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Sample records for ceylon

  1. An electronics laboratory in Ceylon

    1962-01-01

    At the request of the Ceylon Government, the International Atomic Energy Agency provided Ceylon with the services of an expert to install electronic equipment for nuclear raw materials prospecting and assay and to train local personnel in the operation and maintenance of the instruments

  2. Atomic Energy Activities in Ceylon

    Siriwardene, P. P.G.L. [University of Ceylon, Colombo, Ceylon (Sri Lanka); Atomic Energy Authority of Ceylon, Ceylon (Sri Lanka)

    1971-07-01

    Ceylon is an island of an area of about 25,000 square miles and has appreciable Quantities of certain radioactive minerals. Several complex uranium and thorium minerals have been found in gem gravels, in pegmatites and other vein deposits. The most important of these are thorianite, urano-thorianite, thorite and monazite. Monazite is a phosphate of the rare earths and in its primary state is found in certain granitic gneusses, migmatites and in pegmatites, but these primary occurences are of no commercial importance. The mineral is also found as an important constituent of heavy mineral sands on the west and south-west coasts of the island and these are commercially exploitable. An experimental plant refines the sand for export. Ceylon monazite sand contains over 9 percent thoria as ThO{sub 2} and about 0.3 percent U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The Geological Survey Department is responsible for the survey and refining of these sands. On the north east coast of Ceylon there are large deposits of the black mineral beach sand, ilmenite and this also occurs in small amounts in various other parts of the island's coastal area. The ilmenite contains about one percent monazite.

  3. Report of mass communication Ceylon: October 1969-December 31, 1970.

    1971-01-01

    Experience with media usage by the FPA (Family Planning Association of Ceylon between October 1969 and December 1970 is summarized. During this time, the Association purchased 100-200 column inches each of contract advertising space in 26 newspapers. The press has published 268 press release, I.P.P.F., U.N., features and international press clipping in addition to specialized medical articles on family planning methods and 8 articles by FPA office-bearers. In January 1970; the Association launched local radio's first 5-minute daily commercial in Sinhala and Tamil. The program was repeated from April to July 1970. A series of 5 slides on family planning has been shown in movie theathers and more sets are being prepared for viewing. Posters have been used on buses and are currently on display on the National Railways project. Folders, leaflect, and poster calendars have been produced and used. Family Planning stickers have put up in 700 barber saloons. The FPA had stalls in the 1970 3-day National Exhibition at Batticaloa, the 4-day U.N. Poster Exhibition at Badulla, and the 2-week Ceylon Medical College Centenary Exhibition in Colombo. The Information Unit of FPA has answered 18, 541 written inquiries. A family planning communication us regularly dispatched to members of the Cabinet, government and opposition members of parliament, senators, chairmen of local bodies, and key trade union officials.

  4. The potential value of the seaweed Ceylon moss (Gelidium amansii) as an alternative bioenergy resource.

    Wi, Seung Gon; Kim, Hyun Joo; Mahadevan, Shobana Arumugam; Yang, Duck-Joo; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2009-12-01

    Sea weed (Ceylon moss) possesses comparable bioenergy production potential to that of land plants. Ceylon moss has high content of carbohydrates, typically galactose (23%) and glucose (20%). We have explored the possibility of sodium chlorite in Ceylon moss pretreatment that can ultimately increase the efficiency of enzymatic saccharification. In an acidic medium, chlorite generates ClO(2) molecules that transform lignin into soluble compounds without any significant loss of carbohydrate content and this procedure is widely used as an analytical method for holocellulose determination. Sodium chlorite-pretreated samples resulted in glucose yield up to 70% with contrast of only 5% was obtained from non-pretreated samples. The efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis is significantly improved by sodium chlorite pretreatment, and thus sodium chlorite pretreatment is potentially a very useful tool in the utilisation of Ceylon moss biomass for ethanol production or bioenergy purposes.

  5. Bark Extracts of Ceylon Cinnamon Possess Antilipidemic Activities and Bind Bile Acids In Vitro

    Walimuni Prabhashini Kaushalya Mendis Abeysekera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol (95% and dichloromethane : methanol (1 : 1 bark extracts of authenticated Ceylon cinnamon were investigated for range of antilipidemic activities (ALA: HMG-CoA reductase, lipase, cholesterol esterase, and cholesterol micellization inhibitory activities and bile acids binding in vitro. Individual compounds in bark extracts were also evaluated. Bark extracts showed ALA in all the assays studied. The IC50 (μg/mL values ranged within 153.07±8.38–277.13±32.18, 297.57±11.78–301.09±4.05, 30.61±0.79–34.05±0.41, and 231.96±9.22–478.89±9.27, respectively, for HMG-CoA reductase, lipase, cholesterol esterase, and cholesterol micellization inhibitory activities. The bile acids binding (3 mg/mL for taurocholate, glycodeoxycholate, and chenodeoxycholate ranged within 19.74±0.31–20.22±0.31, 21.97±2.21–26.97±1.61, and 16.11±1.42–19.11±1.52%, respectively. The observed ALA were moderate compared to the reference drugs studied. Individual compounds in bark extracts ranged within 2.14±0.28–101.91±3.61 and 0.42±0.03–49.12±1.89 mg/g of extract. Cinnamaldehyde and gallic acid were the highest and the lowest among the tested compounds. The ethanol extract had highest quantity of individual compounds and ALA investigated. Properties observed indicate usefulness of Ceylon cinnamon bark in managing hyperlipidemia and obesity worldwide. Further, this study provides scientific evidence for the traditional claim that Ceylon cinnamon has antilipidemic activities.

  6. Infant and maternal health services in Ceylon, 1900-1948: imperialism or welfare?

    Jones, Margaret

    2002-08-01

    This article contests a dominant contemporary view that colonial medicine was oppressive and detrimental to welfare; in particular, that infant and maternal welfare services were culturally hegemonic in their imposition of western practices and values on indigenous women. It does so by studying the development of these services in just one British colony--the 'model colony' of Ceylon from 1900 until independence. It shows how, at both a practical and a theoretical level, there was a direct policy transfer from the metropolitan centre to the colony. Moreover, the main justifications for the development of health and welfare services for women and children ran parallel to those used earlier in Britain. By 1948, these services were extensive in Ceylon and contributed to the fall in infant and maternal mortality rates at the end of the colonial period. It concludes by arguing that, just as in the West, these services were contradictory: they could both help maintain the exploitative State and enhance welfare. However, it is ultimately on their ability to improve health and welfare that they should be judged.

  7. 'Zonder eigen gewinne en glorie' : Mr. Iman Wilhelm Falck (1736-1785), gouverneur en directeur van Ceylon en Onderhorigheden

    Dulm, Frits van

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is about the gentleman-lawyer Falck, his period in office as Governor of Ceylon from the age of 28 and his surroundings. The historian Stapel described him as the last great figure in the Company. He differentiated from his contemporaries and predecessors. The research pays extensive

  8. Icones Plantarum Malabaricarum: Early 18th century botanical drawings of medicinal plants from colonial Ceylon.

    Van Andel, Tinde; Scholman, Ariane; Beumer, Mieke

    2018-04-27

    From 1640-1796, the Dutch East India Company (VOC) occupied the island of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). Several VOC officers had a keen interest in the medicinal application of the local flora. The Leiden University Library holds a two-piece codex entitled: Icones Plantarum Malabaricarum, adscriptis nominibus et viribus, Vol. I. & II. (Illustrations of Plants from the Malabar, assigned names and strength). This manuscript contains 262 watercolour drawings of medicinal plants from Sri Lanka, with handwritten descriptions of local names, habitus, medicinal properties and therapeutic applications. This anonymous document had never been studied previously. To identify all depicted plant specimens, decipher the text, trace the author, and analyse the scientific relevance of this manuscript as well as its importance for Sri Lankan ethnobotany. We digitised the entire manuscript, transcribed and translated the handwritten Dutch texts and identified the depicted species using historic and modern literature, herbarium vouchers, online databases on Sri Lankan herbal medicine and 41 botanical drawings by the same artist in the Artis library, Amsterdam. We traced the origin of the manuscript by means of watermark analysis and historical literature. We compared the historic Sinhalese and Tamil names in the manuscript to recent plant names in ethnobotanical references from Sri Lanka and southern India. We published the entire manuscript online with translations and identifications. The watermarks indicate that the paper was made between 1694 and 1718. The handwriting is of a VOC scribe. In total, ca. 252 taxa are depicted, of which we could identify 221 to species level. The drawings represent mainly native species, including Sri Lankan endemics, but also introduced medicinal and ornamental plants. Lamiaceae, Zingiberaceae and Leguminosae were the best-represented families. Frequently mentioned applications were to purify the blood and to treat gastro-intestinal problems, fever and

  9. A Study of Utilization, Design and Cost of Secondary Schools. Report to the Minister of Education and Cultural Affairs, Government of Ceylon.

    Asian Regional Inst. for School Building Research, Colombo (Sri Lanka).

    An introductory section includes information regarding the background and educational aspects of the study, and the collection and analysis of data. Consideration is then given to--(1) various factors affecting the cost of school buildings in Ceylon, and (2) standard building plans. The report shows how the cost of buildings for education in…

  10. Heroines of lonely outposts or tools of the empire? British nurses in Britain's model colony: Ceylon, 1878-1948.

    Jones, Margaret

    2004-09-01

    In 1878 two 'Nightingale' nurses arrived in the British colony of Ceylon to initiate a training programme for indigenous women in the skills and values of what was then termed 'scientific nursing'. These two women were the first of a succession of British women who went to the colony to nurse in its hospitals and to train Ceylonese women for the profession. Using the official records of the colonial government held in the National Archives, Kew and the records of the Overseas Nursing Association in the Rhodes House Collection, Oxford, this paper explores both the professional and social experiences of these women. This paper also analyses the role that these representatives of the colonial state played in the development of an indigenous nursing profession and concludes that their presence in the colony ultimately left an ambiguous legacy. In their role as trainers of indigenous women, they furthered the development and spread of a Western nursing profession in the colony's hospitals. At the same time, however, their continuing dominance of training and the positions of responsibility was an inhibiting factor in the ability of indigenous nurses to organise and professionalise. Whereas the doctors, trained in the colony's Medical College, achieved registration as early as 1905, the nurses had to wait until 1949, a year after independence, before their qualification was recognised and protected. Nursing remained throughout the colonial period therefore, even more so than at the metropolitan centre, the 'Cinderella' of the medical professions.

  11. Improving diet and activity of insectivorous primates in captivity: Naturalizing the diet of Northern Ceylon gray slender loris, Loris lydekkerianus nordicus.

    Williams, Emma; Cabana, Francis; Nekaris, K A I

    2015-01-01

    Data on in-situ diet and nutritional requirements should inform the provision of food to captive insectivorous primates. Despite the growing availability of such information an over-reliance on commercially available primate foods and fruit continues in many captive establishments. Wild slender lorises are almost exclusively insectivorous, yet captive conspecifics are fed a primarily frugivorous diet that is likely to contribute to behavioral and health problems. We investigated the effect of naturalizing diet in the Northern Ceylon grey slender loris (Loris lydekkerianus nordicus) by providing live insect prey to a captive group of five individuals. We calculated activity budgets in accordance with six established categories and recorded positional behaviors. We collected data over 30 hours for each of three conditions: pre-enrichment, enrichment, post-enrichment. We hypothesized that increased opportunity for the display of natural behaviors would be stimulated by the dietary enrichment of live insects and made the following predictions; 1) Percentage time spent foraging would increase and time spent inactive would decrease; 2) behavioral repertoires would increase; 3) foraging patterns would be more constant over time with reduced feeding-time peaks. We analyzed time budget and behavioral changes using Friedman tests. We found significant changes in activity budgets with inactivity reduced and foraging levels increased to levels seen in wild slender lorises. We found a significant increase in postures used in foraging and a wider behavioral repertoire. We discuss the benefits of providing free-ranging live food in relation to enhancing the temporal-spatial distribution of food acquisition, satisfying nutritional requirements, balancing energy intake, and expenditure, expanding sensory stimulation, and promoting behavioral competence. We discuss our findings in relation to other insectivorous primates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Induced mutation studies with Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. and some indica rice varieties from Ceylon

    Ganashan, P [Agricultural Research Station, Maha-Illuppallama, Ceylon (Sri Lanka)

