and ablative approaches, is a major challenge in clinical practice.

  17. Myocardial Gene Expression of T-bet, GATA-3, Ror-γt, FoxP3, and Hallmark Cytokines in Chronic Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy: An Essentially Unopposed TH1-Type Response

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    Luciana Gabriel Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC, a late consequence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy with prognosis worse than those of noninflammatory etiology (NIC. Although the T cell-rich myocarditis is known to play a pathogenetic role, the relative contribution of each of the functional T cell subsets has never been thoroughly investigated. We therefore assessed gene expression of cytokines and transcription factors involved in differentiation and effector function of each functional T cell subset (TH1/TH2/TH17/Treg in CCC, NIC, and heart donor myocardial samples. Methods and Results. Quantitative PCR showed markedly upregulated expression of IFN-γ and transcription factor T-bet, and minor increases of GATA-3; FoxP3 and CTLA-4; IL-17 and IL-18 in CCC as compared with NIC samples. Conversely, cytokines expressed by TH2 cells (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 or associated with Treg (TGF-β and IL-10 were not upregulated in CCC myocardium. Expression of TH1-related genes such as T-bet, IFN-γ, and IL-18 correlated with ventricular dilation, FoxP3, and CTLA-4. Conclusions. Results are consistent with a strong local TH1-mediated response in most samples, possibly associated with pathological myocardial remodeling, and a proportionally smaller FoxP3+CTLA4+ Treg cell population, which is unable to completely curb IFN-γ production in CCC myocardium, therefore fueling inflammation.

  18. Towards the establishment of a consensus real-time qPCR to monitor Trypanosoma cruzi parasitemia in patients with chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: a substudy from the BENEFIT trial.

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    Moreira, Otacilio C; Ramírez, Juan David; Velázquez, Elsa; Melo, Myllena F A Dias; Lima-Ferreira, Carolina; Guhl, Felipe; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Marin-Neto, Jose Antonio; Morillo, Carlos A; Britto, Constança

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is an accurate method to quantify Trypanosoma cruzi DNA and can be used to follow-up parasitemia in Chagas disease (CD) patients undergoing chemotherapy. The Benznidazole Evaluation for Interrupting Trypanosomiasis (BENEFIT) study is an international, multicenter, randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of benznidazole (BZ) treatment in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). One important question to be addressed concerns the effectiveness of BZ in reducing overall parasite load in CCC patients, even in the absence of parasitological cure. This report describes the evaluation of multiple procedures for DNA extraction and qPCR-based protocols aiming to establish a standardized methodology for the absolute quantification of T. cruzi DNA in Guanidine-EDTA blood (GEB) samples. A panel of five primer sets directed to the T. cruzi nuclear satellite DNA repeats (Sat-DNA) and to the minicircle DNA conserved regions (kDNA) was compared in either SYBR Green or TaqMan systems. Standard curve parameters such as, amplification efficiency, coefficient of determination and intercept were evaluated, as well as different procedures to generate standard samples containing pre-established T. cruzi DNA concentration. Initially, each primer set was assayed in a SYBR Green qPCR to estimate parasite load in GEB samples from chronic Chagas disease patients. The results achieved from Bayesian transmutability analysis elected the primer sets Cruzi1/Cruzi2 (p=0.0031) and Diaz7/Diaz8 (p=0.0023) coupled to the QIAamp DNA Kit extraction protocol (silica gel column), as the most suitable for monitoring parasitemia in these patients. Comparison between the parasite burden of 150 GEB samples of BENEFIT patients from Argentina, Brazil and Colombia, prior to drug/placebo administration, was performed using Cruzi1/Cruzi2 primers in a SYBR Green approach. The median parasitemia found in patients from

  19. Chagas Disease

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    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. ... nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood ...

  20. Peripartum cardiomyopathy

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    Cardiomyopathy - peripartum ... Cardiomyopathy occurs when there is damage to the heart. As a result, the heart muscle becomes weak ... the lungs, liver, and other body systems. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy in which ...

  1. Nanotechnological approaches against Chagas disease.

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    Romero, Eder Lilia; Morilla, Maria Jose

    2010-03-18

    Over several thousand years, the flagellated Trypanosome cruzi-causative agent of Chagas disease-developed a complex life cycle between the reduviidae vectors and its human hosts. Due to their silent and hidden location, the intracellular amastigotes are mainly responsible for the nearly 50,000 annual deaths caused by the chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Chagas disease is the most important parasitic disease in the Americas, though treatments have not evolved towards a more efficient pharmacotherapy that (i) eradicates the scarce amastigotes present at the indeterminate/chronic form and (ii) employs less toxic drugs than benznidazole or nifurtimox. Nano-drug delivery systems (nanoDDS) represent useful means to selectively deliver the drug to intracellular targets. However, preclinical research in Chagas must be extended in order to improve the chances of a clinical implementation. The stages involved in this process are (i) selection of the appropriate drug for a specific parasite, (ii) development of a drug-loaded nanoDDS structure that displays the adequate pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and intracellular transit and (iii) selection of the right parasite form to target and the right stage of the disease for the treatment to be started. In this review we will critically overview the few research works published in the last 20years in the context of nanotechnology and Chagas diseases and highlight the gaps in knowledge towards the design of more efficient medicines to address this endemic. PMID:19941920

  2. Chagas cardiomyopathy: The potential effect of benznidazole treatment on diastolic dysfunction and cardiac damage in dogs chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Santos, Fabiane M; Mazzeti, Ana L; Caldas, Sérgio; Gonçalves, Karolina R; Lima, Wanderson G; Torres, Rosália M; Bahia, Maria Terezinha

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac involvement represents the main cause of mortality among patients with Chagas disease, and the relevance of trypanocidal treatment to improving diastolic dysfunction is still doubtful. In the present study, we used a canine model infected with the benznidazole-sensitive Berenice-78 Trypanosoma cruzi strain to verify the efficacy of an etiologic treatment in reducing the parasite load and ameliorating cardiac muscle tissue damage and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in the chronic phase of the infection. The effect of the treatment on reducing the parasite load was monitored by blood PCR and blood culture assays, and the effect of the treatment on the outcome of heart tissue damage and on diastolic function was evaluated by histopathology and echo Doppler cardiogram. The benefit of the benznidazole-treatment in reducing the parasite burden was demonstrated by a marked decrease in positive blood culture and PCR assay results until 30days post-treatment. At this time, the PCR and blood culture assays yielded negative results for 82% of the treated animals, compared with only 36% of the untreated dogs. However, a progressive increase in the parasite load could be detected in the peripheral blood for one year post-treatment, as evidenced by a progressive increase in positive results for both the PCR and the blood culture assays at follow-up. The parasite load reduction induced by treatment was compatible with the lower degree of tissue damage among animals euthanized in the first month after treatment and with the increased cardiac damage after this period, reaching levels similar to those in untreated animals at the one-year follow-up. The two infected groups also presented similar, significantly smaller values for early tissue septal velocity (E' SIV) than the non-infected dogs did at this later time. Moreover, in the treated animals, an increase in the E/E' septal tissue filling pressure ratio was observed when compared with basal values as well as with

  3. Função do átrio esquerdo na miocardiopatia chagásica Function of the left atrium in the Chagas' cardiomyopathy

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    Maria do Carmo Pereira Nunes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar a função do átrio esquerdo em portadores de miocardiopatia dilatada de etiologia chagásica e correlacioná-la à função diastólica e à classe funcional. MÉTODOS: Estudados 75 portadores de miocardiopatia chagásica de julho de 1999 a maio de 2001, submetidos a exame clínico, eletrocardiograma e ecocardiograma transesofágico. A função do átrio esquerdo foi avaliada por meio das velocidades no apêndice atrial esquerdo e do reverso atrial na veia pulmonar. O grupo controle constou de 20 pacientes normais. RESULTADOS: A idade foi de 48±13 anos e 69% eram homens. A maioria dos pacientes estava em classe funcional I e II (88%, em tratamento convencional para insuficiência cardíaca. A fração de ejeção do ventrículo esquerdo foi de 39±13%. Os indicadores de função diastólica associaram-se aos de função sistólica e à classe funcional. Os portadores de padrão pseudonormal ou restritivo de disfunção diastólica apresentavam maior diâmetro do átrio esquerdo, menores velocidades do fluxo no apêndice atrial esquerdo, e maior duração do reverso atrial. Não houve diferença entre os pacientes com padrão normal e relaxamento diastólico anormal em relação ao grupo controle. CONCLUSÃO: A função atrial esquerda constitui um importante parâmetro na avaliação dos pacientes com miocardiopatia chagásica, e relaciona-se às funções sistólica e diastólica do ventrículo esquerdo.OBJECTIVE: To study the function of the left atrium in carriers of dilated cardiomyopathy of chagasic etiology and relate it to the diastolic function and to the functional class. METHODS: We studied 75 chagasic with cardiomyopathy patients from July to 1999 to May to 2001, submitted to clinical exams, electrocardiogram and transesophageal echocardiogram. The left atrium function was assessed by means of the velocities in the left atrial appendix and the atrial reverse in the pulmonary vein. The control group consisted of 20

  4. Cell Therapy in Chagas Disease

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    Antonio C. Campos de Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease which is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is an important cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America. In later stages chagasic cardiomyopathy is associated with congestive heart failure which is often refractory to medical therapy. In these individuals heart transplantation has been attempted. However, this procedure is fraught with many problems attributable to the surgery and the postsurgical administration of immunosuppressive drugs. Studies in mice suggest that the transplantation of bone-marrow-derived cells ameliorates the inflammation and fibrosis in the heart associated with this infection. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging reveals that bone marrow transplantation ameliorates the infection induced right ventricular enlargement. On the basis of these animal studies the safety of autologous bone marrow transplantation has been assessed in patients with chagasic end-stage heart disease. The initial results are encouraging and more studies need to be performed.

  5. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy ... In a case of restrictive cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle is normal size or slightly enlarged. Most of the time, it also pumps normally. However, it does not ...

  6. Perspectivas da evolução clínica de pacientes com cardiomiopatia chagásica listados em prioridade para o transplante cardíaco Clinical perspectives of patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy listed as high priority for heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Felipe P. Moreira

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O choque cardiogênico é responsável por elevados índices de mortalidade na fila de espera para o transplante cardíaco. Na cardiomiopatia chagásica, a alta incidência de disfunção biventricular pode contribuir com a gravidade desta complicação. MÉTODO: Foram estudados 141 pacientes indicados em caráter de prioridade para o transplante. Destes pacientes, 46 eram portadores de cardiomiopatia chagásica e 95 de outras cardiomiopatias. O choque cardiogênico foi tratado farmacologicamente e com o implante ocasional do balão intra-aórtico. Em cinco pacientes chagásicos, foi realizado o implante de dispositivo paracorpóreo de assistência ventricular esquerda. RESULTADOS: Num período médio de 2,8 meses, 58 (41,1% dos 141 pacientes foram transplantados, 73 (51,7% faleceram e 10 foram retirados da fila. A mortalidade entre os pacientes chagásicos e não chagásicos foi de 45,6% e 54,7%, respectivamente. No entanto, a expectativa média de vida, sem a realização do transplante cardíaco, dos pacientes chagásicos foi de apenas 1,5 meses, sendo observado risco relativo de mortalidade de 1,6 para estes pacientes em relação aos não chagásicos (pINTRODUCTION: Heart failure is responsible for high mortality rates of patients on heart transplantation waiting lists. In Chagas cardiomyopathy, the presence of biventricular dysfunction increases the severity of this situation. METHOD: One hundred and forty-one patients suffering from cardiogenic shock, listed as high priority for heart transplantation, were studied. Forty-six patients presented with Chagas cardiomyopathy and 95 with other cardiomyopathies. Heart failure was treated using intravenous inotropic drugs and intra-aortic balloon pump implantation. Five patients with Chagas disease underwent paracorporeal left ventricular assist device implantation. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 2.8 months, 58 (41.1% of the 141 patients were transplanted, while 73 (53.7% died

  7. Pediatric Cardiomyopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Pediatric Cardiomyopathies Updated:Oct 22,2015 Patient education material ... oxygen or high blood pressure. According to the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, one in every 100,000 children ...

  8. Dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiomyopathy - dilated ... The most common causes of dilated cardiomyopathy are: Heart disease caused by a narrowing of the arteries Poorly controlled high blood pressure There are many other causes of dilated ...

  9. Involvement of the autonomic nervous system in Chagas heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Reis Lopes

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system and especially the intracardiac autonomic nervous system is involved in Chagas' disease. Ganglionitis and periganglionitis were noted in three groups ofpatients dying with Chagas'disease: 1 Those in heart failure; 2 Those dying a sudden, non violent death and; 3 Those dying as a consequence ofaccidents or homicide. Hearts in the threegroups also revealed myocarditis and scattered involvement of intramyocardial ganglion cells as well as lesions of myelinic and unmyelinic fibers ascribable to Chagas'disease. In mice with experimentally induced Chagas' disease weobserved more intensive neuronal lesions of the cardiac ganglia in the acute phase of infection. Perhaps neuronal loss has a role in the pathogenesis of Chagas cardiomyopathy. However based on our own experience and on other data from the literature we conclude that the loss of neurones is not the main factor responsible for the manifestations exhibited by chronic chagasic patients. On the other hand the neuronal lesions may have played a role in the sudden death ofone group of patients with Chagas'disease but is difficult to explain the group of patients who did not die sudderly but instead progressed to cardiac failure.

  10. Dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide techniques are easily obtainable, noninvasive examinations that provide useful information in the evaluation, diagnosis and management of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The gated blood pool scan allows the assessment of ventricular size, configuration, and wall and septal thickness. These data allow the functional class of the cardiomyopathy (congestive, restrictive or hypertrophic) to be defined. Often THallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging adds further information and is particularly useful in distinguishing congestive cardiomyopathy from severe coronary artery disease and in depicting septal abnormalities in hipertrophic cardiomyopathy. Useful as these techniques are, they are not substitutes for conventional approaches to diagnosis. Careful history taking and physical examination, as well as scrutiny of the electrocardiogram, chest X-ray and echocardiogram should be standard practice for the evaluation of patients with suspected cardiomyopathy. Judicious use of noninvasive techniques may obviate the need for cardiac catheterization in many patients

  11. Acute Chagas Disease Induces Cerebral Microvasculopathy in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nisimura, Lindice Mitie; Estato, Vanessa; de Souza, Elen Mello; Reis, Patricia A.; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Pereira, Mirian Claudia de Souza; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is the main clinical form of Chagas disease (CD); however, cerebral manifestations, such as meningoencephalitis, ischemic stroke and cognitive impairment, can also occur. The aim of the present study was to investigate functional microvascular alterations and oxidative stress in the brain of mice in acute CD. Acute CD was induced in Swiss Webster mice (SWM) with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Cerebral functional capillary density (the number of spontaneously perf...

  12. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennira, S; Demiraj, A; Khouaja, A; Boujnah, M R

    2006-10-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and under recognized form of dilated cardiomyopathy, defined as a heart failure in the last month of pregnancy or in the first five months post-partum with absence of determinable cause for cardiac failure and absence of demonstrable heart disease. The incidence of peripartum cardiomyopathy ranges from 1 in 1300 to 1 in 15,000 pregnancy. Advanced maternal age, multiparity, twin births, preeclampsia and black race are known risk factors. The etiology of peripartum cardiomyopathy remains unknown but viral, autoimmune or idiopathic myocarditis are highly suggested. The clinical presentation on patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy is similar to that of patients with systolic heart failure. The treatment is based on drugs for sympyomatic control. Studies in graeter populations are need to determine the role of immunosupressive treatment. About half patients of peripartum cardiomyopathy recover. The left ventricular ejection fraction and the left ventricular end-diastolic diameter are statistically significant prognostic factors. The risk of developing peripartum cardiomyopathy in subsequent pregnancies remains high. The place of dobutamine stress test in counseling the patients who desire pregnancy must be more studied. PMID:17078264

  13. What Causes Cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cardiomyopathy? Cardiomyopathy can be acquired or inherited. “Acquired” means ... case when the disease occurs in children. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy usually is inherited. It’s caused by ...

  14. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouquet, Frédéric; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    The peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy resulting from alteration of angiogenesis toward the end of pregnancy. The diagnosis is based on the association of clinical heart failure and systolic dysfunction assessed by echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnoses to rule out are myocardial infarction, amniotic liquid embolism, myocarditis, inherited cardiomyopathy, and history of treatment by anthracycline. Risk factors are advance maternal age (>30), multiparity, twin pregnancy, African origin, obesity, preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, and prolonged tocolytic therapy. Treatment of acute phase is identical to usual treatment of acute systolic heart failure. After delivery, VKA treatment should be discussed in case of systolic function <25% because of higher risk of thrombus. A specific treatment by bromocriptine can be initiated on a case-by-case basis. Complete recovery of systolic function is observed in 50% of cases. The mortality risk is low. Subsequent pregnancy should be discouraged, especially if systolic function did not recover. PMID:26160284

  15. Carlos Chagas: biographical sketch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Carlos Chagas was born on 9 July 1878 in the farm "Bon Retiro" located close to the City of Oliveira in the interior of the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. He started his medical studies in 1897 at the School of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro. In the late XIX century, the works by Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch induced a change in the medical paradigm with emphasis in experimental demonstrations of the causal link between microbes and disease. During the same years in Germany appeared the pathological concept of disease, linking organic lesions with symptoms. All these innovations were adopted by the reforms of the medical schools in Brazil and influenced the scientific formation of Chagas. Chagas completed his medical studies between 1897 and 1903 and his examinations during these years were always ranked with high grades. Oswaldo Cruz accepted Chagas as a doctoral candidate and directed his thesis on "Hematological studies of Malaria" which was received with honors by the examiners. In 1903 the director appointed Chagas as research assistant at the Institute. In those years, the Institute of Manguinhos, under the direction of Oswaldo Cruz, initiated a process of institutional growth and gathered a distinguished group of Brazilian and foreign scientists. In 1907, he was requested to investigate and control a malaria outbreak in Lassance, Minas Gerais. In this moment Chagas could not have imagined that this field research was the beginning of one of the most notable medical discoveries. Chagas was, at the age of 28, a Research Assistant at the Institute of Manguinhos and was studying a new flagellate parasite isolated from triatomine insects captured in the State of Minas Gerais. Chagas made his discoveries in this order: first the causal agent, then the vector and finally the human cases. These notable discoveries were carried out by Chagas in twenty months. At the age of 33 Chagas had completed his discoveries and published the scientific articles that gave him world

  16. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, A; Zaccaria, R; Bombardieri, G; Gasbarrini, A; Pola, P

    2007-06-01

    Decompensated liver cirrhosis is characterized by a peripheral vasodilation with a low-resistance hyperdynamic circulation. The sustained increase of cardiac work load associated with such a condition may result in an inconstant and often subclinical series of heart abnormalities, constituting a new clinical entity known as "cirrhotic cardiomyopathy". Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is variably associated with baseline increase in cardiac output, defective myocardial contractility and lowered systo-diastolic response to inotropic and chronotropic stimuli, down-regulated beta-adrenergic function, slight histo-morphological changes, and impaired electric "recovery" ability of ventricular myocardium. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is usually clinically latent or mild, likely because the peripheral vasodilation significantly reduces the left ventricle after-load, thus actually "auto-treating" the patient and masking any severe manifestation of heart failure. In cirrhotic patients, the presence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may become unmasked and clinically evident by certain treatment interventions that increase the effective blood volume and cardiac pre-load, including surgical or transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunts, peritoneo-venous shunts (LeVeen) and orthotopic liver transplantation. Under these circumstances, an often transient overt congestive heart failure may develop, with increased cardiac output as well as right atrial, pulmonary artery and capillary wedge pressures. PMID:17383244

  17. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Munk, Kim; Goetzsche, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sparse information with regard to the electrocardiographic (ECG) changes in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is available. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and electrocardiographic changes in a Danish cohort of patients with TC. We discuss the...

  18. Update on Chagas' disease in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumonteil Eric

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a major public health problem in most of the American continent. As transmission of the parasite is being interrupted in most of South America, the disease remains endemic in various areas of Mexico. We review here some of the information gathered in recent years. Seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection in humans remains relatively high in some areas, and there has been a general increase in the number of chronic cases reported to health authorities in recent years. In fact, chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy appears to be affecting a large number of patients with heart disease, but many cases may be misreported because of the unspecific nature of the clinical symptoms. Epidemiological monitoring of vector and reservoir populations, as well as of human cases is helping focus on endemic areas, but a better coordination and development of these efforts is still needed. Recent studies of parasite biology are in agreement with previous work showing the great diversity of parasite characteristics, and support the need for a regional approach to this zoonosis. Strong and continuing support from health and academic authorities is thus still needed to further improve our understanding of Chagas' disease in Mexico and implement efficient control programs.

  19. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gonzalo; Guzzo-Merello; Marta; Cobo-Marcos; Maria; Gallego-Delgado; Pablo; Garcia-Pavia

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is the most frequently consumed toxic substance in the world. Low to moderate daily intake of alcohol has been shown to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In contrast, exposure to high levels of alcohol for a long period could lead to progressive cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Cardiac dysfunction associated with chronic and excessive alcohol intake is a specific cardiac disease known as alcoholic cardiomyopathy(ACM). In spite of its clinical importance, data on ACM and how alcohol damages the heart are limited. In this review, we evaluate available evidence linking excessive alcohol consumption with heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. Additionally, we discuss the clinical presentation, prognosis and treatment of ACM.

  20. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sénior, Juan Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy or stress-induced cardiomyopathy is often diagnosed as an acute coronary syndrome in postmenopausal women, because its clinical presentation may mimic an acute myocardial infarction: anginal chest pain, changes in the ST segment and T wave in precordial leads and elevated cardiac biomarkers of necrosis. It is characterized by systolic dysfunction with transient ballooning of the apical and middle portions of the left ventricle in the absence of significant coronary disease. Prognosis is good and complete recovery occurs in days to weeks. We report three cases of postmenopausal women with initial diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; no significant coronary lesions were found in the coronary angiography; apical ballooning, characteristic of this syndrome, was observed on left ventriculography. On follow-up, the three patients had complete recovery of systolic function at six weeks.

  1. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Signe; Hove, Jens D; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2014-01-01

    Cirrhosis is known to cause alterations in the systemic haemodynamic system. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy designates a cardiac dysfunction that includes impaired cardiac contractility with systolic and diastolic dysfunction, as well as electromechanical abnormalities in the absence of other known...... causes of cardiac disease. This condition is primarily revealed by inducing physical or pharmacological stress, but echocardiography is excellent at revealing diastolic dysfunction and might also be used to detect systolic dysfunction at rest. Furthermore, measurement of circulating levels of cardiac...... relation to invasive procedures such as shunt insertion and liver transplantation. Current pharmacological treatment is nonspecific and directed towards left ventricular failure, and liver transplantation is currently the only proven treatment with specific effect on cirrhotic cardiomyopathy....

  2. Chagas Disease, France

    OpenAIRE

    Lescure, François-Xavier; Canestri, Ana; Melliez, Hugues; Jauréguiberry, Stéphane; Develoux, Michel; Dorent, Richard; Guiard-Schmid, Jean-Baptiste; Bonnard, Philippe; Ajana, Faïza; Rolla, Valeria; Carlier, Yves; Gay, Frederick; Elghouzzi, Marie-Hélène; Danis, Martin; Pialoux, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is endemic to Latin America; its prevalence is highest in Bolivia. CD is sometimes seen in the United States and Canada among migrants from Latin America, whereas it is rare in Europe. We report 9 cases of imported CD in France from 2004 to 2006.

  3. Polymorphism in the Alpha Cardiac Muscle Actin 1 Gene Is Associated to Susceptibility to Chronic Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Farage Frade; Priscila Camilo Teixeira; Barbara Maria Ianni; Cristina Wide Pissetti; Bruno Saba; Lin Hui Tzu Wang; Andréia Kuramoto; Luciana Gabriel Nogueira; Paula Buck; Fabrício Dias; Helene Giniaux; Agnes Llored; Sthefanny Alves; Andre Schmidt; Eduardo Donadi

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America, and may lead to a life-threatening inflammatory dilated, chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). One third of T. cruzi-infected individuals progress to CCC while the others remain asymptomatic (ASY). A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Since mutations i...

  4. Clinical and echocardiographic predictors of mortality in chagasic cardiomyopathy - systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clodoval de Barros Pereira Júnior

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis, prognosis and evaluation of death risk in Chagas cardiomyopathy still constitute a challenge due to the diversity of manifestations, which determine the importance of using echocardiography, tissue Doppler and biomarkers. To evaluate, within a systematic review, clinical and echocardiographic profiles of patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, which may be related to worse prognosis and major mortality risk. To perform the systematic review, we used Medline (via PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases to identify 82 articles published from 1991 to 2012, with the following descriptors: echocardiography, mortality and Chagas disease. We selected 31 original articles, involving diagnostic and prognostic methods. The importance of Chagas disease has increased due to its emergence in Europe and United States, but most evidence came from Brazil. Among the predictors of worse prognosis and higher mortality risk are morphological and functional alterations in the left and right ventricles, evaluated by conventional echocardiography and tissue Doppler, as well as the increase in brain natriuretic peptide and troponin I concentrations. Recently, the evaluations of dyssynchrony, dysautonomia, as well as strain, strain rate and myocardial twisting were added to the diagnostic arsenal for the early differentiation of Chagas cardiomyopathy. Developments in imaging and biochemical diagnostic procedures have enabled more detailed cardiac evaluations, which demonstrate the early involvement of both ventricles, allowing a more accurate assessment of the mortality risk in Chagas disease.

  5. Incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Abelmann, Walter H.

    1985-01-01

    Full reliable data on the incidence and prevalence of dilated cardiomyopathy are not available. In the United States, at least 0.7% of cardiac deaths are attributable to cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy probably contributes the great majority of these cases. The mortality rate for cardiomyopathy in males is twice that of females, and for blacks it is 2.4 times that of whites. Cardiomyopathy was diagnosed in 0.67% of patients discharged from hospitals in 1979 with diagnoses of disease of...

  6. Current drug therapy and pharmaceutical challenges for Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, José; Davies, Carolina; Simonazzi, Analía; Real, Juan Pablo; Palma, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    One of the most significant health problems in the American continent in terms of human health, and socioeconomic impact is Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Infection was originally transmitted by reduviid insects, congenitally from mother to fetus, and by oral ingestion in sylvatic/rural environments, but blood transfusions, organ transplants, laboratory accidents, and sharing of contaminated syringes also contribute to modern day transmission. Likewise, Chagas disease used to be endemic from Northern Mexico to Argentina, but migrations have earned it global. The parasite has a complex life cycle, infecting different species, and invading a variety of cells - including muscle and nerve cells of the heart and gastrointestinal tract - in the mammalian host. Human infection outcome is a potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, and gastrointestinal tract lesions. In absence of a vaccine, vector control and treatment of patients are the only tools to control the disease. Unfortunately, the only drugs now available for Chagas' disease, Nifurtimox and Benznidazole, are relatively toxic for adult patients, and require prolonged administration. Benznidazole is the first choice for Chagas disease treatment due to its lower side effects than Nifurtimox. However, different strategies are being sought to overcome Benznidazole's toxicity including shorter or intermittent administration schedules-either alone or in combination with other drugs. In addition, a long list of compounds has shown trypanocidal activity, ranging from natural products to specially designed molecules, re-purposing drugs commercialized to treat other maladies, and homeopathy. In the present review, we will briefly summarize the upturns of current treatment of Chagas disease, discuss the increment on research and scientific publications about this topic, and give an overview of the state-of-the-art research aiming to produce an alternative medication to treat T. cruzi infection

  7. Chagas' disease and AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Vaidian, Anil K; Louis M Weiss; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2004-01-01

    Chagas' disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is an opportunistic infection in the setting of HIV/AIDS. Some individuals with HIV and chronic T. cruzi infection may experience a reactivation, which is most commonly manifested by meningoencephalitis. A reactivation myocarditis is the second most common manifestation. These presentations may be difficult to distinguish from toxoplasmosis in individuals with HIV/AIDS. The overlap of HIV and Trypanosoma cruzi infection occurs not only in endemic ar...

  8. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilichou, Kalliopi; Thiene, Gaetano; Bauce, Barbara; Rigato, Ilaria; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Migliore, Federico; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Rizzo, Stefania; Zorzi, Alessandro; Daliento, Luciano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a heart muscle disease clinically characterized by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and pathologically by an acquired and progressive dystrophy of the ventricular myocardium with fibro-fatty replacement. Due to an estimated prevalence of 1:2000-1:5000, AC is listed among rare diseases. A familial background consistent with an autosomal-dominant trait of inheritance is present in most of AC patients; recessive variants have also been reported, either or not associated with palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair. AC-causing genes mostly encode major components of the cardiac desmosome and up to 50% of AC probands harbor mutations in one of them. Mutations in non-desmosomal genes have been also described in a minority of AC patients, predisposing to the same or an overlapping disease phenotype. Compound/digenic heterozygosity was identified in up to 25% of AC-causing desmosomal gene mutation carriers, in part explaining the phenotypic variability. Abnormal trafficking of intercellular proteins to the intercalated discs of cardiomyocytes and Wnt/beta catenin and Hippo signaling pathways have been implicated in disease pathogenesis.AC is a major cause of sudden death in the young and in athletes. The clinical picture may include a sub-clinical phase; an overt electrical disorder; and right ventricular or biventricular pump failure. Ventricular fibrillation can occur at any stage. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies led to identify biventricular and dominant left ventricular variants, thus supporting the use of the broader term AC.Since there is no "gold standard" to reach the diagnosis of AC, multiple categories of diagnostic information have been combined and the criteria recently updated, to improve diagnostic sensitivity while maintaining specificity. Among diagnostic tools, contrast enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance is playing a major role in detecting left dominant forms of AC, even preceding morpho

  9. The pathogenesis of Chagas' disease: when autoimmune and parasite-specific immune responses meet

    OpenAIRE

    Milena B. P. Soares; LAIN PONTES-DE-CARVALHO; RICARDO RIBEIRO-DOS-SANTOS

    2001-01-01

    Chagas' disease is a major health problem in Latin America, where it constitutes one of the leading causes of heart failure. About one fourth of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals develop chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CChC), the most severe form of the disease. CChC is histologically characterized by the presence of multifocal inflammatory infiltrates in the heart, composed mainly by mononuclear cells, usually adhered to myocytes and leading to myocytolysis, and frequently by interstit...

  10. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens H

    2010-01-01

    Increased cardiac output was first described in patients with cirrhosis more than fifty years ago. Later, various observations have indicated the presence of a latent cardiac dysfunction, which includes a combination of reduced cardiac contractility with systolic and diastolic dysfunction and......, nitric oxide overproduction, and cannabinoid receptor activation. Systolic incompetence in patients can be revealed by pharmacological or physical strain and during stressful procedures, such as transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt insertion and liver transplantation. Systolic dysfunction has...... cirrhotic patients and it may be normalised by beta-blockers. No specific therapy for cirrhotic cardiomyopathy can be recommended, but treatment should be supportive and directed against the cardiac dysfunction. Future research should better describe the prevalence, impact on morbidity and survival, and...

  11. Effects of aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Chagas' heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Haline; Teixeira, Maxelle Martins; de Sousa, Rodrigo Cunha; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Correia, Dalmo; Rodrigues Junior, Virmondes; Levy, Bruce David; de Paula Rogério, Alexandre

    2016-04-15

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). In some patients with Chagas disease, symptoms progress to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Endogenously, inflammation is resolved in the presence of lipid mediators such as aspirin-triggered RvD1 (AT-RvD1) which has anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution effects. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, the effects of AT-RvD1 on T. cruzi antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with Chagas heart disease. The levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-13 increased in PBMCs from cardiac-form Chagas patients in stage B1 (patients with fewer heart abnormalities) stimulated with T. cruzi antigen compared to those in non-stimulated PBMCs. AT-RvD1 reduced the IFN-γ concentrations in PBMCs from patients with Chagas disease stimulated with T. cruzi antigen compared to stimulated with T. cruzi antigen cells. AT-RvD1 treatment resulted in no observable changes in TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-13 levels. AT-RvD1 significantly decreased the percentage of necrotic cells and caused a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of T. cruzi antigen-stimulated PBMCs from patients with Chagas disease. These findings demonstrate that AT-RvD1 modulates the immune response in Chagas disease patients and might have potential to be used as an alternative approach for slowing the development of further heart damage. PMID:26927755

  12. Chronic phase of Chagas disease: why should it be treated? A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis and evolutive pattern of Chagas disease suggests that the chronic phase should be more widely treated in order to (i eliminate Trypanosoma cruzi and prevent new inflammatory foci and the extension of tissue lesions, (ii promote tissue regeneration to prevent fibrosis, (iii reverse existing fibrosis, (iv prevent cardiomyopathy, megaoesophagus and megacolon and (v reduce or eliminate cardiac block and arrhythmia. All cases of the indeterminate chronic form of Chagas disease without contraindications due to other concomitant diseases or pregnancy should be treated and not only cases involving children or recently infected cases. Patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy grade II of the New York Heart Association classification should be treated with specific chemotherapy and grade III can be treated according to medical-patient decisions. We are proposing the following new strategies for chemotherapeutic treatment of the chronic phase of Chagas disease: (i repeated short-term treatments for 30 consecutive days and interval of 30-60 days for six months to one year and (ii combinations of drugs with different mechanisms of action, such as benznidazole + nifurtimox, benznidazole or nifurtimox + allopurinol or triazole antifungal agents, inhibition of sterol synthesis.

  13. Chagas heart disease: pathophysiologic mechanisms, prognostic factors and risk stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Rassi Jr

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Chagas heart disease (CHD results from infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is the leading cause of infectious myocarditis worldwide. It poses a substantial public health burden due to high morbidity and mortality. CHD is also the most serious and frequent manifestation of chronic Chagas disease and appears in 20-40% of infected individuals between 10-30 years after the original acute infection. In recent decades, numerous clinical and experimental investigations have shown that a low-grade but incessant parasitism, along with an accompanying immunological response [either parasite-driven (most likely or autoimmune-mediated], plays an important role in producing myocardial damage in CHD. At the same time, primary neuronal damage and microvascular dysfunction have been described as ancillary pathogenic mechanisms. Conduction system disturbances, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, systemic and pulmonary thromboembolism and sudden cardiac death are the most common clinical manifestations of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. Management of CHD aims to relieve symptoms, identify markers of unfavourable prognosis and treat those individuals at increased risk of disease progression or death. This article reviews the pathophysiology of myocardial damage, discusses the value of current risk stratification models and proposes an algorithm to guide mortality risk assessment and therapeutic decision-making in patients with CHD.

  14. Estado actual en el tratamiento de la enfermedad de Chagas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WERNER APT B

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Efficient drugs against Chagas' disease must have an effect on the amastigote forms or intracellular reproduction elements of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi. Trypomastigote and epimastigote forms derive from the former and their response to medications is less marked. The only drugs used in humans are nifurtimox (NF and benznidazole (BNZ. Other useful medications are allopurinol and itraconazole. NF acts producing free radicals and BNZ inhibits the synthesis of macromolecules. There is consensus that Chagas' disease must be treated in all its periods, since T.cruzi DNA is detected by polymerase chain reaction in chronic cases, even when microscopy is negative. The pharmacological treatment modifies the natural evolution of the disease. It also helps to solve a public health problem, considering that there is a high number of subjects with Chagas' disease. Subjects with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy with terminal heart failure are the only cases without indication for treatment. Due to the digestive and skin secondary effects of the drugs, treated patients must be controlled clinically and with complete blood counts and hepatic proiles before, during and after the therapy. Approximately 30% of patients will experience secondary effects. Children have a better tolerance to the drugs. Congenital or acquired acute, intermediate and chronic cases should be treated.

  15. Types of Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ventricles, making it harder for the heart to pump blood. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also can cause stiffness of the ... Over time, the heart loses the ability to pump blood effectively. Dilated cardiomyopathy can lead to heart failure , ...

  16. Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search The Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation (CCF) is a national, non-profit organization focused on pediatric cardiomyopathy, a chronic disease of the heart muscle. CCF is dedicated to accelerating the search for ...

  17. Athletes’ Stress Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Gavrilova

    2012-01-01

    The article is focused on the examination of 1352 male athletes, engaged in different sports, actively training and participating in competitions. Stress cardiomyopathy was exposed in 14.8 % of cases. The article considers differential diagnostics of stress cardiomyopathy.

  18. MR imaging in cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the WHO classification, cardiomyopathies are a group of diseases which are associated with myocardial dysfunction and can be classified either as primary or secondary cardiomyopathies. Genetic disorders have been identified in certain primary cardiomyopathies, however often the etiology remains unknown. The term ''secondary cardiomyopathy'' is used to specify diseases with the clinical indications of a cardiomyopathy, but can be attributed to a certain pathophysiological mechanism such as exposure to toxic substances, metabolic syndromes or systemic diseases. Based on morphological and functional criteria, primary cardiomyopathies are divided into dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). During the last two decades MR imaging has emerged to a well established diagnostic tool for the understanding and treatment of cardiomyopathies. Morphological and functional information can be achieved with a high level of accuracy and reproducibility. Tissue alteration of the myocardium can be detected assessing regional contrast enhancement, T1- and T2-signal intensities and chemical shift phenomena. This article describes characteristic aspects of MR imaging for the diagnosis of primary and secondary cardiomyopathies. (orig.)

  19. Pregnancy, cardiomyopathies, and genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tintelen, J. Peter; Pieper, Petronella G.; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Van den Berg, Maarten P.

    2014-01-01

    Although familial forms of cardiomyopathy such as hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy have been recognized for decades, it is only recently that much of the genetic basis of these inherited cardiomyopathies has been elucidated. This has provided important insights into the pathophysiological mech

  20. Left Atrial Function in Patients with Chronic Chagasic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia da Silva Fragata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chagas disease is a cause of dilated cardiomyopathy, and information about left atrial (LA function in this disease still lacks. Objective: To assess the different LA functions (reservoir, conduit and pump functions and their correlation with the echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular (LV systolic and diastolic functions. Methods: 10 control subjects (CG, and patients with Chagas disease as follows: 26 with the indeterminate form (GI; 30 with ECG alterations (GII; and 19 with LV dysfunction (GIII. All patients underwent M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography, pulsed-wave Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Reservoir function (Total Emptying Fraction: TEF: (p <0.0001, lower in GIII as compared to CG (p = 0.003, GI (p <0.001 and GII (p <0.001. Conduit function (Passive Emptying Fraction: PEF: (p = 0.004, lower in GIII (GIII and CG, p = 0.06; GI and GII, p = 0.06; and GII and GIII, p = 0.07. Pump function (Active Emptying Fraction: AEF: (p = 0.0001, lower in GIII as compared to CG (p = 0.05, GI (p<0.0001 and GII (p = 0.002. There was a negative correlation of E/e’ average with the reservoir and pump functions (TEF and AEF, and a positive correlation of e’ average with s’ wave (both septal and lateral walls and the reservoir, conduit and pump LA functions. Conclusion: An impairment of LA functions in Chagas cardiomyopathy was observed.

  1. Control of Chagas disease vectors

    OpenAIRE

    JM Ramsey; CJ Schofield

    2003-01-01

    Most Latin American countries are making dramatic progress in controlling Chagas disease, through a series of national and international initiatives focusing on elimination of domestic populations of Triatominae, improved screening of blood donors, and clinical support and treatment of persons infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Some countries, particularly Uruguay, Chile and Brazil, are sufficiently advanced in their programmes to initiate detailed planning of the subsequent phases of Chagas di...

  2. Mode of death on Chagas heart disease: comparison with other etiologies. a subanalysis of the REMADHE prospective trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia M Ayub-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Sudden death has been considered the main cause of death in patients with Chagas heart disease. Nevertheless, this information comes from a period before the introduction of drugs that changed the natural history of heart failure. We sought to study the mode of death of patients with heart failure caused by Chagas heart disease, comparing with non-Chagas cardiomyopathy.We examined the REMADHE trial and grouped patients according to etiology (Chagas vs non-Chagas and mode of death. The primary end-point was all-cause, heart failure and sudden death mortality; 342 patients were analyzed and 185 (54.1% died. Death occurred in 56.4% Chagas patients and 53.7% non-Chagas patients. The cumulative incidence of all-cause mortality and heart failure mortality was significantly higher in Chagas patients compared to non-Chagas. There was no difference in the cumulative incidence of sudden death mortality between the two groups. In the Cox regression model, Chagas etiology (HR 2.76; CI 1.34-5.69; p = 0.006, LVEDD (left ventricular end diastolic diameter (HR 1.07; CI 1.04-1.10; p<0.001, creatinine clearance (HR 0.98; CI 0.97-0.99; p = 0.006 and use of amiodarone (HR 3.05; CI 1.47-6.34; p = 0.003 were independently associated with heart failure mortality. LVEDD (HR 1.04; CI 1.01-1.07; p = 0.005 and use of beta-blocker (HR 0.52; CI 0.34-0.94; p = 0.014 were independently associated with sudden death mortality.In severe Chagas heart disease, progressive heart failure is the most important mode of death. These data challenge the current understanding of Chagas heart disease and may have implications in the selection of treatment choices, considering the mode of death.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00505050 (REMADHE.

  3. Acute Chagas Disease in a Returning Traveler

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Yvonne L.; Juliano, Jonathan J; Montgomery, Susan P.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is rarely recognized, and the risk for acquiring the disease is undefined in travelers to Central America. We describe a case of acute Chagas disease in a traveler to Costa Rica and highlight the need for increased awareness of this infection in travelers to Chagas-endemic areas.

  4. Control of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yoichi; Nakagawa, Jun

    2006-01-01

    The Southern Cone Initiative (Iniciativa de Salud del Cono Sur, INCOSUR) to control domestic transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi is a substantial achievement based on the enthusiasm of the scientific community, effective strategies, leadership, and cost-effectiveness. INCOSUR triggered the launch of other regional initiatives in Central America and in the Andean and Amazon regions, which have all made progress. The Central American Initiative targeted the elimination of an imported triatomine bug (Rhodnius prolixus) and the control of a widespread native species (Triatoma dimidiata), and faced constraints such as a small scientific community, the difficulty in controlling a native species, and a vector control programme that had fragmented under a decentralized health system. International organizations such as the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) have played an important role in bridging the gaps between fragmented organizational resources. Guatemala achieved virtual elimination of R. prolixus and ;reduction of Tri. Dimidiata and El Salvador and Honduras revitalized their national programmes. The programme also revealed new challenges. Tri. dimidiata control needs to cover a large geographic area efficiently with stratification, quality control, community mobilization, and information management. Stakeholders such as the National Chagas Program, the local health system and their communities, as well as local government must share responsibilities to continue comprehensive vector control. PMID:16735164

  5. Control of Chagas disease vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsey JM

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Most Latin American countries are making dramatic progress in controlling Chagas disease, through a series of national and international initiatives focusing on elimination of domestic populations of Triatominae, improved screening of blood donors, and clinical support and treatment of persons infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Some countries, particularly Uruguay, Chile and Brazil, are sufficiently advanced in their programmes to initiate detailed planning of the subsequent phases of Chagas disease control, while others such as Peru, Ecuador, and Mexico, are currently applying only the initial phases of the control campaigns. In this review, we seek to provide a brief history of the campaigns as a basis for discussion of future interventions. Our aim is to relate operational needs to the underlying biological aspects that have made Chagas disease so serious in Latin America but have also revealed the epidemiological vulnerability of this disease.

  6. Melatonin in Chagas´ disease: Possible therapeutic value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Cardinali

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease is a severe health problem in Latin America, causing approximately 50 000 deaths a year, with approximately 18 million infected people. About 25-30% of the patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi develop the chronic form of the disease. The protective response against T. cruzi depends on both innate and acquired immunity involving macrophages, natural killer cells, T and B lymphocytes, and the production of proinflammatory Th-1 cytokines. In addition, an increased nitric oxide (NO production in macrophages leading to effective microbicidal action is needed to control parasitemia. Melatonin is detectable in T. cruzi and may play a role in promoting infection whereas, when administered in high doses during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection, it can decrease parasitemia while reducing NO production. During chronic disease progression, the sustained oxidative stress concomitant to myocardial damage could be reduced by administering melatonin. It is hypothesized that the coordinated administration of a melatonin agonist like the MT1/MT2 agonist ramelteon, that lacks antioxidant activity and may not affect NO production during the acute phase, and of melatonin in doses high enough to decrease oxidative damage, to preserve mitochondrial and to prevent cardiomyopathy during the chronic phase, could be a novel add-on treatment of Chagas´ disease.

  7. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Darío BRAVO-TOBAR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35, II (n = 29, and III (n = 18. A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease.

  8. Chagas Disease: No Longer Exotic

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-03

    This podcast is designed to inform health care providers about Chagas disease, diagnosis, and treatment and to assist in identifying infected patients.  Created: 4/3/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 4/8/2008.

  9. Review of cardiomyopathy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiomyopathies are increasingly being detected on both routine and non-routine imaging. Furthermore, the diagnosis of cardiomyopathy is changing from the traditional method of clinical presentation and cardiac morphology to a quantifiable method based on both cardiac morphology and function. With cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, coronary computed tomography and nuclear medicine increasingly being utilized along with echocardiography in the diagnostic process, it is important for the radiologist to be aware of the relevant criteria in formulating a diagnosis. We aim to provide an overview of the imaging characteristics of the most commonly encountered cardiomyopathies

  10. Review of cardiomyopathy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunaratnam, Kughan, E-mail: Kughan@hotmail.com [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Wong, Lok Hun, E-mail: nuhkol@hotmail.com [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Nasis, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.nasis@southernhealth.org.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Ellims, Andris, E-mail: aellims@hotmail.com [The Alfred Hospital, 55 Commercial Road, Melbourne, VIC 3004 (Australia); Nandurkar, Dee, E-mail: nandurkar.dee@gmail.com [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Soo, Geoffrey, E-mail: geoffrey.soo@southernhealth.org.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Cameron, James, E-mail: james.cameron@monash.edu.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Troupis, John, E-mail: john.troupis@southernhealth.org.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia)

    2013-10-01

    Cardiomyopathies are increasingly being detected on both routine and non-routine imaging. Furthermore, the diagnosis of cardiomyopathy is changing from the traditional method of clinical presentation and cardiac morphology to a quantifiable method based on both cardiac morphology and function. With cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, coronary computed tomography and nuclear medicine increasingly being utilized along with echocardiography in the diagnostic process, it is important for the radiologist to be aware of the relevant criteria in formulating a diagnosis. We aim to provide an overview of the imaging characteristics of the most commonly encountered cardiomyopathies.

  11. Sex differences in cardiomyopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Sven; van der Meer, Peter; van Tintelen, J. Peter; van den Berg, Maarten P.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of heart muscle diseases with a variety of specific phenotypes. According to the contemporary European Society of Cardiology classification, they are classified into hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular (ARVC), restrictive (RC

  12. New perspectives in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.M. Kofflard (Marcel)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractHypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a primary cardiac disorder with a heterogeneous expression. Although relatively uncommon, the disease has been studied extensively as appears from the numerous studies that have explored specific facets of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This review will focus

  13. Enfermedad de Chagas en Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos N. Talavera - López

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available LA ENFERMEDAD DE CHAGAS ES UN PROBLEMA DE SALUD pública en toda Latinoamérica; alrededor de 20 millones de personas están infectadas y 200 millones están en riesgo de contraer la enfermedad. En 2006, la prevalencia en Centroamérica era del 7%. Actualmente no existe vacuna contra el protozoo y el tratamiento disponible resulta, aparte de poco efectivo, muy tóxico para el paciente. Los programas de control de vectores han ayudado a reducir los índices de infestación en Latinoamérica, pero aún falta mucho por hacer. En Nicaragua, la enfermedad de Chagas está subvalorada y los trabajos publicados son muy pocos. Es necesario investigar sobre esta enfermedad en nuestro país con otro enfoque, uno que no subvalore la enfermedad y ayude a desarrollar métodos diagnósticos y posibles tratamientos. Este artículo recopila información sobre los trabajos realizados porlos grupos más importantes de investigación en Chagas de Nicaragua en cuanto a epidemiología, control vectorial, diagnóstico y caracterización molecular.

  14. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy corresponds to a syndrome characterized by a transient myocardial dysfunction affecting the left ventricular apex that classically occurs after major physical or emotional stress (also called 'broken heart syndrome' or 'stress-induced cardiomyopathy'). The author describes the case of a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage. (author)

  15. Exercise Rehabilitation in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Somarriba, Gabriel; Extein, Jason; Miller, Tracie L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with cardiomyopathy carry significant risk of morbidity and mortality. New research and technology have brought about significant advancements to the diagnosis and clinical management of children with cardiomyopathy. However, currently heart transplantation remains the standard of care for children with symptomatic and progressive cardiomyopathy. Cardiovascular rehabilitation programs have yielded success in improving cardiac function, overall physical activity, and quality of life i...

  16. Dilated cardiomyopathy following trastuzumab chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Karmakar

    2012-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity manifesting as dilated cardiomyopathy is a rarely reported adverse effect of trastuzumab. We hereby report a case of dilated cardiomyopathy, which occurred following trastuzumab chemotherapy in a 32-year-old female. The patient responded to discontinuation of trastuzumab and standard medical treatment. Extensive search of Indian literature revealed no reported case of dilated cardiomyopathy occurring due to trastuzumab.

  17. Chagas disease risk in Texas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahotra Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five-stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post-1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc-minute. The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence-based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag-York-Mollié model and post-1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This

  18. Dystrophin-Deficient Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Forum; Garry, Daniel J

    2016-05-31

    Dystrophinopathies are a group of distinct neuromuscular diseases that result from mutations in the structural cytoskeletal Dystrophin gene. Dystrophinopathies include Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy, as well as DMD and BMD female carriers. The primary presenting symptom in most dystrophinopathies is skeletal muscle weakness. However, cardiac muscle is also a subtype of striated muscle and is similarly affected in many of the muscular dystrophies. Cardiomyopathies associated with dystrophinopathies are an increasingly recognized manifestation of these neuromuscular disorders and contribute significantly to their morbidity and mortality. Recent studies suggest that these patient populations would benefit from cardiovascular therapies, annual cardiovascular imaging studies, and close follow-up with cardiovascular specialists. Moreover, patients with DMD and BMD who develop end-stage heart failure may benefit from the use of advanced therapies. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, cardiac involvement, and treatment of cardiomyopathy in the dystrophic patient. PMID:27230049

  19. Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhuang; Di Xu

    2009-01-01

    Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(TC) is a recently described acute cardiac syndrome, which the latest cardiomyopathy classification of the European Society of Cardiology describes as an unclassified cardiomyopathy. TC mimics acute myocardial infarction(AMI) and is characterised by ischaemic chest symptoms, an elevated electrocardiogram ST-segment, and moderately increased levels of cardiac disease markers. However, patients with TC have no coronary angiogram-detectable or non-obstructive coronary arterial disease(CAD), and left ventriculography documents transient left apical and middle ventricular wall dysfunction. In this review, we describe TC and evaluate epidemiological, clinical and instrumental features, pathophysiological mechanisms, therapy and prognosis of this syndrome, with a view to raising awareness of the disease.

  20. Treatment with Benznidazole during the Chronic Phase of Experimental Chagas' Disease Decreases Cardiac Alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Simone; Ramos, Carolina O.; Senra, Juliana F. V.; Vilas-Boas, Fabio; Rodrigues, Maurício M.; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena B. P.

