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Sample records for cervical spondylotic neuropathy

  1. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although spondylotic changes of the cervical spine occur in more than half of patients over 50, less than a ... acquired narrowing of the cervical spinal canal, with subsequent mechanical and ischaemic insults to the ... event, such as a hyperextension injury after a fall. Neck pain or stiffness and gait abnormalities are common ...

  2. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy (CSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to normal aging. Arthritis of the spine and spinal cord trauma can be other causes of CSM. How is cervical spondylotic myelopathy diagnosed? Your doctor will do a ... can confirm if you have spinal cord compression in your neck. It also can ...

  3. Possible detection of cervical spondylotic neuropathy using Distribution of F-latency (DFL, a new neurophysiological parameter

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    Rabbani Khondkar S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported a new nerve conduction measurement parameter which we named the Distribution of F-latency (DFL and showed that this was an approximate mirror of the Distribution of Conduction Velocity (DCV of motor nerve fibers. This work was performed using measurements on the 20 median nerves from 10 volunteers. The DFL showed a number of different patterns including single peaks, broad peaks and double peaks, the latter observed on subjects with Cervical Spondylosis (CS. It was thought that a retrospective analysis of these data could be worthwhile in determining whether Cervical Spondylotic neuropathy could be detected using the DFL. Findings The DFL from the 8 median nerves of 4 normal subjects had single peaks, which has been assumed to represent a normal pattern. The DFL from one side of 5 subjects diagnosed with or suspected to have CS had double peaks. Broad peaks were observed in 7 nerves of which 5 were from subjects who had double peaks in the DFL on the contra lateral side. Conclusions Based on these findings, double peaks in the DFL appear to be associated with CS neuropathy. These findings further suggest that broad peaks in the DFL could indicate the early stages of the disease. Differential compression of nerve branches at the spinal roots are being explored as possible causes. This study does not preclude other pathologies contributing to double or broad peaks, but does suggest that the DFL could form a screening tool for CS neuropathy.

  4. [Minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liang; Sun, Taicun; Huang, Yonghui

    2010-01-01

    To summarize the recent minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR). The recent literature at home and abroad concerning minimally invasive approach for CSR was reviewed and summarized. There were two techniques of minimally invasive approach for CSR at present: percutaneous puncture techniques and endoscopic techniques. The degenerate intervertebral disc was resected or nucleolysis by percutaneous puncture technique if CSR was caused by mild or moderate intervertebral disc herniations. The cervical microendoscopic discectomy and foraminotomy was an effective minimally invasive approach which could provide a clear view. The endoscopy techniques were suitable to treat CSR caused by foraminal osteophytes, lateral disc herniations, local ligamentum flavum thickening and spondylotic foraminal stenosis. The minimally invasive procedure has the advantages of simple handling, minimally invasive and low incidence of complications. But the scope of indications is relatively narrow at present.

  5. Intradiscal corticosteroid injections in spondylotic cervical radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, Francois; Rahmani, Lamia; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Nys, Alain; Poiraudeau, Serge; Ledoux, Michel; Revel, Michel [Hopital Cochin (AP-HP) Universite Paris 5, Service de Reeducation et de Readaptation de l' Appareil Locomoteur et des Pathologies du Rachis, Paris (France); Drape, Jean L.; Chevrot, Alain [Hopital Cochin (AP-HP), Department of Radiology B, Paris (France)

    2007-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment outcomes with intradiscal injection of corticosteroids (IDIC) in cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Twenty consecutive patients were treated with intradiscal injection of 25 mg of acetate of prednisolone under fluoroscopic control. All patients had previously received a nonsurgical treatment for at least 3 months without success. Outcomes were assessed 1, 3 and 6 months after IDIC. Radicular pain reduction as scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS 100-mm length) was statistically significant at 1 month (19.0{+-}28.0 mm; p=0.008), 3 months (25.2{+-}27.5 mm; p=0.002), and 6 months (24.6{+-}28.4 mm; p=0.001). In all, 40% of treated patients described at least 50% pain improvement 6 months after treatment. Four patients had complete relief of radicular pain. In conclusion, IDIC should be an alternative in the nonsurgical management of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. (orig.)

  6. Ayurvedic management in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvesh Kumar Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The age related spondylotic changes may result in direct compressive and ischemic dysfunction of the spinal cord known as cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM. Symptoms often develop insidiously and are characterized by neck stiffness, unilateral or bilateral deep aching neck, arm and shoulder pain, and possibly stiffness or clumsiness while walking. The management available in current mainstream medicine is not satisfactory. Various Ayurvedic treatments have been in use for these manifestations. We present a case of CSM, which was treated with a combination of Panchakarma procedures and Ayurvedic oral drugs. The patient was considered suffering from Greevastambha (neck stiffness and was treated with Shalishastika pinda svedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice for one month and Mustadi yapana basti (enema with medicated milk for 16 days along with oral Ayurvedic drugs such as Brihatavata chintamani rasa 50 mg, Ekangaveer ras-250 mg, Ardhangavatari rasa-125 mg Amrita satva (dry extract of Tinospora cordifolia Willd-500 mg, Muktasukti pisti-500 mg, Ashwagandha churna (powder of Withania somnifera Dunal-500 mg Dashmool kvatha ghana (solid extract of Dashmool kvatha-500 mg, Trayodashanga guggulu-575 mg, twice a day with honey and Eranda paka-10 g twice a day with milk. Patient's condition which was assessed for symptoms of CSM and Chile's modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA score for cervical spondylotic myelopathy showed substantial improvement. This study shows that the cases of CSM may be successfully managed with Ayurvedic treatment.

  7. Ayurvedic management in cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    The age related spondylotic changes may result in direct compressive and ischemic dysfunction of the spinal cord known as cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Symptoms often develop insidiously and are characterized by neck stiffness, unilateral or bilateral deep aching neck, arm and shoulder pain, and possibly stiffness or clumsiness while walking. The management available in current mainstream medicine is not satisfactory. Various Ayurvedic treatments have been in use for these manifestations. We present a case of CSM, which was treated with a combination of Panchakarma procedures and Ayurvedic oral drugs. The patient was considered suffering from Greevastambha (neck stiffness) and was treated with Shalishastika pinda svedana (sudation with medicated cooked bolus of rice) for one month and Mustadi yapana basti (enema with medicated milk) for 16 days along with oral Ayurvedic drugs such as Brihatavata chintamani rasa 50 mg, Ekangaveer ras-250 mg, Ardhangavatari rasa-125 mg Amrita satva (dry extract of Tinospora cordifolia Willd)-500 mg, Muktasukti pisti-500 mg, Ashwagandha churna (powder of Withania somnifera Dunal)-500 mg Dashmool kvatha ghana (solid extract of Dashmool kvatha)-500 mg, Trayodashanga guggulu-575 mg, twice a day with honey and Eranda paka-10 g twice a day with milk. Patient's condition which was assessed for symptoms of CSM and Chile's modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) score for cervical spondylotic myelopathy showed substantial improvement. This study shows that the cases of CSM may be successfully managed with Ayurvedic treatment. Copyright © 2016 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Intradiscal corticosteroid injections in spondylotic cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, Francois; Rahmani, Lamia; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Nys, Alain; Poiraudeau, Serge; Ledoux, Michel; Revel, Michel; Drape, Jean L.; Chevrot, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment outcomes with intradiscal injection of corticosteroids (IDIC) in cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Twenty consecutive patients were treated with intradiscal injection of 25 mg of acetate of prednisolone under fluoroscopic control. All patients had previously received a nonsurgical treatment for at least 3 months without success. Outcomes were assessed 1, 3 and 6 months after IDIC. Radicular pain reduction as scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS 100-mm length) was statistically significant at 1 month (19.0±28.0 mm; p=0.008), 3 months (25.2±27.5 mm; p=0.002), and 6 months (24.6±28.4 mm; p=0.001). In all, 40% of treated patients described at least 50% pain improvement 6 months after treatment. Four patients had complete relief of radicular pain. In conclusion, IDIC should be an alternative in the nonsurgical management of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. (orig.)

  9. Value of metrizamide CT for cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, Takao; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Gomibuchi, Fumio; Maniwa, Yoshifumi

    1984-01-01

    Metrizamide CT findings were compared with metrizamide myelographic findings in 94 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (112 cases) to evaluate the diagnostic value of metrizamide CT. Changes in the shape of cervical spinal cord were more apparent by CT than by myelography. Osteophytes or the position and size of the spinal cord compressed by an enlarged intervertebral disc were not visualized by myelography but by CT. The shape of the reformed cervical spinal cord and residues of compression following the decompression therapy were visualized more clearly on CT than on myelogram. However, ''false negative'' occurs readily on CT unless scanning conditions (e.g., the position of the body) are adequate. Metrizamide CT, if combined with myelography, may provide more adequate information on cervical spondylotic myelopathy. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Value of metrizamide CT for cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Takao; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Gomibuchi, Fumio; Maniwa, Yoshifumi (Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-04-01

    Metrizamide CT findings were compared with metrizamide myelographic findings in 94 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (112 cases) to evaluate the diagnostic value of metrizamide CT. Changes in the shape of cervical spinal cord were more apparent by CT than by myelography. Osteophytes or the position and size of the spinal cord compressed by an enlarged intervertebral disc were not visualized by myelography but by CT. The shape of the reformed cervical spinal cord and residues of compression following the decompression therapy were visualized more clearly on CT than on myelogram. However, ''false negative'' occurs readily on CT unless scanning conditions (e.g., the position of the body) are adequate. Metrizamide CT, if combined with myelography, may provide more adequate information on cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

  11. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy: what the neurologist should know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celmir de Oliveira Vilaça

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is a wellknown cause of disability among older people. A significant amount of these patients is asymptomatic. Once the symptoms start, the worsening may follow a progressive manner. We should suspect of spondylotic myelopathy in any individual over 55 years presenting progressive changes in gait or losing fine motor control of the upper limbs. Despite its frequent prevalence, this condition is still neglected and many times confused with other supratentorial lesions regarding diagnostic. Here we address some of most important aspects of this disease, calling attention to pathophysiology, the natural history, presentation, differential diagnosis, clinical assessment, and treatment.

  12. Evidence of an Inherited Predisposition for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpesh A.; Spiker, William Ryan; Daubs, Michael; Brodke, Darrel S.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective population based study cross referencing a genealogic database of over 2 million Utah residents with 10 years of clinical diagnosis data from a large tertiary hospital. Objective The objective of this study is to determine the presence or absence of an inherited predisposition to the development of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Summary of Background Data A genetic predisposition for the development of cervical spondylosis has been discussed in the literature with low quality evidence. Families with a high incidence of disease or early onset disease in monozygotic twins have both been reported. However, these suggestions of an inherited predisposition for disease have never been rigorously studied. The purpose of this study is to determine a genetic predisposition among patients diagnosed with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Methods The Utah Population Database (UPDB) combines health and genealogic data on over 2 million Utah residents. ICD-9 codes were used to identify 486 patients in the database with a diagnosis of cervical spondylosis with myelopathy (ICD9 code 721.1). The hypothesis of excessive familial clustering was tested using the Genealogical Index of Familiality (GIF) and Relative risks (RR) in relatives were estimated by comparing rates of disease in relatives with rates estimated in the relatives of 5 matched controls for each case. This methodology has been previously reported and validated for other disease conditions but not for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Results The GIF analysis for patients with CSM showed significant excess relatedness for disease (pspondylosis with myelopathy. Level of Evidence III PMID:21252820

  13. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy

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    Sun Qizhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM is a special degenerative disease because of the intermediate normal level or levels between supra and infraabnormal levels. Some controversy exists over the optimal procedure for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. The study was to evaluate the outcomes of the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF with zero-profile devices for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. Materials and Methods: 17 consecutive patients with two noncontiguous levels of CSM operated between December 2009 and August 2012 were included in the study. There were 12 men and 5 women with a mean age of 60.7 years (range 45-75 years. Involved disc levels were C3/4 and C5/6 in 11 patients and C4/5 and C6/7 in six patients. Preoperative plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT with 3-D reconstruction and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the cervical spine were taken in all patients. All radiographs were independently evaluated by 2 spine surgeons and 1 radiologist. The outcomes were assessed by the average operative time, blood loss, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA score, improvement rate, neck dysfunction index (NDI, swallowing quality of life (SWAL-QOL score, the cervical lordosis and complications. Results: The mean followup was 48.59 months (range 24-56 months. The average operative time and blood loss was 105.29 min and 136.47 ml, respectively. The preoperative JOA score was 8.35, which significantly increased to 13.7 at the final followup ( P 0.05. Cerebrospinal fluid leak, dysphagia and radiological adjacent segment degeneration occurred in one patient, respectively. Conclusion: The ACDF with zero-profile devices is generally effective and safe in treating two noncontiguous levels of CSM.

  14. Functional outcome of corpectomy in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

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    Williams Kanishka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM is serious consequence of cervical intervertebral disk degeneration. Morbidity ranges from chronic neck pain, radicular pain, headache, myelopathy leading to weakness, and impaired fine motor coordination to quadriparesis and/or sphincter dysfunction. Surgical treatment remains the mainstay of treatment once myelopathy develops. Compared to more conventional surgical techniques for spinal cord decompression, such as anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, laminectomy, and laminoplasty, patients treated with corpectomy have better neurological recovery, less axial neck pain, and lower incidences of postoperative loss of sagittal plane alignment. The objective of this study was to analyze the outcome of corpectomy in cervical spondylotic myelopathy, to assess their improvement of symptoms, and to highlight complications of the procedure. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four patients underwent cervical corpectomy for cervical spondylotic myelopathy during June 1999 to July 2005.The anterior approach was used. Each patient was graded according to the Nuricks Grade (1972 and the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA Scale (1991, and the recovery rate was calculated. Results: Preoperative patients had a mean Nurick′s grade of 3.83, which was 1.67 postoperatively. Preoperative patients had a mean mJOA score of 9.67, whereas postoperatively it was 14.50. The mean recovery rate of patients postoperatively was 62.35% at a mean follow-up of 1 year (range, 8 months to 5 years.The complications included one case (4.17% of radiculopathy, two cases (8.33% of graft displacement, and two cases (8.33% of screw back out/failure. Conclusions: Cervical corpectomy is a reliable and rewarding procedure for CSM, with functional improvement in most patients.

  15. Reoperation Rates After Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy and Myelopathy: A National Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moon Soo; Ju, Young-Su; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Makhni, Melvin C; Riew, K Daniel

    2016-10-15

    National population-based cohort study. To compare the reoperation rates between cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy in a national population of patients. There is an inherently low incidence of reoperation after surgery for cervical degenerative disease. Therefore, it is difficult to sufficiently power studies to detect differences between reoperation rates of different cervical diagnoses. National population-based databases provide large, longitudinally followed cohorts that may help overcome this challenge. We used the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service national database to select our study population. We included patients with the diagnosis of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion from January 2009 to June 2014. We separated patients into two groups based on diagnosis codes: cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Age, sex, presence of diabetes, osteoporosis, associated comorbidities, number of operated cervical disc levels, and hospital types were considered potential confounding factors. The overall reoperation rate was 2.45%. The reoperation rate was significantly higher in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy than in patients with cervical radiculopathy (myelopathy: P = 0.0293, hazard ratio = 1.433, 95% confidence interval 1.037-1.981). Male sex, presence of diabetes or associated comorbidities, and hospital type were noted to be risk factors for reoperation. The reoperation rate after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was higher for cervical spondylotic myelopathy than for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy in a national population of patients. 3.

  16. Operative Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, SB; Clark, CR; Traynelis, VC

    2004-01-01

    Background: The natural history of cervical spondylotic myelopathy is frequently one of slow, progressive neurological deterioration. The operative treatment for patients with moderate to severe involvement is decompression of the spinal cord. Laminectomy has been a traditional approach and laminoplasty has developed as an attractive alternative. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the outcomes of these two procedures in similar groups of patients at a five year average follow-up. Methods: A consecutive series of twenty patients who underwent open-door laminoplasty for multi-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy or radiculopathy was compared to a similar group of 22 matched patients who underwent multi-level laminectomies. Patients were similar in age, gender, number of operative levels, and length of follow-up. At the latest examination, each patient underwent a comprehensive neurological evaluation. A modification of the Nurick classification was used to assess the degree of myelopathy. Radiographs at latest follow-up were assessed for instability, and measurements of the space-available-for-the-cord and Pavlov ratio were made at involved levels. Results: Myelopathy, as determined by our modified Nurick scale, improved from a preoperative average of 2.44 to 1.48 in laminoplasty patients and from an average of 3.09 to 2.50 in laminectomy patients. Pain improved 57 percent and 8 percent in laminoplasty and laminectomy groups, respectively. Subjective neck stiffness was not significantly different based on the numbers available, although laminoplasty patients demonstrated some loss of range of motion on examination. The only variable that predicted the postoperative degree of myelopathy in both groups was the preoperative degree of myelopathy. Conclusions: Laminectomy and laminoplasty patients demonstrated improvements in gait, strength, sensation, pain, and degree of myelopathy. Laminoplasty was associated with fewer late complications. Based on

  17. FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF CERVICAL SPONDYLOTIC MYELOPATHY

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    MARVIN JESUALDO VARGAS UH

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the functional outcome of surgical treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Methods: A retrospective study involving 34 patients with CSM, operated from January 2014 to June 2015. The neurological status was assessed using the Nurick and modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (mJOA scales preoperatively and at 12 months. Sex, age, time of evolution, affected cervical levels, surgical approach and T2-weighted magnetic resonance hyperintense signal were also evaluated. Results: A total of 14 men and 20 women participated. The mean age was 58.12 years. The average progression time was 12.38 months. The preoperative neurological state by mJOA was mild in 2 patients, moderate in 16 and severe in 16, with a mean of 11.44 points. The preoperative Nurick was grade II in 14 patients, grade III in 8, grade IV in 10 and grade V in 2. The T2-weighted hyperintense signal was documented in 18 patients (52.9%. The functional outcome according to the mJOA recovery rate was good in 15 patients (44.1% and poor in 19 (55.9%. The degree of Nurick recovery was good in 20 (58.8% and poor in 14 (41.2%. Conclusions: Decompressive surgery of the spinal cord has been shown to be effective in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy in well-selected patients. Although it is suggested that there are certain factors that correlate with functional outcome, we believe that more prospective randomized studies should be conducted to clarify this hypothesis.

  18. Neurorestoratology evidence in an animal model with cervical spondylotic myelopathy

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    Li X

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xiang Li,1,2 Guangsheng Li,1,3 Keith Dip-Kei Luk,1 Yong Hu1–3 1Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, 2Shenzhen Key Laboratory for Innovative Technology in Orthopaedic Trauma, The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, 3Spinal Division, Department of Orthopaedics, Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical University, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China Background: Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM is a chronic compression injury of the spinal cord, with potentially reversible conditions after surgical decompression, and a unique model of incomplete spinal cord injury. Several animal studies showed pathological changes of demyelination, axon loss and neuron apoptosis in rats with chronic spinal cord compression. However, there is a limited understanding of the neurological change in the spinal cord after surgical decompression. The aim of this study was to validate the neurorestoratology of myelopathic lesions in the spinal cord in a rat model. Materials and methods: A total of 16 adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: sham control (group 1; CSM model with 4-week chronic compression (group 2, 2 weeks (group 3 and 4 weeks (group 4 after surgical decompression of CSM model. The compression and decompression were verified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI test. Neurological function was evaluated by Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB locomotor rating scale, ladder rung walking test and somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs. Neuropathological change was evaluated by histological examinations. Results: MRI confirmed the compression of the cervical spinal cord as well as the reshaping of cord morphology after decompression. After decompression, significant changes of neurological function were observed in BBB scores (p < 0.01, F = 10.52, ladder rung walking test (p < 0.05, F = 14.21 and latencies (p < 0.05, F = 5.76 and amplitudes (p < 0.05, F = 3.8 of

  19. Cervical spine locking plate fixation for treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy in large breed dogs.

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    Trotter, Eric J

    2009-08-01

    To describe indirect decompression by means of cervical spine locking plate (CSLP) fixation with vertebral distraction, discectomy, and cancellous block bone grafting in large breed dogs with single caudal cervical dynamic spondylotic lesions diagnosed by myelography with linear traction to the cervical spine, and contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Prospective clinical study. Dogs (n=12) with caudal cervical spondylotic myelopathy because of a single dynamic, traction-responsive lesion. Single, traction-responsive, caudal cervical spondylotic lesions were treated by vertebral distraction, discectomy, cancellous block bone grafting, and CSLP fixation. Follow-up was obtained by sequential recheck examination by the author or referring veterinarian or by telephone inquiries. Ten dogs had neurologic improvement after surgery. Indirect decompression by maintained distraction with cancellous block grafting and CSLP fixation was readily accomplished with less risk of blood loss or iatrogenic spinal cord injury than that associated with direct (ventral) decompression. There were no complications of graft intrusion, extrusion or subsidence, implant loosening, foraminal impingement, or end-plate failure. Two dogs that had satisfactory short-term recoveries developed clinical signs associated with adjacent segment disease and were euthanatized. At long-term follow-up, 8 dogs had satisfactory function, either a normal gait or one with slight to moderate proprioceptive deficits. CSLP fixation with cancellous block interbody grafting is an effective and perhaps safer method of treating single-level, traction-responsive cervical spondylosis in large breed dogs. CSLP fixation with interbody bone grafting is a viable alternative to other techniques for treatment of single-level, traction-responsive cervical spondylosis.

  20. Canal expansive laminoplasty in the management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

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    Kaplan, Leon; Bronstein, Yigal; Barzilay, Yair; Hasharoni, Amir; Finkelstein, Joel

    2006-08-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is often progressive and leads to motor and sensory impairments in the arms and legs. Canal expansive laminoplasty was initially described in Japan as an alternative to the traditional laminectomy approach. The results of this approach have not previously been described in the Israeli population. To describe the technique of CEL and present our clinical results in the management of patients with CSM due to multilevel compressive disease. All patients undergoing CEL during the period 1984-2000 were identified. Of these, 24 of 25 patients had complete clinical information. Mean follow-up was 18 months (range 4-48). Mean age was 60 years (range 45-72). One patient underwent CEL at three levels, 22 patients at four to five levels and 1 patient at six levels The primary outcome measure was improvement in spinal cord function (according to the Nurick classification). Twenty-three (96%) of the patients experienced relief of their symptoms. Of these, 11 patients showed improvement in their Nurick grade, 12 patients were unchanged and one had worsening. Intraoperative complications (epidural bleeding and dural tear) occurred in six patients. Two patients developed a late kyphosis. Our treatment of choice for multilevel CSM is canal expansive laminoplasty as initially described by Hirabayashi. It provides the ability for posterior surgical decompression without compromising the mechanical stability of the spine. This approach has the benefit of not requiring internal fixation and fusion. Our clinical outcome and surgical complication rate are comparable to those in the literature.

  1. Gait impairment in cervical spondylotic myelopathy: comparison with age- and gender-matched healthy controls.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malone, Ailish

    2012-12-01

    Gait impairment is a primary symptom of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM); however, little is known about specific kinetic and kinematic gait parameters. The objectives of the study were: (1) to compare gait patterns of people with untreated CSM to those of age- and gender-matched healthy controls; (2) to examine the effect of gait speed on kinematic and kinetic parameters.

  2. Reliability of three-dimensional gait analysis in cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Ailish

    2010-10-01

    Gait impairment is one of the primary symptoms of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Detailed assessment is possible using three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA), however the reliability of 3DGA for this population has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of temporal-spatial, kinematic and kinetic parameters in a CSM population.

  3. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy caused by violent motor tics in a child with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Da-Young; Kim, Seung-Ki; Chae, Jong-Hee; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2013-02-01

    We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with Tourette syndrome (TS) who developed progressive quadriparesis that was more severe in the upper extremities. He had experienced frequent and violent motor tics consisting of hyperflexion and hyperextension for years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a focal high-signal intensity cord lesion and adjacent cervical spondylotic changes. Initially, the patient was observed for several months because of diagnostic uncertainty; his neurological status had improved and later worsened again. Anterior cervical discectomy of C3-4 and fusion immediately followed by posterior fixation were performed. After surgery, the neck collar was applied for 6 months. His neurological signs and symptoms improved dramatically. TS with violent neck motion may cause cervical spondylotic myelopathy at an early age. The optimal management is still unclear and attempts to control tics should be paramount. Circumferential fusion with neck bracing represents a viable treatment option.

  4. Does rehabilitation of cervical lordosis influence sagittal cervical spine flexion extension kinematics in cervical spondylotic radiculopathy subjects?

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    Moustafa, Ibrahim Moustafa; Diab, Aliaa Attiah Mohamed; Hegazy, Fatma A; Harrison, Deed E

    2017-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that improvement of cervical lordosis in cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) will improve cervical spine flexion and extension end range of motion kinematics in a population suffering from CSR. Thirty chronic lower CSR patients with cervical lordosis cervical extension traction. Treatments were applied 3 × per week for 10 weeks, care was terminated and subjects were evaluated at 3 intervals: baseline, 30 visits, and 3-month follow-up. Radiographic neutral lateral cervical absolute rotation angle (ARA C2-C7) and cervical segmental (C2-C7 segments) rotational and translational flexion-extension kinematics analysis were measured for all patients at the three intervals. The outcome were analyzed using repeated measures one-way ANOVA. Tukey's post-hoc multiple comparisons was implemented when necessary. Pearson correlation between ARA and segmental translational and rotational displacements was determined. Both groups demonstrated statistically significant increases in segmental motion at the 10-week follow up; but only the SG group showed a statistically significant increase in cervical lordosis (p cervical spine. This finding provides objective evidence that cervical flexion/extension is partially dependent on the posture and sagittal curve orientation. These findings are in agreement with several other reports in the literature; whereas ours is the first post treatment analysis identifying this relationship.

  5. Anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis of the cervical spine in cervical spondylotic myelopathy in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Motohiro; Tani, Toshikazu; Ushida, Takahiro; Ishida, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis of the cervical spine has received insufficient attention in contrast to that of the lumbar spine. The authors analyzed the functional significance of anterior and posterior degenerative spondylolisthesis (anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis) of the cervical spine to elucidate its role in the development of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) in the elderly. A total of 79 patients aged 65 or older who eventually had surgical treatment for CSM were evaluated radiographically. Altogether, 24 patients (30%) had displacement of 3.5 mm or more (severe spondylolisthesis group), 31 had displacement of 2.0-3.4 mm (moderate spondylolisthesis group), and 24 had less than 2.0 mm displacement (mild spondylolisthesis group). The severe spondylolisthesis group consisted of 14 patients with anterolisthesis (anterolisthesis group) and 10 patients with retrolisthesis (retrolisthesis group). Patients with severe spondylolisthesis had a high incidence (93%) of degenerative spondylolisthesis at C3/4 or C4/5 and significantly greater cervical mobility than those with mild spondylolisthesis. The anterolisthesis group, but not the retrolisthesis group, had a significantly wider spinal canal than the mild spondylolisthesis group, although the degree of horizontal displacement and cervical mobility did not differ significantly between the anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis groups. Severe cord compression seen on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and high-intensity spinal cord signals seen on T2-weighted MRI scans corresponded significantly to the levels of the spondylolisthesis. Degenerative spondylolisthesis is not a rare radiographic finding in elderly patients with CSM, which tends to cause intense cord compression that is seen on MRI scans. Greater mobility of the upper cervical segments may be a compensatory reaction for advanced disc degeneration of the lower cervical segments, leading to the development of degenerative

  6. Effect of different surgical methods on headache associated with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy.

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    Sun, Yuqing; Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Yan, Kai; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Shan; Tian, Wei

    2015-09-23

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, total disk replacement and open door laminoplasty have been widely used to treat patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy. In our clinical practice, many patients with cervical spondylosis also complain of headache, and wish to know if the surgical treatment for cervical spondylosis can also alleviate this symptom. Considering that there is no literature concerning this extra benefit of surgical manipulation on cervical spondylosis, we have carried out this retrospective study. Among the patients treated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, total disk replacement and open door laminoplasty in our institute for cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy between February 2002 to March 2011, 108 of whom that have complained about headache at the same time were included in this study. Those patients were followed by 25 to 145 months. Severity of headache before the surgery and at the last follow up was recorded by VAS pain scores and compared among the patients with different surgical methods using SPSS17.0 software. One way ANOVA was used to compare VAS scores between the groups, paired sample t-tests were used to compare the differences in a group at different time points. Headache was significantly alleviated in all groups (P  0.05). No significant differences were found among the groups comparing the degree of alleviation of VAS scores before and after the surgery (P > 0.05). Considering that all the three procedures in the current study have achieved similar effect on alliviating headache in patients with cevical myelopathy, and that what they have in common was that was the decompression of spinal cord, it can be assumed that the headache associated with cervical spondylosis may be the result of compression on the spinal cord. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, total disk replacement and open door laminoplasty can all significantly alleviate headache in patients

  7. Manual therapy and therapeutic exercise in patient with symptomatic cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a case report.

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    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Carneiro, Kysia Karine Almeida; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2013-10-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is caused by narrowing of the cervical spinal canal, although surgical decompression is an obvious indication for spinal cord stenosis, there are not enough data to determine that surgery is the most indicated intervention for milder forms. The purpose of the present case report was to describe the outcomes results of the physical therapy treatment with emphasis on manual therapy and therapeutic exercise for a patient with CSM. A 58-year-old male patient attended the physical therapy clinic due to pain and paresthesia in the upper and lower limbs. The magnetic resonance imaging was compatible with spondylotic myelopathy. Following physical therapy treatment, the patient exhibited an improvement in functional capacity (triangle step test and timed 10-m walk), pain, paresthesia, mJOA scale and Neck Disability Index. Based on the lack of rapid evolution of neurological impairment, physical therapy treatment was indicated, which achieved satisfactory results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Posterior atlantoaxial ′facetal′ instability associated with cervical spondylotic disease

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    Atul Goel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The association of single or multiple level cervical spondylotic disease with atlantoaxial instability is assessed. The implications of identifying and treating atlantoaxial instability in such an association are highlighted. Materials and Methods: The analysis is based on an experience with 11 patients treated during the period June 2013-June 2014. All patients had single or multilevel cervical spondylotic disease. The spinal canal compromise and evidence of cord compression was evident on imaging in the cervical subaxial spine and was related to disc bulges and osteophytic bars. There was no or relatively insignificant compression of the cervicomedullary cord by the odontoid process. There was no evidence of odontoid process-related instability on dynamic imaging. Apart from presence of features of cervical spondylosis, investigations and surgical exploration and direct manual handling of the facets revealed evidence of Type B (posterior atlantoaxial′facetal′ instability in all patients. Our 5-point clinical grading system and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA scores were used to monitor the patients both before and after surgery and at follow-up. Surgery involved both at lantoaxial and subaxial cervical fixation. During the average period of follow-up of 9 months (5-17 months, all patients showed remarkable and gratifying neurological recovery. Conclusion: We conclude that atlantoaxial facetal instability can be ′frequently′ associated with cervical spondylosis and needs surgical stabilization. Our surgical outcome analysis suggests that missing or ignoring the presence of atlantoaxial facetal instability can be an important cause of suboptimal result or failure of surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

  9. Neuropsychological improvement in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy after posterior decompression surgery

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    Hoshimaru, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    Patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy sometimes complain of cognitive dysfunction, which may be coincidence. However, cognitive dysfunction may be related to disorders of the cervical spine and/or spinal cord. This study investigated cognitive dysfunction in patients with cervical spinal disorders. A total of 79 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (40 women and 39 men, mean age 61.2 years) underwent cervical laminoplasty between January 2006 and July 2007. Ten of these 79 patients (7 women and 3 men, mean age 65.2 years) complained of moderate to severe memory disturbances. These 10 patients underwent neuroimaging studies and a battery of neuropsychological tests consisting of the mini-mental state examination, Kohs Block Design Test, Miyake Memory Test, Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT), and 'kana-hiroi' test before and 3 months after surgery. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed no organic brain lesions in the 10 patients, but single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated reduced regional cerebral blood flow in the posterior cortical areas in eight patients before surgery. Neuropsychological test scores showed statistically significant improvement after surgery in the Kohs Block Design Test and the BVRT, which measure visuospatial perception and reflect the function of the parietal and/or occipital lobes (p<0.05). The practice effect may have contributed to the neuropsychological improvements, but this study suggests that cervical spinal disorders may affect cognitive functions and that surgical treatment can ameliorate such effects. (author)

  10. The Significance of the Trömner Sign in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Patient.

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    Chaiyamongkol, Weera; Laohawiriyakamol, Teeranan; Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin; Tanutit, Pramot; Bintachitt, Piyawat; Siribumrungwong, Koopong

    2017-11-01

    This study is a diagnostic analysis. To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of Trömner sign in cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), and how its presence correlates with the severity of myelopathy. A clinical presentation of myelopathy corresponding with image findings is a current standard to diagnose CSM. Trömner sign is an alternative of well-known Hoffmann sign to detect CSM. Little is known about its diagnostic accuracy and how its presence correlates with the severity of CSM. Consecutive patients with clinical diagnosis of CSM and other cervical spondylosis-related problems were enrolled in either CSM group, cervical spondylotic radiculopathy group, or axial pain group. Normal volunteers and patients without spine-related issues were used as a control. All participants were examined for the presence of myelopathic signs. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of all participants were reviewed by a radiologist. There were 85 participants included in the study. Diagnostic sensitivity was 76%, 94%, 76%, and 36% for Hoffmann sign, Trömner sign, inverted radial reflex, and Babinski sign, respectively. Trömner sign had relatively high sensitivity (95%) despite of mild degree of myelopathy. Negative predictive value was 60%, 85%, 59%, and 38% for Hoffmann sign, Trömner sign, inverted radial reflex, and Babinski sign, respectively. There were 63%-71% of patients in either axial pain group or cervical spondylotic radiculopathy group had positive Trömner sign. Most of CSM patients with cord signal changed had positive myelopathic sign. Regarding CSM patient without cord signal change, most of tests were negative except Trömner sign. High sensitivity (94%) and relatively high negative predictive value (85%) for Trömner sign indicate the usefulness of Trömner sign in ruling out CSM. High incidence of positive Trömner sign in presymptomatic cervical cord compression patients suggests Trömner sign could have a useful role in early detection of presymptomatic

  11. Functional Outcomes of Surgery in Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy versus Myelopathy: A Comparative Study

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    F. Omidi-Kashani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cervical spondylosis can cause three different categories of symptoms and signs with possible overlap in the affected patients. Aim. We aim to compare functional outcome of surgery in the patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy, regardless of their surgical type and approach. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 140 patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy who had been operated from August 2006 to January 2011, as Group A (68 cases and Group B (72 cases, respectively. The mean age was 48.2 and 55.7 years, while the mean followup was 38.9 and 37.3 months, respectively. Functional outcome of the patients was assessed by neck disability index (NDI and patient satisfaction with surgery. Results. Only in Group A, the longer delay caused a worse surgical outcome (NDI. In addition, in Group B, there was no significant relationship between imaging signal change of the spinal cord and our surgical outcomes. Improvement in NDI and final satisfaction rate in both groups are comparable. Conclusions. Surgery was associated with an improvement in NDI in both groups (P<0.001. The functional results in both groups were similar and comparable, regarding this index and patient's satisfaction score.