    1970-03-01

    Non-imbibed seeds of Brachiaria brizantha were irradiated with doses of {sup 60}Co gamma rays ranging from 7.5 to 75 kR and fresh stem cuttings containing three nodes were irradiated with doses ranging from 7.5 to 45 kR. Chromosome counts were made using the Carnoy method. There was no germination at 75 kR, and 18% germination at 60 kR with no survival of the seedlings. At the other doses germination and seedling survival decreased from 56% and 100% respectively for the control to 42% and 46% respectively at 45 kR. There were no chlorophyll mutants at 7.5 kR, while a few were observed among seedlings at the higher doses. In the stem cuttings establishment was poor and morphological variations were observed at all doses above 15 kR. A mutant of desirable plant type was obtained from the 45-kR seed treatment with an erect growth habit, reduced pubescence, short internodes, profuse tillering and rapid regrowth compared with the parent. Four indica rice varieties, H-4, H-8, H-7 and Pachchaiperumal 2462/11 (PP 2462/11), were subjected to gamma rays, neutrons and ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) treatments. The LD{sub 50} level for gamma rays was 50 to 60 kR, for neutrons 1600 R and for EMS 0.4%. Germination and final plant stand in the M{sub 1} generation were affected only slightly by the neutron treatments, but were greatly reduced by EMS, and gamma irradiation above 35 kR. The final plant stand of the variety PP 2462/11 was most reduced by all the mutagens. In the M{sub 2} generation there was segregation for chlorophyll mutants, of the albina, chlorina, xantha, virescens and zebrina types. Other macro-mutations observed were for grain size and shape, plant height, flowering date and sterility. Grass clump types were found occasionally. (author)

  13. Expeditions and other exploration

    NN,

    1969-01-01

    The Flora of Ceylon Project. From U.S. surplus funds the Smithsonian Institution has through the initiative of Dr. F.R. Fosberg launched a project to revise the Flora of Ceylon. Specialists are given grants for travel to Ceylon, and subsistence and travel in Ceylon, mainly hunting after living

  14. Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Ceylon cinnamon) as a potential pharmaceutical agent for type-2 diabetes mellitus: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Ranasinghe, Priyanga; Galappaththy, Priyadarshani; Constantine, Godwin Roger; Jayawardena, Ranil; Weeratunga, Hasitha Dhananjaya; Premakumara, Sirimal; Katulanda, Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies have explored the anti-diabetic effects of Cinnamomum cassia extract in vivo and in vitro. However, there are no studies at present exploring the effects of the indigenous species of Sri Lankan cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) in patients with diabetes mellitus. The present study aims to evaluate the potential effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract as a pharmaceutical agent in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. Methods/design The study will be conducted as a...

  15. Civil-Military Relations in Post-Conflict Sri Lanka: Successful Civilian Consolidation in the Face of Political Competition

    2015-12-01

    residence in Ceylon. This impacted Indian Tamil citizenship and franchise rights. The founder of All Ceylon Tamil Congress (ACTC), G. G. Ponnambalam...187 Ibid. 188 Bandarage, The Separatist Conflict in Sri Lanka, 154. 189 Minister Athulathmudali visited the U.S. to buy military hardware

  16. Expeditions and other exploration

    NN,

    1969-01-01

    The Flora of Ceylon Project (continued from p. 1684). This project of the Smithsonian Institution stands in Ceylon under the responsibility of Dr. R. Read, who himself is working on Monocots. Otherwise it is performed by visiting botanists who get transport, drying facilities, and can amply do field

  17. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    2010-04-01

    ... the bark of Anogeissus latifolia, a large tree found in the dry deciduous forests of India and Ceylon... percent). (3) Loss on drying. Not more than 14 percent dried at 105 °C for 5 hours. (4) Identification...

  18. Tamralipti: The ancient port of India

    Tripati, S.; Rao, S.R.

    20', 87 degrees 55') east coast of India. Other ports of Bengal, such as Satgaon and Sonargaon were also having overseas contacts with Ceylone, Java and Sumatra. In this paper, an attempt is made to synthesize archaeological, literary, epigraphic...

  19. Preliminary investigation of genetic characterization of native and endemic fowl types of Sri Lanka

    Silva, L.P.; Rajapaksha, W.R.A.K.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    The Red Jungle Fowl (Gallus gallus) is generally considered to be main ancestor of the domestic fowl (Callus domesticus). However, it is also believed that other wild Callus species might have contributed to the modern genetic make-up of the domestic fowl, one wild species being the Ceylon Jungle Fowl (Gallus lafayetti), endemic to Sri Lanka, which could have contributed to the domestic stock of Sri Lankan native poultry. The present study was conducted in order to investigate the origin of native fowl in Sri Lanka and to establish genetic relationships among them and the Ceylon Jungle Fowl. Morphological characters of endemic, indigenous and exotic fowl types were recorded. These included Ceylon Jungle fowl; eleven types of native chicken from Sri Lanka; and two exotic chicken breeds (Cornish and Rhode Island Red). Blood samples were collected for DNA extraction. Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was carried out using sixteen non-specific primers. The results of morphological characterization revealed many variations in plumage and colour pattern. Single and pea comb types were found in both native and exotic types of chicken. A prominent yellow colour marking on a red comb was a unique feature in Ceylon Jungle fowl. The presence of white spots in red earlobes was a distinguishing feature of all native chicken types. Sixteen non-specific primers were used in the study, and produced 22 polymorphic bands ranging from 500 to 1960 bp. Genetic similarity indices ranged from 0.5 to 1.1 in average genetic distance scale, indicating a broad genetic base in the samples studied. Cluster analysis revealed a clear separation of Ceylon Jungle Fowl from all other types studied, indicating that contribution in data analysis, and the Director and staff, National Zoological Gardens, Sri Lanka, for their help in sampling Ceylon Jungle Fowl. (author)

  20. A Non-Targeted Approach for Discrimination of Sri Lankan Teas by UPLC-Qtof/MS and Chemometrics

    Jandrić, Zora; Islam, Marivil

    2017-01-01

    Tea is one of the main export products grown in Sri Lanka, which ranks as the world's fourth-largest producer of tea. The selection of specific cultivars, the humidity, cool temperatures, and the rainfall patterns of the country's central highlands provide a climate that favors the production of high-quality tea, which is well known as Ceylon tea. Ceylon tea reportedly contains many compounds beneficial to health. Because of the widespread consumption of Ceylon tea, the quality control and safety of the tea are extremely important. Its popularity and value make Ceylon tea a common target for fraud. As a continuation of the preliminary research on the differentiation of tea varieties discussed in the previous issue of the newsletter, an untargeted metabolomics approach was developed to investigate the possibility of distinguishing Sri Lankan teas from different geographical origins, as well as differentiating between treated and untreated black tea samples. Authentic tea samples were obtained directly from four production sites in Sri Lanka (green (Talawakelle, Hanatana, Ratnapura, and Passara) and black (Talawakelle)), and analysed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography – quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QToF MS) with multivariate data analysis (MVA).

  1. Fouling polyzoans of Bombay offshore waters

    Raveendran, T.V.; DeSouza, A.P.; Wagh, A.B.

    ). Geographical distribution: M. savartii is a common species around the world in wanner shallow waters (PilIai, 1981). It has been reported earlier from the Gulf of Mexico, Wcst Atlantic, Red Sea, East Indics, Indian Ocean, Ceylon, Australia, Califor nia, Japan...

  2. Contributions to the Herpetology of Sumatra

    Hubrecht, A.A.W.

    1879-01-01

    The genus Cophotis was established by Peters for an Agamid from Ceylon and his species, Cophotis ceylanica, must be rare and very locally distributed in that island, according to Günther. The latter author gives a detailed description and an excellent figure of the animal in his Reptiles of British

  3. On five new species of the genus Ichthyurus, Westw

    Ritsema Cz., C.

    1879-01-01

    Of the above mentioned genus of Malacoderm Coleoptera, founded in 1848 by Westwood in his Cabinet of Oriental Entomology, twelve species have hitherto been described, all Natives of the Old World and distributed as follow: Sierra Leone (West Africa): one ¹); Moulmein (East-Indies): two ²); Ceylon:

  4. Expeditions and other exploration

    Steenis-Kruseman, van M.J.

    1977-01-01

    On 3 September 1977, Dr. H.P. Nooteboom (L) went to Ceylon for 2 months to collect additional material of Symplocaceae for ’A revised Flora of Ceylon’. Although this project was due to end by September 1977, it appeared to have been extended for another year. The genus Symplocos, with about 20 taxa,

  5. Wave characteristics in the sea around the Andaman and Nicobar Islands

    Gouveia, A.D.; RamaRaju, D.V.; Murty, C.S.

    Wave data were collected during 51 and 52 cruises (Feb. 1979) and 66 and 67 cruises (Jan. 1980) of R.V. Gaveshani using a shipborne wave recorder. Some wave records were also obtained along the 5 degrees 30'N lat. from Ceylon to the Great Nicobar...

  6. Maritime heritage in and around Chilika lake, Orissa: Geological evidences for its decline

    Tripati, S.; Vora, K.H.

    , datable to the 3rd millennium BC. The archaeological findings embodies to the fact that the well-known ports of the bygone era such as Manikapatna on Chilika coast, Palur on the extreme south and Che-li-ta-lo had close contacts with Africa, Ceylon, China...

  7. Dating by fission tracks in archaeology. 3. Tephrochronology and Hominid dating

    Poupeau, G.; Zuleta, E.

    1984-01-01

    Tephras (or volcanic ashes) are excellent stratigraphic tracers. Its utilization in this domain, or tephrochronology, is shortly presented. The main archaeological utilization of the tephrochronology is related with the dating of fossil hominids, there where exist the volcano-fossil sedimentar series, at Ceylon or at East-African Rift. (L.C.) [pt

  8. The Asian Newspaper's Reluctant Revolution.

    Lent, John A., Ed.

    This book is composed of 19 articles written by both Asian and American scholars on the history and present conditions of newspapers in 15 Asian nations: China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Australia, Burma, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, the Philippines, Thailand, South Vietnam, Ceylon, India, and Pakistan. Two overviews of the Asian…

  9. Untitled

    Calotropis gigantea is a shrub common in the eastern and southern parts of. India, Ceylon and Eastern Asia. The milkyjuice obtained from it is used for medicinal and insecticidal purposes and frequent cases of criminal poisoning by its means are known. The possibilities of obtaining a guttapercha-like Solid from this latex ...

  10. Colonial museology and the Buddhist chronicles of Sri Lanka: agency and negotiation in the development of the palm-leaf manuscript collection at the Colombo Museum.

    Jonathan Sweet

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The roles of colonial museums in South Asia have been understood in terms of the dissemination of museology within the British Empire. This has often underplayed the participation of local intellectuals in the formation of museum collections, and thus has not recognized their agency in the creation of knowledge and of longstanding cultural assets. This article addresses this in part through an historical case study of the development of the palm-leaf manuscript collection at the Colombo Museum in nineteenth century Ceylon. The article focuses on the relationships between Government aims, local intellectuals and the Buddhist clergy. I argue that colonial museology and collecting activity in Ceylon ought to be understood as a negotiated process and a number of reasons for this are discussed. This article contributes to an area of museological research that is exploring the roles of indigenous actors in colonial collecting and museum practice in South Asia and broader geographical contexts.

  11. Sri Lanka: Background and U.S. Relations

    2008-01-22

    in Indian epic literature. Although Ceylon gained its independence from Britain peacefully in 1948, succeeding decades have been marred by ethic...Agreement ( FTA ), and relevant negotiations were put on hold pending positive developments in peace negotiations. The United States also maintains a...sovereignty. Some have accused the LTTE of playing a human rights card when they are under particularly strong military pressure.140 The Rajapaksa

  12. An early historic assemblage offshore of Godawaya, Sri Lanka: Evidence for early regional seafaring in South Asia.

    Muthucumarana, R; Gaur, A.S.; Chandraratne, W.M.; Manders, M.; Rao, B.R; Bhushan, R; Khedekar, V.D.; Dayananda, A.M.A.

    of Ceylon, Colombo. Parthesius R, Millar K, Devendra S, Green J (2003) Sri Lanka Maritime Archaeological Unit Report on the Avondster Project 2001 – 2002. The Netherlands Ray HP (2003) The Archaeology of Seafaring in South Asia. Cambridge University... and Mesopotamia, Part I: New WDS analysis. Archaeometry, 48(4):581-603. Somadeva R (2006) Urban origins in Southern Sri Lanka. Published by African and comparative Archaeology, Department of Archaeology and ancient History Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden...