    2005-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is one of the main causes of death due to heart failure in Latin American countries. Benznidazole, the chemotherapeutic agent most often used for the treatment of chagasic patients, is highly toxic and has limited efficacy, especially in the chronic phase of the disease. In the present study we used a mouse model of chronic Chagas' disease to investigate the effects of benznidazole treatment during the chronic phase on disease progression. The hearts of benznidazole-treated mice had decreased parasitism and myocarditis compared to the hearts of untreated chagasic mice. Both groups of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected mice had significant alterations in their electrocardiograms compared to those of the healthy mice. However, untreated mice had significantly higher cardiac conduction disturbances than benznidazole-treated mice, including intraventricular conduction disturbances, atrioventricular blocks, and extrasystoles. The levels of antibodies against T. cruzi antigens (epimastigote extract, P2β, and trans-sialidase) as well as antibodies against peptides of the second extracellular loops of β1-adrenergic and M2-muscarinic cardiac receptors were also lower in the sera from benznidazole-treated mice than in the sera from untreated mice. These results demonstrate that treatment with benznidazole in the chronic phase of infection prevents the development of severe chronic cardiomyopathy, despite the lack of complete parasite eradication. In addition, our data highlight the role of parasite persistence in the development of chronic Chagas' disease and reinforce the importance of T. cruzi elimination in order to decrease or prevent the development of severe chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:15793134

  1. The BENEFIT trial: testing the hypothesis that trypanocidal therapy is beneficial for patients with chronic Chagas heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Antonio Marin-Neto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Among the pathophysiological derangements operating in the chronic phase of Chagas disease, parasite persistence is likely to constitute the main mechanism of myocardial injury in patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. The presence of Trypanosoma cruzi in the heart causes a low-grade, but relentless, inflammatory process and induces myocardial autoimmune injury. These facts suggest that trypanocidal therapy may positively impact the clinical course of patients with chronic Chagas heart disease. However, the experimental and clinical evidence currently available is insufficient to support the routine use of etiologic treatment in these patients. The BENEFIT project - Benznidazole Evaluation for Interrupting Trypanosomiasis - is an international, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of trypanocidal treatment with benznidazole in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease. This project is actually comprised of two studies. The pilot study investigates whether etiologic treatment significantly reduces parasite burden, as assessed by polymerase chain reaction-based techniques and also determines the safety and tolerability profile of the trypanocidal drug in this type of chagasic population. The full-scale study determines whether antitrypanosomal therapy with benznidazole reduces mortality and other major cardiovascular clinical outcomes in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease.

  2. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F. David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  3. [Consensus document for the detection and management of Chagas disease in primary health care in a non-endemic areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca Saumell, Carme; Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Solsona Díaz, Lluís; Gascón Brustenga, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Although it is commonly transmitted by an insect vector in continental Latin-America, in recent decades, due migration, has been diagnosed in other countries such Spain, the European country with a largest immigrant population of Latin American. For a long time, the patient remains asymptomatic, but some years after this stage, the symptoms can be serious (dilated cardiomyopathy, megacolon, megaesophagus). In addition, detection in pregnant women has a high priority because of the route of vertical transmission. Several specific guidelines about Chagas disease has been developed on the Banks of blood, maternal hospitals, HIV co-infection, organ transplant. But due to the detection of lack of information to primary care professionals, we consider to will be useful this document written and agreed to by family phisicians, pediatricians and specialists in International Health. PMID:25704793

  4. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions familial restrictive cardiomyopathy familial restrictive cardiomyopathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. For ...

  5. Saw-tooth cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatza Ageliki A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present an unusual case of cardiomyopathy in a two month old male infant with a grade-I systolic murmur. Echocardiographic examination disclosed left ventricular (LV, dysplasia with saw-tooth like inwards myocardial projections extending from the lateral walls towards the LV cavity. There was mild LV systolic dysfunction with apical hypokinesia. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance demonstrated in detail these cross bridging muscular projections originating from the inferior interventricular septum and lateral LV wall, along with areas of hypokinesis at the LV septum and apex in a noncoronary distribution, without any late gadolinium enhancement. We have termed this condition saw-tooth cardiomyopathy because of the very characteristic appearance.

  6. Humoral immunity in cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Lowry, P J; Thompson, R. A.; Littler, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Sera from patients with heart disease were examined by single sandwich indirect immunofluorescence for the presence of antibodies to human heart muscle. Endocardial biopsy specimens were also examined by direct immunofluorescence for deposition of antibodies in vivo. No consistent or specific abnormality was found in the biopsy specimens or sera of patients with congestive cardiomyopathy. The presence of anti-heart antibodies in cardiac disease appears to reflect damage to cardiac muscle what...

  7. Saw-tooth cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Karatza Ageliki A; Danias Peter G; Davlouros Periklis A; Kiaffas Maria G; Alexopoulos Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We present an unusual case of cardiomyopathy in a two month old male infant with a grade-I systolic murmur. Echocardiographic examination disclosed left ventricular (LV), dysplasia with saw-tooth like inwards myocardial projections extending from the lateral walls towards the LV cavity. There was mild LV systolic dysfunction with apical hypokinesia. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance demonstrated in detail these cross bridging muscular projections originating from the inferior interve...

  8. Carlos Chagas Discoveries as a Drop Back to Scientific Construction of Chronic Chagas Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo B. Bestetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scientific construction of chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD started in 1910 when Carlos Chagas highlighted the presence of cardiac arrhythmia during physical examination of patients with chronic Chagas disease, and described a case of heart failure associated with myocardial inflammation and nests of parasites at autopsy. He described sudden cardiac death associated with arrhythmias in 1911, and its association with complete AV block detected by Jacquet's polygraph as Chagas reported in 1912. Chagas showed the presence of myocardial fibrosis underlying the clinical picture of CCHD in 1916, he presented a full characterization of the clinical aspects of CCHD in 1922. In 1928, Chagas detected fibrosis of the conductive system, and pointed out the presence of marked cardiomegaly at the chest X-Ray associated with minimal symptomatology. The use of serological reaction to diagnose CCHD was put into clinical practice in 1936, after Chagas' death, which along with the 12-lead ECG, revealed the epidemiological importance of CCHD in 1945. In 1953, the long period between initial infection and appearance of CCHD was established, whereas the annual incidence of CCHD from patients with the indeterminate form of the disease was established in 1956. The use of heart catheterization in 1965, exercise stress testing in 1973, Holter monitoring in 1975, Electrophysiologic testing in 1973, echocardiography in 1975, endomyocardial biopsy in 1981, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in 1995, added to the fundamental clinical aspects of CCHD as described by Carlos Chagas.

  9. Immunosuppression and Chagas disease: a management challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Jesús Pinazo

    Full Text Available Immunosuppression, which has become an increasingly relevant clinical condition in the last 50 years, modifies the natural history of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in most patients with Chagas disease. The main goal in this setting is to prevent the consequences of reactivation of T. cruzi infection by close monitoring. We analyze the relationship between Chagas disease and three immunosuppressant conditions, including a description of clinical cases seen at our center, a brief review of the literature, and recommendations for the management of these patients based on our experience and on the data in the literature. T. cruzi infection is considered an opportunistic parasitic infection indicative of AIDS, and clinical manifestations of reactivation are more severe than in acute Chagas disease. Parasitemia is the most important defining feature of reactivation. Treatment with benznidazole and/or nifurtimox is strongly recommended in such cases. It seems reasonable to administer trypanocidal treatment only to asymptomatic immunosuppressed patients with detectable parasitemia, and/or patients with clinically defined reactivation. Specific treatment for Chagas disease does not appear to be related to a higher incidence of neoplasms, and a direct role of T. cruzi in the etiology of neoplastic disease has not been confirmed. Systemic immunosuppressive diseases or immunosuppressants can modify the natural course of T. cruzi infection. Immunosuppressive doses of corticosteroids have not been associated with higher rates of reactivation of Chagas disease. Despite a lack of evidence-based data, treatment with benznidazole or nifurtimox should be initiated before immunosuppression where possible to reduce the risk of reactivation. Timely antiparasitic treatment with benznidazole and nifurtimox (or with posaconazole in cases of therapeutic failure has proven to be highly effective in preventing Chagas disease reactivation, even if such treatment has not been

  10. Update on Chagas' disease in Mexico Actualización sobre la enfermedad de Chagas en México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dumonteil

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a major public health problem in most of the American continent. As transmission of the parasite is being interrupted in most of South America, the disease remains endemic in various areas of Mexico. We review here some of the information gathered in recent years. Seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection in humans remains relatively high in some areas, and there has been a general increase in the number of chronic cases reported to health authorities in recent years. In fact, chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy appears to be affecting a large number of patients with heart disease, but many cases may be misreported because of the unspecific nature of the clinical symptoms. Epidemiological monitoring of vector and reservoir populations, as well as of human cases is helping focus on endemic areas, but a better coordination and development of these efforts is still needed. Recent studies of parasite biology are in agreement with previous work showing the great diversity of parasite characteristics, and support the need for a regional approach to this zoonosis. Strong and continuing support from health and academic authorities is thus still needed to further improve our understanding of Chagas' disease in Mexico and implement efficient control programs.La enfermedad de Chagas, causada por el parásito protozoario Trypanosoma cruzi, constituye un importante problema de salud pública en el continente americano. La transmisión del parásito se ha ido interrumpiendo en la mayor parte de América del Sur, pero la enfermedad sigue siendo endémica en varias regiones de México. En este artículo se revisa la información más reciente sobre dicha enfermedad. La seroprevalencia de la infección por T. cruzi se ha mantenido a niveles relativamente altos en algunas regiones, y se observa un aumento general en el número de casos reportados a las autoridades de salud en los últimos a

  11. A therapeutic nanoparticle vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi in a BALB/c mouse model of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Meagan A; Wang, Qian; Jones, Kathryn M; Heffernan, Michael J; Buhaya, Munir H; Beaumier, Coreen M; Keegan, Brian P; Zhan, Bin; Dumonteil, Eric; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, results in an acute febrile illness that progresses to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy in 30% of patients. Current treatments have significant side effects and poor efficacy during the chronic phase; therefore, there is an urgent need for new treatment modalities. A robust TH1-mediated immune response correlates with favorable clinical outcomes. A therapeutic vaccine administered to infected individuals could bolster the immune response, thereby slowing or stopping the progression of chagasic cardiomyopathy. Prior work in mice has identified an efficacious T. cruzi DNA vaccine encoding Tc24. To elicit a similar protective cell-mediated immune response to a Tc24 recombinant protein, we utilized a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticle delivery system in conjunction with CpG motif-containing oligodeoxynucleotides as an immunomodulatory adjuvant. In a BALB/c mouse model, the vaccine produced a TH1-biased immune response, as demonstrated by a significant increase in antigen-specific IFNγ-producing splenocytes, IgG2a titers, and proliferative capacity of CD8(+) T cells. When tested for therapeutic efficacy, significantly reduced systemic parasitemia was seen during peak parasitemia. Additionally, there was a significant reduction in cardiac parasite burden and inflammatory cell infiltrate. This is the first study demonstrating immunogenicity and efficacy of a therapeutic Chagas vaccine using a nanoparticle delivery system. PMID:26890466

  12. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

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    Luiz Henrique Conde SANGENIS

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro.

  13. ACE I/D polymorphism in Indian patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Dhandapany, Perundurai Subramaniam; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh;

    2008-01-01

    The study was carried to determine the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with the risk of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM).......The study was carried to determine the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with the risk of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM)....

  14. Tratamiento de la enfermedad de Chagas TREATMENT OF CHAGAS DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Apt

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad se acepta que la enfermedad de Chagas humana debe ser tratada en cualquier período de su evolución con la única excepción del período crónico terminal. En el período agudo clínico, infección de menos de 2 meses así como en el biológico: pesquisa de parásitos al fresco, frotis, gota gruesa y con serología convencional positiva e IgM(+. El ideal de tratamiento es con nifurtimox (NF 8-10 mg/kg día en adultos y 15 mg/kg día en niños por 60-90 días. La dosis se reparte en tres tomas. La curación clínica y serológica es de un 60%. En Brasil donde no se utiliza este fármaco se trata con benznidazol (BNZ 5 mg/kg día (adultos y 5-10mg/kg día en niños por 60 días. En las infecciones congénitas la terapia debe ser precoz en cuanto se realice el diagnóstico por clínica y pesquisa del parásito al fresco, frotis, microstraut etc. Muchas veces el diagnóstico se efectúa por persistencia de la serología por más de 6 meses y el recién nacido ya esta en etapa crónica de la infección. Es necesario efectuar seguimiento clínico serológico y parasitológico de los casos. Las infecciones accidentales deben ser tratadas por 10 días. En los trasplantes de órganos en que el receptor o dador es chagásico se debe indicar terapia con NF o BNZ a igual dosis y tiempo que la señalada anteriormente. Las reactivaciones en los casos crónicos ejem: que adquieren un SIDA o que presentan depresiones del sistema de inmunidad celular como leucemias, Hodgkin, etc se deben tratar como cuadros agudos con NF ó BNZ por periodos prolongados de 5 ó más meses. En estos casos obviamente la prevención es lo ideal: hacer serología para Chagas a los pacientes con SIDA, etc. En el período crónico hay consenso en el tratamiento debido a que tanto en la forma indeterminada como en el período crónico inicial la terapia tiene rendimiento ya que siempre hay parásitos tisulares demostrados por PCR aunque el microscopio óptico no los

  15. Cine MRI of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cine MRI was performed using 1.5T or 0.5T MR units in eleven patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Septal and posterior wall thickness measured by cine MRI correlated well with those obtained by ultrasonographic cardiogram. In hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, cine MRI demonstrated the site and nature of obstructive change in left ventricle. Cine MRI also showed flow void due to mitral regurgitation successfully. We considered cine MRI is useful means to evaluate the anatomical and functional findings in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  16. Microfibrillar cardiomyopathy: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfibrillar cardiomyopathy is a very rare cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM. The index case was a male patient who presented with shortness of breath and pedal edema. Further clinical investigations favored a clinical diagnosis of RCM. An endomyocardial biopsy revealed subendocardial and interstitial hyaline eosinophillic material resembling amyloid that did not stain with Congo red. An electron microscopic examination showed that this material was composed of twisted linear and bundles of tangled microfibrils. The etiology of the microfibrillar deposition is currently unknown. The pathologists should entertain the diagnosis of microfibrillar cardiomyopathy in suspected cases of amyloidosis that are negative for Congo red.

  17. Systematic review of pregnancy in women with inherited cardiomyopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, Sebastien P. J.; van der Smagt, Jasper J.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Pieper, Petronella G.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy exposes women with inherited cardiomyopathies to increased risk for heart failure and arrhythmias. In this paper, we review the clinical course and management of pregnant women with the following inherited cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogeni

  18. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26411603

  19. Tachycardia-induced Cardiomyopathy (Tachycardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan A. Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The term tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy or tachycardiomyopathy refers to impairment in left ventricular function secondary to chronic tachycardia, which is partially or completely reversible once the tachyarrhythmia is controlled. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy has been shown to occur both in experimental models and in patients with incessant tachyarrhythmia.Data from several studies and from case reports have shown that rate control by means of cardioversion, negative chronotropic agents, and surgical or catheter-based atrioventricular node ablation, resulted in significant improvement of systolic function.The diagnosis of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy is usually made following observation of marked improvement in systolic function after normalization of heart rate. Clinicians should be aware that patients with unexplained systolic dysfunction may have tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy, and that controlling the arrhythmia may result in improvement of systolic function.

  20. Familial neurofibromatosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, A. P.; Emanuel, R W

    1988-01-01

    Two siblings from a family in which neurofibromatosis was inherited as an autosomal dominant had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neurofibromatosis. Idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may have occurred by chance in two first degree relatives with neurofibromatosis. An alternative explantation is that these diseases are both manifestations of a common hereditary defect of neural crest tissue. Another possibility is that abnormalities of catecholamine metabolism and nerve growth factor in ne...

  1. New insights into cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Hove, Jens D; Dixen, Ulrik;

    2013-01-01

    beta-receptor function seem involved in the autonomic and cardiac dysfunction. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy can be revealed by tissue Doppler imaging but is best demasked by physical or pharmacological stress. Liver transplantation may revert cardiac dysfunction but surgery and shunt insertion may also......Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy designates a cardiac dysfunction, which includes reduced cardiac contractility with systolic and diastolic dysfunction, and presence of electrophysiological abnormalities in particular prolongation of the QT interval. Several pathophysiological mechanisms including reduced...

  2. MRI of restrictive cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI in combination of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging for the identification of restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Methods: One hundred sixteen patients with RCM underwent ECG, thoracic radiography, echocardiography and MRI. The final diagnosis was made on comprehensive evaluation in consideration of patient history, clinical symptoms and imaging appearances. Fifty-five normal subjects were used as the controls. All patients were divided into two groups according to contrast-enhanced MRI patterns: RCM with delayed enhancement (RCM with DE, n=35) and RCM without delayed enhancement (RCM without DE, n=81). Bi-atrial and bi-ventricular size, ventricular septal and left free wall thickness were measured. A paired t-test was used for statistic analysis. Results: Bi-atrial size, right ventricular diastolic diameter (RVDD), ventricular septal and left free wall thickness were significantly larger in RCM patients than in normal subjects (P0.05). Visual observation showed mild mitral regurgitation (50 cases), moderate mitral regurgitation (24 cases ), mild tricuspid regurgitation (32 cases) and severe tricuspid regurgitation (46 cases). Thirty-five RCMs with DE presented diffuse (15 cases) or segmental (20 cases) enhancement. Twelve RCMs with diffuse delayed enhancement showed powdery, enhancement, and 3 showed petaline enhancement. Three cases with powdery enhancement were histologically proven as myocardial amyloidosis. Ventricular septum was the most vulnerable segment in patients with segmental enhancement. Six cases presented subendocardial enhancement that corresponded to apical obliteration, of which one case was confirmed as hypereosinophilia by bone marrow biopsy and the other 14 cases didn't present any regular enhancement. In 81 RCMs without DE, marked bi-atrial dilation, near-normal ventricular chambers and near-normal ventricular thickness were presented. Conclusion: MRI is an excellent imaging modality for

  3. Polymorphism in the alpha cardiac muscle actin 1 gene is associated to susceptibility to chronic inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Farage Frade

    Full Text Available AIMS: Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America, and may lead to a life-threatening inflammatory dilated, chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC. One third of T. cruzi-infected individuals progress to CCC while the others remain asymptomatic (ASY. A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Since mutations in multiple sarcomeric genes, including alpha-cardiac actin (ACTC1 have been involved in hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy, we investigated the involvement of the ACTC1 gene in CCC pathogenesis. METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a proteomic and genetic study on a Brazilian study population. The genetic study was done on a main cohort including 118 seropositive asymptomatic subjects and 315 cases and the replication was done on 36 asymptomatic and 102 CCC cases. ACTC1 protein and mRNA levels were lower in myocardial tissue from patients with end-stage CCC than those found in hearts from organ donors. Genotyping a case-control cohort of CCC and ASY subjects for all informative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the ACTC1 gene identified rs640249 SNP, located at the 5' region, as associated to CCC. Associations are borderline after correction for multiple testing. Correlation and haplotype analysis led to the identification of a susceptibility haplotype. Functional assays have shown that the rs640249A/C polymorphism affects the binding of transcriptional factors in the promoter regions of the ACTC1 gene. Confirmation of the detected association on a larger independent replication cohort will be useful. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic variations at the ACTC1 gene may contribute to progression to chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy among T. cruzi-infected patients, possibly by modulating transcription factor binding to ACTC1 promoter regions.

  4. Chagas disease. A new pathophysiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: There is scarce information on myocardial perfusion abnormalities and on the coronary vasomotor condition in Chagas disease patients. Aims: To assess regional perfusion abnormalities and the coronary vasomotor response of patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease. Methods: With the use of 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT imaging and cold pressor test and intracoronary acetylcoline (ACH) perfusion, we studied 9 patients aged 42,6±12 years, 4 males, in the chronic stage of Chagas disease (5 with the indeterminate form and 4 with heart lesion) with normal coronary arteries. Vasomotor responses to intracoronary increasing doses of ACH and to a single dose of nitroglycerine (NTG) were assessed with digital quantitative angiography. Regional myocardial perfusion was evaluated at rest and after cold pressor test by a semi quantitative score analysis in an 18-segment model with 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT images. Results were expressed as mean ± 2SD. Differences between continuous variables were measured by two tails Student's t test for paired variables and the significance level was set at 5 %. Results: All patients had regional perfusion defects and abnormal vasomotor response. The diameter of the left anterior descending artery decreased 34% from a basal diameter of 3.66∫0.95 mm down to 2.42±0.74 mm after maximal response to ACH (p<0.002). NTG infusion augmented its diameter to 3.86±0.77 mm (p<0.0002) that is a 60% increase from post ACH diameter. Myocardial perfusion score was 1∫2.66 at rest and 6.22±3.6 after cold pressor test (p<0.0001). Conclusions: This group of patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease showed an abnormal vasoconstrictive response to intracoronary ACH and cold-induced perfusion defects suggesting that endothelial dysfunction plays a role in the pathophysiology of chronic Chagas heart disease

  5. Chagas disease in the Amazon Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Marcelo Aguilar

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The risk that Chagas disease becomes established as a major endemic threat in Amazonia (the world's largest tropical biome, today inhabited by over 30 million people relates to a complex set of interacting biological and social determinants. These include intense immigration from endemic areas (possibly introducing parasites and vectors, extensive landscape transformation with uncontrolled deforestation, and the great diversity of wild Trypanosoma cruzi reservoir hosts and vectors (25 species in nine genera, which maintain intense sylvatic transmission cycles. Invasion of houses by adventitious vectors (with infection rates > 60% is common, and focal adaptation of native triatomines to artificial structures has been reported. Both acute (~ 500 and chronic cases of autochthonous human Chagas disease have been documented beyond doubt in the region. Continuous, low-intensity transmission seems to occur throughout the Amazon, and generates a hypoendemic pattern with seropositivity rates of ~ 1-3%. Discrete foci also exist in which transmission is more intense (e.g., in localized outbreaks probably linked to oral transmission and prevalence rates higher. Early detection-treatment of acute cases is crucial for avoiding further dispersion of endemic transmission of Chagas disease in Amazonia, and will require the involvement of malaria control and primary health care systems. Comprehensive eco-epidemiological research, including prevalence surveys or the characterization of transmission dynamics in different ecological settings, is still needed. The International Initiative for Chagas Disesae Surveillance and Prevention in the Amazon provides the framework for building up the political and scientific cooperation networks required to confront the challenge of preventing Chagas disease in Amazonia.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARVC arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy ( ARVC ) is a form of heart disease that ...

  7. Serodiagnosis of chronic Chagas infection by using EIE-Recombinant-Chagas-Biomanguinhos kit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Yara M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A kit based on an enzyme immunoassay, EIE-Recombinant-Chagas-Biomanguinhos, developed by the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, was evaluated for the serodiagnosis of chronic Chagas disease. Evaluation was performed with 368 serum samples collected from individuals living in an endemic area for Chagas disease: 131 patients in the chronic phase with confirmed clinical, epidemiological, and serological diagnosis (indirect immunofluorescence, indirect hemagglutination or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and 237 nonchagasic seronegative individuals were considered negative control. The EIE-Recombinant-Chagas-Biomanguinhos kit showed high sensitivity, 100% (CI 95%: 96.4-100% and high specificity, 100% (CI 95%: 98-100%. The data obtained were in full agreement with clinical and conventional serology data. In addition, no cross-reaction was observed with sera from patients with cutaneous (n=14 and visceral (n=3 leishmaniasis. However, when these sera were tested by conventional serological assays for Chagas disease, cross-reactions were detected in 14.3% and 33.3% of the patients with cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, respectively. No cross-reactions were observed when sera from nonchagasic seronegative patients bearing other infectious disease (syphilis, n=8; HTLV, n=8; HCV, n=7 and HBV, n=12 were tested. In addition, sera of patients with inconclusive results for Chagas disease by conventional serology showed results in agreement with clinical evaluation, when tested by the kit. These results are relevant and indicate that the refered kit provides a safe immunodiagnosis of Chagas disease and could be used in blood bank screening.

  8. A Paratransgenic Strategy for the Control of Chagas Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ivy Hurwitz; Annabeth Fieck; Nichole Klein; Christo Jose; Angray Kang; Ravi Durvasula

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease results from infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This disease remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in central and south America. Chagas disease now exists and is detected worldwide because of human migration. Control of Chagas disease has relied mainly on vector eradication however, the development of insect resistance to pesticides, coupled with cost and adverse health effects of insecticide treatments, has prompted our group to investigate novel m...

  9. Pathogenesis of Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimaki, Angeliki; Kleber, Andre G; Saffitz, Jeffrey E

    2015-11-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is a primary myocardial disease. It is characterized by frequent ventricular arrhythmias and increased risk of sudden cardiac death typically arising as an early manifestation before the onset of significant myocardial remodelling. Myocardial degeneration, often confined to the right ventricular free wall, with replacement by fibrofatty scar tissue, develops in many patients. ACM is a familial disease but genetic penetrance can be low and disease expression is highly variable. Inflammation might promote disease progression. It also appears that exercise increases disease penetrance and accelerates its development. More than 60% of probands harbour mutations in genes that encode desmosomal proteins, which has raised the possibility that defective cell-cell adhesion might play a role in disease pathogenesis. Recent advances have implicated changes in the canonical wingless-type mouse mammary tumour virus integration site (Wnt)/β-catenin and Hippo signalling pathways and defects in forwarding trafficking of ion channels and other proteins to the intercalated disk in cardiac myocytes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathogenesis of ACM and highlight future research directions. PMID:26199027

  10. Aptamer binding and neutralization of β1-adrenoceptor autoantibodies: basics and a vision of its future in cardiomyopathy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberland, Annekathrin; Wallukat, Gerd; Schimke, Ingolf

    2011-08-01

    Autoantibodies directed against the second extracellular receptor loop of the β(1) receptor (β(1)-ECII-AABs) that belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors have been frequently found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, Chagas' cardiomyopathy, and peripartum cardiomyopathy and have been clearly evidenced to be related to disease pathogenesis. Consequently, specific proteins or peptides used as binders in immunoapheresis or as in vivo neutralizers of β(1)-ECII-AABs have been suggested for patient treatment. Aptamers, which are target specifically selected short single- or double-stranded RNA or DNA sequences, are a recently introduced new molecule class applicable to bind and neutralize diverse molecule species, including antibodies. This article reviews selection technologies and characteristics of aptamers with respect to a single-stranded DNA aptamer recently identified as having a very high affinity against β(1)-ECII-AABs. The potential of this aptamer for the elimination of β(1)-ECII-AABs and in vivo neutralization is critically analyzed in view of its potential for future use in cardiomyopathy treatment. PMID:22814426

  11. Melatonin in Chagas´ disease: Possible therapeutic value La melatonina en la enfermedad de Chagas: Su posible valor terapéutico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Cardinali

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease is a severe health problem in Latin America, causing approximately 50 000 deaths a year, with approximately 18 million infected people. About 25-30% of the patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi develop the chronic form of the disease. The protective response against T. cruzi depends on both innate and acquired immunity involving macrophages, natural killer cells, T and B lymphocytes, and the production of proinflammatory Th-1 cytokines. In addition, an increased nitric oxide (NO production in macrophages leading to effective microbicidal action is needed to control parasitemia. Melatonin is detectable in T. cruzi and may play a role in promoting infection whereas, when administered in high doses during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection, it can decrease parasitemia while reducing NO production. During chronic disease progression, the sustained oxidative stress concomitant to myocardial damage could be reduced by administering melatonin. It is hypothesized that the coordinated administration of a melatonin agonist like the MT1/MT2 agonist ramelteon, that lacks antioxidant activity and may not affect NO production during the acute phase, and of melatonin in doses high enough to decrease oxidative damage, to preserve mitochondrial and to prevent cardiomyopathy during the chronic phase, could be a novel add-on treatment of Chagas´ disease.La enfermedad de Chagas es un problema grave de salud en América Latina, causando cerca de 50 000 muertes al año y unos 18 millones de infectados. Alrededor del 25-30% de los pacientes infectados con Trypanosoma cruzi desarrollan la forma crónica de la enfermedad. La respuesta de defensa ante el T. cruzi depende de la inmunidad innata y adquirida con la participación de macrófagos, células “natural killer”, linfocitos T y B, y la producción de citoquinas proinflamatorias de tipo Th-1. Además, el aumento en la producción de óxido nítrico (NO en los macrófagos lleva a una acci

  12. The ecology of Chagas disease in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, C J; Apt, W; Miles, M A

    1982-01-01

    Chagas disease probably affects over half a million people in Chile, principally in rural communities in the fertile valleys of the arid 'norte chico' region, north of Santiago. The main domestic vector is Triatoma infestans, but Triatoma spinolai, although mainly in rocky sylvatic and peridomestic ecotopes, also invades houses. Since the Spanish invasion in the sixteenth century, and particularly during the last 100 years, the endemic region has suffered an ecological breakdown, largely due to excessive timbering and over-grazing, which has led to a denuded landscape with severe loss of agricultural productivity. This breakdown, combined with uneconomically sized farms and poor marketing, exacerbates the poverty of the rural communities. As in other similar areas of Latin America, the combination of poverty and poor education discourages improvements in housing which would reduce the risk of vector-transmitted Chagas disease. This paper reviews the historical and ecological background of the endemic region of Chile, both as a basis for further work, and as a point of comparison with other endemic areas. The review attempts to show how the current status of Chagas disease is likely to be maintained through its association with poor quality housing, poverty and ecological degradation, drawing parallels with other endemic++ areas and suggesting ways by which the ecological damage might be reversed. PMID:6821391

  13. Uruguay declared free of Chagas disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    According to 1997 entomological and sero-epidemiological data, the transmission of Chagas disease has been interrupted in Uruguay; this has been certified by an independent commission appointed by the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO). Transmission of Chagas disease, which is endemic in Uruguay, is via the vector Triatoma infestans or through transfusion with infected blood. In 1983, T. infestans lived in dwellings in 80% of Uruguay; in 1996, in all departments except Tacuarembo, house infestation rates decreased to below 0.1% (a reduction equivalent to 95%). The vector is found around the home, rather than in it, in Tacuarembo; therefore, its presence does not have any significance for transmission. The number of infected blood donors is now negligible, and there is 100% coverage via compulsory blood screening. Uruguay is the first Southern Cone country to have achieved the goals established by the Ministries of Health of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay to eliminate the transmission of Chagas disease. PMID:12321803

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI has been proposed as a noninvasive method for evaluating patients with a variety of cardiomyopathies. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) is defined as a primary disorder of the right ventricle characterized by partial or total replacement of muscle by adipose or fibrous tissue. Its diagnosis currently rests on techniques that accurately identify specific anatomic and functional abnormalities of the right ventricle. The aim of our study was to analyze the MRI features in 41 patients (age 19-64 years; 26 patients with ARVD, 7 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 8 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)). They were investigated by spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) Cine using a 0.5T unit Toshiba 50A with cardiac software. SE and Cine MRI allowed assessment of localization (hence type of HC) and extent of changes in visualized wall and ventricular dysfunction. In all patients with ARVD MRI SE-T1 W allowed localization of the abnormally bright signal intensity from the RV-free wall, apex and subtricuspid region, characteristic for the subcutenous fat. In 8 patients the structural changes were also present in left ventricular myocardium. MRI can be a useful method in supplying additional information to that obtained in 2D Echo by identifying the site, extent and type of cardiomyopathy. MRI is a very useful non-invasive method in diagnosis of ARVD. (author)

  15. Severity of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the severity of dilated cardiomyopathy, thallium scan was performed in 60 cases. In 16 of all, serial thallium scan was performed in the periods of average 26 months. In these cases, extension of perfusion defect was observed from apical to inferoposterior regions. Therefore, we classified dilated cardiomyopathy into three groups by thallium scan; (I) dilated left ventricular type (n = 16), (II) apical hypoperfusion type (n = 12), (III) inferoposterior perfusion defect type (n = 32). These groups were correlated with hemodynamic findings. All patients had also cardiac catheterization and gated blood pool scan. As results, group III had high incidence of right ventricular and lung thallium uptake and patchy pattern compared to other groups. Group III had also high incidence of dyspnoea on exertion, S3 and ECG abnormalities. In hemodynamics, end-diastolic ventricular volume index and end-systolic ventricular volume index increased and, right ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular ejection fraction decreased according to the severity of dilated cardiomyopathy from group I to III. In addition, the incidence of mitral regurgitation and dyskinesis was observed highly in group III. In conclusion, perfusion defect was frequently demonstrated in dilated cardiomyopathy without coronary artery stenosis. And right and left ventricular function was depressed according to the extension of perfusion defect. (author)

  16. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description Dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia (DCMA) syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  17. Evaluation of Parasiticide Treatment with Benznidazol in the Electrocardiographic, Clinical, and Serological Evolution of Chagas Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abilio Augusto Fragata-Filho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is one of the most important endemic parasitic diseases in Latin America. In its chronic phase, progression to cardiomyopathy has high morbidity and mortality. The persistence of a normal electrocardiogram (ECG provides a similar prognosis to that of a non-diseased population. Benznidazole (BNZ is the only drug with trypanocidal action available in Brazil.A group of 310 patients with chronic Chagas disease who had normal ECGs at the first medical visit performed before 2002 were included. There were 263 patients treated with BNZ and 47 untreated. The follow-up period was 19.59 years. Univariate analyses showed that those treated were younger and predominantly male. As many as 79.08% of those treated and 46.81% of those untreated continued with normal electrocardiograms (p <0.0001. The occurrence of electrocardiographic abnormalities and relevant clinical events (heart failure, stroke, total mortality, and cardiovascular death was less prevalent in treated patients (p <0.001, p: 0.022, p: 0.047 respectively. In multivariate analyses, the parasiticide treatment was an independent variable for persistence of a normal ECG pattern, which was an independent variable in the prevention of significant clinical events. The immunofluorescence titers decreased with the parasitological treatment. However, the small number of tests in untreated patients did not allow the correlation of the decrease of these titers with electrocardiographic alterations.These data suggest that treatment with benznidazole prevents the occurrence of electrocardiographic alterations. On the other hand, patients who develop ECG abnormalities present with more significant clinical events.

  18. Health-related quality of life in patients with Chagas disease: a review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovane Rodrigo Sousa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (ChD, a neglected tropical disease caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, remains a serious public health issue in Latin America and is an emerging disease in several non-endemic countries, where knowledge of the condition and experience with its clinical management are limited. Regionally, the disease is the major cause of disability secondary to tropical diseases in young adults. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL impairment is common in patients with ChD, especially in those with Chagas dilated cardiomyopathy, the most severe manifestation of the disease, which frequently leads to heart failure. The aim of this review was to conduct a literature search for studies that have evaluated the determining factors of HRQoL in ChD patients. We included cross-sectional, case-control, cohort, and experimental studies, as well as clinical trials that evaluated the HRQoL in ChD patients aged 18 to 60 years and are presenting an explicit description of statistical analysis. Using a combination of keywords based on Descriptors in Health Sciences (DeCS and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH for searches in PubMed and the Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO, 148 studies were found. After exclusions, 12 studies were selected for analysis. Three main findings were extracted from these studies: 1 cardiac involvement is associated with a worse HRQoL in ChD patients; 2 HRQoL is associated with the patients' functional capacity; and 3 simple and inexpensive therapeutic measures are effective for improving HRQoL in ChD patients. Hence, ChD patients' functional capacity, the effectiveness of non-surgical conservative treatment, and cardiac involvement are important determining factors for the HRQoL in ChD patients.

  19. Risk of Cardiomyopathy in Younger Persons With a Family History of Death from Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis F; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Øyen, Nina;

    2015-01-01

    at the population level is unclear. In a nationwide cohort, we examined the risk of cardiomyopathy by family history of premature death (data, we constructed a cohort of 3.9 million persons born from 1950 to 2008. We......BACKGROUND: Recommendations for presymptomatic screening of relatives of cardiomyopathy patients are based on findings from tertiary centers. Cardiomyopathy inheritance patterns are fairly well understood, but how cardiomyopathy in younger persons (... ascertained family history of premature (

  20. Keshan disease and mitochondrial cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Fuyu

    2006-01-01

    Keshan disease (KD) is a potentially fatal form of cardiomyopathy (disease of the heart muscle) endemic in certain areas of China. From 1984 to 1986, a national comprehensive scientific investigation on KD in Chuxiong region of Yunnan Province in the southwest China was conducted. The investigation team was composed of epidemiologists, clinic doctors, pathologists, biochemists, biophysicists and specialists in ecological environment. Results of pathological, biochemical and biophysical as well as clinical studies showed: an obvious increase of enlarged and swollen mitochondria with distended crista membranes in myocardium from patients with KD; significant reductions in the activity of oxidative phosphorylation (succinate dehydrogenase, cytochrome oxidase, succinate oxidase, H+-ATPase) of affected mitochondria; decrease in CoQ, cardiolipin, Se and GSHPx activity, while obvious increase in the Ca2+ content. So, it was suggested that mitochondria are the predominant target of the pathogenic factors of KD. Before Chuxiong KD survey only a few cases of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy were studied. During the multidisciplinary scientific investigation on KD in Chuxiong a large amount of samples from KD cases and the positive controls were examined. On the basis of the results obtained it was suggested that KD might be classified as a "Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy" endemic in China. This is one of the achievements in the three years' survey in Chuxiong and is valuable not only to the deeper understanding of pathogenic mechanism of KD but also to the study of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy in general.Keshan disease is not a genetic disease, but is closely related to the malnutrition (especially microelement Se deficiency). KD occurs along a low Se belt, and Se supplementation has been effective in prevention of such disease. The incidence of KD has sharply decreased along with the steady raise of living standard and realization of preventive measures. At present, patients of

  1. Identification of the Syrian hamster cardiomyopathy gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, V; Okazaki, Y; Belsito, A; Piluso, G; Matsuda, Y; Politano, L; Nigro, G; Ventura, C; Abbondanza, C; Molinari, A M; Acampora, D; Nishimura, M; Hayashizaki, Y; Puca, G A

    1997-04-01

    The BIO14.6 hamster is a widely used model for autosomal recessive cardiomyopathy. These animals die prematurely from progressive myocardial necrosis and heart failure. The primary genetic defect leading to the cardiomyopathy is still unknown. Recently, a genetic linkage map localized the cardiomyopathy locus on hamster chromosome 9qa2.1-b1, excluding several candidate genes. We now demonstrate that the cardiomyopathy results from a mutation in the delta-sarcoglycan gene that maps to the disease locus. This mutation was completely coincident with the disease in backcross and F2 pedigrees. This constitutes the first animal model identified for human sarcoglycan disorders. PMID:9097966

  2. A global systematic review of Chagas disease prevalence among migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Erin E; Vinetz, Joseph M; Weeks, John R; Brouwer, Kimberly C

    2016-04-01

    Human migration has been identified as a potential factor for increased Chagas disease risk and has transformed the disease from a Latin American problem to a global one. We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature between 2004-2014 in order to: summarize recent seroprevalence estimates of Chagas disease among Latin American migrants, in both endemic and non-endemic settings; compare seroprevalence estimates in migrants to countrywide prevalence estimates; and identify risk factors for Chagas disease among migrants. A total of 320 studies were screened and 23 studies were included. We found evidence that the prevalence of Chagas disease is higher than expected in some migrant groups and that reliance on blood donor screening prevalence estimates underestimates the burden of disease. Overall there is a dearth of high quality epidemiologic studies on the prevalence of Chagas disease in migrants, especially among intra-regional migrants within Latin America. Given that this zoonotic disease cannot likely be eradicated, improved surveillance and reporting is vital to continuing control efforts. More accurate health surveillance of both Latin American migrants and the Chagas disease burden will help countries appropriately scale up their response to this chronic disease. Overall, improved estimates of Chagas disease among migrants would likely serve to highlight the real need for better screening, diagnostics, and treatment of individuals living with the disease. PMID:26777312

  3. Changes in Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Nisha Jain; Soman, Kizhake V; Zago, Maria P; Koo, Sue-Jie; Spratt, Heidi; Stafford, Susan; Blell, Zinzi N; Gupta, Shivali; Nuñez Burgos, Julio; Barrientos, Natalia; Brasier, Allan R; Wiktorowicz, John E

    2016-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) infection causes chagasic cardiomyopathy; however, why 30-40% of the patients develop clinical disease is not known. To discover the pathomechanisms in disease progression, we obtained the proteome signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal healthy controls (N/H, n = 30) and subjects that were seropositive for Tc-specific antibodies, but were clinically asymptomatic (C/A, n = 25) or clinically symptomatic (C/S, n = 28) with cardiac involvement and left ventricular dysfunction. Protein samples were labeled with BODIPY FL-maleimide (dynamic range: > 4 orders of magnitude, detection limit: 5 f-mol) and resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE). After normalizing the gel images, protein spots that exhibited differential abundance in any of the two groups were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and searched against UniProt human database for protein identification. We found 213 and 199 protein spots (fold change: |≥ 1.5|, psurvival and free radical scavenging capacity in C/S (but not C/A) subjects. The MYC/SP1 transcription factors that regulate hypoxia and oxidative/inflammatory stress were predicted to be key targets in the context of control of Chagas disease severity. Further, MARS-modeling identified a panel of proteins that had >93% prediction success in classifying infected individuals with no disease and those with cardiac involvement and LV dysfunction. In conclusion, we have identified molecular pathways and a panel of proteins that could aid in detecting seropositive individuals at risk of developing cardiomyopathy. PMID:26919708

  4. Myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is multifactorial and explains the occurrence of angina, in about 50% of patients. The pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia may be explained by the increase of the ventricular mass and relative paucity of the coronary microcirculation; the elevated ventricular filling pressures and myocardial stiffness causing a compression of the coronary microvessels; the impaired coronary vasodilator flow reserve caused by anatomic and functional abnormalities; and the systolic compression of epicardial vessel (myocardial bridges). Myocardial ischemia must be investigated by perfusion scintigraphic methods since its presence influences the prognosis and has relevant clinical implications for management of patients. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and documented myocardial ischemia usually need to undergo invasive coronary angiography to exclude the presence of concomitant atherosclerotic coronary disease. (author)

  5. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong; Chen, Shubao

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affec...

  6. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a historical note

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ To the Editor: I read with interest the case report of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a Chinese woman.1 Unfortunately, the authors mistakenly attributed the original description of this syndrome to Tsuchihashi et al in 2001.2Actually Dote et al3 first described this syndrome in 1991, ten years before Tsuchihashi et al did.2 Incidentally, the authors did make a reference in their case report to the article by Dote et al3 which was cited as reference 1.

  7. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer G. Duncan

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is common in patients with diabetes and is a significant contributor to the high mortality rates associated with diabetes. Heart failure is common in diabetic patients, even in the absence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, an entity known as diabetic cardiomyopathy. Evidence indicates that myocardial metabolism is altered in diabetes, which likely contributes to contractile dysfunction and ventricular failure. The mitochondria are the center of metabolism, and...

  8. Cardiomyopathies and the Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, D A; Cox, A T; Boos, C; Hardman, R; Sharma, S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a group of heterogeneous myocardial diseases that are frequently inherited and are a recognised cause of premature sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Incomplete expressions of disease and the overlap with the physiological cardiac manifestations of regular intensive exercise create diagnostic challenges in young athletes and military recruits. Early identification is important because sudden death in the absence of prodromal symptoms is a common presentation, and there are several therapeutic strategies to minimise this risk. This paper examines the classification and clinical features of cardiomyopathies with specific reference to a military population and provides a detailed account of the optimum strategy for diagnosis, indications for specialist referral and specific guidance on the occupational significance of cardiomyopathy. A 27-year-old Lance Corporal Signaller presents to his Regimental medical officer (RMO) after feeling 'light-headed' following an 8 mile unloaded run. While waiting to see the RMO, the medical sergeant records a 12-lead ECG. The ECG is reviewed by the RMO immediately prior to the consultation and shows voltage criteria for left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and inverted T-waves in II, III, aVF and V1-V3 (Figure 1). This Lance Corporal is a unit physical training instructor and engages in >10 h of aerobic exercise per week. He is a non-smoker and does not have any significant medical history. PMID:26246349

  9. Recent views on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent Views on Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy provides a review of results obtained in the area of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, as well as a perspective for the future treatment of this cardiac disorder. The debate on the existence of a true obstruction to left ventricular outflow is expertly presented, as are current concepts of pathophysiology. Long-term treatment with the calcium antagonist, verapamil is thoroughly reviewed and surgical treatment and its implications, as applied to 160 patients suffering from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, is thoroughly discussed. In addition, presentations on echocardiography and radionuclide cardiology as non-invasive procedures provide up-to-date views. Results obtained from pressure-volume loops and stress-strain relationships in patients with HCM, both before and after verapamil and propranolol treatments, are of special interest. To provide a better insight of this peculiar disease, two hemodynamic concepts - cavity angulation and atrioventricle - are introduced, emphasizing the interaction between morphology and function, and stressing the importance of the integrity of left atrial function. (Auth.)

  10. Skeletal muscle involvement in cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongelli, Giuseppe; D'Alessandro, Raffaella; Maddaloni, Valeria; Rea, Alessandra; Sarkozy, Anna; McKenna, William J

    2013-12-01

    The link between heart and skeletal muscle disorders is based on similar molecular, anatomical and clinical features, which are shared by the 'primary' cardiomyopathies and 'primary' neuromuscular disorders. There are, however, some peculiarities that are typical of cardiac and skeletal muscle disorders. Skeletal muscle weakness presenting at any age may indicate a primary neuromuscular disorder (associated with creatine kinase elevation as in dystrophinopathies), a mitochondrial disease (particularly if encephalopathy, ocular myopathy, retinitis, neurosensorineural deafness, lactic acidosis are present), a storage disorder (progressive exercise intolerance, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa, as in Danon disease), or metabolic disorders (hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperammonaemia or other specific biochemical abnormalities). In such patients, skeletal muscle weakness usually precedes the cardiomyopathy and dominates the clinical picture. Nevertheless, skeletal involvement may be subtle, and the first clinical manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder may be the occurrence of heart failure, conduction disorders or ventricular arrhythmias due to cardiomyopathy. ECG and echocardiogram, and eventually, a more detailed cardiovascular evaluation may be required to identify early cardiac involvement. Paediatric and adult cardiologists should be proactive in screening for neuromuscular and related disorders to enable diagnosis in probands and evaluation of families with a focus on the identification of those at risk of cardiac arrhythmia and emboli who may require specific prophylactic treatments, for example, pacemaker, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and anticoagulation. PMID:24149064

  11. [Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: a specific entity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondex, A; Arlès, F; Lipovac, A-S; Richecoeur, M; Bronstein, J-A

    2012-04-01

    Cirrhosis is a frequent and severe condition, which is the late stage of numerous chronic liver diseases. It is associated with major hemodynamic alterations characteristic of hyperdynamic circulation and with a series of structural, functional, electrophysiological and biological heart abnormalities termed cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. The pathogenesis of this syndrome is multifactorial. It is usually clinically latent or mild, likely because the peripheral vasodilatation significantly reduces the left ventricle afterload. However, sudden changes of hemodynamic state (vascular filling, surgical or transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunts, peritoneo-venous shunts and orthotopic liver transplantation) or myocardial contractility (introduction of beta-blocker therapy) can unmask its presence, and sometimes convert latent to overt heart failure. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may also contribute to the pathogenesis of hepatorenal syndrome. This entity has been described recently, and its diagnostic criteria are still under debate. To date, current management recommendations are empirical, nonspecific measures. Recognition of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy depends on a high level of awareness for the presence of this syndrome, particularly in patients with advanced cirrhosis who undergo significant surgical, pharmacological or physiological stresses. PMID:22115174

  12. Chagas disease and globalization of the Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño-León, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of autochthonous cases of Chagas disease in the Amazon since the 1970s has led to fear that the disease may become a new public health problem in the region. This transformation in the disease's epidemiological pattern in the Amazon can be explained by environmental and social changes in the last 30 years. The current article draws on the sociological theory of perverse effects to explain these changes as the unwanted result of the shift from the "inward" development model prevailing until the 1970s to the "outward" model that we know as globalization, oriented by industrial forces and international trade. The current article highlights the implementation of five new patterns in agriculture, cattle-raising, mining, lumbering, and urban occupation that have generated changes in the environment and the traditional indigenous habitat and have led to migratory flows, deforestation, sedentary living, the presence of domestic animals, and changes in the habitat that facilitate colonization of human dwellings by vectors and the domestic and work-related transmission of the disease. The expansion of Chagas disease is thus a perverse effect of the globalization process in the Amazon. PMID:17308715

  13. Cognitive impairment in human chronic Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Mangone

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available We proposed to investigate subclinical cognitive impairment secondary to chronic Chagas' disease (CCD. No similar study was previously done. The neuropsychological performance of 45 chronic Chagasic patients and 26 matched controls (age, education place and years of residency in endemic area was compared using the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE, Weschler Memory Scale (WMS and the Weschler Adult Intelligent Scale (WAIS. Non-parametric tests and Chi2 were used to compare group means and multivariate statistics in two way frequency tables for measures of independence and association of categorical variables with the disease. Results: Chagasic patients showed lower MMSE scores (p<004, poor orientation (p<.004, and attention (p<.007. Lower WMS MQ were associated with CCD (Chi2 5.9; p<.01; Fisher test p<.02. Lower WAIS IQ were associated with CCD (Chi2 6.3, p<.01; Fisher test p<.01 being the digit symbol (p<.03, picture completion (p<.03, picture arrangement (p<.01 and object assembly (p<.03 subtests the most affected. The impairment in non-verbal reasoning, speed of information processing, problem solving, learning and sequencing observed in chronic Chagas disease patients resembles the cognitive dysfunction associated with white matter disease.

  14. Feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: variations on a theme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history and the physical, radiographic, electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, haemo-dynamic and angiocardiographic findings from 18 cats with idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are described. These data document a diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations of this disease in cats. The variety and complexity of feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy complicate the diagnosis and challenge the idea that this disorder is a single disease entity

  15. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-06-26

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  16. Restrictive Cardiomyopathy: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Bin Abdullah*, Mehboob.M.Kalburgi, Sahana Shetty and Satyasrinivas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a 28 years old male presenting with heart failure. A thorough clinical evaluation directed us towards restrictive heart disease. Doppler echocardiographic study was used as a main modality of diagnosis and cardiac catheterization confirmed the diagnosis of idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy. We express the contribution of clinical findings and appropriate diagnostic measures in approaching a case of Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM.

  17. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  18. Molecular genetics and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a disease of functional impairment in the cardiac muscle and its etiology includes both extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Cardiomyopathy caused by the intrinsic factors is called as primary cardiomyopathy of which two major clinical phenotypes are hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Genetic approaches have revealed the disease genes for hereditary primary cardiomyopathy and functional studies have demonstrated that characteristic functional alterations induced by the disease-associated mutations are closely related to the clinical types, such that increased and decreased Ca(2+) sensitivities of muscle contraction are associated with HCM and DCM, respectively. In addition, recent studies have suggested that mutations in the Z-disc components found in HCM and DCM may result in increased and decreased stiffness of sarcomere, respectively. Moreover, functional analysis of mutations in the other components of cardiac muscle have suggested that the altered response to metabolic stresses is associated with cardiomyopathy, further indicating the heterogeneity in the etiology and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy. PMID:26178429

  19. The noble enigma: Chagas' nominations for the Nobel Prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutinho Marilia

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Chagas, a Brazilian physician, discovered the American trypanosomiasis in 1909. Like other remarkable discoveries of those days, his work helped to articulate the insect-vector theory and other theoretical guidelines in tropical medicine. Unlike all other discoveries, all the stages of this work were accomplished in a few months and by a single man. Chagas' discovery was widely recognized at home and abroad. He was twice nominated for the Nobel Prize - in 1913 and in 1921-, but never received the award. Evidence suggests that the reasons for this failure are related to the violent opposition that Chagas faced in Brazil. The contentions towards Chagas were related to a rejection of the meritocratic procedures that gave him prominence, as well as to local petty politics.

  20. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Detailed FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mainly, in rural areas of Latin America where poverty is widespread). Chagas disease ( T. cruzi infection) is ... Prevention 1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) ...

  1. The potential influence of atherogenic dyslipidemia on the severity of chronic Chagas heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Peverengo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction: chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD is the most common manifestation of American Trypanosomiasis, causing about 50,000 deaths annually. Several factors bear correlation with the severity of CCHD. However, to our knowledge, the assessment on the contribution of major cardiovascular risk factors (CRF, such as hypertension and atherogenic dyslipidemia (AD to CCHD severity is scarce, despite their well-established role in coronary artery disease, heart failure and stroke. Objective: to explore the potential relationship of blood pressure and AD with the clinical profile of patients with CCHD. Methods: we performed a cross-sectional study in T. cruziseropositive patients categorized according to a standard CCHD classification. All individuals were subjected to complete clinical examination. Autoantibodies induced by T. cruzi were assessed by ELISA. Results: we observed that Atherogenic index (AI levels rose significantly in relation to the severity of the CCHD stage, with CCHD III cases showing the highest values of AI. Furthermore, those patients with globally dilated cardiomyopathy with reduced ejection fraction showed higher levels of AI. In regard to autoantibodies, anti-B13 also showed relation with the severity of the disease. Conclusion: we observed that AI correlated with CCHD stages and contributed, in association with anti-B13 antibodies and age, to the prediction of systolic heart failure.