  12. Kinematic MR imaging in surgical management of cervical disc disease, spondylosis and spondylotic myelopathy

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    Muhle, C.; Metzner, J.; Brinkmann, G.; Heller, M. [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Weinert, D.; Schoen, R.; Rautenberg, E.; Mehdorn, H.M. [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Falliner, A. [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Orthopedics; Resnick, D. [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1999-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate the clinical value and influence of kinematic MR imaging in patients with degenerative diseases of the cervical spine. Material and methods: Eighty-one patients were examined with a 1.5 T whole body magnet using a positioning device. Cervical disc disease was classified according to clinical and radiographic findings into 4 stages: stage I=cervical disc disease (n=13); stage II=spondylosis (n=42); stage III=spondylosis with restricted motion (n=11); and stage IV-cervical spondylotic myelopathy (n=15). Findings on kinematic MR images were compared to those on flexion and extension radiographs, myelography, CT-myelography and static MR imaging. Furthermore, the influence of kinematic MR imaging on surgical management and intra-operative patient positioning was determined. Results: Additional information obtained by kinematic MR imaging changed the therapeutic management in 7 of 11 (64%) patients with stage III disease, and in 13 of 15 (87%) patients with stage IV disease. Instead of an anterior approach, a posterior surgical approach was chosen in 3 of 11 patients (27%) with stage III disease and in 6 of 15 patients (40%) with stage IV disease. Hyperextension of the neck was avoided intra-operatively in 4 patients (27%) with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and in 1 patient with stage II (2%) and in 1 patient with stage III (9%) disease. Kinematic MR imaging provided additional information in all patients with stages III and IV disease except in 1 patient with stage III disease, when compared to flexion and extension radiographs, myelography, CT-myelography and static MR examination. Conclusion: Kinematic MR imaging adds additional information when compared to conventional imaging methods in patients with advanced stages of degenerative disease of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  13. Kinematic MR imaging in surgical management of cervical disc disease, spondylosis and spondylotic myelopathy

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    Muhle, C.; Metzner, J.; Brinkmann, G.; Heller, M.; Weinert, D.; Schoen, R.; Rautenberg, E.; Mehdorn, H.M.; Falliner, A.; Resnick, D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the clinical value and influence of kinematic MR imaging in patients with degenerative diseases of the cervical spine. Material and methods: Eighty-one patients were examined with a 1.5 T whole body magnet using a positioning device. Cervical disc disease was classified according to clinical and radiographic findings into 4 stages: stage I=cervical disc disease (n=13); stage II=spondylosis (n=42); stage III=spondylosis with restricted motion (n=11); and stage IV-cervical spondylotic myelopathy (n=15). Findings on kinematic MR images were compared to those on flexion and extension radiographs, myelography, CT-myelography and static MR imaging. Furthermore, the influence of kinematic MR imaging on surgical management and intra-operative patient positioning was determined. Results: Additional information obtained by kinematic MR imaging changed the therapeutic management in 7 of 11 (64%) patients with stage III disease, and in 13 of 15 (87%) patients with stage IV disease. Instead of an anterior approach, a posterior surgical approach was chosen in 3 of 11 patients (27%) with stage III disease and in 6 of 15 patients (40%) with stage IV disease. Hyperextension of the neck was avoided intra-operatively in 4 patients (27%) with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and in 1 patient with stage II (2%) and in 1 patient with stage III (9%) disease. Kinematic MR imaging provided additional information in all patients with stages III and IV disease except in 1 patient with stage III disease, when compared to flexion and extension radiographs, myelography, CT-myelography and static MR examination. Conclusion: Kinematic MR imaging adds additional information when compared to conventional imaging methods in patients with advanced stages of degenerative disease of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  14. Imaging Modalities for Cervical Spondylotic Stenosis and Myelopathy

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    C. Green

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylosis is a spectrum of pathology presenting as neck pain, radiculopathy, and myelopathy or all in combination. Diagnostic imaging is essential to diagnosis and preoperative planning. We discuss the modalities of imaging in common practice. We examine the use of imaging to differentiate among central, subarticular, and lateral stenosis and in the assessment of myelopathy.

  15. Cervical corpectomy with preserved posterior vertebral wall for cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a randomized control clinical study.

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    Ying, Zhang; Xinwei, Wang; Jing, Zhang; Shengming, Xu; Bitao, Lv; Tao, Zhang; Wen, Yuan

    2007-06-15

    Cervical corpectomy with preserved posterior vertebral wall (CPW) had been performed by the senior author (Y.W.) since 1999. A prospective study had been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of CPW since 2001. To validate the clinical outcome of CPW against conventional corpectomy (CC). Anterior surgical managements of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) include discectomy and corpectomy. Both have significant disadvantages, including low fusion rates and residual symptoms. A procedure incorporating multilevel discectomy, corpectomy with preserved posterior vertebral wall, autograft and plating was described. By keeping the posterior vertebral wall (PW), infringement of the vein plexus and spinal canal was avoided and more fusion site was available. From March 2001 to March 2004, 178 cases of CSM were randomized to undergo CPW (n = 89) or CC (n = 89). Arthrodesis was done with autogenous iliac bone graft or titanium cage supplemented with anterior self-lock plates in both groups. Operation time, blood loss, days of hospitalization, the numbers and types of complications, and preoperative and postoperative JOA scores were recorded. Fusion rate, segmental lordosis, and disc height were assessed by roentgenography. Three-dimensional reconstructions of CT scan were used to confirm fusion evidence. Average operation time and blood loss decreased significantly in the CPW group (98.06 +/- 19.42 minutes, and 131.69 +/- 62.41 mL) as compared with those in the CC group (108.45 +/- 22.35 minutes, and 181.57 +/- 82.10 mL) (P < 0.05). There were 2 cases of epidural bleeding and 1 case of CSF leak in the CC group. Other complications were minor. JOA improvement scores were similar in both groups. Roentgenograms showed that the fusion rate was 100% at 6 months postoperatively in both groups. CT scans showed that PW fused with grafts and bone dust in cages. Improvement in segmental lordosis and disc height was similar in both groups. CPW is a feasible procedure for anterior

  16. Effect of double-door laminoplasty on atypical symptoms associated with cervical spondylotic myelopathy/radiculopathy.

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    Sun, Yuqing; Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Yan, Kai; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Shan; Tian, Wei

    2016-05-10

    Double-door laminoplasty is an effective method in treating patients with cervical spondylosis. Many patients with cervical spondylosis experience a set of atypical symptoms such as vertigo and tinnitus, and wish to know if the surgical treatment for cervical spondylosis can also alleviate those symptoms. The current research was carried out to investigate if atypical symptoms can be alleviated in patients who received laminoplasty for the treatment of cervical spondylosis. One hundred ninety patients who received laminoplasty to treat cervical spondylotic myelopathy/radiculopathy in our center and complained about one or more of the atypical symptoms before the surgery were followed for a mean of 61.9 months (from 39 to 87 months) after the surgery. Severity scores were retrospectively collected by follow up outpatient visits or phone interviews. The data was calculated based on patient feedback on the frequency and severity of those symptoms before the surgery and at last follow up, and were compared by paired sample t-tests. Most patients reported that the atypical symptoms such as vertigo (P cervical spondylosis. Further research is needed to explore mechanisms underlying this extra benefit of laminoplasty.

  17. Criteria for preferring anterior approach in surgical treatment of cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy

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    Yurdal Gezercan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylosis is a progressive, chronic and insidious degenerative disease, which origins from the cervical intervertebral disc and then diffuses to surrounding bony and soft tissues. If the spine and nerve roots are involved due to degenerative changes, this is called as cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy (CSMR and it is the most frequent cause of myelopathy over age of 50. Cases with progressive character and functional neurological deficits and cases with a prolonged course refractory to conservative therapy shall be treated surgically. The aim of the surgical treatment is to relieve the pressure on the spinal cord and nerve roots, to preserve the proper anatomical alignment of the cervical vertebrae or to reestablish correct anatomical positioning if it is distorted and lastly to increase the life quality by relieving patients neurological signs and complaints. While achieving these goals, complications shall be avoided as much as possible. These goals can be accomplished by anterior or posterior surgical approaches to the cervical vertebrae. The style of the surgical approach can only be decided by a detailed evaluation of the patient's clinical and radiological features. The utmost aim of the surgical procedure, which is to achieve sufficient neurological decompression and to preserve/establish proper cervical vertebral alignment, can be provided best by anterior approaches. In our current study, the criteria to prefer anterior approach in surgical treatment of CSMR will be reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 669-678

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) predicts functional impairment in mild to moderate cervical spondylotic myelopathy

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    Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Salamon, Noriko; Grinstead, John W.; Holly, Langston T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Context MRI is the standard imaging modality for the assessment of the cervical spinal cord; however, MRI assessment of the spinal cord in cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) patients has not demonstrated a consistent association with neurological function or outcome after surgical or medical intervention. Thus, there is a need for sensitive imaging biomarkers that can predict functional impairment in patients with advanced cervical spondylosis. Purpose The purpose of this study was to implement diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) as an imaging biomarker for microstructural integrity and functional impairment in patients with cervical spondylosis. Study Design/Setting Non-randomized, single institution study. Patient Sample Forty-eight cervical spondylosis patients with or without spinal cord signal change underwent DTI of the spinal cord along with functional assessment. Outcome Measures Functional measures of neurological function via mJOA score Methods This study was supported by the NIH and there are no perceived conflicts of interest. A zoomed-EPI technique and 2D spatially selective RF excitation pulse were used for DTI measurement. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial and axial diffusion coefficient (RD and AD), axial diffusion anisotropy, ψ, defined as AD-MD, and the standard deviation of primary eigenvector orientation were evaluated at the site of compression. Results Results suggest average FA, tADC, ψ, and standard deviation of primary eigenvector orientation at the spinal level of highest compression were linearly correlated with modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (mJOA) score. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis suggested FA and ψ could identify stenosis patients with mild to moderate symptoms with a relatively high sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion The results of this study support the potential use of DTI as a biomarker for predicting functional impairment in patients with cervical spondylosis

  19. Cervical disc arthroplasty for the treatment of spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy.

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    Khong, Peter; Bogduk, Nikolai; Ghahreman, Ali; Davies, Mark

    2013-10-01

    The concept of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for the anterior treatment of cervical pathology has existed for approximately half a decade. In this time, multiple devices have been developed for this purpose, with the ultimate aim to provide an alternative to fusion. Fifty-five patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy underwent CDA over a 5 year period. Data was collected on 46 patients, which included Visual Analogue Scale scores for neck pain and arm pain, Neck Disability Index scores, Short Form-36 v2 (SF-36) and Nurick grades for myelopathy patients. Preoperative data and data obtained at the latest clinical follow-up (median 48 months, range, 10-76 months) were analysed to assess the intermediate term efficacy of the procedure. In patients with radiculopathy, arm pain improved by 88% (p<0.001). In those presenting with myelopathy, the Nurick grades improved from a median of 1 to 0 (p<0.001). In both groups of patients, improvements in pain and neurologic deficit were accompanied by significant improvements in multiple domains of the SF-36. Using a composite system which considered neck pain, arm pain, function and myelopathy, we arrived at an overall success rate of 73%. We concluded that CDA is an effective intervention for improving neurologic deficit, arm pain and local neck symptoms that translated into improvements in physical and social functioning in the intermediate term. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Is Decompressive Surgery for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Effective in Patients Suffering from Concomitant Multiple Sclerosis or Parkinson’s Disease?

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    Taylor E. Purvis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A subset of patients with a demyelinating disease suffer from concurrent cervical spondylotic myelopathy, both of which evince similar symptomatology. Differentiating the cause of these symptoms is challenging, and little research has been done on patients with coexisting diseases. This review explores the current literature on the appropriate surgical management of patients with concurrent multiple sclerosis (MS and cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM, and those with both Parkinson’s disease (PD and CSM. MS and CSM patients may benefit from surgery to reduce pain and radiculopathy. Surgical management in PD and CSM patients has shown minimal quality-of-life improvement. Future studies are needed to better characterize demyelinating disease patients with concurrent disease and to determine ideal medical or surgical treatment.

  1. Long term results of anterior corpectomy and fusion for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

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    Rui Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Results showed good clinical outcomes of anterior corpectomy and fusion (ACCF for patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM during a short term follow-up; however, studies assessing long term results are relatively scarce. In this study we intended to assess the long term clinical and radiographic outcomes, find out the factors that may affect the long term clinical outcome and evaluate the incidence of adjacent segment disease (ASD. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of 145 consecutive CSM patients on ACCF treatment with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Clinical data were collected from medical and operative records. Patients were evaluated by using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA scoring system preoperatively and during the follow-up. X-rays results of cervical spine were obtained from all patients. Correlations between the long term clinical outcome and various factors were also analyzed. FINDINGS: Ninety-three males and fifty-two females completed the follow-up. The mean age at operation was 51.0 years, and the mean follow-up period was 102.1 months. Both postoperative sagittal segmental alignment (SSA and the sagittal alignment of the whole cervical spine (SACS increased significantly in terms of cervical lordosis. The mean increase of JOA was 3.8 ± 1.3 postoperatively, and the overall recovery rate was 62.5%. Logistic regression analysis showed that preoperative duration of symptoms >12 months, high-intensity signal in spinal cord and preoperative JOA score ≤ 9 were important predictors of the fair recovery rate (≤ 50%. Repeated surgery due to ASD was performed in 7 (4.8% cases. CONCLUSIONS: ACCF with anterior plate fixation is a reliable and effective method for treating CSM in terms of JOA score and the recovery rate. The correction of cervical alignment and the repeated surgery rate for ASD are also considered to be satisfactory.

  2. Zero-Profile Spacer Versus Cage-Plate Construct in Anterior Cervical Diskectomy and Fusion for Multilevel Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

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    Tong, Min-Ji; Xiang, Guang-Heng; He, Zi-Li; Chen, De-Heng; Tang, Qian; Xu, Hua-Zi; Tian, Nai-Feng

    2017-08-01

    Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion with plate-screw construct has been gradually applied for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy in recent years. However, long cervical plate was associated with complications including breakage or loosening of plate and screws, trachea-esophageal injury, neurovascular injury, and postoperative dysphagia. To reduce these complications, the zero-profile spacer has been introduced. This meta-analysis was performed to compare the clinical and radiologic outcomes of zero-profile spacer versus cage-plate construct for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. We systematically searched MEDLINE, Springer, and Web of Science databases for relevant studies that compared the clinical and radiologic outcomes of zero-profile spacer versus cage and plate for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Risk of bias in included studies was assessed. Pooled estimates and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated. On the basis of predefined inclusion criteria, 7 studies with a total of 409 patients were included in this analysis. The pooled data revealed that zero-profile spacer was associated with a decreased dysphagia rate at 2, 3, and 6 months postoperatively when compared with the cage-plate group. Both techniques had similar perioperative outcomes, functional outcome, radiologic outcome, and dysphagia rate immediately and at >1-year after operation. On the basis of available evidence, zero-profile spacer was more effective in reducing postoperative dysphagia rate for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Both devices were safe in anterior cervical surgeries, and they had similar efficacy in improving the functional and radiologic outcomes. More randomized controlled trials are needed to compare these 2 devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterizing Thalamocortical Disturbances in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: Revealed by Functional Connectivity under Two Slow Frequency Bands.

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    Fuqing Zhou

    Full Text Available Recent advanced MRI studies on cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM revealed alterations of sensorimotor cortex, but the disturbances of large-scale thalamocortical systems remains elusive. The purpose of this study was to characterizing the CSM-related thalamocortical disturbances, which were associated with spinal cord structural injury, and clinical measures.A total of 17 patients with degenerative CSM and well-matched control subjects participated. Thalamocortical disturbances were quantified using thalamus seed-based functional connectivity in two distinct low frequencies bands (slow-5 and slow-4, with different neural manifestations. The clinical measures were evaluated by Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA score system and Neck Disability Index (NDI questionnaires.Decreased functional connectivity was found in the thalamo-motor, -somatosensory, and -temporal circuits in the slow-5 band, indicating impairment of thalamo-cortical circuit degeneration or axon/synaptic impairment. By contrast, increased functional connectivity between thalami and the bilateral primary motor (M1, primary and secondary somatosensory (S1/S2, premotor cortex (PMC, and right temporal cortex was detected in the slow-4 band, and were associated with higher fractional anisotropy values in the cervical cord, corresponding to mild spinal cord structural injury.These thalamocortical disturbances revealed by two slow frequency bands inform basic understanding and vital clues about the sensorimotor dysfunction in CSM. Further work is needed to evaluate its contribution in central functional reorganization during spinal cord degeneration.

  4. Indication for the operative methods in surgical treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy

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    Kobayashi, Akira; Inoue, Shunichi; Watabe, Tsuneo; Nagase, Joji; Harada, Yoshitada

    1984-01-01

    Indication for the operative methods for cervical spondylotic myelopathy was examined in 16 patients undergoing CT-myelography before and after operation. There was a highly significant correlation between the anteroposterior (A-P) diameter of the spinal cord and clinical symptoms. Patients with shorter A-P diameter of the spinal cord tended to have severer preoperative clinical symptoms. Clinical symptoms improved as the post operative A-P diameter of the spinal cord increased. Fixation with decompression of the anterior spinal cord should be indicated when constriction of 5 mm or less of the spinal cord is seen segmentally at the level of the intervertebral disc. Dilation of the spinal cavity should be indicated when the constriction of the spinal cord is 5 mm or less at all levels of the cervical spinal cord. In performing fixation with anterior decompression, 15 mm is considered to be the most suitable width for complete and safe decompression of the flattened spinal cord with a wide transverse diameter. (Namekawa, K)

  5. Balance chiropractic therapy for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

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    Yang, Feng; Li, Wen-Xiong; Liu, Zhu; Liu, Li

    2016-10-22

    Cervical spondylosis is a very common disorder and cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) is the most common form of spinal degenerative disease. Its clinical manifestations focus on pain and numbness of the neck and arm as well as restricted movement of the neck, which greatly affect the patient's life and work. The orthopedic of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory holds that the basic pathologic change in spinal degenerative diseases is the imbalance between the dynamic system and the static system of the cervical spine. Based on this theory, some Chinese physicians have developed a balance chiropractic therapy (BCT) to treat CSR, which has been clinically examined for more than 50 years to effectively cure CSR. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of BCT on CSR and to investigate the mechanism by which the efficacy is achieved. We propose a multicenter, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BCT for CSR. Participants aged 18 to 65 years, who are in conformity with the diagnostic criteria of CSR and whose pain score on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) is more than 4 points and less than 8 points, will be included and randomly allocated into two groups: a treatment group and a control group. Participants in the treatment group will be treated with BCT, while the control group will receive traction therapy (TT). The primary outcome is pain severity (measured with a VAS). Secondary outcomes will include cervical curvature (measured by the Borden Index), a composite of functional status (measured by the Neck Disability Index, NDI), patient health status (evaluated by the SF-36 health survey) and adverse events (AEs) as reported in the trial. If BCT can relieve neck pain without adverse effects, it may be a novel strategy for the treatment of CSR. Furthermore, the mechanism of BCT for CSR will be partially elucidated. Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02705131 . Registered on 9

  6. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Correlates with Short-Term Myelopathy Outcome in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantam, Aditya; Rao, Avinash; Kurpad, Shekar N; Jirjis, Michael B; Eckardt, Gerald; Schmit, Brian D; Wang, Marjorie C

    2017-01-01

    To determine if spinal cord diffusion tensor imaging indexes correlate with short-term clinical outcome in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). A prospective consecutive cohort study was performed in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery for CSM. After obtaining informed consent, patients with CSM underwent preoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging of the cervical spine. Fractional anisotropy (FA) values at the level of maximum cord compression and at the noncompressed C1-2 level were calculated on axial images. We recorded the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale, Neck Disability Index, and Short Form-36 physical functioning subscale scores for all patients preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Statistical analysis was performed to identify correlations between FA and clinical outcome scores. The study included 27 patients (mean age 54.5 years ± 1.9, 12 men). The mean postoperative changes in mJOA scale, Neck Disability Index, and Short Form-36 physical functioning subscale scores were 0.9 ± 0.3, -6.0 ± 1.9, and 3.4 ± 1.9. The mean FA at the level of maximum compression was significantly lower than the mean FA at the C1-2 level (0.5 vs. 0.55, P = 0.01). FA was significantly correlated with change in mJOA scale score (Pearson r = -0.42, P = 0.02). FA was significantly correlated with the preoperative mJOA scale score (Pearson r = 0.65, P < 0.001). Preoperative FA at the level of maximum cord compression significantly correlates with the 3-month change in mJOA scale score among patients with CSM. FA was also significantly associated with preoperative mJOA scale score and is a potential biomarker for spinal cord dysfunction in CSM. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Imaging Factors that Distinguish Between Patients with Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy with Mild to Moderate Cervical Spinal Cord Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun Ming; Zhang, Jing Tao; Yang, Da Long; Yang, Yi Peng; Xia, He Huan; Yang, Liu

    2017-10-13

    BACKGROUND Not all patients with spinal cord compression due to cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) have clinical symptoms and signs. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the imaging findings in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with CSM with mild to moderate cervical spinal cord compression. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective clinical study included 68 patients. Group A (n=30) had no symptoms and signs; group B (n=38) had symptoms and signs of cervical myelopathy. The age, sex, body mass index (BMI), history of steroid treatment, duration of symptoms, number of spondylotic cervical segments, Torg ratio, range of motion (ROM), incidence of cervical segmental instability, overall curvature of the cervical spine, direction of spinal cord compression, and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity were compared. RESULTS For groups A and B, the Torg ratio was 90.3% and 83.6% (Pvariable, independently associated with cervical segmental instability (OR=5.898, P=0.037), an MRI T2-weighted intramedullary high signal (OR=9.718, P=0.002), and Torg ratio (OR=0.155, P=0.006). CONCLUSIONS Cervical segmental instability, a high intramedullary signal on T2-weighted MRI, and the Torg ratio had the greatest capacity to distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with CSM with mild to moderate cervical spinal cord compression.

  8. Clinical report of cervical arthroplasty in management of spondylotic myelopathy in Chinese

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    Lu Ning

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To investigate clinical effects and manual operational point of Bryan cervical disc prosthesis in Chinese, to observe the stability and range of movement (ROM post-operatively. Methods and materials From 2003,12 to 2005,12, Bryan disc prosthesis replacement applied in 83 cases (102 levels of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM after anterior decompression in our hospital. Clinical (JOA grade and Odom's scale and radiological (X-ray of flexion, extension; left and right bending position follow-up was performed. Systemic radiographic study about stability and ROM of replaced level post operationally were measured. CT or MRI scans were applied in all cases to evaluate the signs of the prosthesis deflexion and hetero-ossification in the replaced levels. Results At least 12 months follow-up were done in 65/83 of these paients. All of 83 patients were improved according to Odsm's scale. JOA score increased from average 8.7 to 15.5. There was no prosthesis subsidence. Replaced segment achieved stability and restored partial of normal ROM 4.73°(3.7°–5.9° early postoperation and 8.12°(5.8°–13.6° more than 12 months postoperation in flex and extension position. No obvious loss of lordosis was found. CT or MRI follow-up shows position deflexion of the prosthesis metal endplates ( Conclusion Byran cervical disc prosthesis restored motion to the level of the intact segment in flexion-extension and lateral bending in post-operative images. At the same time, it can achieve good anterior decompression treatment effect and immediate stability in replaced 1 or 2 levels, and which is a new choice for the treatment of CSM.

  9. Neuroprotective Potential of Gentongping in Rat Model of Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy Targeting PPAR-γ Pathway

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    Wen Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR is the most general form of spinal degenerative disease and is characterized by pain and numbness of the neck and arm. Gentongping (GTP granule, as a classical Chinese patent medicine, has been widely used in curing CSR, whereas the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study is to explore the pharmacological mechanisms of GTP on CSR. The rat model of CSR was induced by spinal cord injury (SCI. Our results showed that GTP could significantly alleviate spontaneous pain as well as ameliorate gait. The HE staining and Western blot results showed that GTP could increase the quantity of motoneuron and enhance the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ in the spinal cord tissues. Meanwhile, immunofluorescence staining analysis indicated that GTP could reduce the expression of TNF-α in the spinal cord tissues. Furthermore, the protein level of Bax was decreased whereas the protein levels of Bcl-2 and NF200 were increased after the GTP treatment. These findings demonstrated that GTP might modulate the PPAR-γ pathway by inhibiting the inflammatory response and apoptosis as well as by protecting the cytoskeletal integrity of the spinal cord, ultimately play a neuroprotective role in CSR.

  10. Prediction of myelopathic level in cervical spondylotic myelopathy using diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Cui, Jiao-Long; Li, Han-Xiong; Luk, Keith D K; Hu, Yong

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the use of a newly designed machine learning-based classifier in the automatic identification of myelopathic levels in cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). In all, 58 normal volunteers and 16 subjects with CSM were recruited for diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) acquisition. The eigenvalues were extracted as the selected features from DTI images. Three classifiers, naive Bayesian, support vector machine, and support tensor machine, and fractional anisotropy (FA) were employed to identify myelopathic levels. The results were compared with clinical level diagnosis results and accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated to evaluate the performance of the developed classifiers. The accuracy by support tensor machine was the highest (93.62%) among the three classifiers. The support tensor machine also showed excellent capacity to identify true positives (sensitivity: 84.62%) and true negatives (specificity: 97.06%). The accuracy by FA value was the lowest (76%) in all the methods. The classifiers-based method using eigenvalues had a better performance in identifying the levels of CSM than the diagnosis using FA values. The support tensor machine was the best among three classifiers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Surgical Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Associated Hypertension--A Retrospective Study of 309 Patients.

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    Ze-qun Li

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease, and various risk factors are known to be involved in it. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM is the most common non-traumatic cause of myelopathy, which displays neurological symptoms and may induce systemic symptoms. To date, it is still unknown whether CSM is associated with hypertension, and if so, whether the decompression operations can attenuate CSM associated hypertension. Here, a total of 309 patients with CSM who received anterior or posterior decompression surgery were enrolled as subjects. Blood pressure measurements were performed before and within one week after the surgery. Among the 309 subjects, 144 (46.6% of them exhibited hypertension before surgery, a significantly higher ratio than that of the whole population. One week after surgery, blood pressure of 106 (73.6% patients turned back to normal. Blood pressure of another 37(25.7% patients decreased with different degrees, although still higher than normal. Moreover, it appears that both approaches were effective in improving blood pressure, while the posterior approach was more effective in decreasing systolic blood pressure. We speculate this type of hypertension might result from hyperactivity of sympathetic nervous system as the heart rate of these patients decreased after surgery as well. Collectively, compression of spinal cord in CSM patients might be associated with hypertension, and decompression surgery largely attenuated this type of hypertension. These findings prove CSM to be a potential associated factor of high blood pressure and may shed light on therapies of hypertension in clinics.

  12. Reliability of surface electromyography timing parameters in gait in cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malone, Ailish

    2012-02-01

    The aims of this study were to validate a computerised method to detect muscle activity from surface electromyography (SEMG) signals in gait in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), and to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the activation times designated by this method. SEMG signals were recorded from rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), and medial gastrocnemius (MG), during gait in 12 participants with CSM on two separate test days. Four computerised activity detection methods, based on the Teager-Kaiser Energy Operator (TKEO), were applied to a subset of signals and compared to visual interpretation of muscle activation. The most accurate method was then applied to all signals for evaluation of test-retest reliability. A detection method based on a combined slope and amplitude threshold showed the highest agreement (87.5%) with visual interpretation. With respect to reliability, the standard error of measurement (SEM) of the timing of RF, TA and MG between test days was 5.5% stride duration or less, while the SEM of BF was 9.4%. The timing parameters of RF, TA and MG designated by this method were considered sufficiently reliable for use in clinical practice, however the reliability of BF was questionable.

  13. Modification of Nurick scale and Japanese Orthopedic Association score for Indian population with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revanappa, Kartik Kumbhar; Moorthy, Ranjith K; Jeyaseelan, Visalakshi; Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2015-01-01

    Existing scales for functional grading of patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), such as the Nurick scale and modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (mJOA) scale, do not address certain culture-specific activities of the Indian population while grading patients with CSM. We modified the Nurick scale and mJOA scale to develop the Indian modifications of Nurick (imNurick) and mJOA scales (imJOA and imJOA scales), respectively, and then evaluated these modified scales in 93 patients with CSM to determine whether these modifications had a meaningful impact on the functional scores of these patients. There was good interobserver agreement in the assessments documented in all the four scales (Nurick grade, imNurick grade, mJOA scale, and imJOA scale) (kappa = 1). Both Nurick grading (z = 4.4, P = 0.00) and imNurick grading (z = 5.5, P = 0.00) had a valid construct when tested against lower limb mJOA (llmJOA) score. The Indian modified upper limb JOA (imulmJOA) score too had a good construct with modified upper limb JOA (ulmJOA) score (z = 2.5, P = 0.01). There was substantial agreement between Nurick grade and imNurick grade (weighted kappa of 0.75) when taken as a whole group and between ulmJOA score and imulmJOA scores (weighted kappa of 0.75). However, there was significant disagreement between the Nurick grade and imNurick grade scales in patients who were Nurick grade 2 and 3 (kappa = 0.07). The proposed Indian modifications of Nurick grade and mJOA scale that incorporate the ethnic practices of the Indian population and some Asian population are better discriminators of different levels of functional ability among patients with CSM in this population, as compared to the existing Nurick grading and mJOA scale.

  14. Assessment of Psychometric Properties of Various Balance Assessment Tools in Persons With Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Alice Y Y; Pang, Marco Y C

    2017-09-01

    Study Design Clinical measurement, cross-sectional, repeated-measures design. Background Persons with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) are known to have balance impairments. The psychometric properties of various balance assessment tools have not been evaluated in this population. Objective To examine the floor and ceiling effects, item difficulty and item discrimination index, internal consistency, reliability, and validity of the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest), Mini-BESTest, Brief BESTest, and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) in persons with CSM. Methods Seventy-two individuals with CSM were evaluated with the above balance scales. Thirty-two were assessed by a second rater on the same day to establish interrater reliability, and by the same rater 1 to 2 days later to assess test-retest reliability. Results Of the 4 balance tools, only the BBS showed a substantial ceiling effect (skewness, γ 1 balance scales. All balance tests showed good internal consistency (Cronbach α>0.8), with excellent test-retest (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 2,1 >0.80) and interrater reliability (ICC 2,1 >0.80). In addition, all balance tests were strongly correlated with one another (ie, concurrent validity), and with the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (ie, convergent validity). Their correlations with the Abbreviated Mental Test were low (ie, discriminant validity). All 4 balance tests could adequately identify fallers and users of mobility aids (area under the curve, >0.8) (ie, known-groups validity). Conclusion The Brief BESTest is the most preferred tool for persons with CSM because of its excellent reliability, validity, and short administration time, whereas the BBS is the least preferred due to its substantial ceiling effect. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(9):673-682. Epub 13 Jul 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7283.

  15. A Global Perspective on the Outcomes of Surgical Decompression in Patients With Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: Results From the Prospective Multicenter AOSpine International Study on 479 Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehlings, M.G.; Ibrahim, A.; Tetreault, L.; Albanese, V.; Alvarado, M.; Arnold, P.; Barbagallo, G.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Bolger, C.; Defino, H.; Kale, S.; Massicotte, E.; Moraes, O.; Scerrati, M.; Tan, G.; Tanaka, M.; Toyone, T.; Yukawa, Y.; Zhou, Q.; Zileli, M.; Kopjar, B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter international cohort. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate outcomes of surgical decompression for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) at a global level. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: CSM is a degenerative spine disease and the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction

  16. Comparison of one-level microendoscopy laminoforaminotomy and cervical arthroplasty in cervical spondylotic radiculopathy: a minimum 2-year follow-up study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aims to compare the perioperative parameters and clinical results between microendoscopy laminoforaminotomy (MELF) and cervical arthroplasty (CA) in the treatment of one-level cervical spondylotic radiculopathy in a retrospective study. Methods From 2003 to 2007, a total of 97 patients with one-level cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were treated. Forty-five patients underwent CA. Fifty-two patients underwent MELF. Patient demographics and operative data were collected with a minimum 2-year follow-up. Perioperative parameters were compared. Clinical assessment in terms of neck disability index (NDI), short form (SF)-36, and visual analogue scale (VAS) of arm pain and neck pain was performed prior to surgery and at 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Results Fluoroscopy time (CA, 60.3 s; MELF, 12.1 s; P  0.05). Conclusions As alternatives of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), both CA and MELF can produce satisfactory clinical outcomes. MELF has the additional benefits of less blood loss, less surgical time, less X-ray time, and shorter hospital stay. PMID:24341633

  17. Measuring surgical outcomes in cervical spondylotic myelopathy patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: assessment of minimum clinically important difference.