  13. Indian Ocean: Zone of Peace or Conflict? The Impact of India’s Military Capability on Regional Stability.

    1991-05-20

    East." Ghandi , 1921 CHAPTER I Introduction As early as 1964, Sri Lanka (Ceylon), with the support of India and other members of the non-aligned states...34of vital strategic interest to India," Prime Minister Indira Ghandi increasingly looked beyond the borders of India when defining national interests...not escape anyone. 36 Placing significant emphasis on "attaining self reliance for defence ... ," Indira Ghandi saw an ever increasing need for an

  14. PATHORCHUR (COLEUS AROMATICUS): A REVIEW OF THE MEDICINAL EVIDENCE FOR ITS PHYTOCHEMISTRY AND PHARMACOLOGY PROPERTIES

    Om Prakash Rout; Rabinarayan Acharya; Sagar Kumar Mishra; Rashmibala Sahoo

    2012-01-01

    Coleus aromaticus Benth., (Fam. Lamiaceae), syn. Coleus amboinicus Lour. Spreng or Plectranthus ambonicus Lour, is commonly known as Indian/ country borage and ‘Pathorchur’ in Hindi and Bengali. It is recorded in the Indian system of medicine as one of the sources of Pashanabheda. It is large succulent aromatic perennial herb, shrubby below, hispidly villous or tomentose. It is found throughout India, Ceylon and Moluccas. The leaves of the plant are bitter, acrid and were being widely used tr...

  15. Alva Myrdal och svenskt familjeplaneringsbistånd : Affinitet mellan välfärdsideologi och principerna bakom befolkningskontroll

    Lundberg, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Around the 1950s an explosive population growth started in the Third World. Parallel with the population growth a global network grew up advocating population control and limited population growth. Sweden had a unique place in that network through a pioneering role promoting the issue in the UN organization. During the 20th century Sweden was a pioneer country in terms of initiatives for population control. Ceylon family planing pilot project was something new in a time when other donors cons...

  16. Mission from Anti-Terrorism to Peace in Sri Lanka

    2009-03-24

    citizens working together. Endnotes 1 Asoka Bandarage, “The Sri Lankan Conflict a Multi-Polar Approach,” Harvard International Review, 15 June 2008...8 Asoka Bandarage, “The Sri Lankan Conflict a Multi-Polar Approach”, Harvard International Review, 15 June 2008, available from...Eastern University Press, 2003), 222. 24 H. Kaunaratna. BA (Ceylon) University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, interviewed by author, 25 November 2008. 25 Asoka

  17. Activation Analysis. Proceedings of an Informal Study Group Meeting

    1971-01-01

    As part of its programme to promote the exchange of information relating to nuclear science and technology, the International Atomic Energy Agency convened in Bangkok, Thailand, from 6-8 July 1970, an informal meeting to discuss the topic of Activation Analysis. The meeting was attended by participants drawn from the following countries: Australia, Burma, Ceylon, Republic of China, India, Indonesia, Prance, Japan, Republic of Korea, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, United States of America and Vietnam. The proceedings consist of the contributions presented at the meeting with minor editorial changes

  18. 第三世界の海運業と外国援助 : セイロン海運公社の事例研究

    中村, 尚司

    1988-01-01

    Most of the newly emerging states in the third world have been keen to establish their own merchant fleets since the political independence from the Western colonial powers. Some of them have sought for certain financial aid from the industrial countries in order to reinforce their national flag carriers. In the case of Sri Lanka, the Ceylon Shipping Corporation which was set up as a public enterprise in 1971, purchased eight second-hand cargo ships (85,965 ton) at about 4.8 billion yen and m...

  19. The 1962 programme of technical assistance

    1962-01-01

    Experts and equipment are provided by the Agency in response to requests from Member States after the requests have been examined by technical, financial and other relevant criteria. Under the 1962 programme to be financed with the Agency's own resources, assistance in the form of services of experts and equipment will be given to the following countries: Argentina, Brazil, Burma, Ceylon, Chile, Denmark, El Salvador, Ghana, Haiti, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Pakistan, Paraguay, the Philippines, Portugal, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, the United Arab Republic, and Yugoslavia. Some details of the individual projects of assistance to be financed with the Agency's own resources are given

  20. Activation Analysis. Proceedings of an Informal Study Group Meeting

    NONE

    1971-07-01

    As part of its programme to promote the exchange of information relating to nuclear science and technology, the International Atomic Energy Agency convened in Bangkok, Thailand, from 6-8 July 1970, an informal meeting to discuss the topic of Activation Analysis. The meeting was attended by participants drawn from the following countries: Australia, Burma, Ceylon, Republic of China, India, Indonesia, Prance, Japan, Republic of Korea, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, United States of America and Vietnam. The proceedings consist of the contributions presented at the meeting with minor editorial changes.

  1. United States Air Force Statistical Digest. Fiscal Year 1970. 25th Edition

    1971-02-22

    GUIDED MISSILE. AIR TO AIR MISSILE. AND TARGET DRONEACCEPTANCES BY MANUFACTURER. BY MONTI -!- FY 1970 o ACCEPl’ED ACCEPTANCES FOR FY 1970 TOTAL...AUTOMATICALLY DECLASSIFIEDDOD VIR. 5200.10 CONFIDENTIAL Ceylon •••••.•.•..• 19 19 - 1 - 6 - 12 - - - - - Federation of Malaysia . • • • 215 215 67 17 1...Medical Service Squadrons & Flights • • • • • • • • Air Postal & Courier ,Groups& Fligl:ts ••••••• Censorship Squadrons

  2. Mutagenic effects of gamma rays on the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll and viable macro mutations in chilli (Capsicum annuum L.)

    Rangaiah, S.; Manjunath, A.; Puttaramanaik

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, uniform dry and healthy seeds of two cultivars of chilli namely Ceylon and Byadagi were exposed to 60 Co gamma rays at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 krad doses at BARC, Mumbai. Thus there were total 18 treatments, eight different doses of gamma rays and one control in each cultivar. The M2 populations were compared with the respective control populations for chlorophyll and viable mutations. The treated populations were compared with the respective control populations for chlorophyll mutations (M2 and M3) and viable mutations (M2)' The results of the study are presented

  3. Leak detection on underground fuel oil transfer line using radio tracer iodine-131

    Wickramanayake, D.G.L.; Ranjith, H.L.A.

    1998-01-01

    Leak detection study was carried out on the fuel oil transfer line of the Ceylon Petroleum Corporation using 131 I tracer. The study was carried out to determine whether the technique developed can be used in the field and to monitor the condition of the pipeline. Radiation safety assessment was made prior to the test. The dynamic pressurization technique was used. Any detectable leak was not shown at the detecting sensitivity of 0.40 mm 2 under the test conditions. The method reported is considered to be successful and economically viable. (author)

  4. News from IAEA Headquarters

    1966-01-01

    Full text: Two more countries have joined the Agency - Panama and Jordan - bringing IAEA membership up to 96. Mr. Ginige Richard Walter de Silva (Ceylon) has been appointed Director of the Division of Conference and General Services of the Agency. Born in 1911 at Nugegeda, Ceylon, Mr. de Silva obtained his B.Sc. in Physics at London University and his M.A. in Physics and Mathematics at Cambridge University. He has had a long career in the Civil Service, mainly in the administrative, commercial and finance branches of government. Mr.de Silva took over from Mr. Arthur E. Barrett, Chief of the Conference and Engineering Services, who had been Acting Director of the Division for a long period of time, and who will be leaving the Agency later this year to take up work elsewhere. From the early days of IAEA in 1957, Mr. Barrett has been closely associated with the establishment of the Agency's temporary headquarters in Vienna. He has been in charge of the planning and design of the technical facilities for the various conference installations and responsible for the servicing of all the General Conference sessions since 1958. In fact, Mr. Barrett has played an essential part in the creation of the Vienna Congress Centre in the former Hofburg Imperial Palace. Educated at Cambridge and London Universities, Mr. Barrett has had some 35 years of public service, first in the BBC in London and subsequently with the United Nations in New York. (author)

  5. Evaluation of Food Freshness and Locality by Odor Sensor

    Koike, Takayuki; Shimada, Koji; Kamimura, Hironobu; Kaneki, Noriaki

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether food freshness and locality can be classified using a food evaluation system consisting four SnO2-semiconductor gas sensors and a solid phase column, into which collecting aroma materials. The temperature of sensors was periodically changed to be in unsteady state and thus, the sensor information was increased. The parameters (in quefrency band) were extracted from sensor information using cepstrum analysis that enable to separate superimposed information on sinusoidal wave. The quefrency was used as parameters for principal component and discriminant analyses (PCA and DCA) to detect food freshness and food localities. We used three kinds of strawberries, people can perceive its odors, passed from one to three days after harvest, and kelps and Ceylon tea, people are hardly to perceive its odor, corrected from five areas as sample. Then, the deterioration of strawberries and localities of kelps and Ceylon teas were visually evaluated using the numerical analyses. While the deteriorations were classified using PCA or DCA, the localities were classified only by DCA. The findings indicate that, although odorant intensity influenced the method detecting food quality, the quefrency obtained from odorant information using cepstrum analysis were available to detect the difference in the freshness and the localities of foods.

  6. News from IAEA Headquarters

    NONE

    1966-06-15

    Full text: Two more countries have joined the Agency - Panama and Jordan - bringing IAEA membership up to 96. Mr. Ginige Richard Walter de Silva (Ceylon) has been appointed Director of the Division of Conference and General Services of the Agency. Born in 1911 at Nugegeda, Ceylon, Mr. de Silva obtained his B.Sc. in Physics at London University and his M.A. in Physics and Mathematics at Cambridge University. He has had a long career in the Civil Service, mainly in the administrative, commercial and finance branches of government. Mr.de Silva took over from Mr. Arthur E. Barrett, Chief of the Conference and Engineering Services, who had been Acting Director of the Division for a long period of time, and who will be leaving the Agency later this year to take up work elsewhere. From the early days of IAEA in 1957, Mr. Barrett has been closely associated with the establishment of the Agency's temporary headquarters in Vienna. He has been in charge of the planning and design of the technical facilities for the various conference installations and responsible for the servicing of all the General Conference sessions since 1958. In fact, Mr. Barrett has played an essential part in the creation of the Vienna Congress Centre in the former Hofburg Imperial Palace. Educated at Cambridge and London Universities, Mr. Barrett has had some 35 years of public service, first in the BBC in London and subsequently with the United Nations in New York. (author)

  7. Sex differentials in mortality.

    1970-06-01

    The questions leing considered are whether a higher female than male mortality rate exists in Ceylon, India, and Pakistan, and whether this sex differential can account for the observed high male sex ratios. There is a choice between explaining the recorded masculinity of the Indian population by assuming that the subordinate position of women caused their omission from the census or that it caused their unrecorded death in childhood. The 1951 census report of India states that there is a traditional fondness for male issues in most parts of the country and a corresponding dislike for female children. However, a life table for India applied to the 1951 census gave a higher average female age at death 34.7 years as opposed to 33.5 years for male. Other estimates for India and Pakistan for the period 1951-1961 give 37.8 years for life expectancy for males and 36.98 for females. In 1953 the female death rate in Ceylon was over 80% higher than that of the males in the most reproductive ages, 20-29. In 1963 the female excess mortality at the same ages was still 25%, and in the age group 30-34 almost a 1/3 higher. In India the female death rate at ages 15-44 was 38% higher than that of the males in the 1958-1959 survey and as much as 174% higher in the Khanna rural survey, 1956-1960. In Pakistan a Population growth Estimate experiment conducted during 1962-1965 on a national probability sample has shown that in the ages 15-44 the female death rate was 75% higher than that of the males. High maternal mortality was the major reason. In addition, female mortality among young children over age 1 year was 24% higher in 1965 and 1963. There was little difference between the rates of mortality of the 2 sexes at age 45 and above. Recent trends in Ceylon show considerable improvement in maternal mortality which has reduced by 22% the ratio of female to male mortality at age 15-44. Also the ratio at ages 1-9 fell by 8%. to .1 of a year for every calendar year to 1980.

  8. Atomic assistance in 1961

    1961-01-01

    More than 100 experts provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency will be working in different parts of the world this year, assisting the Agency's Member States in building up their national programs of peaceful atomic development. The total allocation of EPTA funds to the Agency for the two-year period 1961-62 is $1 393 600 (of which approximately half is available in 1961), and is meant not only for the provision of experts and equipment but also for training fellowships and regional projects. The countries which will receive Agency assistance in the form of experts and equipment this year are: Afghanistan, Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Burma, Ceylon, Chile, the Republic of China, Denmark, Greece, Guatemala, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Pakistan, the Philippines, Senegal, the Sudan, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, the United Arab Republic, Vietnam and Yugoslavia

  9. Solar photovoltaics in Sri Lanka: a short history

    Gunaratne, L.