  2. PERIPARTUM CARDIOMYOPATHY--REPORT OF 16 CASES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨佳欣; 刘俊涛; 边旭明

    2002-01-01

    Objective.To analyze the clinical characteristics of peripartum cardiomyopathy and to evaluate the different factors that influence the prognosis of the peripartum cardiomyopathy.Method.A retrospective review was undertaken on records of women who were diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy at Peking Union Medical College Hospital between Jan.1983 and May 1999.Results.During the research period,only 16 pregnant women were documented as peripartum cardiomyopathy.Some of the women undertook ultrasonic cardiographic (UCG) examination that showed decreased systolic function.Seven women were complicated with pregnancy induced hypertension.Three died of disseminated intravascular coagulation,embolism and cardiogenic shock respectively.Conclusion.Early diagnosis of the peripartum cardiomyopathy is extremely important.The UCG can provide helpful information on disease progression or regression.

  3. The noble enigma: Chagas' nominations for the Nobel Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Marilia Coutinho; Olival Freire Jr.; João Carlos Pinto Dias

    1999-01-01

    Carlos Chagas, a Brazilian physician, discovered the American trypanosomiasis in 1909. Like other remarkable discoveries of those days, his work helped to articulate the insect-vector theory and other theoretical guidelines in tropical medicine. Unlike all other discoveries, all the stages of this work were accomplished in a few months and by a single man. Chagas' discovery was widely recognized at home and abroad. He was twice nominated for the Nobel Prize - in 1913 and in 1921-, but never r...

  4. Prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against Chagas disease

    OpenAIRE

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Rios-Castro, Martha; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia del Carmen; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in which the most affected organ is the heart. Conventional chemotherapy has a very low effectiveness; despite recent efforts, there is currently no better or more effective treatment available. DNA vaccines provide a new alternative for both prevention and treatment of a variety of infectious disorders, including Chagas disease. Recombinant DNA technology has allowed some vaccines to be developed using recombinant proteins or virus-lik...

  5. Biologic and Genetics Aspects of Chagas Disease at Endemic Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Marilanda Ferreira Bellini; Rosana Silistino-Souza; Marileila Varella-Garcia; Maria Tercília Vilela Azeredo-Oliveira; Ana Elizabete Silva

    2012-01-01

    The etiologic agent of Chagas Disease is the Trypanosoma cruzi, transmitted through blood-sucking insect vectors of the Triatominae subfamily, representing one of the most serious public health concerns in Latin America. There are geographic variations in the prevalence of clinical forms and morbidity of Chagas disease, likely due to genetic variation of the T. cruzi and the host genetic and environmental features. Increasing evidence has supported that inflammatory cytokines and chemokines a...

  6. A Multi-disciplinary Overview of Chagas in Periurban Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McCune

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available There are between 8 and 11 million cases of America Human Trypanosomiasis, commonly known as Chagas disease, in Latin America. Chagas is endemic in southern Peru, especially the Arequipa region, where it has expanded from poor, rural areas to periurban communities. This paper summarizes the findings of four studies in periurban Arequipa: on determinants of disease-vector infestation; on prevalence, spatial patterns, and risk factors of Chagas; on links between migration, settlement patterns, and disease-vector infestation; and on the relationship between discordant test results and spatially clustered transmission hotspots. These studies identified two risk factors associated with the disease: population dynamics and the urbanization of poverty. Understanding the disease within this new urban context will allow for improved public health prevention efforts and policy initiatives. Discovered in 1909 by Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, American Human Trypanosomiasis is a chronic and potentially life-threatening illness found throughout Latin America (Moncayo, 2003. Indeed, it is estimated that there are between 8 and 11 million cases in Mexico and Central and South America (Centers for Disease Control [CDC], 2009. Chagas disease, as it is most commonly known, is endemic in southern Peru, especially in the region of Arequipa. Once thought to be limited to poor, rural areas, the disease is now appearing in the periurban communities that surround Arequipa City, the capital of the region (Cornejo del Carpio, 2003. Understanding the urbanization of Chagas disease will allow public health and medical professionals to better combat the further transmission of the disease. After providing an overview of Chagas and introducing the scope of the disease in Latin America, this paper will summarize the findings of four recent studies conducted in periurban districts in Arequipa. Ultimately, this paper seeks to identify the risk factors associated with Chagas

  7. Altered Cardiomyocyte Function and Trypanosoma cruzi Persistence in Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jader Santos; Santos-Miranda, Artur; Sales-Junior, Policarpo Ademar; Monti-Rocha, Renata; Campos, Paula Peixoto; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Roman-Campos, Danilo

    2016-05-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the triatominae Trypanosoma cruzi, is one of the leading causes of heart malfunctioning in Latin America. The cardiac phenotype is observed in 20-30% of infected people 10-40 years after their primary infection. The cardiac complications during Chagas disease range from cardiac arrhythmias to heart failure, with important involvement of the right ventricle. Interestingly, no studies have evaluated the electrical properties of right ventricle myocytes during Chagas disease and correlated them to parasite persistence. Taking advantage of a murine model of Chagas disease, we studied the histological and electrical properties of right ventricle in acute (30 days postinfection [dpi]) and chronic phases (90 dpi) of infected mice with the Colombian strain of T. cruzi and their correlation to parasite persistence. We observed an increase in collagen deposition and inflammatory infiltrate at both 30 and 90 dpi. Furthermore, using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, we detected parasites at 90 dpi in right and left ventricles. In addition, we observed action potential prolongation and reduced transient outward K(+) current and L-type Ca(2+) current at 30 and 90 dpi. Taking together, our results demonstrate that T. cruzi infection leads to important modifications in electrical properties associated with inflammatory infiltrate and parasite persistence in mice right ventricle, suggesting a causal role between inflammation, parasite persistence, and altered cardiomyocyte function in Chagas disease. Thus, arrhythmias observed in Chagas disease may be partially related to altered electrical function in right ventricle. PMID:26976879

  8. Differentiation of ischemic cardiomyopathy from idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether ischemic cardiomyopathy (ischemic DCM) could be distinguished from idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (idiopathic DCM) by radionuclide cardiac imaging, seven patients with ischemic DCM and eight patients with idiopathic DCM were studied with thallium scanning and gated cardiac blood pool imaging at rest and during exercise. The resting ejection fraction of the two groups were similar (ischemic DCM 20.7+-9.0%, idiopathic DCM 26.0+-13.4%, ns), and the change in the ejection fraction during exercise were also similar. Both groups showed no increment of ejection fraction during exercise. Thallium scan showed perfusion defect in 14 of 15 patients. The perfusion defects were extensive in ischemic DCM than idiopathic DCM (defect score 49.6+-5.7 vs. 21.1+-13.2%, p>0.001). Moreover, the distribution of the defects were different; in ischemic DCM the defects were distributed according to the territory of coronary arteries, but in idiopathic DCM, defects were seen frequently in the apex or at the base of left ventricle. In conclusion, resting thallium scan was most reliable imaging technique to distinguish ischemic DCM from idiopathic DCM. (author)

  9. Ergotamine-Induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozpelit, Ebru; Ozpelit, Mehmet E; Akdeniz, Bahri; Göldeli, Özhan

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a recently increasing diagnosed disease showed by transient apical or mid-apical left ventricular dysfunction. It is known as a disease of postmenopausal women, which is usually triggered by emotional or physical stress. Although the trigger is mostly endogenous, some drugs have also been reported as the cause. Published case reports of TC associated with drug usage consist of sympathomimetic drugs, inotropic agents, thyroid hormone, cocaine, and 5-fluorouracil. We present an unusual case of TC in which the possible trigger is ergotamine toxicity. PMID:25099482

  10. [Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: origin and variants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronov, D M

    2008-01-01

    This literature review is devoted to the " tako-tsubo " cardiomyopathy - rare type of cardiomyopathy characterized by transient myocardial stunning. In acute phase the disease resembles myocardial infarction. However no involvement of coronary arteries is found at angiography. Echocardiography and ventriculography reveal a- or - hypokinesia of various parts of the left ventricle. Classic (initial) variant of the disease is associated with concomitant apical akinesia and hyperkinesis of basal segments. The heart acquires a distinctive configuration with ballooning apex which resembles device used to trap octopus. The author refers to described by him 11 cases of myocardial damage with infarct-like clinic without changes of coronary arteries in healthy men younger than 35 years (D.M.Aronow, 1968, 1974). These cases occurred during severe physical stress and had in their basis hypercatecholaminemia which led to reversible myocardial damage of the myocardium which corresponded to modern concept of myocardial stunning. During exercise tests these patients had 3 times greater increase of urinal epinephrine excretion compared with 61 patients of the same age with atherosclerotic heart disease. PMID:18991836

  11. Evolving Approaches to Genetic Evaluation of Specific Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Loon Yee Louis; Moran, Rocio T; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of the genetic basis of cardiomyopathy has expanded significantly over the past 2 decades. The increasing availability, shortening diagnostic time, and lowering costs of genetic testing have provided researchers and physicians with the opportunity to identify the underlying genetic determinants for thousands of genetic disorders, including inherited cardiomyopathies, in effort to improve patient morbidities and mortality. As such, genetic testing has advanced from basic scientific research to clinical application and has been incorporated as part of patient evaluations for suspected inherited cardiomyopathies. Genetic evaluation framework of inherited cardiomyopathies typically encompasses careful evaluation of family history, genetic counseling, clinical screening of family members, and if appropriate, molecular genetic testing. This review summarizes the genetics, current guideline recommendations, and evidence supporting the genetic evaluation framework of five hereditary forms of cardiomyopathy: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). PMID:26472190

  12. Importance of genetic evaluation and testing in pediatric cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad; Tariq; Stephanie; M; Ware

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are clinically heterogeneous heart muscle disorders that are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Phenotypes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. There is substantial evidence for a genetic contribution to pediatric cardiomyopathy. To date, more than 100 genes have been implicated in cardiomyopathy, but comprehensive genetic diagnosis has been problematic because of the large number of genes, the private nature of mutations, and difficulties in interpreting novel rare variants. This review will focus on current knowledge on the genetic etiologies of pediatric cardiomyopathy and their diagnostic relevance in clinical settings. Recent developments in sequencing technologies are greatly impacting the pace of gene discovery and clinical diagnosis. Understanding the genetic basis for pediatric cardiomyopathy and establishing genotypephenotype correlations may help delineate the molecular and cellular events necessary to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for heart muscle dysfunction in children.

  13. Chronic Chagas disease: from basics to laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberland, Annekathrin; Saravia, Silvia Gilka Munoz; Wallukat, Gerd; Ziebig, Reinhard; Schimke, Ingolf

    2013-02-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is ranked as the most serious parasitic disease in Latin America and has huge potential to become a worldwide problem, due to increasing migration, and international tourism, as well as infectant transfer by blood contact and transfusion, intrauterine transfer, and organ transplantation. Nearly 30% of chronically-infected patients become symptomatic, often with a latency of 10-30 years, developing life-threatening complications. Of those, nearly 90% develop Chagas heart disease, while the others manifest gastrointestinal disease and neuronal disorders. Besides interrupting the infection cycle and chemo therapeutic infectant elimination, starting therapy early in symptomatic patients is important for counteracting the disease. This would be essentially supported by optimized patient management, involving risk assessment, early diagnosis and monitoring of the disease and its treatment. From economic and logistic viewpoints, the tools of laboratory medicine should be especially able to guarantee this. After summarizing the basics of chronic Chagas disease, such as the epidemiological data, the pathogenetic mechanisms thought to drive symptomatic Chagas disease and also treatment options, we present tools of laboratory medicine that address patient diagnosis, risk assessment for becoming symptomatic and guidance, focusing on autoantibody estimation for risk assessment and heart marker measurement for patient guidance. In addition, increases in levels of inflammation and oxidative stress markers in chronic Chagas disease are discussed. PMID:23045386

  14. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy screening in young athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappoport, W.J. [Arizona Heart Inst., Phoenix, AZ (United States); Steingard, P.M. [Phoenix Suns, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of sudden death during vigorous exercise. Early identification of this abnormality by ECG screening of high-school athletes before they participate in competitive sports helps save lives. (orig.)

  15. Left Ventricular Noncompaction: A Distinct Genetic Cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Favalli, Valentina; Narula, Nupoor; Serio, Alessandra; Grasso, Maurizia

    2016-08-30

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) describes a ventricular wall anatomy characterized by prominent left ventricular (LV) trabeculae, a thin compacted layer, and deep intertrabecular recesses. Individual variability is extreme, and trabeculae represent a sort of individual "cardioprinting." By itself, the diagnosis of LVNC does not coincide with that of a "cardiomyopathy" because it can be observed in healthy subjects with normal LV size and function, and it can be acquired and is reversible. Rarely, LVNC is intrinsically part of a cardiomyopathy; the paradigmatic examples are infantile tafazzinopathies. When associated with LV dilation and dysfunction, hypertrophy, or congenital heart disease, the genetic cause may overlap. The prevalence of LVNC in healthy athletes, its possible reversibility, and increasing diagnosis in healthy subjects suggests cautious use of the term LVNC cardiomyopathy, which describes the morphology but not the functional profile of the cardiomyopathy. PMID:27561770

  16. [Ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, K.; Christensen, A.H.; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to determine the number and distribution of cardiomyopathies as the aetiology of ventricular tachyarrhythmias among patients discharged from the Department of Cardiology, Rigshospitalet. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was a retrospective review of...... patients discharged with the diagnostic codes ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation or premature ventricular contractions with cardiomyopathy as the presumed aetiology. Patients discharged during a period of 6 years and 5 months were included in the study. The patients were characterized by...... disease, gender, age, previous cardiac arrest and treatment with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). RESULTS: 993 patients were screened and 128 patients with cardiomyopathy were identified, corresponding to 13% of the screened patients. 58 (45%) of the patients had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM...

  17. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T.; Hauptman, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  18. Unveiling nonischemic cardiomyopathies with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Niti R; Peterson, Tyler J; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A; Glockner, James; Mankad, Sunil V; Williamson, Eric E

    2014-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a heterogeneous group of myocardial disorders with mechanical or electrical dysfunction. Identification of the etiology is important for accurate diagnosis, treatment and prognosis, but continues to be challenging. The ability of cardiac MRI to non-invasively obtain 3D-images of unparalleled resolution without radiation exposure and to provide tissue characterization gives it a distinct advantage over any other diagnostic tool used for evaluation of cardiomyopathies. Cardiac MRI can accurately visualize cardiac morphology and function and also help identify myocardial edema, infiltration and fibrosis. It has emerged as an important diagnostic and prognostic tool in tertiary care centers for work up of patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This review covers the role of cardiac MRI in evaluation of nonischemic cardiomyopathies, particularly in the context of other diagnostic and prognostic imaging modalities. PMID:24417294

  19. The Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ruti Parvari; Aviva Levitas

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure and a major indication for heart transplantation in children and adults. This paper describes the state of the genetic knowledge of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The identification of the causing mutation is important since presymptomatic interventions of DCM have proven value in preventing morbidity and mortality. Additionally, as in general in genetic studies, the identification of the mutated genes has a direct clinical impact for the f...

  20. Acute gastritis-induced Takotsubo's cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Villablanca, Pedro A.; Sukhal, Shashvat; Ansari, Asimul; Mohammed, Dergham

    2013-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 50-year-old lady presented with epigastralgia, electrocardiogram (ECG) showed T-wave inversions and the echocardiogram low ejection fraction (EF) with apical ballooning. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed gastritis. She recovered with proton pump inhibitors treatment. This is the first case that describes gastritis-induced stress cardiomyopathy. Clinicians should be aware of Takotsubo's cardiomyopathy (TCM) as a possible complication of gastritis.

  1. RATIONAL PHARMACOTHERAPY IN TAKOTSUBO CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marchev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rational pharmacotherapy in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is based on clinical picture and data of functional and laboratory investigations of concrete patient. In patients with hypotension and moderate-to-severe left ventricle outflow tract obstruction inotropic agents must not to be used because they can worsen the degree of obstruction. In these patients beta blockers can improve hemodynamics by causing resolution of the obstruction. If intraventricular thrombus is detected, anticoagulation for at least 3 months is recommended. The duration of anticoagulant therapy may be modified depending on the extent of cardiac function recovery and thrombus resolution. For patients without thrombus but with severe left ventricular dysfunction, anticoagulation is recommended until the akinesis or dyskinesis has resolved but not more than 3 months.

  2. Stimulant-related Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Mike; Riguzzi, Christine; Frenkel, Oron; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a rare but increasingly recognized mimic of acute coronary syndrome. Patients present with angina,ST-segment changes on electrocardiogram (both elevations and depressions),and rapid rises in cardiac biomarkers. Many kinds of stressful events have been associated with TC, but only a handful of drug-related cases have previously been reported. We describe the case of a 58-year-old woman who developed TC 2 days after crack cocaine use, a diagnosis first suggested as bedside echocardiography in the emergency department.Recognition of the classic echocardiographic appearance of TC—apical hypokinesis causing “ballooning” of the left ventricle during systole—may greatly assist providers in the early identification of this condition. PMID:25308824

  3. Trypanocide treatment of women infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and its effect on preventing congenital Chagas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Diana L; Danesi, Emmaria; Olivera, Veronica; Codebó, Maria Olenka; Denner, Susana; Heredia, Cecilia; Streiger, Mirtha; Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2014-11-01

    With the control of the vectorial and transfusional routes of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, congenital transmission has become an important source of new cases. This study evaluated the efficacy of trypanocidal therapy to prevent congenital Chagas disease and compared the clinical and serological evolution between treated and untreated infected mothers. We conducted a multicenter, observational study on a cohort of mothers infected with T. cruzi, with and without trypanocidal treatment before pregnancy. Their children were studied to detect congenital infection. Among 354 "chronically infected mother-biological child" pairs, 132 were treated women and 222 were untreated women. Among the children born to untreated women, we detected 34 infected with T. cruzi (15.3%), whose only antecedent was maternal infection. Among the 132 children of previously treated women, no infection with T. cruzi was found (0.0%) (p<0.05). Among 117 mothers with clinical and serological follow up, 71 had been treated and 46 were untreated. The women were grouped into three groups. Group A: 25 treated before 15 years of age; Group B: 46 treated at 15 or more years of age; Group C: untreated, average age of 29.2 ± 6.2 years at study entry. Follow-up for Groups A, B and C was 16.3 ± 5.8, 17.5 ± 9.2 and 18.6 ± 8.6 years respectively. Negative seroconversion: Group A, 64.0% (16/25); Group B, 32.6% (15/46); Group C, no seronegativity was observed. Clinical electrocardiographic alterations compatible with chagasic cardiomyopathy: Group A 0.0% (0/25); B 2.2% (1/46) and C 15.2% (7/46). The trypanocidal treatment of women with chronic Chagas infection was effective in preventing the congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to their children; it had also a protective effect on the women's clinical evolution and deparasitation could be demonstrated in many treated women after over 10 years of follow up. PMID:25411847

  4. Chagas disease: Central American initiative launched.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    An initiative to interrupt the transmission of Chagas disease in Central America was launched at a meeting held October 22-24, 1997, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Sponsored by the UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), the meeting was attended by government delegates from Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. The initiative was launched within the framework of Resolution 13 of the Meeting of Ministers of Health of the Central American Countries, held in Belize in September 1997. Detailed plans of activities were prepared for each country for the period 1998-2001, for approval by the various ministries of health, while operational, epidemiological, and entomological research priorities were also agreed upon. Research projects to help improve disease control will be sponsored by TDR. The first meeting of the Technical Intergovernment Commission established to meet annually to assess progress in control activities will occur in October 1998 in Guatemala. Vector and infection rate data are briefly presented on each country represented at the meeting. PMID:12348564

  5. Behavioural biology of Chagas disease vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Ricardo Lazzari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselves and even predate the insects that try to feed on them. Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods. These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases. In this review article, we analyse various aspects of the behaviour of triatomine bugs to illustrate how each behavioural trait represents a particular adaptation to their close association with their hosts, which may easily turn into predators. Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology.

  6. A new era for chagas disease drug discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Martine; Chaplin, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical trials investigating treatment of chronic indeterminate Chagas disease with two re-purposed azole anti-fungal drugs, posaconazole and ravuconazole, revealed their inferiority to the current standard-of-care benznidazole and highlighted the inadequacy of the existing pre-clinical testing paradigm for this disease. A very limited number of controlled clinical trials for Chagas disease have been conducted to date. The selection of these compounds for clinical evaluation relied heavily on pre-clinical data obtained from in vitro screens and animal studies. This chapter reviews the evolution of CYP51 as a target for Trypanosoma cruzi growth inhibition and also explores the impact of clinical trial data on contemporary Chagas disease drug discovery. Advances in pre-clinical profiling assays, the current compound landscape and progress towards the identification of new drug targets to re-invigorate research are reviewed. PMID:25727705

  7. DNA analysis in inherited cardiomyopathies : Current status and clinical relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Van den Berg, Maarten P.; Van Tintelen, J. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Most hypertrophic cardiomyopathies and a subset of dilated and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies are familial diseases. They generally show an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and have underlying mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric, cytoskeletal, nuclear envelope, and des

  8. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy : diagnosis, genetic background, and risk management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, J. A.; van der Heijden, J. F.; Dooijes, D.; van Veen, T. A. B.; van Tintelen, J. P.; Hauer, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC), also known as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C), is a hereditary disease characterised by ventricular arrhythmias, right ventricular and/or left ventricular dysfunction, and fibrofatty replacement of cardiomyocytes. Patients with A

  9. Aspectos neurológicos da moléstia de chagas Neurological aspects of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritz Köberle

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Chagas related in more than two 200 cases, what he called "nervous forms" of trypanosomiasis, that is neurological manifestations from central origin (idiotism, infantilism, pseudo-bulbar paralysis, aphasia, cerebellar ataxia, atetosis, espostic or paralytic diplegia, disbasia. At that time Chagas expressed his concepts as follows: "In relation to the frequency of trypanosomiasis nervous forms we have performed many observations which allow us to state that this disease is the one which causes the largest number of organic affections of the central nervous system, in human pathology". We are plenty convinced by Chagas's statement. By experiments on animals of laboratory we have very often noticed a rather varied neurological symptomatology, being worth point out identical syndromes to those observed by Chagas. Our autopsy material non-rarely include chronic Chagas cases presenting a most varied symtomatology. Among them we have named only three cases of discerebral nanism, a rather rare affection in other parts of the world and relatively frequent in our material. The fact which we have demonstrated, i.e., a relatively great decreasing of number of nervous cells in the peripheral system could happen in the central nervous system as well. Provided that there are only two quantitative works on neuron number diminishing in the central nervous system in mice and rats we decline to go into further details about central neuropathies in man. We emphasized the necessity to perform researches on this field by means of intimate collaboration between clinicians and pathologists, as the only way to confirm on scientific basis all that was observed by the panoramic and genial vision of Carlos Chagas.

  10. Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Association with PulmonaryArtery Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Peighambari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy is an uncommon condition constituting 1% -2% of the cases with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM diagnosis. We interestingly report two patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in association with significant pulmonary artery hypertension without any other underlying reason for pulmonary hypertension. The patients were assessed by echocardiography, cardiac catheterization and pulmonary function parameters study.

  11. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  12. Doença de Chagas no Brasil Chagas disease in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio C. Vinhaes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Sumariam-se os dados da Fundação Nacional de Saúde (FNS sobre o estado atual dos vetores da doença de Chagas no Brasil, verificando-se que após vinte anos de controle químico continuado houve franca redução dos índices triatomínico-tripanosômicos, particularmente para esp��cies como Triatoma infestans e Panstrongylus megistus. Em paralelo, dados de sorologia escolar, de internações e de mortalidade pela doença indicam descenso nas taxas de incidência e impacto médico social da protozoose, restando áreas mais preocupantes, como o Nordeste e resíduos de T. infestans. Impõe-se urgente uma vigilância epidemiológica efetiva, a ser realizada por estados e municípios ante o processo de descentralização da FNS.This article presents the current situation for Chagas disease vectors in Brazil, based on data from the Brazilian National Health Foundation (FNS. Over the course of the last 20 years, continuous chemical control has resulted in a clear reduction of triatomine densities and Trypanosoma cruzi in Brazilian dwellings. Results have been particularly promising in relation to Triatoma infestans and Panstrongylus megistus, considered the most important species in the past. In parallel, data from school serological surveys, hospitalized patients, and mortality records show an important decrease in the disease. Nevertheless, some areas of the Brazilian Northeast and some residual foci of Triatoma infestans and Panstrongylus megistus remain as major challenges for public health authorities, requiring effective epidemiological surveillance. States and municipalities are required to assume this task at present, as the traditional Brazilian National Health Foundation is undergoing decentralization.

  13. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies

  14. Cardiomyopathy in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J T; Garner, M M

    2000-09-01

    From 1994 to 1999, 16 captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), from among 42 necropsy cases, were diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. The incidence of cardiomyopathy in this study population was 38%. Fourteen of 16 hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy were males and all hedgehogs were adult (>1 year old). Nine hedgehogs exhibited 1 or more of the following clinical signs before death: heart murmur, lethargy, icterus, moist rales, anorexia, dyspnea, dehydration, and weight loss. The remaining 7 hedgehogs died without premonitory clinical signs. Gross findings were cardiomegaly (6 cases), hepatomegaly (5 cases), pulmonary edema (5 cases), pulmonary congestion (4 cases), hydrothorax (3 cases), pulmonary infarct (1 case), renal infarcts (1 case), ascites (1 case), and 5 cases showed no changes. Histologic lesions were found mainly within the left ventricular myocardium and consisted primarily of myodegeneration, myonecrosis, atrophy, hypertrophy, and disarray of myofibers. All hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy had myocardial fibrosis, myocardial edema, or both. Other common histopathologic findings were acute and chronic passive congestion of the lungs, acute passive congestion of the liver, renal tubular necrosis, vascular thrombosis, splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, and hepatic lipidosis. This is the first report of cardiomyopathy in African hedgehogs. PMID:11021439

  15. Inherited cardiomyopathies caused by troponin mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun-Wei Lu; Xiao-Yan Wu; Sachio Morimoto

    2013-01-01

    Genetic investigations of cardiomyopathy in the recent two decades have revealed a large number of mutations in the genes encoding sarcomeric proteins as a cause of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), or restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Most functional analyses of the effects of mutations on cardiac muscle contraction have revealed significant changes in the Ca2+-regulatory mechanism, in which cardiac troponin (cTn) plays important structural and functional roles as a key regulatory protein. Over a hundred mutations have been identified in all three subunits of cTn, i.e., cardiac troponins T, I, and C. Recent studies on cTn mutations have provided plenty of evidence that HCM- and RCM-linked mutations increase cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, while DCM-linked mutations decrease it. This review focuses on the functional consequences of mutations found in cTn in terms of cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, ATPase activity, force generation, and cardiac troponin I phosphorylation, to understand potential molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms of the three types of inherited cardiomyopathy.

  16. Enfermedad de Chagas congenita en la Ciudad de Salta, Argentina Congenital Chagas' disease in Salta, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Zaidenberg

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la respuesta clínica y serológica a la infección chagásica de 937 embarazadas y sus 929 recién nacidos (RN vivos, grupo I; 4 RN de origen diverso, grupo II y 35 RN derivados de otros centros, grupo III. Las embarazadas se estudiaron con 3 reacciones serológicas; se definió infección cuando 2 o más reacciones eran positivas. En los RN el diagnóstico se confirmó por observación directa del T. cruzi en una muestra de sangre. Los RN con Chagas congénita (RN-ChC fueron tratados y seguidos con estudios clínicos y de laboratorio. Se detectaron 149 embarazadas chagásicas (15.9%, de las cuales se diagnosticaron 6 RN-ChC (4%. En el total de 968 RN estudiados se detectaron 12 RN infectados. El micro-hematócrito fue el método parasitológico de lectura rápida más efectivo para el diagnóstico de infección en nuestra serie. El par de reacciones serológicas específicas constituyó un criterio de mayor seguridad para el control y seguimiento de la infección congénita. Las expresiones clínicas más comunes de infección fueron hepatomegalia, esplenomegalia, ictericia, anemia y prematurez, con distintos grados de asociación. Se concluye que dadas las características clínicas de la enfermedad de Chagas congénita en nuestro medio, se impone como estrategia el diagnóstico serológico para la enfermedad de Chagas en todas las embarazadas y el control y seguimiento de sus RN hasta descartar o confirmar infección congénita.The immune response to Trypanosoma cruzi was studied in our hospital in 937 pregnant women (PW and their 929 newborns (NB, group I; 4 NB from this center not included in the first group, group II and 35 NB derived from other centers, group III. Two positive results among indirect hemagglutination (IHA, complement fixation (CF and indirect hemagglutination (IHA, complement fixation (CF and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF tests were considered as the criterion of previous infection with T. cruzi in PW. The

  17. Perinatal Screening for Chagas Disease in Southern Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Morven S; Rench, Marcia A; Todd, Charles W; Czaicki, Nancy; Steurer, Francis J; Bern, Caryn; Montgomery, Susan P

    2015-03-01

    Perinatal screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in a cohort of 4000 predominantly Hispanic women in southern Texas revealed that Chagas disease occurs with sufficient frequency (0.25%) that targeted perinatal screening should be considered to identify infected mothers and infants at risk for congenital infection. PMID:26407360

  18. Autonomic Findings in Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Martinez, Jose; Katz, Stuart D; Tully, Lisa; Reynolds, Harmony R

    2016-01-15

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) often occurs after emotional or physical stress. Norepinephrine levels are unusually high in the acute phase, suggesting a hyperadrenergic mechanism. Comparatively little is known about parasympathetic function in patients with TC. We sought to characterize autonomic function at rest and in response to physical and emotional stimuli in 10 women with a confirmed history of TC and 10 age-matched healthy women. Sympathetic and parasympathetic activity was assessed at rest and during baroreflex stimulation (Valsalva maneuver and tilt testing), cognitive stimulation (Stroop test), and emotional stimulation (event recall, patients). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and measurement of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation were also performed. TC women (tested an average of 37 months after the event) had excessive pressor responses to cognitive stress (Stroop test: p emotional arousal (recall of TC event: p = 0.03 vs baseline). Pressor responses to hemodynamic stimuli were also amplified (Valsalva overshoot: p <0.05) and prolonged (duration: p <0.01) in the TC women compared with controls. Plasma catecholamine levels did not differ between TC women and controls. Indexes of parasympathetic (vagal) modulation of heart rate induced by respiration and cardiovagal baroreflex gain were significantly decreased in the TC women versus controls. In conclusion, even long after the initial episode, women with previous episode of TC have excessive sympathetic responsiveness and reduced parasympathetic modulation of heart rate. Impaired baroreflex control may therefore play a role in TC. PMID:26743349

  19. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  20. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  1. Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Rodrigues Coura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available From an epidemiological point of view, Chagas disease and its reservoirs and vectors can present the following characteristics: (i enzooty, maintained by wild animals and vectors, with broad occurrence from southern United States of America (USA to southern Argentina and Chile (42ºN 49ºS, (ii anthropozoonosis, when man invades the wild ecotope and becomes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from wild animals or vectors or when the vectors and wild animals, especially marsupials, invade the human domicile and infect man, (iii zoonosis-amphixenosis and exchanged infection between animals and humans by domestic vectors in endemic areas and (iv zooanthroponosis, infection that is transmitted from man to animals, by means of domestic vectors, which is the rarest situation in areas endemic for Chagas disease. The characteristics of Chagas disease as an enzooty of wild animals and as an anthropozoonosis are seen most frequently in the Brazilian Amazon and in the Pan-Amazon region as a whole, where there are 33 species of six genera of wild animals: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Edentata (Xenarthra, Carnivora and Primata and 27 species of triatomines, most of which infected with T. cruzi . These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. In four seroepidemiological surveys that were carried out in areas of the microregion of the Negro River, state of Amazonas, in 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2010, we found large numbers of people who were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection. The majority of them and/or their relatives worked in piassava extraction and had come into contact with and were stung by

  2. Chagas disease in a Texan horse with neurologic deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Laura K; Hamer, Sarah A; Shaw, Sarah; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Auckland, Lisa D; Hodo, Carolyn L; Chaffin, Keith; Rech, Raquel R

    2016-01-30

    A 10-year-old Quarter Horse gelding presented to the Texas A&M University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a six month-history of ataxia and lameness in the hind limbs. The horse was treated presumptively for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) based on clinical signs but was ultimately euthanized after its condition worsened. Gross lesions were limited to a small area of reddening in the gray matter of the thoracic spinal cord. Histologically, trypanosome amastigotes morphologically similar to Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, were sporadically detected within segments of the thoracic spinal cord surrounded by mild lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Ancillary testing for Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., Toxoplasma gondii and Leishmania spp. was negative. Conventional and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of affected paraffin embedded spinal cord were positive for T. cruzi, and sequencing of the amplified T. cruzi satellite DNA PCR fragment from the horse was homologous with various clones of T. cruzi in GenBank. While canine Chagas disease cases have been widely reported in southern Texas, this is the first report of clinical T. cruzi infection in an equid with demonstrable amastigotes in the spinal cord. In contrast to previous instances of Chagas disease in the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and humans, no inflammation or T. cruzi amastigotes were detected in the heart of the horse. Based on clinical signs, there is a potential for misdiagnosis of Chagas disease with other infectious diseases that affect the equine CNS. T. cruzi should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with neurologic clinical signs and histologic evidence of meningomyelitis that originate in areas where Chagas disease is present. The prevalence of T. cruzi in horses and the role of equids in the parasite life cycle require further study. PMID:26801589

  3. Aptamer BC007 for neutralization of pathogenic autoantibodies directed against G-protein coupled receptors: A vision of future treatment of patients with cardiomyopathies and positivity for those autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallukat, Gerd; Müller, Johannes; Haberland, Annekathrin; Berg, Sabine; Schulz, Angela; Freyse, Ernst-Joachim; Vetter, Roland; Salzsieder, Eckhard; Kreutz, Reinhold; Schimke, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies such as idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), Chagas' cardiomyopathy and Peripartum cardiomyopathy present with autoantibodies against G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR-AABs) that agonistically activate their receptors. For the treatment of "agonistic autoantibody diseases" and in particular DCM, the removal of the GPCR-AABs by immunoadsorption (IA) has been studied with convincing patient benefit. To overcome cost and logistics problems of IA, the application of the aptamer BC007 for in vivo neutralization of GPCR-AABs could help. We demonstrate here, that the aptamer neutralized, in vitro, the presently known cardiovascular-pathogenic GPCR-AABs. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, the aptamer demonstrated its GPCR-AAB neutralizing potency in vivo. In the serum of DCM patients, the same GPCR-AAB reduction was achieved when patients were either immunoadsorbed or patient's serum was ex vivo treated with the aptamer. In our view, aptamer BC007 treatment in GPCR-AAB-positive patients would have a comparable benefit as that seen after IA. Not knowing all that interfering with our idea of aptamer-dependent neutralization of GPCR-AABs, the first preliminary steps have been taken for bringing the idea closer to patients. PMID:26584137

  4. Changes in radiocardiohemodynamic data in patients with latent cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is concerned with study of central hemodynamics in patients with congested cardiomyopathy by means of radiocardiography. The data on 26 patients with congested cardiomyopathy and 20 patients of control group are presented. In patients with congested cardiomyopathy exact decrease of cardiac output, increase of general peripheric resistance, radiocardiogram characteristic of cardiomyopathy only are detected. It is concluded that radiocardiography is a simple, reliable, available method giving unbiased presentation of the state of central hemodynamics, which promotes an earlier diagnosis and treatment of congested cardiomyopathy

  5. X-linked cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.J.; Sillence, D.O.; Mulley, J.C. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Two major loci of X-linked cardiomyopathy have been mapped by linkage analysis. The gene for X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is mapped to the dystrophin locus at Xp21, while Barth syndrome has been localised to distal Xq28. XLCM usually presents in juvenile males with no skeletal disease but decreased dystrophin in cardiac muscle. Barth syndrome most often presents in infants and is characterized by skeletal myopathy, short stature and neutropenia in association with cardiomyopathy of variable severity. Prior to carrier or prenatal diagnosis in a family, delineation of the cardiomyopathy locus involved is essential. We report the linkage mapping of a large kindred in which several male infants have died with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There is a family history of unexplained death of infant males less than 6 months old over 4 generations. Features of Barth syndrome such as short stature, skeletal myopathy and neutropenia have not been observed. Genotyping at 10 marker loci in Xq28 has revealed significant pairwise lod scores with the cardiomyopathy phenotype at DXS52 (Z=2.21 at {theta}=0.0), at markers p26 and p39 near DXS15 (Z=2.30 at {theta}=0.0) and at F8C (Z=2.24 at {theta}=0.0). A recombinant detected with DXS296 defines the proximal limit to the localization. No recombinants were detected at any of the loci distal to DXS296. The most distal marker in Xq28, DXS1108, is within 500 kb of the telomere. As the gene in this family is localized to Xq28, it is possible that this disorder is an allelic variant at the Barth syndrome locus.

  6. Multimodality imaging in apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rosario; Parisi; Francesca; Mirabella; Gioel; Gabrio; Secco; Rossella; Fattori

    2014-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy(AHCM) is a relatively rare morphologic variant of HCM in which the hypertrophy of myocardium is localized to the left ventricular apex. Symptoms of AHCM might vary from none to others mimic coronary artery disease including acute coronary syndrome, thus resulting in inappropriate hospitalization. Transthoracic echocardiography is the firstline imaging technique for the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. However, when the hypertrophy of the myocardium is localized in the ventricular apex might results in missed diagnosis. Aim of this paper is to review the different imaging techniques used for the diagnosis of AHCM and their role in the detection and comprehension of this uncommon disease.

  7. O gênero Schizotrypanum Chagas, 1909

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Dias

    1939-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho, em que foram analisados os caractéres de Schizotrypanum e consideradas suas relações com os de outros flagelados digenéticos, acreditamos ter ficado bem demonstrado que este gênero encontra sólidos fundamentos em que se baseie. Schizotrypanum possue caractéres morfológicos peculiares, que o aproximam de Leishmania no periodo de multiplicação e de Trypanosoma na fase sanguinea. Os flagelados pertencentes a esse gênero caracterisam-se não só pela morfologia da fórma de tripanosoma, como pela evolução no organismo do vertebrado. No S. cruzi, como no S. vespertilionis, a multiplicação se processa nos tecidos, constando da divisão binaria das formas intracelulares de leishmania; os tripanosomas sanguicolas não se multiplicam. Nenhum Trypanosoma apresenta no mamífero uma evolução morfológicamente e ecológicamente identica á de Schizotrypanum. S. cruzi aproxima-se dos tripanosomas patogenicos pela morfologia da fórma sanguicola e pela virulencia ás vezes mortal para o homem e diversos animais; deles se afasta entretanto pela evolução no inséto, modo de transmissão e facil cultivabilidade, caractéres biológicos estes que são comuns aos tripanosomas não patogenicos. Em nenhum dos grupos de tripanosomas póde o S. cruzi ser rigorosamente incluido, deles se distinguindo facilmente seja por sua morfologia, seja por sua biologia. O conjunto de caractéres próprios fundamenta perfeitamente a manutenção do gênero de Chagas, indicando-lhe como situação mais adequada, na classificação dos tripanosomídeos de mamíferos, o logar intermediario entre Leishmania e Trypanosoma. A separação do gênero Schizotrypanum é o melhor caso, quiça o unico justificado, dentre as numerosas tentativas para o desmembramento de Trypanosoma. Ela se impõe como medida compreensiva e util para a coordenação dos membros da complexa familia dos tripanosomideos e se justifica á luz dos mais exigentes crit

  8. Does my patient have chronic Chagas disease? Development and temporal validation of a diagnostic risk score

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano do Brasil; Sergio Salles Xavier; Marcelo Teixeira Holanda; Alejandro Marcel Hasslocher-Moreno; José Ueleres Braga

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: INTRODUCTION With the globalization of Chagas disease, unexperienced health care providers may have difficulties in identifying which patients should be examined for this condition. This study aimed to develop and validate a diagnostic clinical prediction model for chronic Chagas disease. METHODS This diagnostic cohort study included consecutive volunteers suspected to have chronic Chagas disease. The clinical information was blindly compared to serological tests results, and a ...

  9. Chagas disease, migration and community settlement patterns in Arequipa, Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Bayer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease is one of the most important neglected tropical diseases in the Americas. Vectorborne transmission of Chagas disease has been historically rare in urban settings. However, in marginal communities near the city of Arequipa, Peru, urban transmission cycles have become established. We examined the history of migration and settlement patterns in these communities, and their connections to Chagas disease transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This was a qualitative study that employed focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. Five focus groups and 50 in-depth interviews were carried out with 94 community members from three shantytowns and two traditional towns near Arequipa, Peru. Focus groups utilized participatory methodologies to explore the community's mobility patterns and the historical and current presence of triatomine vectors. In-depth interviews based on event history calendars explored participants' migration patterns and experience with Chagas disease and vectors. Focus group data were analyzed using participatory analysis methodologies, and interview data were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Entomologic data were provided by an ongoing vector control campaign. We found that migrants to shantytowns in Arequipa were unlikely to have brought triatomines to the city upon arrival. Frequent seasonal moves, however, took shantytown residents to valleys surrounding Arequipa where vectors are prevalent. In addition, the pattern of settlement of shantytowns and the practice of raising domestic animals by residents creates a favorable environment for vector proliferation and dispersal. Finally, we uncovered a phenomenon of population loss and replacement by low-income migrants in one traditional town, which created the human settlement pattern of a new shantytown within this traditional community. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pattern of human migration is therefore an important

  10. Monoamniotic Monochorionic Twins Discordant for Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Dianna; Bouhlal, Yosr; Ursell, Philip C.; Shieh, Joseph T. C.

    2013-01-01

    Occasionally “identical twins” are phenotypically different, raising the question of zygosity and the issue of genetic versus environmental influences during development. We recently noted monochorionic-monoamniotic twins, one of which had an isolated cardiac abnormality, noncompaction cardiomyopathy, a condition characterized by cardiac ventricular hypertrabeculation. We examined the prenatal course and subsequent pathologic correlation since ventricular morphogenesis may depend on early mus...

  11. Celiac disease with pulmonary haemosiderosis and cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Işikay, Sedat; Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Kilinç, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or pulmonary haemosiderosis can be associated with several distinguished conditions. Pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare, severe and fatal disease characterised by recurrent episodes of alveolar haemorrhage, haemoptysis and anaemia. Association of pulmonary haemosiderosis and celiac disease is extremely rare. We describe a case of celiac disease presented with dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis without gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac disease. In addition, vi...

  12. Update in cardiomyopathies and congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Heart Hospital, London, UK and Monaldi Hospital, Naples, Italy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This abstract book contains four reports and all abstracts presented to the Joint Meeting: Update in cardiomyopathies and congestive heart failure, 22-23 September 2011 - Naples, Italy, endorsed by the Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases (WG 21 of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC.

  13. Association of genetic markers with cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karthik

    2015-09-01

    Results: The inter group heterogeneity for ESD and SOD of red cell enzymes and GC system of plasma proteins was found to be a significant value (ESD: and #967;2 =10.2564; d.f. = 2; 0.01>p>0.001; SOD: and #967;2 = 11.1120; d.f. = 2; 0.01>p>0.001; GC: and #967;2 = 15.5044; d.f. = 2; p>0.001, when observed between cardiomyopathy patients and controls. Thus, all the examined groups were deviating from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium indicating a significant association between cardiomyopathy and these red cell enzymes and plasma protein markers. There was a predominant occurrence of Haptoglobin 2 phenotype in patients when compared to controls. Risk estimates show significant association with both ESD and GC systems with an increased risk of 100% and more, indicating that individuals with ESD (2-2 and 2-1 and GC (2-1 phenotypes are more likely to get the disease when compared with the other phenotypes of the ESD and GC systems. Conclusions: Out of seven genetic markers, four markers (ESD, SOD, HP and GC are found to be significant i.e. they show some relation with the cardiomyopathy which influences the disease. Furthermore studies on genetic markers, to be attempted in future, would certainly enlighten us to assess the role of these polymorphic systems in different cardiomyopathies. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(9.000: 2190-2197

  14. Diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Caforio, Alida L P;

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, The ESC Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases proposed an updated classification of cardiomyopathies based on morphological and functional phenotypes and subcategories of familial/genetic and non-familial/non-genetic disease. In this position statement, we propose a...

  15. Prevalence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsung O Cheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ To the Editor: I read with interest the recent article on cardiac troponin T (TNNT2) mutations in Chinese patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) by Wu et al.1 The authors cited a prevalence of HCM of 0.2% in general population, but did not indicate whether it referred to the general population in China or some other countries.

  16. MT-CYB mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole;

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a characteristic of heart failure. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA, particularly in MT-CYB coding for cytochrome B in complex III (CIII), have been associated with isolated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We hypothesized that MT-CYB mutations might play an important...

  17. Clinical and molecular classification of cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cecchi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The term “cardiomyopathies” was used for the first time 55 years ago, in 1957. Since then awareness and knowledge of this important and complex group of heart muscle diseases have improved substantially. Over these past five decades a large number of definitions, nomenclature and schemes, have been advanced by experts and consensus panel, which reflect the fast and continued advance of the scientific understanding in the field. Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited myocardial diseases, which represent an important cause of disability and adverse outcome. Although considered rare diseases, the overall estimated prevalence of all cardiomyopathies is at least 3% in the general population worldwide. Furthermore, their recognition is increasing due to advances in imaging techniques and greater awareness in both the public and medical community. Cardiomyopathies represent an ideal translational model of integration between basic and clinical sciences. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore essential in order to ensure their correct diagnosis and management. In the present work, we aim to provide a concise overview of the historical background, genetic and phenotypic spectrum and evolving concepts leading to the various attempts of cardiomyopathy classifications produced over the decades.

  18. Dissecting slander and crying for justice: Carlos Chagas and the Nobel Prize of 1921.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2013-10-01

    Chagas disease was discovered by Carlos Chagas in 1909. Chagas worked at Oswaldo Cruz Institute, where the bases of experimental medicine were settled in Brazil, and that had no connection with the Faculty of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro. Chagas had several enemies at Oswaldo Cruz Institute mainly because of his election to Head of Service in 1910, and for the position of Oswaldo Cruz Directorship in 1917. Furthermore, Chagas gained enemies at Faculty of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro, which did not like to see the economical political autonomy of Oswaldo Cruz Institute. This allowed the Institute not only to perform top experimental research, but also to take the leadership of research in the country. Chagas was nominated to the Nobel Prize of 1921 in December, 1920. None was awarded the Nobel Prize in that year. He seems to have been evaluated by the Noble Committee of Karolinska Institute from March to May of 1921. At that time, his enemies were denying his discovery of Trypanosoma cruzi, a key point in Chagas' nomination by Karolinska Institute, and giving no epidemiological importance for the disease. By the same way, the obligation of small pox vaccination was tarnishing his public image. Having taken into account the epidemiologic importance of Chagas disease, the strong historical mistake in the process of Chagas evaluation, and the inequity behind all these facts, we insist on a posthumous Nobel Prize for the man who made the most complete medical-scientist discovery of all time. PMID:23410487

  19. Evaluation of VDR gene polymorphisms in Trypanosoma cruzi infection and chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important modulator of the immune response. It acts over several immune cell types where the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed. Due to the high relevance of this signaling pathway, several studies have investigated the possible influence of genes involved in the metabolism of Vitamin D and its receptor in different human diseases. Here, we analyzed whether four single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the VDR gene (rs731236, rs7975232, rs1544410 and rs2228570) are involved in the susceptibility to infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and/or to chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) in a Colombian endemic population for this parasite. Our results showed that the rs2228570*A allele is associated with CCC development (P = 4.46E-03, OR = 1.51). In summary, the data presented in this report suggest that variation within the VDR gene may affect the immune response against T. cruzi, increasing the probability of cardiac complications in infected individuals. PMID:27502545

  20. Interactive Media on Chagas Disease: Development and Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudinei Caetano de Souza

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An interactive media on Chagas disease was developed as an educational tool, on the context of the scientific research and dissemination actions of the National Institute of Structural Biotechnology and Medicinal Chemistry in Infectious Diseases (INBEQMeDI. Different computational resources were used either in terms of hardware and software. The media contains 13 videos that range from 30 seconds to 4 minutes, all with information about Chagas disease, showing the social and economic aspects; the research made by the INBEQMeDI group; different aspects of the disease illustrated by slides arranged in a mobile carousel, and radio programs, with funny skits. The target audience for use of this feature is students aged 10 to 17 years. Teachers of areas of science and biology, through a partnership with the Agency of Education of the State of São Paulo, will be invited to plan a strategy for media use with their students.

  1. Distribution and characterization of canine Chagas disease in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjos, S A; Snowden, K F; Craig, T M; Lewis, B; Ronald, N; Olson, J K

    2008-04-15

    Although acute and chronic cases of canine Chagas disease have been reported from multiple areas in the southern region of the United States, little data are available on current disease occurrence patterns in endemic areas. Therefore, a study to assess frequency, geographic distribution, signalment, and clinical spectrum of Chagas disease in domestic dogs from Texas was conducted. Serology, histopathology, and clinical case records from multiple institutions for the time period 1993-2007 were analyzed. A total of 537 serologically and/or histopathologically confirmed cases were documented. Cases were reported from 48 of 254 counties within Texas, covering all major geographic regions. Forty-eight dog breeds were represented among the cases, primarily in the sporting and working groups. In histopathologically confirmed cases, acute death occurred in 42%, approximately half of which were ecoregions of Texas, affecting a broad range of dog breeds and age groups. PMID:18255233

  2. Chagas Heart Disease Pathogenesis: One Mechanism or Many?

    OpenAIRE

    Bonney, Kevin M.; David M. Engman

    2008-01-01

    Chagas heart disease (CHD), caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is the leading cause of infectious myocarditis in the world. The etiology of CHD is unclear and multiple mechanisms have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of the disease. This review describes the proposed mechanisms of CHD pathogenesis and evaluates the historical significance and evidence supporting each. Although the majority of CHD-related pathologies are currently attributed to parasite persistence in...

  3. A cost-benefit analisys of chagas disease control

    OpenAIRE

    C.J. Schofield; J.C.P. Dias

    1991-01-01

    Chagas disease transmission can be effetively interrupted by insecticidal control of its triatomine bug vectors. We present here a simple model comparing the costs and benefits of such a programme, designed to eliminate domestic populations of Triatoma infestans throughout its known area of distribution over the seven southernmost countries of Latin America. The model has been simplified to require only four financial estimates relating to the unit cost of housing spraying and benefits due to...

  4. Elimination of vector-borne transmission of Chagas disease

    OpenAIRE

    AC Silveira; MC Vinhaes

    1999-01-01

    The control of the vector-borne transmission of Chagas disease in Brazil was organized as a national program in 1975, when two large entomological and sero-epidemiological surveys were conducted in the country in order to identify areas at highest risk of transmission and to guide inerventions regarding the chemical treatment of domestic vectors of the disease. The authors present the baseline data gathered through these studies and compare them with more recent data. The evaluation performed...

  5. Epicuticular lipids induce aggregation in Chagas disease vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Juárez M Patricia; Mijailovsky Sergio J; Girotti Juan R; Figueiras Alicia

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The triatomine bugs are vectors of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Aggregation behavior plays an important role in their survival by facilitating the location of refuges and cohesion of aggregates, helping to keep them safely assembled into shelters during daylight time, when they are vulnerable to predators. There are evidences that aggregation is mediated by thigmotaxis, by volatile cues from their faeces, and by hexane-ex...

  6. Opportunity cost for early treatment of Chagas disease in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine M Ramsey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given current neglect for Chagas disease in public health programs in Mexico, future healthcare and economic development policies will need a more robust model to analyze costs and impacts of timely clinical attention of infected populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A Markov decision model was constructed to simulate the natural history of a Chagas disease cohort in Mexico and to project the associated short and long-term clinical outcomes and corresponding costs. The lifetime cost for a timely diagnosed and treated Chagas disease patient is US$ 10,160, while the cost for an undiagnosed individual is US$ 11,877. The cost of a diagnosed and treated case increases 24-fold from early acute to indeterminate stage. The major cost component for lifetime cost was working days lost, between 44% and 75%, depending on the program scenario for timely diagnosis and treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the long term, it is cheaper to diagnose and treat chagasic patients early, instead of doing nothing. This finding by itself argues for the need to shift current policy, in order to prioritize and attend this neglected disease for the benefit of social and economic development, which implies including treatment drugs in the national formularies. Present results are even more relevant, if one considers that timely diagnosis and treatment can arrest clinical progression and enhance a chronic patient's quality of life.