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    Brenda M Auffinger

    Full Text Available OBJECT: The concept of minimum clinically important difference (MCID has been used to measure the threshold by which the effect of a specific treatment can be considered clinically meaningful. MCID has previously been studied in surgical patients, however few studies have assessed its role in spinal surgery. The goal of this study was to assess the role of MCID in patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM. METHODS: Data was collected on 30 patients who underwent ACDF for CSM between 2007 and 2012. Preoperative and 1-year postoperative Neck Disability Index (NDI, Visual-Analog Scale (VAS, and Short Form-36 (SF-36 Physical (PCS and Mental (MCS Component Summary PRO scores were collected. Five distribution- and anchor-based approaches were used to calculate MCID threshold values average change, change difference, receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC, minimum detectable change (MDC and standard error of measurement (SEM. The Health Transition Item of the SF-36 (HTI was used as an external anchor. RESULTS: Patients had a significant improvement in all mean physical PRO scores postoperatively (p<0.01 NDI (29.24 to 14.82, VAS (5.06 to 1.72, and PCS (36.98 to 44.22. The five MCID approaches yielded a range of values for each PRO: 2.00-8.78 for PCS, 2.06-5.73 for MCS, 4.83-13.39 for NDI, and 0.36-3.11 for VAS. PCS was the most representative PRO measure, presenting the greatest area under the ROC curve (0.94. MDC values were not affected by the choice of anchor and their threshold of improvement was statistically greater than the chance of error from unimproved patients. CONCLUSION: SF-36 PCS was the most representative PRO measure. MDC appears to be the most appropriate MCID method. When MDC was applied together with HTI anchor, the MCID thresholds were: 13.39 for NDI, 3.11 for VAS, 5.56 for PCS and 5.73 for MCS.

  18. Computed tomography in cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy: Visualisation of structures, myelographic comparison, cord measurements and clinical utility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Y.L.; Du Boulay, G.H.; Stevens, J.M.; Kendall, B.E.

    1986-05-01

    Sixty-nine patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), radiculopathy (CSR), or both (CSMR) were studied with computed tomography (CT). Computer-assisted myelography (CAM) accurately determines the site and nature of spondylotic protrusions and provides good visualisation of the subarachnoid space and cord deformities even in areas with dilute metrizamide. However, excessive vertebral movement and bulging ligamenta flava with their effects on cord deformity, so easily visualised in myelograms, are completely or partially missed. In the assessment of CSM, metrizamide myelography (MM) followed by CAM should be performed, particularly when the myelographic images are unsatisfactory due to contrast dilution or blockage, when cord compression cannot be ascertained with MM and when cord atrophy is suspected. In CSR, the diagnostic information from MM and CAM is comparable. The diagnostic criteria in CAM are, however, less direct and since MM is adequate in uncomplicated cases, CAM is generally not necessary. The APD, APD/TD ratio, area and circularity are sensitive indices of cord deformity and the first two should be used more often to assist visual assessment of cord deformity. The relation between cord parameters and treatment response is better reflected in CSM cases managed conservatively and the results suggest that the degree of cord deformity is helpful in determining the outcome and hence the choice between surgical and conservative treatment. In plain CT, the osteophytes and calcified discs are adequately visualised and canal dimensions measured with accuracy, but the cervical cord and roots cannot be properly assessed and the diagnosis of CSM or CSR cannot be ascertained. At present, its role in cervical spondylosis is therefore limited.

  19. Computed tomography in cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy: visualisation of structures, myelographic comparison, cord measurements and clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y L; du Boulay, G H; Stevens, J M; Kendall, B E

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-nine patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), radiculopathy (CSR), or both (CSMR) were studied with computed tomography (CT). Computer-assisted myelography (CAM) accurately determines the site and nature of spondylotic protrusions and provides good visualisation of the subarachnoid space and cord deformities even in areas with dilute metrizamide. However, excessive vertebral movement and bulging ligamenta flava with their effects on cord deformity, so easily visualised in myelograms, are completely or partially missed. In the assessment of CSM, metrizamide myelography (MM) followed by CAM should be performed, particularly when the myelographic images are unsatisfactory due to contrast dilution or blockage, when cord compression cannot be ascertained with MM and when cord atrophy is suspected. In CSR, the diagnostic information from MM and CAM is comparable. The diagnostic criteria in CAM are, however, less direct and since MM is adequate in uncomplicated cases, CAM is generally not necessary. The APD, APD/TD ratio, area and circularity are sensitive indices of cord deformity and the first two should be used more often to assist visual assessment of cord deformity. The relation between cord parameters and treatment response is better reflected in CSM cases managed conservatively and the results suggest that the degree of cord deformity is helpful in determining the outcome and hence the choice between surgical and conservative treatment. In plain CT, the osteophytes and calcified discs are adequately visualised and canal dimensions measured with accuracy, but the cervical cord and roots cannot be properly assessed and the diagnosis of CSM or CSR cannot be ascertained. At present, its role in cervical spondylosis is therefore limited.

  20. Computed tomography in cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy: Visualisation of structures, myelographic comparison, cord measurements and clinical utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Y.L.; Du Boulay, G.H.; Stevens, J.M.; Kendall, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-nine patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), radiculopathy (CSR), or both (CSMR) were studied with computed tomography (CT). Computer-assisted myelography (CAM) accurately determines the site and nature of spondylotic protrusions and provides good visualisation of the subarachnoid space and cord deformities even in areas with dilute metrizamide. However, excessive vertebral movement and bulging ligamenta flava with their effects on cord deformity, so easily visualised in myelograms, are completely or partially missed. In the assessment of CSM, metrizamide myelography (MM) followed by CAM should be performed, particularly when the myelographic images are unsatisfactory due to contrast dilution or blockage, when cord compression cannot be ascertained with MM and when cord atrophy is suspected. In CSR, the diagnostic information from MM and CAM is comparable. The diagnostic criteria in CAM are, however, less direct and since MM is adequate in uncomplicated cases, CAM is generally not necessary. The APD, APD/TD ratio, area and circularity are sensitive indices of cord deformity and the first two should be used more often to assist visual assessment of cord deformity. The relation between cord parameters and treatment response is better reflected in CSM cases managed conservatively and the results suggest that the degree of cord deformity is helpful in determining the outcome and hence the choice between surgical and conservative treatment. In plain CT, the osteophytes and calcified discs are adequately visualised and canal dimensions measured with accuracy, but the cervical cord and roots cannot be properly assessed and the diagnosis of CSM or CSR cannot be ascertained. At present, its role in cervical spondylosis is therefore limited. (orig.)

  1. Greater Cervical Muscle Fat Infiltration Evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging is Associated With Poor Postural Stability in Patients With Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsutake, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Maiko; Chyuda, Yuji; Oka, Shinichiro; Hirata, Hirokatsu; Matsuo, Takashi; Oishi, Tsuyoshi; Horikawa, Etsuo

    2016-01-01

    A population-based, cross-sectional study. The aim of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between static postural stability and fat infiltration within cervical multifidus muscle in patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR). CSR causes denervation by compression of nerve roots. This denervation is detected by fatty infiltration or results in fatty infiltration within muscles. Proprioceptive information in cervical multifidus muscle plays an important role in coordinated movement of postural stability; however, there have been few studies evaluating the relationship between postural stability and fat infiltration within cervical multifidus muscle among CSR patients. Sixteen CSR patients with C6 injuries and 25 age-matched healthy controls underwent magnetic resonance images to examine bilateral cervical multifidus muscle. For evaluation of fat within muscle, a muscle fat index (MFI) was calculated by using both measurement of cervical multifidus muscle and intermuscular fat. Participants' postural stability at upright position with eyes-opened and eyes-closed for 60 seconds was examined by a platform. Two parameters, the total length and the area of the center of pressure (COP), were used for evaluation. The CSR group showed significantly poorer postural stability than the control group (eyes-opened the total length; P cervical multifidus muscle could directly cause postural instability in static standing, even though the proprioceptive information has normal lower limbs.

  2. Arthroplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy: similar results to patients with only radiculopathy at 3 years' follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Li-Yu; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Tsai, Tzu-Yun; Ko, Chin-Chu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2014-09-01

    Cervical arthroplasty has been accepted as a viable option for surgical management of cervical spondylosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD). The best candidates for cervical arthroplasty are young patients who have radiculopathy caused by herniated disc with competent facet joints. However, it remains uncertain whether arthroplasty is equally effective for patients who have cervical myelopathy caused by DDD. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of arthroplasty for patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and patients with radiculopathy without CSM. A total of 151 consecutive cases involving patients with CSM or radiculopathy caused by DDD and who underwent one- or two-level cervical arthroplasty were included in this study. Clinical outcome evaluations and radiographic studies were reviewed. Clinical outcome measurements included the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) of neck and arm pain, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, and the Neck Disability Index (NDI) in every patient. For patients with CSM, Nurick scores were recorded for evaluation of cervical myelopathy. Radiographic studies included lateral dynamic radiographs and CT for detection of the formation of heterotopic ossification . Of the 151 consecutive patients with cervical DDD, 125 (82.8%; 72 patients in the myelopathy group and 53 in the radiculopathy group) had at least 24 months of clinical and radiographic follow-up. The mean duration of follow-up in these patients was 36.4 months (range 24-56 months). There was no difference in sex distribution between the 2 groups. However, the mean age of the patients in the myelopathy group was approximately 6 years greater than that of the radiculopathy group (53.1 vs 47.2 years, p radiculopathy group and 95.8% of those in the radiculopathy group retained spinal motion (no significant difference). Evaluation of CT scans showed heterotopic ossification in 34 patients (47.2%) in the myelopathy group and 25 patients (47.1%) in the

  3. The correlation between evoked spinal cord potentials and magnetic resonance imaging before Surgery in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Kosuke; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Kato, Yoshihiko; Imajo, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the correlation between electrophysiological examination and MRI diagnosis. Twenty-four patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and evoked spinal cord potentials (ESCPs) before surgery. In all the patients, only the intervertebral level was symptomatic, as shown by ESCPs. ESCPs following median nerve stimulation (MN-ESCPs), transcranial electric stimulation (TCE-ESCPs), and spinal cord stimulation (Spinal-ECSPs) were recorded. The patients were grouped into two groups as follows: group A, all ESCPs were abnormal; group B, normal spinal cord stimulation. Spinal cord transverse area and compression ratio (central and 1/4-lateral anteroposterior diameter divided by transverse diameter) were measured on T1-weighted axial imaging, with abnormal ESCPs as indicators of spinal cord morphology. Central and 1/4-lateral compression ratio was significantly lower in group A. Spinal cord morphology of magnetic resonance imaging is useful for functional diagnosis. (author)

  4. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy in the young adult: a review of the literature and clinical diagnostic criteria in an uncommon demographic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenta, Peter S; Ghobrial, George M; Krespan, Kelly; Nguyen, Phi; Ali, Muhammed; Harrop, James S

    2014-05-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is typically encountered in the elderly population. Significant inconsistencies currently exist regarding the definition of the disorder, the true incidence of CSM in younger populations, and the established diagnostic criteria. To highlight the lack of standardization in the definition and diagnosis of CSM. A PubMed literature search was conducted spanning the years 2001-2011. The search was limited by the following terms: (1) English language, (2) adults (19-44 years old), and (3) "cervical spondylotic myelopathy." Each article was reviewed to determine if the presence of the definition of CSM existed in the article. The clinical characteristics used to make the diagnosis of CSM were recorded for each article. Cochran's Q statistic was used to determine whether some clinical characteristics were more frequently used than others. Ninety-three papers were reviewed in detail and 16 case reports, reviews, and articles concerning less than 3 patients were excluded, resulting in 77 articles in the final analysis. The most common clinical definitions were gait disturbance (22/77 articles (28.6%)), upper limb paresthesias or sensory disturbance (21/77 (27.3%)), and clumsy hands (15/77 (19.5%)). Hyperreflexia, spasticity, and pathologically increased reflexes were identified as diagnostic criteria in a minority of patients. The literature employs a wide range of neurologic signs and symptoms to make the diagnosis of CSM, with a majority of studies failing to rely on strict diagnostic criteria. The clinician should not discount CSM as an explanation for the aforementioned findings, as it is well-reported in the literature among the ages 18-44. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Clinical observation on improvement of motion range of cervical spine of patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy treated with rotation-traction manipulation and neck pain particles and cervical neck pain rehabilitation exercises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Peng-Chao; Zhu, Li-Guo; Gao, Jing-Hua; Yu, Jie; Feng, Min-Shan; Wei, Xu; Wang, Shang-Quan

    2010-10-01

    To observe the effects of two different therapies on patients whose cervical function were restricted due to cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Form April 2008 to October 2009, 71 cases with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were divided into group A (36 cases) and group B (35 cases). Among them, 22 cases were male and 49 cases were female, ranging in age form 45 to 65 years with an average of 52.27 years, course of disease was from 3 days to 5 years. The patients in group A were treated with rotation-traction manipulation, neck pain particles and cervical rehabilitation exercises; and the patients in group B were treated with cervical traction, Diclofenac sodium sustained release tablets and wearing neck collar. Theapeutic time was two weeks. The cervical anteflexion, extension, left and right lateral bending, left and right rotative activity were measured by helmet-style activities instrument before and after treatment (at the 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 days and 1 month after treatment respectively). There were no difference between two groups in cervical activity in all directions before treatment (P > 0.05). Compared with the beginning, cervical anteflexion and extension showed significant difference at the 5th day after treatment in group A (P cervical anteflexion showed significant difference at the 13th day after treatment (P 0.05); cervical extension showed significant difference at the 7th day after treatment compared with the beginning (P cervical anteflexion, left and right lateral bending, left and right rotative activity showed significant difference at the 1 month after treatment (P cervical rehabilitation exercises in treating cervicalspondylotic radiculopathy have quick effect to improve the activities of cervical anteflexion, extension, left lateral bending, and have durable effect to improve the activities of cervical spine in all directions.

  6. The relationship between central motor conduction time and spinal cord compression in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

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    Rikita, T; Tanaka, N; Nakanishi, K; Kamei, N; Sumiyoshi, N; Kotaka, S; Adachi, N; Ochi, M

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective study. Few studies have reported a relationship between central motor conduction time (CMCT), which evaluates corticospinal function, and degree of spinal cord compression in patients with myelopathy. Thus, there is no consensus on predicting the degree of prolonged CMCT on the basis of the degree of spinal cord compression. If a correlation exists between CMCT and spinal cord compression, then spinal cord compression may be a useful noninvasive clinical indicator of corticospinal function. Therefore, this study evaluated the relationship between CMCT and cervical spinal cord compression measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Hiroshima University Hospital in Japan. We studied 33 patients undergoing laminoplasty. Patients exhibited significant cervical spinal cord compression on both MRI and intraoperative electrophysiological examination. We assessed transcranial magnetic stimulation measurement of CMCT; spinal cord compression parameters such as area, lateral diameter, anteroposterior diameter and flattening of the spinal cord at the lesion site and C2/3 levels on MRI; and pre- versus postoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. Correlations between CMCT and flattening as well as anteroposterior diameter of the spinal cord at the lesion level were observed. Strong correlations between CMCT and the ratio of the flattening and anteroposterior diameter parameters at the lesion level to that at the C2/3 level were also observed. Measurement of spinal cord compression may be useful for the evaluation of corticospinal function as a proxy for CMCT in patients with CSM.

  7. Deep surgical site infection after anterior decompression and fusion with plate fixation for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qunfeng; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Liang; Lu, Xuhua; Ni, Bin

    2016-02-01

    To analyze the diagnosis and management of deep surgical site infection (SSI) with implant involved after anterior decompression and fusion for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy/myelopathy (CSR/CSM). Data of the patients who underwent anterior cervical decompression and fusion with plate fixation due to CSR/CSM were retrospectively reviewed. Cases with postoperative deep SSI with implant involved were identified and analyzed. A total of 1287 patients were finally included. Five patients (0.4%) were found to be with deep SSI. Bone fusion was not obtained when SSI was confirmed in each patient. Three cases were cured using one or two debridement and postoperative antibiotic therapy. Two cases with delayed diagnosis needed anterior implants removal, interbody fusion with autologous iliac bone and posterior lateral mass screw fixation at the first/second debridement. One of the two patients developed esophagus perforation after a second debridement and experienced one-month open drainage. All of the patients were cured without relapse of infection. For early deep SSI after anterior cervical decompression and fusion, surgical debridement was effective to eradicate infection. But for cases with delayed diagnosis, anterior debridement with prophylactic implant removal and posterior reconstruction was an ideal option. Esophagus perforation complicated with multiple debridements should be paid attention to and avoided. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Comparison of Functional and Radiological Outcomes Between Two Posterior Approaches in the Treatment of Multilevel Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

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    Da-Jiang Ren

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior cervical decompression is an accepted treatment for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM. Each posterior technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. In the present study, we compared the functional and radiological outcomes of expansive hemilaminectomy and laminoplasty with mini titanium plate in the treatment of multilevel CSM. Methods: Forty-four patients with multilevel CSM treated with posterior cervical surgery in Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Beijing Army General Hospital from March 2011 to June 2012 were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into two groups by surgical procedure: Laminoplasty (Group L and hemilaminectomy (Group H. Perioperative parameters including age, sex, duration of symptoms, operative duration, and intraoperative blood loss were recorded and compared. Spinal canal area, calculated using AutoCAD ® software(Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA, and neurological improvement, evaluated with Japanese Orthopedic Association score, were also compared. Results: Neurological improvement did not differ significantly between groups. Group H had a significantly shorter operative duration and significantly less blood loss. Mean expansion ratio was significantly greater in Group L (77.83 ± 6.41% than in Group H (62.72 ± 3.86% (P < 0.01. Conclusions: Both surgical approaches are safe and effective in treating multilevel CSM. Laminoplasty provides a greater degree of enlargement of the spinal canal, whereas expansive hemilaminectomy has the advantages of shorter operative duration and less intraoperative blood loss.

  9. Standalone Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion Versus Combination with Foraminotomy for the Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy Secondary to Bony Foraminal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qunfeng; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Bangke; Jiang, Jiayao; Guo, Xiang; Lu, Xuhua; Ni, Bin

    2016-11-01

    To compare the results of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) combined with anterior cervical foraminotomy (ACF) and standalone ACDF for the treatment of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR). The data of 24 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF combined with ACF for significant bony foraminal stenosis were reviewed. The clinical outcomes, including visual analog scale (VAS) scores for neck pain and arm pain and Neck Disability Index, were evaluated by questionnaires. Radiologic outcomes as manifested by C2-7 angle and surgical segmental angle were recorded. The outcomes were compared with outcomes of standalone ACDF for CSR secondary to posterolateral spurs. At the final follow-up evaluation, all patients obtained bone fusion. No patient developed adjacent segment disease. Operative time was longer and blood loss was more in the ACDF combined with ACF group than in the ACDF group (all P 0.05). For CSR with foraminal stenosis secondary to significant bony pathology that cannot be managed with standalone ACDF, ACDF combined with ACF is an effective and safe treatment strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biceps-Related Physical Findings Are Useful to Prevent Misdiagnosis of Cervical Spondylotic Amyotrophy as a Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Eiichiro; Shigematsu, Hideki; Inoue, Kazuya; Egawa, Takuya; Tanaka, Masato; Okuda, Akinori; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Koizumi, Munehisa; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2018-02-01

    Case-control study. The aim of the present study was to identify physical findings useful for differentiating between cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA) and rotator cuff tears to prevent the misdiagnosis of CSA as a rotator cuff tear. CSA and rotator cuff tears are often confused among patients presenting with difficulty in shoulder elevation. Twenty-five patients with CSA and 27 with rotator cuff tears were enrolled. We included five physical findings specific to CSA that were observed in both CSA and rotator cuff tear patients. The findings were as follows: (1) weakness of the deltoid muscle, (2) weakness of the biceps muscle, (3) atrophy of the deltoid muscle, (4) atrophy of the biceps muscle, and (5) swallow-tail sign (assessment of the posterior fibers of the deltoid). Among 25 CSA patients, 10 (40.0%) were misdiagnosed with a rotator cuff tear on initial diagnosis. The sensitivity and specificity of each physical finding were as follows: (1) deltoid weakness (sensitivity, 92.0%; specificity, 55.6%), (2) biceps weakness (sensitivity, 80.0%; specificity, 100%), (3) deltoid atrophy (sensitivity, 96.0%; specificity, 77.8%), (4) biceps atrophy (sensitivity, 88.8%; specificity, 92.6%), and (5) swallow-tail sign (sensitivity, 56.0%; specificity, 74.1%). There were statistically significant differences in each physical finding. CSA is likely to be misdiagnosed as a rotator cuff tear; however, weakness and atrophy of the biceps are useful findings for differentiating between CSA and rotator cuff tears to prevent misdiagnosis.

  11. Impact of Age and Duration of Symptoms on Surgical Outcome of Single-Level Microscopic Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in the Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aim to evaluate the impact of age and duration of symptoms on surgical outcome of the patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR who had been treated by single-level microscopic anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF. We retrospectively evaluated 68 patients (48 female and 20 male with a mean age of 41.2±4.3 (ranged from 24 to 72 years old in our Orthopedic Department, Imam Reza Hospital. They were followed up for 31.25±4.1 months (ranged from 25 to 65 months. Pain and disability were assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Neck Disability Index (NDI questionnaires in preoperative and last follow-up visits. Functional outcome was eventually evaluated by Odom’s criteria. Surgery could significantly improve pain and disability from preoperative 6.2±1.4 and 22.2±6.2 to 3.5±2.0 and 8.7±5.2 (1–21 at the last follow-up visit, respectively. Satisfactory outcomes were observed in 89.7%. Symptom duration of more and less than six months had no effect on surgical outcome, but the results showed a statistically significant difference in NDI improvement in favor of the patients aged more than 45 years (P=0.032, although pain improvement was similar in the two groups.

  12. Neurological deterioration after laminectomy for spondylotic cervical myeloradiculopathy: the putative role of spinal cord ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, G R; D'Angelo, C M

    1988-01-01

    Most cases of neurological deterioration after laminectomy for cervical radiculomyelopathy occur several weeks to months postoperatively, except when there has been direct trauma to the spinal cord or nerve roots during surgery. Four patients are described who developed episodes of neurological deterioration during the postoperative recovery period that could not be attributed to direct intraoperative trauma nor to epidural haematoma or instability of the cervical spine as a consequence of laminectomy. Following laminectomy for cervical radiculomyelopathy four patients were unchanged neurologically from their pre-operative examinations, but as they were raised into the upright position for the first time following surgery focal neurological deficits referrable to the spinal cord developed. Hypotension was present in all four cases during these episodes and three of the four patients had residual central cervical cord syndromes. These cases represent the first reported instances of spinal cord ischaemia occurring with post-operative hypotensive episodes after decompression for cervical spondylosis. PMID:3404170

  13. [Clinical study on spinal cord decompression combined with traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Tan, Ming-Sheng; Yi, Ping; Tang, Xiang-Sheng; Hao, Qing-Ying; Qi, Ying-Na

    2018-01-25

    To compare the clinical effect between spinal card decompression combined with traditional Chinese medicine and simple spinal card decompression for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. From June 2012 to June 2015, 73 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were treated, including 42 males and 31 females, aged from 29 to 73 years old with a mean of 50.9 years old. The patients were divided into the simple operation group (34 cases) and the operation combined with traditional Chinese medicine group(39 cases) according to the idea of themselves. The anterior discectomy or subtotal corpectomy with internal fixation or posterior simple open-door decompression with lateral mass screw fixation were performed in the patients. Among them, 39 cases were treated with traditional Chinese medicine after surgery. The Japanese orthopedic association (JOA) score of spinal cord function, the improvement rate of neural function, the neck dysfunction index (NDI) score and the governor vessel stasis syndrome score were compared between two groups preoperative and postoperative 1 week, 1 month and the final follow-up respectively. The internal fixation and the condition of spinal cord decompression were observed by CT, MRI and X-rays before and after operation. All the operations were successful, no injuries such as dura mater, spinal cord and nerve root were found. All the wounds were healed without infection except one patient had a superficial infection. It was solved after intermittent debridement and anti-infective therapy. Hematoma occurred in 1 case, complicated with spinal cord compression, caused incomplete paralysis, and promptly performed the re-operation to remove the hematoma without any obvious sequelae. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 24 months, (14.6±0.8) months for simple operation group and (13.5±0.7) months for operation combined with traditional Chinese medicine group, and there was no significant difference( P >0.05). The scores of JOA, NDI and

  14. [Clinical study on curing the cervical spondylotic radiculopathy with the methods of Blade needle closed loosing and reduction with traction at the same time].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shang-Ming; Guo, Hai; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Ling-Ling; Zhu, Li-Li; Wang, Zi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    To observe the effects of curing the cervical spondylotic radiculopathy with the methods of Blade needle closed loosing and reduction with traction at the same time. From May 2006 to May 2009, 65 patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were divided into treatment group and control group according the random number table produced by SAS Software. There were 18 males and 17 females in the treatment group,age in range from 42 to 73 years old with an average of (61.3 +/- 6.4) years, course of disease was from 8 to 42 months with an average of (23.8 +/- 13.8) months, preoperatively cervical functional score was from 4 to 17 scores with the mean of (11.45 +/- 3.31) scores. And in the control group, including 14 males and 16 females, aged from 44 to 76 years old with an average of (62.4 +/- 8.8) years, course of disease was from 7 to 43 months with an average of (24.4 +/- 16.8) months, preoperatively cervical functional score was from 4 to 18 scores with the mean of (11.40 +/- 3.24) scores. The patients of treatment group were treated with Blade needle closed loosing the specific pain point on the neck and shoulder, then immediately underwent traction and reduction after operation. And the patients of control group were treated with traditional traction. The cervical functional score were compared between the two groups at 10, 20, 180 d after treatment, including pain of neck and shoulder, limitation of motion of neck, tenderness of neck, numbness and muscle weakness of upper limb. (1) At the 10th day after treatment, the total score of treatment group was (15.43 +/- 3.46) scores, which was obviously higher than that of control group's (13.17 +/- 3.18) scores (P cervical spondylotic radiculopathy can significantly obtain clinical effects,which can quickly improve symptoms, relieve pain of neck and shoulder, limitation of motion of neck, tenderness of neck, numbness and muscle weakness of upper limb.

  15. Posterior or Single-stage Combined Anterior and Posterior Approach Decompression for Treating Complex Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Coincident Multilevel Anterior and Posterior Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Cai, Pan; Li, Yuwei; Wang, Haijiao; Xia, Shengli; Wang, Xiuhui

    2017-12-01

    A single-center, retrospective, longitudinal matched cohort clinical study of prospectively collected outcomes. To compare retrospectively the clinical outcomes and complications of the posterior approach laminoplasty and single-stage anterior approach laminoplasty combined with anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for treating patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy coincident multilevel anterior and posterior compression, known as complex cervical spondylotic myelopathy (cCSM) here. The optimal surgical management of this type of cCSM remains controversial. Sixty-seven patients with multilevel cCSM underwent decompression surgery from 1996 to 2007. Among these patients, 31 underwent a single-stage combined approach with decompression (combined approach group) and 36 underwent laminoplasty for posterior approach (posterior approach group). Average operative duration, operative estimated blood loss, surgical costs, and cervical alignment were measured. Average operative duration, operative estimated blood loss, and surgical costs were significantly lower in the posterior approach group than those in the combined approach group (P0.05). No statistical difference was observed in the preoperative Cobb angle (P>0.05), whereas a significant statistical difference was observed for the postoperative Cobb angle (Pgroups. The surgical incidences of complications were 22.2% and 48.4% in the posterior and combined approach groups (Papproach laminoplasty and single-stage combined approach led to significant neurological improvement and pain reduction in the majority of patients. Both approaches showed similar results in terms of decompression and neurological improvement. The posterior approach was superior to the combined approach in terms of surgical costs, surgical time, blood loss, and complication rate.

  16. Cervical spinal locking plate in combination with cortical ring allograft for a one level fusion in dogs with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Robert L; Levine, Jonathan M; Coates, Joan R; Bahr, Anne; Hettlich, Bianca F; Kerwin, Sharon C

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate use of a surgical technique commonly used in humans for treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) in dogs. Prospective case series. Dogs with CSM (n=10). Dogs weighing >30 kg that had CSM at 1 vertebral articulation were eligible for inclusion. Dogs had vertebral column distraction/fusion performed using a cortical ring allograft, cancellous autograft, and a spinal locking plate. Dogs were evaluated temporally by repeat neurological examinations and by client perception of postsurgical outcome, determined by telephone interview. Nine dogs survived the immediate postoperative period. Seven of 8 dogs had moderate to complete improvement without recurrence (mean follow-up, 2.48 years). The most common postsurgical complications were screw loosening (n=4) and plate shifting (2), neither of which required surgical revision. One dog had pseudoarthrosis that may have negatively impacted outcome. Treatment of single level CSM in dogs with ring allograft and a spinal locking plate system may lead to successful outcomes. The major problems encountered with included cost of the implants and adjusting the system designed for humans to fit the vertebral column of a dog. For dogs with CSM at a single level, the use of a spinal locking plate in combination with a cortical ring allograft can be an effective surgical treatment. Costs of the implants as well as anatomic differences in dogs make this type of surgery less appealing.

  17. Characteristics of Residual Symptoms After Laminoplasty in Diabetic Patients With Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machino, Masaaki; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Ito, Keigo; Kato, Fumihiko; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-06-15

    A prospective cohort study. The purpose of this study was to compare cervical laminoplasty outcomes between diabetic and nondiabetic patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), and to characterize residual symptoms of diabetic patients. Diabetes is one of the most frequent comorbidities in CSM patients. However, no report has elucidated residual symptoms following surgery in diabetic patients with CSM. .: A total of 505 consecutive patients with CSM (331 males, 189 females; mean age, 66.6 years; age range, 41-91 years; >1-year follow up after laminoplasty) were enrolled and divided into diabetic group (n = 105) and nondiabetic group (n = 400). The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores and recovery rate (RR) of each function were compared between the groups. To quantitatively assess performance, the 10-s grip and release (G&R) test and the 10-s step test were evaluated. There was no significant difference in the mean RRs of upper extremity motor function between diabetic and nondiabetic patients (59.2% vs. 60.5%, respectively; P = 0.789). The RR of lower extremity motor function was lower in the diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group (36.1% vs. 43.4%, respectively; P = 0.047); the RR of upper extremity sensory function also was lower (36.8% vs. 49.6%, respectively; P = 0.006). However, the mean RRs of sensory functions of lower extremities were 59.7% (diabetic) and 59.2% (nondiabetic) (P = 0.953). There was no significant difference in the mean RRs of trunk sensory function between the groups (69.3% vs. 74.1%, respectively; P = 0.303). The mean RRs of urinary bladder function were 42.1% (diabetic) and 53.7% (nondiabetic) (P = 0.035). The preoperative mean number of the 10-s step test was lower in the diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group, and the postoperative mean number also was significantly lower in the diabetic group. Gait disturbance, hand numbness, and bladder dysfunction after surgery persisted

  18. [Omnipaque (iohexol) CT myelography (CTM) in the diagnosis of cervical spondylotic myelopathy--correlative study of conventional myelography (a report of 100 cases)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y S

    1989-04-01

    100 cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy were studied with both CTM and conventional myelography and the results were compared. It was shown that CTM possesses more advantages over its counterpart as follows: (1) CTM can demonstrate with a higher degree of accuracy the size and configuration of the spinal cord, its internal composition and cystic necrosis, can pick up more herniations, hard and soft, up to 16% (39/252) and better define the position left, middle and right of the protrusion. (2) CTM is capable of making a correct diagnosis of cervical myelopathy and cystic necrosis in the cord. Analysis also showed that the degree of changes of spinal cord seen on CTM correlation closely with severity of the clinical picture. Atrophy and cystic necrosis of the cord are important factors accounting for clinical deterioration and operative failure.

  19. Paraspinal muscle morphometry in cervical spondylotic myelopathy and its implications in clinicoradiological outcomes following central corpectomy: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, Sumit; Mohan, Dilip; Furtado, Sunil V; Sai Kiran, Narayanam Anantha; Dadlani, Ravi; Aryan, Saritha; Rao, Arun S; Hegde, Alangar S

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the superficial, deep flexor (DF), and deep extensor (DE) paraspinal muscles in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), and to evaluate their correlations with functional status and sagittal spinal alignment changes following central corpectomy with fusion and plating. In this retrospective study of 67 patients who underwent central corpectomy with fusion and plating for CSM, the CSAs of the paraspinal muscles were calculated on the preoperative T2-weighted axial MR images and computed as ratios with respect to the corresponding vertebral body areas (VBAs) and as flexor/extensor CSA ratios. These ratios were then compared with those in the normative population and analyzed with respect to various clinicoradiological factors, including pain status, Nurick grade, and segmental angle change at follow-up (SACF). The mean CSA values for all muscle groups and the DF/DE ratio were significantly lower in the study cohort compared with an age- and sex-matched normative study group (p < 0.001). Among various independent variables tested in a multivariate regression analysis, increasing age and female sex significantly predicted a lower total extensor CSA/VBA ratio (p < 0.001), while a longer duration of symptoms significantly predicted a greater total flexor/total extensor CSA ratio (p = 0.02). In patients undergoing single-level corpectomy, graft subsidence had a positive correlation with SACF in all patients (p < 0.05), irrespective of the preoperative segmental angle and curvature, while in patients undergoing 2-level corpectomy, graft subsidence demonstrated such a correlation only in the subgroup with lordotic curvatures (p = 0.02). Among the muscle area ratios, the DF/DE ratio demonstrated a negative correlation with SACF in the subgroup with preoperative straight or kyphotic segmental angles (p = 0.04 in the single corpectomy group, p = 0.01 in the 2-level corpectomy group

  20. Pathology and prognosis of proximal-type cervical spondylotic amyotrophy: new assessment using compound muscle action potentials of deltoid and biceps brachii muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imajo, Yasuaki; Kato, Yoshihiko; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Suzuki, Hidenori; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2011-04-01

    Case studies of patients with cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA) used compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) of deltoid and biceps brachii muscles. To discuss pathology and prognosis from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CMAPs of deltoid and biceps brachii muscles. CSA is a rare type of cervical spondylotic disorder. Selective lesions in ventral nerve roots (VNR) or anterior horns (AH) have been proposed to explain the pathology of CSA, but these are not well understood. Conservative therapy was performed in 21 patients with the proximal-type CSA. Patients were classified into two groups: 13 with incomplete recovery of deltoid and biceps brachii muscle strength (Group 1) and 8 with complete recovery (Group 2). All underwent MRI. Erb-point-stimulated CMAPs were recorded in the deltoid and biceps. Measurements of CMAPs included negative-peak amplitude from the baseline to peak. The percentage amplitude of CMAPs was calculated in contrast to the opposite side. Sagittal T2-weighted MRI showed spinal cord compression in all patients from Group 1 and in four patients from Group 2. Deltoid muscle CMAPs: Three patients from Group 1 and all eight patients from Group 2 had a CMAPs' amplitude on the normal side that was greater than 10 mV. Biceps brachii muscle CMAPs: four patients from Group 1 and four patients from Group 2 had a CMAPs' amplitude on the normal side that was greater than 10 mV. Patients with a CMAPs amplitude on the normal side that exceeded 10 mV had no impingement of the AH. A CMAPs' amplitude that exceeded 10 mV on the normal side and a CMAPs' amplitude of more than 50% on the affected side compared with the normal side indicated slight involvement of VNR. These patients were able to fully recover function.