    1994-01-01

    With a significant unelectrified rural population, Sri Lanka has followed the evolution of solar photovoltaic (PV) technology in the West very closely since the 1970s as terrestrial applications for photovoltaics were developed. It was not until 1980 that the Sri Lankan government embarked on the promotion of solar photovoltaics for rural domestic use when the Ceylon Electricity Board formed the Energy Unit. In addition, Australian and Sri Lankan government-funded pilot projects have given the local promoters further valuable insight into how and how not to promote solar photovoltaics. The establishment of community-based solar photovoltaic programmes by non-governmental organizations has developed a novel approach to bridge the gap between this state-of-the-art technology and the remotely located end-users. (author)

  10. Revisiting “Vegetables” to combat modern epidemic of imbalanced glucose homeostasis

    Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Vegetables have been part of human food since prehistoric times and are considered nutritionally necessary and good for health. Vegetables are rich natural resource of biological antioxidants and possess capabilities of maintaining glucose homeostasis. When taken before starch-rich diet, juice also of vegetables such as ridge gourd, bottle gourd, ash gourd, chayote and juice of leaves of vegetables such as radish, Indian Dill, ajwain, tropical green amaranth, and bladder dock are reported to arrest significantly the rise in postprandial blood glucose level. Juice of vegetables such as ash gourd, squash gourd, and tropical green amaranth leaves are observed to tone-down sweet-beverages such as sucrose, fructose, and glucose-induced postprandial glycemic excursion. On the other hand, juice of egg-plant and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and palak are reported to augment starch-induced postprandial glycemic excursion; and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and radish supplement to the glucose-induced postprandial glycemia. Vegetables possess multifaceted antihyperglycemic activities such as inhibition of pancreatic α-amylase and intestinal α-glucosidase, inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1β in liver and skeletal muscles, and insulin mimetic and secretagogue activities. Furthermore, they are also reported to influence polyol pathway in favor of reducing development of oxidative stress, and consequently the development of diabetic complications. In the wake of emergence of modern maladaptive diet-induced hyperglycemic epidemic therefore, vegetables may offer cost-effective dietary regimen to control diet-induced glycemic over load and future development of diabetes mellitus. However, for vegetables have been reported to do both, mitigate as well as supplement to the diet-induced postprandial glycemic load, care is required in selection of vegetables when considered as medicament. PMID:24991093

  11. Revisiting "Vegetables" to combat modern epidemic of imbalanced glucose homeostasis.

    Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Vegetables have been part of human food since prehistoric times and are considered nutritionally necessary and good for health. Vegetables are rich natural resource of biological antioxidants and possess capabilities of maintaining glucose homeostasis. When taken before starch-rich diet, juice also of vegetables such as ridge gourd, bottle gourd, ash gourd, chayote and juice of leaves of vegetables such as radish, Indian Dill, ajwain, tropical green amaranth, and bladder dock are reported to arrest significantly the rise in postprandial blood glucose level. Juice of vegetables such as ash gourd, squash gourd, and tropical green amaranth leaves are observed to tone-down sweet-beverages such as sucrose, fructose, and glucose-induced postprandial glycemic excursion. On the other hand, juice of egg-plant and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and palak are reported to augment starch-induced postprandial glycemic excursion; and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and radish supplement to the glucose-induced postprandial glycemia. Vegetables possess multifaceted antihyperglycemic activities such as inhibition of pancreatic α-amylase and intestinal α-glucosidase, inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1β in liver and skeletal muscles, and insulin mimetic and secretagogue activities. Furthermore, they are also reported to influence polyol pathway in favor of reducing development of oxidative stress, and consequently the development of diabetic complications. In the wake of emergence of modern maladaptive diet-induced hyperglycemic epidemic therefore, vegetables may offer cost-effective dietary regimen to control diet-induced glycemic over load and future development of diabetes mellitus. However, for vegetables have been reported to do both, mitigate as well as supplement to the diet-induced postprandial glycemic load, care is required in selection of vegetables when considered as medicament.

  12. Antispasmodic and Antidiarrheal Activities of Valeriana hardwickii Wall. Rhizome Are Putatively Mediated through Calcium Channel Blockade.

    Bashir, Samra; Memon, Raafia; Gilani, Anwar H

    2011-01-01

    Valeriana hardwickii is indigenous to Pakistan, Burma and Ceylon, where it is traditionally being used as an antispasmodic and antidiarrheal, besides its culinary use as spice. The aim of this paper was to provide pharmacological validation to these medicinal uses. The crude aqueous-methanolic extract of Valeriana hardwickii rhizome (Vh.Cr) was studied on isolated rabbit jejunum and castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice for spasmolytic and antidiarrheal properties, respectively. Vh.Cr caused concentration-dependent (0.01-1 mg/mL) relaxation of spontaneous contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum and inhibited K(+)-induced contractions (0.01-0.3 mg/mL), similar to verapamil, suggestive of calcium channel blockade (CCB). The CCB effect was confirmed when pretreatment of the jejunum preparations with Vh.Cr produced a concentration-dependent (0.03-0.1 mg/mL) rightward shift in the Ca(++) concentration-response curves, as caused by verapamil. Vh.Cr exhibited dose-dependent (100-300 mg/kg) protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice. Loperamide, a standard antidiarrheal drug, similarly prevented the diarrhea. These data indicate the presence of CCB effect in the extract of Valeriana hardwickii rhizome, possibly mediating its antispasmodic and antidiarrheal activities and provide a scientific base for its traditional use in hyperactive gut disorders.

  13. Antispasmodic and Antidiarrheal Activities of Valeriana hardwickii Wall. Rhizome Are Putatively Mediated through Calcium Channel Blockade

    Samra Bashir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Valeriana hardwickii is indigenous to Pakistan, Burma and Ceylon, where it is traditionally being used as an antispasmodic and antidiarrheal, besides its culinary use as spice. The aim of this paper was to provide pharmacological validation to these medicinal uses. The crude aqueous-methanolic extract of Valeriana hardwickii rhizome (Vh.Cr was studied on isolated rabbit jejunum and castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice for spasmolytic and antidiarrheal properties, respectively. Vh.Cr caused concentration-dependent (0.01–1 mg/mL relaxation of spontaneous contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum and inhibited K+-induced contractions (0.01–0.3 mg/mL, similar to verapamil, suggestive of calcium channel blockade (CCB. The CCB effect was confirmed when pretreatment of the jejunum preparations with Vh.Cr produced a concentration-dependent (0.03–0.1 mg/mL rightward shift in the Ca++ concentration-response curves, as caused by verapamil. Vh.Cr exhibited dose-dependent (100–300 mg/kg protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice. Loperamide, a standard antidiarrheal drug, similarly prevented the diarrhea. These data indicate the presence of CCB effect in the extract of Valeriana hardwickii rhizome, possibly mediating its antispasmodic and antidiarrheal activities and provide a scientific base for its traditional use in hyperactive gut disorders.

  14. The Brazil of Marianne North: Memories of an English Traveler

    Ana Lúcia Almeida Gazzola

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Starting from reflections about woman and femininity in the Victorian era, the explosion of literary market in the 19th century, and the access of women to education, literature, and journalism, this text introduces the work of Marianne North, English painter who used to travel aiming to paint the flora of other countries, particularly the exotic tropical flora. Marianne became one of the most famous globetrotter travelers of her time, visiting several countries such as Canada, USA, Jamaica, Brazil, Tenerife, Japan, Borneo, Java, Ceylon, Singapore, India, Wales, Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, South Africa, Seychelles Islands, and Chile. In total, she left registers of about 272 genres (almost 1000 species of plants, some of them little known by the experts. Hence, the text deals with the dual condition of Marianne North as a painter and author of reports about the visited countries. In Brazil, for instance, she lived between 1972 and 1873. Her professionalism and objectivity distinguish her from the other travelers of 19th century.

  15. The Banyan tree: overseas migrants from South Asia.

    Tinker, H

    1979-10-01

    The number of Indian emigrants throughout the years has made little or no population difference to the country. With the population of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh totalling about 700 million in the mid 1970s, emigration is almost irrelevant. In 3 small nations, Mauritius, Fiji, and Guyana, Indians form the majority of the population. Present demographic trends point to the same majority in Trinidad. Indians also are an important group in Malaya, Singapore, and Ceylon, where they are more than 10% of the overall population. In other countries Indians form a small, minority population without political power. Almost all the overseas communities preserved the essential of the Hindu, Muslim, or Sikh religions which they took with them. In the Caribbean the Indian, or East Indian, has discarded his mother tongue after 3 or more generations in isolation. In South Africa only very old emigrants still speak their native tongue. Indian communities abroad often separate into Hindu and Muslim communities. British society uses the term "multi-racial" to describe the pluralistic cultures in its colonies, but British culture is not multiracial. The term has meaning only when applied to an urban area such as Singapore. In Singapore a multilingual policy is applied in order to make the multiracial ideal a reality.

  16. POMETIA (SAPINDACEAE, A STUDY IN VARIABILITY

    M Jacobs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A monograph   of   Pometia,   which   extends   from   Ceylon   throughout Malaysia to Samoa, with a few stations in SE. Asia and Formosa. Two species are recognized:   P. ridleyi   and   P. pinnata,   the   latter   having a particular pattern of  alternating- nerves.  Pometia pinnata is  extremely variable and clearly still in process of differentiation. From the wealth of forms,  8 formae  have  been  selected  for taxonomic  recognition,  1  of them is newly described, 7 are new combinations;  characters are found in the leaves and the inflorescence. Besides, a number of unnamed paramorphs have been described. The distribution of the variability has been sketched for each region. Details about ecology etc. are given. Specimens are cited where  appropriate  and  a general  Identification  List  is  given at the end.

  17. Public acceptance and trade development of irradiated food in Sri Lanka with special reference to spices and onions

    Wilson Wijeratnam, R.S.; Sivakumar, D.

    2001-01-01

    Sri Lankan spices, onion, shallots and dried chillies suffer considerable storage losses due to inadequate preservation method. Irradiation to a dose 7 kGy was found to be effective technique to reduce storage losses and improve quality of different spices. Preliminary results showed prospect of using irradiation for large scale preservation of dried chillis. But due to lack of irradiation, facility scaled- up irradiation and storage trials could not be undertaken. Based on study conducted by the Ceylon Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, a report was submitted to the Atomic Energy Authority of Sri Lanka on the current demand for a multi-purpose irradiation facility. The food items identified for irradiation processing include spices, desiccated coconut, shrimps for export; and onions, chillies and dried fish products, foliage plants and medical products for local trade. The volume of products for commercial processing has also been indicated in the survey report. Steps for approval of the Harmonised Regulations on Food Irradiation as adopted in the RCA Workshop in Seoul, 1998 are at the processing level for submission as a parliamentary bill. A consumer acceptance survey was carried out in 1997; the outcome showed a low acceptance for irradiated spices. About 200 participants comprising private exporters, govt. officials and students were made aware of the irradiation process and benefits of irradiation treatment through the training programmes on post-harvest management at the CISIR. (author)

  18. Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity of Extracts and Active Principles of Commonly Consumed Indian Spices.

    Patra, Kartick; Jana, Samarjit; Mandal, Deba Prasad; Bhattacharjee, Shamee

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that free radical reactions play a key part in the development of degenerative diseases and that an antioxidant-rich diet is a major defense against these free radical reactions. In this study, we explore comparative antioxidant capacities of extracts of some commonly used in Indian spices (anise, cardamom, Ceylon cinnamon, and clove) along with their purified components (anethole, eucalyptol, cinnamaldehyde, and eugenol, respectively). Eugenol shows the highest 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl, and superoxide scavenging and reducing power activity in terms of weight; however, this was not found when compared in terms of equivalence. Extracts of the other three spices were found to be more potent antioxidants than their corresponding active components. Interestingly, clove extract, despite possessing the highest phenol and flavonoid content, is not the most potent radical scavenger. At low concentrations, both the crude extracts and their purified components (except for anethole and eugenol) have low hemolytic activity, but at higher concentrations purified components are more toxic than their respective crude extract. This study suggests that spices as a whole are more potent antioxidants than their purified active components, perhaps reflecting the synergism among different phytochemicals present in spice extracts.