  7. A Paratransgenic Strategy for the Control of Chagas Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Hurwitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease results from infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This disease remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in central and south America. Chagas disease now exists and is detected worldwide because of human migration. Control of Chagas disease has relied mainly on vector eradication however, the development of insect resistance to pesticides, coupled with cost and adverse health effects of insecticide treatments, has prompted our group to investigate novel methods of transmission control. Our laboratory has been instrumental in the development of the paratransgenic strategy to control vectorial transmission of T. cruzi. In this paper, we discuss various components of the paratransgenic approach. Specifically, we describe classes of molecules that can serve as effectors, including antimicrobial peptides, endoglucanases, and highly specific single chain antibodies that target surface glycoprotein tags on the surface of T. cruzi. Furthermore, we address evolving concepts related to field dispersal of engineered bacteria as part of the paratransgenic control strategy and attendant risk assessment evaluation.

  8. Scrutinizing the Biomarkers for the Neglected Chagas Disease: How Remarkable!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Rosa T.; Waghabi, Mariana C.; Cardillo, Fabíola; Mengel, José; Antas, Paulo R. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers or biosignature profiles have become accessible over time in population-based studies for Chagas disease. Thus, the identification of consistent and reliable indicators of the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with heart failure might facilitate the prioritization of therapeutic management to those with the highest chance of contracting this disease. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent state and the upcoming trends in biomarkers for human Chagas disease. As an emerging concept, we propose a classification of biomarkers based on plasmatic-, phenotype-, antigenic-, genetic-, and management-related candidates. The available data revisited here reveal the lessons learned thus far and the existing challenges that still lie ahead to enable biomarkers to be employed consistently in risk evaluation for this disease. There is a strong need for biomarker validation, particularly for biomarkers that are specific to the clinical forms of Chagas disease. The current failure to achieve the eradication of the transmission of this disease has produced determination to solve this validation issue. Finally, it would be strategic to develop a wide variety of biomarkers and to test them in both preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:27563302

  9. Differentiating cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease from nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy utilizing positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if imaging of blood flow (using N-13 ammonia) and glucose metabolism (using F-18 2-deoxyglucose) with positron emission tomography can distinguish cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease from nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, 21 patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction who were evaluated for cardiac transplantation were studied. The origin of left ventricular dysfunction had been previously determined by coronary angiography to be ischemic (11 patients) or nonischemic (10 patients). Images were visually analyzed by three observers on a graded scale in seven left ventricular segments and revealed fewer defects in dilated cardiomyopathy compared with ischemic cardiomyopathy for N-13 ammonia (2.7 +/- 1.6 versus 5 +/- 0.6; p less than 0.03) and F-18 deoxyglucose (2.8 +/- 2.1 versus 4.6 +/- 1.1; p less than 0.03). An index incorporating extent and severity of defects revealed more homogeneity with fewer and less severe defects in subjects with nonischemic than in those with ischemic cardiomyopathy as assessed by imaging of flow (2.8 +/- 1.8 versus 9.2 +/- 3; p less than 0.001) and metabolism (3.8 +/- 3.3 versus 8.5 +/- 3.6; p less than 0.005). Diagnostic accuracy for distinguishing the two subgroups by visual image analysis was 85%. Using previously published circumferential count profile criteria, patients with dilated cardiomyopathy had fewer ischemic segments (0.4 +/- 0.8 versus 2.5 +/- 2 per patient; p less than 0.01) and infarcted segments (0.1 +/- 0.3 versus 2.4 +/- 1.4 per patient; p less than 0.001) than did patients with cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease. The sensitivity for differentiating the two clinical subgroups using circumferential profile analysis was 100% and the specificity 80%

  10. Chagas disease and globalization of the Amazon La enfermedad de Chagas y la globalización de la Amazonia

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Briceño-León

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of autochthonous cases of Chagas disease in the Amazon since the 1970s has led to fear that the disease may become a new public health problem in the region. This transformation in the disease's epidemiological pattern in the Amazon can be explained by environmental and social changes in the last 30 years. The current article draws on the sociological theory of perverse effects to explain these changes as the unwanted result of the shift from the "inward" development mod...

  11. Cardiomyocyte GTP Cyclohydrolase 1 Protects the Heart Against Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiang-En Wu; Shelley L. Baumgardt; Juan Fang; Mark Paterson; Yanan Liu; Jianhai Du; Yang Shi; Shigang Qiao; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.; Warltier, David C.; Kersten, Judy R; Zhi-Dong Ge

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy increases the risk of heart failure and death. At present, there are no effective approaches to preventing its development in the clinic. Here we report that reduction of cardiac GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) degradation by genetic and pharmacological approaches protects the heart against diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was induced in C57BL/6 wild-type mice and transgenic mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of GCH1 with streptozotocin, and co...

  12. Clinical Features and Outcomes of Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Templin, Christian; Ghadri, J R; Diekmann, J.; Napp, L C; Seifert, Burkhardt; et al

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The natural history, management, and outcome of takotsubo (stress) cardiomyopathy are incompletely understood. METHODS The International Takotsubo Registry, a consortium of 26 centers in Europe and the United States, was established to investigate clinical features, prognostic predictors, and outcome of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Patients were compared with age- and sex-matched patients who had an acute coronary syndrome. RESULTS Of 1750 patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, ...

  13. Insights into restrictive cardiomyopathy from clinical and animal studies

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases that primarily affect the myocardium, leading to serious cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Out of the three major categories of cardiomyopathies (hypertrophic, dilated and restrictive), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is less common and also the least studied. However, the prognosis for RCM is poor as some patients dying in their childhood. The molecular mechanisms behind the disease development and progression are not very clear and the treatment of RCM is...

  14. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting as acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdin, Amr; Eitel, Ingo; de Waha, Suzanne; Thiele, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. It is characterized by a local hypertrophy of the apical segments and displays typical electrocardiographic and imaging patterns. The clinical manifestations are variable and range from an asymptomatic course to sudden cardiac death. The most frequent symptom is chest pain and thus apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can mimic the symptoms and repolarization disturbances indicative of acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26628684

  15. Myocardial fibrosis in desmin-related hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Dai Qinyi; Hong Daojun; Zhang Zhaoqi; He Yi; Jiang Tengyong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Desmin-related myopathy (DRM) is known to cause different types of cardiomyopathy. Late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been shown to identify fibrosis in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. We present a rare case of desmin-related hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, CMR revealed fibrosis in the lateral wall of the left ventricle. CMR is superior to conventional echocardiography for the detection of myocardial fibrosis in desmin-related cardiomyopa...

  16. Unbreak My Heart: Targeting Mitochondrial Autophagy in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kubli, Dieter A.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Diabetes is strongly associated with increased incidence of heart disease and mortality due to development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Even in the absence of cardiovascular disease, cardiomyopathy frequently arises in diabetic patients. Current treatment options for cardiomyopathy in diabetic patients are the same as for nondiabetic patients and do not address the causes underlying the loss of contractility. Recent Advances: Although there are numerous distinctions between Type ...

  17. Infant with cardiomyopathy: When to suspect inborn errors of metabolism?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephanie; L; Byers; Can; Ficicioglu

    2014-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism are identified in 5%-26% of infants and children with cardiomyopathy. Although fatty acid oxidation disorders, lysosomal and glycogen storage disorders and organic acidurias are well-known to be associated with cardiomyopathies, emerging reports suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and congenital disorders of glycosylation may also account for a proportion of cardiomyopathies. This review article clarifies when primary care physicians and cardiologists should suspect inborn errors of metabolism in a patient with cardiomyopathy, and refer the patient to a metabolic specialist for a further metabolic work up, with specific discussions of “red flags” which should prompt additional evaluation.

  18. Assessment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by ECG gated cardiac computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of ECG gated cardiac computed tomography (CT) in 12 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was examined. Six of the 12 patients had hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, including one patient with mid-ventricular obstruction. Three of the 12 patients had hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy, and three had apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was confirmed by the angiocardiogram in all patients. Cardiac CT was performed after intravenous administration of contrast media usually given as a bolus injection. The gantry was set with positive 200 tilt angle. In all patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy except for mid-ventricular obstruction, the hypertrophied interventricular septum in the basal and mid portions was observed, and the left ventricular cavity was narrowed in systole. In a patient with mid-ventricular obstruction, the marked hypertrophied interventricular septum and antero-lateral papillary muscle were observed. In diastole, the left ventricular cavity was narrow and divided into two parts. The apical cavity was completely disappeared in systole. In all patients with hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy, the diffuse hypertrophied interventricular septum was observed in diastole. In systole, the apical portion of the left ventricular cavity was markedly narrow and antero-lateral papillary muscle was hypertrophic. In all patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the marked apical hypertrophy of the left ventricular wall was observed in diastole. It is concluded that ECG gated cardiac CT could estimate myocardial wall motion and thickness and differentiate the types of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy each other. (author)

  19. The pathogenesis of Chagas' disease: when autoimmune and parasite-specific immune responses meet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILENA B. P. SOARES

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease is a major health problem in Latin America, where it constitutes one of the leading causes of heart failure. About one fourth of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals develop chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CChC, the most severe form of the disease. CChC is histologically characterized by the presence of multifocal inflammatory infiltrates in the heart, composed mainly by mononuclear cells, usually adhered to myocytes and leading to myocytolysis, and frequently by interstitial fibrosis. The pathogenesis of CChC is still unclear, despite intense investigations both in human beings and in animal models of the disease. Although tissue parasitism is rare in the chronic phase of infection, an immune response targeted to persistent parasites or parasite antigens is suggested, by some authors, as the pathogenic mechanism of CChC. Other researchers affirm that the lack of correlation between tissue parasitism and intensity of inflammation suggests, along with the presence of autoreactive immune responses, that CChC results from the action of an autoimmune response. Herein we review reports from the literature and our own data, which together indicate, on one hand, the participation of parasite-specific immune responses and, on the other hand, clearly demonstrate the participation of heart-specific immune responses in the pathogenesis of CChC. Moreover, multiple factors may determine whether an individual in the indeterminate form of the disease will develop CChC. The mechanisms by which T. cruzi breaks immunological tolerance to heart antigens are also discussed.A doença de Chagas constitui um grave problema de saúde pública na América Latina, onde é uma das principais causas de problemas cardíacos. A cardiopatia chagásica crônica (CChC, forma mais grave da doença, manifesta-se em cerca de 25% dos indivíduos infectados pelo Trypanosoma cruzi, e é caracterizada, a nível histopatológico, pela presença de infiltrados

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Parga, Jose Rodrigues; Arteaga, Edmundo; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Setor de Tomografia Computarizada e Ressonancia Magnetica Cardiovascular]. E-mail: rochitte@incor.usp.br; Kim, Raymond J. [Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tassi, Eduardo Marinho [Diagnosticos da America S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Sector of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography

    2007-03-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiac disease that causes sudden death in young people, with an incidence of 1:500 adults. The routinely used criteria for worst prognosis have limited sensitivity and specificity. Thus, the estimated risk of evolving to dilated cardiomyopathy or sudden death is somewhat inaccurate, leading to management uncertainty of HCM patients. Therefore, an accurate noninvasive method for the diagnosis of HCM with prognostic value is of great importance. In the last years, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) emerged not only as a diagnostic tool, but also as a study with prognostic values, by characterizing myocardial fibrosis with great accuracy in HCM patients. Additionally, CMR identifies the types of hypertrophy, analyses the ventricular function, estimates the intraventricular gradient and allows the determination of differential diagnosis. Moreover, CMR can uniquely access myocardial fibrosis in HCM. (author)

  1. Mouse Models in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lodder, Elisabeth M.; Rizzo, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a heart muscle disorder characterized by fibro-fatty replacement of cardiomyocytes. The cardinal manifestations are arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, and seldom heart failure. Mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins and their interaction partners have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ARVC and it is now widely accepted that ARVC is a disease caused by abnormal cell–cell adhesion. The mechanism(s) by which mutations in des...

  2. Mouse models in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lodder, Elisabeth M.; Stefania eRizzo

    2012-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a heart muscle disorder characterized by fibrofatty replacement of cardiomyocytes. The cardinal manifestations are arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and seldom heart failure. Mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins and their interaction partners have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ARVC and it is now widely accepted that ARVC is a disease caused by abnormal cell-cell adhesion due to defects in desmosomes. The mechanism(s...

  3. Predictors and prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Paras

    2013-01-01

    Vishalakshi Chavali, Suresh C Tyagi, Paras K Mishra Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA Abstract: Despite our cognizance that diabetes can enhance the chances of heart failure, causes multiorgan failure,and contributes to morbidity and mortality, it is rapidly increasing menace worldwide. Less attention has been paid to alert prediabetics through determining the comprehensive predictors of diabetic cardiomyopathy (D...

  4. Predictors and prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Chavali V; Tyagi SC; Mishra PK

    2013-01-01

    Vishalakshi Chavali, Suresh C Tyagi, Paras K Mishra Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA Abstract: Despite our cognizance that diabetes can enhance the chances of heart failure, causes multiorgan failure,and contributes to morbidity and mortality, it is rapidly increasing menace worldwide. Less attention has been paid to alert prediabetics through determining the comprehensive predictors of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC...

  5. Counselling issues in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, B.; French, J. A.; Jeremy, R W; French, P; McTaggart, D R; Nicholson, M R; Semsarian, C; Richmond, D R; Trent, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    To illustrate the variable clinical presentations and rates of progression in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), phenotypes and genotypes were compared in three FHC families with different genetic defects. In the first family, the FHC abnormality was a protein truncating mutation (Gln969X) in the cardiac myosin binding protein C gene. The second family had a missense change (Asn755Lys) in the same gene. A missense mutation (Arg453Cys) in the cardiac beta myosin heavy chain gene was p...

  6. Noncompaction cardiomyopathy associated with hypogenetic lung

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chang-yan; ZHAO Jing; JIANG Teng-yong; HUANG Xiao-yong

    2007-01-01

    @@ Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is a rare form of congenital cardiomyopathy with a high incidence of cardiovascular complications. It frequently manifests in an isolated form, namely isolated noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium. Not only does noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium associate with other congenital cardiac malformations, but also with other neuromuscular disorders. The purpose of this study was to explore the correlation of hypogenetic lung with myocardial noncompaction in terms of the clinical course of one of our patients.

  7. Diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Matthew N.; Katz, Morgan J.; Alkadri, Mohi E.

    2012-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is an infrequently diagnosed condition with a high incidence of sudden cardiac death. While the only option for cure is orthotopic cardiac transplantation, the use of an implantable cardiac defibrillator can be life saving. Accordingly, the prompt recognition of ARVC is crucial. Fortunately, a definitive diagnosis of ARVC can often be made by a combination of the clinical history and electrocardiogram alone, as illustrated by the present ...

  8. Bovine Model of Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo R. Bartoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs constitute a recent advance in heart failure (HF therapeutics. As the rigorous experimental assessment of LVADs in HF requires large animal models, our objective was to develop a bovine model of cardiomyopathy. Male calves (n=8 were used. Four animals received 1.2 mg/kg intravenous doxorubicin weekly for seven weeks and four separate animals were studied as controls. Doxorubicin-treated animals were followed with weekly echocardiography. Target LV dysfunction was defined as an ejection fraction ≤35%. Sixty days after initiating doxorubicin, a terminal study was performed to determine hemodynamic, histological, biochemical, and molecular parameters. All four doxorubicin-treated animals exhibited significant (P<0.05 contractile dysfunction, with target LV dysfunction achieved in three animals. Doxorubicin-treated hearts exhibited significantly reduced coronary blood flow and interstitial fibrosis and significantly increased apoptosis and myocyte size. Gene expression of atrial natriuretic factor increased more than 3-fold. Plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine levels were significantly increased early and late during the development of cardiomyopathy, respectively. We conclude that sequential administration of intravenous doxorubicin in calves induces a cardiomyopathy with many phenotypic hallmarks of the failing human heart. This clinically-relevant model may be useful for testing pathophysiologic responses to LVADs in the context of HF.

  9. Comprehensive evaluation of radionuclide techniques in differentiating dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyzed significance of radionuclide technique in differentiating dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) from ischemic cardiomyopathy (CAD-CM). The patients with DCM usually show mild perfusion abnormalities and do not have perfusion defects. Perfusion imaging and metabolic imaging is concordant in most patients and reduced wall motion is typically diffuse in DCM. The majority of patients with CAD-CM have perfusion defects and distributed as segmental. The perfusion imaging and metabolic imaging of patients with CAD-CM generally show mismatch and the wall motion abnormality is segmental

  10. Enfermedad de Chagas-Mazza congenita en Salta

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras Silvia; Fernandez María Rosa; Agüero Fernando; Desse Desse Javier; Orduna Tomás; Martino Olindo

    1999-01-01

    Se estudió la infección por T. cruzi en mujeres embarazadas en la localidad de General Güemes, provincia de Salta. La misma fue del 12,3 %. El 8,8% de los recién nacidos estudiados tuvieron diagnóstico de Enfermedad de Chagas utilizando la técnica directa (microhematocrito). Todos fueron tratados con benznidazol a razón de 5mg/kg/día durante 30 dias. Todos presentaron anemia, que fue interpretada como reacción adversa medicamentosa. Se estima que la técnica directa representa la mejor opción ...

  11. Cardiomyopathy in 12-year-old girl with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of a 12 year old girl with Hodgkin's disease is described. In the course of her illness congestive cardiomyopathy developed. The authors discuss many possible etiologies of congestive cardiomyopathy in this case with special referral to the car diotoxicity of antineoplastic drugs. (author)

  12. The Biology of the Triatomine Bugs Native to South Central Texas and Assessment of the Risk They Pose for Autochthonous Chagas Disease Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Edward J; Lawrence, Gena; Gorchakov, Rodion; Alamgir, Hasanat; Dotson, Ellen; Sissel, Blake; Sarkar, Sahotra; Murray, Kristy O

    2015-10-01

    recovered from human habitations, suggests that there is a risk for human exposure to T. cruzi in Texas HSR 8. Because of this, Chagas disease should be considered on the list of differential diagnoses for cases of cardiac arrhythmia, dilated cardiomyopathy, or heart failure in south-central Texas. PMID:26168214

  13. Radiology and pathology correlation in common infiltrative cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infiltrative cardiomyopathies generally pose a diagnostic dilemma as current diagnostic tools are imprecise. Invasive endomyocardial biopsy is considered as the gold standard however it has some limitations. Recently cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is emerging as an excellent technique in diagnosing infiltrative cardiomyopathies and is increasingly being used. Characteristic pathologic and radiologic findings in most common infiltrative cardiomyopathies (amyloid, sarcoid and Fabry's) are discussed and correlated with relative CMR and histologic examples. There is fairly good correlation between the non-invasive radiologic and the invasive histologic findings in common infiltrative cardiomyopathies. Non-invasive CMR with its high sensitivity and specificity has an excellent role in establishing the diagnosis and improving the prognosis of common infiltrative cardiomyopathies.

  14. Patient with Eating Disorder, Carnitine Deficiency and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotino, A Domnica; Sherma, A

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by a dilated and poorly functioning left ventricle and can result from several different etiologies including ischemic, infectious, metabolic, toxins, autoimmune processes or nutritional deficiencies. Carnitine deficiency-induced cardiomyopathy (CDIM) is an uncommon cause of dilated cardiomyopathy that can go untreated if not considered. Here, we describe a 30-year-old woman with an eating disorder and recent percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy (PEG) tube placement for weight loss admitted to the hospital for possible PEG tube infection. Carnitine level was found to be low. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed ejection fraction 15%. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis from a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). She was discharged on a beta-blocker and carnitine supplementation. One month later her cardiac function had normalized. Carnitine deficiency-induced myopathy is an unusual cause of cardiomyopathy and should be considered in adults with decreased oral intake or malabsorption who present with cardiomyopathy. PMID:27159507

  15. Risks of endemicity, morbidity and perspectives regarding the control of Chagas disease in the Amazon Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, in the Amazon Region as elsewhere, can be considered an enzootic disease of wild animals or an anthropozoonosis, an accidental disease of humans that is acquired when humans penetrate a wild ecosystem or when wild triatomines invade human dwellings attracted by light or searching for human blood. The risk of endemic Chagas disease in the Amazon Region is associated with the following phenomena: (i extensive deforestation associated with the displacement of wild mammals, which are the normal sources of blood for triatomines, (ii adaptation of wild triatomines to human dwellings due to the need for a new source of blood for feeding and (iii uncontrolled migration of human populations and domestic animals that are already infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from areas endemic for Chagas disease to the Amazon Region. Several outbreaks of severe acute cases of Chagas disease, as well as chronic cases, have been described in the Amazon Region. Control measures targeted to avoiding endemic Chagas disease in the Amazon Region should be the following: improving health education in communities, training public health officials and communities for vector and Chagas disease surveillance and training local physicians to recognise and treat acute and chronic cases of Chagas diseases as soon as possible.

  16. Genomic African and Native American Ancestry and Chagas Disease: The Bambui (Brazil) Epigen Cohort Study of Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of genetic ancestry on Trypanosoma cruzi infection and Chagas disease outcomes is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We used 370,539 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) to examine the association between individual proportions of African, European and Native American genomic ancestry with T. cruzi infection and related outcomes in 1,341 participants (aged ≥ 60 years) of the Bambui (Brazil) population-based cohort study of aging. Potential confounding variables included sociodemographic characteristics and an array of health measures. The prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 37.5% and 56.3% of those infected had a major ECG abnormality. Baseline T. cruzi infection was correlated with higher levels of African and Native American ancestry, which in turn were strongly associated with poor socioeconomic circumstances. Cardiomyopathy in infected persons was not significantly associated with African or Native American ancestry levels. Infected persons with a major ECG abnormality were at increased risk of 15-year mortality relative to their counterparts with no such abnormalities (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.80; 95% 1.41, 2.32). African and Native American ancestry levels had no significant effect modifying this association. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that African and Native American ancestry have no influence on the presence of major ECG abnormalities and had no influence on the ability of an ECG abnormality to predict mortality in older people infected with T. cruzi. In contrast, our results revealed a strong and independent association between prevalent T. cruzi infection and higher levels of African and Native American ancestry. Whether this association is a consequence of genetic background or differential exposure to infection remains to be determined. PMID:27182885

  17. Urban transmission of Chagas disease in Cochabamba, Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Medrano-Mercado

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a major public health problem in Bolivia. In the city of Cochabamba, 58% of the population lives in peripheral urban districts ("popular zones" where the infection prevalence is extremely high. From 1995 to 1999, we studied the demographics of Chagas infections in children from five to 13 years old (n = 2218 from the South zone (SZ and North zone (NZ districts, which differ in social, environmental, and agricultural conditions. Information gathered from these districts demonstrates qualitative and quantitative evidence for the active transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in urban Cochabamba. Seropositivity was high in both zones (25% in SZ and 19% in NZ. We observed a high risk of infection in children from five to nine years old in SZ, but in NZ, a higher risk occurred in children aged 10-13, with odds ratio for infection three times higher in NZ than in SZ. This difference was not due to triatomine density, since more than 1,000 Triatoma infestans were captured in both zones, but was possibly secondary to the vector infection rate (79% in SZ and 37% in NZ. Electrocardiogram abnormalities were found to be prevalent in children and pre-adolescents (SZ = 40%, NZ = 17%, indicating that under continuous exposure to infection and re-infection, a severe form of the disease may develop early in life. This work demonstrates that T. cruzi infection should also be considered an urban health problem and is not restricted to the rural areas and small villages of Bolivia.

  18. Research priorities for Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a review and analysis of the research landscape for three diseases - Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis - that disproportionately afflict poor and remote populations with limited access to health services. It represents the work of the disease reference group on Chagas Disease, Human African Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis (DRG3) which was established to identify key research priorities through review of research evidence and input from stakeholders' consultations. The diseases, which are caused by related protozoan parasites, are described in terms of their epidemiology and diseases burden, clinical forms and pathogenesis, HIV coinfection, diagnosis, drugs and drug resistance, vaccines, vector control, and health-care interventions. Priority areas for research are identified based on criteria such as public health relevance, benefit and impact on poor populations and equity, and feasibility. The priorities are found in the areas of diagnostics, drugs, vector control, asymptomatic infection, economic analysis of treatment and vector control methods, and in some specific issues such as surveillance methods or transmission-blocking vaccines for particular diseases. This report will be useful to researchers, policy and decision-makers, funding bodies, implementation organizations, and civil society. This is one of ten disease and thematic reference group reports that have come out of the TDR Think Tank, all of which have contributed to the development of the Global Report for Research on Infectious Diseases of Poverty, available at: www.who.int/tdr/stewardship/global_report/en/index.html. PMID:23484340

  19. Chagas y SIDA, la importancia del diagnóstico precoz

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio R. Auger; Rubén Storino; Miguel De Rosa; Oscar Caravello; González, María I.; Edgardo Botaro; Liliana Bonelli; Oscar Rossini

    2005-01-01

    Objetivos: Evaluar las vías de contagio, la reactivación y la evolución de la enfermedad de Chagas en pacientes con HIV. Material y métodos Se incorporaron pacientes internados con SIDA y Chagas reactivo. Se evaluaron la epidemiología, la adicción a drogas, la reactivación de la enfermedad de Chagas y el órgano blanco más afectado, la demora del inicio de tratamiento antiparasitario y la evolución posterior. Se realizaron serologías, estudios parasitológicos en sangre y líquido cefalorraq...

  20. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy precipitated by delirium tremens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agu, Chidozie Charles; Bakhit, Ahmed; Basunia, Md; Bhattarai, Bikash; Oke, Vikram; Salhan, Divya; Schmidt, Frances

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with alcohol withdrawal symptoms, which later progressed to delirium tremens. During hospitalization, she developed respiratory distress with acute pulmonary edema. Electrocardiogram (ECG) showed diffuse ST elevation with elevated cardiac enzymes. Echocardiogram showed estimated ejection fraction of 20-25% with characteristic apical ballooning. After several days of supportive care, the patient showed significant clinical improvement with normalization of ECG, cardiac enzymes, and echocardiographic findings. Coronary angiogram revealed no coronary abnormalities. Although Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been associated with diverse forms of physical or emotional stress, only a few cases have been described with delirium tremens in the medical literature. PMID:26653700

  1. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy precipitated by delirium tremens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidozie Charles Agu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old woman presented with alcohol withdrawal symptoms, which later progressed to delirium tremens. During hospitalization, she developed respiratory distress with acute pulmonary edema. Electrocardiogram (ECG showed diffuse ST elevation with elevated cardiac enzymes. Echocardiogram showed estimated ejection fraction of 20–25% with characteristic apical ballooning. After several days of supportive care, the patient showed significant clinical improvement with normalization of ECG, cardiac enzymes, and echocardiographic findings. Coronary angiogram revealed no coronary abnormalities. Although Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been associated with diverse forms of physical or emotional stress, only a few cases have been described with delirium tremens in the medical literature.

  2. An obstetric emergency called peripartum cardiomyopathy!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a rare obstetric emergency affecting women in late pregnancy or up to five months of postpartum period. The etiology of PPCM is still not known. It has potentially devastating effects on mother and fetus if not treated early. The signs, symptoms and treatment of PPCM are similar to that of heart failure. Early diagnosis and proper management is the corner stone for better outcome of these patients. The only way to prevent PPCM is to avoid further pregnancies.

  3. Role of hepatitis C virus in myocarditis and cardiomyopathies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Matsumori

    2004-01-01

    Recent nationwide clinico-epidemiological surveys in Japan showed that the occurrence of cardiomyopathies was most frequently seen in the age of sixties, and that cardiomyopathies are important causes of heart failure in the elderly. Viral infection was conventionally considered to cause myocarditis, which resulted in the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recent studies suggest that hepatitis C virus (HCV) is involved in the development of dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in addition to myocarditis. Furthermore, left ventricular aneurysm represents the same morbid state not only after myocardial infarction but also after myocarditis. There were wide variations in the frequency of detection of HCV genomes in cardiomyopathy in different regions and in different populations. Major histocompatibility complex class Ⅱ genes may play a role in the susceptibility to HCV infection, and may influence the development of different phenotypes of cardiomyopathy. If in fact the myocardial damage is caused by HCV, it might be expected that interferon (IFN) administration would be useful for its treatment. Hepatitis patients receiving IFN treatment for hepatitis were screened by thallium myocardial scintigraphy, and an abnormality was discovered in half of the patients. Treatment with IFN resulted in a disappearance of the image abnormality. It has thus been suggested that mild myocarditis and myocardial damage may be cured with IFN. We have recently found that high concentrations of circulating cardiac troponin T are a specific marker of cardiac involvement in HCV infection. By measuring cardiac troponin T in patients with HCV infection, the prevalence of cardiac involvement in HCV infection will be clarified. We are proposing a collaborative work on a global network on myocarditis/cardiomyopathies due to HCV infection. (J Geriatr Cardiol 2004;1(2):83-89. )

  4. The Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruti Parvari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure and a major indication for heart transplantation in children and adults. This paper describes the state of the genetic knowledge of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. The identification of the causing mutation is important since presymptomatic interventions of DCM have proven value in preventing morbidity and mortality. Additionally, as in general in genetic studies, the identification of the mutated genes has a direct clinical impact for the families and population involved. Identifying causative mutations immediately amplifies the possibilities for disease prevention through carrier screening and prenatal testing. This often lifts a burden of social isolation from affected families, since healthy family members can be assured of having healthy children. Identification of the mutated genes holds the potential to lead to the understanding of disease etiology, pathophysiology, and therefore potential therapy. This paper presents the genetic variations, or disease-causing mutations, contributing to the pathogenesis of hereditary DCM, and tries to relate these to the functions of the mutated genes.

  5. Inhibition of Autoimmune Chagas-Like Heart Disease by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guimaro, M.C.; Alves, R. J. V.; Rose, E.; Sousa, A.O.; Rosa, A.D.; Hecht, M.M.; Sousa, M.V.; Andrade, R.R.; Vital, T.; Plachý, Jiří; Nitz, N.; Hejnar, Jiří; Gomes, C.C.; Teixeira, A.R.L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 12 (2014). ISSN 1935-2735 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Chagas disease * inbred chicken * adoptive transfer of immunity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.446, year: 2014

  6. Acute peritonitis as the first presentation of valvular cardiomyopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Higgins, Nikki

    2012-02-01

    Valvular cardiomyopathy can present a diagnostic challenge in the absence of overt cardiac symptoms. This report describes the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with acute peritonitis associated with vomiting and abdominal distension. Subsequent abdominal computed tomography and ultrasound revealed bibasal pleural effusions, ascites, and normal ovaries. An echocardiogram revealed that all cardiac chambers were dilated with a global decrease in contractility and severe mitral, tricuspid, and aortic regurgitation. A diagnosis of cardiomyopathy with acute heart failure, secondary to valvular heart disease, was secured. Acute peritonitis as the presenting feature of valvular cardiomyopathy is a rare clinical entity.

  7. Leptin levels in different forms of Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fernandes

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is produced primarily by adipocytes. Although originally associated with the central regulation of satiety and energy metabolism, increasing evidence indicates that leptin may be an important mediator in cardiovascular pathophysiology. The aim of the present study was to investigate plasma leptin levels in patient with Chagas' heart disease and their relation to different forms of the disease. We studied 52 chagasic patients and 30 controls matched for age and body mass index. All subjects underwent anthropometric, leptin and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP measurements and were evaluated by echocardiography, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG, and chest X-ray. All patients had fasting blood samples taken between 8:00 and 9:00 am. Chagasic patients were divided into 3 groups: group I (indeterminate form, IF group consisted of 24 subjects with 2 positive serologic reactions for Chagas' disease and no cardiac involvement as evaluated by chest X-rays, ECG and two-dimensional echocardiography; group II (showing ECG abnormalities and normal left ventricular systolic function, ECG group consisted of 14 patients; group III consisted of 14 patients with congestive heart failure (CHF group and left ventricular dysfunction. Serum leptin levels were significantly lower (P < 0.001 in the CHF group (1.4 ± 0.8 ng/mL when compared to the IF group (5.3 ± 5.3 ng/mL, ECG group (9.7 ± 10.7 ng/mL, and control group (8.1 ± 7.8 ng/mL. NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001 in the CHF group (831.8 ± 800.1 pg/mL when compared to the IF group (53.2 ± 33.3 pg/mL, ECG group (83.3 ± 57.4 pg/mL, and control group (32 ± 22.7 pg/mL. Patients with Chagas' disease and an advanced stage of CHF have high levels of NT-ProBNP andlow plasma levels of leptin. One or more leptin-suppressing mechanisms may operate in chagasic patients.

  8. Acute Chagas' cardiopathy in a polar bear (Ursus maritimus in Guadalajara, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime-Andrade G. J.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 24 year old female polar bear (Ursus maritimus who contracted Chagas' infection at the Guadalajara Zoo, in Jalisco, México, and died of acute Chagas' carditis 15 days later. The histopathological findings are described, as well as the presence of triatomines (Triatoma longipennis Usinger infected with Trypanosoma cruzi collected within 5 meters from the place where the animal lived in the city of Guadalajara.

  9. High Interleukin 17 Expression Is Correlated With Better Cardiac Function in Human Chagas Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, Luisa M. D.; Villani, Fernanda N. A.; Nunes, Maria do Carmo P.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Rocha, Manoel O. C.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) is associated with the indeterminate or cardiac clinical forms of Chagas disease and whether IL-17 expression can be correlated with patients' cardiac function. Our results demonstrated that cardiac Chagas patients have a lower intensity of expression of IL-17 by total lymphocytes and lower frequency of circulating T helper 17 cells. Correlative analysis showed that high IL-17 expression was associated wit...

  10. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcript...

  11. Aortic distensibility measured by pulse-wave velocity is not modified in patients with Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arteaga Edmundo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental studies demonstrate that infection with trypanosoma cruzi causes vasculitis. The inflammatory lesion process could hypothetically lead to decreased distensibility of large and small arteries in advanced Chagas' disease. We tested this hypothesis. Methods and results We evaluated carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV in 53 Chagas' disease patients compared with 31 healthy volunteers (control group. The 53 patients were classified into 3 groups: 1 16 with indeterminate form of Chagas' disease; 2 18 with Chagas' disease, electrocardiographic abnormalities, and normal systolic function; 3 19 with Chagas' disease, systolic dysfunction, and mild-to-moderate congestive heart failure. No difference was noted between the 4 groups regarding carotid-femoral PWV (8.4 ± 1.1 vs 8.2 ± 1.5 vs 8.2 ± 1.4 vs 8.7 ± 1.6 m/s, P = 0.6 or pulse pressure (39.5 ± 7.6 vs 39.3 ± 8.1 vs 39.5 ± 7.4 vs 39.7 ± 6.9 mm Hg, P = 0.9. A positive, significant, similar correlation occurred between PWV and age in patients with Chagas' disease (r = 0.42, P = 0.002, in controls (r = 0.48, P = 0.006, and also between PWV and systolic blood pressure in both groups (patients with Chagas' disease, r = 0.38, P = 0.005; healthy subjects, r = 0.36, P = 0.043. Conclusion Carotid femoral pulse-wave velocity is not modified in patients with Chagas' disease, suggesting that elastic properties of large arteries are not affected in this disorder.

  12. The potential for emergence of Chagas disease in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Click Lambert

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available To determine the risk for Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis in the United States, the characteristics that make the triatomine vector effective and the areas most at risk for transmission were delineated. In addition, the status of Chagas disease awareness among physicians in areas with a potential risk for the disease was determined. A geographical information system (GIS was used to analyze three triatomine species within the United States known to harbor Trypanosoma cruzi and that exhibit qualities of domesticity. An analysis of the minimum temperature threshold for increased triatomine activity delineates the current population at increased risk, and by incorporating temperature predictions for 2030, the population at risk under a future climate scenario was also delineated. Considering both environmental and social factors, a vignette-based physician survey, based on the results of the GIS analysis, was used to gauge the level of awareness of Chagas disease within the delineated higher risk range. The current area at increased risk for Chagas disease includes much of the southern United States, and the higher risk range is expected to expand into the central United States based upon the 1°C (1.8°F increase in temperature predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC by the year 2030. Survey results indicate a limited consideration of Chagas disease during differential diagnosis, illustrating that the low number of Chagas disease cases discovered in the United States may be attributable to a lack of disease awareness as opposed to a lack of disease threat. This study combines GIS and survey analyses to evaluate the role that temperature variability and disease awareness among physicians play in the potential emergence of Chagas disease in the United States. This approach indicates that there is a potential for Chagas disease to emerge in the United States.

  13. Ecological aspects of the vectorial control of Chagas' disease in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    João Carlos P. Dias

    1994-01-01

    The feasibility and most important ecological aspects of vectorial Chagas' disease control are discussed. The spread and maintenance of this disease involve multiple ecological and sociopolitical factors that must be taken into account when control programs are planned, executed and evaluated. In spite of its complexity, Chagas disease can be controlled using methods that target specific mechanisms of transmission, the most important being vectorial and transfusional. Major ecological problem...

  14. Mapping of Chagas disease research: analysis of publications in the period between 1940 and 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Ramos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Publications are often used as a measure of success in research work. Chagas disease occurs in Central and Southern America. However, during the past years, the disease has been occurring outside Latin America due to migration from endemic zones. This article describes a bibliometric review of the literature on Chagas disease research indexed in PubMed during a 70-year period. METHODS: Medline was used via the PubMed online service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine from 1940 to 2009. The search strategy was: Chagas disease [MeSH] OR Trypanosoma cruzi [MeSH]. RESULTS: A total of 13,989 references were retrieved. The number of publications increased steadily over time from 1,361 (1940-1969 to 5,430 (2000-2009 (coefficient of determination for linear fit, R²=0.910. Eight journals contained 25% of the Chagas disease literature. Of the publications, 64.2% came from endemic countries. Brazil was the predominant country (37%, followed by the United States (17.6% and Argentina (14%. The ranking in production changed when the number of publications was normalized by estimated cases of Chagas disease (Panama and Uruguay, population (Argentina and Uruguay, and gross domestic product (Bolivia and Brazil. CONCLUSIONS: Several Latin American countries, where the prevalence of T. cruzi infection was not very high, were the main producers of the Chagas disease literature, after adjusting for economic and population indexes. The countries with more estimated cases of Chagas disease produced less research on Chagas disease than some developed countries.

  15. [Left ventricular hypertrophy in the cat - "when hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is not hypertrophic cardiomyopathy"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaus, T; Wess, G

    2010-07-01

    According to WHO classification hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary genetic cardiomyopathy. Echocardiographically HCM is characterized by symmetric, asymmetric or focal left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) without recognizable underlying physical cause. However, echocardiographically HCM in cats may not be distinguishable from other causes of a thick appearing left ventricle. Hypovolemia can look like a hypertrophied ventricle but is basically only pseudohypertrophic. Well recognized and logical physical causes of LVH include systemic hypertension and outflow obstruction. LVH similar to HCM may also be found in feline hyperthyroidism. The context of the disease helps to differentiate these physical / physiological causes of LVH. Difficult to distinguish from HCM, particularly when based on a snapshot of a single echocardiographic exam, are myocarditis and . Only the clinical and echocardiographic course allow a reasonably confident etiological diagnosis and the differentiation between HCM and secondary LVH. PMID:20582898

  16. Does my patient have chronic Chagas disease? Development and temporal validation of a diagnostic risk score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano do Brasil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION With the globalization of Chagas disease, unexperienced health care providers may have difficulties in identifying which patients should be examined for this condition. This study aimed to develop and validate a diagnostic clinical prediction model for chronic Chagas disease. METHODS This diagnostic cohort study included consecutive volunteers suspected to have chronic Chagas disease. The clinical information was blindly compared to serological tests results, and a logistic regression model was fit and validated. RESULTS The development cohort included 602 patients, and the validation cohort included 138 patients. The Chagas disease prevalence was 19.9%. Sex, age, referral from blood bank, history of living in a rural area, recognizing the kissing bug, systemic hypertension, number of siblings with Chagas disease, number of relatives with a history of stroke, ECG with low voltage, anterosuperior divisional block, pathologic Q wave, right bundle branch block, and any kind of extrasystole were included in the final model. Calibration and discrimination in the development and validation cohorts (ROC AUC 0.904 and 0.912, respectively were good. Sensitivity and specificity analyses showed that specificity reaches at least 95% above the predicted 43% risk, while sensitivity is at least 95% below the predicted 7% risk. Net benefit decision curves favor the model across all thresholds. CONCLUSIONS: A nomogram and an online calculator (available at http://shiny.ipec.fiocruz.br:3838/pedrobrasil/chronic_chagas_disease_prediction/ were developed to aid in individual risk estimation.

  17. Chagas disease: What is known and what should be improved: a systemic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study consists of a broad review on what is known and what should be improved regarding knowledge of Chagas disease, not only through analysis on the main studies published on the topics discussed, but to a large extent based on experience of this subject, acquired over the past 50 years (1961-2011. Among the subjects covered, we highlight the pathogenesis and evolution of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, drugs in use and new strategies for treating Chagas disease; the serological tests for the diagnosis and the controls of cure the infection; the regional variations in prevalence, morbidity and response to treatment of the disease; the importance of metacyclogenesis of T. cruzi in different species of triatomines and its capacity to transmit Chagas infection; the risks of adaptation of wild triatomines to human dwellings; the morbidity and need for a surveillance and control program for Chagas disease in the Amazon region and the need to prioritize initiatives for controlling Chagas disease in Latin America and Mexico and in non-endemic countries, which is today a major international dilemma. Finally, we raise the need for to create a new initiative for controlling Chagas disease in the Gran Chaco, which involves parts of Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay.

  18. Chagas disease and transfusion medicine: a perspective from non-endemic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angheben, Andrea; Boix, Lucia; Buonfrate, Dora; Gobbi, Federico; Bisoffi, Zeno; Pupella, Simonetta; Gandini, Giorgio; Aprili, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    In the last decades, increasing international migration and travel from Latin America to Europe have favoured the emergence of tropical diseases outside their "historical" boundaries. Chagas disease, a zoonosis endemic in rural areas of Central and South America represents a clear example of this phenomenon. In the absence of the vector, one of the potential modes of transmission of Chagas disease in non-endemic regions is through blood and blood products. As most patients with Chagas disease are asymptomatic and unaware of their condition, in case of blood donation they can inadvertently represent a serious threat to the safety of the blood supply in non-endemic areas. Since the first cases of transfusion-transmitted Chagas disease were described in the last years, non-endemic countries began to develop ad hoc strategies to prevent and control the spread of the infection. United States, Spain, United Kingdom and France first recognised the need for Trypanosoma cruzi screening in at-risk blood donors. In this review, we trace an up-to-date perspective on Chagas disease, describing its peculiar features, from epidemiological, pathological, clinical and diagnostic points of view. Moreover, we describe the possible transmission of Chagas disease through blood or blood products and the current strategies for its control, focusing on non-endemic areas. PMID:26513769

  19. Urban Chagas disease in children and women in primary care centres in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Moscatelli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of this disease in women of childbearing age and children treated at health centres in underserviced areas of the city of Buenos Aires. Demographic and Chagas disease status data were collected. Samples for Chagas disease serology were obtained on filter paper and the reactive results were confirmed with conventional samples. A total of 1,786 subjects were screened and 73 positive screening results were obtained: 17 were from children and 56 were from women. The Trypanosoma cruziinfection risk was greater in those individuals who had relatives with Chagas disease, who remember seeing kissing bugs, who were of Bolivian nationality or were born in the Argentine province of Santiago del Estero. The overall prevalence of Chagas disease was 4.08%. Due to migration, Chagas disease is currently predominantly urban. The observed prevalence requires health programme activities that are aimed at urban children and their mothers. Most children were infected congenitally, which reinforces the need for Chagas disease screening of all pregnant women and their babies in Argentina. The active search for new cases is important because the appropriate treatment in children has a high cure rate.

  20. A cost-benefit analisys of chagas disease control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Schofield

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease transmission can be effetively interrupted by insecticidal control of its triatomine bug vectors. We present here a simple model comparing the costs and benefits of such a programme, designed to eliminate domestic populations of Triatoma infestans throughout its known area of distribution over the seven southernmost countries of Latin America. The model has been simplified to require only four financial estimates relating to the unit cost of housing spraying and benefits due to avoidance of premature death in the acute phase of the disease, avoidance of supportive treatment and care in the chronic phase of the disease, and avoidance of corrective digestive and cardiac surgery. Exceptfor these direct medical costs, al other potential benefits have been ignored. Nevertheless, the model shows that the direct financial benefits of such a programme would far outweigh the costs, and the project would support a remarkably high internal rate of return under the least optimistic estimates.

  1. Cerebral evoked potentials in human chronic Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Genovese

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available Seventy five patients with the diagnosis of chronic Chagas' disease were studied by employing EPs techniques. Two of them had delayed arrival of the signal to the Erb's point and one to the spinal cord when looking at SEPs. TWo patients had increment of the time interval between waves 1st and IIIrd, when studying PEATs. These findings were interpreted as due to peripheral nerve fibers damage, a feature described in previous papers. The, most striking finding was the prolonged time interval between waves N13 and N20 (SEPs found in two patients and between waves IIIrd and Vth (PEAT seen in 7 affected subjects. These observations suggested the development of some sort of CNS involvement, perhaps related to myelin damage, in patients who reached the chronic state of the infection.

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis in Chagas' disease vectors control interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Oliveira Filho

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available After a large scale field trial performed in central Brazil envisaging the control of Chagas' disease vectors in an endemic area colonized by Triatoma infestans and T. sordida the cost-effectiveness analysis for each insecticide/formulation was performed. It considered the operational costs and the prices of insecticides and formulations, related to the activity and persistence of each one. The end point was considered to be less than 90% of domicilliary unitis (house + annexes free of infestation. The results showed good cost-effectiveness for a slow-release emulsifiable suspension (SRES based on PVA and containing malathion as active ingredient, as well as for the pyrethroids tested in this assay-cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and permethrin.

  3. [Association of encephalic vascular accidents and Chagas disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, E R; Marquez, J O; da Costa Neto, B; Menezes, A A; Chapadeiro, M E

    1991-01-01

    The frequency of strokes was studied in chronic chagasic and years of age, non-chagasic patients, older than 15 coming to necropsy in Uberaba, from 1979 than 1988. The study consisted of paired sex and age matched controls. Two hundred and eight pairs were analysed. Either ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes were found in 41 (19.7%) of the chagasics and in 55 (26.4%) of the non-chagasic, a difference not significant at the level of 5%. Twelve (75%) of the former had infarcts and 4 (25%) had brain hemorrhage; five (31.3%) of the non-chagasics had ischemic strokes and 11 (68.7%) had hemorrhagic strokes. The differences were significant to the level of 5%. The results indicate a high frequency of ischemic strokes in human Chagas' disease and demonstrate a lesser frequency of hemorrhagic stroke in chagasics when compared with non-chagasics. PMID:1841424

  4. Radioisotopic exploration of patients suffering from chronic Chagas' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of Chagas' disease - a histic and haematic parasitosis endemic in extensive areas of Latin America, with 60 million people exposed to it and 20 million infected - stems from the high sickness and mortality rates affecting mainly rural and fringe populations. Nevertheless, progressive urbanization of the disease due to population migration and blood transfusion is being observed. The authors studied 56 cases of patients with Chagas' disease, 45 of whom were detected asymptomatically when donating blood by immunoserological reactions involving complement fixation and haemagglutination. Radiotracers were used to explore ventricular function in 56 cases; oesophageal transit in 29 cases; the upper urinary tract in 25 cases; and bladder function in 22 cases. All four procedures were applied to 19 patients. In 40 patients a study was made of the left and right ventricular function, the left being found altered in 17% of the cases, the right ventricular function in 22% and both in 25%. In 26 cases (65%) anomalies were encountered in at least one of the two ventricles. Oesophageal transit was altered in 20 patients, 16 of them asymptomatically. In 6 of them it was prolonged, in 4 it was adynamic and in 10 cases uncoordinated. The upper urinary tract showed abnormalities (pyelic dilation, pyelo-ureteral dyskinesia, ureteral dyskinesia, ureteral dilation and/or vesico-ureteral reflux) in 22 patients, in all cases asymptomatically. Bladder function was abnormal in 18 asymptomatic patients, basically represented by a residual decompensated cystopathy with a hypotonicity of different degrees. Of the 45 patients without symptoms detected when donating blood, there was alteration of ventricular function in 49%, of oesophageal transit in 68%, of the upper urinary tract in 90%, and of bladder function in 78%, with an overall figure of 66% abnormal examinations from 106 radioisotopic studies

  5. New ECG Criteria in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.P.J. Cox; J.J. van der Smagt; A.A.M. Wilde; A.C.P. Wiesfeld; D.E. Atsma; M.R. Nelen; L.M. Rodriguez; P. Loh; M.J. Cramer; P.A. Doevendans; J.P. van Tintelen; J.M.T. de Bakker; R.N.W. Hauer

    2009-01-01

    Background-Desmosomal changes, electric uncoupling, and surviving myocardial bundles in fibrofatty tissue characterize arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C). Resultant activation delay is pivotal for reentry and thereby ventricular tachycardia (VT). Current task force cr

  6. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy ...

  7. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy ...

  8. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All ...

  9. X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Cardiospecific Phenotype of Dystrophinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Nakamura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM is a distinct phenotype of dystrophinopathy characterized by preferential cardiac involvement without any overt skeletal myopathy. XLDCM is caused by mutations of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD gene and results in lethal heart failure in individuals between 10 and 20 years. Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, an allelic disorder, have a milder phenotype of skeletal muscle involvement compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and sometimes present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The precise relationship between mutations in the DMD gene and cardiomyopathy remain unclear. However, some hypothetical mechanisms are being considered to be associated with the presence of some several dystrophin isoforms, certain reported mutations, and an unknown dystrophin-related pathophysiological mechanism. Recent therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the severe dystrophinopathy phenotype, appears promising, but the presence of XLDCM highlights the importance of focusing on cardiomyopathy while elucidating the pathomechanism and developing treatment.

  10. Advanced quantitative echocardiography in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hastrup Svendsen, Jesper; Sogaard, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular (RV) cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a regional disease of the RV myocardium with variable degrees of left ventricular involvement. Three-dimensional echocardiography and Doppler tissue imaging (DTI) are new echocardiographic modalities for the evaluation of ...

  11. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Isoproterenol-induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure rats (SHHFs) take far longer to develop compensated heart failure and congestive decompensation than common surgical models of heart failure. Isoproterenol (ISO) infusion can accelerate cardiomyopathy in young SHHFs, while dietary salt loa...

  12. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. RARE CASES OF HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY: VARIANTS AND CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Zimina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy belongs to a group of hereditary diseases due to sarcomere gene mutation. This abnormality is characterized by the development of symmetric or asymmetric hypertrophy of left ventricular myocardium with its normal contractile function or hypercontractility. Authors provide a brief overview of variants of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and phenocopies of this disease, when structural changes in the heart are not the result of classic sarcomere gene mutation. In patients with some phenocopies concentric left ventricular hypertrophy can transform into its dilatation with reduced contractility. Such variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is presented in the first clinical observation. The second case shows that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be one of the symptoms of the disease with other reasons for poor outcome.

  15. Genetic Aspects and Family Studies of Noncompaction and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Hoedemaekers (Yvonne)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe first reports of familial cardiac disorders appeared over 60 years ago. Since then, knowledge on cardiogenetic disorders has increased tremendously. And now cardiogenetics is a rapidly expanding field, including the familial cardiomyopathies, arrhythmias, congenital heart diseases an

  16. Genetics Home Reference: DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on PubMed Cohen N, Muntoni F. Multiple pathogenetic mechanisms in X linked dilated cardiomyopathy. Heart. 2004 Aug; ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  17. Dynamic electrocardiographic changes in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quarta, Giovanni

    2010-04-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities of depolarisation and repolarisation contribute to the diagnostic criteria for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). The development of diagnostic ECG features were investigated in a genotyped cohort with ARVC to provide more sensitive markers of early disease.

  18. Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Ali Eltawansy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 53-year-old female presenting with a new-onset heart failure that was contributed secondary to noncompaction cardiomyopathy. The diagnosis was made by echocardiogram and confirmed by cardiac MRI. Noncompaction cardiomyopathy (also known as ventricular hypertrabeculation is a newly discovered disease. It is considered to be congenital (genetic cardiomyopathy. It is usually associated with genetic disorders and that could explain the genetic pathogenesis of the non-compaction cardiomyopathy. Our case had a history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. There is a high incidence of arrhythmia and embolic complications. The treatment usually consists of the medical management, defibrillator placement, and lifelong anticoagulation. Heart transplantation will be the last resort.

  19. Challenges and opportunities in dystrophin-deficient cardiomyopathy gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2006-01-01

    The last decade has evidenced unprecedented progress in gene therapy of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD and BMD) skeletal muscle disease. Cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in both patients and carriers of DMD, BMD and X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy. However, there is little advance in heart gene therapy. The gene, the vector, vector delivery, the target tissue and animal models are five fundamental components in developing an effective gene therapy. Int...