  1. Comparison of titanium and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages in the surgical treatment of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a prospective, randomized, control study with over 7-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Xinwei; Lu, Xuhua; Yang, Lili; Yang, Haisong; Yuan, Wen; Chen, Deyu

    2013-07-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with titanium- or polyetheretherketone (PEEK)-cage reconstruction is widely used in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). This study was to compare outcomes of titanium and PEEK cages in the treatment of multilevel CSM. Between November 2002 and December 2004, a total of 80 patients with 3-level CSM were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to titanium group and PEEK group. The overall follow-up period of the patients ranged from 86 to 116 months (average 99.7 months). Clinical and radiological results were compared between titanium group and PEEK group. At the final follow-up, the clinical outcomes including JOA score, NDI score, and the excellent and good rates of clinical outcomes in the PEEK group were better than those in the titanium group. More loss of the Cobb angles and the intervertebral height was observed in the titanium group, resulting in the radiological parameters in the titanium group becoming inferior to the PEEK group at the final follow-up. Cage subsidence rates were 34.5 and 5.4% in the titanium and PEEK groups, respectively. Fusion was observed in all patients of two groups at the final follow-up. Two patients presented with cage dislocation without clinical symptoms in the titanium group. In surgical treatment of multilevel CSM, PEEK cage is superior to titanium cage in maintenance of intervertebral height and cervical lordosis, resulting in better clinical outcomes in the long-term follow-up.

  2. [Clinical study of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy treated with massage therapy combined with Magnetic sticking therapy at the auricular points and the cost comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Saina; Sheng, Feng; Pan, Yunhua; Xu, Feng; Wang, Zhichao; Cheng, Lei

    2015-08-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy on cervical spondylotic radiculopathy between the combined therapy of massage and magnetic-sticking at the auricular points and the simple massage therapy, and conduct the health economics evaluation. Seventy-two patients of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were randomized into a combined therapy group, and a simple massage group, 36 cases in each one. Finally, 35 cases and 34 cases were met the inclusive criteria in the corresponding groups separately. In the combined therapy group, the massage therapy and the magnetic sticking therapy at auricular points were combined in the treatment. Massage therapy was mainly applied to Fengchi (GB 20), Jianjing (GB 21), Jianwaishu (SI 14), Jianyu (LI 15) and Quchi (LI 11). The main auricular points for magnetic sticking pressure were Jingzhui (AH13), Gan (On12) Shen (CO10), Shenmen (TF4), Pizhixia (AT4). In the simple massage group, the simple massage therapy was given, the massage parts and methods were the same as those in the combined therapy group. The treatment was given once every two days, three times a week, for 4 weeks totally. The cervical spondylosis effect scale and the simplified McGill pain questionnaire were adopted to observe the improvements in the clinical symptoms, clinical examination, daily life movement, superficial muscular pain in the neck and the health economics cost in the patients of the two groups. The effect was evaluated in the two groups. The effective rate and the clinical curative rate in the combined therapy group were better than those in the control group [100. 0% (35/35) vs 85. 3% (29/34), 42. 9% (15/35) vs 17. 6% (6/34), both P<0. 05]. The scores of the spontaneous symptoms, clinical examnation, daily life movement and superficialmuscular pain in the neck were improved apparently after treatment as compared with those before treatment in the patients of the two groups (all P<0. 001). In terms of the improvements in the spontaneous symptoms, clinical

  3. Image Diagnostic Classification of Magnetic Resonance T2 Increased Signal Intensity in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: Clinical Evaluation Using Quantitative and Objective Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machino, Masaaki; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ito, Keigo; Kato, Fumihiko; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2018-03-15

    A prospective imaging study. The study investigated whether the classification of increased signal intensity (ISI) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reflects the severity of symptoms in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Although the ISI on MRI in patients with CSM is observed, the degree of ISI has not been examined. The association between ISI and the surgical outcomes in cervical myelopathy remains controversial. A total of 505 consecutive patients with CSM (311 males; 194 females) were enrolled. The mean age was 66.6 years (range, 41-91 yrs), with an average postoperative follow-up period of 26.5 ± 12.5 months. The ISI was classified into three groups based on sagittal T2-weighted MRI as follows: Grade 0, none; Grade 1, light (obscure); and Grade 2, intense (bright). Pre- and postoperative neurological status was evaluated using the Japanese Orthopedic Association scoring system for cervical myelopathy (JOA score) and quantifiable tests, including the 10-s grip and release test (10-s G&R test) and the 10-s step test. The preoperative MRI showed 168 patients in Grade 0, 169 patients in Grade 1, and 168 in Grade 2, with no age differences among three groups. Grade 2 patients had a longer duration of symptom compared with the other grades. Grade 0 patients had a better postoperative JOA score and recovery rate compared with the other grades. The preoperative and postoperative scores in the G&R test and steps were better in the Grade 0 patients compared with the other grades. Grade 1 and 2 patients had similar outcomes and recovery rates. ISI on MRI in patients with CSM was prospectively classified into three grades. The ISI grading was not associated with the preoperative severity of myelopathy and outcomes. 2.

  4. Dynamic changes in the dural space and spinal cord cross-sectional area during flexion and extension in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machino, Masaaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Ito, Keigo; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Kato, Fumihiko

    2009-01-01

    The number of patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is increasing with the aging of the population. The patients' during spinal cord tends to be compressed neck extension, because the yellow ligaments and intervertebral discs protrude into the spinal canal during neck extension (pincer mechanism). A total of 100 patients with CSM were prospectively enrolled in this study. After preoperative myelography, multi-detector-row CT (MDCT) scans were acquired in flexion and extension, and the dural space and spinal cord cross-sectional area at each disc level from C2/3 to C7/Th1 were measured by using Scion imaging software. The average dural space and average spinal cord cross-sectional area were smaller in extension than in flexion from the C3/4 to C7/Th1 disc level, and the greatest dynamic changes were seen at the C5/6 level. MDCT demonstrated dynamic factors in patients with CSM. The spinal cord cross-sectional area became narrower during extension in patients with CSM. (author)

  5. The Feature of Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes in Elderly Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Prospective Cohort Study on 1025 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machino, Masaaki; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ito, Keigo; Kato, Fumihiko; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-10-09

    A prospective cohort study OBJECTIVE.: The purpose of this study was to compare the surgical outcomes between non-elderly and elderly patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and to characterize the preoperative symptoms and postoperative residual symptoms in elderly patients. Age at the time of surgery influences the surgical outcome. However, no report has elucidated residual symptoms following surgery in elderly patients with CSM. We designed a large-scale cohort study examining the surgical outcomes of CSM in elderly patients from a single surgery. A total of 1025 consecutive patients with CSM (642 men and 383 women; mean age, 64.4 years; range, 23-93 years) who underwent laminoplasty were included. Patients were divided into three groups based on age: non-elderly (<65 years), young-old (65-74 years), and old-old (≥75 years), and the number of patients in each group was 488, 329, and 208, respectively. The pre- and postoperative neurological statuses were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system for cervical myelopathy. The recovery rate (RR) of each function was compared among the three groups. Radiographic data including alignment and range of motion (ROM) were also assessed. The mean preoperative JOA scores of motor function of the lower extremity in non-elderly, young-old, and old-old groups were 2.8, 2.2, and 1.6, respectively (P < 0.0001). Elderly patients showed significantly lower JOA scores for bladder function than non-elderly patients (2.7, 2.5, and 2.2, P < 0.0001). Cervical lordosis in the neutral position increased gradually with age. Total ROM decreased with increasing age. After surgery, the mean RRs of motor function of the lower extremity were 57.7%, 38.6%, and 24.0%, respectively. Gait disturbance significantly increased with age (P < 0.0001). Postoperative gait disturbance persisted more than other symptoms in elderly patients than in non-elderly patients. 2.

  6. Surgical site infections following operative management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy: prevalence, predictors of occurence, and influence on peri-operative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalai, C M; Worley, N; Poorman, G W; Cruz, D L; Vira, S; Passias, P G

    2016-06-01

    Studies have examined infection rates following spine surgery and their relationship to post-operative complications and increased length of stay. Few studies, however, have investigated predictors of infection, specifically in the setting of operative intervention for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). This study aims to identify the incidence and factors predictive of infection amongst this cohort. This study performed a retrospective review of the prospectively collected American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database. Patients included those treated surgically for CSM (ICD-9 code 721.1) from 2010 to 2012. Patient demographics and surgical data were collected with outcome variables including the occurrence of one of the following surgical site infections (SSIs) within 30 days of index operation: superficial SSI, deep incisional SSI, and organ/space SSI. 3057 patients were included in this analysis. Overall infection rate was 1.15 % (35/3057), of which 54.3 % (19/35) were superficial SSIs, 28.6 % (10/35) were deep incisional SSI, and 20 % (7/35) were peri-spinal SSI. Logistic regression revealed factors associated with SSI included: higher BMI [OR 1.162 (CI 1.269-1.064), p = 0.001] and operative time ≥208 min [OR 4.769 (CI 20.220-1.125), p = 0.034]. The overall SSI rate for the examined CSM cohort was 1.15 %. This study identified increased BMI and operative time ≥208 min as predictors of infection in surgical CSM patients. This information should be carefully considered in delivering patient education and future efforts to optimize risk in CSM patients indicated for surgical intervention.

  7. Prediction of Neurological Impairment in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy using a Combination of Diffusion MRI and Proton MR Spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Ellingson

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated a combination of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and magnetic resonance spectroscopic (MRS biomarkers in order to predict neurological impairment in patients with cervical spondylosis.Twenty-seven patients with cervical spondylosis were evaluated. DTI and single voxel MRS were performed in the cervical cord. N-acetylaspartate (NAA and choline (Cho metabolite concentration ratios with respect to creatine were quantified, as well as the ratio of choline to NAA. The modified mJOA scale was used as a measure of neurologic deficit. Linear regression was performed between DTI and MRS parameters and mJOA scores. Significant predictors from linear regression were used in a multiple linear regression model in order to improve prediction of mJOA. Parameters that did not add value to model performance were removed, then an optimized multiparametric model was established to predict mJOA.Significant correlations were observed between the Torg-Pavlov ratio and FA (R2 = 0.2021, P = 0.019; DTI fiber tract density and FA, MD, Cho/NAA (R2 = 0.3412, P = 0.0014; R2 = 0.2112, P = 0.016; and R2 = 0.2352, P = 0.010 respectively; along with FA and Cho/NAA (R2 = 0.1695, P = 0.033. DTI fiber tract density, MD and FA at the site of compression, along with Cho/NAA at C2, were significantly correlated with mJOA score (R2 = 0.05939, P < 0.0001; R2 = 0.4739, P < 0.0001; R2 = 0.7034, P < 0.0001; R2 = 0.4649, P < 0.0001. A combination biomarker consisting of DTI fiber tract density, MD, and Cho/NAA showed the best prediction of mJOA (R2 = 0.8274, P<0.0001, with post-hoc tests suggesting fiber tract density, MD, and Cho/NAA were all significant contributors to predicting mJOA (P = 0.00053, P = 0.00085, and P = 0.0019, respectively.A linear combination of DTI and MRS measurements within the cervical spinal cord may be useful for accurately predicting neurological deficits in patients with cervical spondylosis. Additional studies may be necessary

  8. A study on the clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyooka, Satoshi

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) images of the cervical compressive myelopathy. It was also meant to serve as a review of clinical symptoms and an investigation of the usefulness of MRI. Comparative studies were carried out on 110 cases concerning the shape and signal intensity of the spinal cord, anterior epidural venous plexus MR images and clinical symptoms. The shape of the spinal cord and pre- and post-surgical conditions revealed by MRI correlated with clinical symptoms. As for the signal intensity of the spinal cord, in cases in which both high (T2-weighted image) and low (T1-weighted image) signals detected prior to surgery continued after surgery, as well as cases with high and low signals appearing after surgery, had the lower improvement than average. Low signal intensity on T1-weighted images are assumed to indicate irreversible changes of the spinal cord. High signal intensity on T2-weighted images is assumed to indicate both reversible and irreversible changes of the spinal cord. Epidural venous plexus can also be observed in healthy people and is not directly bound to clinical manifestations. Nevertheless, changes in the shape of the epidural venous plexus and signal intensity can reflect venous plexus compression and circulatory changes caused by compression. In the application of MRI to cervical compressive myelopathies, images of changes in the shape and signal intensity of the spinal cord and anterior epidural venous plexus images were considered important observations linked to clinical symptoms. MRI is an essential non-invasive imaging technique for the diagnosis of cervical compressive myelopathy, estimation of prognosis and postoperative follow-up. More investigations of compressive factors, circulatory dynamics of the spinal cord and high quality image are necessary. (author)

  9. Prediction of Neurological Impairment in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy using a Combination of Diffusion MRI and Proton MR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Salamon, Noriko; Hardy, Anthony J.; Holly, Langston T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In the present study we investigated a combination of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic (MRS) biomarkers in order to predict neurological impairment in patients with cervical spondylosis. Methods Twenty-seven patients with cervical spondylosis were evaluated. DTI and single voxel MRS were performed in the cervical cord. N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and choline (Cho) metabolite concentration ratios with respect to creatine were quantified, as well as the ratio of choline to NAA. The modified mJOA scale was used as a measure of neurologic deficit. Linear regression was performed between DTI and MRS parameters and mJOA scores. Significant predictors from linear regression were used in a multiple linear regression model in order to improve prediction of mJOA. Parameters that did not add value to model performance were removed, then an optimized multiparametric model was established to predict mJOA. Results Significant correlations were observed between the Torg-Pavlov ratio and FA (R2 = 0.2021, P = 0.019); DTI fiber tract density and FA, MD, Cho/NAA (R2 = 0.3412, P = 0.0014; R2 = 0.2112, P = 0.016; and R2 = 0.2352, P = 0.010 respectively); along with FA and Cho/NAA (R2 = 0.1695, P = 0.033). DTI fiber tract density, MD and FA at the site of compression, along with Cho/NAA at C2, were significantly correlated with mJOA score (R2 = 0.05939, P spondylosis. Additional studies may be necessary to validate these observations. PMID:26431174

  10. Comparison of a zero-profile anchored spacer (ROI-C) and the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages with an anterior plate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yijie; Wang, Heng; Li, Xuefeng; Chen, Jie; Sun, Han; Wang, Genlin; Yang, Huilin; Jiang, Weimin

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to analyze the clinical and radiographic efficacy of a new zero-profile anchored spacer called the ROI-C in anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy (MCSM). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical, radiological outcomes and complications of multilevel ACDF with the ROI-C or with the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages with an anterior plate. From April 2011 to April 2014, 60 patients with MCSM were operated on using ACDF, with the ROI-C in 28 patients and PEEK cages with an anterior plate in 32 patients. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, and clinical and radiological results were compared between the ROI-C group and the cage-plate group. The mean follow-up time was 23.8 ± 6.6 months, ranging from 12 to 36 months. At the first month and the last follow-up, the neck disability index (NDI) scores were decreased, and the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores were significantly increased, compared with the presurgical measurements in both groups. There were no significant differences in NDI scores or JOA scores between the two groups (P > 0.05), but there were significant differences in the operation time, blood loss and the presence of dysphagia (P PEEK cage with an anterior plate.

  11. A Comparison of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion versus Fusion Combined with Artificial Disc Replacement for Treating 3-Level Cervical Spondylotic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seo-Ryang; Lee, Sang-Bok; Cho, Kyoung-Suok

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 3-level hybrid surgery (HS), which combines fusion and cervical disc replacement (CDR), compared to 3-level fusionin patient with cervical spondylosis involving 3 levels. Patients in the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) group (n=30) underwent 3-level fusion and the HS group (n=19) underwent combined surgery with fusion and CDR. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the visual analogue scale for the arm, the neck disability index (NDI), Odom criteria and postoperative complications. The cervical range of motion (ROM), fusion rate and adjacent segments degeneration were assessed with radiographs. Significant improvements in arm pain relief and functional outcome were observed in ACDF and HS group. The NDI in the HS group showed better improvement 6 months after surgery than that of the ACDF group. The ACDF group had a lower fusion rate, higher incidence of device related complications and radiological changes in adjacent segments compared with the HS group. The better recovery of cervical ROM was observed in HS group. However, that of the ACDF group was significantly decreased and did not recover. The HS group was better than the ACDF group in terms of NDI, cervical ROM, fusion rate, incidence of postoperative complications and adjacent segment degeneration.

  12. Cervical Laminoplasty for Multilevel Cervical Myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Krishna Sayana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylotic myelopathy can result from degenerative cervical spondylosis, herniated disk material, osteophytes, redundant ligamentum flavum, or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Surgical intervention for multi-level myelopathy aims to decompress the spinal cord and maintain stability of the cervical spine. Laminoplasty was major surgical advancement as laminectomy resulted in kyphosis and unsatisfactory outcomes. Hirabayashi popularised the expansive open door laminoplasty which was later modified several surgeons. Laminoplasty has changed the way surgeons approach multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

  13. CERVICAL SPONDYLOTIC MYELOPATHY WITH FUNCTIONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Objectif: Rapporter notre expérience sur le devenir fonctionnel de dix huit (18) patients opérés pour une myélopathie cervicarthrosique (MPCA) invalidante et suivis sur une période de 4 à 15 ans. Patients et methods: Cette étude rétrospective (1982 à 1999) a concerné 18 patients opérés pour une myélopathie ...

  14. CERVICAL SPONDYLOTIC MYELOPATHY WITH FUNCTIONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirteen of them complained about neck pain-8, brachialgia-3 or paresthesia-2. All patients presented various progressive spinal cord lesions (tetraparesis: 13, paraparesis: 4, tetraplegia: 1). They had also spasticity. Anterior approach were performed in the 18 cases. The average follow-up was 6.9 years. Results: All ...

  15. Multilevel decompressive laminectomy and transpedicular instrumented fusion for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy: A minimum follow-up of 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Kotil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cervical laminectomies with transpedicular insertion technique is known to be a biomechanically stronger method in cervical pathologies. However, its frequency of use is low in the routine practice, as the pedicle is thin and risk of neurovascular damage is high. In this study, we emphasize the results of cervical laminectomies with transpedicular fixation using fluoroscopy in degenerative cervical spine disorder. Materials and Methods: Postoperative malposition of the transpedicular screws of the 70 pedicles of the 10 patients we operated due to degenerative stenosis in the cervical region, were investigated. Fixation was performed between C3 and C7, and we used resected lamina bone chips for fusion. Clinical indicators included age, gender, neurologic status, surgical indication, and number of levels stabilized. Dominant vertebral artery of all the patients was evaluated with Doppler ultrasonography. Preoperative and postoperative Nurick grade of each patient was documented. Results: No patients experienced neurovascular injury as a result of pedicle screw placement. Two patients had screw malposition, which did not require reoperation due to minor breaking. Most patients had 32-mm screws placed. Postoperative computed tomography scanning showed no compromise of the foramen transversarium. A total of 70 pedicle screws were placed. Good bony fusion was observed in all patients. At follow-up, 9/10 (90% patients had improved in their Nurick grades. The cases were followed-up for an average of 35.7 months (30-37 months. Conclusions: Use of the cervical pedicular fixation (CPF provides a very strong three-column stabilization but also carries vascular injury without nerve damage. Laminectomies technique may reduce the risk of malposition due to visualization of the spinal canal. CPF can be performed in a one-stage posterior procedure. This technique yielded good fusion rate without complications and can be considered as a good

  16. Unusual Cause of Neuropathy: Extensive Dural Spread of Primary Cervical Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen N Ponnampalam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a very rare case of a high grade osteosarcoma of the cervical spine in a 62-year-old woman. She presented with a relatively short history of a swelling in the posterior neck and cervical lymphadenopathy. This was associated with hoarseness of the voice, significant weight loss, and right upper arm radicular symptoms initially, progressing to paraplegia. Based on MR and CT imaging of the neck and an excision biopsy of an enlarged right supraclavicular lymph node, the histology revealed a high grade primary osteosarcoma of the cervical spine.

  17. Fatores prognósticos associados ao tratamento cirúrgico da mielorradiculopatia espondilótica cervical Factores pronósticos asociados con el tratamiento quirúrgico de la mielorradiculopatía cervical espondilótica Prognostic factors associated with surgical treatment of cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Meluzzi

    2012-01-01

    de inestabilidad de White y en la escala de Kellgren. RESULTADOS: El 80% había mejorado, el 14% tuvo estabilización y el 6% presentó deterioro del cuadro neurológico. El empeoramiento neurológico no se asoció con ningún factor clínico, ambiental ni de imagen. La mejoría neurológica fue directamente proporcional a edad menor para la cirugía, ausencia de comorbilidad, signo de Hoffman, atrofia muscular, hiperintensidad de la medula espinal en la RM, período más corto de la evolución preoperatoria, mejor estado neurológico preoperatorio, y siendo inversamente proporcional al diâmetro AP del canal espinal y a las compresiones múltiples. Identificada una asociación con el tabaquismo. Más de 70 años de edad, la evolución superior a 24 meses, la atrofia muscular, la puntuación JOA igual o inferior a siete puntos y el diámetro AP del canal menor o igual a seis mm no se asociaron con a mejoría.OBJECTIVE: Identify the individual, social, environmental clinical factors and also imaging studies which correlate to the final result of neurological improvement in patients undergoing surgical treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy. METHODS: The clinical assessment was quantified by the deficit in JOA scale. We analyzed 200 cases of cervical myeloradiculopathy surgically treated in HC-FMUSP, from January 1993 to January 2007. The mean follow-up was 6 years and 8 months. The analysis was based on radiological criteria of instability by White and Kellgren scale. RESULTS: 80% had improved, 14% stabilized and 6% had worsened. The neurological deterioration was not associated with any clinical, environmental or imaging factor. The neurological improvement was directly proportional to the lower age at surgery, absence of co-morbidity, Hoffman sign, muscular atrophy, spinal cord hyperintensity on MRI, the shortest period of preoperative evolution, better preoperative neurological status and was inversely proportional to the AP diameter of the spinal canal and

  18. Avaliação das técnicas cirúrgicas para tratamento da mielorradiculopatia espondilótica cervical Evaluación de las técnicas quirúrgicas para el tratamiento de la mielorradiculopatía cervical espondilótica Evaluation of surgical techniques for treatment of cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Meluzzi

    2012-01-01

    de 200 pacientes sometidos a tratamiento quirúrgico de la mielorradiculopatía cervical en el HC-FMUSP, desde enero de 1993 a enero de 2007. La evaluación clínica se cuantificó mediante la escala de la JOA, con un segmento promedio de 06 años y 08 meses. RESULTADOS: Se observó una mejoría neurológica posoperatoria en las vías anterior y posterior, con excepción de las laminectomías sin fusión, donde hubo deterioro neurológico tardío. La vía anterior mostró una tasa significativamente mayor de complicaciones relacionadas con el déficit de fusión intervertebral, desplazamiento del injerto, síndrome de disco adyacente, disfonía, disfagia, o mala posición de injerto y placas, lesión de la raíz del nervio y tasa significativamente mayor de nueva intervención quirúrgica. En la vía posterior, mayor incidencia de inestabilidad en la cifosis posoperatoria, en la laminectomía, y en la laminoplastia no se observó esto, teniendo esta última tasas similares a las encontradas en la vía anterior. No hubo mejoría en el dolor axial en las laminoplastias y se agravó en las laminectomías, mientras que en las discectomías y las corpectomías se produjo una mejoría significativa de los síntomas. CONCLUSIÓN Las vías anterior y posterior fueron eficaces en la producción de mejoría neurológica, con excepción de las laminectomías sin fusión. La vía anterior produjo más complicaciones, pero el dolor es mejor tratado.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of surgical treatment of cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy in the production of postoperative neurological improvement, measured in points by the scale of JOA (Japanese Orthopaedic Association and the recovery rate and complications of therapy. METHODS: Analysis of medical records and imaging studies of 200 patients undergoing surgical treatment of cervical myeloradiculopathy in HC-FMUSP, from January 1993 to January 2007. Clinical evaluation was quantified by the scale of the JOA, with an

  19. Roentogenological study of antero-posterior diameter in developmental canal stenosis of cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higo, Masaru

    1987-05-01

    Developmental canal stenosis of the cervical spine is an important underlying condition of cervical spondylotic myelopathy. However, the criteria of the degree of narrowing is different among investigators and their rationales are unclear. To clarify this point, the antero-posterior diameter of the cervical spinal canal was measured in groups of normal subjects, patients with neck-shoulder-arm syndrome and cervical spondylosis. The measured values were analyzed statistically. The antero-posterior diameter was the widest in normal individuals and the narrowest in patients with the cervical spondylotic myelopathy. The point of differentiation of developmental canal stenosis was determined as 14 mm for males and 13 mm for females using the mean +- 2SD of the values in normal subjects. Patients with values lower than this criteria comprised 82 % of those with the cervical spondylotic myelopathy. These patients could be further classified into those that also showed clear cervical spondylotic changes and those that did not.

  20. Interobserver agreement on MRI evaluation of patients with cervical radiculopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, B.; Beelen, A.; van der Kallen, B. F.; Nollet, F.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; de Visser, M.; Tans, J. Th J.

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the interobserver agreement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of herniated discs, spondylotic neuroforaminal stenosis, and root compression in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy and in addition, to assess the added value of disclosure of clinical

  1. Laminoplasty and laminectomy for cervical sponydylotic myelopathy: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; van Tulder, M.W.; Moojen, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is frequently encountered in neurosurgical practice. The posterior surgical approach includes laminectomy and laminoplasty.OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review evaluating the effectiveness of posterior laminectomy compared with posterior laminoplasty...

  2. Morphology of the cervical spinal cord with myelopathy on computed myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Hiroaki; Asano, Masafumi; Yokota, Hidemaro

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between morphological changes in the spinal cord shown on computer-assisted myelography and symptoms was investigated in 73 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Flatness of the spinal cord was seen in many of the patients. Symptoms were likely to be severer with increasing the degree of flatness of the spinal cord. The length of the flat spinal cord will help to select the operative method for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Cervicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intercourse or during a cervical exam, and abnormal vaginal discharge. However, it's also possible to have cervicitis and ... symptoms, they may include: Large amounts of unusual vaginal discharge Frequent, painful urination Pain during intercourse Bleeding between ...

  4. A comparative study of the treatment of cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy. Experience with 50 cases treated by means of extensive laminectomy, foraminotomy, and excision of osteophytes during the past 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, J A; Janin, Y; Carras, R; Lavine, L S

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews management by means of the posterior approach of 50 patients with cervical myeloradiculopathy caused by spondylosis and stenosis of the spinal canal seen in the past 10 years. Careful selection of patients is an absolute necessity since a primary cause of failure occurred in individuals who subsequently proved to have motor neurone disease. Older individuals with long-standing neurological deficits, especially long tract signs indicative of fixed lesions, were benefited primarily by a lack of further progression of their disorder and occasional improvement in hand function and gait. Diagnostic evaluation should include electromyography, nerve conduction studies, and sensory evoked cortical potentials. With the introduction of the fourth generation CAT scanning equipment, additional diagnostic information is available regarding the internal configuration of the spinal canal, its contents, and the amount of available space at various levels. Supplementary myelography remains of basic importance. Laminectomy includes two levels above and below the areas of significant canal encroachment. Foraminal decompression with removal of only the innermost third of the foramen permits mobilization of the nerve roots, removal of osteophytes and untethering of the dural sac. A great deal of importance is attached to the preservation of the cervical lordotic curve since, with an adequate decompression and an intact dura, the cord moves dorsally into an expanded canal, rising above the ventrally situated osteophytes. In those patients with reversal of the cervical curve and swan neck deformities, posterior decompression has not been of value. Recent more radical procedures in such cases, such as vertebrectomy, remain to be evaluated. Any procedure which will permit further kyphotic deformity, such as laminectomy, is contraindicated. Eighty-five percent of the patients operated upon by the recommended surgical approach improved.

  5. Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arsenic can cause peripheral neuropathy. In addition, certain insecticides and solvents have also been known to cause ... ranges from clinical studies of the genetics and natural history of hereditary neuropathies to basic science investigations ...

  6. Diabetic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of diabetic neuropathy may become severe enough to cause depression in some patients. x Prognosis The prognosis for ... of diabetic neuropathy may become severe enough to cause depression in some patients. View Full Prognosis Clinical Trials ...

  7. Auditory Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with auditory neuropathy have greater impairment in speech perception than hearing health experts would predict based upon their degree of hearing loss on a hearing test. For example, a person with auditory neuropathy may be able to hear ...

  8. Hereditary Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and autonomic neuropathy. The most common type is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, one of the hereditary motor and sensory ... and autonomic neuropathy. The most common type is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, one of the hereditary motor and sensory ...

  9. Cervicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a sexually transmitted infection, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. Cervicitis can develop from noninfectious causes, too. Successful ... result from common sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including gonorrhea, chlamydia, trichomoniasis and genital herpes. Allergic reactions. An ...

  10. [Diagnosis and management of cervical spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis, which can present as radiculopathy and myelopathy, is common in people over the age of 50. Since evidence of radiological spondylotic change is frequently found in many asymptomatic adults, it is necessary to assess whether neurological symptoms result from cervical spondylosis or other neurological disorders. In order to avoid misdiagnosis, it is important to compare the levels of the lesions shown on imaging with the clinical findings. Differential diagnosis between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and cervical spondylotic myelopathy is an issue of major clinical importance. Though the course of disease development and the ultimate prognosis for patients with cervical spondylosis is highly variable and extremely difficult to predict, many patients experience a relatively benign form of the disease.

  11. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzik, Wiesław; Kaczorowska, Beata; Przybyła, Monika; Chudzik, Bartosz; Gałka, Małgorzata

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is most common chronic complication of diabetes mellitus. It is responsible for substantial morbidity, increased mortality and impaired quality of life. Patogenesis of diabetic neuropathy is complex. Chronic hyperglycemia is a major factor induces nerve fibers injury. High level of glucose stimulate the polyol pathway causing osmotic stress and enhance reactive oxygen species generation, as well as it play an important role in diabetic angiopathy development. Distal symmetric polineuropathy is most common type of diabetic neuropathy. Many patient may develop combinations of neuropathies concerning somatic and autonomic system. Early diagnosis and administered suitable treatment are necessary to reduce severe complication of diabetic neuropathy as well as strict glycemic control and risk factor increased.

  12. Comparação do Índice de Torg obtido por meio de radiografia e ressonância magnética nos pacientes com mielopatia cervical espondilótica Comparación del Índice de Torg, obtenido por medio de radiografía y resonancia, en los pacientes con mielopatía espondilótica cervical Comparison of the Torg Index obtained by radiography and magnetic resonance in patients with spondylotic cervical myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre de Oliveira Zam

    2012-01-01

    68,7 ± 5 Kg y altura de 1,68 ± 0,6 m. No hubo diferencias significativas entre el Índice de Torg calculado por la radiografía y el de la resonancia magnética, siendo menores los índices observados en la RM (radiografía: 0,73 ± 0,17 vs RM: 0,48 ± 0,14, p OBJECTIVE: Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (SCM is a dysfunction related to spinal cord degeneration typical of aging. In the imaging studies can achieve a measure of the Torg index to estimate cervical stenosis. We aim therefore to measure the Torg index in X-rays and Magnetic Resonance (MR, to investigate possible discrepancies between the methods of measurement. METHODS: The Torg Index was measured on radiographs and MR of the cervical spine, obtained by determining the relationship between the posterior surface of the vertebral body and the nearest point to the corresponding laminar line, divided by the sagittal diameter of vertebral body. RESULTS: A total 29 patients has participated, 10 women and 19 men, with mean age of 48.1 ± 11 years, weight 68.7 ± 5kg and height 1.68 ± 0.6m. There were significant differences between the Torg Index calculated by radiography and MR, and lower rates observed on MR (radiography: 0.73 ± 0.17 vs. RM: 0.48 ± 0.14, p <0.05. However, both measurements reflect the same result: absolute cervical stenosis (Torg index < 0.8. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm reports by other authors who believe that the Torg Index measured by radiography, as recommended, minimizes the actual cervical canal stenosis. Our study suggests that MRI allows better estimate of the degree of stenosis, although our results regarding the degree of cervical stenosis were statistically similar.