  19. Ethics Review Committee approval and informed consent: an analysis of biomedical publications originating from Sri Lanka

    Siriwardhana Chesmal

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background International guidelines on research have focused on protecting research participants. Ethical Research Committee (ERC approval and informed consent are the cornerstones. Externally sponsored research requires approval through ethical review in both the host and the sponsoring country. This study aimed to determine to what extent ERC approval and informed consent procedures are documented in locally and internationally published human subject research carried out in Sri Lanka. Methods We obtained ERC approval in Sri Lanka and the United Kingdom. Theses from 1985 to 2005 available at the Postgraduate Institute of Medicine (PGIM library affiliated to the University of Colombo were scrutinised using checklists agreed in consultation with senior research collaborators. A Medline search was carried out with MeSH major and minor heading 'Sri Lanka' as the search term for international publications originating in Sri Lanka during 1999 to 2004. All research publications from CMJ during 1999 to 2005 were also scrutinized. Results Of 291 theses, 34% documented ERC approvals and 61% documented obtaining consent. From the international journal survey, 250 publications originated from Sri Lanka of which only 79 full text original research publications could be accessed electronically. Of these 38% documented ERC approval and 39% documented obtaining consent. In the Ceylon Medical Journal 36% documented ERC approval and 37% documented obtaining consent. Conclusion Only one third of the publications scrutinized recorded ERC approval and procurement of informed consent. However, there is a positive trend in documenting these ethical requirements in local postgraduate research and in the local medical journal.

  20. Possibility of regional fuel cycle centres in the context of Bangladesh

    Innas, A.M.; Ahsan, M.; Husain, S.R.; Chowdhury, R.K.; Rahman, A.

    1977-01-01

    The region consisting of Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Ceylon, Bangladesh, Burma, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and Indonesia is considered for a model study on the possibility of establishing regional fuel cycle centres. Nuclear power generation capacity for this region is estimated and projected through 2000 A.D. and accordingly the demands for various nuclear fuel cycle services are determined. Preliminary calculations show that for the region conversion and fuel fabrication plants may be economically feasible before 1990 whereas reprocessing plants may become feasible only after 1990. The possibility of enrichment plant is even more uncertain. Ore, enrichment and fabrication in future may constitute more than 95-98% of the total fuel cycle cost. For fuel cycle economy, therefore, regional cooperation should be emphasized for these services. Reprocessing has to be considered because of the valuable fissile materials present in the spent fuel. Assuming that regional fuel cycle centre/centres may be established in Bangladesh, the study considered the local advantages and disadvantages of such an effort. Though no major problem could be identified in the case of conversion and fabrication plants, considerable difficulty is anticipated from a large reprocessing plant because of waste management and disposal problems. Bangladesh does not appear to have any suitable waste disposal site in view of the present technology. However, if the long term leaching problemns of solidified wastes are resolved then wastes may be dumped in the sea-canyon in the Bay of Bengal (called the ''Swatch of no ground'') or in the deep underground caverns

  1. Plantes aromatiques du Plateau des Cataractes (Bassin du Congo. Caractérisation du chémotype de l'huile essentielle de Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle acclimaté au Congo-Brazzaville

    Silou, T.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic plants from the Plateau des Cataractes (Congo Basin. Chemotype characterization of essential oil of Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle acclimatized in Congo-Brazzaville. Description. The essential oils of Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle, Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt, Cymbopogon flexuosus (Nees ex Steud. Wats and Cymbopogon citratus L. (DC. Stapf (lemongrass consist of more than 80% of the following constituents: citronellal, geraniol, citral, citronellol, geranyl acetate, and limonene. For the purposes of business transactions, it is therefore important to know the exact chemical composition of the essential oils produced. Objectives. Chemotype evaluation of C. nardus acclimatized on the Plateau des Cataractes. Method. The essential oils of C. nardus were extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by chromatography (GC and GC/MS over a period of more than ten years. Results. Cymbopogon nardus was found to produce a Java type citronella essential oil (C. winterianus with the following profile: citronellal (40-48%, geraniol (10-22%, citronellol (10-12%, limonene (2-3%, geranyl acetate (1-2%, linalool (1%. The difference between these two types of citronella, Java and Ceylon, was based on the relative proportions of their three main constituents: citronellal, geraniol and citronellol. Cymbopogon nardus is known for its high variability, with two varieties and sept subvarieties. Conclusions. The citronella established in West and Central Africa under the name of Cymbopogon nardus (Java type could be considered a Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt, based on the chemical composition of its essential oil.

  2. A.E. Nordenski and the auroral oval

    Nygrén, Tuomo; Silén, Johan

    In 1857, Adold Erik Nordenskiöld (1832-1901), a Finnish geographer and mineralogist, was forced to withdraw from his position at the University of Helsinki because of a conflict with the czarist officials in Finland. He then moved to Sweden, where he became one of the most celebrated explorers of his time. Most famous of his polar expeditions was the discovery of the Northeast Passage. Nordenskiöld made his voyage in the wooden steamship Vega in 1878-79.Vega started its voyage on June 22, 1878, and was directed in a course around Scandinavia and along the Siberian coast toward Bering Strait. Nordenskiöld's plan was to reach the Pacific Ocean during the summer months, but this was hindered by unfavorable ice conditions. At the end of September the sea was blocked by ice fields, and the Vega had to pass the winter on the northern coast of the Chukchi Peninsula (67°4‧49″N, 173°23‧2″W)—exasperatingly close to the open waters of Bering Strait. The ship could not set sail any sooner than the following July when the sea was free again. After visiting Japan, China, and Ceylon, the Vega passed through the Suez Canal and finally, on April 24, 1880, arrived at Stockholm.

  3. THE GENUS CULLENIA Wight * (Bombacaceae

    A. J. G. H. KOSTERMANS

    1956-12-01

    Full Text Available The monotypic genus Cullenia was established by Wight (IconesPI. Ind. or. 5 (1 : pi. 1761—62 & text, 1851, who differentiated it fromDurio Adans. mainly by the lack of a corolla and the position and shapeof the anthers. The only species, originally described as Durio ceylanicusby Gardner, was cited by Wight as Cullenia excelsa Wight. K. Schumanncorrected the specific epithet rather casually and atributed it (wronglyto Wight. Bentham (in Benth. & Hook., Gen. pi. 1: 212. 1867; Baillon(Hist. pi. 4: 159. 1872, Masters (in Hook, f., Fl. Br. Ind. 1: 350. 1874and Beccari (Malesia 3: 219. 1889 accepted the genus.Bakhuizen van den Brink (in Bull. Jard. bot. Buitenzorg III, 6: 228.1924 incorporated the genus in Durio.In my opinion Cullenia represents a "good" genus by its lack ofcorolla. Alston, although accepting Bakhuizen's reduction, informed mepersonally, that he, too, is inclined to consider Cullenia different fromDurio.The pollen were described as being naked and pedicellate by Gardner;this wrong statement was corrected by Wight; the anthers are pedicellateand one-celled.In this paper a new Cullenia species is described, which strengthensthe position of the genus; both species are restricted to the rain forestregion of Ceylon and the Southern Indian Peninsula.

  4. Nature–Culture Relations: Early Globalization, Climate Changes, and System Crisis

    Sing C. Chew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalization has been on everyone’s lips in light of the contemporary conditions. It has been viewed mostly as a stage reached as a result of long-term societal changes over the course of world history. For us, globalization has been an ongoing process for at least the last 5000 years. Little attention has been paid to the socioeconomic and natural processes that led to the current transformation. With the exception of historical sociologists, there is less interest in examining the long-term past as it is often assumed that the past has nothing to teach us, and it is the future that we have to turn our intellectual gaze. This paper will argue the opposite. We believe a long-term tracing of the socioeconomic and political processes of the making of the modern world will allow us to have a more incisive understanding of the current trajectory of world development and transformations. To plead our case, we outline the emergence of the first Eurasian World Economy linking seven regions (Europe, the Arabian Peninsula, East Africa, the Persian Gulf, Central Asia, South Asia, Ceylon, Southeast Asia, and China of the world, with the exception of the Americas, starting as early as 200 BC, and the sequence of structural crises and transformations (trading networks and commodities that has circumscribed the structures and trends of the current global system. Such consideration in our view is limited if we do not also include the relations between social systems and Nature, and the rhythms of the climate. For the latter, an awareness of the natural rhythms of the climate as well as human induced changes or climate forcing have triggered system-wide level collapses during certain early historical periods.

  5. A SURVEY OF THE SPECIES AND DISTRIBUTION OF AEDES AT SEAPORTS AND AIRPORTS OF IRIAN JAYA

    Sumengen Sumengen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Walaupun penyakit demam berdarah terdapat dimana-mana didaerah Asia Tenggara termasuk Indonesia, namun demikian belum pernah dilaporkan adanya di propinsi Irian Jaya. Vector utama penyakit tersebut adalah A. (Stegomya aegypti meskipun A. (S albopictus juga dapat menjadi vectornya. Penyakit lain yang terpenting dapat ditularkan oleh A. aegypti ialah yellow fever, dimana virusnya hanya terdapat di Afrika dan Amerika. Mengingat letak geografis yang sangat dekat dan kommunikasi yang regular baik melalui laut dan udara dengan negara-negara seperti Philipana, Thailand, Singapura, Vietnam, India, Ceylon dan Indonesia, maka setiap saat kedua penyakit tersebut kemungkinan dapat menginfeksi penduduk Irian Jaya. Untuk membantu mempelajari apakah infeksi dapat terjadi maka dari bulan September sampai dengan Desember 1968 telah dilakukan survey pendahuluan untuk mengetahui species Aedes yang ada dan distribusinya di pelabuhan-pelabuhan laut maupun udara terpenting di Irian Jaya. Survey ini dilakukan dengan cara mengadakan penangkapan serta pemeriksaan nyamuk dan larva yang terdapat pada setiap bangunan didaerah pelabuhan laut maupun udara. Berdasarkan hasil survey yang dilakukan ternyata ditemukan adanya 7 species Aedes yaitu, A. aegypti, A. albopictus, A. (S scutellaris, A. (Finlaya koehi, A. (Ochlerotatus vigilax, A. (S alboleneatus, dan A. (F novalbitarsis. Walaupun Van Den Assem & Bonne Wepster (1964 menyatakan bahwa sebagian besar di wilayah Irian Jaya masih belum ditemukan adanya A. aegypti tetapi pada penelitian ini ternyata dari 11 pelabuhan laut dan udara, 9 diantaranya ditemukan A. aegypti. Timbulnya A. aegypti pada beberapa kota diwilayah Irian Jaya pada tahun 1968 mungkin disebabkan karena pemindahan vector tersebut dari daerah-daerah lain melalui kapal laut maupun udara yang merupakan alat pengangkut dari satu daerah kedaerah lain.

  6. The sex ratio distortion in the human head louse is conserved over time

    Biliński Szczepan M

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At the turn of the 19th century the first observations of a female-biased sex ratio in broods and populations of the head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis, had been reported. A study by Buxton in 1940 on the sex ratio of lice on prisoners in Ceylon is still today the subject of reanalyses. This sex ratio distortion had been detected in ten different countries. In the last sixty years no new data have been collected, especially on scalp infestations under economically and socially more developed conditions. Results Here we report a female bias of head lice in a survey of 480 school children in Argentina. This bias is independent of the intensity of the pediculosis, which makes local mate competition highly unlikely as the source of the aberrant sex ratio; however, other possible adaptive mechanisms cannot be discounted. These lice as well as lice from pupils in Britain were carrying several strains of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia pipientis, one of the most wide spread intracellular sex ratio distorters. Similar Wolbachia strains are also present in the pig louse, Haematopinus suis, suggesting that this endosymbiont might have a marked influence on the biology of the whole order. The presence of a related obligate nutritional bacterium in lice prevents the investigation of a causal link between sex ratio and endosymbionts. Conclusions Regardless of its origin, this sex ratio distortion in head lice that has been reported world wide, is stable over time and is a remarkable deviation from the stability of frequency-dependent selection of Fisher's sex ratio. A female bias first reported in 1898 is still present over a hundred years and a thousand generations later.