  20. Treatment of depression in an adolescent with cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanidir, Canan; Tanidir, Ibrahim C; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2015-10-01

    Patients with cardiomyopathy have a higher incidence of mood and anxiety disorders, resulting in greater probability for hospitalisation and increased risk for arrhythmia and death. We report a case of a 16-year-old boy with Danon disease, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, who later developed depression and significant weight loss. The patient was successfully treated for his anxiety and depression with mirtazapine without any adverse cardiac effects. PMID:25400066

  1. Reversible cardiomyopathy complicating intrathecal baclofen withdrawal: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Pizon, Anthony F.; LoVecchio, Frank

    2007-01-01

    This case report is about reversible cardiomyopathy associated with intrathecal baclofen withdrawal. Previous literature has reported that enteral baclofen does not adequately control intrathecal baclofen withdrawal. In our case, coronary atherosclerosis did not play a role in the development of the cardiomyopathy. However, reinstitution of intrathecal baclofen promptly resulted in improvement. One could hypothesize that myocardial stunning from sympathetic hyperactivity led to a similar card...

  2. Development of a preclinical model of ischemic cardiomyopathy in swine

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Ladage, Dennis; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Yaniz, Elisa; Chen, Jiqiu; Tilemann, Lisa; Sakata, Susumu; Badimon, Juan J; Hajjar, Roger J.; Kawase, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    A number of promising therapies for ischemic cardiomyopathy are emerging, and the role of translational research in testing the efficacy and safety of these agents in relevant clinical models has become important. The goal of this study was to develop a chronic model of ischemic cardiomyopathy in a large animal model. In this study, 40 consecutive pigs were initially enrolled. To induce progressive stenosis, a plastic occluder with a fixed diameter of 1.0 mm fitted with an 18-gauge copper wir...

  3. Doxorubicin cardiomyopathy in children with left-sided Wilms tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two children with Wilms tumor of the left kidney experienced severe anthracycline cardiomyopathy after irradiation to the tumor bed and conventional dosage of doxorubicin. The cardiomyopathy is attributed 1) to the fact that radiation fields for left Wilms tumor include the lower portion of the heart and 2) to the interaction of doxorubicin and irradiation on cardiac muscle. It is recommended that doxorubicin dosage be sharply restricted in children with Wilms tumor of the left kidney who receive postoperative irradiation

  4. A Rare Occurance with Epidermolysis Bullosa Disease: Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Derya Cimen

    2014-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a congenital and herediter vesiculobullous disease. Dystrophic form of this disease is characterized by severe malnutrition, failure to thrive, adhesions at fingers, joint contractures related with the formation of scar tissues, carcinoma of the skin, anemia, hipoalbuminemia, wound enfections and sepsis. Rarely, mortal dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in patients. In this report we present a 13 year-old pediatric patient with dilated cardiomyopathy, clinically diagn...

  5. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy – An unexpected complication in spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, Niels; Kühne, Christian; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Hänsel, Bernd; Winkler, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an apical ballooning syndrome, which can be triggeredby stress. Only few case reports describe the onset of Takotsubo as a complication of neurosurgery procedures. Clinical presentation: A case of a 53 year-old female with a spinal neurinoma and surgery-associated Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is demonstrated. The patient developed typical signs of a myocardial infarction with circulation depression and ST elevation, but normal cardiac enzymes at the end o...

  6. Impact of New Electrocardiographic Criteria in Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Richard NW Hauer; Moniek eCox; Judith eGroeneweg

    2012-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) has originally been described as a disorder characterized by fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium, primarily of the right ventricle (RV), and ventricular tachyarrhythmias, sudden death, and at a late stage progressive heart failure. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia or cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) was the previous name of the disease. However, similar histopathologic changes are also found in the left ventricle (LV). AC is also considered a hereditar...

  7. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy: diagnosis, genetic background, and risk management

    OpenAIRE

    Groeneweg, J. A.; van der Heijden, J. F.; Dooijes, D.; van Veen, T.A.B.; van Tintelen, J.P.; Hauer, R.N.

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC), also known as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C), is a hereditary disease characterised by ventricular arrhythmias, right ventricular and/or left ventricular dysfunction, and fibrofatty replacement of cardiomyocytes. Patients with AC typically present between the second and the fourth decade of life with ventricular tachycardias. However, sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be the first manifestation, often at young age in the con...

  8. RARE CASES OF HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY: VARIANTS AND CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    V. Yu. Zimina; G. V. Mislitskaya; S. A. Sayganov; S. D. Dzakhova

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy belongs to a group of hereditary diseases due to sarcomere gene mutation. This abnormality is characterized by the development of symmetric or asymmetric hypertrophy of left ventricular myocardium with its normal contractile function or hypercontractility. Authors provide a brief overview of variants of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and phenocopies of this disease, when structural changes in the heart are not the result of classic sarcomere gene mutation. In patients...

  9. Primary antiphospholipid syndrome, hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and hypotelorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermair, Joerg; Kammler, Juergen; Laubichler, Peter; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder associated with arterial/venous thrombosis. Cardiac manifestations of APS include valve stenosis/insufficiency, coronary artery disease and myocardial dysfunction presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy. In the following report, we present the case of a man with primary APS, hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and hypotelorism-a combination that has not yet been reported in the literature. PMID:27048398

  10. Troponin Ⅰ,cardiac diastolic dysfunction and restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-pei HUANG; Jian-feng DU

    2004-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of heart muscle that are associated with cardiac dysfunction. Molecular genetic studies performed to date have demonstrated that the damage or mutations in several sarcomeric contractile protein genes are associated with the development of the diseases. In this review, cardiac troponin Ⅰ, one of the sarcomeric thin filament protein, will be discussed regarding its role in cardiac function, its deficiency-related diastolic dysfunction, and the mutation of this protein-mediated restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  11. Chagas disease and globalization of the Amazon La enfermedad de Chagas y la globalización de la Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Briceño-León

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of autochthonous cases of Chagas disease in the Amazon since the 1970s has led to fear that the disease may become a new public health problem in the region. This transformation in the disease's epidemiological pattern in the Amazon can be explained by environmental and social changes in the last 30 years. The current article draws on the sociological theory of perverse effects to explain these changes as the unwanted result of the shift from the "inward" development model prevailing until the 1970s to the "outward" model that we know as globalization, oriented by industrial forces and international trade. The current article highlights the implementation of five new patterns in agriculture, cattle-raising, mining, lumbering, and urban occupation that have generated changes in the environment and the traditional indigenous habitat and have led to migratory flows, deforestation, sedentary living, the presence of domestic animals, and changes in the habitat that facilitate colonization of human dwellings by vectors and the domestic and work-related transmission of the disease. The expansion of Chagas disease is thus a perverse effect of the globalization process in the Amazon.El incremento de casos autóctonos de la enfermedad de Chagas en la Amazonia a partir de los años setenta hace temer que pueda convertirse en un novedoso problema de salud pública en la región. Este cambio del patrón epidemiológico de la enfermedad en la región amazónica debe ser explicado por las transformaciones ambientales y sociales que han ocurrido en los pasados treinta años. Este artículo utiliza la teoría sociológica de los efectos perversos para explicar esos cambios como el resultado indeseado del cambio de modelo de desarrollo "hacia adentro", que había existido hasta los años setenta, por otro "hacia fuera" que está orientado por las fuerzas de la producción y el comercio internacional que conocemos como globalización. El art

  12. Superior vena thrombosis with peripartum dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 30 years multiparous female with history of emergency caesarean section 10 days back was referred to us with cough, severe breathlessness at rest, orthopnea with pain in neck and arms. Clinical examination revealed signs of heart failure. Echocardiography showed ejection fraction of 15%, with no right ventricular strain. A diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy was made. Doppler ultrasound of neck veins showed bilateral internal jugular vein thrombosis. Subsequent multislice CT examination showed thrombosis of superior vena cava and both internal jugular veins (with collateral formation) and pulmonary embolism. There were no mediastinal abnormalities on the CT scan. Her thrombophilia screen and CT scan brain was normal. She was managed in collaboration with cardiologist. Following treatment with subcutaneous enoxaparin therapy and warfarin her symptoms of upper limb pain improved. She responded very well to medical therapy for heart failure with marked improvement of NYHA functional class. (author)

  13. Multifactorial QT Interval Prolongation and Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gysel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old woman collapsed while working as a grocery store cashier. CPR was performed and an AED revealed torsades de pointes (TdP. She was subsequently defibrillated resulting in restoration of sinus rhythm with a QTc interval of 544 msec. Further evaluation revealed a diagnosis of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy (TCM contributing to the development of a multifactorial acquired long QT syndrome (LQTS. The case highlights the role of TCM as a cause of LQTS in the setting of multiple risk factors including old age, female gender, hypokalemia, and treatment with QT prolonging medications. It also highlights the multifactorial nature of acquired LQTS and lends support to growing evidence of an association with TCM.

  14. Difficulties in clinical diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi B. Channaiah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a disorder which describes initial left ventricular dysfunction and symptoms of cardiac failure between the late stages of pregnancy and the first five months after delivery. PPCM is a difficult diagnosis to make because it resembles common cardiac issues that are normally experienced during pregnancy. Clinical presentation is representative of cardiac failure and is commonly misdiagnosed until further progression. This disorder is commonly seen in some regions of the world and rare in others. Proper evaluation and rapid treatment are crucial for an effective recovery. Subsequent pregnancies should be evaluated before pursuing. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the difficulties in clinical diagnosis and provide a concise and practical approach to treatment of suspected PPCM. [J Exp Integr Med 2015; 5(2.000: 69-74

  15. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiology,diagnosis and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuo; Komamura; Miho; Fukui; Toshihiro; Iwasaku; Shinichi; Hirotani; Tohru; Masuyama

    2014-01-01

    In 1990,takotsubo cardiomyopathy(TCM)was first discovered and reported by a Japanese cardiovascular specialist.Since then,this heart disease has gained worldwide acceptance as an independent disease entity.TCM is an important entity that differs from acute myocardial infarction.It occurs more often in postmenopausal elderly women,is characterized by a transient hypokinesis of the left ventricular(LV)apex,and is associated with emotional or physical stress.Wall motion abnormality of the LV apex is generally transient and resolves within a few days to several weeks.Its prognosis is generally good.However,there are some reports of serious TCM complications,including hypotension,heart failure,ventricular rupture,thrombosis involving the LV apex,and torsade de pointes.It has been suggested that coronary spasm,coronary microvascular dysfunction,catecholamine toxicity and myocarditis might contribute to the pathogenesis of TCM.However,its pathophysiology is not clearly understood.

  16. CNS disease triggering Takotsubo stress cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Wahbi, Karim

    2014-12-15

    There are a number of hereditary and non-hereditary central nervous system (CNS) disorders, which directly or indirectly affect the heart (brain-heart disorders). The most well-known of these CNS disorders are epilepsy, stroke, infectious or immunological encephalitis/meningitis, migraine, and traumatic brain injury. In addition, a number of hereditary and non-hereditary neurodegenerative disorders may impair cardiac functions. Affection of the heart may manifest not only as arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, autonomic impairment, systolic dysfunction/heart failure, arterial hypertension, or pulmonary hypertension, but also as stress cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo syndrome, TTS). CNS disease triggering TTS includes subarachnoid bleeding, epilepsy, ischemic stroke, intracerebral bleeding, migraine, encephalitis, traumatic brain injury, PRES syndrome, or ALS. Usually, TTS is acutely precipitated by stress triggered by various different events. TTS is one of the cardiac abnormalities most frequently induced by CNS disorders. Appropriate management of TTS from CNS disorders is essential to improve the outcome of affected patients. PMID:25213573

  17. Metabolic remodeling associated with subchronic doxorubicin cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxorubicin (Adriamycin®) is a potent and broad-spectrum antineoplastic agent, the clinical utility of which is restricted by a cumulative and progressive cardiomyopathy that develops with repeated dosing. Fundamental to the cardiac failure is an interference with mitochondrial respiration and inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Global gene expression arrays in cardiac tissue indicate that inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by doxorubicin (DOX) is accompanied by a decreased expression of genes related to aerobic fatty acid oxidation and a corresponding increase in expression of genes involved in anaerobic glycolysis, possibly as an alternate source for ATP production. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether this is also manifest at the metabonomic level as a switch in metabolic flux in cardiac tissue, and whether this can be averted by co-administering the cardioprotective drug, dexrazoxane (DZR). 13C-isotopomer analysis of isolated perfused hearts from male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving 6 weekly s.c. injections of 2 mg/kg DOX demonstrated a shift from the preferential oxidation of fatty acids to enhanced oxidation of glucose and lactate plus pyruvate, indicative of a compensatory shift towards increased pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. Substrate-selective isotopomer analysis combined with western blots indicate an inhibition of long-chain fatty acid oxidation and not MCAD activity or fatty acyl-carnitine transport. Co-administering DZR averted many treatment-related changes in cardiac substrate metabolism, consistent with DZR being an effective cardioprotective agent against DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. This switch in substrate metabolism resembles that described for other models of cardiac failure; accordingly, this change in metabolic flux may represent a general compensatory response of cardiac tissue to imbalances in bioenergetic demand and supply, and not a characteristic unique to DOX-induced cardiac failure itself.

  18. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: diagnosis in an emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mancini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC is a reversible cardiomyopathy characterized by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricle (LV in the absence of significant obstructive coronary disease. In emergency departments the diagnosis remains a challenge because clinical and electrocardiographic presentation of Takotsubo is quite similar to ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. We conducted a retrospective descriptive study on 1654 patients admitted to our emergency department from 2006 to 2009 who had a left heart catheterization for a suspected acute coronary syndrome and among them we evaluated characteristics on admission of 14 patients with a clinical picture suggestive for a TC. All patients were postmenopausal female. Ten patients (71% had preceding stressful events and four patients (29% did not have identifiable stressors. Thirteen patients (93% presented chest pain and one (7% syncope. ST-segment elevation was present in six patients (43%. One patient (7% presented an episode of ventricular fibrillation. All patients presented increased cardiac Troponin T. Initial LV ejection fraction, evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography was 44±10%. Follow-up LV ejection fraction was 61±10%. Six patients (43% had characteristic apical ballooning and eight patients (57% had hypokinesia or akinesia of the apical or/and midventricular region of the LV without ballooning. Coronary angiography was normal in nine patients (64% and five (36% had stenosis <50%. None had complete obstruction of a coronary. Takotsubo syndrome should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients admitted in an emergency department with a suspected diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. Emergency physicians should recognize salient aspects of the medical history at presentation in order to organize appropriate investigations and avoid inappropriate therapies.

  19. Female infant with oncocytic cardiomyopathy and microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS): A clue to the pathogenesis of oncocytic cardiomyopathy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.M.; Krous, H.F.; Eichenfield, L.F.; Swalwell, C.I.; Jones, M.C. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    A infant girl had red stellate skin lesions on the cheeks and neck, and mildly short palpebral fissures. Her skin abnormality was typical of microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS), a newly recognized syndrome consisting of congenital linear skin defects and ocular abnormalities in females monosomic for Xp22. She died suddenly and unexpectedly at age 4 months; the cause of death was ascribed to oncocytic cardiomyopathy. Oncocytic cardiomyopathy occurs only in young children, who present with refractory arrhythmias leading to cardiac arrest. The coexistence of two rare conditions, one of which is mapped to the X chromosome, and an excess of affected females with oncocytic cardiomyopathy is also X-linked, with Xp22 being a candidate region. Overlapping manifestations in the two conditions (ocular abnormalities in cases of oncocytic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias in MLS) offer additional support for this hypothesis. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Chagas' disease in the Amazon Basin: V. Periurban palms as habitats of Rhodnius robustus and Rhodnius pictipes - triatomine vectors of Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Miles

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi infected Rhodnius robustus and/or Rhodnius pictipes were commonly found, in large numbers, in the Brazilian Amazonian palms Maximiliana regia ("inajá", Acrocomia sclerocarpa ("mucajá" and Orbignya speciosa ("babaçu". The common opossum, Didelphis marsupialis, was the animal most frequently associated with triatomine infested palms. R. pictipes, frequently light-attracted into houses from palm trees, was the probable source of an acute case of Chagas' disease in the vicinity of Belém. It is considered that triatomine infested palms are likely to cause some cases of acute Chagas' disease in the States of Amazonas and Rondônia. Possible control methods are suggested.Rhodnius robustus e/ou Rhodnius pictipes, infectados com Trypanosoma cruzi foram comumente encontrados, em grande numero, nas palmeiras Maximiliana regia (inaja, Acrocomia sclerocarpa (mucaja e Orbignya speciosa (babacu na Amazonia brasileira. O marsupial Didelphis marsupialis foi o animal encontrado mais frequentemente nas palmeiras associadas a alta prevalencia de triatomineos. R. pictipes que e atraido pela luz nas residencias de palmeiras vizinhas, provavelmente e a fonte de um caso agudo de doenca de Chagas nas vizinhancas de Belem. Sugere-se que as palmeiras albergando triatomineos poderiam ser relacionadas com infeccoes humanas de doenca de Chagas nos Estados de Amazonas e Rondonia. Sugere-se, tambem, possiveis metodos de controle.

  1. Comparação entre o reagente Chagas-latex e a imunofluorescência no diagnóstico sorológico da doença de Chagas na zona sul do Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Baruffa

    1973-10-01

    Full Text Available Os Autores submeteram 142 amostras de soros de casos agudos e crônicos de Doença de Chagas, já examinados com o Reagente Chagas-Latex, ao exame de Imunofluorescência, obtendo correspondência de resultados em 139 (97,9%. O alto índice de fidelidade, provavelmente devido à ausência na zona de doenças que possam proporcionar resultados falsamente positivos, fez do Reagente Chagas-Latex um método simples e fácil para a triagem sorológica nos casos suspeitos em zona endêmica.142 serum samples from acute and ehronic Chagas Disease, diagnosed by Chagas-Latex Reagent, were examined by Imunofluorescence. Results of both Imunofiuorescence and Chagas-Latex were in concordance in 139 (97,9%. The high concordance rate between the two technics, praibably depending from the absence in the region of endemic diseases causing false positive results, leads to the conclusion that Chagas-Latex Reagent is a simple and easy test for sorological trials in endemic Chagas Disease area

  2. La enfermedad de Chagas en las Américas: una perspectiva de ecosalud Chagas disease in the Americas: an ecohealth perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Briceño-León

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El proceso de transmisión de la enfermedad de Chagas ha estado históricamente relacionado con los patrones de ocupación territorial de los asentamientos humanos. En las áreas rurales puede ocurrir más fácilmente el encuentro del vector, los agentes patógenos y los seres humanos, por las condiciones de la vivienda y la pobreza existente en estas zonas. Los procesos migratorios permanentes o estacionales han jugado un papel igualmente importante en el transporte de los vectores y en la infección de la población en las zonas urbanas. Las nuevas fronteras agrícolas del Amazonas se han establecido nuevas áreas de transmisión de la enfermedad. La atención dada a los bancos de sangre ha permitido disminuir la transmisión transfusional, pero la inmigración internacional ha cambiado la situación epidemiológica, pues en Estados Unidos y España viven miles de enfermos que habían sido infectados décadas antes y no encuentran adecuada atención. Los avances en el conocimiento y el control de la enfermedad son mostrados en el artículo, señalando las limitaciones existentes en cuanto al mejoramiento de las condiciones ambientales y de vivienda de los pobres.The historical processes involved in Chagas disease transmission relate to the patterns and conditions of human settlements, especially in rural areas, due to proximity to forest areas, where both vectors and Trypanosoma cruzi can occur, combined with precarious housing conditions and underlying poverty. However, seasonal and permanent rural-urban migration has played a major role in re-mobilizing vectors, T. cruzi, and Chagas-infected individuals. A new agricultural frontier in the Amazon has led to a new transmission pattern, especially with palm trees located close to houses. Improved blood bank surveillance has decreased transmission by blood transfusions. International migration also plays a role in Chagas disease epidemiology. The United States and Spain, where specific health

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion and cardiac enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion, and 12 patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and abnormal thickening of the septal wall and normal left ventricular dimensions, while the patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy had focal wall thinning (usually involving the apical-septal wall) and dilated left ventricle in addition to hypertrophied heart. The quantitative measurement for cardiac dimensions using MRI was similar to that found on echocardiography in all cases. In addition, inhomogeneous signal intensities at left ventricular wall were observed in 3 cases of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which may suggest the existence of myocardial fibrosis. Gated MRI should be performed for early detection and follow-up of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, since some patients will progress from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to dilated cardiomyopathy. (author)

  4. Subtle abnormalities in contractile function are an early manifestation of sarcomere mutations in dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens J; Colan, Steven D;

    2012-01-01

    Sarcomere mutations cause both dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM); however, the steps leading from mutation to disease are not well described. By studying mutation carriers before a clinical diagnosis develops, we characterize the early manifestations of sarcomere ...

  5. A Genetic Variants Database for Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaag, Paul A.; Jongbloed, Jan D. H.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van der Smagt, Jasper J.; Jongbloed, Roselie; Bikker, Hennie; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; van Tintelen, J. Peter

    2009-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is a hereditary cardiomyopathy characterized by fibrofatty replacement of cardiomyocytes, ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden death. ARVD/C is mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins. However, the pathoge

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion and cardiac enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Nagata, Seiki; Sakakibara, Hiroshi

    1988-05-01

    Gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion, and 12 patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and abnormal thickening of the septal wall and normal left ventricular dimensions, while the patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy had focal wall thinning (usually involving the apical-septal wall) and dilated left ventricle in addition to hypertrophied heart. The quantitative measurement for cardiac dimensions using MRI was similar to that found on echocardiography in all cases. In addition, inhomogeneous signal intensities at left ventricular wall were observed in 3 cases of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which may suggest the existence of myocardial fibrosis. Gated MRI should be performed for early detection and follow-up of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, since some patients will progress from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to dilated cardiomyopathy.

  7. THE ROLE OF PARVOVIRUS B19 IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF INFLAMMATORY CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Shchedrina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of inflammatory cardiomyopathy is discussed. The etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory cardiomyopathy are considered with focus on the role of parvovirus B19.

  8. Echocaridography, electrocardiography, and radiography of cats with dilatation cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and hyperyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The echocardiographic, ECG, and radiographic findings of sequentially examined cats with dilatation cardiomyopathy (DCM, n = 7), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, n = 8), and hyperthyroidism (HT, n = 20) were compared with those of healthy control cats (n = 11). Cats with DCM were easily differentiated from healthy cats by echocardiography and from cats with HCM and HT by a dilated left ventricle at end-diastole with a mean +/- SD of 2.20 +/- 0.36 cm, reduced fractional shortening (2.9% +/- 3.7%), reduced aortic amplitude (0.07 +/- 0.05 cm), reduced left ventricular wall amplitude (0.09 +/- 0.09 cm), and increased E-point septal separation (0.83 +/- 0.29 cm). The cats with HCM were most consistently recognized echocardiographically by increased left ventricular wall thickness at end-diastole (0.75 +/- 0.12 cm). Some cats with HT had abnormal echocardiograms with left ventricular wall hypertrophy. These cats could usually be differentiated from the cats with HCM because of normal or increased ventricular wall amplitude, aortic amplitude, or percentage of thickening of the left ventricular wall and interventricular septum. Left atrial enlargement (left atrial diameter greater than 1.57 cm or left atrium/aorta greater than 1.75) was commonly detected by the echocardiogram in cats with DCM, HCM, or HT. The echocardiogram was helpful in differentiating the type of cardiomyopathy (DCM, HCM, or HT) when plain thoracic radiographs indicated that cardiomegaly existed. The ECG may have indicated incorrectly that there was left ventricular enlargement in some cats with HT, and it did not indicate consistently that left ventricular enlargement existed when present in cats with DCM or HCM. The ECG was a poor indicator of left atrial enlargement in all cats

  9. Pupillary Light Reflexes are Associated with Autonomic Dysfunction in Bolivian Diabetics But Not Chagas Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Anthony; Pajuelo, Monica; Tornheim, Jeffrey A; Vu, Nancy; Carnero, Andrés M; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Camacho, Marilyn; Justiniano, Juan; Colanzi, Rony; Bowman, Natalie M; Morris, Tiffany; MacDougall, Hamish; Bern, Caryn; Moore, Steven T; Gilman, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is common in Chagas disease and diabetes. Patients with either condition complicated by cardiac autonomic dysfunction face increased mortality, but no clinical predictors of autonomic dysfunction exist. Pupillary light reflexes (PLRs) may identify such patients early, allowing for intensified treatment. To evaluate the significance of PLRs, adults were recruited from the outpatient endocrine, cardiology, and surgical clinics at a Bolivian teaching hospital. After testing for Chagas disease and diabetes, participants completed conventional autonomic testing (CAT) evaluating their cardiovascular responses to Valsalva, deep breathing, and orthostatic changes. PLRs were measured using specially designed goggles, then CAT and PLRs were compared as measures of autonomic dysfunction. This study analyzed 163 adults, including 96 with Chagas disease, 35 patients with diabetes, and 32 controls. PLRs were not significantly different between Chagas disease patients and controls. Patients with diabetes had longer latency to onset of pupil constriction, slower maximum constriction velocities, and smaller orthostatic ratios than nonpatients with diabetes. PLRs correlated poorly with CAT results. A PLR-based clinical risk score demonstrated a 2.27-fold increased likelihood of diabetes complicated by autonomic dysfunction compared with the combination of blood tests, CAT, and PLRs (sensitivity 87.9%, specificity 61.3%). PLRs represent a promising tool for evaluating subclinical neuropathy in patients with diabetes without symptomatic autonomic dysfunction. Pupillometry does not have a role in the evaluation of Chagas disease patients. PMID:27044564

  10. Scintigraphy for the detection of myocardial damage in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroso, Enio Roberto Pietra; Rezende, Nilton Alves de, E-mail: narezende@terra.com.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Abuhid, Ivana Moura [Instituto de Medicina Nuclear e Diagnostico Molecular, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-15

    Background: non-invasive cardiological methods have been used for the identification of myocardial damage in Chagas disease. Objective: to verify whether the rest/stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is able to identify early myocardial damage in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease. Methods: eighteen patients with the indeterminate form of Chagas Disease and the same number of normal controls, paired by sex and age, underwent rest/stress myocardial scintigraphy using sestamibi-99mTc, aiming at detecting early cardiac damage. Results: the results did not show perfusion or ventricular function defects in patients at the indeterminate phase of Chagas disease and in the normal controls, except for a patient who presented signs of ventricular dysfunction in the myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with electrocardiographic gating. Conclusion: the results of this study, considering the small sample size, showed that the rest/stress myocardial scintigraphy using sestamibi-99mTc is not an effective method to detect early myocardial alterations in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease (author)

  11. Insights into the clinical and functional significance of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Junqueira Junior

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Exclusive or associated lesions in various structures of the autonomic nervous system occur in the chronic forms of Chagas disease. In the indeterminate form, the lesions are absent or mild, whereas in the exclusive or combined heart and digestive disease forms, they are often more pronounced. Depending on their severity these lesions can result mainly in cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction but also in sympathetic dysfunction of variable degrees. Despite the key autonomic effect on cardiovascular functioning, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease remains unknown. METHODS: Review of data on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease and their potential consequences, and considerations supporting the possible relationship between this disturbance and general or cardiovascular clinical and functional adverse outcomes. RESULTS: We hypothesise that possible consequences that cardiac dysautonomia might variably occasion or predispose in Chagas disease include: transient or sustained arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, adverse overall and cardiovascular prognosis with enhanced morbidity and mortality, an inability of the cardiovascular system to adjust to functional demands and/or respond to internal or external stimuli by adjusting heart rate and other hemodynamic variables, and immunomodulatory and cognitive disturbances. CONCLUSIONS: Impaired cardiac autonomic modulation in Chagas disease might not be a mere epiphenomenon without significance. Indirect evidences point for a likely important role of this alteration as a primary predisposing or triggering cause or mediator favouring the development of subtle or evident secondary cardiovascular functional disturbances and clinical consequences, and influencing adverse outcomes.

  12. Triatominae Biochemistry Goes to School: Evaluation of a Novel Tool for Teaching Basic Biochemical Concepts of Chagas Disease Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Leonardo Rodrigues; de Oliveria Cudischevitch, Cecília; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Macedo, Gustavo Bartholomeu; Lannes, Denise; da Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a new approach to teaching the basic biochemistry mechanisms that regulate the biology of Triatominae, major vectors of "Trypanosoma cruzi," the causative agent of Chagas disease. We have designed and used a comic book, "Carlos Chagas: 100 years after a hero's discovery" containing scientific information…

  13. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiene, Gaetano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) is a heart muscle disease clinically characterized by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Its prevalence has been estimated to vary from 1:2,500 to 1:5,000. ARVC/D is a major cause of sudden death in the young and athletes. The pathology consists of a genetically determined dystrophy of the right ventricular myocardium with fibro-fatty replacement to such an extent that it leads to right ventricular aneurysms. The clinical picture may include: a subclinical phase without symptoms and with ventricular fibrillation being the first presentation; an electrical disorder with palpitations and syncope, due to tachyarrhythmias of right ventricular origin; right ventricular or biventricular pump failure, so severe as to require transplantation. The causative genes encode proteins of mechanical cell junctions (plakoglobin, plakophilin, desmoglein, desmocollin, desmoplakin) and account for intercalated disk remodeling. Familiar occurrence with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and variable penetrance has been proven. Recessive variants associated with palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair have been also reported. Clinical diagnosis may be achieved by demonstrating functional and structural alterations of the right ventricle, depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, arrhythmias with the left bundle branch block morphology and fibro-fatty replacement through endomyocardial biopsy. Two dimensional echo, angiography and magnetic resonance are the imaging tools for visualizing structural-functional abnormalities. Electroanatomic mapping is able to detect areas of low voltage corresponding to myocardial atrophy with fibro-fatty replacement. The main differential diagnoses are idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract tachycardia, myocarditis, dialted cardiomyopathy and sarcoidosis. Only palliative therapy is available and consists of antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation and

  14. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basso Cristina

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D is a heart muscle disease clinically characterized by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Its prevalence has been estimated to vary from 1:2,500 to 1:5,000. ARVC/D is a major cause of sudden death in the young and athletes. The pathology consists of a genetically determined dystrophy of the right ventricular myocardium with fibro-fatty replacement to such an extent that it leads to right ventricular aneurysms. The clinical picture may include: a subclinical phase without symptoms and with ventricular fibrillation being the first presentation; an electrical disorder with palpitations and syncope, due to tachyarrhythmias of right ventricular origin; right ventricular or biventricular pump failure, so severe as to require transplantation. The causative genes encode proteins of mechanical cell junctions (plakoglobin, plakophilin, desmoglein, desmocollin, desmoplakin and account for intercalated disk remodeling. Familiar occurrence with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and variable penetrance has been proven. Recessive variants associated with palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair have been also reported. Clinical diagnosis may be achieved by demonstrating functional and structural alterations of the right ventricle, depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, arrhythmias with the left bundle branch block morphology and fibro-fatty replacement through endomyocardial biopsy. Two dimensional echo, angiography and magnetic resonance are the imaging tools for visualizing structural-functional abnormalities. Electroanatomic mapping is able to detect areas of low voltage corresponding to myocardial atrophy with fibro-fatty replacement. The main differential diagnoses are idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract tachycardia, myocarditis, dialted cardiomyopathy and sarcoidosis. Only palliative therapy is available and consists of antiarrhythmic drugs

  15. Importance of transesophageal echocardiography in peripartum cardiomyopathy undergoing lower section cesarean section under regional anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Goyal, Sameer; Irpachi, Kalpana; Smita, Barya

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a relatively rare but life threatening disease. The etiology and pathogenesis of peripartum cardiomyopathy is generally centered upon viral and autoimmune mechanism. This case report describes the anesthetic management of a patient with term pregnancy suffering from dilated peripartum cardiomyopathy planned for cesarean section, successfully managed with epidural anesthesia after precipitate labour.

  16. Chagas Disease Vector Control in Tupiza, Southern Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Guillen

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy domestic and peridomestic infestations of Triatoma infestans were controlled in two villages in southern Bolivia by the application of deltamethrin SC25 (2.5% suspension concentrate at a target dose of 25 mg a.i./m². Actual applied dose was monitored by HPLC analysis of filter papers placed at various heights on the house walls, and was shown to range from 0 to 59.6 about a mean of 28.5 mg a.i./m². Wall bioassays showed high mortality of T. infestans during the first month after the application of deltamethrin. Mortality declined to zero as summer temperatures increased, but reappeared with the onset of the following winter. In contrast, knockdown was apparent throughout the trial, showing no discernible temperature dependence. House infestation rates, measured by manual sampling and use of paper sheets to collect bug faeces, declined from 79% at the beginning of the trial to zero at the 6 month evaluation. All but one of the houses were still free of T. infestans at the final evaluation 12 months after spraying, although a small number of bugs were found at this time in 5 of 355 peridomestic dependencies. Comparative cost studies endorse the recommendation of large-scale application of deltamethrin, or pyrethroid of similar cost-effectiveness, as a means to eliminate domestic T. infestans populations in order to interrupt transmission of Chagas disease

  17. Urbanization, land tenure security and vector-borne Chagas disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael Z.; Barbu, Corentin M.; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R.; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Escalante-Mejia, Patricia; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Niemierko, Malwina; Mabud, Tarub S.; Behrman, Jere R.; Naquira-Velarde, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Modern cities represent one of the fastest growing ecosystems on the planet. Urbanization occurs in stages; each stage characterized by a distinct habitat that may be more or less susceptible to the establishment of disease vector populations and the transmission of vector-borne pathogens. We performed longitudinal entomological and epidemiological surveys in households along a 1900 × 125 m transect of Arequipa, Peru, a major city of nearly one million inhabitants, in which the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, by the insect vector Triatoma infestans, is an ongoing problem. The transect spans a cline of urban development from established communities to land invasions. We find that the vector is tracking the development of the city, and the parasite, in turn, is tracking the dispersal of the vector. New urbanizations are free of vector infestation for decades. T. cruzi transmission is very recent and concentrated in more established communities. The increase in land tenure security during the course of urbanization, if not accompanied by reasonable and enforceable zoning codes, initiates an influx of construction materials, people and animals that creates fertile conditions for epidemics of some vector-borne diseases. PMID:24990681

  18. Archaeosomes display immunoadjuvant potential for a vaccine against Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Leticia H; Corral, Ricardo S; Morilla, María José; Romero, Eder L; Petray, Patricia B

    2013-02-01

    Archaeosomes (ARC), vesicles made from lipids extracted from Archaea, display strong adjuvant properties. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the highly stable ARC formulated from total polar lipids of a new Halorubrum tebenquichense strain found in Argentinean Patagonia, to act as adjuvant for soluble parasite antigens in developing prophylactic vaccine against the intracellular protozoan T. cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. We demonstrated for the first time that C3H/HeN mice subcutaneously immunized with trypanosomal antigens entrapped in these ARC (ARC-TcAg) rapidly developed higher levels of circulating T. cruzi antibodies than those measured in the sera from animals receiving the antigen alone. Enhanced humoral responses elicited by ARC-TcAg presented a dominant IgG2a antibody isotype, usually associated with Th1-type immunity and resistance against T. cruzi. More importantly, ARC-TcAg-vaccinated mice displayed reduced parasitemia during early infection and were protected against an otherwise lethal challenge with the virulent Tulahuén strain of the parasite. Our findings suggest that, as an adjuvant, H. tebenquichense-derived ARC may hold great potential to develop a safe and helpful vaccine against this relevant human pathogen. PMID:23291939

  19. Viability study of a multiplex diagnostic platform for Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Foti

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A new multiplex assay platform was evaluated to detect Trypanosoma cruzi infection using the recombinant antigens CRA, FRA, CRAFRA fusion and parasite lysate. The antigens presented different sensitivity and specificity in a singleplex test when compared to a serial dilution of two pools comprising 10 positive serum samples and one pool of 10 negative samples. The recombinant protein CRA presented lower sensitivity (55% in contrast to the 100% specificity and sensitivity of FRA, CRAFRA and T. cruzi lysate. These antigens also showed good results in a duplex test and the duplex test with CRAFRA/T. cruzi lysate showed better performance with 100% specificity and sensitivity, as well as a lower cut-off value in comparison to the other duplex test, FRA/T. cruzi lysate. Hence, when the antigens were used in duplex format, both tests showed decreased cut-off values and no interference between different bead sets, resulting in increasing sensitivity and specificity. The results of these multiplex tests show that they could be an alternative to singleplex detection for Chagas disease, and also indicate the necessity of using multiplex diagnostic tools to increase the sensitivity and specificity for diagnostic tests. Emerging data from the T. cruzi genome and from its ORFeome project will also allow the identification of new antigens for this disease detection application.

  20. Viability study of a multiplex diagnostic platform for Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Leonardo; Fonseca, Bruna de Paula Fonseca e; Nascimento, Lilian Dias; Marques, Christiane de Fatima Silva; da Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Duarte, Cesar Augusto Barros; Probst, Christian M; Goldenberg, Samuel; Pinto, Antônio Gomes; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2009-07-01

    A new multiplex assay platform was evaluated to detect Trypanosoma cruzi infection using the recombinant antigens CRA, FRA, CRAFRA fusion and parasite lysate. The antigens presented different sensitivity and specificity in a singleplex test when compared to a serial dilution of two pools comprising 10 positive serum samples and one pool of 10 negative samples. The recombinant protein CRA presented lower sensitivity (55%) in contrast to the 100% specificity and sensitivity of FRA, CRAFRA and T. cruzi lysate. These antigens also showed good results in a duplex test and the duplex test with CRAFRA/T. cruzi lysate showed better performance with 100% specificity and sensitivity, as well as a lower cut-off value in comparison to the other duplex test, FRA/T. cruzi lysate. Hence, when the antigens were used in duplex format, both tests showed decreased cut-off values and no interference between different bead sets, resulting in increasing sensitivity and specificity. The results of these multiplex tests show that they could be an alternative to singleplex detection for Chagas disease, and also indicate the necessity of using multiplex diagnostic tools to increase the sensitivity and specificity for diagnostic tests. Emerging data from the T. cruzi genome and from its ORFeome project will also allow the identification of new antigens for this disease detection application. PMID:19753468

  1. Oxidative Stress in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by MYBPC3 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lynch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies can result from mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins including MYBPC3, which encodes cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C. However, whether oxidative stress is augmented due to contractile dysfunction and cardiomyocyte damage in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies has not been elucidated. To determine whether oxidative stress markers were elevated in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies, a previously characterized 3-month-old mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM expressing a homozygous MYBPC3 mutation (cMyBP-C(t/t was used, compared to wild-type (WT mice. Echocardiography confirmed decreased percentage of fractional shortening in DCM versus WT hearts. Histopathological analysis indicated a significant increase in myocardial disarray and fibrosis while the second harmonic generation imaging revealed disorganized sarcomeric structure and myocyte damage in DCM hearts when compared to WT hearts. Intriguingly, DCM mouse heart homogenates had decreased glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio and increased protein carbonyl and lipid malondialdehyde content compared to WT heart homogenates, consistent with elevated oxidative stress. Importantly, a similar result was observed in human cardiomyopathy heart homogenate samples. These results were further supported by reduced signals for mitochondrial semiquinone radicals and Fe-S clusters in DCM mouse hearts measured using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, we demonstrate elevated oxidative stress in MYPBC3-mutated DCM mice, which may exacerbate the development of heart failure.

  2. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after a dancing session: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Ammar A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Stress-induced (Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare form of cardiomyopathy which presents in a manner similar to that of acute coronary syndrome. This sometimes leads to unnecessary thrombolysis therapy. The pathogenesis of this disease is still poorly understood. We believe that reporting all cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy will contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Here, we report a patient who, in the absence of any recent stressful events in her life, developed the disease after a session of dancing. Case presentation A 69-year-old Caucasian woman presented with features suggestive of acute coronary syndrome shortly after a session of dancing. Echocardiography and a coronary angiogram showed typical features of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and our patient was treated accordingly. Eight weeks later, her condition resolved completely and the results of echocardiography were totally normal. Conclusions Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, though transient, is a rare and serious condition. Although it is commonly precipitated by stressful life events, these are not necessarily present. Our patient was enjoying one of her hobbies (that is, dancing when she developed the disease. This case has particular interest in medicine, especially for the specialties of cardiology and emergency medicine. We hope that it will add more information to the literature about this rare condition.

  3. A human type 5 adenovirus-based Trypanosoma cruzi therapeutic vaccine re-programs immune response and reverses chronic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Resende Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a prototypical neglected tropical disease. Specific immunity promotes acute phase survival. Nevertheless, one-third of CD patients develop chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC associated with parasite persistence and immunological unbalance. Currently, the therapeutic management of patients only mitigates CCC symptoms. Therefore, a vaccine arises as an alternative to stimulate protective immunity and thereby prevent, delay progression and even reverse CCC. We examined this hypothesis by vaccinating mice with replication-defective human Type 5 recombinant adenoviruses (rAd carrying sequences of amastigote surface protein-2 (rAdASP2 and trans-sialidase (rAdTS T. cruzi antigens. For prophylactic vaccination, naïve C57BL/6 mice were immunized with rAdASP2+rAdTS (rAdVax using a homologous prime/boost protocol before challenge with the Colombian strain. For therapeutic vaccination, rAdVax administration was initiated at 120 days post-infection (dpi, when mice were afflicted by CCC. Mice were analyzed for electrical abnormalities, immune response and cardiac parasitism and tissue damage. Prophylactic immunization with rAdVax induced antibodies and H-2Kb-restricted cytotoxic and interferon (IFNγ-producing CD8+ T-cells, reduced acute heart parasitism and electrical abnormalities in the chronic phase. Therapeutic vaccination increased survival and reduced electrical abnormalities after the prime (analysis at 160 dpi and the boost (analysis at 180 and 230 dpi. Post-therapy mice exhibited less heart injury and electrical abnormalities compared with pre-therapy mice. rAdVax therapeutic vaccination preserved specific IFNγ-mediated immunity but reduced the response to polyclonal stimuli (anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, CD107a+ CD8+ T-cell frequency and plasma nitric oxide (NO levels. Moreover, therapeutic rAdVax reshaped immunity in the heart tissue as reduced the number of perforin+ cells

  4. EBCT in diagnosis on primary cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of electron beam CT (EBCT) in primary cardiomyopathy (PCM). Methods: EBCT including coronary scanning and heart movie study was performed in 15 patients. The diagnosis of PCM was established by clinical and imaging findings or/and pathologic examination. Results: BECT findings related to the classification of PCM drawn up by WHO/ISFC were as follows: (1) dilated PCM (8 cases): dilated left ventricle (LV) was found in 7 of 8 cases and dilated right ventricle (RV) in the remaining one. Hypokinetic contraction of the LV wall with (250 ± 101) ml LVEDV and (18.9 ±6.6)% LVEF presented in the patients with dilated LV. (2) Hypertrophic PCM (5 cases): Hypertrophic ventricular septum (16.5 ± 2.3) mm was demonstrated in all cases, hypertrophy of the LV wall or the apex in 3 of 5 cases, and stenosis of the LV outflow tract in 2 cases. (3) Restrictive PCM (2 cases): Thickening of endocardium with lower density than cardiac muscle, reduced RV, obliteration of apex, hypokinetic contraction of the RV wall, and dilatation of right atrium (RA) with parietal thrombus formation of RA was identified in one patient. Both the LV and the RV were involved, with enlargement of atrium. Conclusion: The findings of PCM on EBCT seem to reflect pathologic and functional changes of PCM, and may be useful for diagnosis and classification of PCM

  5. Genetic bases of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Rampazzo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC is a heart muscle disease in which the pathological substrate is a fibro-fatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium. The major clinical features are different types of arrhythmias with a left branch block pattern. ARVC shows autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Recessive forms were also described, although in association with skin disorders. Ten genetic loci have been discovered so far and mutations were reported in five different genes. ARVD1 was associated with regulatory mutations of transforming growth factor beta-3 (TGFβ3, whereas ARVD2, characterized by effort-induced polymorphic arrhythmias, was associated with mutations in cardiac ryanodine receptor-2 (RYR2. All other mutations identified to date have been detected in genes encoding desmosomal proteins: plakoglobin (JUP which causes Naxos disease (a recessive form of ARVC associated with palmoplantar keratosis and woolly hair; desmoplakin (DSP which causes the autosomal dominant ARVD8 and plakophilin-2 (PKP2 involved in ARVD9. Desmosomes are important cell-to-cell adhesion junctions predominantly found in epidermis and heart; they are believed to couple cytoskeletal elements to plasma membrane in cell-to-cell or cell-to-substrate adhesions.

  6. Prooxidant Mechanisms in Iron Overload Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Feng Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron overload cardiomyopathy (IOC, defined as the presence of systolic or diastolic cardiac dysfunction secondary to increased deposition of iron, is emerging as an important cause of heart failure due to the increased incidence of this disorder seen in thalassemic patients and in patients of primary hemochromatosis. At present, although palliative treatment by regular iron chelation was recommended; whereas IOC is still the major cause for mortality in patient with chronic heart failure induced by iron-overloading. Because iron is a prooxidant and the associated mechanism seen in iron-overload heart is still unclear; therefore, we intend to delineate the multiple signaling pathways involved in IOC. These pathways may include organelles such as calcium channels, mitochondria; paracrine effects from both macrophages and fibroblast, and novel mediators such as thromboxane A2 and adiponectin; with increased oxidative stress and inflammation found commonly in these signaling pathways. With further understanding on these complex and inter-related molecular mechanisms, we can propose potential therapeutic strategies to ameliorate the cardiac toxicity induced by iron-overloading.

  7. Management of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvano, Maria; Mastella, Giulio; Zorzi, Alessandro; Migliore, Federico; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Bauce, Barbara; Rigato, Ilaria; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Iliceto, Sabino; Thiene, Gaetano; Basso, Cristina; Corrado, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a genetically determined heart muscle disorder, predisposing to sudden cardiac death (SCD), particularly in young patients and athletes. Pathological features include loss of myocytes and fibrofatty replacement of right ventricular myocardium; a biventricular involvement is often observed. The diagnosis of ARVC (prevalence 1:5.000 in the general population) does not rely on a single gold standard test but is achieved using a scoring system, proposed in 2010 by an International Task Force, which encompasses familial and genetic factors, ECG abnormalities, arrhythmias, and structural/functional ventricular alterations. The main goal of treatment is the prevention of SCD. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the only proven "lifesaving" therapy; however, it is associated with a significant morbidity due to device-related complications and inappropriate ICD interventions. Other treatment options such as life style changes, antiarrhythmic drugs, beta-blockers and catheter ablation may reduce the arrhythmic burden and alleviate symptoms, without evident impact on prevention of SCD. Selection of patient candidates to ICD implantation is the most challenging issue in the clinical management of ARVC. This article reviews the current perspective on management of ARVC, focusing on clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, risk stratification and therapeutic strategies of affected patients. PMID:27186923

  8. Current therapeutic concepts in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Jan; Poloczkova, Hana; Nemec, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a relatively rare disease characterized by systolic heart failure occuring towards the end of pregnancy or during the months following birth. It is most often seen in women of African descent, and its incidence seems to be slightly increasing in recent years. Other etiologies of heart failure should be excluded to determine the diagnosis of PPCM. The clinical picture corresponds to systolic heart failure. The rapid onset of the symptoms in relation to pregnancy is striking. The essential diagnostic procedures such as echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy may be beneficial in certain situations. The etiology of the disease remains unclear. Speculated causes include myocarditis, autoimmune disorders, cardiotropic virus infection, and abnormal responses to hemodynamic and hormonal changes during pregnancy. Particular attention is currently given to the concept of increased oxidative stress inducing production of proapoptotic, angiostatic and proinflammatory mediators. Recovery of left ventricular systolic function occurs in about half of the cases. Mortality has been decreasing in recent years, especially in the United States, but is still between 10-15% in less developed countries where therapeutic possibilities are limited. In addition to standard heart failure therapy, specific treatments (pentoxyfilline, bromocriptine, immunomodulatory therapy) have been tested. Mechanical circulatory support is sometimes needed. Heart transplantation is the therapeutic option for the most severe heart failure and is used in about 10% of the cases. Recurrence in subsequent pregnancy is common and therefore, another pregnancy is not recommended in many cases. PMID:25483952

  9. Congenital Chagas disease of second generation in Santiago, Chile. Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCHENONE Hugo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Chagas disease (CChD has been reported in different countries, mostly in Latin America. In 1987 a fatal case of CChD of second generation (CChDSG was published. Within a period of six months - 1989-1990 - two cases of CChDSG were diagnosed and studied in the city of Santiago. Two premature newborns, sons of two sisters, with moderate liver and spleen enlargement, were found to have positive serology for Chagas disease and xenodiagnoses. The mothers, urban residents all their lives, without antecedents of triatomine bugs contact or blood transfusions, showed positive serology and xenodiagnoses. Their mother (grandmother of the infants, lived 20 years in a Northern rural Chagas disease endemic locality, in a triatomine infested house. Afterwards, she moved to Santiago, where she married and has resided up to now. Serology and xenodiagnoses were also positive. All the Trypanosoma cruzi infected individuals were successfully treated with nifurtimox.

  10. Study of the hypothalamic - hypophyseal - thyroid axis by the administration of TRH to Chagas' disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TSH and T3 response to synthetic TRH was evaluated in two groups of patients: normal and with Chagas' disease, from the urban area of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Plasma T4, PBI and TSH values were within the normal range, when compared with those found in the controls: So were the thyroid uptakes of 2 and 24 hours; the basal levels of T3 where within the normal range except in three subjects whose values were higher than normal. After TRH administration the amount of TSH secretion in patients with Chagas' disease was increased when compared to normal ones, while T3 secretion was unaltered. It is suggested that in the Chagas' disease there is an increase in the pituitary TSH, while the thyroid reserve is preserved. This increase could be due to a difference in the regulation rate of TRH, which is determined by the neuronal degeneration caused by the disease itself. (author)

  11. [José Lima Pedreira de Freitas and the redefinition and control of Chagas disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Juan Stuardo Yazlle

    2016-08-01

    A brief overview of the evolution of knowledge about Chagas disease since its discovery by Carlos Chagas in 1909 until the mid-1940s is presented. The trajectory of physician Pedreira de Freitas and his growing involvement in research in the area led to his contributions to laboratory diagnosis - which lent consistency and security to epidemiological surveys of Chagas disease - and the redefinition of the scale of the disease in Brazil and the Americas with its terrible social and economic impact. His proposal for the disease prevention model - based on selective purging in the application of insecticide - was adopted nationally and internationally and made it possible to bring the disease under control in Brazil and other countries. He devoted himself with equal intensity to enhancing the teaching of medical practices in the community and was a pioneer in the implementation of preventive medicine in medical education in Brazil. PMID:27557035

  12. Left ventricular diastolic properties in dilated cardiomyopathy, transmural myocardial infarction, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Left ventricular (LV) diastolic properties in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), transmural myocardial infarction (TMI), and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) were evaluated. Radionuclide angiography and M-mode echocardiography were performed for 11 cases of DCM, 40 cases of TMI, 21 cases of HCM, and nine normal control subjects. In DCM, the peak filling rate (PFR) and filling fraction (FF) were significantly reduced, but the time to the peak filling rate (TPFR) was not prolonged. In TMI, both the PFR and FF were significantly reduced. Moreover, the TPFR was significantly prolonged in TMI as compared to DCM. Although depression of the PFR in HCM was not apparent, prolongation of the TPFR in HCM was marked. In DCM, there was good correlation between the PFR and left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) (r = 0.71, p < 0.03). In TMI, there was a good correlation between the TPFR and the standard deviation of the LV phase angle histogram (SDP), indicating LV asynergy (r = 0.589, p < 0.005). In HCM, both the FF and PFR correlated inversely with the LV wall thickness (r = -0.74, p < 0.008; r = -0.581, p < 0.03, respectively). These results indicate that various factors affect LV diastolic properties in heart disease, and that radionuclide angiography is a valuable technique for evaluating LV diastolic function. (author)

  13. Development of peptide-based lineage-specific serology for chronic Chagas disease: geographical and clinical distribution of epitope recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Bhattacharyya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease, caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health issue in Latin America. Genetically diverse, the species is sub-divided into six lineages, known as TcI-TcVI, which have disparate geographical and ecological distributions. TcII, TcV, and TcVI are associated with severe human disease in the Southern Cone countries, whereas TcI is associated with cardiomyopathy north of the Amazon. T. cruzi persists as a chronic infection, with cardiac and/or gastrointestinal symptoms developing years or decades after initial infection. Identifying an individual's history of T. cruzi lineage infection directly by genotyping of the parasite is complicated by the low parasitaemia and sequestration in the host tissues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have applied here serology against lineage-specific epitopes of the T. cruzi surface antigen TSSA, as an indirect approach to allow identification of infecting lineage. Chagasic sera from chronic patients from a range of endemic countries were tested by ELISA against synthetic peptides representing lineage-specific TSSA epitopes bound to avidin-coated ELISA plates via a biotin labelled polyethylene glycol-glycine spacer to increase rotation and ensure each amino acid side chain could freely interact with their antibodies. 79/113 (70% of samples from Brazil, Bolivia, and Argentina recognised the TSSA epitope common to lineages TcII/TcV/TcVI. Comparison with clinical information showed that a higher proportion of Brazilian TSSApep-II/V/VI responders had ECG abnormalities than non-responders (38% vs 17%; p<0.0001. Among northern chagasic sera 4/20 (20% from Ecuador reacted with this peptide; 1/12 Venezuelan and 1/34 Colombian samples reacted with TSSApep-IV. In addition, a proposed TcI-specific epitope, described elsewhere, was demonstrated here to be highly conserved across lineages and therefore not applicable to lineage-specific serology. CONCLUSIONS

  14. El ensayo inmunoenzimatico en microgotas sobre nitrocelulosa (Dot-ELISA en el diagnostico de la enfermedad de Chagas: I. Estudio comparativo de dos preparaciones antigenicos de Trypanosoma cruzi The Dot-Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (Dot-ELISA in the diagnosis of Chagas-disease: I. Comparative study of two antigenic preparations of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M. de Hubsch

    1988-09-01

    cardiomyopathy; 74 patients with different diseases including siphilis,toxoplasmosis, leisjmaniasis or autoantibodies such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies. By defining the diagnostic titers (cut Off: 1:512 for citoplasmatic antigen and 1:128 for the integral antigen, a sensitivity of 100% has been obtained with both antigenic preparations, being the specificity of 96% for the former and 100% for the latter when leishmaniasis sera were not included. A comparative study with conventional serology was carried out using 147 sera from a Laboratory of Chagas' diagnosis; Dot-ELISA with citoplasmic antigen showed co-positivity index of 1.0, co-negativity 0.989 and efficiency of 0.993, and Dot-ELISA with integral antigen 1.0, 0.979 and 0.986 respectively. According to this evaluation, Dot-ELISA using whole formalin fixed epimastigotes might be a practical alternative for the serological diagnosis of Chagas' disease.