  13. Autonomic neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  14. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Toshiko; Miyamoto, Kazuto; Beppu, Hirokuni; Hirose, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Katsuhiro

    1981-01-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author)

  15. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Beppu, H.; Hirose, K.; Yamada, K. (Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital (Japan))

    1981-07-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author).

  16. Root compression on MRI compared with clinical findings in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, B.; Tans, J.T.J.; van der Kallen, B.F.; Nollet, F.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Visser, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the occurrence of symptomatic and asymptomatic root compression caused by herniated discs and spondylotic foraminal stenosis by MRI in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy. Participants 78 patients with symptoms and signs of cervical radiculopathy of less than one

  17. Copper deficiency myelopathy in the setting of advanced degenerative cervical spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Paul S; Nazar, Ryan G; Park, Michael C; James, Robert F

    2016-08-01

    When presenting conjointly, degenerative cervical spondylosis and copper deficiency myelopathy may be difficult to differentiate providing the potential for mismanagement and unnecessary surgery. We present a case of a 69-year-old female with copper deficiency myelopathy secondary to previous bowel resection in the setting of advanced degenerative cervical spondylotic disease.

  18. Infectious neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to address bacterial, viral, and other infectious causes of neuropathy or neuronopathy, with an emphasis on clinical manifestations and treatment. Most infectious neuropathies have been well described for some time and treatments are well established. An exception is HIV-associated distal symmetric polyneuropathy, which is an area of active research. Current work in this area focuses on epidemiology, risk factors, and underlying mechanisms. Infectious diseases are an important part of the differential diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders because they are among the most amenable to treatment. However, diagnosis of infectious peripheral neuropathy may be challenging because of variability in a number of factors, including the pattern of deficits, geographic distribution of pathogens, length of time from the onset of infection to the development of neuropathy, and mechanism of nerve injury.

  19. Steroids have no place in the management of cervical myelopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in adults in Western society. Very little has been written about it in Nigeria. This would give the impression that it is rare in Nigeria. Unfortunately, this is not the case and having seen a few patients now in Abuja, we can appreciate ...

  20. Functional profiles of SCN9A variants in dorsal root ganglion neurons and superior cervical ganglion neurons correlate with autonomic symptoms in small fibre neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, C.; Hoeijmakers, J.G.; Liu, S.; Gerrits, M.M.; te Morsche, R.H.; Lauria, G.; Dib-Hajj, S.D.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Faber, C.G.; Merkies, I.S.; Waxman, S.G.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with small fibre neuropathy typically manifest pain in distal extremities and severe autonomic dysfunction. However, occasionally patients present with minimal autonomic symptoms. The basis for this phenotypic difference is not understood. Sodium channel Na(v)1.7, encoded by the SCN9A gene,

  1. A community-based epidemiological study of peripheral neuropathies in Assiut, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Mahmoud R; Darwish, Esam S; Khedr, Eman M; Sabry, Mahmoud M; Abdulah, Mohamed A

    2012-12-01

    There is very little published information about the prevalence, patterns, and predictors of peripheral neuropathies. The current study is a community-based survey was conducted in the Assiut Governorate to estimate their prevalence and clinical profile. A door-to-door study was carried out on 42,223 persons from rural and urban communities in the Assiut Governorate, Egypt. There were 13,288 (31.5%) subjects from the urban and 28,935 (68·5%) from the rural area. All subjects filled in a questionnaire designed specifically for diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy. Positive cases were then given a complete medical and neurological examination, routine laboratory tests, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging (magnetic resonance). The crude prevalence rate (CPR) of peripheral neuropathy was 3181/100,000 inhabitants. There was a significantly higher prevalence in the rural compared with the urban population (3795 versus 1844/100,000) and in females than males (4473 versus 1943/100,000; Psyndrome (1686/100,000). Diabetic neuropathy was the most common non-compressive neuropathy with a CPR of 649/100,000. Type II diabetes was recorded in 241 patients with a CPR of 571/100,000. Compressive radiculopathy had a crude prevalence of 358/100,000; traumatic and iatrogenic radiculopathy had a prevalence rate of 149/100,000. Less common conditions were: uremic neuropathy (21/100,000) hepatic neuropathy (14/100,000), Bell's palsy (28/100,000), Guillian-Barre' syndrome (12/100,000), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (12/100,000), hereditary sensory motor neuropathy (12/100,000), and idiopathic neuropathy (92/100,000). The overall prevalence of peripheral neuropathies was high in comparison to other studies. Entrapment neuropathy, diabetic neuropathy, and spondylotic radiculopathy were the most common. Overall, the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy was higher in the rural than in the urban population.

  2. Interobserver agreement on MRI evaluation of patients with cervical radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, B., E-mail: kuijperb@maasstadziekenhuis.n [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Neurology, Maasstad Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Beelen, A. [Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kallen, B.F. van der [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Nollet, F. [Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J. [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Visser, M. de [Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tans, J. Th.J. [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the interobserver agreement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of herniated discs, spondylotic neuroforaminal stenosis, and root compression in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy and in addition, to assess the added value of disclosure of clinical information to interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: The MRI images of 82 patients with less than 1 month of symptoms and signs of cervical radiculopathy were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists who were unaware of clinical findings. MRI analysis was repeated after disclosure of clinical information. Interobserver agreement was calculated using kappa statistics. Results: The kappa score for evaluation of herniated discs and of spondylotic foramen stenosis was 0.59 and 0.63, respectively. A kappa score of 0.67 was found for the presence of root compression. After disclosure of clinical information kappa scores increased slightly: from 0.59 to 0.62 for the detection of herniated discs, from 0.63 to 0.66 for spondylotic foramen stenosis, and from 0.67 to 0.76 for root compression. Conclusion: Interobserver reliability of MRI evaluation in patients with cervical radiculopathy was substantial for root compression, with or without clinical information. Agreement on the cause of the compression, i.e., herniated disc or spondylotic foraminal stenosis, was lower.

  3. Interobserver agreement on MRI evaluation of patients with cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, B.; Beelen, A.; Kallen, B.F. van der; Nollet, F.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Visser, M. de; Tans, J. Th.J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the interobserver agreement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of herniated discs, spondylotic neuroforaminal stenosis, and root compression in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy and in addition, to assess the added value of disclosure of clinical information to interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: The MRI images of 82 patients with less than 1 month of symptoms and signs of cervical radiculopathy were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists who were unaware of clinical findings. MRI analysis was repeated after disclosure of clinical information. Interobserver agreement was calculated using kappa statistics. Results: The kappa score for evaluation of herniated discs and of spondylotic foramen stenosis was 0.59 and 0.63, respectively. A kappa score of 0.67 was found for the presence of root compression. After disclosure of clinical information kappa scores increased slightly: from 0.59 to 0.62 for the detection of herniated discs, from 0.63 to 0.66 for spondylotic foramen stenosis, and from 0.67 to 0.76 for root compression. Conclusion: Interobserver reliability of MRI evaluation in patients with cervical radiculopathy was substantial for root compression, with or without clinical information. Agreement on the cause of the compression, i.e., herniated disc or spondylotic foraminal stenosis, was lower.

  4. Characteristics of spondylotic myelopathy on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhadi, Mike A; Perno, Joseph R; Melhem, Elias R; Nucifora, Paolo G P

    2014-01-01

    In patients with spinal stenosis, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine can be improved by using 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences to provide a high-resolution assessment of osseous and ligamentous structures. However, it is not yet clear whether 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences adequately evaluate the spinal cord itself. As a result, they are generally supplemented by additional 2D fast spin echo sequences, adding time to the examination and potential discomfort to the patient. Here we investigate the hypothesis that in patients with spinal stenosis and spondylotic myelopathy, 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences can characterize cord lesions equally well as 2D fast spin echo sequences. We performed a retrospective analysis of 30 adult patients with spondylotic myelopathy who had been examined with both 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences and 2D fast spin echo sequences at the same scanning session. The two sequences were inspected separately for each patient, and visible cord lesions were manually traced. We found no significant differences between 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo sequences in the mean number, mean area, or mean transverse dimensions of spondylotic cord lesions. Nevertheless, the mean contrast-to-noise ratio of cord lesions was decreased on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences compared to 2D fast spin echo sequences. These findings suggest that 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences do not need supplemental 2D fast spin echo sequences for the diagnosis of spondylotic myelopathy, but they may be less well suited for quantitative signal measurements in the spinal cord.

  5. Effect of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion on Patients with Atypical Symptoms Related to Cervical Spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Sun, Yuqing; Yan, Kai; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Shan; Tian, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Background A considerable number of patients with cervical spondylosis complain about one or multiple atypical symptoms such as vertigo, palpitations, headache, blurred vision, hypomnesia, and/or nausea. It remains unclear whether surgical intervention for cervical spondylosis can also effectively alleviate those symptoms. The current study was performed to see if anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) offers such an extra benefit for patients with cervical spondylosis. Objective To investigate if patients who received ACDF for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy can also achieve alleviation of certain atypical symptoms associated with cervical spondylosis after the surgery in the long run. Methods Sixty-seven patients who underwent ACDF for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy were involved in this study. All these patients also complained about various associated atypical symptoms. They were followed up for 26 to 145 months after the surgery. Severity and frequency scores of the atypical symptoms before the surgery and at last follow-up were compared by paired t tests. Results Most patients reported significantly alleviated symptoms at the last follow-up compared with before the surgery. The severity of vertigo, headache, nausea, and palpitations were significantly alleviated at the last follow-up (with p values of p < 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.022, p = 0.004, respectively). There were no significant changes in the severity of tinnitus (p = 0.182), blurred vision (p = 0.260), and hypomnesia (p = 0.821). Conclusion ACDF can significantly alleviate vertigo, headache, nausea, and palpitations in most patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy, but it is not effective in alleviating symptoms such as tinnitus, blurred vision, and hypomnesia. It can be considered for alleviating atypical symptoms when other treatment options prove

  6. Double crush syndrome caused by cervical spondylosis and vertebral artery loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Young Joon; Choe, Woo Jin

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this article is to report a successful treatment experience in a rare case of simultaneous cervical nerve root compression by spondylotic cervical foraminal stenosis and a vertebral artery loop. 51-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of left-sided cervical pain radiating to the left shoulder with progressive exacerbation of weakness on left shoulder girdle muscles for 7 months. The patient had no history of trauma. The patient's CT and MRI revealed impingement of the left C6 cervical nerve root by a tortuous vertebral artery loop and also by narrowed left C5-6 cervical foramen that had undergone spondylotic changes. The patient underwent left C5-6 hemilaminectomy, facetectomy and C5-6 fusion. The procedures were uneventful, and the patient recovered with complete resolution of symptoms. The patient continued to be asymptomatic at a 2-year follow-up examination, and the muscle mass of his left girdle returned normal. This report illustrates the first phenomenon of a double crush syndrome caused by vertebral artery loop and cervical spondylotic changes. When patients with cervical spondylosis present with unexplainably severe pain and weakness, additional underlying pathologies should be considered when making differential diagnoses. The investigation planning should involve electromyography, computed tomography angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Oblique Corpectomy to Manage Cervical Myeloradiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibbaro Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The authors describe a lateral approach to the cervical spine for the management of spondylotic myeloradiculopathy. The rationale for this approach and surgical technique are discussed, as well as the advantages, disadvantages, complications, and pitfalls based on the author's experience over the last two decades. Methods. Spondylotic myelo-radiculopathy may be treated via a lateral approach to the cervical spine when there is predominant anterior compression associated with either spine straightening or kyphosis, but without vertebral instability. Results. By using a lateral approach, the lateral aspect of the cervical spine and the vertebral artery are easily reached and visualized. Furthermore, the lateral part of the affected intervertebral disc(s, uncovertebral joint(s, vertebral body(ies, and posterior longitudinal ligament can be removed as needed to decompress nerve root(s and/or the spinal cord. Conclusion. Multilevel cervical oblique corpectomy and/or lateral foraminotomy allow wide decompression of nervous structures, while maintaining optimal stability and physiological motion of the cervical spine.

  8. Cytokine Concentrations in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Great Danes with Cervical Spondylomyelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Martin‐Vaquero, P.; da Costa, R.C.; Moore, S.A.; Gross, A.C.; Eubank, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of human cervical spondylotic myelopathy and could also play a role in cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM) in dogs. Hypothesis/Objectives That cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytokine concentrations would differ between clinically normal (control) and CSM‐affected Great Danes (GDs), with affected GDs showing higher levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)‐6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein‐1/chemokine ligand 2 (MCP‐...

  9. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves that are connected with the brain and control sight, eye movement, hearing, and taste. Most often, cranial neuropathy affects the nerves that control the eye ...

  10. Study protocol for a randomised controlled multicentre study: the Foraminotomy ACDF Cost-Effectiveness Trial (FACET) in patients with cervical radiculopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekema, A.E.; Kuijlen, J.M.; Lesman-Leegte, G.A.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Asselt, A.D. van; Vroomen, P.C.; Dijk, J.M.C. van; Reneman, M.F.; Soer, R.; Groen, R.J.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cervical radiculopathy due to discogenic or spondylotic stenosis of the neuroforamen can be surgically treated by an anterior discectomy with fusion (ACDF) or a posterior foraminotomy (FOR). Most surgeons prefer ACDF, although there are indications that FOR is as effective as ACDF, has

  11. Operative Outcomes for Cervical Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Galbraith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy are common disorders which can lead to significant clinical morbidity. Conservative management, such as physical therapy, cervical immobilisation, or anti-inflammatory medications, is the preferred and often only required intervention. Surgical intervention is reserved for those patients who have intractable pain or progressive neurological symptoms. The goals of surgical treatment are decompression of the spinal cord and nerve roots and deformity prevention by maintaining or supplementing spinal stability and alleviating pain. Numerous surgical techniques exist to alleviate symptoms, which are achieved through anterior, posterior, or circumferential approaches. Under most circumstances, one approach will produce optimal results. It is important that the surgical plan is tailored to address each individual's unique clinical circumstance. The objective of this paper is to analyse the major surgical treatment options for cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy focusing on outcomes and complications.

  12. Preliminary and intermediate follow-up outcomes for cervical disc replacement in the treatment of cervical spondylopathy in 12 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Zhonglai; Yang Huilin; Jiang Weimin; Li Xigong; Li Xuefeng; Tang Tiansi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the short and intermediate-term clinical outcomes of porous coated motion (PCM) cervical prosthesis in the treatment of cervical spondylosis. Methods: The 12 (13 levels) patients who were suffered spondylotic myelopathy with PCM cervical prosthesis were treated. Evaluate the clinical outcome by comparing the JOA scores, the position of prosthesis,rotation of motion, the heterotopic ossification and Odom's scales. Results: After the average 6.5 months(3 ∼ 12 months) follow-up, the JOA scales raised from 8.35 ± 1.10 preoperatively to 15.88 ± 0.73 postoperatively (P 0.05). There was no occurrence of failures of prosthesis such as subsidence, loosening, or excursion. Heterotopic ossification was also absent. Conclusion: The clinical outcomes for cervical disc replacement in the treatment of cervical spondylopathy are satisfied. (authors)

  13. Genetically determined optic neuropathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Reynier, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    The present review focuses on recent advances in the knowledge of hereditary optic neuropathies resulting from retinal ganglion cell degeneration, mostly due to mitochondrial dysfunctions.......The present review focuses on recent advances in the knowledge of hereditary optic neuropathies resulting from retinal ganglion cell degeneration, mostly due to mitochondrial dysfunctions....

  14. Propylthiouracil and peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Van Boekel

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is a rare manifestation in hyperthyroidism. We describe the neurological manifestations of a 38 year old female with Graves' disease who developed peripheral neuropathy in the course of her treatment with propylthiouracil. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs disappeared. Therefore, we call attention for a possible toxic effect on peripheral nervous system caused by this drug.

  15. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of finding ways to prevent, treat, and, ultimately, cure them. Show More Show Less ... Definition Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder characterized by muscle weakness in the hands, with differences from one side of the body ...

  16. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Myelopathy associated with age-related cervical disc herniation: a retrospective review of magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ryalat, Nosaiba Tawfik; Saleh, Saif Aldeen; Mahafza, Walid Sulaiman; Samara, Osama Ahmad; Ryalat, Abdee Tawfiq; Al-Hadidy, Azmy Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Cervical intervertebral disc herniation can lead to myelopathy. Aging is an established variable related to spondylotic myelopathy. Studying this association will help in controlling the increase in spondylotic myelopathy with age. To study the association between cervical disc level, its direction, and the frequency of my-elopathy with age, and to assess the epidemiology of age-related cervical disc herniation and myelopathy. Retrospective review of magnetic resonance (MR) images. Tertiary referral hospital. We studied the MR images of adults patients ( > 18 years of age) referred to our department between 2001 and 2012 for suspected cervical spondylopathy. The direction and severity of herniation and the presence of myelopathy was determined for spinal levels C2 to C7. Relationship between age-related cervical disc herniation and myelopathy. We studied 6584 patient MR images, which included 2402 males (39.1%) and 3737 females (60.9%). The frequency of myelopathy increased with age from 0.6% in patients 70 years of age. The most common level affected by myelopathy was C5-C6. In elderly patients ( > 60 years), the C3-C4 level became the predominant level affected by myelopathy. Likewise, the frequency of central disc herniation increased significantly (P disc herniation than lower cervical levels in the elderly. The increased frequency of central disc herniation with age suggest an important, and probably a cause-effect relationship, between herniation and myelopathy. We were unable to access clinical data or electrophysiological studies to correlate with MR image findings.

  18. [Clinical study of a cervical anterior Hybrid technique with posterior longitudinal ligament retained for cervical spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yu-song; Chen, Jiang; Sun, Qi; Li, Jin-yu; Zheng, Chen-ying; Bai, Chun-xiao; Xu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    To explore the clinical effects and significances of a cervical anterior Hybrid technique with posterior longitudinal ligament retained in treating cervical spondylosis. The clinical data of 138 patients with cervical spondylosis underwent cervical anterior Hybrid surgery were retrospectively analyzed from March 2009 to March 2013. There were 52 males and 86 females,the age ranged from 36 to 58 years old with an average of 45.3 years. Course of disease was from 3 to 16 months. Cervical spondylosis classification included 22 cases with nerve root type, 68 cases with myelopathic type, 48 cases with mixed type. All patients were treated with the primary Hybrid surgery and their cervical posterior longitudinal ligaments were retained in anterior decompression. JOA score and image examination were used to evaluate clinical effect, and image examination included range of motion of the replacement segment, range of motion of the whole cervical spine, the sagittal diameter of the spinal cord before and after operation. All operations were successful and operation time was 60 to 125 min (averaged 90.6 min), perioperative bleeding was 10 to 60 ml (averaged 30.1 ml). All patients were followed up from 12 to 48 months with an average of 22.2 months. All pathological segments obtained fully decompression, reserved posterior longitudinal ligament had no obvious hypertrophy, proliferation and calcification. The prosthesis had good location and the incision healed well without complications. Upper limbs root symptoms were completely relieved in the patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy, muscle strengths and sensations got different recovery in the patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. JOA score was increased from preoperative 8.62±1.22 to final follow-up 14.26±1.47 (P0.05). Spinal cord sagittal diameter was increased from preoperative (5.2±1.3) mm to postoperative (8.8±0.5) mm (P<0.05). Anterior cervical Hybrid surgery with posterior longitudinal ligament

  19. Age-Related Incidence of Cervical Spondylosis in Residents of Jeju Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min-Geun; Park, Bong-Keun; Park, Min-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cervical spine radiograms of 460 Jeju islanders. Purpose To investigate the age-matched incidences and severity of the cervical disc degeneration and associated pathologic findings. Overview of Literature Several related studies on the incidences of disc and Luschka's and facet joint degeneration have provided some basic data for clinicians. Methods Cervical radiographs of 460 (220 males and 240 females) patients in their fourth to ninth decade were analyzed. Ninety patients in their third decade were excluded because of absence of spondylotic findings. Results Overall incidence of cervical spondylosis was 47.8% (220 of 460 patients). The percentile incidences of spondylosis in the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth decade was 13.2% (10 of 76 patients), 34.6% (37 of 107 patients), 58.9% (66 of 112 patients), 58.8% (50 of 85 patients), 70.3% (45 of 64 patients) and 75.0% (12 of 16 patients), respectively. The percentile incidences of one, two, three, four and five level spondylosis among 220 spondylosis patients was 45.5% (n=100), 34.1% (n=75), 15.0% (n=33), 4.5% (n=10), and 0.9% (n=2). Severity of disc degeneration ranged from ± to ++++, and was ± in 6.0% (24 segments), + in 49.6% (198 segments), ++ in 35.3% (141 segments), +++ in 9.0% (36 segments) and ++++ in 0.25% (one segment). Spurs and anterior ligament ossicle formed at the spondylotic segments, mostly at C4~6. The rate of posterior corporal spurs formation was very low. Olisthesis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament were rarely combined with spondylosis. Cervical lordotic curve decreased gradually according to the progress of severity of spondylosis. Conclusions The incidence of cervical spondylosis and number of spondylotic segments increase, and degeneration gradually becomes more severe with age. PMID:27790313

  20. Cervical Spondylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic Causes Cervical spondylosis Cervical spondylosis Cervical spondylosis is degeneration of the bones and ... Related Symptom Checker Numbness in hands Numbness Cervical spondylosis Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Doctors & departments Advertisement Mayo ...

  1. Tetraplegia After Thyroidectomy in a Patient with Cervical Spondylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Li, Feng; Guan, Hanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis is degeneration of the cervical spine that occurs during the normal course of aging, and may progress into compression of the spinal cord, or cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), which can cause neurologic dysfunction. Cervical spondylosis can be identified in the majority of people older than 50 years. Many people with cervical spondylosis or CSM are asymptomatic. However, patients with CSM are at higher risk of spinal cord injury (SCI) following minor injury. A 60-year-old woman with asymptomatic cervical spondylosis underwent an elective subtotal thyroidectomy for thyroid nodules. After the surgery, she developed tetraplegia. MRI revealed spinal cord compression and injury. Main diagnoses, therapeutics interventions, and outcomes: Acute cervical SCI was diagnosed. After an emergency anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion surgery, she almost completely recovered. Iatrogenic cervical SCI after nonspinal surgeries that requires neck hyperextension is rarely reported, probably due to underdiagnosis and underreport. Among the 14 cases (including ours) published in the literature, most patients had cervical spondylosis and were senior men. Five patients had diabetes. Four patients had long-term hemodialysis. Seven patients had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery that requires prolonged operative time. Only 3 patients had almost complete recovery. Most patients were disabled. Two patients required tracheostomy for long-term ventilator support. Two patients died. These cases reiterate the potential risk of iatrogenic SCI in people with predisposing conditions such as cervical spondylosis, especially considering the rising prevalence and severity of cervical spondylosis caused by the aging of the population and modern sedentary lifestyle. Surgeries requiring prolonged neck hyperextension put patients with cervical spondylosis at risk for SCI. Failure to recognize the potential occurrence of iatrogenic SCI might endanger patients

  2. [Autonomic peripheral neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David; Cauquil, Cecile; Lozeron, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms of dysautonomic disturbances are varied and mostly acquired. They can result from lesions of sympathetic or parasympathetic vegetative fibers located in the peripheral contingent, or in the somatic contingent by demyelination or axonal loss; or more rarely by cellular bodies in the sympathetic or parasympathetic ganglia. Several chronic peripheral neuropathies can be associated with dysautonomia. Only some causes need to be known because they can be clinically significant. Dysautonomia may be seen during chronic acquired neuropathies but also acute or subacute ones. The most frequent cause in the world is the dysautonomia of the diabetes; it affects all the systems; the cardiovascular dysfunction has an impact on the prognosis for survival when it is severe. Hereditary autonomic neuropathies are rare; they can declare themselves very early during the Riley-Day syndrome or very late during amyloid polyneuropathies due to transthyretin gene mutation. The diagnosis can be confirmed by molecular biology. The dysautonomia is frequent and often severe. These neuropathies justify symptomatic treatment to improve quality of life. For some of them, a specific treatment can be proposed to treat the causal affection to try to stop the progression of the disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. [Idiopathic autonomic neuropathy (pandysautonomia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowicz, E; Drozdowski, W; Pogumirski, J

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of current literature, clinical and neuropathologic features of idiopathic autonomic neuropathy is presented. Idiopathic autonomic neuropathy is a disease characterized by acute or subacute onset, monophasic course over a period of several years, it is often preceded by an infection. The spectrum of autonomic changes ranges from cholinergic or adrenergic dysfunction to pandysautonomia, leading to heterogeneity of its clinical features. Possible sympathetic system abnormalities found in autonomic neuropathy are: poor pupillary response to light in darkness, orthostatic hypotension leading to syncope, hypotension without compensatory tachycardia, ejaculation disturbances and vasomotor instability. Possible parasympathetic dysfunctions are: salivation and lacrimation disturbances, absent pupillary constriction to light and near gaze, gastrointestinal tract immobility and impairment of gastrointestinal function, atonic bladder with large residual volume, erectile impotence. Pandysautonomia is thought to result from an immune mediated mechanism and responds well to plasmaferesis and intravenous immunoglobin therapy leading to gradual, sometimes not full, recovery. Moreover in this article we pay attention to the clinical value of many tests like cardiovascular or pharmacological studies in the diagnosis of pandysautonomia and in differentiation of pre- and postganglionic changes. In order to diagnose idiopathic autonomic neuropathy one has to rule out a large number of diseases with autonomic dysfunction e.g.: diabetes, malignant neoplasms, acute intermittent porphyria, Shy-Drager syndrome, Riley-Day's dysautonomia, Parkinson's disease, amyloidosis and others.

  4. Laminoplastia expansiva: uma alternativa no tratamento da mielopatia espondilótica cervical Expansive laminoplasty: an alternative for the treatment of cervical espondiloarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Cardoso de Andrade

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se a técnica de laminoplastia expansiva cervical e analisam-se os resultados cirúrgicos obtidos em 28 pacientes portadores de mielopatia espondilótica cervical tratados através desse método e com seguimento mínimo de seis meses. Vinte e quatro pacientes (86% apresentaram melhora clínica, segundo a escala de Nurick, três (10% permaneceram estáveis e uma paciente faleceu no pós-operatório imediato. Os bons resultados alcançados indicam que essa técnica é simples, eficaz e tem baixo índice de complicações no tratamento da mielopatia espondilótica.We describe the surgical technique of expansive cervical laminoplasty and analyse the results in 28 patients treated by this method for cervical spondylotic myelopathy with a minimum follow-up of six months. Twenty-four patients (86% had clinical improvement according to the Nurick scale while three (10% had no improvement and one patient died on the first days post-operatively. The good results achieved demonstrate that this technique is simple, effective and has few complications on the treatment of spondylotic myelopathy.

  5. Preliminary clinical applications of DTI in human cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Ting; Mai Weiwen; Liang Biling; Shen Jun; Huang Suiqiao; Hu Chunhong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To condcut preliminary study of the value of DTI(diffusion tensor imaging) in human cervical spinal cord. Methods: Twenty-one patients suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy and twenty volunteers without any clinical symptoms underwent routine MRI and DTI examination. DTI was performed in six non-collinear directions with single-shot fast spin echo echo, planar imaging sequence(b value = 400 s·mm -2 ). ADC(apparent diffusion coefficient) and FA(fractional anisotropy)values were measured by ROIs(regions of interest) in 4 different level segment spinal cord (C 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 ) in normal volunteers, in lesions and normal segmental spinal cord in clinical cases respectively. DTI original images were automatically processed by using IDL (Version 5.6) soft- ware to produce color tensor images. SPSS11.0 software for windows was used for t-test and one-way ANOVA analysis. The difference was considered statistically significant if P 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 , were analyzed and it was found that FA value between them had a significant difference by ANOVA, F=159.24, P 2/3 level. However, ADC value between 4 segments had no significant difference(F=2.191, P>0.05). (2)In patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, routine MRI T2WI showed abnormal signal in 9 cases, and showed no abnormal signal in 12 dases. In sixteen cases it was found that abnormal patchy green signal on colorized tensor maps appeared on the normal blue spinal cord. Also, in patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, there was significant difference in ADC and FA value between lesions and normal spinal cord (paired t test, for ADC, t=2.88, P 2/3 level segment spinal cord in normal volunteers (0.85 ± 0.03) is the highest among other segments. FA value decreases gradually along cervical spinal cord towards the caudal direction. However, the difference of ADC values amongst 4 segments is not significant. DTI colorized tensor maps can show more lesions than routine MRI

  6. Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy

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    Mona Amini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary systemic vasculitis in pre-capillary arteries is associated with peripheral neuropathy. In some types of systematic vasculitis about 60 % of patients have peripheral nervous system (PNS involvement. In vasculitic peripheral neuropathies (VPN a necrotizing and inflammatory process leads to narrowing of vasa nervorum lumen and eventually the appearance of ischemic lesions in peripheral nerves. Some features might be suggestive of VPN, like: axonal nerve degeneration, wallerian-like degeneration, and diameter irregularity of nerve. Peripheral nervous system (PNS destruction during systemic vasculitides should be considered, due to its frequency and early occurrence in vasculitis progression. The first line treatment of non systematic VPNs is corticosteroid agents, but these drugs might worsen the VPNs or systemic vasculitis.

  7. Acute nutritional axonal neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Johanna; Logigian, Eric L

    2018-01-01

    This study describes clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features of a severe acute axonal polyneuropathy common to patients with acute nutritional deficiency in the setting of alcoholism, bariatric surgery (BS), or anorexia. Retrospective analysis of clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory data of patients with acute axonal neuropathy. Thirteen patients were identified with a severe, painful, sensory or sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy that developed over 2-12 weeks with sensory ataxia, areflexia, variable muscle weakness, poor nutritional status, and weight loss, often with prolonged vomiting and normal cerebrospinal fluid protein. Vitamin B6 was low in half and thiamine was low in all patients when obtained before supplementation. Patients improved with weight gain and vitamin supplementation, with motor greater than sensory recovery. We suggest that acute or subacute axonal neuropathy in patients with weight loss or vomiting associated with alcohol abuse, BS, or dietary deficiency is one syndrome, caused by micronutrient deficiencies. Muscle Nerve 57: 33-39, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Painful peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Bo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Painful peripheral neuropathy (PPN is characterized by neuropathic pain (NP, which is accompanied by dysfunction of motor, sensory and autonomic nervous system. It always involves small nerve fibers, including A δ and C fibers. PPN can be classified into two types according to etiology: hereditary and acquired. Pain of PPN can manifest as spontaneous pain and stimulus-evoked pain (allodynia, hyperalgesia and hyperpathia. The manifestation of typical cases is length-dependent, which firstly involves the feet, and then progresses proximally and to the hands, presenting a glove-stock pattern. PPN can be either an isolated disease entity or part of other diseases. The former indicates idiopathic small fiber neuropathy (SFN, while the latter contains various diseases involving peripheral nerve fibers, including systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy with other causes. The accessory examinations of PPN include quantitative sensory testing (QST, intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD, sympathetic skin response (SSR, etc. Among them, IENFD is the "golden standard" for SFN. The major therapeutic methods are to control primary diseases and relieve pain. Medications alleviating neuropathic pain consist of carbamazepine, pregabalin, gabapentin and amitriptyline, etc.

  9. [Clinical observation of dynamic cervical implant (DCI) internal fixation in the surgical treatment of cervical spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-hai; Hou, Shu-xun; Li, Li; Yu, Shun-zhi; Hou, Tie-sheng

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the early clinical effects and radiological outcome of dynamic cervical implant (DCI) internal fixation in treating cervical spondylosis, and evaluate its safety and efficiency. From June 2009 to December 2011, 19 patients with cervical spondylosis correspond to the indication of DCI internal fixation in the study, including 5 cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and 14 cases of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. There were 8 males and 11 females, aged from 35 to 54 years with a mean of 43.2 years. Pathological segments included C3,4 in 1 case, C4,5 in 6, C5,6 in 6, C6,7 in 4, C3,4 and C5,6, C6,7 in 2. All patients were treated with anterior discectomy and decompression and DCI internal fixation, meanwhile, 2 cases of them with anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion plate fixation. Clinical evaluation included Modified Japanese orthopedics association (mJOA), neck disability index (NDI), visual analogue scale (VAS) score and patient satisfaction index (PSI) at pre-operation and final follow-up. Radiographic evaluation included flexion/extension lateral view at operative level and adjacent segment. The adjacent level degeneration was analyzed according to Miyazaki classification on MRI images. All patients were followed up from 12 to 42 months with an average of 19.8 months. Preoperative mJOA score was 13.6±1.1 and at final follow-up was 16.3±1.2 with improvement rate of 85.0%. Preoperative VAS,NDI was 6.6± 1.4, 17.1±7.4 and at final follow-up was 1.4±0.8, 6.1±3.9, respectively; there was statistical significance in all above-mentioned results between preoperative and final follow-up (P0.05). Preoperative DHI at operation level was (6.3±1.1) mm and final follow-up was (7.1±0.8) mm, there was statistical significance in DHI between preoperative and final follow-up (Pspondylosis with dynamic cervical implant can got satisfactory outcome in early follow-up. Activity of operative segment obtain reservation in some degree. The incidence of

  10. Intramedullary high intensity lesion on T2-weighted MR images in compressive cervical myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameyama, Takashi; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Yanagi, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Takeshi; Hirose, Yoshikiyo (Nagoya Daini Red Hospital (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 147 patients with compressive lesion of the cervical spinal canal. Intramedullary high intensity lesions were observed on T2-weighted or proton density spin-echo images in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (20.0%) and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine (25.7%), while such signal abnormality was not found in patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Frequency of this finding was proportional to clinical severity of myelopathy and degree of spinal cord compression. The pathophysiological basis of such signal abnormality was presumed to vary from acute edema to chronic myelomalacia. In most cases showing intramedullary high intensity lesion, the spinal cord was compressed at multiple levels, but the high intensity was usually found at a signal level where the compression was maximum. There was a good correlation between the neurological level and the high intensity level on MR images. Thus, the intramedullary lesion on MR images is considered to be the main site of lesion responsible for the neurological symptoms. (author).