  7. Training in radioisotope uses for agricultural investigations

    NONE

    1966-12-15

    Full text: Seventeen students from Cambodia, the Republic of China, India, Israel, Pakistan, the Philippines, Syria, Thailand and the United Arab Republic attended an inter-regional training course on the use of radioisotopes in soil and plant investigations in Manila, Philippines. Held from 3 October to 25 November 1966, the course was organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) under the UN Expanded Programme of Technical Assistance. During the first three weeks, the students, most of whom had graduate training or experience in agricultural research, were taught the basic characteristics of isotopes and the techniques of measuring radiation. Lectures and practical laboratory exercises in the more specialized studies of soil-plant relations took up the rest of the time. Some of the topics covered were: field and water culture experiments, measurement of nutrient in the soil, autoradiography of plant materials, plant mutation and breeding, use of radioisotopes in the study of photosynthesis and plant growth, nuclear techniques for determining soil moisture and density, the use of labelled fertilizer in studying the efficient utilization of fertilizer, etc. Dr. Getulio B. Viado, Head of the Training Institute, Philippine Atomic Energy Commission, was Director of the course, while Dr. Shaukat Ahmed, Director of the Atomic Research Centre, West Pakistan, served as Technical Adviser and as a principal lecturer. The teaching staff consisted of Philippine scientists and three visiting professors: Dr. Victor Middelboe of the IAEA Seibersdorf Laboratory, Dr. M.S. Chandraratna of Ceylon and Dr. S.C. Chang of the Republic of China. (author)

  8. Low-angle X-ray scattering properties of irradiated spices

    Almeida, A.P.G.; Braz, D.; Barroso, R.C.; Lopes, R.T.

    2007-01-01

    The scattering of X-rays at low angles (LAXS) is a technique dominated by the coherent scattering process. One characteristic observation of low-angle coherent scattering is the so-called molecular interference effect, being characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. In the present study, LAXS profiles from five different spices are carefully measured in order to establish characteristic scattering signatures. Samples of Ceylon cinnamon, cumin, nutmeg, paprika and black pepper were bought in local market in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The LAXS patterns were obtained using a Shimadzu DRX 6000 diffractometer in reflection geometry. Coherent scattering patterns are measured for the samples for θ=5-35 o . The data were collected in 0.05 o increments every 3 s. In order to evaluate the possible molecular structure changes caused to the irradiation procedure, the signatures obtained for control (non-irradiated) spices were compared with spice samples irradiated with different doses varying from 3 to 40 kGy. The LAXS patterns of all samples were obtained after 30, 60, 90, 120 days to evaluate the effect of storage period. Scattering profiles from spices irradiated with different irradiation doses were obtained and the results compared. For each spice, there is no considerable deviation in shape in function of the irradiation dose. It indicates that the molecular structure of each analyzed spices is preserved considering the dose range chosen. The results show that the molecular structure was found to be stable during storage at the ambient temperature for up to 4 months

  9. Book Reviews

    Redactie KITLV

    1974-04-01

    Full Text Available - Umar Junus, Claire Holt, Culture and politics in Indonesia, Cornell Univ. Press, Ithaca and London, 1972. xi, 348 pp., maps, indexes., Benedict R. O’G. Anderson, James Siegel (eds. - S. Avé, Robert Stiller, Antologia Literatury Malajskiej. Biblioteka Narodowa, Zaklad Narodowy im. Ossolinskich, Wroclaw etc. 1971. 528 p. - H.J. Heering, J. van Baal, De boodschap der drie illusies. Van Gorcum & Co. Assen 1972. 135 blz. - The Siauw Giap, Goh Cheng Teik, The Malay Thirteenth incident and democracy in Malaysia. Oxford in Asia Current Affairs. Oxford University Press, Kula Lumpur & Singapore, 1971. 76 p. - W.F. Wertheim, Harry J. Benda, Continuity and change in Southeast Asia: Collected journal articles, Southeast Asia studies, Yale University, New Haven 1972, 307 p. - J.J. Ras, James Danandjaja, An annotated bibliography of Javanese folklore, Occasional paper no.9, Center for South and Southeast Asia studies, University of California, Berkeley, 1972, 162 pp. - I. Schöffer, Rob Nieuwenhuys, Oost Indische spiegel. Wat Nederlandse schrijvers en dichters over Indonesië hebben geschreven, vanaf de eerste jaren der Compagnie tot heden. Em. Querido, Amsterdam 1972. 645 blz. (Inleiding 11-18, Aantekeningen 555-621, Verantwoording 622-25, Namen en adressen 626, Woordenlijst 627-30, Register 631-45. - E. Postel-Coster, James L. Peacock, Indonesia; an anthropological perspective. Goodyear regional anthropological series, Edword Norbeck (ed.. Goodyear publishing company, Inc., Pacific Palisades, California, 1973. 168 pp. - C. Baks, O.H.K. Spate, India, Pakistan and Ceylon, the regions. Methuen and Co. Ltd., University Paperback 420, London 1972. 407-862 p., A.T.A. Learmouth, B.H. Farmer (eds. - ,

  10. Lead toxicity, defense strategies and associated indicative biomarkers in Talinum triangulare grown hydroponically.

    Kumar, Abhay; Prasad, M N V; Sytar, Oksana

    2012-11-01

    Talinum species have been used to investigate a variety of environmental problems for e.g. determination of metal pollution index and total petroleum hydrocarbons in roadside soils, stabilization and reclamation of heavy metals (HMs) in dump sites, removal of HMs from storm water-runoff and green roof leachates. Species of Talinum are popular leaf vegetables having nutrient antinutrient properties. In this study, Talinum triangulare (Jacq.) Willd (Ceylon spinach) grown hydroponically were exposed to different concentrations of lead (Pb) (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.25 mM) to investigate the biomarkers of toxicity and tolerance mechanisms. Relative water content, cell death, photosynthetic pigments, sulphoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), anthocyanins, α-tocopherol, malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) glutathione (GSH and GSSG) and elemental analysis have been investigated. The results showed that Pb in roots and shoots gradually increased as the function of Pb exposure; however Pb concentration in leaves was below detectable level. Chlorophylls and SQDG contents increased at 0.25 mM of Pb treatment in comparison to control at all treated durations, thereafter decreased. Levels of carotenoid, anthocyanins, α-tocopherol, and lipid peroxidation increased in Pb treated plants compared to control. Water content, cells death and elemental analysis suggested the damage of transport system interfering with nutrient transport causing cell death. The present study also explained that Pb imposed indirect oxidative stress in leaves is characterized by decreases in GSH/GSSG ratio with increased doses of Pb treatment. Lead-induced oxidative stress was alleviated by carotenoids, anthocyanins, α-tocopherol and glutathione suggesting that these defense responses as potential biomarkers for detecting Pb toxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Training in radioisotope uses for agricultural investigations

    1966-01-01

    Full text: Seventeen students from Cambodia, the Republic of China, India, Israel, Pakistan, the Philippines, Syria, Thailand and the United Arab Republic attended an inter-regional training course on the use of radioisotopes in soil and plant investigations in Manila, Philippines. Held from 3 October to 25 November 1966, the course was organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) under the UN Expanded Programme of Technical Assistance. During the first three weeks, the students, most of whom had graduate training or experience in agricultural research, were taught the basic characteristics of isotopes and the techniques of measuring radiation. Lectures and practical laboratory exercises in the more specialized studies of soil-plant relations took up the rest of the time. Some of the topics covered were: field and water culture experiments, measurement of nutrient in the soil, autoradiography of plant materials, plant mutation and breeding, use of radioisotopes in the study of photosynthesis and plant growth, nuclear techniques for determining soil moisture and density, the use of labelled fertilizer in studying the efficient utilization of fertilizer, etc. Dr. Getulio B. Viado, Head of the Training Institute, Philippine Atomic Energy Commission, was Director of the course, while Dr. Shaukat Ahmed, Director of the Atomic Research Centre, West Pakistan, served as Technical Adviser and as a principal lecturer. The teaching staff consisted of Philippine scientists and three visiting professors: Dr. Victor Middelboe of the IAEA Seibersdorf Laboratory, Dr. M.S. Chandraratna of Ceylon and Dr. S.C. Chang of the Republic of China. (author)

  12. /sup 226/Ra in the western Indian Ocean

    Chung, Y.

    1987-09-01

    /sup 226/Ra profiles have been measured in the western Indian Ocean as part of the 1977-78 Indian Ocean GEOSECS program. These profiles show a general increase in deep and bottom water Ra concentration from the Circumpolar region to the Arabian Sea. A deep Ra maximum which originates in the Arabian Sea and in the Somali basin at about 3000 m depth spreads southward into the Mascarene basin and remains discernible in the Madagascar and Crozet basins. In the western Indian Ocean, the cold Antarctic Bottom Water spreads northward under the possibly southward-flowing deep water, forming a clear benthic front along the Crozet basin across the Southwest Indian Ridge into the Madagascar and Mascarene basins. The Antarctic Bottom Water continues to spread farther north to the Somali basin through the Amirante Passage at 10/sup 0/S as a western boundary current. The benthic front and other characteristic features in the western Indian Ocean are quite similar to those observed in the western Pacific where the benthic front as a distinctive feature was first described by Craig et al. Across the Mid-Indian Ridge toward the Ceylon abyssal plain near the triple junction, Ra profiles display a layered structure, reflecting the topographic effect of the mid-ocean ridge system on the mixing and circulation of the deep and bottom waters. Both Ra and Si show a deep maximum north of the Madagascar Basin. Linear relationships between these two elements are observed in the deep and bottom water with slopes increasing northward. This suggests a preferential input of Ra over Si from the bottom sediments of the Arabian Sea and also from the flank sediments of the Somali basin.

  13. Survey in South-East Asia

    NONE

    1959-07-15

    In early 1959 an IAEA mission visited Burma, Ceylon, Indonesia and Thailand. In each of the four countries, the mission held detailed discussions with scientists and officials, collected information and exchanged ideas. Besides general discussion, consultations were held in small working groups on specific topics and problems. The members of the mission also visited atomic energy centres, other scientific and technical organizations, educational institutions as well as sites of actual or possible projects. The reports of the mission contain, a general description of the atomic energy programmes of the four countries, covering both current and planned activities, the mission's comments and recommendations and lists of specific requests for Agency assistance made by these countries after discussions with the mission. Atomic energy work in Burma is primarily the responsibility of the Union of Burma Atomic Energy Centre (UBAEC). Set up in 1955, the Centre is a part of the Union of Burma Applied Research Institute (UBARI). The programme of UBAEC includes a broad training scheme, the setting up of a Nuclear Radiation Laboratory by 1960-61, a study of the possibilities of installing a research reactor by 1962-63 and the possible erection of other reactors at a later date. The mission discussed with the Burmese authorities their tentative plans for atomic energy legislation and the advice given might help in the early establishment of an independent atomic energy commission. Ceylon too is embarking on several atomic energy activities and long-range plans are being developed. The emphasis, it is expected, will be mainly on education, raw material prospecting, isotopes and nuclear power development. A Committee on Atomic Energy was created in 1958 by Ceylon's National Planning Council, and the Committee is now working towards the early formation of a central atomic energy authority. The IAEA mission advised the officials of the Committee on the framing of such legislation as

  14. O Brasil de Marianne North: lembranças de uma viajante inglesa The Brazil of Marianne North: memories of an english traveler

    Ana Lúcia Almeida Gazzola

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de reflexões sobre a mulher e a feminilidade no período vitoriano, a explosão do mercado literário no século XIX e o acesso da mulher à educação, à literatura e ao jornalismo, o texto introduz a obra de Marianne North, pintora inglesa que viajava com o objetivo de pintar a flora de outros países, particularmente a exótica flora tropical. Marianne tornou-se uma das mais famosas viajantes globetrotters de sua época, ao percorrer inúmeros países, como Canadá, Estados Unidos, Jamaica, Brasil, Teneriffe, Japão, Bornéu, Java, Ceilão, Singapura, Índia, Gales, Austrália, Nova Zelândia, Tasmânia, África do Sul, as ilhas Seychelles e Chile. No total, ela deixou registrado aproximadamente 727 gêneros (quase 1.000 espécies de plantas, algumas bem pouco conhecidas dos estudiosos. O texto trata, pois, da dupla condição de Marianne North como pintora e como autora de relatos dos países visitados. No Brasil, por exemplo, ela viveu entre 1872 e 1873. Seu profissionalismo e objetividade a distinguem das demais viajantes do século XIX.Starting from reflections about woman and femininity in the Victorian era, the explosion of literary market in the 19th century, and the access of women to education, literature, and journalism, this text introduces the work of Marianne North, English painter who used to travel aiming to paint the flora of other countries, particularly the exotic tropical flora. Marianne became one of the most famous globetrotter travelers of her time, visiting several countries such as Canada, USA, Jamaica, Brazil, Tenerife, Japan, Borneo, Java, Ceylon, Singapore, India, Wales, Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, South Africa, Seychelles Islands, and Chile. In total, she left registers of about 272 genres (almost 1000 species of plants, some of them little known by the experts. Hence, the text deals with the dual condition of Marianne North as a painter and author of reports about the visited countries. In Brazil