  15. Aspectos neurológicos da moléstia de chagas

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    Fritz Köberle

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Chagas related in more than two 200 cases, what he called "nervous forms" of trypanosomiasis, that is neurological manifestations from central origin (idiotism, infantilism, pseudo-bulbar paralysis, aphasia, cerebellar ataxia, atetosis, espostic or paralytic diplegia, disbasia. At that time Chagas expressed his concepts as follows: "In relation to the frequency of trypanosomiasis nervous forms we have performed many observations which allow us to state that this disease is the one which causes the largest number of organic affections of the central nervous system, in human pathology". We are plenty convinced by Chagas's statement. By experiments on animals of laboratory we have very often noticed a rather varied neurological symptomatology, being worth point out identical syndromes to those observed by Chagas. Our autopsy material non-rarely include chronic Chagas cases presenting a most varied symtomatology. Among them we have named only three cases of discerebral nanism, a rather rare affection in other parts of the world and relatively frequent in our material. The fact which we have demonstrated, i.e., a relatively great decreasing of number of nervous cells in the peripheral system could happen in the central nervous system as well. Provided that there are only two quantitative works on neuron number diminishing in the central nervous system in mice and rats we decline to go into further details about central neuropathies in man. We emphasized the necessity to perform researches on this field by means of intimate collaboration between clinicians and pathologists, as the only way to confirm on scientific basis all that was observed by the panoramic and genial vision of Carlos Chagas.

  16. Estado actual de nuestros conocimientos sobre la enfermedad de chagas en la Republica Mexicana

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    Jorge Tay

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los datos obtenidos de la revisión minuciosa en relación a enfermedad de Chagas de la literatura médica de la República Mexicana y extranjera desde el afio de 1939 en que por primeira vez se reporta a Trypanosoma cruzi en México, hasta el ano de 1976. Mediante mapas, tablas y cuadros se senalan las localidades en donde se han encontrado casos humanos, reservorios no humanos y transmisores. Se hacen comentários acerca de los resultados obtenidos y se seffala la importancia de incrementar los estúdios sobre enfermedades de Chagas en nuestro país.É a apresentação dos dados obtidos a partir de uma minuciosa revisão feita na literatura médica mexicana e estrangeira com relação à doença de Chagas no México. O estudo refere-se ao período de 1939 quando, pela primeira vez, menciona-se Trypanosoma cruzi no México, até 1976. Através de mapas, tabelas e quadros são mostrados os lugares onde foram encontrados casos humanos, reservatórios e transmissores. São feitos comentários sobre os resultados obtidos e é ressaltada a necessidade de ampliação dos estudos sobre a doença de Chagas no México.A thorough review of the literature is made regarding Chagas disease in Mexico and else- where since 1939, when Trypanosoma cruzi was first reported in this country until 1976. The location where human cases, non human reservoirs and transmitters have been found is pointed out by means of maps, tables and charts comments are made regarding the results reported. The importance of increasing the studies of Chagas' disease in our country is stressed.

  17. Value of cardiovascular MR in diagnosing left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy and in discriminating between other cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyse the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial parameters to differentiate left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) from other cardiomyopathies and controls. We retrospectively analysed 12 patients with LVNC, 11 with dilated and 10 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and compared them to 24 controls. LVNC patients had to fulfil standard echocardiographic criteria as well as additional clinical and imaging criteria. Cine steady-state free precession and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging was performed. The total LV myocardial mass index (LV-MMI), compacted (LV-MMIcompacted), non-compacted (LV-MMInon-compacted), percentage LV-MMnon-compacted, ventricular volumes and function were calculated. Data were compared using analysis of variance and Dunnett's test. Additionally, semi-quantitative segmental analyses of the occurrence of increased trabeculation were performed. Total LV-MMInon-compacted and percentage LV-MMnon-compacted were discriminators between patients with LVCN, healthy controls and those with other cardiomyopathies with cut-offs of 15 g/m2 and 25 %, respectively. Furthermore, trabeculation in basal segments and a ratio of non-compacted/compacted myocardium of ≥3:1 were criteria for LVNC. A combination of these criteria provided sensitivities and specificities of up to 100 %. None of the LVNC patients demonstrated LGE. Absolute CMR quantification of the LV-MMInon-compacted or the percentage LV-MMnon-compacted and increased trabeculation in basal segments allows one to reliably diagnose LVNC and to differentiate it from other cardiomyopathies. (orig.)

  18. Rare case of stress cardiomyopathy due to intramuscular epinephrine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Salik; Melnick, Stephen; Lohani, Saroj; Lloyd, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 37-year-old woman who presented to our hospital with retrosternal chest pain following intramuscular administration of epinephrine due to presumed anaphylaxis. On arrival, she was found to have ST segment depression in the anterolateral leads on ECG and elevated cardiac troponins. She was diagnosed with stress cardiomyopathy based on left ventricle dysfunction and angiographically normal coronary arteries on cardiac catheterisation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third reported case of takotsubo cardiomyopathy following appropriately dosed intramuscular administration of epinephrine for anaphylaxis. This case highlights the importance of considering stress cardiomyopathy in patients presenting with chest pain syndrome following systemic administration of epinephrine. PMID:27268785

  19. RISK OF PATIENTS WITH HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY UNDERGOING NONCARDIAC SURGERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-ming Xuan; Yong Zeng; Wen-ling Zhu

    2007-01-01

    To determine the risk of noncardiac surgery in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.Methods We reviewed the medical records of all patients who were diagnosed as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 1998 to August 2006 and identified 24 patients who subsequently underwent noncardiac surgery.Results There were no intraoperative cardiac events. Postoperative cardiac events were identified in 3 patients including 1 death due to acute myocardial infarction and 2 episodes of transient hypotension.Conclusions The risk of anesthesia and noncardiac surgery is low in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.During the perioperative period, beta-blockers and/or calcium channel blockers should be given; vasodilator and inotropic agents should be avoided due to the side effects on hemodynamics.

  20. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Teng J.

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  1. The diagnostic value of cardiac blood pool imaging in cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-two normal controls and thirty-three patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were examined by multigated cardiac imaging and phase analysis. The imaging traits of hypertrophic ones displayed thicken septal wall. The differences of synchronization of ventricular systolic function between hypertrophic ones and normal were statistically significant (P < 0.01). The imaging features of dilated cardiomyopathy showed that ventricular wall motion was seriously hypokinitic or akinitic and left ventricule enlarged abnormally. The function and synchronization of ventricular systole in dilated ones were worse than these in the hypertrophic (P < 0.01). These data suggest that the cardiac blood pool images can diagnose and differentiate the hypertrophic from dilated cardiomyopathy

  2. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a relatively uncommon inherited disease. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is also uncommonly observed, which often occurs in pregnant or post partum women but is rare in men. This report describes a 38 years old man with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who developed SCAD leading to acute inferior myocardial infarction. After emergent appendectomy operation at another hospital, he was immediately transferred to the Cardiology Department of our hospital due to acute myocardial infarction. He emergently underwent coronary angiography which showed a long dissection involving the right coronary. He underwent an emergent CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and he was discharged. According to our knowledge, no case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy unrelated to postpartum period or oral contraceptive use has been reported so far. (author)

  3. Defective insulin signaling and mitochondrial dynamics in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermeier, Francisco; Navarro-Marquez, Mario; López-Crisosto, Camila; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Quiroga, Clara; Bustamante, Mario; Verdejo, Hugo E.; Zalaquett, Ricardo; Ibacache, Mauricio; Parra, Valentina; Castro, Pablo F.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a common consequence of longstanding type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and encompasses structural, morphological, functional, and metabolic abnormalities in the heart. Myocardial energy metabolism depends on mitochondria, which must generate sufficient ATP to meet the high energy demands of the myocardium. Dysfunctional mitochondria are involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic heart disease. A large body of evidence implicates myocardial insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of DCM. Recent studies show that insulin signaling influences myocardial energy metabolism by impacting cardiomyocyte mitochondrial dynamics and function under physiological conditions. However, comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanisms linking insulin signaling and changes in the architecture of the mitochondrial network in diabetic cardiomyopathy is lacking. This review summarizes our current understanding of how defective insulin signaling impacts cardiac function in diabetic cardiomyopathy and discusses the potential role of mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:25686534

  4. Bromocriptine as a new therapeutic agent for peripartum cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chopra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a poorly understood, rare disorder in which left ventricular systolic dysfunction and symptoms of heart failure occur between the last month of pregnancy and the first 5 months postpartum. Recent data suggest that uncontrolled oxidative stress leads to the activation of the prolactin cleaving enzyme cathepsin D that in turn leads to an increase in a cleaved 16 kDa prolactin. This cleaved form that has an angiostatic and proapoptotic role appears to drive the disease by adversely impacting the endothelium and cardiomyocyte. Bromocriptine that reduces the prolactin production by dopamine agonist actions may improve outcomes in patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy by eliminating the cleaved form of prolactin despite the activation of the cleaving enzyme. In limited case reports and proof of concept studies use of bromocriptine in the early stages has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy. However, larger randomized control study is still awaited.

  5. Atlas of the clinical genetics of human dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Jan; Frese, Karen S; Peil, Barbara;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Numerous genes are known to cause dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, until now technological limitations have hindered elucidation of the contribution of all clinically relevant disease genes to DCM phenotypes in larger cohorts. We now utilized next-generation sequencing to overcome these......, leading to 99.1% coverage of the target region with at least 50-fold and a mean read depth of 2415. In this well characterized cohort, we find the highest number of known cardiomyopathy mutations in plakophilin-2, myosin-binding protein C-3, and desmoplakin. When we include yet unknown but predicted...... disease variants, we find titin, plakophilin-2, myosin-binding protein-C 3, desmoplakin, ryanodine receptor 2, desmocollin-2, desmoglein-2, and SCN5A variants among the most commonly mutated genes. The overlap between DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and channelopathy causing mutations is...

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease: The borderline between wild and domestic cycles in Venezuela.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leidi eHerrera

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available American trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, occurs between triatomine vectors and mammals, including man. T. cruzi has 150 Ma in America with almost 10 million of infected people today. The overlapping of its wild and domestic ecotopes is increasing. The host-parasite imbrications has been discerned by the study of infection patterns, transmissibility and transmission cycles in natural and laboratory models, through to parasitological and molecular tests. This article describes specific parasite niches, as plant biocenosis or biological corridors between domestic and wild ecotopes and helps distinguish Chagas disease risks and the borderline between wild and domestic transmission cycles, with emphasis on Venezuelan studies.

  7. Necroscopic study of a Chagas' disease chronic case with normal electrocardiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphological changes in the postmortem study of a man probably with the indeterminate form of Chagas' disease are described. The heart exhibited lesions of the epicardium, myocardium and endocardium, as well as of the conduction system, primarily small inflammatory foci. There was mild fibrosis of the myocardium, atrioventricular node, and left bundle branch (at its origin). These alterations, although mild, were similar, in quality, to those described in the other chronic forms of Chagas' disease, and suggest active lesions, with a potential for further development. In the esophagus, among other features, a striking reduction of the number of neurons was observed. (author)

  8. Distantiae transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: a new epidemiological feature of acute Chagas disease in Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    Samanta Cristina das Chagas Xavier; André Luiz Rodrigues Roque; Daniele Bilac; Vitor Antônio Louzada de Araújo; Sócrates Fraga da Costa da Costa Neto; Elias Seixas Lorosa; Luiz Felipe Coutinho Ferreira da Silva; Ana Maria Jansen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The new epidemiological scenario of orally transmitted Chagas disease that has emerged in Brazil, and mainly in the Amazon region, needs to be addressed with a new and systematic focus. Belém, the capital of Pará state, reports the highest number of acute Chagas disease (ACD) cases associated with the consumption of açaí juice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The wild and domestic enzootic transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated in the two locations (Jurunas and Va...

  9. Antigenicity and Diagnostic Potential of Vaccine Candidates in Human Chagas Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shivali Gupta; Xianxiu Wan; Zago, Maria P.; Martinez Sellers, Valena C.; Silva, Trevor S.; Dadjah Assiah; Monisha Dhiman; Sonia Nuñez; Petersen, John R; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan C.; Jose G Estrada-Franco; Nisha Jain Garg

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in Latin America and an emerging infectious disease in the US and Europe. We have shown TcG1, TcG2, and TcG4 antigens elicit protective immunity to T. cruzi in mice and dogs. Herein, we investigated antigenicity of the recombinant proteins in humans to determine their potential utility for the development of next generation diagnostics for screening of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: Sera samples f...

  10. Distantiae Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: A New Epidemiological Feature of Acute Chagas Disease in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; Bilac, Daniele; de Araújo, Vitor Antônio Louzada; Neto, Sócrates Fraga da Costa; Lorosa, Elias Seixas; da Silva, Luiz Felipe Coutinho Ferreira; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The new epidemiological scenario of orally transmitted Chagas disease that has emerged in Brazil, and mainly in the Amazon region, needs to be addressed with a new and systematic focus. Belém, the capital of Pará state, reports the highest number of acute Chagas disease (ACD) cases associated with the consumption of açaí juice. Methodology/Principal Findings The wild and domestic enzootic transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated in the two locations (Jurunas and Val-...

  11. Trimetazidine therapy prevents obesity-induced cardiomyopathy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussher, John R; Fillmore, Natasha; Keung, Wendy; Mori, Jun; Beker, Donna L; Wagg, Cory S; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Inhibiting fatty acid oxidation has emerged as a novel approach for the treatment of ischemic heart disease. Our aim was to determine whether pharmacologic inhibition of 3-ketoacyl-coenzyme A thiolase (3-KAT), which catalyzes the final step of fatty acid oxidation, could improve obesity-induced cardiomyopathy. A 3-week treatment with the 3-KAT inhibitor trimetazidine prevented obesity-induced reduction in both systolic and diastolic function. Therefore, targeting cardiac fatty acid oxidation may be a novel therapeutic approach to alleviate the growing burden of obesity-related cardiomyopathy. PMID:25064584

  12. Inferior ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Associated with Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Koeth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM is usually characterized by transient left ventricular apical ballooning. Due to the clinical symptoms which include chest pain, electrocardiographic changes, and elevated myocardial markers, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is frequently mimicking ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the absence of a significant coronary artery disease. Otherwise an acute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery can produce a typical Takotsubo contraction pattern. ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI is frequently associated with emotional stress, but to date no cases of STEMI triggering TCM have been reported. We describe a case of a female patient with inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by TCM.

  13. A Rare Occurance with Epidermolysis Bullosa Disease: Dilated Cardiomyopathy

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    Derya Cimen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa is a congenital and herediter vesiculobullous disease. Dystrophic form of this disease is characterized by severe malnutrition, failure to thrive, adhesions at fingers, joint contractures related with the formation of scar tissues, carcinoma of the skin, anemia, hipoalbuminemia, wound enfections and sepsis. Rarely, mortal dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in patients. In this report we present a 13 year-old pediatric patient with dilated cardiomyopathy, clinically diagnosed with Epidermolysis bullosa as well as a review of recent related literature.

  14. Penetrance of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Children and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten K; Havndrup, Ole; Christiansen, Michael;

    2013-01-01

    The penetrance of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) during childhood and adolescence has been only sparsely described. We studied the penetrance of HCM and the short- and long-term outcomes of clinical screening and predictive genetic testing of child relatives of patients with HCM.......The penetrance of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) during childhood and adolescence has been only sparsely described. We studied the penetrance of HCM and the short- and long-term outcomes of clinical screening and predictive genetic testing of child relatives of patients with HCM....

  15. Current and future treatment strategies for iron overload cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongjaikam, Suwakon; Kumfu, Sirinart; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Fucharoen, Suthat; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2015-10-15

    Iron overload cardiomyopathy is the major cause of death in transfusion-dependent thalassemia (TDT) patients. Growing evidence demonstrates that combined iron chelators, or the combination of an iron chelator with antioxidant(s) are effective in diminishing myocardial iron deposition and attenuating cardiac dysfunction. This review comprehensively summarizes basic and clinical reports on the therapeutic efficacy of combined iron chelators, or the combination of an iron chelator with antioxidant(s) on the heart. Promising benefits of these treatments in preventing cardiac dysfunction due to iron overload could provide extensive insight into future therapeutic strategies for better treatment and prevention of cardiomyopathy in TDT patients. PMID:26291660

  16. Técnica do xenodiagnostico na molestia de Chagas

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    Emmanuel Dias

    1940-01-01

    Full Text Available O xenodiagnostico é um processo muito valioso para o diagnostico etiologico da moléstia de Chagas. Consiste em alimentar-se barbeiros normais em supótos portadores da infecção e determinar-se, depois, si eles adquirem ou não o parasitismo. Em cada região deve ser empregada, de preferência, o transmissor local mais importante. Três a seis ninfas famintas são geralmente empregadas em cada prova, devendo ficar em contacto com o doador até encherem-se completamente (15-30 minutos. Si o exame de fezes – espontaneamente eliminadas ou obtidas por punção anal – não revelar a presença de flagelados, os insetos devem ser dissecados 40 a 60 dias depois da sucção, para exame do conteúdo duodenal.Xenodiagnosis is a very valuable method for the etiological diagnosis of Chagas’s disease. It consists in allowing the clean insect transmitter to feed upon the suspected carrier, and in ascertaining whether the bugs become infected. The principal local vector is the most suitable species to be used in a given region. Three to six hungry nymphs are usually employed in each test and must feed until repletion (15-30 minutes. It flagellates are not detected in the faeces or in the rectal contents, obtained by anal puncture, insects are dissected 40-60 days after the and the duodenal contents is examined.

  17. Insecticide resistance in vector Chagas disease: evolution, mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America. The disease is caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to human through the feces of infected triatomine insects. Because no treatment is available for the chronic forms of the disease, vector chemical control represents the best way to reduce the incidence of the disease. Chemical control has been based principally on spraying dwellings with insecticide formulations and led to the reduction of triatomine distribution and consequent interruption of disease transmission in several areas from endemic region. However, in the last decade it has been repeatedly reported the presence triatomnes, mainly Triatoma infestans, after spraying with pyrethroid insecticides, which was associated to evolution to insecticide resistance. In this paper the evolution of insecticide resistance in triatomines is reviewed. The insecticide resistance was detected in 1970s in Rhodnius prolixus and 1990s in R. prolixus and T. infestans, but not until the 2000s resistance to pyrthroids in T. infestans associated to control failures was described in Argentina and Bolivia. The main resistance mechanisms (i.e. enhanced metabolism, altered site of action and reduced penetration) were described in the T. infestans resistant to pyrethrods. Different resistant profiles were demonstrated suggesting independent origin of the different resistant foci of Argentina and Bolivia. The deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans was showed to be controlled by semi-dominant, autosomally inherited factors. Reproductive and developmental costs were also demonstrated for the resistant T. infestans. A discussion about resistance and tolerance concepts and the persistence of T. infestans in Gran Chaco region are presented. In addition, theoretical concepts related to toxicological, evolutionary and ecological aspects of insecticide resistance are discussed in order to understand the particular scenario of pyrethroid

  18. Barriers to treatment access for Chagas disease in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Manne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: According to World Health Organization (WHO prevalence estimates, 1.1 million people in Mexico are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease (CD. However, limited information is available about access to antitrypanosomal treatment. This study assesses the extent of access in Mexico, analyzes the barriers to access, and suggests strategies to overcome them. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 key informants and policymakers at the national level in Mexico. Data on CD cases, relevant policy documents and interview data were analyzed using the Flagship Framework for Pharmaceutical Policy Reform policy interventions: regulation, financing, payment, organization, and persuasion. Data showed that 3,013 cases were registered nationally from 2007-2011, representing 0.41% of total expected cases based on Mexico's national prevalence estimate. In four of five years, new registered cases were below national targets by 11-36%. Of 1,329 cases registered nationally in 2010-2011, 834 received treatment, 120 were pending treatment as of January 2012, and the treatment status of 375 was unknown. The analysis revealed that the national program mainly coordinated donation of nifurtimox and that important obstacles to access include the exclusion of antitrypanosomal medicines from the national formulary (regulation, historical exclusion of CD from the social insurance package (organization, absence of national clinical guidelines (organization, and limited provider awareness (persuasion. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to treat CD in Mexico indicate an increased commitment to addressing this disease. Access to treatment could be advanced by improving the importation process for antitrypanosomal medicines and adding them to the national formulary, increasing education for healthcare providers, and strengthening clinical guidelines. These recommendations have important implications for other

  19. Molecular epidemiology of human oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan David Ramírez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, displays significant genetic variability revealed by six Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI. In this pathology, oral transmission represents an emerging epidemiological scenario where different outbreaks associated to food/beverages consumption have been reported in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela. In Colombia, six human oral outbreaks have been reported corroborating the importance of this transmission route. Molecular epidemiology of oral outbreaks is barely known observing the incrimination of TcI, TcII, TcIV and TcV genotypes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: High-throughput molecular characterization was conducted performing MLMT (Multilocus Microsatellite Typing and mtMLST (mitochondrial Multilocus Sequence Typing strategies on 50 clones from ten isolates. Results allowed observing the occurrence of TcI, TcIV and mixed infection of distinct TcI genotypes. Thus, a majority of specific mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the sylvatic cycle of transmission were detected in the dataset with the foreseen presence of mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the domestic cycle of transmission. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest the incrimination of sylvatic genotypes in the oral outbreaks occurred in Colombia. We observed patterns of super-infection and/or co-infection with a tailored association with the severe forms of myocarditis in the acute phase of the disease. The transmission dynamics of this infection route based on molecular epidemiology evidence was unraveled and the clinical and biological implications are discussed.

  20. Nuclear cardiologic study of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (T.T.C.) was described for the first time in Japan in the earliest nineties. It represents 1 to 2 % of acute cardiac events and mimics closely acute myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to investigate 99 mTc- tetrofosmine or 201Thallium myocardial Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), 123I-meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine (123I-mibg) myocardial SPECT and myocardial Positron Emission Tomography using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in patients with T.T.C., assessing respectively left ventricular perfusion, innervation and metabolism. We studied four patients (three females) with T.T.C.. We performed two weeks after acute phase (subacute phase) myocardial perfusion SPECT and 123I-mibg myocardial SPECT for each patient. Two of them underwent myocardial PET with FDG. Then, we assessed left ventricular innervation and metabolism three months (chronic phase I) and more than six months (chronic phase II) after the acute phase. We compared the discrepancies between radionuclides uptake in the left ventricular apical region during a follow-up period of more than six months. In subacute phase, perfusion SPECT was normal for each patient. Conversely, 123I-mibg SPECT and FDG-PET showed concordant apical uptake defect. This perfusion-metabolism pattern called 'inverse flow-metabolism mismatch' is the metabolic state of stunned myocardium. After three months, we found improvement of apical tracer uptake in both FDG-PET and 123I-mibg SPECT. These findings suggest that T.T.C. is characterized by myocardial apical stunning which is related to a disturbance of cardiac sympathetic innervation. 123I-mibg SPECT might be useful to diagnose earlier this pathology and to rule out acute myocardial infarction. (authors)

  1. Predictors and prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavali V

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vishalakshi Chavali, Suresh C Tyagi, Paras K Mishra Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA Abstract: Despite our cognizance that diabetes can enhance the chances of heart failure, causes multiorgan failure,and contributes to morbidity and mortality, it is rapidly increasing menace worldwide. Less attention has been paid to alert prediabetics through determining the comprehensive predictors of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM and ameliorating DCM using novel approaches. DCM is recognized as asymptomatic progressing structural and functional remodeling in the heart of diabetics, in the absence of coronary atherosclerosis and hypertension. The three major stages of DCM are: (1 early stage, where cellular and metabolic changes occur without obvious systolic dysfunction; (2 middle stage, which is characterized by increased apoptosis, a slight increase in left ventricular size, and diastolic dysfunction and where ejection fraction (EF is <50%; and (3 late stage, which is characterized by alteration in microvasculature compliance, an increase in left ventricular size, and a decrease in cardiac performance leading to heart failure. Recent investigations have revealed that DCM is multifactorial in nature and cellular, molecular, and metabolic perturbations predisposed and contributed to DCM. Differential expression of microRNA (miRNA, signaling molecules involved in glucose metabolism, hyperlipidemia, advanced glycogen end products, cardiac extracellular matrix remodeling, and alteration in survival and differentiation of resident cardiac stem cells are manifested in DCM. A sedentary lifestyle and high fat diet causes obesity and this leads to type 2 diabetes and DCM. However, exercise training improves insulin sensitivity, contractility of cardiomyocytes, and cardiac performance in type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new clues to diagnose and mitigate DCM. This review embodies

  2. Cardiomyopathy in a Harris hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, João; Reynolds, Caryn A; Beaufrère, Hugues; Serio, Jacqueline; Blair, Robert V; Gaschen, Lorrie; Johnson, James G; Del Piero, Fabio; Barker, Steven A; Nevarez, Javier G; Tully, Thomas N

    2016-07-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION An adult sexually intact female Harris hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus) housed at a wildlife hospital was evaluated because of acute collapse during an educational exhibition. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination and hematologic analysis revealed no abnormalities; radiography revealed findings consistent with a previous tibiotarsal fracture. Coelioscopy with histologic examination and fungal culture of lung and air sac samples revealed anthracosis but no fungal infection. The hawk was discharged and temporarily removed from the education program; 1 month later, upon reintroduction into the program, it collapsed again. Physical examination and hematologic findings were similar to those after the first episode. Transcoelomic and transesophageal echocardiography and CT angiocardiography findings were consistent with cardiomyopathy. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Initial cardiac treatment included furosemide (0.5 mg/kg [0.23 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) and pimobendan (10 mg/kg [4.5 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h). After 10 days of treatment, peak and trough plasma concentrations of pimobendan were measured at 25, 196 and 715.97 ng/mL, respectively; the dosage was decreased to 0.25 mg/kg (0.11 mg/lb), PO, every 12 hours. No overt signs of toxicosis were detected. A sample was collected to reevaluate plasma pimobendan concentration after 30 days of treatment; results were not obtained prior to the patient's death but revealed a peak concentration of 16.8 ng/mL, with an undetectable trough concentration. The hawk was found dead 6 months after initial evaluation. Necropsy revealed cardiomegaly, but histologic examination did not reveal an inciting cause of cardiac dysfunction. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Cardiac disease in raptors may be underreported. Transcoelomic and transesophageal echocardiography and CT angiography provided useful information for the diagnosis of cardiac disease in the hawk of this report. PMID:27379599

  3. Chagas Disease: Challenges in Developing New Trypanocidal Lead Compounds [Doença de Chagas: Desafios no Desenvolvimento de Novas Substâncias Líderes Tripanomicidas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de C. da Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease cycle was fully elucidated by Carlos Chagas in 1909, when he reported his discovery to the scientific community in two seminal papers. Today remains innumerous factors that limit its therapeutic treatment. One of them is the lack of new drugs in the market since is well known that the existing drugs are poorly active with low efficacy and considerable side effects. Nowadays, many efforts have been done in combinatorial chemistry and synthesis of new compounds searching for new lead compounds. The present review intends to show that a wide variety of synthetic strategies are being used for the preparation of pharmaceutically active compounds against several strains of T. cruzi with a range of potential clinical applications.

  4. Bolivian migrants with Chagas disease in Barcelona, Spain: a qualitative study of dietary changes and digestive problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, Elizabeth; Pell, Christopher; Angulo, Nataly; Pinazo, María Jesús; Gimeno, Faust; Elizalde, Ignasi; Gysels, Marjolein; Muñoz, Jose; Pool, Robert; Gascón, Joaquim

    2011-12-01

    Due to international migration, Chagas disease, endemic in Latin America, has become more common in non-endemic areas. Chronic Chagas disease can cause damage to the digestive system leading to constipation. However, a range of factors influences constipation and a better understanding of the role of non-Chagas related factors is required to improve management of Chagas-related digestive problems. This study explores perceptions of constipation and changes in food and exercise habits amongst Bolivians in Barcelona, Spain. Bolivian migrants attending the Tropical Medicine Unit (Hospital Clínic, Barcelona) were interviewed about their food habits in Spain and Bolivia, migratory experience, work and leisure activities. Chagas seropositive participants also received radiological examinations. Bolivian migrants experienced dietary changes, influenced by work-related factors, which included reductions in quantities of food and liquid consumed. Almost half the participants reported changes in digestive rhythm since arriving in Spain. Constipation, which was common, in some cases was only recounted during interviews. Bolivian migrants' constipation may be associated with chronic Chagas disease or migration-related dietary changes. Careful questioning using the Rome III criteria is however required to ensure its diagnosis. Radiological studies are also required to confirm the role of Chagas disease and identify potentially serious intestinal damage. PMID:24038501

  5. Comparação entre o reagente Chagas-latex e a imunofluorescência no diagnóstico sorológico da doença de Chagas na zona sul do Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Baruffa

    1973-10-01

    Full Text Available Os Autores submeteram 142 amostras de soros de casos agudos e crônicos de Doença de Chagas, já examinados com o Reagente Chagas-Latex, ao exame de Imunofluorescência, obtendo correspondência de resultados em 139 (97,9%. O alto índice de fidelidade, provavelmente devido à ausência na zona de doenças que possam proporcionar resultados falsamente positivos, fez do Reagente Chagas-Latex um método simples e fácil para a triagem sorológica nos casos suspeitos em zona endêmica.

  6. Chagas' disease in the Brazilian Amazon: I - a short review Doença de Chagas na Amazônia Brasileira: I. revisão

    OpenAIRE

    José Rodrigues Coura; Angela Cristina Verissimo Junqueira; Cristina Maria Giordano; Ilra Renata Komoda Funatsu

    1994-01-01

    At least eighteen species of triatominae have been found in the Brazilian Amazon, nine of them naturally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi or "cruzi-like" trypanosomes and associated with numerous wild reservoirs. Despite the small number of human cases of Chagas' disease described to date in the Brazilian Amazon the risk that the disease will become endemic in this area is increasing for the following reasons: a) uncontrolled deforestation and colonization altering the ecological balance betwe...

  7. FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1: a multiplexed flow cytometry method for differential serological diagnosis of chagas disease and leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Teixeira-Carvalho

    Full Text Available Differential serological diagnosis of Chagas disease and leishmaniasis is difficult owing to cross-reactivity resulting from the fact that the parasites that cause these pathologies share antigenic epitopes. Even with optimized serological assays that use parasite-specific recombinant antigens, inconclusive test results continue to be a problem. Therefore, new serological tests with high sensitivity and specificity are needed. In the present work, we developed and evaluated the performance of a new flow cytometric serological method, referred to as FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1, for the all-in-one classification of inconclusive tests. The method uses antigens for the detection of visceral leishmaniasis, localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease and is based on an inverted detuned algorithm for analysis of anti-Trypanosomatidae IgG1 reactivity. First, parasites were label with fluorescein isothiocyanate or Alexa Fluor 647 at various concentrations. Then serum samples were serially diluted, the dilutions were incubated with suspensions of mixed labeled parasites, and flow cytometric measurements were performed to determine percentages of positive fluorescent parasites. Using the new method, we obtained correct results for 76 of 80 analyzed serum samples (95% overall performance, underscoring the outstanding performance of the method. Moreover, we found that the fluorescently labeled parasite suspensions were stable during storage at room temperature, 4 °C, and -20 °C for 1 year. In addition, two different lots of parasite suspensions showed equivalent antigen recognition; that is, the two lots showed equivalent categorical segregation of anti-Trypanosomatidae IgG1 reactivity at selected serum dilutions. In conclusion, we have developed a sensitive and selective method for differential diagnosis of Chagas disease, visceral leishmaniasis, and localized cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  8. Application of radionuclide techniques in evaluation of dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the clinical significance of radionuclide techniques in differentiating dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) from ischemic cardiomyopathy (CAD-CM). Methods: 28 patients (pts) with DCM and 55 pts with CAD-CM were studied. All pts underwent 99Tcm-MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT and 18F-FDG myocardial metabolic PET. 73 pts had 99Tcm-RBC radionuclide ventriculography and 68 pts had coronary angiography. Results: 23 pts (82%) with DCM showed perfusion abnormalities with mild and not segmental distribution. 52 pts (95%) with CAD-CM showed perfusion abnormalities that distributed along the coronary vessel territories. Perfusion defects were found in 4 pts (14%) with DCM and 45 pts (82%) with CAD-CM (P<0.01). The average perfusion score was 4.5 +- 2.6 in DCM and 9.5 +- 2.9 in CAD-CM, the area of perfusion diminished uptake was significantly smaller in DCM than in CAD-CM (P < 0.001). 2 pts with DCM and 18 pts with CAD-CM had metabolic defect. The patterns of perfusion/metabolic imaging showed mismatch in most pts with CAD-CM but match in pts with DCM. The LVEF in pts with DCM and CAD-CM was decreased but no significant difference between DCM and CAD-CM was observed. The RVEF in pts with DCM was significantly lower than that in pts with CAD-CM (32.4% +- 13.9% vs 40.9% +- 15.4%, P < 0.05). Conclusions: The radionuclide techniques showed to be helpful for distinguishing DCM from CAD-CM. The discriminate analysis revealed that segmental perfusion abnormality and RVEF were the most important factors for differentiation of DCM from CAD-CM

  9. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Colmenares, Cecilia; Ruiz-Guevara, Raiza; Mauriello, Luciano; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Noya, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas) with 249 cases (73.5% children) and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana’s signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission. PMID:25946155

  10. Chagas' Disease and HIV Co-infection: Genotypic Characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco Raquel S

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, new aspects of the immunopathology of Chagas' disease have been described in immunosuppressed patients, such as fatal central nervous system lesions related to the reactivation of the parasite. This article is the first description of the genotypic characterization, at the strain level, of Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from a patient with Chagas` disease/AIDS co-infection. The presence of four hypodense lesions was observed in the cranial compute tomographic scan. The diagnosis of AIDS was assessed by the detection of anti-HIV antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Western blot techniques. The CD4+ lymphocyte counts were maintained under 200 cells/mm3 during one year demonstrating the severity of the state of immunosuppression. Chagas' disease was confirmed by serological and parasitological methods. Trypomastigote forms were visualized in a thick blood smear. The parasite isolated is genotypically similar to the CL strain. The paper reinforces that cerebral Chagas' disease can be considered as another potential opportunistic infection in AIDS resulting from the reactivation of a dormant T. cruzi infection acquired years earlier.

  11. Dynamics of the antibody-T.cruzi competition during Chagas infection: Prognostic relevance of intracellular replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibona, G. J.; Condat, C. A.; Isasi, S. Cossy

    2005-02-01

    A recently proposed model for the competitive parasite-antibody interactions in Chagas disease is extended by separately describing the parasitic intracellular and extracellular phases. The model solutions faithfully reproduce available population data and yield predictions for parasite-induced cardiac cell damage.

  12. [Serologic study of the diagnosis of Chagas disease in Nicaraguan students in the Juventud island].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, N V; Cabrera Alonso, C; Martínez, R; Cantelar de Francisco, N; Pérez Insueta, O

    1989-01-01

    The results obtained during the serologic study for the diagnosis of Chagas' disease in 868 Nicaraguan students in the Isle of Youth are reported. Qualitative hemagglutination and indirect immunofluorescence were used. It was found that 8.5% of these students showed antibodies specific to Trypanosoma cruzi by means of this diagnostic test. PMID:2518003

  13. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkisyolé Alarcón de Noya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas with 249 cases (73.5% children and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana’s signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission.

  14. Oral Transmission of Chagas Disease by Consumption of Açaí Palm Fruit, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Nóbrega, Aglaêr A.; Garcia, Marcio H.; Tatto, Erica; Marcos T Obara; Costa, Elenild; Sobel, Jeremy; Araujo, Wildo N.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, a total of 178 cases of acute Chagas disease were reported from the Amazonian state of Pará, Brazil. Eleven occurred in Barcarena and were confirmed by visualization of parasites on blood smears. Using cohort and case–control studies, we implicated oral transmission by consumption of açaí palm fruit.

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi in the chicken model: Chagas-like heart disease in the absence of parasitism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Teixeira, A.R.L.; Gomes, C.; Nitz, N.; Sousa, A.O.; Alvez, R.M.; Guimaro, M.C.; Cordeiro, C.; Bernal, F.M.; Rosa, A.C.; Hejnar, Jiří; Leonardecz, E.; Hecht, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2011), e1000. ISSN 1935-2735 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Chagas disease * Trypanosoma cruzi * kDNA minicircles * inbred chicken Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2011

  16. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure

  17. Thallium scintigraphy for the prognosis of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the significance of perfusion defects demonstrated by thallium-201 and age in the prognosis of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Seventy-four dilated cardiomyopathy patients underwent thallium scintigraphy as well as clinical and hemodynamic examination. Abnormal perfusion defects were present in 23 of 38 patients aged <60 years (61%) and in 26 of 36 elderly patients aged ≥60 years (72%; NS). Univariate analysis showed that such perfusion defects were a significant predictor of cardiac death only in patients aged <60 years (p=0.015). Stepwise discriminant analysis also revealed that perfusion defects were a significant predictor in patients aged <60 years (Wilks' lambda 0.499, chi-square test 20.2, p=0.003). Perfusion defects were not more important than the history of syncope or stroke in elderly dilated cardiomyopathy patients. Twenty-one patients died of disease-related causes during 58±43 months. The five-year survival rate was better in patients aged <60 years without than in those with perfusion defects (100% vs 58.4%, respectively), but not affected in patients aged ≥60 years (66.7% vs 62.2%). Thallium scintigraphy is valuable for the prognosis of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy aged <60 years who are usually candidates for heart transplantation. Absence of thallium perfusion defects may indicate good long-term prognosis. (author)

  18. Analysis of left ventricular function in patients with idiopathic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of left ventricular function by cardiac pool scintigraphy and that of the regional wall motion by Fourier analysis were done in 43 cases of idiopathic cardiomyopathy and normal cases at rest and exercise stress. The normal group showed a linear increase of the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by multistage exercise stress, but showed bo abnormality of the regional wall motion. The congestive cardiomyopathy group showed markedly lower LVEF than those of the normal group at rest and a decreasing tendency by exercise stress. Abnormalities of the regional ventricular wall motion were not provoked by exercise stress. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy group showed higher LVEF at rest than those of the normal group, but showed no more increases after the LVEF reached a certain plateau by increases of exercise. This group showed no abnormality of the regional ventricular wall motion. The hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy group showed higher LVEF at rest than those of the normal group, but decreased LVEF by multistage exercise stress. (Chiba, N.)

  19. Familial occurrence of isolated non-compaction cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorsheyd, Anouk; Cramer, Maarten-Jan M.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Vonken, Evert-Jan P.; van der Smagt, Jasper; van Tintelen, Peter; Hauer, Richard N. W.

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims: Isolated left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) may have an autosomal dominant or X-linked recessive inheritance. We focus on the familial occurrence of LVNC after misdiagnosing this disorder in symptomatic patients in two families. After identification of the ind

  20. Reversal of haemochromatotic cardiomyopathy in beta thalassaemia by chelation therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Politi, A; M. Sticca; Galli, M

    1995-01-01

    Haemochromatotic cardiomyopathy is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with beta thalassaemia major. Once congestive heart failure develops most patients die in a few months. Congestive heart failure was reversed and echocardiographic findings were restored to normal in a 24 year old woman with beta thalassaemia who resumed treatment with chelation therapy (desferrioxamine).

  1. Muscle carnitine deficiency presenting as familial fatal cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, A. A.; M. Jaffe; Shapira, Y.; Ne'eman, Z; Gutman, A; S. Korman

    1987-01-01

    Three siblings presented with fatal cardiomyopathy confirmed by electron microscopy, and normal serum but low muscle carnitine concentrations. A fourth had similar signs but remained asymptomatic. He was treated with carnitine orally which increased the concentration in muscle, though it remained below normal. Electron microscopic features were unchanged.

  2. Iatrogenic takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by locally applied epinephrine and cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundbøll, Jens; Pareek, Manan; Høgsbro, Morten;

    2014-01-01

    normal coronary arteries; however, left ventriculography showed apical ballooning of the left ventricle, and the diagnosis of takotsubo cardiomyopathy was made. This was confirmed by a subsequent transthoracic echocardiography. Four days later the patient had complete resolution of the symptoms, and a...

  3. Dilated cardiomyopathy as part of familial dystrophia myotonica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadgaard, Tenna; Eiskjær, Hans; Jensen, Peter Kjestrup Axel;

    2014-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a condition characterized by non-ischaemic heart failure and is often hereditary. We present a family in which the proband had DCM in isolation while several relatives presented with myotonia, hypotonia, poly-hydramnion during pregnancy or a mental handicap. The...

  4. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo – broken heart and mind?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redfors B

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Björn Redfors, Yangzhen Shao, Elmir Omerovic Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract: Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by severe but potentially reversible regional left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, ie, akinesia, in the absence of explanatory angiographic evidence of a coronary occlusion. The typical pattern is that of an akinetic apex with preserved contractions in the base, but other variants are also common, including basal or midmyocardial akinesia with preserved apical function. The pathophysiology of SIC remains largely unknown but catecholamines are believed to play a pivotal role. The diverse array of triggering events that have been linked to SIC are arbitrarily categorized as either emotional or somatic stressors. These categories can be considered as different elements of a continuous spectrum, linked through the interface of neurology and psychiatry. This paper reviews our current knowledge of SIC, with focus on the intimate relationship between the brain and the heart. Keywords: stress-induced cardiomyopathy, takotsubo cardiomyopathy, catecholamine, cerebral injury, emotional stress, somatic stress

  5. Thallium scintigraphy for the prognosis of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabe, Toshikazu; Furuno, Takashi; Kitaoka, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Yoshihisa; Yamasaki, Naohito; Doi, Yoshinori [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    This study evaluated the significance of perfusion defects demonstrated by thallium-201 and age in the prognosis of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Seventy-four dilated cardiomyopathy patients underwent thallium scintigraphy as well as clinical and hemodynamic examination. Abnormal perfusion defects were present in 23 of 38 patients aged <60 years (61%) and in 26 of 36 elderly patients aged {>=}60 years (72%; NS). Univariate analysis showed that such perfusion defects were a significant predictor of cardiac death only in patients aged <60 years (p=0.015). Stepwise discriminant analysis also revealed that perfusion defects were a significant predictor in patients aged <60 years (Wilks' lambda 0.499, chi-square test 20.2, p=0.003). Perfusion defects were not more important than the history of syncope or stroke in elderly dilated cardiomyopathy patients. Twenty-one patients died of disease-related causes during 58{+-}43 months. The five-year survival rate was better in patients aged <60 years without than in those with perfusion defects (100% vs 58.4%, respectively), but not affected in patients aged {>=}60 years (66.7% vs 62.2%). Thallium scintigraphy is valuable for the prognosis of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy aged <60 years who are usually candidates for heart transplantation. Absence of thallium perfusion defects may indicate good long-term prognosis. (author)

  6. A serious complication in the puerperium : peripartum cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M. G. E.; Santema, J. G.; van der Voort, P. H. J.; Bams, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Two women, aged 27, presented with different symptoms shortly after giving birth to their first child. Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) was diagnosed. PPCM is a rare form of cardiac failure occurring late in pregnancy or in the postpartum period. Many women experience dyspnoea, fatigue, and pedal oe

  7. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells, cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  8. Atrioventricular conduction after alcohol septal ablation for obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna; Weibring, Kristina; Havndrup, Ole;

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Lesion of the atrioventricular conduction system is a well known adverse effect of alcohol septal ablation (ASA) in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We assessed the atrioventricular conduction at long-term follow-up after ASA. METHODS: In patients with a pacemaker...

  9. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: from mutation to functional analysis of defective protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, P.; Vondrášek, Jiří; Škvor, J.; Brdička, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2011), s. 384-391. ISSN 0353-9504 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00B107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : myosin heavy chain * homology modeling * molecular simulation * inherited cardiomyopathies Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.796, year: 2011

  10. Upper esophageal sphincter pressure in patients with Chagas' disease and primary achalasia

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    Dantas R.O.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important component of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES is the cricopharyngeal muscle. During the measurement of sphincter pressure the catheter passed through the sphincter affects the pressure value. In Chagas' disease and primary achalasia there is an esophageal myenteric plexus denervation which may affect UES pressure. We measured the UES pressure of 115 patients with Chagas' disease, 28 patients with primary achalasia and 40 healthy volunteers. We used a round manometric catheter with continuous perfusion and the rapid pull-through method, performed in triplicate during apnea. Pressures were measured in four directions, and the direction with the highest pressure (anterior/posterior and the average of the four directions were measured. The highest UES pressure in Chagas' disease patients without abnormalities upon radiologic esophageal examination (N = 63 was higher than in normal volunteers (142.8 ± 47.4 mmHg vs 113.0 ± 46.0 mmHg, mean ± SD, P<0.05. There was no difference in UES pressure between patients with primary achalasia and patients with Chagas' disease and similar esophageal involvement and normal volunteers (P>0.05. There was no difference between patients with or without esophageal dilation. In the group of subjects less than 50 years of age the UES pressure of primary achalasia (N = 21 was lower than that of Chagas' disease patients with normal radiologic esophageal examination (N = 41, measured at the site with the highest pressure (109.3 ± 31.5 mmHg vs 149.6 ± 45.3 mmHg, P<0.01 and as the average of the four directions (64.2 ± 17.1 mmHg vs 83.5 ± 28.6 mmHg, P<0.05. We conclude that there is no difference in UES pressure between patients with Chagas' disease, primary achalasia and normal volunteers, except for patients with minor involvement by Chagas' disease, for whom the UES pressure at the site with the highest pressure was higher than the pressure of normal volunteers and patients with primary

  11. Esophageal striated muscle contractions in patients with Chagas' disease and idiopathic achalasia

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    R.O. Dantas

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease causes degeneration and reduction of the number of intrinsic neurons of the esophageal myenteric plexus, with consequent absent or partial lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and loss of peristalsis in the esophageal body. The impairment of esophageal motility is seen mainly in the distal smooth muscle region. There is no study about esophageal striated muscle contractions in the disease. In 81 patients with heartburn (44 with esophagitis taken as controls, 51 patients with Chagas' disease (21 with esophageal dilatation and 18 patients with idiopathic achalasia (11 with esophageal dilatation we studied the amplitude, duration and area under the curve of esophageal proximal contractions. Using the manometric method and a continuous perfusion system we measured the esophageal striated muscle contractions 2 to 3 cm below the upper esophageal sphincter after swallows of a 5-ml bolus of water. There was no significant difference in striated muscle contractions between patients with heartburn and esophagitis and patients with heartburn without esophagitis. There was also no significant difference between patients with heartburn younger or older than 50 years or between men and women or in esophageal striated muscle contractions between patients with heartburn and Chagas' disease. The esophageal proximal amplitude of contractions was lower in patients with idiopathic achalasia than in patients with heartburn. In patients with Chagas' disease there was no significant difference between patients with esophageal dilatation and patients with normal esophageal diameter. Esophageal striated muscle contractions in patients with Chagas' disease have the same amplitude and duration as seen in patients with heartburn. Patients with idiopathic achalasia have a lower amplitude of contraction than patients with heartburn.

  12. Epidemiology and genetics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

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    Tanjore Reena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is a heart muscle disorder and is known to be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Mutations in several sarcomeric, cytoskeletal and mitochondrial genes have been reported in HCM. Though many cases of HCM are being identified, there is limited data regarding the epidemiology and genetics of HCM in India. Aim: Therefore the present study is envisaged at identifying the epidemiological variables in HCM and fitting a probability model assuming dominant mode of inheritance in HCM, which may in turn shed light on the heterogeneity of this complex disorder. Materials AND Methods: The 127 HCM cases were divided into subtypes based on pattern of hypertrophy. Chi square analysis, odds ratio, probability, relative frequency, penetrance and heritability estimates were calculated apart from epidemiological variables. Results: The HCM subtypes revealed the heterogeneous nature of the condition suggesting that the genes/mutations involved in their pathogenesis are different and this is supported by distinctive differences observed in their probability, heritability and penetrance estimates apart from epidemiological variables. An increased male preponderance was observed with the sex ratio being 3.7:1. The age at onset was found to be more than a decade early in familial cases (30 ± 10 yrs compared to non familial cases (44 ± 14 yrs. Chi square analysis revealed obstructive HCM to be following autosomal dominant mode of inheritance where as non-obstructive HCM was significantly deviating. The level of deviation was significantly high for the middle onset group compared to early and late onset groups, therefore this group may be considered as an admixture wherein genes/gene modifiers and environmental variables may be contributing to the heterogeneity and this is further supported by odds ratio. Conclusions: The study thus brings out the complexity of HCM and suggests that modes of inheritance other than

  13. Differentiation of cardiomyopathy using quantitative parameters by MUGA study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiomyopathy as an independent entity or as a complication of a generalized disorder has been a problem as regards both diagnosis and management. So far no reliable quantitative parameter for detection and monitoring of therapy is available which can be derived from noninvasive investigation. Twenty patients suspected to have cardiomyopathy were evaluated by a multigated data acquisition study (MUGA). The suspicion was based on clinical symptoms, chest X-ray finding and findings of surface electrocardiography (ECG) and 2-D-echocardiography. Aetiologically the patients could be divided into three groups although clinical symptoms and investigative findings overlapped. Group A consisted of five patients between 20 and 26 years of age who had no aetiological factor that could be attributed to their disease. This group probably represents the primary myocardial disease (PMD). Group B consisted of six patients in the age ranging from 35 to 50 years where excessive alcohol consumption and chronic collagenous disease was attributed to be the cause of the cardiomyopathy. This group probably represented the non-ischaemic congestive cardiomyopathy (NICC). Group C consisted of nine patients in the range of 40 to 55 years of age who had episodes of ischaemic attacks or had a history of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). They probably represented cases of ischaemic congestive cardiomyopathy (ICC). The results of the MUGA study showed similar findings for both group A and B patients, namely, enlargement of both ventricular blood pools, low global ejection fractions (GEF), and generalized hypokinesia to akinesia with low values of sectorial ejection fractions. However, some patients of group B showed improvement of their GEF values after treatment. The group C patients showed moderately low left ventricular global ejection fraction (LVGEF) with normal right ventricular global ejection fraction (RVGEF). Only the left ventricular blood pool was enlarged and only segmental hypokinesia

  14. The characteristics of stress cardiomyopathy in an ethnically heterogeneous population

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    Francisco O Nascimento

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Stress cardiomyopathy is a cardiac syndrome that is characterized by transient left ventricular systolic dysfunction in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Its epidemiology has been described in homogeneous Asian, Caucasian and Black populations, but its characteristics in heterogeneous populations are poorly understood. Our aim was to assess the characteristics of stress cardiomyopathy in a heterogeneous population that included a large percentage of Hispanics. METHODS: We reviewed 59 consecutive cases of stress cardiomyopathy that were confirmed by coronary angiography and were in agreement with the Mayo Clinic diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 74 years (range, 39-91 years, and 37 patients were female (62.7%. Twenty-nine patients (49.2% were Latino/Hispanic, 26 (44% were Caucasian, 3 (5% were Asian, and 1 patient (1.7% was Black. The most common chief symptom was dyspnea, followed by chest pain and an absence of symptoms in 54.2, 28.8, and 18.6% of the patients, respectively. The primary EKG abnormalities consisted of a T wave inversion, an ST segment elevation, and ST segment depression in 69.5%, 25.4%, and 15.3% of the patients, respectively. The stressor event was identified in 90% of the cases. In 32 cases (54%, the stressor event was physical stress or a medical illness, and in 21 cases (35.6%, the stressor event was emotional stress. The in-hospital mortality rate was 8.5%. CONCLUSIONS: In our heterogeneous study population, stress cardiomyopathy presented with a 3:2 female-to-male ratio, and dyspnea was the most common chief complaint. Stress cardiomyopathy exhibited a T wave inversion as the primary EKG abnormality. These findings differ from previous cases that have been reported, and further studies are needed.