  11. Intramedullary high intensity lesion on T2-weighted MR images in compressive cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Takashi; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Yanagi, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Takeshi; Hirose, Yoshikiyo

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 147 patients with compressive lesion of the cervical spinal canal. Intramedullary high intensity lesions were observed on T2-weighted or proton density spin-echo images in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (20.0%) and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine (25.7%), while such signal abnormality was not found in patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Frequency of this finding was proportional to clinical severity of myelopathy and degree of spinal cord compression. The pathophysiological basis of such signal abnormality was presumed to vary from acute edema to chronic myelomalacia. In most cases showing intramedullary high intensity lesion, the spinal cord was compressed at multiple levels, but the high intensity was usually found at a signal level where the compression was maximum. There was a good correlation between the neurological level and the high intensity level on MR images. Thus, the intramedullary lesion on MR images is considered to be the main site of lesion responsible for the neurological symptoms. (author)

  12. [The modified method registration of kinesthetic evoked potentials and its application for research of proprioceptive sensitivity disorders at spondylogenic cervical myelopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, S A; Voronin, S G

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the efficacy of modified (passive radiocarpal articulation flexion/extension) and «standard» (passive radiocarpal articulation flexion) methods of kinesthetic evoked potentials for proprioceptive sensitivity assessment in healthy subjects and patients with spondylotic cervical myelopathy. The study included 14 healthy subjects (4 women and 10 men, mean age 54.1±10.5 years) and 8 patients (2 women and 6 men, mean age 55.8±10.9 years) with spondylotic cervical myelopathy. Muscle-joint sensation was examined during the clinical study. A modified method of kinesthetic evoked potentials was developed. This method differed from the "standard" one by the organization of a cycle including several passive movements,where each new movement differed from the preceding one by the direction. The modified method of kinesthetic evoked potentials ensures more reliable kinesthetic sensitivity assessment due to movement variability. Asignificant increaseof the latent periods of the early components of the response was found in patients compared to healthy subjects. The modified method of kinesthetic evoked potentials can be used for objective diagnosis of proprioceptive sensitivity disorders in patients with spondylotic cervical myelopathy.

  13. Venous hypertensive myelopathy associated with cervical spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Seiji; Chang, Charles; Chang, Geraldine; Yue, James J

    2016-11-01

    Venous hypertensive myelopathy (VHM) results from spinal vascular malformations of arteriovenous shunting that increases spinal venous pressure, leading to congestive edema and neurologic dysfunction. There has been no report of VHM associated with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). The aim of this study was to report an extremely rare case of VHM likely due to CSM. This study is a case report and review of the literature. The patient was a 51-year-old man with CSM exhibiting relatively rapid neurologic deterioration with an abnormal expansion of a centromedullary hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the absence of traumatic injury. Neurologic examination and radiologic imaging were taken by various means. The patient developed a cervical radiculopathy, followed by gait disturbance and motor weakness. The MRI of the cervical spine demonstrated spinal canal stenosis due to disc bulging and flavum hypertrophy at the C5/C6 and C6/C7 levels as well as hyperintense area over the C5-C7 levels on T2-weighted images. Although decompression surgery was planned, an acute inflammatory process such as transverse myelitis or demyelinating disease other than cord compression was also considered, and the patient received intravenous steroids. His walking improved for several days. However, his symptoms then became significantly worse, and he had difficulty walking. Subsequent MRI demonstrated marked progression of the T2 hyperintense lesion over the C4-T1 vertebral levels. Flow voids were also noted on the dorsal surface of the upper cervical cord on T2-weighted MRI. His lab work, medical history, and the local enhancement on contrast-enhanced MRI indicated low probability of spinal inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the decision was made to perform anterior cervical discectomy and fusion surgery on two levels. Following surgery, his symptoms improved promptly. Our case indicates that VHM could be caused by spondylotic cord compression in the

  14. [A Case of Subacute Combined Degeneration Caused by Vitamin B12 Deficiency in a Cervical Spondylosis Surgery Referral].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Kunio; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Sugie, Akira; Yamada, Makoto; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Ito, Yutaka; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2016-12-01

    A 62-year-old man with a 1-year history of numbness of the extremities, clumsiness, and gait disorder was diagnosed with cervical spondylotic myelopathy at a neighboring clinic and referred to our institution for surgery. The patient had undergone a total gastrectomy 6 years previously. Flattening of the cervical cord, associated with diffuse cervical spondylosis and intramedullary intensity change, was observed on magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine. Neurological examination revealed decreased vibratory and position sense in all limbs, with posterior funiculus-based neurological symptoms. Blood biochemistry revealed decreased vitamin B12(VB12)levels and megaloblastic anemia. On the basis of these findings, the patient was diagnosed with subacute combined degeneration(SCD). The patient was treated with VB12 for 3 months; the gait disorder resolved and the intramedullary intensity changes in the posterior column of the medulla oblongata, thoracicus, and spinal cord were no longer observed. SCD is a pathological condition in which recovery of neurological function may be achieved through early administration of VB12. In some cases, it is difficult to differentiate between this condition and cervical spondylotic myelopathy because both diseases exhibit progressive spinal symptoms. The medical history and results of neurological evaluations of the patient are important for an accurate diagnosis, and should therefore not be overlooked.

  15. Drug-induced peripheral neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilholm, Ole Jakob; Christensen, Alex Alban; Zedan, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by medication, and various descriptions have been applied for this condition. In this MiniReview, the term 'drug-induced peripheral neuropathy' (DIPN) is used with the suggested definition: Damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system caused by a chemical ...

  16. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body—in both hands or in both feet. Some types of peripheral neuropathy develop suddenly, while others progress more slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: ... sleeping because of feet and leg pain Loss of balance and coordination ...

  17. Daspsone Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Sarojini

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24 year old lady being treated with 300 mg of dapsone daily for dermatitits herpetiformis, developed weakness and wasting of muscles of feet with claw hand deformity and t drop, 2 months tater. Neurological examination and nerve conduction studies conformed the presence of a peripheral motor neuropathy. Dapsone was discontinued and the patient was treated with cotrimatoxazole, gluten-free diet and supportive therapy. This satisfactorily controlled the dermatological lesion without adversely affecting the resolution of her neuropthy. Symptomatic improvement reported by the patient was confirmed by EMG and nerve conduction studies.

  18. The Clinical Features, Risk Factors, and Surgical Treatment of Cervicogenic Headache in Patients With Cervical Spine Disorders Requiring Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohata, Keiko; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Onodera, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Shimohata, Takayoshi

    2017-07-01

    To clarify the clinical features and risk factors of cervicogenic headache (CEH; as diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-Third Edition beta) in patients with cervical spine disorders requiring surgery. CEH is caused by cervical spine disorders. The pathogenic mechanism of CEH is hypothesized to involve a convergence of the upper cervical afferents from the C1, C2, and C3 spinal nerves and the trigeminal afferents in the trigeminocervical nucleus of the upper cervical cord. According to this hypothesis, functional convergence of the upper cervical and trigeminal sensory pathways allows the bidirectional (afferent and efferent) referral of pain to the occipital, frontal, temporal, and/or orbital regions. Previous prospective studies have reported an 86-88% prevalence of headache in patients with cervical myelopathy or radiculopathy requiring anterior cervical surgery; however, these studies did not diagnose headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria. Therefore, a better understanding of the prevalence rate, clinical features, risk factors, and treatment responsiveness of CEH in patients with cervical spine disorders requiring surgery is necessary. We performed a single hospital-based prospective cross-sectional study and enrolled 70 consecutive patients with cervical spine disorders such as cervical spondylotic myelopathy, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, cervical spondylotic radiculopathy, and cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy who had been scheduled to undergo anterior cervical fusion or dorsal cervical laminoplasty between June 2014 and December 2015. Headache was diagnosed preoperatively according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-Third Edition beta. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire, Neck Disability Index, and a 0-100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) were used to evaluate clinical

  19. Restoration of optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You SW

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Si-Wei You,1 Ming-Mei Wu,2 Fang Kuang,2 Kin-Sang Cho,3 Kwok-Fai So4,5 1Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, 2Institute of Neurosciences, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, China; 3Schepens Eye Research Institute, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 4GHM Institute of CNS Regeneration, Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Diseases, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 5Department of Ophthalmology, The State Key laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China Abstract: Optic neuropathy refers to disorders involving the optic nerve (ON. Any damage to ON or ON-deriving neurons, the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, may lead to the breakdown of the optical signal transmission from the eye to the brain, thus resulting in a partial or complete vision loss. The causes of optic neuropathy include trauma, ischemia, inflammation, compression, infiltration, and mitochondrial damages. ON injuries include primary and secondary injuries. During these injury phases, various factors orchestrate injured axons to die back and become unable to regenerate, and these factors could be divided into two categories: extrinsic and intrinsic. Extrinsic inhibitory factors refer to the environmental conditions that influence the regeneration of injured axons. The presence of myelin inhibitors and glial scar, lack of neurotrophic factors, and inflammation mediated by injury are regarded as these extrinsic factors. Extrinsic factors need to trigger the intracellular signals to exert inhibitory effect. Proper regulation of these intracellular signals has been shown to be beneficial to ON regeneration. Intrinsic factors of RGCs are the pivotal reasons that inhibit ON regeneration and are closely linked with extrinsic factors. Intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and calcium levels affect axon guidance and growth cone response to guidance molecules

  20. Docetaxel-induced neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckhoff, Lise; Feddersen, Søren; Knoop, Ann

    2015-01-01

    neuropathy (DIPN). The main purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of genetic variants in GSTP1 and ABCB1 on DIPN. Material and methods. DNA was extracted from whole blood from 150 patients with early-stage breast cancer who had received adjuvant docetaxel from February 2011 to May 2012. Two...... polymorphisms in GSTP1 and three in ABCB1 were selected for the primary analysis, and a host of other candidate genes was explored and compared between 75 patients with clinician-reported DIPN grade ≥ 2 and 75 patients without DIPN. Results. Patients with the genetic variants GSTP1 rs1138272 C/T or T/T (114Ala...

  1. Can axial pain be helpful to determine surgical level in the multilevel cervical radiculopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Bo-Kyung; You, Ki Han; Park, Moon Soo

    2017-01-01

    Spine surgeons are required to differentiate symptomatic cervical disc herniation with asymptomatic radiographic herniation. Although the dermatomal sensory dysfunction of upper extremity is the most important clue, axial pain including cervicogenic headache and parascapular pain may be helpful to find surgical target level. However, there is no review article about the axial pain originated from cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and relieved by surgical decompression. The purpose is to review the literatures about the axial pain, which can be utilized in determining target level to be decompressed in the patients with cervical radiculopathy at multiple levels. Cervicogenic headaches of suboccipital headaches, retro-orbital pain, retro-auricular pain, or temporal pain may be associated with C2, C3, and C4 radiculopathies. The pain around scapula may be associated with C5, C6, C7, and C8 radiculopathies. However, there is insufficient evidence to make recommendations for the use in clinical practice because they did not evaluate sensitivity and specificity.

  2. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    of plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors...

  3. Sagittal Alignment of a Strut Graft Affects Graft Subsidence and Clinical Outcomes of Anterior Cervical Corpectomy and Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Koun; Fushimi, Kazunari; Miyamoto, Kei; Hioki, Akira; Shimizu, Katsuji; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2017-10-01

    Retrospective study. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of sagittal alignment of the strut graft on graft subsidence and clinical outcomes after anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF). ACCF is a common technique for the treatment of various cervical pathologies. Although graft subsidence sometimes occurs after ACCF, it is one cause for poor clinical results. Malalignment of the strut graft is probably one of the factors associated with graft subsidence. However, to the best of our knowledge, no prior reports have demonstrated correlations between the alignment of the strut graft and clinical outcomes. We evaluated 56 patients (33 men and 23 women; mean age, 59 years; range, 33-84 years; 45 with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and 11 with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament) who underwent one- or two-level ACCF with an autogenous fibular strut graft and anterior plating. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score recovery ratio for cervical spondylotic myelopathy was used to evaluate clinical outcomes. The JOA score and lateral radiograms were evaluated 1 week and 1 year postoperatively. Patients were divided into two groups (a straight group [group I] and an oblique group [group Z]) based on radiographic assessment of the sagittal alignment of the strut graft. Group I showed a significantly greater JOA score recovery ratio ( p subsidence than group Z ( p subsidence after ACCF. In contrast, an oblique strut graft can lead to significantly increased strut graft subsidence and poor clinical results.

  4. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent ...

  5. [Analysis of X-ray signs of cervical spondylosis between vertebral artery type and radiculopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Min-Shan; Gao, Jing-Hua; Zhu, Li-Guo; Ma, Zi-Long; Gao, Chun-Yu; Ding, Hong-Lei

    2015-04-01

    To improve the X-ray diagnosis of cervical spondylosis of vertebral artery type (VCS). A blinded design research. The X-ray signs both 60 patients with VCS and 60 patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were collected from January 2011 to November 2012. There were 36 males and 84 females, aged from 25 to 65 years old with an average of (48.4 ± 12.3) years old. Cervical curvature, atlanto-occipital joint angle, atlanto-axial joint angle, C2/C3 joint angle and lower cervical instability condition and segmental distribution were measured and recorded by X-rays. These data were analyzed and compared between the two groups after unblended. Combined with clinical manifestations,the X-ray imaging features of VCS were further analyzed. There was significant difference in cervical curvature between two groups in anteflexion X-ray films (P cervical instability condition and segmental distribution between two groups. In VCS group, the mild and moderate dizziness was main symptom, flexion and extension activities of neck was most common cause in the dizziness; and always accompanied with headache; tenderness mostly concentrated in the upper cervical area. Both X-ray signs and clinical manifestations can prompt the abnormalities of the upper cervical structure or function in patients with VCS. Anteflexion activities of neck observed by functional position of X-ray films should be emphasized in diagnosis of VCS.

  6. ANTIOXIDANT STATUS IN DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giriraja Vrushabaiah Kanakapura

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy are the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. Neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy are microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. Antioxidant status is reduced in DM-induced retinopathy and nephropathy. Present study is undertaken to evaluate the degree of oxidative stress in diabetic neuropathy patients. The aim of the study is to study on oxidative stress as measured by lipid peroxidation marker, malondialdehyde and antienzyme status in type II DM patients with neuropathy and compared them with a controlled nondiabetic group. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study included 100 subjects from Sapthagiri Medical College, Bangalore, from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, of age group 50 to 70 yrs. out of which 50 patients were non-insulin-dependent DM with neuropathy and rest 50 age and sex matched apparently healthy individuals (control group. Antioxidant status was assessed by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione reductase (GR, Catalase and Reduced Glutathione (GSH. RESULTS It showed a significant increase p<0.001 in FBS, PPBS, TC, TG, LDL, VLDL, CAT, MDA, while HDL, GSH, GPX, GR and SOD were found to be decreased significantly (p 0.001. CONCLUSION MDA was significantly elevated in diabetic group, whereas antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and reduced glutathione were significantly decreased, which might be helpful in risk assessment of various complications of DM. The data suggests that alteration in antioxidant status and MDA may help to predict the risk of diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Tetraplegia after thyroidectomy in a patient with cervical spondylosis: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Li, Feng; Guan, Hanfeng

    2015-02-01

    Cervical spondylosis is degeneration of the cervical spine that occurs during the normal course of aging, and may progress into compression of the spinal cord, or cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), which can cause neurologic dysfunction. Cervical spondylosis can be identified in the majority of people older than 50 years. Many people with cervical spondylosis or CSM are asymptomatic. However, patients with CSM are at higher risk of spinal cord injury (SCI) following minor injury.A 60-year-old woman with asymptomatic cervical spondylosis underwent an elective subtotal thyroidectomy for thyroid nodules. After the surgery, she developed tetraplegia. MRI revealed spinal cord compression and injury. Main diagnoses, therapeutics interventions, and outcomes: Acute cervical SCI was diagnosed. After an emergency anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion surgery, she almost completely recovered.Iatrogenic cervical SCI after nonspinal surgeries that requires neck hyperextension is rarely reported, probably due to underdiagnosis and underreport. Among the 14 cases (including ours) published in the literature, most patients had cervical spondylosis and were senior men. Five patients had diabetes. Four patients had long-term hemodialysis. Seven patients had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery that requires prolonged operative time. Only 3 patients had almost complete recovery. Most patients were disabled. Two patients required tracheostomy for long-term ventilator support. Two patients died. These cases reiterate the potential risk of iatrogenic SCI in people with predisposing conditions such as cervical spondylosis, especially considering the rising prevalence and severity of cervical spondylosis caused by the aging of the population and modern sedentary lifestyle. Surgeries requiring prolonged neck hyperextension put patients with cervical spondylosis at risk for SCI. Failure to recognize the potential occurrence of iatrogenic SCI might endanger patients' lives.

  8. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  9. Cervical Dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pass through. Cervical dysplasia is detected in a pap test (pap smear), and diagnosed in a biopsy. Abnormal ... American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) recommends routine pap tests to diagnose cervical cancer early. You can check ...

  10. Cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bleeding between periods, after intercourse, or after menopause Vaginal discharge that does not stop, and may be pale, ... Instructions Hysterectomy - abdominal - discharge Hysterectomy - laparoscopic - ... Images Cervical cancer Cervical neoplasia ...

  11. Vertebral autograft used as bone transplant for anterior cervical corpectomy: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Andreas; Holz, Carsten; Marx, Thomas; Sanchin, Lhagva; Menzel, Matthias

    2003-02-01

    In this prospective patient study, we used a surgical technique for autograft bone fusion during anterior cervical corpectomy (ACC) in patients experiencing cervical spondylotic myelopathy. We packed the resected bone material of the corpectomy into a titanium mesh cage. To evaluate the efficacy of our autograft technique, we analyzed the results according to neurological outcome, radiological outcome, and complications. Between 1995 and 1998, 27 ACC operations were performed for cervical spondylotic myelopathy caused by multisegmental cervical spondylosis. In all patients, decompression of the cervical canal and/or spinal nerve roots was performed by a median cervical corpectomy by an anterior approach. After the ACC was completed, a titanium mesh cage, which was variable in diameter and length, was filled with morselized and impacted bone material from the cervical corpectomy and was then implanted. An anterior cervical plate was placed in all patients to achieve primary stability of the cervical vertebral column. Age, sex, pre- and postoperative myelopathy, number of decompressed levels, radiological results, and complications were assessed. The severity of myelopathy was graded according to the scoring system of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Symptomatic improvement of neurological deficits was achieved in 80% of the patients. The mean preoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association score improved from 13.1 to 15.2 postoperatively (P < 0.05). No patient demonstrated worsening of myelopathic symptoms. Radiological follow-up studies demonstrated complete bony fusion in all patients. A vertical movement of 2.25 +/- 0.43 mm of the titanium cage into the adjacent vertebral bodies was observed in 24 patients. In patients with either a lordotic or neutral cervical spinal axis postoperatively, the axis remained unchanged during the entire follow-up period. The results of this study demonstrate that transplantation of autograft bone material harvested during the

  12. Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-03-06

    Did you know that cervical cancer rates differ by race/ethnicity and region? Or that cervical cancer can usually be prevented if precancerous cervical lesions are found by a Pap test and treated? Find out how getting regular Pap tests can save a woman's life.  Created: 3/6/2007 by National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.   Date Released: 4/25/2007.

  13. Syringomyelia and cervical spondylosis: A clinicoradiological investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Y.L.; Moseley, I.F.

    1987-03-01

    Eight eight patients with proven syringomyelia have been studied retrospectively to explore the relationship between syringomyelia and spondylotic degeneration of the cervical spine. When compared with age and sex matched control subjects, they showed no significant increase in incidence or severity of spondylosis or of vertebral subluxation. Duration of symptoms, degree of disablity, and the pattern of analgesia or lower motor neurone lesions in the arms did not appear to be related to the development of spondylosis. The onset of moderate spondylosis, was however, earlier than in the controls, and individual cases with a remarkably early onset or unusual site and/or severity of spondylosis and subluxation were encountered, particularly following laminectomy. It was also noted that in a small number of patients the concomitant development of spondylosis contributed to clinical deterioration. It is concluded that while syringomyelia does not have a consistent, major role in the development of cervical spondylosis or vertebral luxation, it may contribute to progression of spinal degenerative disease in some patients.

  14. Syringomyelia and cervical spondylosis: A clinicoradiological investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Y.L.; Moseley, I.F.

    1987-01-01

    Eight eight patients with proven syringomyelia have been studied retrospectively to explore the relationship between syringomyelia and spondylotic degeneration of the cervical spine. When compared with age and sex matched control subjects, they showed no significant increase in incidence or severity of spondylosis or of vertebral subluxation. Duration of symptoms, degree of disablity, and the pattern of analgesia or lower motor neurone lesions in the arms did not appear to be related to the development of spondylosis. The onset of moderate spondylosis, was however, earlier than in the controls, and individual cases with a remarkably early onset or unusual site and/or severity of spondylosis and subluxation were encountered, particularly following laminectomy. It was also noted that in a small number of patients the concomitant development of spondylosis contributed to clinical deterioration. It is concluded that while syringomyelia does not have a consistent, major role in the development of cervical spondylosis or vertebral luxation, it may contribute to progression of spinal degenerative disease in some patients. (orig.)

  15. Genetics Home Reference: small fiber neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sodium channel. Sodium channels transport positively charged sodium atoms (sodium ions) into cells and play a key ... Resources (5 links) Cleveland Clinic: Neuropathy Johns Hopkins Medicine: Peripheral Neuropathy MalaCards: sodium channelopathy-related small fiber ...

  16. Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder (ANSD) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder (ANSD) KidsHealth / For Parents / Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum ... is done while the child is sleeping. Otoacoustic emission (OAE): This test measures how well the outer ...

  17. Hypothyroidism: Can It Cause Peripheral Neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypothyroidism: Can it cause peripheral neuropathy? Can hypothyroidism cause peripheral neuropathy and, if so, how is it treated? Answers from Todd B. Nippoldt, M.D. Hypothyroidism — a condition in which your ...

  18. Tandem keyhole foraminotomy in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy: retrospective review of 35 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background There has been no report regarding the results of two-level keyhole foraminotomy. The purpose of this study was to detail clinical outcomes following consecutive two-level cervical foraminotomy (tandem keyhole foraminotomy (TKF)) in patients with radiculopathy. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective review of 35 cases involving patients treated by a single surgeon using TKF. Clinical symptoms, data of physical examinations, pathology and clinical outcomes were detailed and discussed about this surgical method. Results Patients consisted of cervical disc herniation (CDH) (19/35), cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) (13/35), and cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA) (3/35). TKF was performed from C3 to C5 in 2 patients (6%), from C4 to C6 in 7 patients (20%), from C5 to C7 in 23 patients (66%), and from C6 to T1 in 3 patients (8%). The mean operative duration was 99.2 min (range, 72 to 168 min). The mean estimated blood loss was 55.8 g (range, 0 to 200 g). Radicular pain was relieved within 3 months in 88% (29/32) and in 97% (31/32) at final follow-up. Resolution of muscle weakness was recognized within 6 months after operation in all CSA cases. Sixty-six percent of patients showed a greater than 20% deficit in grip weakness on the affected side compared with the normal side. After pain was relieved, grip strength improved by more than 15%. Conclusions TKF is a safe and highly effective procedure for patients with cervical radiculopathy and does not require invasive preoperative examinations. Further investigation is required to determine the effects of consecutive facetectomy. PMID:24884935

  19. NON-GLAUCOMATOUS OPTIC NEUROPATHY IN IBADAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though, optic neuropathy is not a diagnosis in itself, as it results from various aetiologies3, some cases of optic neuropathy are amenable to treatment with good visual outcome4,5. Optic neuropathy is a significant cause of visual impairment among Nigerians6. A study in the Low. Vision Clinic in Ibadan showed that the third.

  20. Transient paralysis shortly after anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-dong; Xia, Qun; Ji, Ning; Liu, Yan-cheng; Han, Yue; Ning, Shang-long

    2013-02-01

    To report three cases of transient paralysis shortly after (within 4 hours) anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF), and investigate the possible causes. Clinical and radiological data of three cases (two men and one woman, aged 41-61 years) were analyzed retrospectively. All three patients underwent ACCF for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. The decompressed segments were located in C(5) , C(6) and C(5) + C(6-7) discs, respectively. Paralysis occurred from 30 minutes to 4 hours after surgery. In two cases the paralysis was complete; it was incomplete in the third. All patients received immediate dehydration, neurotrophic drugs and high-dose methylprednisolone therapy upon recognition of their paralysis. Meanwhile, cervical MRIs were performed and showed no significant hematomas compressing the cervical spinal cord; spinal cord edema was clearly evident in all cases. In two cases the paralysis resolved within 2 hours of diagnosis and immediate medication. In the third case, because the neurological symptoms were incompletely resolved 24 hours after beginning medication, a second laminoplasty was performed. During decompression, tremendous pressure was released from the cervical spinal cord. The neurological symptoms had resolved completely by 1 week after decompression. The precise cause for transient paralysis after these anterior cervical surgeries is not yet clear. Spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury is generally regarded as the most likely cause. Therefore, a combination of cervical spinal cord edema and limited anterior decompression space may have been the main contributing factors to the paralysis reported here. Early diagnosis and early intervention to relieve the paralysis can restore spinal cord function and result in a satisfactory prognosis. © 2013 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. [Optic neuropathy in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Simona; Pascu, Ruxandra; Panea, Cristina; Voinea, Liliana; Badarau, Anca; Nanea, Mariana; Romanitan, Oana; Ciuluvica, R

    2008-01-01

    The inflammation of the optic nerve called optic neuropathy could be an onset marker of multiple sclerosis. The authors review the place of optic neuropathy (neuritis) in the inflammatory demyelinating disease continuum, especially as the onset symptom of multiple sclerosis. We present the clinical symptoms, the aetiology of optic neuritis and the adjacent methods used to investigate optic neuritis. In the article are presented the actual criteria used to establish the multiple sclerosis diagnosis and the revised criteria for optic neuromyelitis, with emphasis on the differential diagnosis between these diseases.

  2. [Clinical outcome of mid-term follow-up of anterior cervical non-fusion surgery versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for cervical spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, L; Wang, W L; Hai, Y; Liu, Y Z; Chen, X L; Chen, L

    2016-07-05

    To evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of artificial cervical disc replacement (Prodisc-C), dynamic cervical implant and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in the treatment of cervical spondylosis. From May 2011 to May 2013, a total of 44 cervical spondylosis patients that received cervical disc arthroplasty (Prodisc-C), dynamic cervical implant (DCI) or ACDF were retrospectively reviewed in Orthopedics Department, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University.The patients were divided into three groups by surgical methods.Parameters as gender, age, the operation time, blood loss and average hospital stay of three groups were compared.The patients were followed 3 months, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months postoperatively.Neck disability index (NDI), Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) Score and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were used to evaluate the clinical outcomes of the three groups.We also measured the cervical lordosis, range of motion of surgical segment and adjacent segment and height of disc at pre-op and post-op. All the patients were got at least 24 months follow-up.The differences between postoperative JOA, NDI and VAS scores and preoperative scores were of statistical significance (P0.05) among three groups.But the operative time and intraoperative blood loss were statistically different (P0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between pre-and postoperative ROM of upper and lower levels among three groups (P>0.05), but had statistically difference in operative levels [(7.0±1.0) mm, (9.2±1.5) mm, (6.8±1.4) mm, Pfusion surgery and ACDF have received good clinical effects in the treatment of spondylotic myelopathy or radicular spondylosis.The artificial cervical disc replacement and dynamic cervical implant can not only recover cervical lordosis and keep the range of motion and stability of the surgical segment, but also reduce the incidence of compensatory motion at adjacent segments and will prevent

  3. [Long-term effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression in treatment of cervical spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hui; Li, Kangren; Fan, Shanjun; Xue, Li; Qiu, Xueyong; Yu, Bin; Gao, Shen; Chen, Jian

    2010-12-01

    To retrospectively analyze the long-term effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) in treatment of cervical spondylosis. Between March 2003 and June 2005, 156 patients with cervical spondylosis were treated with PLDD. There were 74 males and 82 females with an average age of 55.4 years (range, 31-74 years). The disease duration varied from 2 months to 15 years. Fifty-nine patients were classified as cervical spondylotic radiculopathy, 48 as vertebral-artery-type cervical spondylosis, 19 as cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and 30 as mixed type spondylosis. The lesions were located at the levels of C3, 4 in 32 discs, C4, 5 in 66 discs, C5, 6 in 89 discs, and C6, 7 in 69 discs, and including 71 one-level lesion and 85 multi-level lesions. All cases were followed up to study the long-term effectiveness and correlative factors. A total of 117 (75%) patients' symptoms were lightened or eased up immediately after operation. Discitis occurred in 1 case at 3 days after operation and was cured after 3 weeks of antibiotic use. All patients were followed up 5 years to 7 years and 3 months (5 years and 6 months on average). According to Macnab criteria, the long-term effectiveness was excellent in 60 cases (38.46%), good in 65 cases (41.67%), fair in 19 cases (12.18%), and poor in 12 cases (7.69%); the excellent and good rate was 80.13%. No significant difference was observed in the wedge angels and displacements of the intervertebral discs between before and after operations (P > 0.05). Multiple-factors logistic regression showed that the disease duration and patient's age had obvious relationship with the effectiveness of treatment (P spondylosis, disc protrusion degree, mild cervical instability, and lesion scope had no correlation with the effectiveness of treatment (P > 0.05). PLDD is safe and effective in treatment of cervical spondylosis with less complication. There is no impact on the stability in cervical spinal constructs. The disease duration and

  4. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery.

  5. DNA testing in hereditary neuropathies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2013-01-01

    The inherited neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders in which there have been rapid advances in the last two decades. Molecular genetic testing is now an integral part of the evaluation of patients with inherited neuropathies. In this chapter we describe the genes responsible for the primary inherited neuropathies. We briefly discuss the clinical phenotype of each of the known inherited neuropathy subgroups, describe algorithms for molecular genetic testing of affected patients and discuss genetic counseling. The basic principles of careful phenotyping, documenting an accurate family history, and testing the available genes in an appropriate manner should identify the vast majority of individuals with CMT1 and many of those with CMT2. In this chapter we also describe the current methods of genetic testing. As advances are made in molecular genetic technologies and improvements are made in bioinformatics, it is likely that the current time-consuming methods of DNA sequencing will give way to quicker and more efficient high-throughput methods, which are briefly discussed here.

  6. Molecular approach of auditory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Magali Aparecida Orate Menezes da; Piatto, Vânia Belintani; Maniglia, Jose Victor

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the otoferlin gene are responsible for auditory neuropathy. To investigate the prevalence of mutations in the mutations in the otoferlin gene in patients with and without auditory neuropathy. This original cross-sectional case study evaluated 16 index cases with auditory neuropathy, 13 patients with sensorineural hearing loss, and 20 normal-hearing subjects. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and the mutations in the otoferlin gene sites were amplified by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism. The 16 index cases included nine (56%) females and seven (44%) males. The 13 deaf patients comprised seven (54%) males and six (46%) females. Among the 20 normal-hearing subjects, 13 (65%) were males and seven were (35%) females. Thirteen (81%) index cases had wild-type genotype (AA) and three (19%) had the heterozygous AG genotype for IVS8-2A-G (intron 8) mutation. The 5473C-G (exon 44) mutation was found in a heterozygous state (CG) in seven (44%) index cases and nine (56%) had the wild-type allele (CC). Of these mutants, two (25%) were compound heterozygotes for the mutations found in intron 8 and exon 44. All patients with sensorineural hearing loss and normal-hearing individuals did not have mutations (100%). There are differences at the molecular level in patients with and without auditory neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  8. Lifestyle risk factors for ulnar neuropathy and ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Poul; Johnsen, Birger; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We examined whether lifestyle factors differ between patients with ulnar neuropathy confirmed by electroneurography (ENG) and those with ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms with normal ulnar nerve ENG. Methods: Among patients examined by ENG for suspected ulnar neuropathy, we identified...... 546 patients with ulnar neuropathy and 633 patients with ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms. These groups were compared with 2 separate groups of matched community referents and to each other. Questionnaire information on lifestyle was obtained. The electrophysiological severity of neuropathy was also...

  9. Evaluation and Prevention of Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajouhi M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic neuropathy is an incapacitating disease that afflicts almost 50 percent of patients with diabetes. A late finding in type 1 diabetes, diabetic neuropathy can be an early finding in non insulin-dependent diabetes. Diabetic neuropathies are divided primarily into two groups, sensorimotor and autonomic. Patients may acquire only one type of diabetic neuropathy or may present with combinations of neuropathies, such as autonomic neuropathy or distal symmetric polyneuropathy, the latter of which the most common form. Motor deficits, orthostatic hypotension, silent cardiac ischemia, hyperhidrosis, vasomotor instability, gastroparesis, bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction can also result from diabetic neuropathy. Strict control of blood sugar, combined with proper daily foot care, is essential to avoid the complications of this disorder. With the potential to afflict any part of the nervous system, diabetic neuropathy should be suspected in all patients with type 2 diabetes as well as patients who have had type 1 diabetes for over five years. Although some patients with diabetic neuropathy notice few symptoms, upon physical examination mild to moderately severe sensory loss may be noted by the physician. Idiopathic neuropathy has been known to precede the onset of type 2 diabetes.