  15. Analysis of archaeological precious stones from Slovenia

    Šmit, Ž. [Facully of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Fajfar, H. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeršsek, M. [Slovenian Museum of Natural History, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Knific, T. [National Museum of Slovenia, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kržic, A. [Higher Vocational Centre, Sezana (Slovenia); Lux, J. [Institute for the Protection of Cultural Heritage of Slovenia, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Precious stones have been attractive pieces of jewelry since ancient times. However, due to the limited sources of origin, the quality of applied items mainly depended on long-range commercial relations, but also on fashion. In Antiquity and Late Antiquity, stones much used and sought for were emeralds and garnets. In Slovenia, emeralds are typically related to the early Roman period and are incorporated in the finds of gold jewelry from the graves. Emerald is generally beryl colored by admixture of chromium, though green colors can also be due to admixtures of iron or vanadium. Garnets were increasingly used by various nations of the People Migration period, and mounted in gilded silver or gold objects by 'cloisonne' or 'en cabochon' techniques. In Slovenia, numerous jewelry items containing garnets were found in the graves and in post-Roman fortified settlements. Geologically, according to the admixtures of metal ions, the garnets are divided into several species, while the most common among archaeological finds are almandines and pyropes and their intermediate types. It is also common to divide garnets into five groups, the first two originating from India, the third from Ceylon and the fifth from Czech Republic. The measurements involved presumed emeralds from Roman jewelry finds in Slovenia and comparative samples of beryl from Siberia and Habachtal in Austria. The analysis determined the coloring ions and showed relations between particular stones. For garnets, ten samples from brooches, earrings and rings were selected for the analysis on the basis of previous micro Raman examination. The analysis was performed by a combined PIXE-PIGE technique using proton beam in air. The light elements of Na, Mg, AI were determined according to the emitted gamma rays, while X-rays were used for the elements heavier than silicon. Two X-ray spectra were measured in each measuring point, soft and hard X-ray; the latter was obtained using an

  16. ECOSOC conference news

    1972-01-01

    The Economic and Social Council of the UN met in Geneva for its fifty-third summer session from July 3-28. A request for a study regarding the world's multinational corporations, a call on the Governments concerned for action to stop the reported clandestine trafficking in labor from Africa to Europe, far-reaching recommendations on land reform, and measures to eliminate mass poverty and unemployment in the developing countries, were some of the major decisions taken by the Economic and Social Council. Of particular interest to the Agency are the following matters: 1. Science and Technology A standing committee on science and technology, for which the Council at this session approved terms of reference and a programme of work, was established last year to provide guidance and to make recommendations on matters relating to assistance in the application of science and technology to development. Under the mandate as approved, the standing committee was given the power to suggest scientific and technological policies to promote development in the interest of all mankind. It will assist the Council in co-ordinating the activities of United Nations bodies in the field of science and technology and in appraisal of this field during the decade of the 1970s. 2. The Council also decided to return to the question of United Nations sponsorship of the Protein Advisory Group (PAG) in the summer of 1973. It invited the Secretary-General, in the meantime, to work out proposals for the operation and administration of a special protein fund. 3. United Nations Revolving Fund for Natural Resources Exploration The Council further has recommended that at its forthcoming session the General Assembly should consider the establishment of a United Nations Revolving Fund for Natural Resources Exploration with a view to finalizing and approving the Statute. Membership of the Council Members of the council are: Bolivia, Brazil, Burundi, Ceylon, Chile, China, Finland, France, Ghana, Haiti

  17. Book Reviews

    E.Ch.L. van der Vliet

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available - Rita Bolland, Alfred Bühler, The patola of Gujarat. Double ikat in India. Krebs AG Basel, 1979. Vol. 1, 360 p. tekst, ill. Vol. 2, afb. in kleur en zwart/wit, krt. tab. noten, verkl. woorden. litl., Eberhard Fischer (eds. - Raymond Buve, Hugo G. Nutini, Ritual kinship. The structure and historical development of the Compadrazgo system in rural Tlaxcala, Vol. I. Princeton University Press, N.J., 1980, XVI plus 494 pp., maps, tables, glossary and index., Betty Bell (eds. - Benno Galjart, G.A. Banck, Jagen met een kat... Schaarse middelen en sociale relaties in de Braziliaanse staat Espirito Santo, CEDLA Incidentele publicaties no. 8, CEDLA, Amsterdam 1977. - R.A.L.H. Gunawardana, J. van Goor, Jan Kompanie as schoolmaster: Dutch education in Ceylon, 1690-1795, Historische Studies, Instituut voor Geschiedenis der Rijksuniversiteit te Utrecht, XXIV, Wolters-Noordhoff Groningen, 1978, 205 pp., 3 maps. - Ria Kloppenborg, R.A.L.H. Gunawardana, Robe and plough. Monasticism and economic interest in early medieval Sri Lanka. Association for Asian Studies, Monographs and Papers No. XXXV, University of Arixona Press, Tucson, Arizona, 1979; 377 pages, including bibliography and index. - Els Postel-Coster, Jan van Bremen, Romantropologie - Essays over antropologie en literatuur, Antropologisch-Sociologisch Centrum Universiteit van Amsterdam, 1979., Sjaak van der Geest, Jojada Verrips (eds. - Arie de Ruijter, T. Lemaire, Over de waarde van kulturen. Een inleiding in de kultuurfilosofie. Ambo, Baarn 1976, herdruk 1980. 509 blz. - P. van de Velde, W. Arens, The man-eating myth. Oxford University Press, New York, 1979. XIV + 206 pp., 12 illustrations. - E.Ch.L. van der Vliet, Klaus E. Müller, Geschichte der antiken ethnographie und ethnologischen theoriebildung von den anfängen bis auf die byzantinischen historiographen, Teil II (Studien zur Kulturkunde 52, Wiesbaden: Franza Steiner Verlag, 1980. 563 pp. 11 figs. - J.J. de Wolf, P.T.W. Baxter, Age

  18. Can we bridge the gap? Knowledge and practices related to Diabetes Mellitus among general practitioners in a developing country: A cross sectional study.

    Katulanda, Prasad; Constantine, Godwin R; Weerakkody, Muditha I; Perera, Yashasvi S; Jayawardena, Mahesh G; Wijegoonawardena, Preethi; Matthews, David R; Sheriff, Mohamed Hr

    2011-11-24

    Diabetes mellitus is becoming a serious public health problem in Sri Lanka and many other developing countries in the region. It is well known that effective management of diabetes reduces the incidence and progression of many diabetes related complications, thus it is important that General Practitioners (GPs) have sound knowledge and positive attitudes towards all aspects of its management. This study aims to assess knowledge, awareness and practices relating to management of Diabetes Mellitus among Sri Lankan GPs. A cross-sectional study was conducted among all 246 GPs registered with the Ceylon College of General Practitioners using a pre-validated self-administered questionnaire. 205 responded to the questionnaire(response rate 83.3%). Their mean duration of practice was 28.7 ± 11.2 years. On average, each GP had 27 ± 25 diabetic-patient consultations per-week. 96% managed diabetic patients and 24% invariably sought specialist opinion. 99.2% used blood glucose to diagnose diabetes but correct diagnostic cut-off values were known by only 48.8%. Appropriate use of HbA1c and urine microalbumin was known by 15.2% and 39.2% respectively. 84% used HbA1c to monitor glyceamic control, while 90.4% relied on fasting blood glucose to monitor glyceamic control. Knowledge on target control levels was poor.Nearly 90% correctly selected the oral hypoglyceamic treatment for obese as well as thin type 2 diabetic patients. Knowledge on the management of diabetes in pregnancy was poor. Only 23.2% knew the correct threshold for starting lipid-lowering therapy. The concept of strict glycaemic control in preference to symptom control was appreciated only by 68%. The skills for comprehensive care in subjects with multiple risk factors were unsatisfactory. The study was done among experienced members of the only professional college dedicated to the specialty. However, we found that there is room for improvement in their knowledge and practices related to diabetes. We recommend

  19. Can we bridge the gap? Knowledge and practices related to Diabetes Mellitus among general practitioners in a developing country: A cross sectional study

    Katulanda Prasad

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus is becoming a serious public health problem in Sri Lanka and many other developing countries in the region. It is well known that effective management of diabetes reduces the incidence and progression of many diabetes related complications, thus it is important that General Practitioners (GPs have sound knowledge and positive attitudes towards all aspects of its management. This study aims to assess knowledge, awareness and practices relating to management of Diabetes Mellitus among Sri Lankan GPs. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among all 246 GPs registered with the Ceylon College of General Practitioners using a pre-validated self-administered questionnaire. Results 205 responded to the questionnaire(response rate 83.3%. Their mean duration of practice was 28.7 ± 11.2 years. On average, each GP had 27 ± 25 diabetic-patient consultations per-week. 96% managed diabetic patients and 24% invariably sought specialist opinion. 99.2% used blood glucose to diagnose diabetes but correct diagnostic cut-off values were known by only 48.8%. Appropriate use of HbA1c and urine microalbumin was known by 15.2% and 39.2% respectively. 84% used HbA1c to monitor glyceamic control, while 90.4% relied on fasting blood glucose to monitor glyceamic control. Knowledge on target control levels was poor. Nearly 90% correctly selected the oral hypoglyceamic treatment for obese as well as thin type 2 diabetic patients. Knowledge on the management of diabetes in pregnancy was poor. Only 23.2% knew the correct threshold for starting lipid-lowering therapy. The concept of strict glycaemic control in preference to symptom control was appreciated only by 68%. The skills for comprehensive care in subjects with multiple risk factors were unsatisfactory. Conclusions The study was done among experienced members of the only professional college dedicated to the specialty. However, we found that there is room for improvement in

  20. Book Reviews

    H.L. Peters

    1966-07-01

    Full Text Available - Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf, Matthias Hermanns, Die religiös-magische weltanschauung der Primitivstämme Indiens. Band I. Die Bhagoria Bhil. Franz Steiner Verlag. Wiesbaden 1964. 543 seiten, 10 Abb., 2 Karten, 26 tafeln. - S.J. Tambiah, S. Arasaratnam, Ceylon. The Modern Nations in Historical Perspective, Robin W. Winks (General Editor Prentice-Hall, Inc. New Jersey 1964. 172 pages. - Mohan K. Gautam, L.P. Vidyarthi, The Maler. A study in nature-man-spirit complex of a hill tribe in Bihar. Foreword by Julian Steward. XVI and 261 pp., with 24 plates, 6 tables, 12 figures, 15 appendices with a glossary of local terms. Calcutta 1963. Bookland Private Ltd. - L. Sluimers, J.M. Halpern, Government, politics and social structure in Laos: A study of tradition and innovation. Wyoming enz., The Cellar Bookshop, 1964. VIII, 197 blz. Southeast Asia Studies, Yale University; Monograph Series No. 4. - P.E. de Josselin de Jong, M.G. Swift, Malay peasant society in Jelebu. L.S.E. Monographs on Social Anthropology no. 29. The Athlone Press, London 1965. 178 pp. - C.H.M. Nooy-Palm, John M. Garvan, The Negritos of the Philippines. Edited by Hermann Hochegger. Wiener Beiträge zur Kulturgeschichte und Linguistik, Band XIV. Verlag Ferdinand Berger, Horn-Wien 1963. 288 pgs., krt. - L.F.B. Dubbeldam, H.L. Peters, Enkele Hoofdstukken uit het sociaal-religieuze leven van een Dani-groep. Diss. 1965 Utrecht, printed by Dagblad voor Noord-Limburg N.V. Venlo. 184 pp., ills. - R. Roolvink, Hans Andreas Poetzelberger, Einführung in das Indonesische. Wiesbaden, 1965. 147 pages, 1 table, 1 map. - P. Voorhoeve, M.D. Wainwright, A guide to western manuscripts and documents in the British Isles relating to South and South East Asia. Compiled by M.D. Wainwright and N. Matthews under the general supervision of J.D. Pearson. London 1965. xix, 352 pp., N. Matthews (eds.