  15. Clinical Features and Echocardiographic Findings in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

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    Cristina Blesneac

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, one of the most common inherited cardiomyopathies, is a heterogeneous disease resulting from sarcomeric protein mutations, with an incidence in the adult population of 1:500. Current information on the epidemiology and outcomes of this disease in children is limited. Methods: Thirty-four children diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the Pediatric Cardiology Department from Tîrgu Mureș were evaluated concerning familial and personal history, clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic aspects. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was defined by the presence of a hypertrophied, non-dilated ventricle, in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease that could produce ventricular hypertrophy. Results: The youngest diagnosed child was a neonate, a total of 10 patients being diagnosed until 1 year of age. In 6 cases a positive familial history was found. Noonan syndrome was found in 2 cases. Only 21 patients were symptomatic, the predominant symptoms being shortness of breath on exertion with exercise limitations. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was present in 21 cases (61.7%. Twenty-four patients were on β-blocking therapy, while 4 patients underwent septal myectomy. Conclusions: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous disorder in terms of evolution, age of onset, type and extent of hypertrophy, and the risk of sudden death. It can affect children of any age. There is a need for a complex evaluation, including familial and personal anamnesis, clinical examination, electrocardiogram and echocardiography of all patients. It is highly important to develop screening strategies, including genetic testing, for an early diagnosis, especially in asymptomatic patients with a positive familial background

  16. Fourier amplitude and phase analysis in the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-four patients with a cardiomyopathy were studied by Radionuclide Cardangiography (RNCA) and Fourier amplitude and phase image analysis. The study group included patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (27) and an equal number of patients with a primary cardiomyopathy: drug-induced (22), idiopathic (three), radiation-induced (one), and amyloidosis (one). Twenty-eight patients had rest studies alone and 26 had both rest and stress studies (80 total). The mean rest LVEF in the ischemic group was 27.9%, in the drug-induced group 36.5%, and in the idiopathic group 30%. The stress LVEF decreased in 92% of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and 45% of patients with primary (drug-induced) cardiomyopathy. Fourier amplitude and phase images were generated for each study. Amplitude and phase images were abnormal in all patients with an ischemic cardiomyopathy. LV amplitude abnormalities were regional and phase was directional. A zone of dysynergy on phase analysis was present in 44% of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. In the drug-induced primary cardiomyopathy group, all patients had abnormal amplitude and 86% had abnormal phase. Amplitude abnormalities were global rather than regional and phase patterns were nondirectional. Only one patient had a zone of dysynergy on the phase image. We conclude that the stress LVEF alone cannot consistently differentiate between ischemic and primary cardiomyopathies and that Fourier amplitude and phase analysis may be useful in determining the etiology of a cardiomyopathy (ischemic vs primary)

  17. Aspectos neurológicos da doença de chagas: sistema nervoso central Neurological aspects of Chagas' disease: central nervous system

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    Sylvio de Vergueiro Forjaz

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available The lesions of the nervous system in the Trypanosomiasis Cruzi are quite frequent and are not only limited to the encephalo-spinal-axis. Actually, they are much more common in the peripheral representations of the autonomic nervous system, resulting in the so-called enteromegalies (mega-esophagus, megacolon, etc. so frequent in Brazil. However, only the clinical manifestations due to the encephalic and spinal lesions have been included in the neurological aspects of Chagas' disease (as formerly contended for by Carlos Chagas. In the acute phase of the central nervous system infestation, the Trypanosoma cruzi,as leishmanias, is found in cellular elements of the neuroglia (microglia, astroglia and may be isolated from the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (inoculation in sensitive animals. The corresponding clinical manifestations are the severe difuse meningo-encephalo-myelitis with a high degree of lethality and also signs of infection, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. The infants from endemic areas are much more compromised. The clinical-pathologic as well as experimental confirmations on that acute phase of the disease are numerous and irrefutable. In the chronic phase of the disease, the neurological manifestations are not very clear. Early in 1909, Chagas, impressed with the great number of cases of infantile encephalopathy found in infested regions, imputed to the T. cruzithe etiology of such cases of encephalopathy and considered them as pertaining to a chronic phase of the disease. This has not been confirmed by other investigations, and even if the etiologic agent were the T. cruzithe clinical manifestations have no evolutive character and seem more sequelae than symptoms of a real chronic nervous phase. Even experimentally it has not been possible to demonstrate the presence of parasites in the nervous system of infested animals after clearing of the signs of the acute phase. In patients with chronic Chagas' disease with lesions in

  18. Comparison of Benefits from Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy between Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy and Patients with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

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    Talia Alenabi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT is an effective treatment for patients with moderate to severe heart failure. However, 20-30% of patients remain non-responders to CRT. We sought to identify which patients benefit the most from CRT in regard to the etiology of heart failure. Methods: Eighty-three consecutive patients (62 men who had a biventricular pacemaker inserted at Tehran Heart Center between May 2004 and March 2007 were evaluated retrospectively. The inclusion criteria were comprised of New York Heart Association (NYHA class III or IV, left ventricular ejection fraction120ms. After 6 months, response was defined as being alive, no hospitalization for cardiac decompensation, and an improvement in NYHA class>1 grade. Results: After 6 months, 60 patients out of the 83 patients were responders. Amongst the 83 patients, 48 had ischemic cardiomyopathy and 35 had non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. A cross-tabulation of response versus etiology showed no significant difference between ischemic versus non-ischemic cardiomyopathy with regard to response to CRT (P=0.322. Conclusion: According to our study, there was no difference in response to CRT between ischemic versus non-ischemic cardiomyopathy at six months’ follow-up.

  19. Chagas' disease: the rural environment and vector control in the state of São Paulo, Brazil Doença de Chagas: meio rural e controle de vetores no Estado de São Paulo, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Dalva Marli V. Wanderley

    1993-01-01

    In the first half of this century - a period of expanding coffee cultivation - there was a close relationship between the growth of cleared spaces, the domestication of triatomines, and the establishment of Chagas' disease in the state of São Paulo. However, the initiation of control mesuares in 1950 coincided with a period characterized by a progressive reversal of the conditions that had facilitated the establishment of Chagas' disease in the first place. Alterations were taking place in th...

  20. Reversal of Dilated Cardiomyopathy After Successful Radio-Frequency Ablation of Frequent Atrial Premature Beats, a New Cause for Arrhythmia-Induced Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Louis Vervueren, MD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Incessant atrial premature beats as a potential cause for tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy was suspected in a patient presenting with dilated non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and severely altered left ventricular ejection fraction. The elimination of a left atrial focus by percutaneous RF ablation led to normalization of the clinical status, of atrial and ventricular dimensions and left ventricular systolic function.

  1. [Investigation of vectors and reservoirs in an acute Chagas outbreak due to possible oral transmission in Aguachica, Cesar, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Hugo; Tibaduiza, Tania; Montilla, Marleny; Triana, Omar; Suárez, Diana Carolina; Torres Torres, Mariela; Arias, María Teresa; Lugo, Ligia

    2014-04-01

    Colombia recorded 11 cases of acute Chagas disease and 80 cases of oral contamination with Trypanosoma cruzi. The current study analyzes the entomological and parasitological characteristics of the outbreak in Aguachica, Cesar Department, in 2010. An interdisciplinary group of health professionals and regional university personnel conducted the laboratory tests in the patients and the investigation of the transmission focus. Eleven cases of acute Chagas diseases were detected in a single family in a dwelling with domiciliated triatomines and Rhodnius pallescens, Pantrongylus geniculatus, Eratyrus cuspidatus, and two Didelphis marsupialis opossums infected with T. cruzi in Attalea butyracea and Elaeis oleifera palm trees in the urban area of Aguachica. The study analyzes the role of R. pallescens and palm trees in the wild cycle of T. cruzi and in oral transmission of Chagas disease. Sporadic incursions by wild R. pallescens, P. geniculatus, and E. cuspidatus from the nearby palm trees into human dwellings may cause increasingly frequent outbreaks of oral Chagas disease. PMID:24896050

  2. Brain Chagas'disease: increasing differential diagnosis of brain mass in immunosuppressed patients - a case report and literature revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present a case of Chagas'disease as tumor-like lesion of the brain, in a patient with Aids, simulating the lesions most frequently found in these patients, as toxoplasmosis, lymphoma and cryptococcosis. Furthermore, the case reported have peculiarity to be the only with lesion documented in cerebellum, and unusual due to be secondary by reactivation of chronic Chagas disease. Moreover, emphasize analysis of cerebrospinal fluid with realization of sorologic tests to Chagas's disease, as simple as effective method, to make use of biopsy with stereotaxia in unfinished cases and bad evolution. Finally, after a wide world literature review about Chagas'disease as a tumor-like lesion of the brain, emphasizing this publication as the first written in a radiology journal of specialty. (author). 40 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  3. Value of cardiovascular MR in diagnosing left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy and in discriminating between other cardiomyopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grothoff, Matthias; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Gutberlet, Matthias [University of Leipzig - Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Pachowsky, Milena [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Hoffmann, Janine [University of Leipzig, Department of Obstetrics, Leipzig (Germany); Posch, Maximilian [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Klaassen, Sabine [Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Charite Medical Faculty and Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    To analyse the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial parameters to differentiate left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) from other cardiomyopathies and controls. We retrospectively analysed 12 patients with LVNC, 11 with dilated and 10 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and compared them to 24 controls. LVNC patients had to fulfil standard echocardiographic criteria as well as additional clinical and imaging criteria. Cine steady-state free precession and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging was performed. The total LV myocardial mass index (LV-MMI), compacted (LV-MMI{sub compacted}), non-compacted (LV-MMI{sub non-compacted}), percentage LV-MM{sub non-compacted}, ventricular volumes and function were calculated. Data were compared using analysis of variance and Dunnett's test. Additionally, semi-quantitative segmental analyses of the occurrence of increased trabeculation were performed. Total LV-MMI{sub non-compacted} and percentage LV-MM{sub non-compacted} were discriminators between patients with LVCN, healthy controls and those with other cardiomyopathies with cut-offs of 15 g/m{sup 2} and 25 %, respectively. Furthermore, trabeculation in basal segments and a ratio of non-compacted/compacted myocardium of {>=}3:1 were criteria for LVNC. A combination of these criteria provided sensitivities and specificities of up to 100 %. None of the LVNC patients demonstrated LGE. Absolute CMR quantification of the LV-MMI{sub non-compacted} or the percentage LV-MM{sub non-compacted} and increased trabeculation in basal segments allows one to reliably diagnose LVNC and to differentiate it from other cardiomyopathies. (orig.)

  4. Discrepancies and consequences of indirect hemagglutination, indirect immunofluorescence and Elisa tests for the diagnosis of Chagas disease

    OpenAIRE

    Regina Maia de Souza; Vicente Amato Neto

    2012-01-01

    Using the indirect hemagglutination (IH), indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests for the diagnosis of Chagas disease, 4000 serum samples were examined. This study was conducted with different purposes: clinical interest, research support and parasitological monitoring of those patients with Chagas disease who were treated with heart transplantations. The tests occurred without patient selection and in accordance with the medical requests. The res...

  5. Formas encefalopaticas de enfermedad de Chagas cronica observadas en Argentina Encephalopathic form of chronic Chagas' disease observed in Argentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Eduardo Jorg

    1981-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen las características clínicas y las manifestaciones dominantes en 22 enfermos observados entre 1963 y 1978 sobre un total de 420 con neuropatías diversas examinados en el area central Norte de la Argentina; afectados por una encefalopatía crónica, que, por hallazgos de laboratorio (demostración del parasito en sangre o en su defecto confirmacion por mas de una prueba serológica positiva y por las correlaciones anatomoclínicas, puede ser imputada a la infección por el Trypanosoma cruzi. En la mitad o mas de los enfermos, son salientes las siguientes manifestaciones: disprosexia y confusión en 81,8%; cefalea y confusión en 72,7%; debilitamiento de reflejos músculo-tendinosos y trastornos del lenguaje en 63,6%; dispraxias en 59%; trastornos de la marcha y crisis mioclónicas en 54,5%; bradicinesias en 50%. En menor escala se encontraron: parestesias, ideas delirantes, perturbaciones cerebelares, crisis de vertigo, diplopia, lipotimias,humor fluctuante. Las menos frecuentes: disautonomia y excitacion. En 8 se hallaron evidencias semiologicas de cardiopatias y en 2 de compromiso digestivo grosero. Se analiza el alcance de esta casuistica en relación a los hallazgos anatomopatológicos en casos mortales y con referencia a lo ya conocido sobre la forma neuropatologica de la enfermedad de Chagas cronica.Among 420 patientes found with diverse subacute and chronic neuropathies, 22 were diagnosed as cases of true trypanosomic encephalopathy by means of the demonstration of parasites in blood (by xenodiagnosis or hemoculture or through serologic tests. In 50% or more of those patientes, following semiologic elements were prevalente: dysprosexia and depression in 81.8%; cephalea and confusion in 72.7%; weakness of muscular-tendineous reflexes and speech disturbance in 63.6% dispraxies in 59.0%; disturbances of gait and myoclonic crises in 54.5%; bradikinesias in 59.0%. Other symptoms were verified in a mirror scale: paresias

  6. Indium-111 antimyosin monoclonal antibody uptake in patients with cardiomyopathy and myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prognostic significance of myocardial uptake of indium-111 antimyosin antibody was evaluated in 17 patients with idiopathic cardiomyopathy; 10 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and 7 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Seven of 10 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy showed positive images. Three of these 7 patients with strongly positive scans died after scintigraphic examination. Six of 7 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy showed positive images. Three of the patients with dilated left ventricle had prominent positive scans and higher heart to lung ratio. The heart to lung ratio of antimyosin uptake in total patients was correlated with left ventricular end-diastolic dimension and ejection fraction measured by echocardiography. In patients with myocarditis, all three patients showed positive scintigrams within 4 weeks after the onset of the disease and 1 of 6 patients was positive thereafter, who had dilated ventricle and decreased cardiac function. Thus, indium-111 antimyosin antibody imaging may be useful to evaluate prognosis of patients with cardiomyopathy and myocarditis. (author)

  7. Simultaneous onset of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy in identical middle-aged twins

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, A.; Somasundram, U; Hall, J

    1999-01-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is a primary myocardial disease which is characterised by left ventricular, or biventricular, dilatation and impaired contractility. The precise aetiology is unknown and the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors is debated. We report two identical male twins of Caucasian origin with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who presented within a few months of each other.


Keywords: idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy; twins

  8. Serological and molecular evidence of enterovirus infection in patients with end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Muir, P; Nicholson, F; Illavia, S. J.; McNeil, T. S.; Ajetunmobi, J. F.; Dunn, H; Starkey, W. G.; Reetoo, K. N.; Cary, N R; Parameshwar, J; Banatvala, J E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relative diagnostic value of enterovirus-specific molecular biological and serological assays in patients with end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy, and to investigate the possible role of other cardiotropic viruses in dilated cardiomyopathy. DESIGN: Analysis of recipient myocardial tissue and serum from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and controls undergoing cardiac transplantation for end-stage cardiac disease. SETTING: University virology department and transplanta...

  9. Recovery of methamphetamine associated cardiomyopathy predicted by late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Buonocore Michael; Caputo Gary; Yeo Khung; Lopez Javier E; Schaefer Saul

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Methamphetamine is known to cause a cardiomyopathy which may be reversible with appropriate medical therapy and cessation of use. Late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been shown to identify fibrosis in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. We present a case of severe methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy in which cardiac function recovered after 6 months. Evaluation by CMR using late gadolinium enhancement was notable for an absence of enh...

  10. Clinical and Genetic Determinants of Cardiomyopathy Risk among Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Kasey J; Cushing-Haugen, Kara; Hansen, John A; Fan, Wenhong; Leisenring, Wendy M; Martin, Paul J; Zhao, Lue Ping; Chow, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Cardiomyopathy has been recognized as a complication after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Using a nested case-cohort design, we examined the relationships between demographic, therapeutic, and selected cardiovascular disease risk factors among ≥1-year HCT survivors who developed cardiomyopathy before (n = 43) or after (n = 89) 1 year from HCT as compared to a randomly selected subcohort of survivors without cardiomyopathy (n = 444). Genomic data were available for 79 cases and 267 noncases. Clinical and genetic covariates were examined for association with the risk of early or late cardiomyopathy. Clinical risk factors associated with both early- and late-onset cardiomyopathy included anthracycline exposure ≥250 mg/m(2) and pre-existing hypertension. Among late-onset cardiomyopathy cases, the development of diabetes and ischemic heart disease further increased risk. We replicated several previously reported genetic associations among early-onset cardiomyopathy cases, including rs1786814 in CELF4, rs2232228 in HAS3, and rs17863783 in UGT1A6. None of these markers were associated with risk of late-onset cardiomyopathy. A combination of demographic, treatment, and clinical covariates predicted early-onset cardiomyopathy with reasonable accuracy (area under the curve [AUC], .76; 95% confidence interval [CI], .68 to .83), but prediction of late cardiomyopathy was poor (AUC, .59; 95% CI .53 to .67). The addition of genetic polymorphisms with marginal associations (odds ratios ≥1.3) did not enhance prediction for either early- or late-onset cardiomyopathy. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors influence the risk of both early- and late-onset cardiomyopathy in HCT survivors. Although certain genetic markers may influence the risk of early-onset disease, further work is required to validate previously reported findings and to determine how genetic information should be incorporated into clinically useful risk prediction models. PMID:26968791

  11. Assessment and epidemiology of Chagas' disease in patients treated in Araguaina - Tocantins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagas disease (AD) was described by Carlos Chagas in 1909. It is caused by a parasite T. cruzi, transmitted by bugs, by blood transfusion, vertical and orally. The DC has two phases: acute and chronic. The evolution to the cardiac form occurs in about 30% of chronic cases and is the largest cause of mortality in chronic Chagas disease. The aim of this study was to Chagas' disease in patients of Tocantins, compared with other heart patients and asymptomatic from the standpoint of non-invasive exams using radiant energies such as echocardiography and ECG and RX. The descriptive study included 80 patients, 20 chronic form of Chagas disease, 20 indeterminate, 20 with other heart diseases, and 20 controls. There was a prevalence of 9.5% of chagasic patients treated in outpatient cardiology at Araguaina Tocantins, and 7.3% in chronic and 2.21% in the indeterminate. Of the chronic patients in the study 50% had mega esophagus and megacolon 4 (20%). Most patients had no family history of AD, nor was a smoker or drinker. Major electrocardiographic abnormalities found refer to driving. The evaluation of ICT, the chronic chagasic showed that increased by 40% of patients, 40% had esophageal changes and 20% of patients had megacolon s. The echocardiogram was abnormal in 42%). 27% of patients had EF below 55% changed. Changes in segmental contractility and Asynchrony septum were found in 80% of chronic Chagas disease. In 80% of the patients was observed diastolic dysfunction. The valvular changes occurred in 75%. Electrocardiographic abnormalities occurred in 80% of patients with CCC, while the other heart had ECG changes. Arterial hypertension had an incidence of 45% in patients with CCC and 40% in FCI. The systolic and diastolic ventricular dysfunction was more prevalent in groups that had an abnormal ECG and arrhythmia. Observed that the group of chagasic decreased ejection fraction is correlated to a higher incidence of arrhythmias besides diastolic dysfunction and related

  12. Indium-111 antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab imaging in patients with cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six patients with cardiomyopathy were imaged following intravenous injection of an indium-111 labeled monoclonal antibody directed against the heavy chain of cardiac myosin. Two patients had hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy (HNCM), two patients had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and two patients had specific heart muscle disease. One of 2 patients with HNCM and one of 2 patients with DCM had a positive antimyosin scan. The 2 patients with specific heart muscle disease manifested persistent blood pool activity of the antibody, thereby precluding interpretation of the images. The present report demonstrates that antimyosin antibody imaging may provide evidence of myocardial injury, or necrosis in some patients with cardiomyopathy. (author)

  13. Echomorphology of cardiomyopathy: review of 217 cases from 1999 to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study echocardiogram features of different types of cardiomyopathy presenting over a 12 year period at a single centre in Peshawar. Methods: The series comprised a retrospective review of 13,788 consecutive echocardiograms carried out at the Muhammadi Hospital International Medical Research Centre, Hayatabad, Peshawar, from January 1999 to December 2010. Patients were split into two: Group I with paediatric and adolescent cases (0-18 years) and Group II with adults (>18 years). In the adult group, women with peripartum cardiomyopathy were subdivided into two groups of 18-30 years and 30 to 44 years. Standard Echo B and M modes and Doppler parameters were recorded to ascertain the diagnoses of common primary and secondary cardiomyopathies. Patients with myocarditis with chambers dilatation and global dysfunction, and cardiopathy associated with major cardiovascular diseases were excluded. SPSS 14 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Cardiomyopathy was diagnosed in 217 (1.57%) cases. There were 144 (66%) cases of dilated cardiomyopathy with a mean age of 13+-14.8 years; 17 (8%) cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with a mean age of 12+-11.5 years; and 7 (3%) cases of restrictive cardiomyopathy with a mean age of 31+-7.8 years. Primary cardiac amyloidosis was confirmed in 9 (4%) cases, and peripartum cardiomyopathy in 25 (11%) females. Rare subtypes were found in 15 (7%) cases. Conclusion: DCM was the most frequently diagnosed subtype of cardiomyopathy followed by HCM in both the adult and paediatric age groups. (author)

  14. A Systematic Review of Phenotypic Features Associated With Cardiac Troponin I Mutations in Hereditary Cardiomyopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jens; Hey, Thomas; Lambrecht, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic investigations have established that mutations in proteins of the contractile unit of the myocardium, known as the sarcomere, may be associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). It has become clinical...... in relation to phenotypic features reported to be associated with mutations in cardiac troponin I (cTnI; TNNI3), which is a recognized sarcomeric disease gene in all 3 cardiomyopathies. RESULTS: The results of this review did not identify specific genotype-phenotype relations in HCM or DCM, and c...

  15. Myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; Isquemia miocardica na cardiomiopatia hipertrofica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Filho, Moyses de Oliveira; Figueiredo, Geraldo L.; Simoes, Marcus V.; Pyntia, Antonio O.; Marin Neto, Jose Antonio [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Div. de Cardiologia

    2000-08-01

    Myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is multifactorial and explains the occurrence of angina, in about 50% of patients. The pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia may be explained by the increase of the ventricular mass and relative paucity of the coronary microcirculation; the elevated ventricular filling pressures and myocardial stiffness causing a compression of the coronary microvessels; the impaired coronary vasodilator flow reserve caused by anatomic and functional abnormalities; and the systolic compression of epicardial vessel (myocardial bridges). Myocardial ischemia must be investigated by perfusion scintigraphic methods since its presence influences the prognosis and has relevant clinical implications for management of patients. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and documented myocardial ischemia usually need to undergo invasive coronary angiography to exclude the presence of concomitant atherosclerotic coronary disease. (author)

  16. Using human pluripotent stem cells to study Friedreich ataxia cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, Duncan E; Pera, Martin F; Delatycki, Martin B; Pébay, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common of the inherited ataxias. It is an autosomal recessive disease characterised by degeneration of peripheral sensory neurons, regions of the central nervous system and cardiomyopathy. FRDA is usually due to homozygosity for trinucleotide GAA repeat expansions found within first intron of the FRATAXIN (FXN) gene, which results in reduced levels of the mitochondrial protein FXN. Reduced FXN protein results in mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation leading to increased oxidative stress and cell death in the nervous system and heart. Yet the precise functions of FXN and the underlying mechanisms leading to disease pathology remain elusive. This is particularly true of the cardiac aspect of FRDA, which remains largely uncharacterized at the cellular level. Here, we summarise current knowledge on experimental models in which to study FRDA cardiomyopathy, with a particular focus on the use of human pluripotent stem cells as a disease model. PMID:27019046

  17. Complete reversal of hypertensive cardiomyopathy after initiating combined antihypertensive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Marijn J; van de Poll, Sweder W; Michels, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Hypertensive cardiomyopathy is a common complication of hypertension, with a prevalence ranging from 12% to 26%. It is associated with an increased cardiac mortality and morbidity. Lifestyle changes and antihypertensive therapy usually have a significant, but relatively small effect on left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), which is associated with a reduction in cardiovascular risk. In this paper, we describe a 39-year-old woman with severe LVH. On transthoracic echocardiogram there was concentric LVH, systolic function was a mildly reduced and there was diastolic dysfunction grade III. After only 6 months of therapy with a combination of antihypertensive agents, the left ventricular mass index was reduced by 29%, systolic function was normal and the diastolic dysfunction improved to grade I. This paper shows that in hypertensive cardiomyopathy, even severe LVH can be completely reversible. PMID:27060071

  18. Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy and Takotsubo Syndrome: Could They Coexist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egea-Serrano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Takotsubo syndrome (TKS is generally caused by a stressful condition, and it usually has a good prognosis after the recovery of left ventricular function. About 70% of the cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may develop obstruction in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT, which is responsible for heart failure. Case Presentation We present a unique case where TKS occurred in a middle-aged male patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM without a clearly identifiable initial stress trigger. Conclusions In the setting of acute left ventricular function depression in HOCM, a comprehensive differential diagnosis should be established. Treatment should be based on hemodynamic changes. After recovery, the prognosis is related to HOCM.

  19. RBM20, a gene for hereditary cardiomyopathy, regulates titin splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Greaser, Marion L.; Radke, Michael H.; Liss, Martin; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Maatz, Henrike; Schulz, Herbert; Li, Shijun; Parrish, Amanda M.; Dauksaite, Vita; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Klaassen, Sabine; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Hacker, Timothy A.; Saupe, Kurt W.; Dec, G. William; Ellinor, Patrick T.; MacRae, Calum A.; Spallek, Bastian; Fischer, Robert; Perrot, Andreas; Özcelik, Cemil; Saar, Kathrin; Hubner, Norbert; Gotthardt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in the adaptation of cardiac function exemplified by the isoform switch of titin, which adjusts ventricular filling. We previously identified a rat strain deficient in titin splicing. Using genetic mapping, we found a loss-of-function mutation in RBM20 as the underlying cause for the pathological titin isoform expression. Mutations in human RBM20 have previously been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. We showed that the phenotype of Rbm20 deficient rats resembles the human pathology. Deep sequencing of the human and rat cardiac transcriptome revealed an RBM20 dependent regulation of alternative splicing. Additionally to titin we identified a set of 30 genes with conserved regulation between human and rat. This network is enriched for genes previously linked to cardiomyopathy, ion-homeostasis, and sarcomere biology. Our studies emphasize the importance of posttranscriptional regulation in cardiac function and provide mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:22466703

  20. Transient stress cardiomyopathies in the elderly: Clinical & Pathophysiologic considerations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A Chen

    2012-01-01

    Transient stress-induced cardiomyopathies have been increasingly recognized and while rare,they tend to affect elderly women more than other demographic groups.One type,often called tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC),is typically triggered by significant emotional or physical stress and is associated with chest pain,electrocardiogram (ECG) changes and abnormal cardiac enzymes.Significant left ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities usually include an akinetic "ballooning" apex with normal or hyperdynamic function of the base.A second type,often called neurogenic stunned myocardium,typically associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage,also usually presents with ECG changes and positive enzymes,but the typical wall motion abnormalities seen include normal basal and apical left ventricular contraction with akinesis of the mid-cavity in a circumferential fashion.The pathophysiology,clinical care and typical courses,are reviewed.

  1. Chagas' disease in the Brazilian Amazon: I - a short review Doença de Chagas na Amazônia Brasileira: I. revisão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available At least eighteen species of triatominae have been found in the Brazilian Amazon, nine of them naturally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi or "cruzi-like" trypanosomes and associated with numerous wild reservoirs. Despite the small number of human cases of Chagas' disease described to date in the Brazilian Amazon the risk that the disease will become endemic in this area is increasing for the following reasons: a uncontrolled deforestation and colonization altering the ecological balance between reservoir hosts and wild vectors; b the adaptation of reservoir hosts of T.cruzi and wild vectors to peripheral and intradomiciliary areas, as the sole feeding alternative; c migration of infected human population from endemic areas, accompanied by domestic reservoir hosts (dogs and cats or accidentally carrying in their baggage vectors already adapted to the domestic habitat. In short, risks that Chagas' disease will become endemic to the Amazon appear to be linked to the transposition of the wild cycle to the domestic cycle in that area or to transfer of the domestic cycle from endemic areas to the Amazon.Pelo menos dezoito espécies de triatomíneos foram encontradas na Amazônia brasileira, nove das quais infectadas com Trypanosoma cruzi ou semelhante ("cruzi-like", associadas com numerosos reservatórios silvestres. A despeito do pequeno número de casos humanos da doença de Chagas descritos até agora na Amazônia brasileira, o risco que essa doença se torne endêmica é cada vez maior, pelas seguintes razões: a desmatamentos e colonização descontrolados, alterando o balanço entre reservatórios e vetores; b adaptação de reservatórios e vetores silvestres com T.cruzi ao peridomicílio, como única alternativa alimentar; c migração de populações humanas infectadas com T.cruzi acompanhadas de reservatórios domésticos (cães e gatos ou de vetores de suas regiões de origem na bagagem, já adaptados ao domicílio. Em resumo, o risco de que

  2. Mutations of Presenilin Genes in Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Duanxiang ; Parks, Sharie B. ; Kushner, Jessica D. ; Nauman, Deirdre ; Burgess, Donna ; Ludwigsen, Susan ; Partain, Julie ; Nixon, Randal R. ; Allen, Charles N. ; Irwin, Robert P. ; Jakobs, Petra M. ; Litt, Michael ; Hershberger, Ray E. 

    2006-01-01

    Two common disorders of the elderly are heart failure and Alzheimer disease (AD). Heart failure usually results from dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). DCM of unknown cause in families has recently been shown to result from genetic disease, highlighting newly discovered disease mechanisms. AD is the most frequent neurodegenerative disease of older Americans. Familial AD is caused most commonly by presenilin 1 (PSEN1) or presenilin 2 (PSEN2) mutations, a discovery that has greatly advanced the fiel...

  3. Alteration of Energy Substrates and ROS Production in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    O. Lorenzo; Ramírez, E.; Picatoste, B.; J. Egido; Tuñón, J.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is initiated by alterations in energy substrates. Despite excess of plasma glucose and lipids, the diabetic heart almost exclusively depends on fatty acid degradation. Glycolytic enzymes and transporters are impaired by fatty acid metabolism, leading to accumulation of glucose derivatives. However, fatty acid oxidation yields lower ATP production per mole of oxygen than glucose, causing mitochondrial uncoupling and decreased energy efficiency. In addition, the oxidatio...

  4. Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy with atrioventricular block and skeletal myopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, A. P.; Shapiro, L M; Rickards, A F; Poole-Wilson, P A

    1990-01-01

    Five generations of an Italian family with an autosomal dominant restrictive cardiomyopathy are described. Members of four generations were examined. Symptoms usually developed in the third or fourth decade but the disease did occur in childhood. Initially the condition was characterised by normal ventricular size and systolic function with increased diastolic filling pressures in both ventricles and consequent bi-atrial enlargement. Cardiac catheterisation showed a left ventricular filling p...

  5. Utilizing ECG-based Heartbeat Classification for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Quazi Abidur; Tereshchenko, Larisa G.; Kongkatong, Matthew; Abraham, Theodore; Abraham, M. Roselle; Shatkay, Hagit

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiovascular disease where the heart muscle is partially thickened and blood flow is (potentially fatally) obstructed. A test based on electrocardiograms (ECG) that record the heart electrical activity can help in early detection of HCM patients. This paper presents a cardiovascular-patient classifier we developed to identify HCM patients using standard 10-seconds, 12-lead ECG signals. Patients are classified as having HCM if the majority of their reco...

  6. Microvascular dysfunction in nonfailing arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a nonischaemic cardiomyopathy and leading cause of sudden death in the young. It has been shown that microvascular dysfunction reflected by an impaired myocardial blood flow (MBF) response to stress is present in patients with other forms of nonischaemic cardiomyopathy, e.g. dilated cardiomyopathy, and that the reduced MBF may be related to a poor prognosis. Therefore, we quantified MBF, coronary flow reserve and coronary vascular resistance in patients with nonfailing ARVC using H215 O and PET. In ten male patients with ARVC (mean age 49 ± 14 years), MBF was quantified at rest and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia using H215 O PET. Results were compared with those obtained in 20 age-matched healthy male control subjects (mean age 46 ± 14 years). Resting MBF was not significantly different between patients with ARVC and controls (MBFrest 1.19 ± 0.29 vs. 1.12 ± 0.20 ml/min/ml). However, hyperaemic MBF was significantly lower in patients with ARVC than in controls (2.60 ± 0.96 vs. 3.68 ± 0.84 ml/min/ml; p = 0.005). Consequently, patients with ARVC had a significantly lower coronary flow reserve than control subjects (2.41 ± 1.34 vs. 3.39 ± 0.93; p = 0.030). In addition, hyperaemic coronary vascular resistance was increased in patients with ARVC (36.79 ± 12.91 vs. 26.31 ± 6.49 mmHg x ml-1 x min x ml; p = 0.007), but was found to be unchanged at rest. In this small well-characterized cohort of patients with nonfailing ARVC, we found a significantly reduced hyperaemic MBF and increased coronary vascular resistance. Further studies are necessary to corroborate this potential new functional aspect of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying ARVC. (orig.)

  7. Detection of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by cardiovascular MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) in identifying apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods: Sixty-five patients with typical apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (T-AHCM), 51 patients with pre-apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (P-AHCM)and 26 normal controls were confirmed by cMRI. All cases underwent electrocardiogram and echocardiography, of which 16 and 34 cases were studied by radionuclide 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT myocardial scanning and coronary angiography plus left ventriculography, respectively. Results: cMRI confirmed all patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but echocardiography missed 96 cases. Two chamber and four chamber views of cine-cMRI were considered as the best position to show detailed structure of cardiac apex. Forty-seven cases showed spade-like configuration of left ventricular cavity in T-AHCM group, but only 15 patients in P-AHCM group presented the same character. T-AHCM group showed higher apical thickness and ratio of the apical wall thickness to that at basal level than P-AHCM group(18.6±2.7) mm vs (13.6±1.0) mm, 2.2±0.5 vs 1.6±0.3, P<0.05), and the ratios of both T-AHCM group and P-AHCM group were significantly higher than that of control group (9.5±1.7) mm, 1.1±0.1, P<0.05). Hypertrophic wall thickening was lesser in T-AHCM group than in P-AHCM group, while the values of both T-AHCM group and P-AHCM group were significantly lesser than that of control one. Conclusion: MRI is the best diagnostic modality for AHCM, which is highly accurate and better than echocardiography, especially for the diagnosis of mild hypertrophy in the early stage. (authors)

  8. Role of cardiac FDG PET-CT in inflammatory cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Role of cardiac FDG PET-CT in the diagnosis and monitoring treatment response of inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of 72 patients (over a period of 3 years) referred for cardiac PET-CT with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) or idiopathic ventricular tachycardia (VT), to rule out inflammatory cardiomyopathy. FDG cardiac PET was done with patients following very high fat low carbohydrate protein preferred diet (VHFLCPPD) protocol one day prior to scan. Myocardial perfusion scan with 99mTc-tetrofosmin or 13N-NH3 was done prior to FDG PET. All patients underwent breathhold CECT, chest PET-CT and cardiac PET-CT 45 min post FDG injection. Scans were reported jointly by a radiologist and nuclear medicine physician. Clinical/pathological follow-up was obtained where possible. Results: 50(69.4%) patients had positive myocardial FDG uptake with matched perfusion defect on NH3/Tc scan in the absence of CAD. 30(42%) patients had associated metabolically active lymphadenopathy and organ lesions. 4 patients had metabolically active lymphnodes with no myocardial inflammation. 18 patients had no abnormality detected on the scan. Patients with positive lymphnodes underwent biopsy and proven to have granulomatous disease either sarcoidosis and with TB or TB alone. 15 patients had post treatment scan which showed complete metabolic response in 7, partial response in 6 and stable disease in 2. Conclusion: Evaluating patients with DCM or idiopathic VT secondary to inflammatory myocarditis is challenging. Cardiac PET scan with VHFLCPPD protocol is the most sensitive modality available for assessment of disease activity in inflammatory cardiomyopathy and monitoring the treatment response especially in patients with ICD

  9. Defective insulin signaling and mitochondrial dynamics in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Westermeier, Francisco; Navarro-Marquez, Mario; López-Crisosto, Camila; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Quiroga, Clara; Bustamante, Mario; Verdejo, Hugo E.; Zalaquett, Ricardo; Ibacache, Mauricio; Parra, Valentina; Castro, Pablo F.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a common consequence of longstanding type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and encompasses structural, morphological, functional, and metabolic abnormalities in the heart. Myocardial energy metabolism depends on mitochondria, which must generate sufficient ATP to meet the high energy demands of the myocardium. Dysfunctional mitochondria are involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic heart disease. A large body of evidence implicates myocardial insulin resistance in...

  10. [Interventional options in modern treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulguerov, F; Radermecker, M A; Legrand, V

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a complex pathology. The understanding of its physiopathology and, notably, of the SAM phenomenon (Systolic Anterior Motion), is crucial for all available treatments. Amongst the most efficient therapies, one can cite the septal myectomy and its most recent technical updates, as well as the alcohol septal ablation. The choice between these two methods depends on the general state of the patient, the thickness of the interventricular septum and the coronary anatomy of the patients. PMID:21374955

  11. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy: Prognostic Value of Electroanatomic Voltage Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Migliore, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endocardial voltage mapping (EVM) identifies low-voltage right ventricular (RV) areas, which may represent the electroanatomic scar substrate of life-threatening tachyarrhythmias. We prospectively assessed the prognostic value of EVM in a consecutive series of patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Methods: We studied 69 consecutive ARVC patients [47 males; median age 35 years(28-45)] who underwent electrophysiological study and both bipolar and...

  12. The ubiquitin proteasome system in human cardiomyopathies and heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Sharlene M.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of protein quality control is a critical function of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Evidence is rapidly mounting to link proteasome dysfunction with a multitude of cardiac diseases, including ischemia, reperfusion, atherosclerosis, hypertrophy, heart failure, and cardiomyopathies. Recent studies have demonstrated a remarkable level of complexity in the regulation of the UPS in the heart and suggest that our understanding of how UPS dysfunction might contribute to the patho...

  13. X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Cardiospecific Phenotype of Dystrophinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Akinori Nakamura

    2015-01-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM) is a distinct phenotype of dystrophinopathy characterized by preferential cardiac involvement without any overt skeletal myopathy. XLDCM is caused by mutations of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene and results in lethal heart failure in individuals between 10 and 20 years. Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, an allelic disorder, have a milder phenotype of skeletal muscle involvement compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sometime...

  14. Mid-Ventricular Variant of Dobutamine-Induced Stress Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Chandraprakasam, Satish; Kanuri, Swapna; Hunter, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dobutamine stress testing is a commonly used modality in detecting and estimating the prognosis in coronary artery disease (CAD). Although it is well tolerated by most patients, adverse events have been reported. Rarely, transient wall motion abnormalities can occur in the absence of obstructive CAD to suggest stress cardiomyopathy. Case Presentation: We report a 48-year-old female with intermittent chest pain. Her physical exam, cardiac enzymes and transthoracic echocardiogram ...

  15. Marked variation in the cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Dutka, D.; Donnelly, J; Nihoyannopoulos, P; Oakley, C; Nunez, D

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To document the cardiac phenotype associated with Friedreich's ataxia, a recessively inherited disorder characterised by spinocerebellar degeneration.
Setting—Individuals with Friedreich's ataxia who accepted the invitation to participate in the study.
Hypothesis—The cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia may offer a human model for the study of factors modulating cardiac hypertrophy.
Methods—55 patients (mean (SD) age 30 (9) years) with a clinical diagnosis of Friedreic...

  16. The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Noureldin Radwa A; Liu Songtao; Nacif Marcelo S; Judge Daniel P; Halushka Marc K; Abraham Theodore P; Ho Carolyn; Bluemke David A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic disease of the heart. HCM is characterized by a wide range of clinical expression, ranging from asymptomatic mutation carriers to sudden cardiac death as the first manifestation of the disease. Over 1000 mutations have been identified, classically in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. Noninvasive imaging is central to the diagnosis of HCM and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is increasingly used to characterize morp...

  17. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ultra-endurance running - two incompatible entities?

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson Mathew G; Chandra Navin; Papadakis Michael; O'Hanlon Rory; Prasad Sanjay K; Sharma Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Regular and prolonged exercise is associated with increased left ventricular wall thickness that can overlap with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Differentiating physiological from pathological hypertrophy has important implications, since HCM is the commonest cause of exercise-related sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Most deaths have been reported in intermittent 'start-stop' sports such as football (soccer) and basketball. The theory is that individuals with HCM are un...

  18. Microvascular dysfunction in nonfailing arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Matthias [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Muenster (Germany); University Hospital Muenster, Institute for Genetics of Heart Diseases, Muenster (Germany); Rahbar, Kambiz; Kies, Peter; Schober, Otmar [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Gerss, Joachim [University of Muenster, Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research, Muenster (Germany); Schaefers, Klaus; Schaefers, Michael [University of Muenster, European Institute for Molecular Imaging - EIMI, Muenster (Germany); Breithardt, Guenter [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Muenster (Germany); Schulze-Bahr, Eric [University Hospital Muenster, Institute for Genetics of Heart Diseases, Muenster (Germany); Wichter, Thomas [Marienhospital Osnabrueck, Department of Cardiology, Niels-Stensen-Kliniken, Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a nonischaemic cardiomyopathy and leading cause of sudden death in the young. It has been shown that microvascular dysfunction reflected by an impaired myocardial blood flow (MBF) response to stress is present in patients with other forms of nonischaemic cardiomyopathy, e.g. dilated cardiomyopathy, and that the reduced MBF may be related to a poor prognosis. Therefore, we quantified MBF, coronary flow reserve and coronary vascular resistance in patients with nonfailing ARVC using H{sub 2}{sup 15} O and PET. In ten male patients with ARVC (mean age 49 {+-} 14 years), MBF was quantified at rest and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia using H{sub 2}{sup 15} O PET. Results were compared with those obtained in 20 age-matched healthy male control subjects (mean age 46 {+-} 14 years). Resting MBF was not significantly different between patients with ARVC and controls (MBF{sub rest} 1.19 {+-} 0.29 vs. 1.12 {+-} 0.20 ml/min/ml). However, hyperaemic MBF was significantly lower in patients with ARVC than in controls (2.60 {+-} 0.96 vs. 3.68 {+-} 0.84 ml/min/ml; p = 0.005). Consequently, patients with ARVC had a significantly lower coronary flow reserve than control subjects (2.41 {+-} 1.34 vs. 3.39 {+-} 0.93; p = 0.030). In addition, hyperaemic coronary vascular resistance was increased in patients with ARVC (36.79 {+-} 12.91 vs. 26.31 {+-} 6.49 mmHg x ml{sup -1} x min x ml; p = 0.007), but was found to be unchanged at rest. In this small well-characterized cohort of patients with nonfailing ARVC, we found a significantly reduced hyperaemic MBF and increased coronary vascular resistance. Further studies are necessary to corroborate this potential new functional aspect of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying ARVC. (orig.)

  19. RBM20, a gene for hereditary cardiomyopathy, regulates titin splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Greaser, Marion L.; Radke, Michael H.; Liss, Martin; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Maatz, Henrike; Schulz, Herbert; Li, Shijun; Parrish, Amanda M.; Dauksaite, Vita; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Klaassen, Sabine; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in the adaptation of cardiac function exemplified by the isoform switch of titin, which adjusts ventricular filling. We previously identified a rat strain deficient in titin splicing. Using genetic mapping, we found a loss-of-function mutation in RBM20 as the underlying cause for the pathological titin isoform expression. Mutations in human RBM20 have previously been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. We showed that the phenotype of Rbm20 deficient ...

  20. A new transthyretin mutation associated with amyloid cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Saraiva, M.J.; Almeida, M do R; Sherman, W.; Gawinowicz, M; Costa, P.; Costa, P. P.; Goodman, D S

    1992-01-01

    In transthyretin (TTR) a new mutation (TTR-Thr45) has been identified in a patient with familial amyloidosis characterized clinically by prominent cardiomyopathy and the absence of peripheral neuropathy. Comparative peptide mapping by high-performance liquid chromatography of the patient's plasma TTR together with normal TTR showed the presence of an abnormal tryptic peptide in the patient's TTR. The sequence of this peptide (peptide 6, residues 36-48) demonstrated the presence of a threonine...

  1. Clinical and morphological features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Korean patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Y. B.; Lee, W S; Kim, D. K.; Choi, Y. S.; Seo, J. D.; Lee, Y. W.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty three cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP) were reviewed to estimate the relative frequencies of the subtypes of HCMP and to clarify whether there is any racial difference in clinical and morphological features of HCMP. The diagnosis was made by echocardiography, cardiac catheterization and left ventriculography. Twenty four patients underwent coronary angiogram. Numbers of cases by the types of HCMP were 20 (61%) with asymmetrical septal hypertrophy (ASH), 11 (33%) with apical ...

  2. Clinical characteristics of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in North America

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Ahmed; Patompong Ungprasert; Supawat Ratanapo; Tanveer Hussain; Riesenfeld, Erik P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome is an acute cardiac syndrome characterized by transient wall motion abnormalities extending beyond a single epicardial vessel in the absence of significant obstructive coronary artery disease. Aim: This study was to describe the clinical characteristics of TC in North America. Materials and Methods: We identified 10 patients who met the Mayo Clinic criteria for TC using our Electronic Medical Re...

  3. Private Mitochondrial DNA Variants in Danish Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole; Hedley, Paula L.; Jensen, Morten K.; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Pham, Tam T.; Bundgaard, Henning; Christiansen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM. Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mi...

  4. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: possible triggers and treatment strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Hazebroek, M.; Dennert, R; Heymans, S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the management of patients with heart failure, morbidity and mortality rates remain high. Common causes of heart failure are ischaemic heart disease, uncontrolled hypertension and valvular disease. However, in up to 50 % of the cases its exact cause remains initially unknown; this condition is called idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Improved diagnostic methods, most notably the advancements in molecular and immunohistological biopsy techniques and genetic re...

  5. Alterations in sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial functions in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Dhalla, Naranjan S; Rangi, Shashanka; Zieroth, Shelley; Xu, Yan-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Although diabetes due to insulin deficiency or insulin resistance is a major cause of heart disease, the pathogenesis of cardiac dysfunction during the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy is not fully understood. Varying degrees of defects in subcellular organelles, such as sarcolemma, mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticulum, myofibrils and extracellular matrix have been observed in the diabetic heart. These subcellular abnormalities in chronic diabetes become evident with the occurrence of h...

  6. Dobutamine stress echocardiography for evaluating cirrhotic cardiomyopathy in liver cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Moon Young; Baik, Soon Koo; Won, Chan Sik; Park, Hong Jun; Jeon, Hyo Keun; Hong, Hyun Il; Kim, Jae Woo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kwon, Sang Ok; Kim, Jang Young; Yoo, Byung Su; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims The blunted ventricular systolic and diastolic contractile responses to physical and pharmacological stress in cirrhosis are termed cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM). CCM has been known to involve multiple defects in the β-adrenergic signaling pathway. The aim of this study was to determine whether cirrhotic patients have blunted cardiac responses to catecholamine stimulation through dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE). Methods Seventy-one cirrhotic patients with normal left...

  7. The surgical treatment of restrictive cardiomyopathy in pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    OpenAIRE

    Challenor, V F; Conway, N.; Monro, J L

    1988-01-01

    A patient with pseudoxanthoma elasticum presented in pulmonary oedema with restrictive left ventricular cardiomyopathy caused by calcified endocardial bands that were confirmed on echocardiography and at catheterisation. The bands were resected as far as possible and the involved mitral valve was replaced by a heterograft. A year later calcification of the heterograft forced its replacement by a St Jude prosthesis. Relief of symptoms has been good in the medium term.

  8. Chagas disease: from bush to huts and houses. Is it the case of the Brazilian amazon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Two of the major problems facing the Amazon - human migration from the other areas and uncontrolled deforestation - constitute the greatest risk for the establishment of endemic Chagas disease in this part of Brazil. At least 18 species of triatomines had been found in the Brazilian Amazon, 10 of them infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, associated with numerous wild reservoirs. With wide-range deforestation, wild animals will perforce be driven into other areas, with tendency for triatomines to become adapted to alternative food sources in peri and intradomicilies. Serological surveys and cross-sectional studies for Chagas disease, carried out in rural areas of the Rio Negro, in the Brazilian Amazon, showed a high level of seropositivity for T. cruzi antibodies. A strong correlation of seroreactivity with the contact of gatherers of piaçava fibers with wild triatomines could be evidenced.

  9. Population differentiation of the Chagas disease vector Triatoma maculata (Erichson, 1848) from Colombia and Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve, Yoman; Panzera, Francisco; Herrera, Leidi; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    The emerging vector of Chagas disease, Triatoma maculata (Hemiptera, Reduviidae), is one of the most widely distributed Triatoma species in northern South America. Despite its increasing relevance as a vector, no consistent picture of the magnitude of genetic and phenetic diversity has yet been developed. Here, several populations of T. maculata from eleven Colombia and Venezuela localities were analyzed based on the morphometry of wings and the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene sequences. Our results showed clear morphometric and genetic differences among Colombian and Venezuelan populations, indicating high intraspecific diversity. Inter-population divergence is suggested related to East Cordillera in Colombia. Analyses of other populations from Colombia, Venezuela, and Brazil from distinct eco-geographic regions are still needed to understand its systematics and phylogeography as well as its actual role as a vector of Chagas disease. PMID:27232127

  10. Nanomedicines against Chagas disease: an update on therapeutics, prophylaxis and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morilla, Maria Jose; Romero, Eder Lilia

    2015-02-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. After a mostly clinically silent acute phase, the disease becomes a lifelong chronic condition that can lead to chronic heart failure and thromboembolic phenomena followed by sudden death. Antichagasic treatment is only effective in the acute phase but fails to eradicate the intracellular form of parasites and causes severe toxicity in adults. Although conventional oral benznidazol is not a safe and efficient drug to cure chronic adult patients, current preclinical data is insufficient to envisage if conventional antichagasic treatment could be realistically improved by a nanomedical approach. This review will discuss how nanomedicines could help to improve the performance of therapeutics, vaccines and diagnosis of Chagas disease. PMID:25707979

  11. [Urbanization of chagas disease in Peru: experiences in prevention and control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Náquira, César

    2014-04-01

    In Peru, Chagas disease has an epidemiological significance in three macro-regions, one of them is the southern macro-region formed by the departments of Arequipa, Moquegua and Tacna. In 1965 a successful control was performed by house spraying insecticides, however, the persistence of the vector made it necessary for a second control plan that was implemented in 2000 and followed the guidelines of CONAL Plan, based on the elimination of Triatoma infestans and screening in blood banks.This plan was successful in Tacna and Moquegua, therefore these departments were considered free of vectorial transmission by the Pan American Health Organization. A ssimilar situation has not been achieved in the department of Arequipa because of the presence, among other factors, of rural migration to the city, in this way the urbanization of Chagas disease is a new epidemiological scenario of which we need to know more. PMID:25123876

  12. Estado actual de nuestros conocimientos sobre la enfermedad de chagas en la Republica Mexicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Tay

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los datos obtenidos de la revisión minuciosa en relación a enfermedad de Chagas de la literatura médica de la República Mexicana y extranjera desde el afio de 1939 en que por primeira vez se reporta a Trypanosoma cruzi en México, hasta el ano de 1976. Mediante mapas, tablas y cuadros se senalan las localidades en donde se han encontrado casos humanos, reservorios no humanos y transmisores. Se hacen comentários acerca de los resultados obtenidos y se seffala la importancia de incrementar los estúdios sobre enfermedades de Chagas en nuestro país.