  10. Delayed anterior cervical plate dislodgement with pharyngeal wall perforation and oral extrusion of cervical plate screw after 8 years: A very rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranath Kapu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with congenital anomaly of cervical spine, who presented with clinical features suggestive of cervical compressive spondylotic myelopathy. He underwent C3 median corpectomy, graft placement, and stabilization from C2 to C4 vertebral bodies. Postoperative period was uneventful and he improved in his symptoms. Eight years later, he presented with a difficulty in swallowing and occasional regurgitation of feeds of 2 months duration and oral extrusion of screw while having food. On oral examination, there was a defect in the posterior pharyngeal wall through which the upper end of plate with intact self-locking screw and socket of missed fixation screw was seen. This was confirmed on X-ray cervical spine. He underwent removal of the plate system and was fed through nasogastric tube and managed with appropriate antibiotics. This case is presented to report a very rare complication of anterior cervical plate fixation in the form of very late-onset dislodgement, migration of anterior cervical plate, and oral extrusion of screw through perforated posterior pharyngeal wall.

  11. Intramedullary arachnoid cyst in association with cervical spondylosis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimizadeh, Abolfazl; Soufiani, Housain

    2013-10-01

    Intramedullary spinal arachnoid cysts are considered to be very rare, and only 11 cases have been reported previously. Development of such a cyst in association with marked cervical spondylosis has not been reported until recently. Brief review of reported cases and debate on likely treatment strategy when such a cyst is associated with symptomatic spondylosis. To report the first example of a cervicothoracic intramedullary arachnoid cyst along with a symptomatic cervical spondylosis. Evaluation of quadriparesis in a 58-year-old female resulted in detection of a cervical spondylotic stenosis that was accompanied with an intramedullary cystic lesion. Parallel management of both pathologies was through a wide laminectomy extending from the lower edge of C3 to T2 with subsequent fenestration and partial resection of the cyst wall via an appropriate dorsal entry root zone myelotomy. Cervicothoracic instrumentation from C3 down to T2 was done to prevent postlaminectomy deformity. Histopathological findings were consistent with the diagnosis of arachnoid cyst. Postoperatively, the patient exhibited marked improvement in neurologic status. Through the review of the current case, first example from the literature, we concluded that surgery should target toward the proper management of both pathologies in a single-stage operation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Only fixation for cervical spondylosis: Report of early results with a preliminary experience with 6 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Goel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The author reports early post-operative outcome and preliminary experience with an alternative form of treatment of cervical degenerative or spondylotic disease leading to spinal canal stenosis that involves fixation-arthrodesis of the affected spinal segment using one or two (double insurance transarticular screws for each joint. Materials and Methods: During the period of months from March 2013 to July 2013, six patients having cervical spondylotic cord compression were treated with transarticular method of screw fixation of the involved segments. The operation involved section of the spinous process at its base, opening up of the facet joint, denuding of articular cartilage, placement of intraarticular cavity bone graft chips and insertion of either a single or two transarticular screws at each level. The fixation was done in four levels in four patients and at two levels in two patients. Japanese Orthopedic Association score, visual analog scale (neck pain and Odom′s criteria were used to monitor the clinical status of the patients before and after the surgery and at follow-up. Results: Immediate post-operative and a relatively short-term post-operative outcome was remarkably gratifying. During the average period of follow-up of 6 months (range: 3-8 months; there was varying degree of recovery of symptoms. The procedure resulted in firm stabilization and fixation of the spinal segment and provided a ground for arthrodesis. No patient worsened after treatment. During the period of follow-up, all patients showed remarkable and progressive recovery in symptoms. Conclusions: Vertical instability and telescoping, listhesis or overriding of the facets on physical activity seems to be the defining phenomenon in pathogenesis of cervical spondylotic disease. The clinical outcome in our patients suggest that only fixation of the spinal segment can be a rationale form of treatment. Transarticular method of treatment is a simple, safe and

  13. The comparison of multiple F-wave variable studies and magnetic resonance imaging examinations in the assessment of cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chu-Hsu; Tsai, Yuan-Hsiung; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chen, Chien-Min; Hsu, Hung-Chih; Wu, Chun-Yen; Hong, Chang-Zern

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the correlation of the findings of multiple median and ulnar F-wave variables and magnetic resonance imaging examinations in the prediction of cervical radiculopathy. The data of 68 patients who underwent both nerve conduction studies of the upper extremities and cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging within 3 mos of the nerve conduction studies were retrospectively reviewed and reinterpreted. The associations between multiple median and ulnar F-wave variables (including persistence, chronodispersion, and minimal, maximal, and mean latencies) and magnetic resonance imaging evidence of lower cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (i.e., C7, C8, and T1 radiculopathy) were investigated. Patients with lower cervical radiculopathy exhibited reduced right median F-wave persistence (P = 0.011), increased right ulnar F-wave chronodispersion (P = 0.041), and a trend toward increased left ulnar F-wave chronodispersion (P = 0.059); however, there were no other consistent significant differences in the F-wave variables between patients with and patients without magnetic resonance imaging evidence of lower cervical radiculopathy. In comparison with normal reference values established previously, the sensitivity and positive predictive value of F-wave variable abnormalities for predicting lower cervical radiculopathy were low. There was a low correlation between F-wave studies and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. The diagnostic utility of multiple F-wave variables in the prediction of cervical radiculopathy was not supported by this study.

  14. New Generation Antidepressants in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez-Álvarez, Ángela-María; Moreno, Carlos B

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of diabetic neuropathy increases with the duration of diabetes and the degree of hyperglycaemia. Pain is one of the most common and incapacitating symptoms of diabetic neuropathy and its pharmacological control is complex. The effectiveness of antidepressive agents has been described in different types of neuropathic pain, but their effectiveness, when used as analgesics in painful diabetic neuropathy, still remains controversial. Objective: To review the possible role of new-ge...

  15. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse eff...... effect should be born in mind, and discontinuation of the drug considered.......A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  16. Imaging of neuropathies about the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinoli, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.martinoli@unige.it [Radiologia – DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Miguel-Perez, Maribel [Unit of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapy, Faculty of Medicine (C Bellvitge), University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Padua, Luca [Fondazione Don Gnocchi Onlus and Department of Neurology, Policlinico “A. Gemelli”, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Gandolfo, Nicola [IM2S – Institut Monégasque de Médecine and Chirurgie Sportive, Montecarlo (Monaco); Zicca, Anna [Radiologia – DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Tagliafico, Alberto [Radiologia – National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies about the hip may be cause of chronic pain and disability. In most cases, these conditions derive from mechanical or dynamic compression of a segment of a nerve within a narrow osteofibrous tunnel, an opening in a fibrous structure, or a passageway close to a ligament or a muscle. Although the evaluation of nerve disorders primarily relies on neurological examination and electrophysiology, diagnostic imaging is currently used as a complement to help define the site and aetiology of nerve compression and exclude other disease possibly underlying the patient’ symptoms. Diagnosis of entrapment neuropathies about the hip with US and MR imaging requires an in-depth knowledge of the normal imaging anatomy and awareness of the anatomic and pathologic factors that may predispose or cause a nerve injury. Accordingly, the aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of hip neuropathies with an emphasis on the relevant anatomy, aetiology, clinical presentation, and their imaging appearance. The lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy (meiralgia paresthetica), femoral neuropathy, sciatic neuropathy, obturator neuropathy, superior and inferior gluteal neuropathies and pudendal neuropathy will be discussed.

  17. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 800-762-2264 Foundation for Women's Cancer Phone Number: 800-444-4441 Previous Page Next Page Cervical cancer fact sheet (PDF, 162 KB) Female reproductive system Related information Human papillomavirus (HPV) and genital ...

  18. Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information about cervical and other gynecologic cancers? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 800-CDC-INFO or www. cdc. gov/ cancer/ gynecologic National Cancer Institute: 800-4-CANCER or www. ...

  19. Cervical Cerclage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Gynecology. 2014;123:372. Cervical cerclage About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  20. Cervical Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... p020041. Accessed Nov. 11, 2014. Cervical cap About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  1. Cervical Laminoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SEEP Alternative Medicine Acupuncture Herbal Supplements Surgical Options Anterior Cervical Fusion Artifical ... tasks. A NASS physician can perform a thorough history to evaluate your symptoms and any recent changes. ...

  2. Cervical Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weeks after delivery Can be inserted hours before sex and remain in place for up to 48 hours Doesn't require a partner's cooperation Poses few if any side effects The cervical cap isn't appropriate for everyone, ...

  3. Cervical Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug Interactions Pill Identifier Commonly searched drugs Aspirin Metformin Warfarin Tramadol Lactulose Ranitidine News & Commentary Recent News ... D May Affect Breast Cancer Survival (Video) Ectopic Pregnancy (Video) Assisted Delivery Additional Content Medical News Cervical ...

  4. Cervical Myomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug Interactions Pill Identifier Commonly searched drugs Aspirin Metformin Warfarin Tramadol Lactulose Ranitidine News & Commentary Recent News ... D May Affect Breast Cancer Survival (Video) Ectopic Pregnancy (Video) Assisted Delivery Additional Content Medical News Cervical ...

  5. A technical case report on use of tubular retractors for anterior cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Arvind G; Patel, Ankit; Ankith, N V

    2017-12-19

    The authors put-forth this technical report to establish the feasibility of performing an anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) and a two-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using a minimally invasive approach with tubular retractors. First case: cervical spondylotic myelopathy secondary to a large postero-inferiorly migrated disc treated with corpectomy and reconstruction with a mesh cage and locking plate. Second case: cervical disc herniation with radiculopathy treated with a two-level ACDF. Both cases were operated with minimally invasive approach with tubular retractor using a single incision. Technical aspects and clinical outcomes have been reported. No intra or post-operative complications were encountered. Intra-operative blood loss was negligible. The patients had a cosmetic scar on healing. Standard procedure of placement of tubular retractors is sufficient for adequate surgical exposure with minimal invasiveness. Minimally invasive approach to anterior cervical spine with tubular retractors is feasible. This is the first report on use of minimally invasive approach for ACCF and two-level ACDF.

  6. Utilization trends of cervical artificial disc replacement after FDA approval compared with anterior cervical fusion: adoption of new technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven J; Hecht, Andrew C; Cho, Samuel K; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2014-02-01

    Epidemiologic study. To compare the utilization of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) versus cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) in terms of patient and hospital characteristics during the 3 years after Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of CDA devices in 2007. There was a surge in CDA adoption in the 3 years prior to FDA approval of CDA devices in 2007. However, utilization trends of CDA versus ACDF since the FDA approval are unknown. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample database was used to identify CDA and ACDF procedures performed in the United States in the 3 years after FDA approval of CDA devices (2008-2010). The frequencies of CDA and ACDF were estimated, stratified by patient and hospital characteristics. Average length of hospital stay and total charges and costs were estimated. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify patient and hospital characteristics associated with CDA utilization. In the 3 years after FDA approval of cervical disc devices, population-adjusted growth rates for CDA and ACDF were 4.9% and 11.8%, respectively (P = 0.6977). Female, African American and Medicaid patients were less likely to receive CDA. CDA was less likely to be performed in patients with cervical spondylotic changes and more likely to be performed in younger and healthier patients. CDA was less likely to be performed in the Midwestern United States or in public hospitals. The prevalence of CDA increased in the 3 years after FDA approval with a growth rate that is approximately twice than that for ACDF. Although there seems to be CDA adoption, CDA growth seemed to have reached a plateau and ACDF still remained the dominant surgical strategy for cervical disc disease. Possible regional, racial, and sex disparities in CDA utilization and a more strict approach in the selection of CDA over traditional ACDF may have impeded rapid adoption of CDA. 3.

  7. Cervical spondylosis with spinal cord encroachment: should preventive surgery be recommended?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Donald R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been stated that individuals who have spondylotic encroachment on the cervical spinal cord without myelopathy are at increased risk of spinal cord injury if they experience minor trauma. Preventive decompression surgery has been recommended for these individuals. The purpose of this paper is to provide the non-surgical spine specialist with information upon which to base advice to patients. The evidence behind claims of increased risk is investigated as well as the evidence regarding the risk of decompression surgery. Methods A literature search was conducted on the risk of spinal cord injury in individuals with asymptomatic cord encroachment and the risk and benefit of preventive decompression surgery. Results Three studies on the risk of spinal cord injury in this population met the inclusion criteria. All reported increased risk. However, none were prospective cohort studies or case-control studies, so the designs did not allow firm conclusions to be drawn. A number of studies and reviews of the risks and benefits of decompression surgery in patients with cervical myelopathy were found, but no studies were found that addressed surgery in asymptomatic individuals thought to be at risk. The complications of decompression surgery range from transient hoarseness to spinal cord injury, with rates ranging from 0.3% to 60%. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence that individuals with spondylotic spinal cord encroachment are at increased risk of spinal cord injury from minor trauma. Prospective cohort or case-control studies are needed to assess this risk. There is no evidence that prophylactic decompression surgery is helpful in this patient population. Decompression surgery appears to be helpful in patients with cervical myelopathy, but the significant risks may outweigh the unknown benefit in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, broad recommendations for decompression surgery in suspected at-risk individuals cannot be made

  8. Increased Segmental Range of Motion Is Correlated With Spondylolisthesis in the Cervical Spine After Laminoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Hideki; Kura, Tomohiko; Iwata, Eiichiro; Okuda, Akinori; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-04-01

    A retrospective study. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of increased segmental range of motion (ROM) after laminoplasty and to clarify whether increased ROM is associated with spondylolisthesis. Finally, we explored the effect of increased segmental ROM on clinical results. Cervical laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy causes reduced ROM, possibly due to the unintended contracture of the facet joint or a bony union. Although it is rarely studied, ROM may also increase following laminoplasty. Thus far, there are no reports describing the correlation between increased segmental ROM and segmental spondylolisthesis after laminoplasty. We evaluated 187 segments from 39 cervical spondylotic myelopathy patients who underwent bilateral open door laminoplasty from C2 to C7. The segmental ROM and spondylolisthesis were measured using dynamic radiographs that were obtained preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively. The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was used for clinical evaluation. To compare the clinical results, we compared the cases with increased ROM in at least one segment with the remaining cases. Increased segmental ROM (i.e., ≥5° increase) was observed in 25 of 187 segments (13.4%) from 14 cases. There was a strong correlation between increased ROM and spondylolisthesis. A high preoperative disc height was associated with increased segmental ROM 2 years postoperation. Regardless of the correlation with spondylolisthesis, there was no statistically significant correlation between increased segmental ROM and JOA score. The decrease in segmental ROM after laminoplasty was not uniform. Approximately 13.4% of all segments showed increased ROM. The preoperative disc height might influence the risk for increased segmental ROM. Furthermore, increased ROM was correlated with spondylolisthesis in the segment, though it was not correlated with clinical results. 4.

  9. Cervical spondylosis: a rare and curable cause of vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Daniel J; Shedid, Daniel; Shehadeh, Mohammad; Weil, Alexander G; Lanthier, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    Spondylotic vertebral artery (VA) compression is a rare cause of vertebrobasilar insufficiency and stroke. A 53-year-old man experienced multiple brief vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) and strokes, not apparently triggered by neck movements. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) documented consecutive infarcts, first in the left then right medial posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territories. Angiography showed two extracranial right vertebral artery (VA) stenoses, left VA hypoplasia, absence of left PICA and a dominant right PICA. Computed tomography angiography revealed right VA compression by osteophytes at C5-C6 and C6-C7 levels. No further vertebrobasilar insufficiency symptoms occurred in the 65 months following VA surgical decompression. Our literature review found 49 published surgical cases with vertebrobasilar symptoms caused by cervical spondylosis. Forty cases had one or more brief TIAs frequently triggered by neck movements. Three cases presented with stroke without prior TIA, with symptoms suggesting a top of the basilar artery embolic infarcts (one combined with a PICA infarct). Six cases had both TIAs and minor stroke. VA compression by uncovertebral osteophytes at the C5-C6 level was common. Dynamic angiography done in 38 cases systematically revealed worsening of VA stenosis or complete occlusion with either neck extension or rotation (ipsilateral when specified). Contralateral VA incompetence was found in 14 patients. Spondylotic VA stenosis can cause hemodynamic TIAs and watershed strokes, especially when contralateral VA insufficiency is combined to specific neck movements. Low-amplitude neck movement may suffice in severe cases. Embolic vertebrobasilar events are less frequent. VA decompression from spondylosis may prevent recurrent ischemic episodes.

  10. MR imaging of spinal factors and compression of the spinal cord in cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minoru; Ishii, Sukenobu; Tani, Shotaro; Sato, Tetsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of surgical 109 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were retrospectively reviewed to examine whether MR imaging would replace conventional radiological procedures in determining spinal factors and spinal cord compression in this disease. MR imaging was useful in determining spondylotic herniation, continuous type of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, and calcification of yellow ligament, probably replacing CT myelography, discography, and CT discography. When total defect of the subarachnoid space on T2-weighted images and block on myelograms were compared in determining spinal cord compression, the spinal cord was affected more extensively by 1.3 intervertebral distance (IVD) on T2-weighted images. When indentation of one third or more in anterior and posterior diameter of the spinal cord was used as spinal cord compression, the difference in the affected extension between myelography and MR imaging was 0.2 IVD on T1-weighted images and 0.6 IVD on T2-weighted images. However, when block was seen in 3 or more IVD on myelograms, the range of spinal cord compression tended to be larger on T1-weighted images. For a small range of spinal cord compression, T1-weighted imaging seems to be helpful in determining the range of decompression. When using T2-weighted imaging, the range of decompression becomes large, frequently including posterior decompression. (N.K.)

  11. Sensory neuropathy in two Border collie puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, K; Van Ham, L; Braund, K G; Bhatti, S; Tshamala, M; Chiers, K; Schrauwen, E

    2005-06-01

    A peripheral sensory neuropathy was diagnosed in two Border collie puppies. Neurological, electrophysiological and histopathological examinations suggested a purely sensory neuropathy with mainly distal involvement. Urinary incontinence was observed in one of the puppies and histological examination of the vagus nerve revealed degenerative changes. An inherited disorder was suspected.

  12. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  13. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non...... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  14. MR imaging of trigeminal neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Yeon; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Chung, Jin Il; Lee, Seung Ik; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves and has both sensory and motor functions. It can be divided into proximal (brainstem, preganglionic, gasserian ganglion, and cavernous sinus) and distal (extracranial opthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular) segments. Patients with trigeminal neuropathy present with a wide variety of symptoms, and lesions producing those symptoms may occur anywhere along the protracted course of the trigeminal nerve, from its distal facial branches to its nuclear columns in the brainstem. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the normal anatomy of the trigeminal nerve and associated various pathologic conditions. These are arranged anatomically according to their site of interaction with it.

  15. Design of Lamifuse: a randomised, multi-centre controlled trial comparing laminectomy without or with dorsal fusion for cervical myeloradiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grotenhuis J André

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background laminectomy is a valuable surgical treatment for some patients with a cervical radiculomyelopathy due to cervical spinal stenosis. More recently attention has been given to motion of the spinal cord over spondylotic spurs as a cause of myelopathic changes. Immobilisation by fusion could have a positive effect on the recovery of myelopathic signs or changes. This has never been investigated in a prospective, randomised trial. Lamifuse is an acronyme for laminectomy and fusion. Methods/Design Lamifuse is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial comparing laminectomy with and without fusion in patients with a symptomatic cervical canal stenosis. The study population will be enrolled from patients that are 60 years or older with myelopathic signs and/or symptoms due to a cervical canal stenosis. A kyphotis shape of the cervical spine is an exclusion criterium. Each treatment arm needs 30 patients. Discussion This study will contribute to the discussion whether additional fusion after a cervical laminectomy results in a better clinical outcome. ISRCT number ISRCTN72800446

  16. Cervical thymoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrão Rapoport

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Cervical thymoma is a primitive thymic neoplasia. It is very rare. This disease presents higher incidence in female patients in their 4th to 6th decade of life. We present a case report of a cervical thymoma CASE REPORT: 54-year-old female patient, caucasian, with no history of morbidity, presenting a left cervical nodule close to the thyroid gland. During the 30 months of investigation a left cervical nodule grew progressively next to the thyroid while the patient showed no symptoms, making accurate diagnosis difficult. Tests on her thyroid function did not show changes, nor were there changes in any subsidiary tests. The diagnosis of the disease was made intra-operatively through total thyroid individualization. The results were confirmed by the histological findings from the ressected material. Cervical thymoma is a very rare disease, with difficult preoperatory diagnosis. Some additional study methods which are employed today are thallium 201, technetium 99 and iodine 131 scintigraphy, magnetic nuclear resonance and especially histopathological findings and classification.

  17. Autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eVerrotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population.

  18. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully w...

  19. Epidemiology of Peripheral Neuropathy: An Indian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Sweety; Pandit, Alak; Ganguly, Goutam; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is a common disorder and presents as diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to physicians and neurologists. In epidemiological studies from India from various regions the overall prevalence of PN varied from 5 to 2400 per 10,000 population in various community studies. India is composed of a multiethnic, multicultural population who are exposed to different adverse environmental factors such as arsenic and lead. Use of different chemotherapeutic agents with propensity to affect peripheral nerves, increasing methods of diagnosis of connective tissue disorders and use of immunomodulating drugs, growing aging population is expected to change the spectrum and burden of peripheral neuropathy in the community. The other important aspect of peripheral neuropathies is in terms of the geographical and occupational distribution especially of toxic neuropathies like arsenic which is common in eastern belt; lead, mercury and organo-phosphorous compounds where occupational exposures are major sources. Inflammatory neuropathies either due to vasculitis or G B Syndrome, chronic inflammatory polyradiculopathies are another major group of neuropathies which is increasing due to increase longevity of Indian subjects and immunological impairment, also adds to morbidity of the patients and are potentially treatable. Leprous neuropathy is common in India and although its frequency is significantly decreasing because of national control program yet pure neuritic form still remains a cause of concern and similar is the case with another infective cause like diptheric neurpathy. Thus this article is an attempt to cover major categories and also highlight the areas where further studies are needed.

  20. An analysis of cervical myelopathy due to cervical spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament by CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Keiju; Yonenobe, Sakuo; Ebara, Sohei; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ono, Keiro

    1988-01-01

    CT-myelographic (CTM) findings of 20 patients with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) and 24 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) were reviewed for the evaluation of (1) contributing factors to preoperative neurologic symptoms and therapeutic prognosis in OPLL, and (2) differences in pathology between OPLL and CSM. In OPLL, the severity of preoperative neurologic symptoms was not related to the degree of deformed spinal cord - as expressed by the transverse area of the spinal cord and the rate of flatness - nor the degree of ossification - as expressed by the rate of stricture, and the transverse areas of the effective spinal canal and ossification. The transverse areas of the spinal cord and effective spinal canal were correlated with both postoperative scores for neurologic symptoms and the recovery rate. Osseous compression to the spinal cord was severer in OPLL than OSM. Regarding other factors, such as size and shape of the spinal cord and therapeutic prognosis, there was no difference between the two diseases. This implied the association of dynamic compression to the spinal cord that resulted from the unstable cervical spine in the case of CSM. (Namekawa, K.)

  1. Analysis of cervical myelopathy due to cervical spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament by CT myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Keiju; Yonenobe, Sakuo; Ebara, Sohei; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ono, Keiro

    1988-04-01

    CT-myelographic (CTM) findings of 20 patients with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) and 24 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) were reviewed for the evaluation of (1) contributing factors to preoperative neurologic symptoms and therapeutic prognosis in OPLL, and (2) differences in pathology between OPLL and CSM. In OPLL, the severity of preoperative neurologic symptoms was not related to the degree of deformed spinal cord - as expressed by the transverse area of the spinal cord and the rate of flatness - nor the degree of ossification - as expressed by the rate of stricture, and the transverse areas of the effective spinal canal and ossification. The transverse areas of the spinal cord and effective spinal canal were correlated with both postoperative scores for neurologic symptoms and the recovery rate. Osseous compression to the spinal cord was severer in OPLL than OSM. Regarding other factors, such as size and shape of the spinal cord and therapeutic prognosis, there was no difference between the two diseases. This implied the association of dynamic compression to the spinal cord that resulted from the unstable cervical spine in the case of CSM. (Namekawa, K.).

  2. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination.

  3. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination

  4. Diagnostic capability of retinal thickness measures in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha Srinivasan

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The GCC FLV can differentiate individuals with diabetic neuropathy from healthy controls, while the inferior RNFL thickness is able to differentiate those with greater degrees of neuropathy from those with mild or no neuropathy, both with an acceptable level of accuracy. Optical coherence tomography represents a non-invasive technology that aids in detection of retinal structural changes in patients with established diabetic neuropathy. Further refinement of the technique and the analytical approaches may be required to identify patients with minimal neuropathy.

  5. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... higher than 300 mg/m2 the patients lost distal tendon and H-reflexes and displayed reduced vibration sense in the feet and the fingers. The amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) from the fingers innervated by the median nerve and the dorsolateral side of the foot innervated by the sural...... of the foot evoked by a tactile probe showed similar changes to those observed in SNAPs evoked by electrical stimulation. At these doses, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) from the tibial nerve had increased latencies of peripheral, spinal and central responses suggesting loss of central processes...

  6. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... nerve were 50-60% reduced, whereas no definite changes occurred at lower doses. The SNAP conduction velocities were reduced by 10-15% at cumulative doses of 400-700 mg/m2 consistent with loss of large myelinated fibres. SNAPs from primarily Pacinian corpuscles in digit 3 and the dorsolateral side...... of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of distal...

  7. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  8. Suboccipital neuropathy after bone conduction device placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, H T; de Ru, J A

    2013-01-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics of a 70-year-old female with occipital neuropathy following bone conduction device surgery. A 65-year-old woman underwent bone conduction device placement surgery on the left temporal bone. Postoperatively she progressively developed chronic pain at the implantation site. The pain led to minimal neck movement, which resulted in complaints of the shoulder and arm on the left side. She was treated by an orthopaedic surgeon for a frozen shoulder. Pain medication and occipital nerve blocking had no sustained effect on the pain. Occipital neuropathy is a syndrome with continuous aching involving the occipital and parietal scalp caused by trauma or peripheral compression of the occipital nerves. The most common causes of occipital neuropathy are probably direct trauma to the nerve and hypertrophic fibrosis of subcutaneous tissue surrounding the nerve. Scar formation after surgery may therefore cause entrapment of the nerve. We describe a case of occipital neuropathy as a complication of BAHA surgery.

  9. Pharmacological Treatment Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Kenneth; Shinkazh, Nataliya; Frank, Jerry; Israel, Igor; Fellner, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Pain modulation is a key treatment goal for diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients. Guidelines have recommended antidepressant, anticonvulsant, analgesic, and topical medications—both approved and off-label—to reduce pain in this population.

  10. Profil electroneuromyographique des neuropathies dans une ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    différentes neuropathies dans une population de diabétiques. Nous avons réalisé une étude descriptive portant sur 110 patients diabétiques admis dans le laboratoire de Neurophysiologie du CHU de Limoges de janvier 2004 à juin 2006. Le diagnostic EMG des neuropathies démyélinisantes était basé sur les critères de ...

  11. [Peripheral neuropathy caused by thallium poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, N; Talamon, C; Smadja, D; Said, G

    1997-10-01

    A 20-year-old man developed over three weeks a sensory and painful neuropathy associated with diffuse alopecia. There was motor weakness, and superficial and deep hypoesthesia of the inferior limbs. Deep tendon reflexes were normal. Electrophysiological study mainly showed axonal motor neuropathy. This patient was admitted six weeks after the first symptoms. The clinical picture suggested thallium poisoning, which was confirmed by thallium concentrations in plasma, urine, hair and nails. After search, thallium was identified in a rat poison.

  12. N-hexane neuropathy in offset printers.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, C M; Yu, C W; Fong, K Y; Leung, S Y; Tsin, T W; Yu, Y L; Cheung, T F; Chan, S Y

    1993-01-01

    In an offset printing factory with 56 workers, 20 (36%) developed symptomatic peripheral neuropathy due to exposure to n-hexane. Another 26 workers (46%) were found to have subclinical neuropathy. The initial change in the nerve conduction study was reduced amplitude of the sensory action potentials, followed by reduced amplitude of the motor action potentials, reduction in motor conduction velocities and increase in distal latencies. These changes indicate primary axonal degeneration with se...

  13. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  14. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cervical cytology (also called the Pap test or Pap smear) and, for some women, testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) . How does cervical cancer occur? Cancer occurs when cervical cells become abnormal ...

  15. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Screening for cervical cancer using the Pap test has decreased the number of new cases of ... their chance of dying from cervical cancer . A Pap test is commonly used to screen for cervical cancer. ...

  16. Cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Deanna Lynn; Comeau, Douglas

    2014-07-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is the result of irritation and/or compression of nerve root as it exits the cervical spine. Pain is a common presenting symptom and may be accompanied by motor or sensory deficits in areas innervated by the affected nerve root. Diagnosis is suggested by history and corresponding physical examination findings. Confirmation is achieved with MRI. A multimodal approach to treatment helps patients improve. Medications may be used to alleviate symptoms and manage pain. Physical therapy and manipulation may improve neck discomfort. Guided corticosteroid injections and selected nerve blocks may help control nerve root pain. Most patients improve with a conservative, nonoperative treatment course. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lateral cervical puncture for cervical myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seol, Hae Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Yoon Hwan; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1985-01-01

    Eleven cervical myelograms were performed by lateral cervical puncture using Metrizamide. So, following results were obtained: 1. Site of lateral cervical puncture; Posterior one third of bony cervical canal at C 1-2 level. 2. Advantages as compared with lumbar puncture for cervical myelograms; 1) Small amount of contrast media 2) Excellent image 3) Less position charge 4) Short time 5) Well visualization of superior margin of obstructive lesion in spinal canal 3. Cessation of lateral cervical puncture, when; 1) Pain during injection of contrast media 2) Localized collection of contrast media

  18. [Clinical characteristics of paraneoplastic retinopathy and optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hou-bin; Wei, Shi-hui; Li, Ying; Wang, Feng-xiang; Yao, Yi; Jiang, Cai-hui; Yin, Zheng-qin; Zhang, Mao-nian; Wei, Wen-bin

    2013-06-01

    To analyze the clinical characteristics of paraneoplastic retinopathy and optic neuropathy(PRON). Case series study. Eight patients were enrolled from October 2006 to March 2012 visited in ophthalmology department, the People Liberation Army General Hospital. The patients were underwent a series of examinations, including fundus photography, visual electrophysiology, fundus fluorescein angiography, optic coherent tomography,fundus autofluorescent imaging, perimetry, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, spinal tap and cerebrospinal fluid test, paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS) antibody test. The patients were followed up in outpatient department and(or) by phone. The clinical manifestation,entity types, and treatment were analyzed. Of the eight patients, there were cancer associated retinopathy(CAR) 3 cases, bilateral diffuse uveal melanocytic proliferation (BDUMP) 2 cases and paraneoplastic optic neuropathy(PON) 3 cases. Five patients were detected the PNS antibodies and revealed three patients with positive results. As for the primary malignancy,four of the eight patients were lung carcinoma,others included invasive thymoma, kidney cancer, acute lymphocytic leukemia and cervical cancer, each for one case. All the patients complained vision blurring or progressive visual decrease. Other complaints included dark shadow in two patients, shimmering, dazzling, double vision and eye pain, each in one patient. One patient complained progressive decreased vision in both eyes prior to the diagnosis of lung cancer. Of the 16 eyes of the eight patients, there were six patients with no light perception vision, five from light perception to 0.05, and other five with no less than 0.4 vision, in the end of the follow up. Five patients were treated with steroid with unsatisfactory efficacy. Each entity of PRON has its own clinical characteristics. PRON especially BDUMP may be a pre-metastatic disease.

  19. Clinical diagnosis of diabetic polyneuropathy with the diabetic neuropathy symptom and diabetic neuropathy examination scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.W.; Lefrandt, J.D.; Links, T.P.; Smit, J.A.; Stewart, R.E.; van der Hoeven, J.H.; Hoogenberg, K.

    OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the discriminative power of the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom (DNS) and Diabetic Neuropathy Examination (DNE) scores for diagnosing diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP), as well as their relation with cardiovascular autonomic function testing (cAFT) and electro-diagnostic studies

  20. MR neurography in ulnar neuropathy as surrogate parameter for the presence of disseminated neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Bäumer

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Patients with ulnar neuropathy of unclear etiology occasionally present with lesion extension from elbow to upper arm level on MRI. This study investigated whether MRI thereby distinguishes multifocal neuropathy from focal-compressive neuropathy at the elbow. METHODS: This prospective study was approved by the institutional ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. 122 patients with ulnar mononeuropathy of undetermined localization and etiology by clinical and electrophysiological examination were assessed by MRI at upper arm and elbow level using T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences at 3T. Twenty-one patients were identified with proximal ulnar nerve lesions and evaluated for findings suggestive of disseminated neuropathy (i subclinical lesions in other nerves, (ii unfavorable outcome after previous decompressive elbow surgery, and (iii subsequent diagnosis of inflammatory or other disseminated neuropathy. Two groups served as controls for quantitative analysis of nerve-to-muscle signal intensity ratios: 20 subjects with typical focal ulnar neuropathy at the elbow and 20 healthy subjects. RESULTS: In the group of 21 patients with proximal ulnar nerve lesion extension, T2-w ulnar nerve signal was significantly (p<0.001 higher at upper arm level than in both control groups. A cut-off value of 1.92 for maximum nerve-to-muscle signal intensity ratio was found to be sensitive (86% and specific (100% to discriminate this group. Ten patients (48% exhibited additional T2-w lesions in the median and/or radial nerve. Another ten (48% had previously undergone elbow surgery without satisfying outcome. Clinical follow-up was available in 15 (71% and revealed definitive diagnoses of multifocal neuropathy of various etiologies in four patients. In another eight, diagnoses could not yet be considered definitive but were consistent with multifocal neuropathy. CONCLUSION: Proximal ulnar nerve T2 lesions at upper

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Prem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the fourth leading cause of death world-wide and a further increase in the prevalence as well as mortality of the disease is predicted for coming decades. There is now an increased appreciation for the need to build awareness regarding COPD and to help the thousands of people who suffer from this disease and die prematurely from COPD or its associated complication(s. Peripheral neuropathy in COPD has received scanty attention despite the fact that very often clinicians come across COPD patients having clinical features suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. Electrophysiological tests like nerve conduction studies are required to distinguish between axonal and demyelinating type of disorder that cannot be analyzed by clinical examination alone. However, various studies addressing peripheral neuropathy in COPD carried out so far have included patients with COPD having markedly varying baseline characteristics like severe hypoxemia, elderly patients, those with long duration of illness, etc. that are not uniform across the studies and make it difficult to interpret the results to a consistent conclusion. Almost one-third of COPD patients have clinical evidence of peripheral neuropathy and two-thirds have electrophysiological abnormalities. Some patients with no clinical indication of peripheral neuropathy do have electrophysiological deficit suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. The more frequent presentation consists of a polyneuropathy that is subclinical or with predominantly sensory signs, and the neurophysiological and pathological features of predominantly axonal neuropathy. The presumed etiopathogenic factors are multiple: chronic hypoxia, tobacco smoke, alcoholism, malnutrition and adverse effects of certain drugs.