  1. ECOSOC conference news[Economic and Social Council of the UN

    NONE

    1972-07-01

    The Economic and Social Council of the UN met in Geneva for its fifty-third summer session from July 3-28. A request for a study regarding the world's multinational corporations, a call on the Governments concerned for action to stop the reported clandestine trafficking in labor from Africa to Europe, far-reaching recommendations on land reform, and measures to eliminate mass poverty and unemployment in the developing countries, were some of the major decisions taken by the Economic and Social Council. Of particular interest to the Agency are the following matters: 1. Science and Technology A standing committee on science and technology, for which the Council at this session approved terms of reference and a programme of work, was established last year to provide guidance and to make recommendations on matters relating to assistance in the application of science and technology to development. Under the mandate as approved, the standing committee was given the power to suggest scientific and technological policies to promote development in the interest of all mankind. It will assist the Council in co-ordinating the activities of United Nations bodies in the field of science and technology and in appraisal of this field during the decade of the 1970s. 2. The Council also decided to return to the question of United Nations sponsorship of the Protein Advisory Group (PAG) in the summer of 1973. It invited the Secretary-General, in the meantime, to work out proposals for the operation and administration of a special protein fund. 3. United Nations Revolving Fund for Natural Resources Exploration The Council further has recommended that at its forthcoming session the General Assembly should consider the establishment of a United Nations Revolving Fund for Natural Resources Exploration with a view to finalizing and approving the Statute. Membership of the Council Members of the council are: Bolivia, Brazil, Burundi, Ceylon, Chile, China, Finland, France, Ghana, Haiti

  2. Analysis of archaeological precious stones from Slovenia

    Šmit, Ž.; Fajfar, H.; Jeršsek, M.; Knific, T.; Kržic, A.; Lux, J.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Precious stones have been attractive pieces of jewelry since ancient times. However, due to the limited sources of origin, the quality of applied items mainly depended on long-range commercial relations, but also on fashion. In Antiquity and Late Antiquity, stones much used and sought for were emeralds and garnets. In Slovenia, emeralds are typically related to the early Roman period and are incorporated in the finds of gold jewelry from the graves. Emerald is generally beryl colored by admixture of chromium, though green colors can also be due to admixtures of iron or vanadium. Garnets were increasingly used by various nations of the People Migration period, and mounted in gilded silver or gold objects by 'cloisonne' or 'en cabochon' techniques. In Slovenia, numerous jewelry items containing garnets were found in the graves and in post-Roman fortified settlements. Geologically, according to the admixtures of metal ions, the garnets are divided into several species, while the most common among archaeological finds are almandines and pyropes and their intermediate types. It is also common to divide garnets into five groups, the first two originating from India, the third from Ceylon and the fifth from Czech Republic. The measurements involved presumed emeralds from Roman jewelry finds in Slovenia and comparative samples of beryl from Siberia and Habachtal in Austria. The analysis determined the coloring ions and showed relations between particular stones. For garnets, ten samples from brooches, earrings and rings were selected for the analysis on the basis of previous micro Raman examination. The analysis was performed by a combined PIXE-PIGE technique using proton beam in air. The light elements of Na, Mg, AI were determined according to the emitted gamma rays, while X-rays were used for the elements heavier than silicon. Two X-ray spectra were measured in each measuring point, soft and hard X-ray; the latter was obtained using an

  3. Book Reviews

    Margaret Leidelmeijer

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available - Roger Busser, Sudo Sueo, The Fukuda Doctrine and ASEAN; New dimensions in Japanese Foreign policy. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 1992. - P.J. Drooglever, C. Fasseur, De Indologen; Ambtenaren voor de Oost 1825-1950. Amsterdam: Bert Bakker, 1993, 552 pp. - Raymond Evans, Tony Swain, A place for strangers; Towards a history of Australian Aboroginal being. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993, xi + 330 pp. - CH.F. van Fraassen, Leonard Andaya, The world of Maluku; Eastern Indonesia in the early modern period. Honolulu: University of Hawai Press, 1993, ix + 306 pp. - J. van Goor, Lodewijk Wagenaar, Galle VOC-vestiging in Ceylon; Beschrijving van een koloniale samenleving aan de vooravond van de Singalese opstand tegen het Nederlandse gezag, 1760. Amsterdam: De Bataafsche Leeuw, 1994. - Geert Kalshoven, A. Schrevel, Access to Water; A socio-economic study into the practice of irrigation development in Indonesia. Ph.D. thesis, The Hague: The Institute of Social Studies, 1993. - Nico Kaptein, Mohamed Ariff, Islam and the economic development of Southeast Asia; The Islamic Voluntary Sector in Southeast Asia. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies,1991.''Islam and the economic development of Southeast Asia; The Muslim private sector in Southeast Asia. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 1991. - Victor T. King, Alistair Morrison, Fair land Sarawak; Some recollections of an expatriate official. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University (Southeast Asia Program, Studies on Southeast Asia 13, 1993, xiv + 182 pp. - H.A.J. Klooster, Klaus H. Schreiner-Brauch, Nationalismus und Personenkult im indonesischen Geschichtsverständnis. Ph.D. Dissertation, Universität Hamburg, 1993, xxi + 293 pp. - Han Knapen, Mark Cleary, Borneo; Change and development. Singapore, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1992, x + 271 pp., tables, figures, index., Peter Eaton (eds. - Sirtjo Koolhof, Christiaan G.F. de Jong

  4. Book Reviews

    Christine Oppong

    1977-01-01

    study of Ghanaian senior civil servants. Cambridge Studies in Social Anthropology 8. Cambridge University Press, London 1974. 187 pp., map, tables. - Sjaak van der Geest, Christine Oppong, Growing up in Dagbon. Accra-Tema, Ghana Publishing Corporation, 1973, 79 pp., map. - H.J.M. Claessen, Jan Vansina, The Tio Kingdom of the Middle Congo, 1880-1892. Published for the International African Institute by the Oxford University Press. London etc. 1973. 586 pp. Appendices, bibliography, index, glossary, maps, diagrams, plates and figures. - J. van Goor, Sinnapah Arasaratnam, Memoir of Julius Stein van Gollenesse, Governor of Ceylon 1743-1751. Selections from the Dutch records of the government of Sri Lanka. Colombo, 1974. 153 pp. - Niels Mulder, Benjamin A. Batson, Siam’s political future: Documents from the end of the absolute monarchy. Ithaca: Cornell University, Southeast Asia Program, Data Paper No. 96, 1974, ix + 102 pp. - H.J. Ruiter, Louis Dumont, Dravidien et Kariera, l’alliance de mariage dans l’Inde du sud, et en Australie. Textes de sciences sociales 14. Mouton éditeur. La Hayes-Paris 1975, 148 pp. - J. Rutherford, Harold M. Ross, Baegu. Social and ecological organization in Malaita, Solomon Islands. Illinois Studies in Anthropology No. 8. University of Illinois Press, Urbana. 1973. - Simon Kooijman, G.K. Roth, Fijian way of life. Melbourne 1973 (second edition, Oxford University Press, 176 pp.

  5. Book Reviews

    Harry A. Poeze

    1988-04-01

    , Beiträge zur Südasien-Forschung, Südasien-Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Band 8S, Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner Verlag, 1984. 236 pp. - Wolfgang Marschall, Pietro Scarduelli, L’isola degli antenati di pietra; Strutture sociali e simboliche dei Nias dell’Indonesia, Laterza, Roma-Bari, 1986. IX + 232 pp., 22 pl., 28 figs. - Nigel Phillips, C. Skinner, The battle for Junk Ceylon; The syair Sultan Maulana, Dordrecht: Foris, 1985. viii + 325 pp. - Harry A. Poeze, Mavis Rose, Indonesia free; A political biography of Mohammad Hatta. Ithaca, New York: Cornell Modern Indonesia Project, viii + 245 pp. - D.J. Prentice, Elisabeth Tooker, Naming systems: The 1980 proceedings of the American Ethnological society, The American Ethnological society, 1984. vii + 107 pp., Harold C. Conklin (eds. - Patricia D. Rueb, Christine Dobbin, Islamic revivalism in a changing peasant economy; Central Sumatra, 1784-1847, London/Malmö; Scandinavian Institute of Asian studies, Monograph series no. 47, 1987, 300 pages, illustrated. - P.C. Verton, Ank Klomp, Politics on Bonaire; An anthropological study. Assen/Maastricht: Van Gorcum, 1986.' [Translated by Dirk H. van der Elst] - Leontine E. Visser, Elisabeth Traube, Cosmology and social life; Ritual exchange among the Mambai of East Timor, Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1986. xxiii + 298 pp., figs., photos, index.

  6. Toxoplasmose humana: meningoencefalomielite toxoplasmica: ocorrência em adulto e recemnascido

    F. Nery Guimarães

    1943-06-01

    sintomas apresentados pelos pacientes, foram: febre, convulsões, distúrbios respiratórios, hidrocefalia, cianose, vômitos, labidade de temperatura, etc., sendo sinal diagnóstico de máxima importância, o encontro de focos de calcificação cerebral profunda e corioretinite em recem nascido (Dyke, Wolf, Cowen, Paige & Caffey . Em dois casos de toxoplasmose verificados em pacientes de seis e oito anos respectivamente, foi encontrada uma encefalite clinicamente atípica, sendo que um deles sarou (Sabin. Os três casos restantes foram descritos em adultos; num deles as lesões não eram típicas (havia concomitância de infecção por Bartonella bacilliformis e nos outros dois, a doença assumiu uma "forma exantemática", simulando as febres maculosas (Pinkerton & Henderson, sendo o achado mais importante microscopicamente, uma pneumonia intersticial. Alem da semelhança clínica, tambem os focos de encefalite encontrados nessa "forma exantemática" da toxoplasmose, são semelhantes aos descritos nas...Since Castellani's initial work in 1914, investigators of various countries have pointed out the occurrence of human toxoplasmosis, a fact which, still not long ago, was a matter of controversy. As resulting from the works of Torres, Levanditi & coworkers, Wolf, Cowen & Paige, Pinkerton & Henderson and Sabin, the problem of parasitism in man by Toxoplasma has to be faced taking into consideration that there have been described doubtful and undoubtful cases. Doubtful are the cases reported by Castellani (Ceylon, 1914; Fedorovitch (The Black Sea, 1916; Chalmers & Kamar (Sudan, 1920; and Bland (London, 1930-31. Undoubtful are those reported by Janku (Praga, 1923; Torres (Rio de Janeiro, 1927; Wolf & Cowen (New York, 1937; Richter (Chicago, 1936: diagnosed by Wolf & Cowen in 1938; Wolf, Cowen & Paige (New York, 1939; Hertig (Massachusetts, 1935: diagnosed by Pinkerton & Weinman in 1940; Pinkerton & Weinman (Lima, Peru, 1940; Sabin (2 cases, Cincinnati, 1941; Pinkerton

  7. Book Reviews

    Redactie KITLV

    1992-01-01

    studies. New Haven, 1990. xiii + 369 pp., W.J. O’Malley, A. Weidemann (eds. - Gisele de Meur, F. Tjon Sie Fat, Representing kinship; Simple models of elementary structures. 1990. (Doctoral thesis. Leiden, published by the author. - Toon van Meijl, Maurice Godelier, Big men and great men; Personifications of power in Melanesia, Cambridge/Paris: Cambridge University Press/Editions de la maison des sciences de l’Homme, 1991, xviii, 328 pp., maps, tables, figures, bibliography, index., Marilyn Strathern (eds. - J.A. de Moor, B.A. Hussainmiya, Orang rejimen; The Malays of the Ceylon rifle regiment. Bangi: Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 1990, 185 pp. - Pieter Muysken, J.M.W. Verhaar, Melanesian pidgin and tok pisin; Studies in language companion series 20. Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1990, xiv + 409 pp. - Niels Mulder, Paul Voogt, Thailand. Amsterdam/’s-Gravenhage: Koninklijk Instituut voor de Tropen/NOVIB, 1991. 70 pp. + kaart, slappe kaft., Han ten Brummelhuis, Irene Stengs (eds. - Ton van Naerssen, George Cho, The Malaysian economy; Spatial perspectives. London: Routledge. 1990, 300 pp. - Julianti Parani, J.R. van Diessen, Jakarta/Batavia. Het centrum van het Nederlandse koloniale rijk in Azië en zijn cultuurhistorische nalatenschap. Cantecleer Kunst - Reisgidsen. De Bilt: Cantecleer, 1989. 343 pp. - A. Ploeg, Christopher J. Healey, Pioneers of the mountain forest, University of Sydney, 1985, Oceania Monographs no. 29, v + 64 pp., plates, figures, maps. - Els Postel-Coster, Carla Risseeuw, The fish don’t talk about the water; Gender transformation, power and resistance among women in Sri Lanka, Leiden: E.J.Brill, 1988, 415 pp., also published as Gender transformation, power and resistance among women in Sri Lanka; The fish don’t speak about the water, New Delhi: Manohar Book service, 1991. Ca. 400 pp., - Willem van Schendel, Mya Tan, Myanmar dilemmas and options; The challenge of economic transition in the 1990’s. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian studies, 1990