  13. Outbreak of acute Chagas disease associated with oral transmission in the Rio Negro region, Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia de Souza-Lima

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Chagas disease is considered as emerging in the Brazilian Amazon, usually occurring in acute outbreaks. Methods We describe 17 cases of acute Chagas disease in Rio Negro, Amazonas. Results There were 15 males (average age, 31.3 years, all positive for Trypanosoma cruzi in fresh blood smear examination, and 14 positive by xenodiagnosis and PCR. The top clinical manifestations were fever, asthenia, abdominal pain, and palpitations. Electrocardiograms featured low-voltage QRS, anterosuperior divisional block, and right bundle branch block associated with anterosuperior divisional block. Conclusions All patients had consumed açaí products from Monte Alegre in the rural area around Santa Izabel do Rio Negro, Brazil.

  14. Outbreak of acute Chagas disease associated with oral transmission in the Rio Negro region, Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cassia de Souza-Lima

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Chagas disease is considered as emerging in the Brazilian Amazon, usually occurring in acute outbreaks. Methods We describe 17 cases of acute Chagas disease in Rio Negro, Amazonas. Results There were 15 males (average age, 31.3 years, all positive for Trypanosoma cruzi in fresh blood smear examination, and 14 positive by xenodiagnosis and PCR. The top clinical manifestations were fever, asthenia, abdominal pain, and palpitations. Electrocardiograms featured low-voltage QRS, anterosuperior divisional block, and right bundle branch block associated with anterosuperior divisional block. Conclusions All patients had consumed açaí products from Monte Alegre in the rural area around Santa Izabel do Rio Negro, Brazil.

  15. A Case of Vertical Transmission of Chagas Disease Contracted via Blood Transfusion in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A Fearon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is endemic in many countries in Latin America, where infected bugs of the Triatominea subfamily carry the parasite in the gut and transmit it to humans through fecal contamination of a bite. However, vertical transmission and transmission through blood transfusion and organ transplantation is well documented. Increasing immigration from endemic countries to North America has prompted blood operators, including Canadian Blood Services and Hema Quebec, to initiate blood donor testing for Chagas antibody. In the present report, an unusual case of vertical transmission from a mother, most likely infected through blood transfusion, and detected as part of a concurrent seroprevalence study in blood donors is described.

  16. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugaa, Kristina H; Haland, Trine F; Leren, Ida S; Saberniak, Jørg; Edvardsen, Thor

    2016-07-01

    This review aims to give an update on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is mainly an autosomal dominant inherited disease linked to mutations in genes encoding desmosomes or desmosome-related proteins. Classic symptoms include palpitations, cardiac syncope, and aborted cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias. Heart failure may develop in later stages. Diagnosis is based on the presence of major and minor criteria from the Task Force Criteria revised in 2010 (TFC 2010), which includes evaluation of findings from six different diagnostic categories. Based on this, patients are classified as having possible, borderline, or definite ARVC. Imaging is important in ARVC diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting structural and functional abnormalities, but importantly these findings may occur after electrical alterations and ventricular arrhythmias. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) and signal-averaged ECGs are analysed for depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG alteration. Ventricular arrhythmias are common in ARVC and are considered a major diagnostic criterion if originating from the RV inferior wall or apex. Family history of ARVC and detection of an ARVC-related mutation are included in the TFC 2010 and emphasize the importance of family screening. Electrophysiological studies are not included in the diagnostic criteria, but may be important for differential diagnosis including RV outflow tract tachycardia. Further differential diagnoses include sarcoidosis, congenital abnormalities, myocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, dilated cardiomyopathy, and athletic cardiac adaptation, which may mimic ARVC. PMID:26498164

  17. Methylene Blue for Acute Septic Cardiomyopathy in a Burned Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Joseph J; Burger, Christina F

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this case summary was to describe the use of methylene blue (MB) in a burned patient with acute septic cardiomyopathy. A 60-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to the Burn Intensive Care Unit with 45% TBSA burns after a house explosion. During the course of his care, he experienced hypotension that was refractory to fluid therapy and vasoactive medications. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed new acute systolic dysfunction with concurrent elevated systemic vascular resistance (SVR). High-dose inotropic agents did not improve cardiac function, and septic shock rendered him a poor candidate for mechanical intra-aortic balloon pump support. MB was administered to sensitize the myocardium to catecholamines and improve contractility with the goal of weaning the other vasoactive medications and diuresing for afterload reduction when hemodynamic stability was achieved. MB has been described in critical care medicine predominately for vasoplegia after cardiopulmonary bypass and vasodilatory septic shock., Our patient had acute septic cardiomyopathy that was refractory to standard pharmacologic approaches to inotropy with concurrent elevated SVR. Hypothesizing the differential temporal effect of inducible nitric oxide synthase on the vasculature and myocardium, we administered MB to improve contractility and support the impending vasodilatory effects of distributive shock. Although MB is not a new drug, the application for septic cardiomyopathy with a supranormal SVR is a unique application. Because of the risk profile associated with MB, we recommend drug monitoring utilizing serial echocardiography and/or right heart catheterization. PMID:25798807

  18. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in two men receiving bevacizumab for metastatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thérèse H Franco

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Thérèse H Franco, Ahmed Khan, Vishal Joshi, Beje ThomasDepartment of Internal Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT, USAAbstract: Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. It is a novel chemotherapeutic agent currently approved as part of combination chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer (Hurwitz et al 2004; Sandler et al 2006; Traina et al 2007. Arterial thrombosis, including cerebral infarction, transient ischemic attacks, myocardial infarction, and angina are common, occurring in 4.4% of patients whose regimen includes bevacizumab (versus 1.9% on regimen without bevacizumab (Genetech, Inc. 2008. This series will review two cases of patients exposed to bevacizumab who subsequently developed ST elevations on electrocardiogram (ECG and elevated cardiac biomarkers. Both patients underwent cardiac catheterization, which demonstrated apical ballooning and akinesis in a distribution discordant with the observed (noncritical atherosclerotic lesions. Both patients had recovery of left ventricular function within 30 days. The clinical presentation, including ECGs and findings on catheterization as well as the rapid recovery of ventricular function, is consistent with the diagnosis of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy was first described in 1991, but the pathophysiology and exact mechanism of injury remain largely unknown. These two cases are notable for their occurrence in men and the association with treatment of metastatic cancer including bevacizumab.Keywords: vascular endothelial growth factor, bevacizumab, metastatic cancer, chemotherapy, takotsubo, cardiomyopathy

  19. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in the Setting of Tension Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Michael; Loarte, Pablo; Mirrer, Brooks; Mallet, Thierry; Salciccioli, Louis; Petrie, Alison; Cohen, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    Background. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is defined as a transient left ventricular dysfunction, usually accompanied by electrocardiographic changes. The literature documents only two other cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the latter setting. Methods. A 78-year-old female presented to the ED with severe shortness of breath, hypertension, and tachycardia. On physical exam, heart sounds (S1 and S2) were regular and wheezing was noticed bilaterally. We found laboratory results with a WBC of 20.0 (103/μL), troponin of 16.52 ng/mL, CK-mb of 70.6%, and BNP of 177 pg/mL. The patient was intubated for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. A chest X-ray revealed a large left-sided tension pneumothorax. Initial echocardiogram showed apical ballooning with a LVEF of 10-15%. A cardiac angiography revealed normal coronary arteries with no coronary disease. After supportive treatment, the patient's condition improved with a subsequent echocardiogram showing a LVEF of 60%. Conclusion. The patient was found to have Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of a tension pneumothorax. The exact mechanisms of ventricular dysfunction have not been clarified. However, multivessel coronary spasm or catecholamine cardiotoxicity has been suggested to have a causative role. We suggest that, in our patient, left ventricular dysfunction was induced by the latter mechanism related to the stress associated with acute pneumothorax. PMID:26366307

  20. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: vectorcardiographic findings in echocardiographically unaffected relative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loperfido, F; Fiorilli, R; Digaetano, A; Di Gennaro, M; Santarelli, P; Bellocci, F; Coppola, E; Zecchi, P

    1982-01-01

    The electrocardiographic and vectorcardiographic (Frank system) features of the first degree relatives of subjects with documented familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were analysed. A total of nine affected members and 29 relatives were examined in four families. THe subjects were considered to be affected when the septal to free posterior wall thickness ratio exceeded 1.3 at M-mode echocardiography. Four relatives had asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Among 25 relatives without evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy, two over 20 years and 10 under 20 years of age showed increased voltage of QRS anterior forces (Qz amplitude greater than 0.80 mV) on the orthogonal electrocardiogram. The vectorcardiographic data of the relatives under 20 years of age without evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy (18 subjects) were compared with those of 38 normal control subjects of comparable age range. The young relatives without disproportionate septal hypertrophy had significantly greater Qz amplitude and Q/Rz ratio than the normal control subjects. In contrast, the echocardiographic data were not significantly different. We suggest that the electrocardiographic finding of abnormal anterior forces in one or more first degree relatives of subjects with documented hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may constitute a valuable aid in ascertaining the genetic transmission of the disease and in recognising affected members without echocardiographic evidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Images PMID:7200794

  1. Oxidative stress and stress signaling: menace of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loren E WOLD; Asli F CEYLAN-ISIK; Jun REN

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in the diabetic population and is currently one of the leading causes of death in the United States and other industrialized countries. The health care expenses associated with cardiovascular disease are staggering, reaching more than US$350 billion in 2003. The risk factors for cardiovascular disease include high fat/cholesterol levels,alcoholism, smoking, genetics, environmental factors and hypertension, which are commonly used to gauge an individual's risk of cardiovascular disease and to track their progress during therapy. Most recently, these factors have become important in the early prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative stress, the imbalance between reactive oxygen species production and breakdown by endogenous antioxidants, has been implicated in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure and diabetes-associated heart dysfunction (diabetic cardiomyopathy). Antioxidant therapy has shown promise in preventing the development of diabetic heart complications. This review focuses on recent advances in oxidative stress theory and antioxidant therapy in diabetic cardiomyopathy, with an emphasis on the stress signaling pathways hypothesized to be involved. Many of these stress signaling pathways lead to activation of reactive oxygen species, major players in the development and progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  2. Surgical outcomes and strategy of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ya-bin; RAJAN S.; KURIAN V.M.; LIU Zhi-yong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the surgical clinical results of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Methods: We retrospectively collected data on 24 patients who underwent surgical management in the past ten years in two hospitals in China and Madras Medical Mission in India. Myomectomy was carried out on all patients. Among them 3 patients underwent mitral valve replacement; 2 patients underwent mitral valve repair (anterior mitral leaflet plication); 2 patients underwent aortic valve replacement; 1 patient underwent aortic valve repair; 2 patients underwent aortic root replacement; 1 patient underwent Bentall's procedure and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass grafting because of a breached muscle bridge. Results: One patient died of post-operative heart failure. The mean follow-up time was 4.3 years. There was significant improvement in the symptomatic status. Sixteen patients were asymptomatic with good effort tolerance and only four patients had New York heart association (NYHA) Classes Ⅰ~Ⅱ due to associated valvular lesions. Conclusion: Our experience proved that symptomatic hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy or non-symptomatic hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with combined heart disease is indication for surgery as surgical intervention could get better clinical results in this kind of patients compared with other non-surgical method because it beneficially reduces the systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve leaflet, which could not be avoided by other non-surgical treatment.

  3. Linkage of familial dilated cardiomyopathy to chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajinovic, M.; Vatta, M.; Milasin, J. [Univ. of Trieste (Italy)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is a heart muscle disease of unknown etiology, characterized by impaired myocardial contractility and ventricular dilatation. The disorder is an important cause of morbidity and mortality and represents the chief indication for heart transplantation. Familial transmission is often recognized (familial dilated cardiomyopathy, or FDC), mostly with autosomal dominant inheritance. In order to understand the molecular genetic basis of the disease, a large six-generation kindred with autosomal dominant FDC was studied for linkage analysis. A genome-wide search was undertaken after a large series of candidate genes were excluded and was then extended to two other families with autosomal dominant pattern of transmission and identical clinical features. Coinheritance of the disease gene was excluded for >95% of the genome, after 251 polymorphic markers were analyzed. Linkage was found for chromosome 9q13-q22, with a maximum multipoint lod score of 4.2. There was no evidence of heterogeneity. The FDC locus was placed in the interval between loci D9S153 and D9S152. Several candidate genes for causing dilated cardiomyopathy map in this region. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Molecular profiling of dilated cardiomyopathy that progresses to heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Joshua M.; Conner, David A.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Parfenov, Michael G.; DePalma, Steve R.; Eminaga, Seda; Konno, Tetsuo; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined by progressive functional and structural changes. We performed RNA-seq at different stages of disease to define molecular signaling in the progression from pre-DCM hearts to DCM and overt heart failure (HF) using a genetic model of DCM (phospholamban missense mutation, PLNR9C/+). Pre-DCM hearts were phenotypically normal yet displayed proliferation of nonmyocytes (59% relative increase vs. WT, P = 8 × 10−4) and activation of proinflammatory signaling with notable cardiomyocyte-specific induction of a subset of profibrotic cytokines including TGFβ2 and TGFβ3. These changes progressed through DCM and HF, resulting in substantial fibrosis (17.6% of left ventricle [LV] vs. WT, P = 6 × 10−33). Cardiomyocytes displayed a marked shift in metabolic gene transcription: downregulation of aerobic respiration and subsequent upregulation of glucose utilization, changes coincident with attenuated expression of PPARα and PPARγ coactivators -1α (PGC1α) and -1β, and increased expression of the metabolic regulator T-box transcription factor 15 (Tbx15). Comparing DCM transcriptional profiles with those in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) revealed similar and distinct molecular mechanisms. Our data suggest that cardiomyocyte-specific cytokine expression, early fibroblast activation, and the shift in metabolic gene expression are hallmarks of cardiomyopathy progression. Notably, key components of these profibrotic and metabolic networks were disease specific and distinguish DCM from HCM.

  5. Dominant de novo DSP mutations cause erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Lynn M; Kam, Chen Y; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Zhou, Jing; Craiglow, Brittany G; Sidbury, Robert; Mathes, Erin F; Maguiness, Sheilagh M; Crumrine, Debra A; Williams, Mary L; Hu, Ronghua; Lifton, Richard P; Elias, Peter M; Green, Kathleen J; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-15

    Disorders of keratinization (DOK) show marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. In most cases, disease is primarily cutaneous, and further clinical evaluation is therefore rarely pursued. We have identified subjects with a novel DOK featuring erythrokeratodermia and initially-asymptomatic, progressive, potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, a finding not previously associated with erythrokeratodermia. We show that de novo missense mutations clustered tightly within a single spectrin repeat of DSP cause this novel cardio-cutaneous disorder, which we term erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy (EKC) syndrome. We demonstrate that DSP mutations in our EKC syndrome subjects affect localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43 in the skin, and result in desmosome aggregation, widening of intercellular spaces, and lipid secretory defects. DSP encodes desmoplakin, a primary component of desmosomes, intercellular adhesion junctions most abundant in the epidermis and heart. Though mutations in DSP are known to cause other disorders, our cohort features the unique clinical finding of severe whole-body erythrokeratodermia, with distinct effects on localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43. These findings add a severe, previously undescribed syndrome featuring erythrokeratodermia and cardiomyopathy to the spectrum of disease caused by mutation in DSP, and identify a specific region of the protein critical to the pathobiology of EKC syndrome and to DSP function in the heart and skin. PMID:26604139

  6. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a Caucasian Italian woman: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellani Debora

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an acute cardiac syndrome characterized by transient LV regional wall motion abnormalities (with peculiar apical ballooning appearance, chest pain or dyspnea, ST-segment elevation and minor elevations of cardiac enzyme levels Case presentation A 68-year-old woman was admitted to the Emergency Department because of sudden onset chest pain occurred while transferring her daughter, who had earlier suffered a major seizure, to the hospital. The EKG showed sinus tachycardia with ST-segment elevation in leads V2–V3 and ST-segment depression in leads V5–V6, she was, thus, referred for emergency coronary angiography. A pre-procedural transthoracic echocardiogram revealed regional systolic dysfunction of the LV walls with hypokinesis of the mid-apical segments and hyperkinesis of the basal segments. Coronary angiography showed patent epicardial coronary arteries; LV angiography demonstrated the characteristic morphology of apical ballooning with hyperkinesis of the basal segments and hypokinesis of the mid-apical segments. The post-procedural course was uneventful; on day 5 after admission the echocardiogram revealed full recovery of apical and mid-ventricular regional wall-motion abnormalities. Conclusion Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a relatively rare, unique entity that has only recently been widely appreciated. Acute stress has been indicated as a common trigger for the transient LV apical ballooning syndrome, especially in postmenopausal women. The present report is a typical example of stress-induced takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a Caucasian Italian postmenopausal woman.

  7. Comparison among patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with hypertension and hypertensive heart disease by 123I-BMIPP myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of 123I-BMIPP myocardial SPECT in discriminating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (46 patients), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with hypertension (23 patients), and hypertensive hypertrophic heart (20 patients) was studied. SPECT image was divided into 17 domains, and dimension of decreased accumulation was decided visually at each domain as four classes called defect score (DS). Summation of DS (TDS) of each group was used to compare frequency and dimension of decreased accumulation, and characteristic of each site. Frequency of decreased accumulation and TDS in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were similar in dimension with those in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with hypertension, and those data in hypertensive hypertrophic heart were lower than those in above-mentioned 2 groups. In the cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with hypertension, decreased accumulation site was similar and was anterior wall-septum junction, septum-posterior wall junction and apex of heart. In the case of hypertensive hypertrophic heart, decreased accumulation site was only the posterior wall. Frequency, dimension and site of decreased accumulation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were different from those in hypertensive hypertrophic heart, and BMIPP was thought to be useful in discriminating these diseases. (K.H.)

  8. Exposure to Citral, Cinnamon and Ruda Disrupts the Life Cycle of a Vector of Chagas Disease

    OpenAIRE

    C. I. Abramson; E. Aldana; E. Sulbaran

    2007-01-01

    The main vector of Chagas disease in Venezuela was exposed to the odors of citral, cinnamon and ruda. Cinnamon was found to stop the life cycle of Rhodnius prolixus relative to untreated animals. Citral and ruda also influenced the life cycle but not to the extent of animals exposed to cinnamon. We suggest that future research be directed toward using cinnamon in field and toxicity tests.

  9. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE IN A RURAL AREA IN THE STATE OF CEARA, BRAZIL

    OpenAIRE

    Erlane Chaves FREITAS; Maria de Fátima OLIVEIRA; Mônica Coelho ANDRADE; VASCONCELOS, Arduina Sofia Ortet de Barros; José Damião da SILVA FILHO; CÂNDIDO, Darlan da Silva; PEREIRA, Laíse dos Santos; João Paulo Ramalho CORREIA; José Napoleão Monte da CRUZ; Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and affects about two to three million people in Brazil, still figuring as an important public health problem. A study was conducted in a rural area of the municipality of Limoeiro do Norte - CE, northeastern Brazil, aiming to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi infection. Of the inhabitants, 52% were examined, among whom 2.6% (4/154) were seropositive in at least two serological tests. All seropositive individuals were older than 50 year...

  10. Chagas Disease in a Non-endemic Country: A Multidisciplinary Research, Bologna, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Chiara; Martelli, Giulia; Ciannameo, Anna; Vocale, Caterina; Fini, Marco; Stefanini, Angelo; Landini, Maria Paola; Viale, Pierluigi; Verucchi, Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    Global processes have brought about a substantial change in the epidemiological landscape of Chagas disease, spreading it to non-endemic areas. Italy is the second country in Europe in terms of Latin American migrants and expected infection rate. Given that scenario, the Bologna University Teaching Hospital undertaken a study aimed at providing preliminary data on the prevalence and investigating the knowledge and the subjective perceptions of Chagas disease, migration pathways and other relevant ill-health experiences. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in association with an ethnographic research. Between November 2010 and May 2013 Chagas disease testing was offered to people who attended the hospital and data were collected to investigate the broader socio-demographic and cultural factors. 151 individuals were screened for anti T. cruzi antibodies; 12 of them, 10 Bolivians and 2 Argentinians, were seroreactive, resulting in an overall prevalence of 7.94 %. Both the quantitative and the qualitative analysis revealed a degree of heterogeneity in terms of knowledge and perceptions of the disease as well as of migration pathways. The results are comparable with those reported by previous studies with similar characteristics and highlight the relevance of such public health issue in a non-endemic context. Moreover, the interdisciplinary approach has greatly helped to unveil the complex social and cultural implications of Chagas disease, to explain the subjective ill-health experiences, and to understand the ways in which the broader socio-economic and cultural context affects an intervention and its potential for success or failure. PMID:25935443

  11. A Deep Insight Into the Sialotranscriptome of the Chagas Disease Vector, Panstrongylus megistus (Hemiptera: Heteroptera)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ribeiro, J.M.C.; Schwarz, Alexandra; Francischetti, I.M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2015), s. 351-358. ISSN 0022-2585 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12002; GA ČR GPP302/11/P798 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Chagas disease * vector biology * saliva ry gland * transcriptome * medical entomology Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 1.953, year: 2014

  12. Evaluation of oral mucosal transudate for immunodiagnosis of Chagas´ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARROS Maria das Neves D. S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticorpos anti-Trypanosoma cruzi (isotipo IgG foram detectados no transudato da mucosa oral (TMO através de um ensaio imunoenzimático. Foram estudados 21 indivíduos com doença de Chagas crônica comprovada através de diagnóstico clínico, eletrocardiográfico, epidemiológico e sorológico: 10 com forma cardíaca, 2 com forma digestiva, 6 com forma mista e 3 com forma assintomática. Sete indivíduos de área endêmica, com sorologia negativa, constituiram o grupo controle. O soro destes grupos foi armazenado a -20 oC. A coleta de TMO de ambos os grupos foi realizada com o dispositivo OraSureâ seguindo orientação do fabricante (OraSureâ , Epitope Inc., Beaverton, OR, USA. As amostras de TMO foram diluídas (1:2 e testadas em duplicata através de um ensaio imunoenzimático da Abbott Laboratories para detectar anticorpos IgG contra doença de Chagas. Vinte dos vinte e um pacientes chagásicos apresentaram densidade óptica acima do limiar de reatividade e foram considerados positivos para doença de Chagas. Nenhuma das amostras provenientes de indivíduos soronegativos foi positiva. A sensibilidade e especificidade foram de 95% e 100%, respectivamente. Estes resultados indicam que TMO poderá ser utilizado como um fluido biológico alternativo para o diagnóstico da doença de Chagas. Nós estamos aumentando o número de indivíduos para validar estes resultados incluindo a análise comparativa entre amostras de TMO e soro.

  13. Accurate real-time PCR strategy for monitoring bloodstream parasitic loads in chagas disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Duffy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This report describes a real-time PCR (Q-PCR strategy to quantify Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi DNA in peripheral blood samples from Chagas disease patients targeted to conserved motifs within the repetitive satellite sequence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Q-PCR has a detection limit of 0.1 and 0.01 parasites/mL, with a dynamic range of 10(6 and 10(7 for Silvio X10 cl1 (T. cruzi I and Cl Brener stocks (T. cruzi IIe, respectively, an efficiency of 99%, and a coefficient of determination (R(2 of 0.998. In order to express accurately the parasitic loads: (1 we adapted a commercial kit based on silica-membrane technology to enable efficient processing of Guanidine Hydrochloride-EDTA treated blood samples and minimize PCR inhibition; (2 results were normalized incorporating a linearized plasmid as an internal standard of the whole procedure; and (3 a correction factor according to the representativity of satellite sequences in each parasite lineage group was determined using a modified real-time PCR protocol (Lg-PCR. The Q-PCR strategy was applied (1 to estimate basal parasite loads in 43 pediatric Chagas disease patients, (2 to follow-up 38 of them receiving treatment with benznidazole, and (3 to monitor three chronic Chagas heart disease patients who underwent heart-transplantation and displayed events of clinical reactivation due to immunosupression. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: All together, the high analytical sensitivity of the Q-PCR strategy, the low levels of intra- and inter-assay variations, as well as the accuracy provided by the Lg-PCR based correction factor support this methodology as a key laboratory tool for monitoring clinical reactivation and etiological treatment outcome in Chagas disease patients.

  14. Megabladder in experimental Chagas disease: pathological features of the bladder wall

    OpenAIRE

    Scremin Luciano Henrique Gazoni; Corbett Carlos Eduardo Pereira; Laurenti Márcia Dallastra; Nunes Elizabeth Visone; Gama-Rodrigues Joaquim José; Okumura Masayuki

    1999-01-01

    Mega-organs, primarily in the digestive tract, are well known to occur in chronic Chagas disease. Acute experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi results in parasitism of a wide range of cells, tissues, and organs, including the urinary bladder. Infection of BALB/c mice with 100,000 bloodstream forms of the Y strain of T. cruzi induced acute infection with intense parasitism of all layers of the urinary bladder. Parasites were found in the mucosa, lamina propria, muscular, adventitial con...

  15. Amazonian Triatomine Biodiversity and the Transmission of Chagas Disease in French Guiana: In Medio Stat Sanitas

    OpenAIRE

    Péneau, Julie; Nguyen, Anne; Flores-Ferrer, Alheli; Blanchet, Denis; Gourbière, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The effects of biodiversity on the transmission of infectious diseases now stand as a cornerstone of many public health policies. The upper Amazonia and Guyana shield are hot-spots of biodiversity that offer genuine opportunities to explore the relationship between the risk of transmission of Chagas disease and the diversity of its triatomine vectors. Over 730 triato-mines were light-trapped in four geomorphological landscapes shaping French-Guiana, and we determined their taxonomic status an...

  16. Development of a Novel Multiplex Immunoassay Multi-cruzi for the Serological Confirmation of Chagas Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Granjon, Elodie; Dichtel-Danjoy, Marie-Laure; Saba, Esber; Sabino, Ester; Campos de Oliveira, Lea; Zrein, Maan

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is due to the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, a protist disseminated by a Triatome vector. This disease is endemic to Latin America and considered by WHO as one of the 17 world’s neglected diseases. In Europe and in North America, imported cases are also detected, due to migration of population outside of the endemic region. Diagnosis of T. cruzi infection is usually made indirectly by the detection of specific antibodies to T. cruzi antigens. Following initial diagnosti...

  17. Biology, diversity and strategies for the monitoring and control of triatomines - Chagas disease vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Costa; Marcelo Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    Despite the relevant achievements in the control of the main Chagas disease vectors Triatoma infestans and Rhodnius prolixus, several factors still promote the risk of infection. The disease is a real threat to the poor rural regions of several countries in Latin America. The current situation in Brazil requires renewed attention due to its high diversity of triatomine species and to the rapid and drastic environmental changes that are occurring. Using the biology, behaviour and diversity of ...

  18. A scientometric evaluation of the Chagas disease implementation research programme of the PAHO and TDR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Carbajal-de-la-Fuente

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR is an independent global programme of scientific collaboration cosponsored by the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Program, the World Bank, and the World Health Organization. TDR's strategy is based on stewardship for research on infectious diseases of poverty, empowerment of endemic countries, research on neglected priority needs, and the promotion of scientific collaboration influencing global efforts to combat major tropical diseases. In 2001, in view of the achievements obtained in the reduction of transmission of Chagas disease through the Southern Cone Initiative and the improvement in Chagas disease control activities in some countries of the Andean and the Central American Initiatives, TDR transferred the Chagas Disease Implementation Research Programme (CIRP to the Communicable Diseases Unit of the Pan American Health Organization (CD/PAHO. This paper presents a scientometric evaluation of the 73 projects from 18 Latin American and European countries that were granted by CIRP/PAHO/TDR between 1997 and 2007. We analyzed all final reports of the funded projects and scientific publications, technical reports, and human resource training activities derived from them. Results about the number of projects funded, countries and institutions involved, gender analysis, number of published papers in indexed scientific journals, main topics funded, patents inscribed, and triatomine species studied are presented and discussed. The results indicate that CIRP/PAHO/TDR initiative has contributed significantly, over the 1997-2007 period, to Chagas disease knowledge as well as to the individual and institutional-building capacity.

  19. La enfermedad de Chagas ya no es tan exótica

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-03

    Este podcast tiene el propósito de informar a los profesionales de la salud sobre la enfermedad de Chagas, su diagnóstico y tratamiento, así como orientar en la identificación de pacientes infectados.  Created: 4/3/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 4/9/2008.

  20. Positive deviance study to inform a Chagas disease control program in southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Sanchez, Claudia; Baus, Esteban G; Guerrero, Darwin; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mainly transmitted by the faeces of triatomine insects that find favourable environments in poorly constructed houses. Previous studies have documented persistent triatomine infestation in houses in the province of Loja in southern Ecuador despite repeated insecticide and educational interventions. We aim to develop a sustainable strategy for the interruption of Chagas disease transmission by promoting living environments that are designed to prevent colonisation of rural houses by triatomines. This study used positive deviance to inform the design of an anti-triatomine prototype house by identifying knowledge, attitudes and practices used by families that have remained triatomine-free (2010-2012). Positive deviants reported practices that included maintenance of structural elements of the house, fumigation of dwellings and animal shelters, sweeping with "insect repellent" plants and relocation of domestic animals away from the house, among others. Participants favoured construction materials that do not drastically differ from those currently used (adobe walls and tile roofs). They also expressed their belief in a clear connection between a clean house and health. The family's economic dynamics affect space use and must be considered in the prototype's design. Overall, the results indicate a positive climate for the introduction of housing improvements as a protective measure against Chagas disease in this region. PMID:25807468

  1. Chronic Chagas Disease Diagnosis: A Comparative Performance of Commercial Enzyme Immunoassay Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Barros, Michelle da Silva; Nakazawa, Mineo; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Gomes, Yara de Miranda

    2016-05-01

    There is a significant heterogeneity in reported performance of serological assays for Chagas disease diagnosis. The conventional serology testing in laboratory diagnosis and in blood banks is unsatisfactory because of a high number of inconclusive and misclassified results. We aimed to assess the quality of four commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests for their ability to detect Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in 685 sera samples. Cross-reactivity was assessed by using 748 sera from patients with unrelated diseases. Initially, we found that the reactivity index against T. cruzi antigen was statistically higher in sera from Chagas disease patients compared with those from non-chagasic patients, supporting the notion that all evaluated tests have a good discriminatory ability toward the diagnosis of T. cruzi infection in patients in the chronic phase of the disease. Although all tests were similarly sensitive for diagnosing T. cruzi infection, there were significant variations in terms of specificity and cross-reactivity among them. Indeed, we obtained divergent results when testing sera from patient with unrelated diseases, particularly leishmaniasis, with the levels of cross-reactivity being higher in tests using whole T. cruzi extracts compared with those using recombinant proteins. Our data suggest that all four tests may be used for the laboratory diagnosis and routine blood screening diagnose for Chagas disease. We also emphasize that, despite their general good performance, caution is needed when analyzing the results when these tests are performed in areas where other diseases, particularly leishmaniasis, are endemic. PMID:26976886

  2. Multi-epitope proteins for improved serological detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection and Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Guderian, Jeffery A; Vallur, Aarthy C; Misquith, Ayesha; Liang, Hong; Mohamath, Raodoh; Luquetti, Alejandro O; Carter, Darrick; Tavares, Suelene N B; Reed, Steven G

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported that tandem repeat (TR) proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi could serve as targets of the antibody response and be useful as diagnostic indicators. To optimize reagents for detecting T. cruzi infection we evaluated individual TR proteins and identified several that were recognized by the majority of Chagas patient's sera collected from individuals form Brazil. We then produced novel, recombinant fusion proteins to combine the reactive TR proteins into a single diagnostic product. Direct comparison of the antibody response of serum samples that were readily detected by the established fusion antigen used in commercial detection of Chagas disease, TcF, revealed strong responses to TcF43 and TcF26 proteins. While the TcF43 and TcF26 antigens enhanced detection and strength of signal, they did not compromise the specificity of detection compared to that obtained with TcF. Finally, it was apparent by testing against a panel of 84 serum samples assembled on the basis of moderate or weak reactivity against TcF (mostly signal:noise TcF43 and TcF26 could more strongly detected by many of the sera that had low TcF antibody levels. Taken together, these data indicate that TcF43 and TcF26 could be used to enhance the detection of T. cruzi infection as well as supporting a diagnosis of Chagas disease. PMID:26658314

  3. Working conditions of Chagas' disease patients in a large Brazilian city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elena Guariento

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the working conditions of Chagas' disease patients in the city of Campinas, São Paulo, focusing on two-hundred-fifty patients with steady employment and treated at the University Hospital (HC-FCM/Unicamp: 98% were working-age and 77.6% were men. The origin of the patients reflected the migratory process occurring among this population. Most of the patients had limited professional skills, while 63.6% had not finished primary school and 21.6% were illiterate. However, 63.6% were regularly employed under duly processed work contracts. Their jobs were mainly in general services (21.6% and heavy industry (21.2%. Some 55% of the patients reported a monthly income less than or equal to U$100.00, and 40.4% reported having been fired at least once during the last ten years, in 8.9% of the cases because of a diagnosis of Chagas' disease. Of the patients undergoing pre-hiring physical examinations (57.2%, 9.1% were refused, 92.3% of whom due to positive serology for T. cruzi. Finally, 78.4% reported not belonging to a labor union. The study demonstrated the precarious working conditions and discrimination experienced by workers with Chagas' disease.

  4. Nuclear angiocardiographic evaluation of effect of the isosorbide dinitrate in chronic Chagas' patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cardiovascular effects of a systemic vasodilator therapy (isosorbide dinitrate - ID) were studied in 13 normal individuals and in 40 chronic Chagas' patients, grouped as follows: 13 in the indeterminate phase of the disease; 14 with the chronic cardiac form and 13 presenting only clinical and laboratory findings of megaesophagus and/or megacolon (digestive form). The LV pump function was studied by means of radionuclide angiography in baseline condition and after 5-10 min of sublingual administration of 5mg of ID.Ejection fraction (EF), peak velocity of LV emptying (Vmax), heart rate (HR) and blood pressure BP) were determined under each condition. All groups showed comparable mean HR and BP values. Only the cardiac group exhibited lower values of EF and Vmax, as compared to normal controls. The vasodilator drug elicited significant comparable (p < 0.05) changes in HR (increase) and BP (decrease) in the four groups. In contrast to normal subjects, who had no significant changes in EF after ID, all the Chagas' groups showed statistically significant (p < 0.05) increases in EF after the vasodilator drug. A small insignificant increase in Vmax was observed in the four groups. These findings suggest that even in patients with Chagas's disease and clinically undetectable heart involvement there is some degree of reduction in ventricular performance, partially corrected by the unloading effects of vasodilador medication. (author)

  5. Positive deviance study to inform a Chagas disease control program in southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Nieto-Sanchez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mainly transmitted by the faeces of triatomine insects that find favourable environments in poorly constructed houses. Previous studies have documented persistent triatomine infestation in houses in the province of Loja in southern Ecuador despite repeated insecticide and educational interventions. We aim to develop a sustainable strategy for the interruption of Chagas disease transmission by promoting living environments that are designed to prevent colonisation of rural houses by triatomines. This study used positive deviance to inform the design of an anti-triatomine prototype house by identifying knowledge, attitudes and practices used by families that have remained triatomine-free (2010-2012. Positive deviants reported practices that included maintenance of structural elements of the house, fumigation of dwellings and animal shelters, sweeping with "insect repellent" plants and relocation of domestic animals away from the house, among others. Participants favoured construction materials that do not drastically differ from those currently used (adobe walls and tile roofs. They also expressed their belief in a clear connection between a clean house and health. The family's economic dynamics affect space use and must be considered in the prototype's design. Overall, the results indicate a positive climate for the introduction of housing improvements as a protective measure against Chagas disease in this region.

  6. Chagas disease and housing improvement in northeastern Brazil: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Marli M; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A; Toma, Helena K; Borges-Pereira, José; de Oliveira, Tiago Guedes; Sarquis, Otília

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease was investigated in two new settlements of landless rural workers inhabiting prefabricated, triatomine-proof houses and in four neighboring older communities where mud huts were still well suitable for vectors. Through a cross-sectional survey and entomological assessment, we surveyed 148 houses/families in the two new settlements and in 47 houses/families in the four older localities. We determined seroprevalence of Chagas disease through IFI and Elisa (eluates) assays and searched for vectors in the domestic and peridomestic environments. Seroprevalence reached 0.6% (3/466) in the new settlements and 0.8% (1/115) in the older communities. Triatomines were not found in the new settlements, while 7 Triatoma brasiliensis, 4 T. pseudomaculata, 1 Panstrongylus lutzi, and 145 Rhodnius nasutus were collected in the older localities. In addition, a colony of T. brasiliensis (n = 55) was encountered inside a school attended by children of the region. Parasite strains isolated from the insects were characterized as T. cruzi I. Despite the low prevalence of Chagas disease in both scenarios, entomological surveillance must be strengthened and housing improvement reinforced in order to control vector transmission. The risk of infection by the vectors was lower in the settlements of improved homes, where conditions for colonization of the peridomestic environment by transmitting insects were not observed. PMID:25673077

  7. Ameliorative effect of ethanolic Gymnema sylvestre extract on diabetic cardiomyopathy against streptozotocin-induced diabetes in Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay Kumar; Uma Bhandari; Chakra Dhar Tripathi; Geetika Khanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes leads to a cardiomyopathy characterized by myocyte loss. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic cardiomyopathy is characterized by decreased left ventricular contractility and diminished ventricular compliance with marked abnormal systolic and diastolic function. Aim: The ameliorative effect of ethanolic Gymnema sylvestre extract (GSE) was evaluated in diabetic cardiomyopathy against STZ-induced diabetes. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced by a single intravenous ...

  8. Enfermedad de Chagas en poblaciones prehistóricas del norte de Chile Chagas disease in prehistoric populations of northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NANCY ORELLANA-HALKYER

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Chagas es producida por el parásito Trypanosoma cruzi, el cual afecta tanto a seres humanos como a animales, en particular mamíferos marsupiales y placentarios. Las vías de transmisión son diversas, siendo una de las más importantes la vía vectorial, en la que participan insectos infectados con este parásito, animales y humanos. En este artículo de revisión discutimos los postulados sobre la vía de transmisión oral, los hallazgos de T. cruzi en momias de América y especialmente en las del norte de Chile. Presentamos además información que apunta a que la enfermedad de Chagas estuvo presente mucho antes de la conquista europea y de la construcción de viviendas de adobe. Comentamos las hipótesis sobre el vector domiciliado más importante de Sudamérica, Triatoma infestans, su antigüedad en la costa de Arica y los reportes más recientes de otros vectores silvestres. También se discute la información relacionada a la participación en el ciclo de T. cruzi de distintos mamíferos silvestres de Chile y asimismo proponemos el estudio paleoparasitológico en restos zooarqueológicos para conocer las especies de mamíferos reservónos de T. cruzi en la antigüedad.Chagas diseases is produced by a parasite named Trypanosoma cruzi, that affects humans and other marsupial and placental mammals. Transmission routes are diverse, but the most important transmission is the vector route, which involves the triatomine insects, wild and domestic infected animáis, and humans. Here we review the data about oral transmission route and the evidences of the etiological agent (Trypanosoma cruzi of Chagas disease in pre-Columbian American mummies, making a critical review of the infection in northern Chile. Moreover, we comment on the hypotheses suggested in relation to the most important vector of the infection in South América Triatoma infestans, its antiquity in the Arica coast, and the recent reports about other wild infected

  9. Chagas' disease and social security: a case-control study in an urban area, Goiás, Brazil Doença de Chagas e previdência social: estudo caso-controle em uma área urbana, Goiás, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Zicker

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and twenty subjects with Chagas' cardiopathy and 120 non-infected subjects were randomly selected from first time claimants of sickness benefits in the National Institute of Social Security (INPS in Goiás. Cases of Chagas' cardiopathy were defined based on serological test, history of residence in an endemic area and, clinical and/or electrocardiogram (ECG alterations suggestive of Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Controls were defined as subjects with at least two negative serological tests. Case and controls were compared in the analysis for age, sex, place of birth, migration history, socio-economic level, occupation, physical exertion at work, age at affiliation and years of contribution to the social security scheme, clinical course of their disease and ECG abnormalities. Chagas' disease patients were younger than other subjects and predominantly of rural origin. Non-infected subjects presented a better socio-economic level, were performing more skilled activities and had less changes of job than cases. No important difference was observed in relation to age at affiliation to INPS. About 60% of cases have claimed for benefits within the first four years of contribution while among controls this proportion was 38.5%. Cases were involved, proportionally more than controls, in "heavy" activities. A risk of 2.3 (95%CL 1.5 - 4.6 and 1.8 (95%CL 1.2- 3.5 was obtained comparing respectively "heavy" and "moderate" physical activity against "light". A relative risk of 8.5 (95%CL 4.9 - 14.8 associated with the presence of cardiopathy was estimated comparing the initial sample of seropositive subjects and controls. A high relative risk was observed in relation to right bundle branch block (RR = 37.1 95%CL = 8.8 - 155.6 and left anterior hemiblock (RR = 4.4, 95%CL = 2.1 - 9.1.São descritas as características sociais e ocupacionais de um grupo de pacientes chagásicos em área urbana no intuito de se estudar a importância médico-social da doen

  10. Chagas disease: what is known and what is needed - A background article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease began millions of years ago as an enzootic disease of wild animals and started to be transmitted to man accidentally in the form of an anthropozoonosis when man invaded wild ecotopes. Endemic Chagas disease became established as a zoonosis over the last 200-300 years through forest clearance for agriculture and livestock rearing and adaptation of triatomines to domestic environments and to man and domestic animals as a food source. It is estimated that 15 to 16 million people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi in Latin America and 75 to 90 million people are exposed to infection. When T. cruzi is transmitted to man through the feces of triatomines, at bite sites or in mucosa, through blood transfusion or orally through contaminated food, it invades the bloodstream and lymphatic system and becomes established in the muscle and cardiac tissue, the digestive system and phagocytic cells. This causes inflammatory lesions and immune responses, particularly mediated by CD4+, CD8+, interleukin-2 (IL and IL-4, with cell and neuron destruction and fibrosis, and leads to blockage of the cardiac conduction system, arrhythmia, cardiac insufficiency, aperistalsis, and dilatation of hollow viscera, particularly the esophagus and colon. T. cruzi may also be transmitted from mother to child across the placenta and through the birth canal, thus causing abortion, prematurity, and organic lesions in the fetus. In immunosuppressed individuals, T. cruzi infection may become reactivated such that it spreads as a severe disease causing diffuse myocarditis and lesions of the central nervous system. Chagas disease is characterized by an acute phase with or without symptoms, and with entry point signs (inoculation chagoma or Romaña's sign, fever, adenomegaly, hepatosplenomegaly, and evident parasitemia, and an indeterminate chronic phase (asymptomatic, with normal results from electrocardiogram and x-ray of the heart, esophagus, and colon or with a

  11. High prevalence of myocardial monoclonal antimyosin antibody uptake in patients with chronic idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antimyosin antibody studies were undertaken to assess the presence of myocardial uptake in patients with chronic idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Three groups were studied: 17 patients with chronic (greater than 12 months) idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, 12 patients with a large, poorly contracting left ventricle not due to dilated cardiomyopathy (control patients) and 8 normal individuals. The patients in the cardiomyopathy and control groups showed a similar degree of clinical and functional impairment. Imaging was undertaken 48 h after antimyosin injection. The heart/lung ratio of antimyosin uptake was used to assess the results. The mean ratio in the cardiomyopathy group was 1.83 +/- 0.36 (range 1.40 to 2.80), a value significantly higher than that obtained in the control patients without cardiomyopathy (mean 1.46 +/- 0.04, range 1.38 to 1.50) or normal subjects (mean 1.46 +/- 0.13, range 1.31 to 1.6) (p less than 0.01). No difference in the ratio was noted between the normal subjects and control patients. Abnormal antimyosin uptake was seen in 12 (70%) of the 17 patients with cardiomyopathy and in only 1 (8%) of the 12 control patients. Positive monoclonal antimyosin antibody studies are highly prevalent in chronic idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

  12. Systolic Compression of Epicardial Coronary and Intramural Arteries: in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Mohiddin, Saidi A; Fananapazir, Lameh

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that systolic compression of epicardial coronary arteries is an important cause of myocardial ischemia and sudden death in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We examined the associations between sudden death, systolic coronary compression of intra- and epicardial arteries, myocardial perfusion abnormalities, and severity of hypertrophy in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  13. Survival and sudden cardiac death after septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Kvistholm; Havndrup, Ole; Hassager, Christian; Helqvist, Steffen; Kelbæk, Henning; Jørgensen, Erik; Køber, Lars; Bundgaard, Henning

    2011-01-01

    Reports of long-term survival and the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) after percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) are sparse.......Reports of long-term survival and the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) after percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) are sparse....

  14. Comparison Between Clinical and Echocardiographic Findings in Infants and Children Diagnosed with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Blesneac; Carmen Şuteu; Rodica Togănel; Theodora Benedek; Benedek I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rather common hereditary disease with an autozomal dominant character, caused by mutations of genes that code for proteins of the cardiac sarcomere. The observed prevalence of this disease is much lower in pediatric patients compared to adults, because it’s late gene expression. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting in infancy has been shown to have a very high mortality.

  15. Non-compaction of the ventricular myocardium, a cardiomyopathy in search of a pathoanatomical definition

    OpenAIRE

    Val-Bernal, José Fernando; Garijo, M.F.; Rodriguez-Villar, Diana; D. Val

    2010-01-01

    Ventricular non-compaction is a rare cardiomyopathy characterized by numerous, excessively prominent ventricular trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses communicating with the ventricular cavity. The lesion is postulated to result from an intrauterine developmental arrest that stops compaction of the myocardial fiber meshwork. This cardiomyopathy affects the left ventricle, with or without concomitant right ventricular involvement. The disease is now seen w...

  16. Genetic and clinical profile of Indian patients of idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy with and without hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Ahmad, Shamim; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh;

    2009-01-01

    Both idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy (IRCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are part of the same disease spectrum and are due to sarcomeric gene mutations. A patient with restrictive physiology without left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) would be diagnosed as IRCM, while one with LVH...

  17. Aspectos neurológicos da doença de chagas: sistema nervoso central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvio de Vergueiro Forjaz

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available The lesions of the nervous system in the Trypanosomiasis Cruzi are quite frequent and are not only limited to the encephalo-spinal-axis. Actually, they are much more common in the peripheral representations of the autonomic nervous system, resulting in the so-called enteromegalies (mega-esophagus, megacolon, etc. so frequent in Brazil. However, only the clinical manifestations due to the encephalic and spinal lesions have been included in the neurological aspects of Chagas' disease (as formerly contended for by Carlos Chagas. In the acute phase of the central nervous system infestation, the Trypanosoma cruzi,as leishmanias, is found in cellular elements of the neuroglia (microglia, astroglia and may be isolated from the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (inoculation in sensitive animals. The corresponding clinical manifestations are the severe difuse meningo-encephalo-myelitis with a high degree of lethality and also signs of infection, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. The infants from endemic areas are much more compromised. The clinical-pathologic as well as experimental confirmations on that acute phase of the disease are numerous and irrefutable. In the chronic phase of the disease, the neurological manifestations are not very clear. Early in 1909, Chagas, impressed with the great number of cases of infantile encephalopathy found in infested regions, imputed to the T. cruzithe etiology of such cases of encephalopathy and considered them as pertaining to a chronic phase of the disease. This has not been confirmed by other investigations, and even if the etiologic agent were the T. cruzithe clinical manifestations have no evolutive character and seem more sequelae than symptoms of a real chronic nervous phase. Even experimentally it has not been possible to demonstrate the presence of parasites in the nervous system of infested animals after clearing of the signs of the acute phase. In patients with chronic Chagas' disease with lesions in

  18. Frequency and echocardiographic study of dilated cardiomyopathy in children presenting with cardiac failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the role of echocardiography in diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy as a cause of cardiac failure in children. Design: This was descriptive study. Children presenting with cardiac failure from indoor patients were selected and echocardiography along with chest X- ray, ECG, cardiac enzymes and ASO titre was performed in all patients. Subject: Fifty hospitalized patients with congestive heart failure were selected consecutively from hospitalized patients. Main Outcome: Role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy in children presenting with cardiac failure. Results: Out of fifty patients admitted with cardiac failure 27 (54%) cases were found to be dilated cardiomyopathy while congenital heart disease, myocarditis and rheumatic heart disease were found in 12 (24%), 8 (16%) and 3 (6%) cases respectively. Conclusion: Dilated cardiomyopathy is an important cause of cardiac failure in children and echocardiography is an important tool to diagnose and differentiate dilated cardiomyopathy from other causes of cardiac failure. (author)

  19. [The assessment process within science and the nomination of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittella, José Eymard Homem

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest achievements in the history of medicine was the description of Chagas disease by the physician and scientist Carlos Chagas. A hundred years after the discovery of the disease, speculation still remains regarding the two official nominations of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel Prize, the biggest worldwide scientific award, in 1913 and in 1921. It has been accepted that the reason why the prize was not awarded to this brilliant scientist may have been the strong opposition that he faced in Brazil, from some physicians and researchers of that time. They went as far as questioning the existence of Chagas disease, thereby possibly influencing the decision of the Nobel Committee not to award the prize to him. Analysis of the database of the Nobel prize archives, with the revelation of the names of nominators, nominees and prizewinners spanning the years 1901-1951, brought information not only about what was considered to be a scientific achievement at that time, but also about who the important scientists were and what the relationships between them were. The non-recognition of Carlos Chagas' discoveries by the Nobel Committee appears to be more correctly explained by these factors than by the negative impact of the local opposition. PMID:19287939

  20. Epidemiological characteristics of patients with Chagas Disease Características epidemiológicas dos pacientes com Doença de Chagas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Adriane Souza Oliveira

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The Chagas Disease is an infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzy, transmitted to a hematophague insect, transfused blood or birth, with evolution divided in acute and chronic phases. Object: Analyses variables from patients with Chagas Disease (CD: age, gender, education, prevalence, and presence of co morbid and work. Methodology: The study region is constituted by many peripheral neighborhoods from Montes Claros City- Minas Gerais- Brazil. The study was made with 7150 registered people in the local health unit (Programa Saúde da Família, Tancredo Neves. The information about Chagas Disease was obtaining from ‘A’ files, this present in virtual information program. Take a part in the study only patients with the confirmed diagnostic of Chagas Disease in two diagnostic methods different. Results: The prevalence of Chagas Disease were 1% (86 patients, 60% of cases belong of female gender. The middle age at the men was 47,5 years and the woman was 48,6 years. The main occupation were: retired 9,3%, general services 51,1%, house-wife 17,4%, unemployment 18,5%, students 1,1% and autonomous 1,1%. The analysis of schooling demonstrates: 27,9% was illiterate, 68,6% does not have completely the primary school and 2,3% has completely the second school. The co morbid more seen were the Systemic Hypertension Arterial (SHA. Conclusion: The epidemiological profile in the study site is of the an adult patient with the age between 40-50 years, female gender, with schooling low, working in general services and with SHA were the co morbid.

    A Doença de Chagas (DC é uma infecção causada pelo Trypanosoma cruzi, transmitida por um inseto hematófago, adquirida por transfusão sanguínea ou congenitamente, com evolução dividida em fase aguda e crônica. Objetivo: Analisar as seguintes variáveis dos pacientes portadores da Doença de Chagas (DC: idade, sexo, escolaridade, prevalência, comorbidades associadas e ocupação. Metodologia: A região do