  2. Endoneurial pressure in hexachlorophene neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, H C; Myers, R R; Zweifach, B W; Lampert, P W

    1978-02-20

    Increased endoneurial pressure of up to 17.0 cm H2O was recorded in the peripheral nerves of rats fed hexachlorophene in their laboratory diet. The pressure was measured using a micropressure transducer developed for recording pressure in the microcirculation. The results were correlated with morphologic findings. Teased nerve fibers and araldite-embedded specimens of hexachlorophene damaged sciatic nerve revealed the characteristic severe intramyelinic edema due to splits in the minor dense lines of compact myelin giving rise to wide interlamellar spaces as shown in previous studies. The endoneurial pressure of rats exposed to hexachlorophene for 11 days and subsequently fed a normal diet returned to normal (0.2-3.0 cm H2O) after 12 days, and morphologic examination showed few residual abnormalities. Prolonged exposure to hexachlorophene for up to 4 weeks caused widespread axonal degeneration in addition to intramyelinic edema. Animals treated with hexachlorophene for 21 days followed by a normal diet for 14 days showed degenerated axons, phagocytosis of myelin as well as interstitial edema and elevated endoneurial pressure. It is suggested that axonal degeneration in hexachlorophene neuropathy is caused by increased endoneurial pressure.

  3. Peroneal neuropathy after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J S; Gwak, M S; Yang, M; Kim, G S; Kwon, C H; Joh, J W; Lee, S K; Kim, S J

    2008-10-01

    The incidence of peroneal neuropathy (PN), occurring predominantly in the left leg, increases after the incorporation of intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) devices among adult liver transplantation (OLT) recipients in our hospital. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible risk factors for PN and the reason for the left-leg predominance. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 501 OLT recipients. The patients were first divided into 2 groups, PN (n = 33) and non-PN (n = 468), to assess possible risk factors. The patients were then categorized into IPC (n = 262) and non-IPC (n = 239) groups according to the use of IPC devices. In a subsequent prospective study, we measured the degree and duration of the tilt of the operating table during OLT to investigate their relationship to the predominant left-leg PN. The rate of IPC device use was significantly greater among the PN than non-PN group (78.8% vs 50.4%, P table were greater and longer than the right tilt. The use of IPC devices during OLT increased the occurrence of PN and the left tilt of the operating table was strongly related to the predominant left-leg PN. Careful protection of the vulnerable point and minimization of the tilting of the operating table is advised during OLT, especially when IPC devices are used.

  4. Plasma dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) as an index of diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N J; Dejgaard, Anders; Hilsted, J

    1988-01-01

    Forearm venous plasma noradrenalin and dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) concentrations were measured in eight diabetic patients with and eight diabetic patients without neuropathy. Plasma noradrenalin was on average the same in patients with and without neuropathy and correlated to serum creatinine...

  5. Ischemic neuropathy and rhabdomyolysis as presenting symptoms of postpartum cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, Rick C. G.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C.; Janssen, Mirian C. H.

    2009-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis and peripheral neuropathy are two distinct disease entities which are rarely encountered in combination. We present a woman with rhabdomyolysis and peripheral neuropathy 3 weeks postpartum. Her symptoms were caused by bilateral femoral artery thrombosis due to postpartum

  6. F wave index: A diagnostic tool for peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G R Sathya

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that F wave index in upper limb was significantly lower in patients with peripheral neuropathy than the healthy controls, and could be used for early detection of peripheral neuropathy.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... link) PubMed OMIM (2 links) NEURONOPATHY, DISTAL HEREDITARY MOTOR, TYPE VA NEURONOPATHY, DISTAL HEREDITARY MOTOR, TYPE VB Sources ...

  8. Headache of cervical origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burguet, J.L.; Wackenheim, A.

    1984-01-01

    The authors recall cervical etiologies of headache. They distinguish on the one hand the cervico-occipital region with minor and major malformations and acquired lesions, and on the other hand the middle and inferior cervical segment. They also recall the original structuralist analysis of the cervical spine and give the example of the ''cervical triplet''. (orig.) [de

  9. Phenotyping animal models of diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biessels, G J; Bril, V; Calcutt, N A

    2014-01-01

    of statistically different values between diabetic and control animals in 2 of 3 assessments (nocifensive behavior, nerve conduction velocities, or nerve structure). The participants propose that this framework would allow different research groups to compare and share data, with an emphasis on data targeted......NIDDK, JDRF, and the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of EASD sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of animal models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of consensus criteria for the phenotyping of rodent models of diabetic neuropathy....... The discussion was divided into five areas: (1) status of commonly used rodent models of diabetes, (2) nerve structure, (3) electrophysiological assessments of nerve function, (4) behavioral assessments of nerve function, and (5) the role of biomarkers in disease phenotyping. Participants discussed the current...

  10. Anesthesia Management in Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Karacaer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus and encompasses damage to the autonomic nerve fibers, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. There is an increased mortality and morbidity rate among these patients. A series of cardiovascular reflex tests known as Ewing's battery tests are used for diagnosis cardiac autonomic neuropathy and provide valuable information to the clinical assessment of these patients. As anesthesia has a major influence on perioperative autonomic function, the interplay between cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and anesthesia may result in unexpected haemodynamic instability during surgery and postoperative recovery. A comprehensive preoperative assessment and perioperative cautious monitoring are necessary for successful anesthesia management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(2.000: 140-151

  11. Blood pressure regulation in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1985-01-01

    Defective blood pressure responses to standing, exercise and epinephrine infusions have been demonstrated in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. The circulatory mechanisms underlying blood pressure responses to exercise and standing up in these patients are well characterized: In both...... which may contribute to exercise hypotension in these patients. During hypoglycemia, blood pressure regulation seems intact in patients with autonomic neuropathy. This is probably due to release of substantial amounts of catecholamines during these experiments. During epinephrine infusions a substantial...... blood pressure fall ensues in patients with autonomic neuropathy, probably due to excessive muscular vasodilation. It is unresolved why blood pressure regulation is intact during hypoglycemia and severely impaired--at similar catecholamine concentrations--during epinephrine infusions....

  12. Cervical Adjacent Segment Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Özbek, Zühtü; Özkara, Emre; Yağmur, İpek; Arslantaş, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Cervical adjacent segment disease; is the general name ofdisc pathologies that develop in adjacent levels after cervical surgery. If thecervical adjacent segment disease that do not require reoperation and it doesnot cause clinical signs is called radiological cervical adjacent segmentpathology, but those causing radiculopathy, myelopathy or instability is calledclinic cervical adjacent segment pathology. The incidence of cervical adjacentsegment disease in 10-year follow-up is 2.4% -2.9%. Wh...

  13. Neuropathies optiques héréditaires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and aut...

  14. Initial sensorimotor and delayed autonomic neuropathy in acute thallium poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordentoft, T; Andersen, E B; Mogensen, P H

    1998-06-01

    In a 27-year old male with acute thallium poisoning, signs of initially severe sensorimotor neuropathy with complete remission after two weeks were demonstrated. Signs of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy were initially absent, but developed after a latency period of one week with marked improvement after seven months. Delayed autonomic neuropathy may be caused by a late affection of small unmyelinated autonomic nerve fibers.

  15. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of total disc replacement on atypical symptoms associated with cervical spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Qing; Zheng, Shan; Yu, Jie; Yan, Kai; Tian, Wei

    2013-07-01

    To determine the efficacy of total disc replacement (TDR) for the treatment of cervical spondylosis associated with atypical symptoms. In this retrospective study, patients with myelopathy and/or radiculopathy related to cervical spondylosis that were treated with TDR were contacted by phone. Atypical symptoms involved in the questionnaire included dizziness, headache, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, tinnitus, palpitations, hypomnesia, and abdominal discomfort. The severity of each atypical symptom was evaluated separately based on an numerical rating scale. The radiographs and charts before and after the surgery were reviewed. Paired samples t tests were used to compare the severity of the symptoms before and after surgery. Between 2003 and 2010, 73 of 133 patients diagnosed with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy treated by TDR experienced atypical symptoms before surgery. The mean follow-up was 34.6 months. There were 47 males and 26 females (mean age 48.9 years). Of the 73 patients, 41 were diagnosed with myelopathy; 13 with radiculopathy; and 19 with mixed-type spondylosis. The incidence of each symptom before surgery was dizziness (46.6%), tinnitus (41.1 %), facial flushing and sweating (41.1 %), palpitations (39.7%), headache (35.6%), hypomnesia (30.1%), nausea and vomiting (20.5%), blurred vision (20.5%), and gastroenterologic discomfort (5.5%). The severity of the following symptoms improved after surgery: dizziness (p = 0.000, α = 0.05), headache (p = 0.000, α = 0.05), nausea and vomiting (p = 0.000, α = 0.05), blurred vision (p = 0.004, α = 0.05), tinnitus (p = 0.000, α = 0.05), palpitations (p = 0.000, α = 0.05), hypomnesia (p = 0.010, α = 0.05), and other symptoms (p = 0.030, α = 0.05). The gastroenterologic discomfort did not improve (p = 0.731, α = 0.05). TDR may have a positive effect on atypical symptoms associated with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy.

  17. Persisting nutritional neuropathy amongst former war prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, G V; Bell, D R

    1982-01-01

    Of 898 former Far East prisoners of war, assessed between 1968 and 1981, 49 (5.5%) had evidence of persisting symptomatic neurological disease dating back to their periods of malnutrition in captivity. The commonest syndromes were peripheral neuropathy (often of "burning foot" type), optic atrophy, and sensori-neural deafness. Though nutritional neuropathies disappeared soon after release in most ex-Far East prisoners of war, in some they have persisted up to 36 years since exposure to the nutritional insult. PMID:6292369

  18. Cervicitis of unknown etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephanie N

    2014-07-01

    Cervicitis has been described by some as the female counterpart of urethritis in men. Over the years a number of clinical and microscopy-based definitions have been suggested in the literature. Clinical manifestations include mucopurulent discharge from the cervix, cervical friability (easy bleeding from the cervix with passage of a swab) and cervical ectopy. Microscopic definitions involving the use of Gram stain of cervical secretions have included either more than 10 white blood cells (WBCs) or more than 30 WBCs per high-power field. Combinations of these clinical and microscopic findings have been used in attempts to increase the accuracy of cervicitis diagnosis. When cervicitis was initially recognized as a clinical entity, several investigators reported the primary pathogens causing cervicitis as Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. It is now well established that most cases of cervicitis are not caused by these two organisms. Most cases of cervicitis are of unknown etiology.

  19. [Three dimensional finite element model of a modified posterior cervical single open-door laminoplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Yang, Y; Fei, Q; Li, D; Li, J J; Meng, H; Su, N; Fan, Z H; Wang, B Q

    2017-06-06

    Objective: To build a three-dimensional finite element models of a modified posterior cervical single open-door laminoplasty with short-segmental lateral mass screws fusion. Methods: The C(2)-C(7) segmental data were obtained from computed tomography (CT) scans of a male patient with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and spinal stenosis.Three-dimensional finite element models of a modified cervical single open-door laminoplasty (before and after surgery) were constructed by the combination of software package MIMICS, Geomagic and ABAQUS.The models were composed of bony vertebrae, articulating facets, intervertebral disc and associated ligaments.The loads of moments 1.5Nm at different directions (flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation)were applied at preoperative model to calculate intersegmental ranges of motion.The results were compared with the previous studies to verify the validation of the models. Results: Three-dimensional finite element models of the modified cervical single open- door laminoplasty had 102258 elements (preoperative model) and 161 892 elements (postoperative model) respectively, including C(2-7) six bony vertebraes, C(2-3)-C(6-7) five intervertebral disc, main ligaments and lateral mass screws.The intersegmental responses at the preoperative model under the loads of moments 1.5 Nm at different directions were similar to the previous published data. Conclusion: Three-dimensional finite element models of the modified cervical single open- door laminoplasty were successfully established and had a good biological fidelity, which can be used for further study.

  20. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain ...

  1. Neuropathy: mobility and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, Carine H. M.

    2008-01-01

    In summary, diabetes is increasingly becoming a disease of elderly people. Some of the under-appreciated complications such as impaired physical functioning, increased risk for falls and fractures need to be more addressed in the future. When evaluating a patient with peripheral neuropathy, it is

  2. Diabetic cachectic neuropathy: An uncommon neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic patients can be affected by a wide variety of neurological complications which may involve the peripheral or autonomic nervous system, or both. These complications significantly impair the quality of life of patients, with impact on morbidity and mortality outcomes. Diabetic cachectic neuropathy, also called diabetic ...

  3. Habitual Physical Activity, Peripheral Neuropathy, Foot Deformities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Habitual physical activity index (3.2 ± 0.83) was highest in work-related activities; 69 (26.1 %) patients presented with peripheral neuropathy and 52 (19. 7%) had the lowest limb function. Pes planus was the most prevalent foot deformity (20.1%). Significant differences existed in physical activity indices across ...

  4. Suboccipital neuropathy after bone conduction device placement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, H.T.; Ru, J.A. de

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics of a 70-year-old female with occipital neuropathy following bone conduction device surgery. DESCRIPTION: A 65-year-old woman underwent bone conduction device placement surgery on the left temporal bone. Postoperatively she progressively developed

  5. Amitriptyline and sertraline in diabetic neuropathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-06-01

    Jun 1, 2008 ... Jawaid et al. Amitriptyline and sertraline in diabetic neuropathy. Int J Health Res, June 2008; 1(2):. 71. Reprinted from. International Journal of. Health Research. Peer-reviewed Online Journal http://www.ijhr.org. PORACOM. Academic Publishers ...

  6. Glycoconjugates as target antigens in peripheral neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Suturkova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of antigens present at the human peripheral nerve is a great challenge in the field of neuroimmunology. The latest investigations are focused on the understanding of the biology of glycoconjugates present at the peripheral nerve, and their immunological reactivity. Increased titers of antibodies that recognize carbohydrate determinants of glycoconjugates (glycolipids and glycoproteins are associated with distinct neuropathic syndromes. There is considerable cross-reactivity among anti-ganglioside antibodies, resulting from shared oligosaccharide epitopes, possibly explaining the overlap in syndromes observed in many affected patients. Sera from patients with neuropathies (GBS, chronic inflammatory demielynating polyneuropathy - CIDP, multifocal motor neuropathy - MMN, cross-react with glycoproteins isolated from human peripheral nerve and from Campylobacter jejuni O:19. The frequency of occurrence of antibodies against these glycoproteins is different, depending of the type of neuropathy. Identification of the cross-reactive glycoproteins and possible additional auto antigens could be useful in laboratory evaluation of peripheral neuropathies and help to develop a more effective therapeutic approach.

  7. Idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy in a poodle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Aparicio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A seven years old, male poodle is examined presenting acute mandible paralysis (dropped jaw, drooling and difficulty for the apprehension and chewing; not evidence of an other alteration of cranial nerves. The muscular biopsy rules out a myositisof masticatory muscles. The disorder is resolved completely in 3 weeks confirming diagnosis of idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy.

  8. Comparison of outcomes and safety of using hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft in cervical cages for anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Mashhadinezhad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   After cervical discectomy, autogenetic bone is packed into the cage to increase the rate of union between adjacent vertebral bodies, but donor site–related complications can still occur. In this study we evaluate the use   of hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft for interbody fusion.     Methods:   From November 2008 to November 2011, 236 patients participated in this study. Peek cages were packed with autologous bone grafts taken from the iliac crest in 112 patients and hydroxyapatite (HA granules in 124 patients.   Patients were followed for 12 months. The patients’ neurological signs, results, and complications were fully recorded   throughout the procedure. Radiological imaging was done to assess the fusion rate and settling ratio.     Results:   Formation of bony bridges at the third month was higher in the autograft group versus the granule group. However, there was no difference between both groups at the 12-month follow-up assessment. No difference (     P > 0.05   was found regarding improvement in neurological deficit as well as radicular pain and recovery rate between the two groups. Conclusions:   Interbody fusion cage containing HA granules proved to be an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. Clinical and neurological outcome, radiographic measurement and fusion rate   in cage containing HA are similar and competitive with autograft packed cages.

  9. Comparison of outcomes and safety of using hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft in cervical cages for anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Mashhadinezhad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   After cervical discectomy, autogenetic bone is packed into the cage to increase the rate of union between adjacent vertebral bodies, but donor site–related complications can still occur. In this study we evaluate the use   of hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft for interbody fusion.     Methods:   From November 2008 to November 2011, 236 patients participated in this study. Peek cages were packed with autologous bone grafts taken from the iliac crest in 112 patients and hydroxyapatite (HA granules in 124 patients.   Patients were followed for 12 months. The patients’ neurological signs, results, and complications were fully recorded   throughout the procedure. Radiological imaging was done to assess the fusion rate and settling ratio.     Results:   Formation of bony bridges at the third month was higher in the autograft group versus the granule group. However, there was no difference between both groups at the 12-month follow-up assessment. No difference (     P > 0.05   was found regarding improvement in neurological deficit as well as radicular pain and recovery rate between the two groups. Conclusions:   Interbody fusion cage containing HA granules proved to be an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. Clinical and neurological outcome, radiographic measurement and fusion rate   in cage containing HA are similar and competitive with autograft packed cages.    

  10. N-hexane neuropathy in screen printers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, V; Chaudhry, N; Tatke, M

    2007-01-01

    To study the clinical and electrophysiological profile of n-hexane neuropathy in a tertiary care center of India. Twenty five screen printers from five different factories, with peripheral neuropathy were included in the study. A detailed general physical, systemic and neurological examination was conducted Visual acuity, color vision and field charting was done in all the subjects. All patients were subjected to Folstein mini mental scale examination. Electrophysiological evaluation included motor and sensory conduction studies of the conventionally studied nerves of upper and lower limbs, Needle EMG of various distal and proximal muscles and patterned visual evoked responses. The electrophysiological profile was repeated every three months till one year. Sural nerve biopsy was studied in six patients. The patients were followed for a maximum of 4 years. Twenty three [92%] patients had sensory- motor neuropathy, while pure sensory neuropathy was seen in two. The sensory conductions were affected almost equally in upper as well as the lower limbs, while the motor conductions were affected more in the lower limbs than the upper limbs. The sensory conductions were not recordable in both the upper and the lower limbs in 18 [72%] patients. Motor conduction studies revealed an asymmetric and patchy involvement. Proximal conduction block was seen in 3 patients [12%]. On needle EMG features of denervation were seen in all patients. P100 latency was normal in all. Sural nerve biopsy showed a selective decrease in large myelinated axons with demyelination. Axonal swelling with focal areas of demyelination was observed in two patients. The electrophysiological patterns as well as the histopathology reflect the pathophysiology of n-hexane neuropathy.

  11. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  12. Cervical spondylosis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervical spondylosis is a disorder that results from abnormal growth of the bones of the neck and degeneration and ... neck pain is a key indication of cervical spondylosis. It may be the only symptom in many ...

  13. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  14. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  15. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  16. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  17. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  18. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  19. Surgery for nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickersin, K; Manheimer, E

    2000-01-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy is characterized by sudden and painless loss of vision in one eye, accompanied by pallid swelling of the optic disc. Although various medical interventions, such as corticosteroids and phenytoin sodium, have been used to treat nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy, no therapy has been proven effective. The objective of this review is to assess the safety and efficacy of surgical treatment compared with other treatment or usual care in people with nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register - Central and MEDLINE. The most recent searches were performed in December 1997. We included randomized trials comparing surgery to no surgery in people with nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. We obtained full copies of all potentially relevant articles. Only one article described a randomized trial of surgery and it was eligible for inclusion. No formal assessment of quality was done. One reviewer extracted data. No synthesis was required, as there was only one trial. The one trial identified randomized 258 patients. The only published report with outcomes data for that trial presents preliminary results from 244 patients who had achieved six months of follow-up at the time of the report. Participants assigned to surgery did no better than participants assigned to careful follow-up regarding improved visual acuity of three or more lines of vision at six months: 32.6% of the surgery group improved compared with 42.7% of the careful follow-up group. The adjusted odds ratio (OR), adjusted for baseline visual acuity and diabetes, comparing the two groups for three or more lines improvement was 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39 to 1. 38) (surgery group improvement was worse than careful follow-up). In addition, participants receiving surgery had a significantly greater risk of losing three or more lines of vision at six months: 23.9% in the surgery group worsened compared with 12.4% in

  20. Cervical subluxation associated with posterior cervical hemivertebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-López, R; Rivero-Garvía, M; Márquez-Rivas, J; Valencia, J

    2016-02-01

    Hemivertebrae, associated with a failure in the formation and fusion of vertebral body ossification nuclei, are a common cause of thoracic or lumbar scoliosis. A cervical location is rare and even rarer as a cause of cervical subluxation in flexion and extension (for which only one previous case has been found). We report on the case of a 7-year-old female patient, who was examined for a cervical fusion defect, consisting of a posterior C4 hemivertebra and a left hemiblock from C5 to C7. After performing surgery consisting of a C4 corpectomy and anterior fixation with intersomatic graft and plate, adequate cervical stabilization with only a self-limiting left C6 brachialgia and ipsilateral Horner syndrome occurs in the postoperative period. Posterior cervical hemivertebra associated with instability is a very rare finding. The anterior approach with corpectomy and anterior plate enables suitable stabilization.

  1. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for unilateral cervical radiculopathy: comparison of midline and paramedian approaches for efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol; Lee, Jongseok

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis.

  2. Hansen Neuropathy: Still a Possible Diagnosis in the Investigation of a Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Andreia; Costa, Alexandre; Taipa, Ricardo; Guimarães, António; Pires, Manuel Melo

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is still one of the most frequent causes of peripheral neuropathy. Although regarded as eradicated in Portugal, is still documented in neuropathological study of patients with clinical peripheral neuropathy without proper diagnosis. Review of the cases of Hansen disease neuropathy diagnosed in Neuropathology Unit of Centro Hospitalar do Porto between 1978 and 2013, atending to gender, age, clinical manifestations and neuropathological findings. Twenty one patients were identified with neuropathological diagnosis of Hansenâs disease neuropathy, predominantly male. The mean age at diagnosis was 52 years, and sensory symptoms predominate as neurological manifestation of disease. Interval between symptoms and diagnosis was 1-38 years. In most nerve samples tuberculoid type of disease was identified. Bacilli were detected in skin and nerve in 44% of cases. Mononeuritis is the most common presentation of leprosy but other clinical manifestations are possible, including skin lesions. Infection with M. leprae injures myelinated and unmyelinated fibres, with replacement of nerve tissue by collagen fibrosis. The diagnosis of leprosy is only achieved by neuropathological study of skin lesions and / or peripheral nerve, supported by the identification of the bacillus. Hansen disease remains a public health problem in tropical areas and, although rare, still described in Western countries reason why should still be considered as a diagnostic possibility in the investigation of peripheral neuropathy.

  3. Atlas-Free Cervical Spinal Cord Segmentation on Midsagittal T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chih Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An automatic atlas-free method for segmenting the cervical spinal cord on midsagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI is presented. Pertinent anatomical knowledge is transformed into constraints employed at different stages of the algorithm. After picking up the midsagittal image, the spinal cord is detected using expectation maximization and dynamic programming (DP. Using DP, the anterior and posterior edges of the spinal canal and the vertebral column are detected. The vertebral bodies and the intervertebral disks are then segmented using region growing. Then, the anterior and posterior edges of the spinal cord are detected using median filtering followed by DP. We applied this method to 79 noncontrast MRI studies over a 3-month period. The spinal cords were detected in all cases, and the vertebral bodies were successfully labeled in 67 (85% of them. Our algorithm had very good performance. Compared to manual segmentation results, the Jaccard indices ranged from 0.937 to 1, with a mean of 0.980 ± 0.014. The Hausdorff distances between the automatically detected and manually delineated anterior and posterior spinal cord edges were both 1.0 ± 0.5 mm. Used alone or in combination, our method lays a foundation for computer-aided diagnosis of spinal diseases, particularly cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

  4. Cramps and small-fiber neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopate, Glenn; Streif, Elizabeth; Harms, Matthew; Weihl, Christopher; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-08-01

    Muscle cramps are a common complaint and are thought to arise from spontaneous discharges of the motor nerve terminal. Polyneuropathy is often causative, but small-fiber neuropathy (SFN) has not been assessed. We performed skin biopsies on consecutive patients with cramps but without neuropathic complaints. Twelve patients were biopsied, 8 with normal small-fiber sensation. Seven patients had decreased intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD), 2 with non-length-dependent loss. A cause for neuropathy was found in 1 patient with cramp-fasciculation syndrome. Creatine kinase was elevated in 8 patients, 4 with decreased IENFD. Muscle biopsy, performed in 8 patients, but was diagnostic in only 1, with McArdle disease. Our data show that 60% of patients with muscle cramps who lack neuropathic complaints have SFN, as documented by decreased IENFD. Cramps may originate as local mediators of inflammation released by damaged small nerve that excite intramuscular nerves. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Hereditary ataxia and sensory-motor neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinović, Ksenija; Hodzić, Samiha; Zjuzin, Nadezda; Lokmic, Eldan

    2003-01-01

    The authors presented this case because of the determined characteristics in the clinical picture and electrophysiologic finding which refer to spinocerebral degeneration and neuropathia of the hereditary type, and give the possibility of the classification into two nosologic entities. One is Roussey Levy's syndrome, what is the advisable diagnosis of our patient, and another Freidreich's ataxia. Regardless to the impossibility of the establishing of diagnosis by means the specific enzimatic and genetic tests, the authors on the basis of the clinical picture, electromioncurographic findings and data from the literature of the diagnostic ally decided for Freidreich's ataxya. The neuropathy have classified into the hereditary motor sensor neuropathy--HMSN type II and presented its characteristics.

  6. Transcranial magnetic stimulation but not MRI predicts long-term clinical status in cervical spondylosis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deftereos, S N; Kechagias, E; Ioakeimidou, C; Georgonikou, D

    2015-03-01

    Case series. To compare transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings between patients who underwent surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy and those with spondylosis who were not operated upon, and to correlate these findings with clinical functionality at follow-up. Private practice. Of 16 consecutive patients with cervical spondylosis 8 underwent surgery (group I) and 8 were treated conservatively (group II). We compared TMS and MRI findings between these groups and we correlated central motor conduction times (CMCTs) and MRI-measured sagittal and parasagittal diameters of the spinal canal at baseline evaluation, with clinical functionality at 2-year follow-up. Group I CMCTs at the lower limbs correlated significantly with modified-JoA 2 years post surgery (r=-0.71, P<0.05), but MRI-measured diameters did not. In group II baseline TMS was unrevealing, contrary to significant spinal stenosis disclosed by MRI. The condition of none of these patients deteriorated at 2 years. CMCTs at the lower limbs, but not cervical spinal canal diameters, correlate with long-term functional outcome following surgical or conservative treatment.

  7. [Assessment of a patient with optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roceanu, Adina; Romaniţan, Oana; Antochi, Florina; Tiu, Cristina; Băjenaru, Ovidiu; Pascu, Ruxandra; Alexandrescu, Cristina; Nanea, Mariana; Voinea, Liliana

    2010-01-01

    Optic neuropathy (ON) is defined as the reduction of vision due to inflammatory lesion of the optic nerve. The patient with ON has to be evaluated clinically but also with complex techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, visual evoked potentials, cerebrospinal fluid examination) because ON could be the presenting symptom in multiple sclerosis patients. Corticosteroids should be administrated intravenous and the patient should be followed by the neurologist in order to signal the appearance of new neurological signs.

  8. Somatic DNA Damages in Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Supriya Simon, A.; Dinesh Roy, D.; Jayapal, V.; Vijayakumar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is one of the most clinically significant complications of diabetes mellitus. Even though many ethological factors have been attributed for the pathogenesis of this disease no attempts were made to correlate DNA damage as a causative factor. Hence the present study was undertaken to asses the extent of somatic DNA damages by cytokinesis-block micronuclei assay (CBMN). An attempt is also being made to correlate the habits and/or risk factors and socioe...

  9. Saturday Morning Palsy: Closed Traumatic Peripheral Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    NN Wazir

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic peripheral neuropathy can occur following fracture, dislocation, forceful reduction or direct compression. During the emergency medical relief mission for earthquake victims in Pakistan, between 30th Oct and 14th Nov 2005, four patients presented with wrist drop and two others with foot drop, all with no underlying fracture or dislocation. All of them were attended by medical teams two to three days for the first time due to difficult rescue work and hard terrain. They were seen in ...

  10. Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy; A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Semra Saygi; Tulun Savas; ilknur Erol

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy, typically seen as a serious childhood migraine attack which is followed by ptosis and diplopia due to oculomotor nerve palsy. This is regarded as a form of migraine in the previous classifications but according to the latest classification of the International Headache Society has been recognized as cranial neuralgia. Due to the poor pathological and radiological findings of oculomotor nerve during attack, it is difficult to make differential diag...

  11. Predicting surgical outcome in cases of cervical myelopathy with magnetic resonance imaging. Critical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Takashi [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-11-01

    In this study, the author attempted to correlate clinical factors significant in cases of cervical myelopathy with postoperative recovery. It is hoped that the results will aid in the preoperative prediction of surgical outcomes. The factors considered were the transverse area of the spinal cord, the cord compression rate, the presence of a high intensity area in T2-weighted MRI, the duration of symptoms before surgery, and age at surgery. Because there are variations in the transverse area of the spinal cord, 100 normal individuals were selected and the standard transverse area was calculated. The transverse area of the spinal cord and the cord constriction rate in the myelopathy cases was then measured and compared to the standard. The data indicated that the constriction rate was most relevant to recovery rate. Clinical thresholds found to correlate with a better than average rate of recovery in cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) were: a cord constriction rate; under 28.7%, cord compression rate; over 0.38, duration of symptoms before surgery; less than 9.2 months, and age at surgery; under 59.2 yrs. In patients with ossification of the longitudinal ligament (OPLL), cord constriction rate; under 36.2%, cord compression rate; over 0.30, duration of symptoms before surgery; less than 14.2 months, and age at surgery; under 57.6 yrs., all correlated with superior recovery, as did cord constriction rate; under 22.3%, and duration of symptoms before surgery; less than 3.7 months with patients suffering from cervical disc herniation (CDH). Furthermore, the absence of a T2-weighted high intensity area in CSM and OPLL patients also correlated with improved recovery. These results suggest that a favorable postoperative recovery rate can be expected in cases of cervical myelopathy that conform to the above criteria. (author)

  12. Surgical outcome of posterior decompression for cervical spondylosis with unilateral upper extremity amyotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yasushi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Nakanishi, Kazuyoshi; Kamei, Naosuke; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2006-09-15

    Case studies of patients with cervical spondylosis with unilateral upper extremity amyotrophy. To clarify the surgical outcome of posterior decompression for this amyotrophy. Cervical spondylosis sometimes causes a characteristic severe muscular atrophy without sensory disturbance or lower-extremity dysfunction, which is the so-called "cervical spondylotic amyotrophy." However, response to treatment, especially to posterior decompression, has not been well understood. This study included 32 patients. All underwent posterior cervical laminoplasty, and 22 patients had an additional foraminotomy. Preoperative and postoperative muscle power and results of imaging and electrophysiologic studies were evaluated. The follow-up period averaged 78 months. Whether impingement was against the ventral nerve root (VNR) or anterior horn (AH) in the spinal cord was assessed according to these findings. These cases were divided into proximal type and distal type according to the most severely atrophic muscle and compared statistically. Severe preoperative muscle atrophy was observed in the deltoid and biceps muscles of 24 patients (proximal type) and in the forearm and hand muscles of 8 patients (distal type). Impingements against the VNR and AH were observed in 21 and 28 cases, respectively, and 17 cases had impingement of both the VNR and AH. Improvements in muscle atrophy after surgery were observed in 25 cases. In proximal-type patients, muscle power improved in 92% of cases but was improved in only 38% of the distal-type cases. Laminoplasty and foraminotomy were effective in the treatment of most patients with this syndrome, although the outcome in the distal type was inferior to that in the proximal type.

  13. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerson C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cherise Meyerson, Greg Van Stavern, Collin McClelland Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. Keywords: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, mitochondria, neuro-ophthalmology, mitochondrial DNA

  14. Fuzzy expert system for diagnosing diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani Katigari, Meysam; Ayatollahi, Haleh; Malek, Mojtaba; Kamkar Haghighi, Mehran

    2017-02-15

    To design a fuzzy expert system to help detect and diagnose the severity of diabetic neuropathy. The research was completed in 2014 and consisted of two main phases. In the first phase, the diagnostic parameters were determined based on the literature review and by investigating specialists' perspectives ( n = 8). In the second phase, 244 medical records related to the patients who were visited in an endocrinology and metabolism research centre during the first six months of 2014 and were primarily diagnosed with diabetic neuropathy, were used to test the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the fuzzy expert system. The final diagnostic parameters included the duration of diabetes, the score of a symptom examination based on the Michigan questionnaire, the score of a sign examination based on the Michigan questionnaire, the glycolysis haemoglobin level, fasting blood sugar, blood creatinine, and albuminuria. The output variable was the severity of diabetic neuropathy which was shown as a number between zero and 10, had been divided into four categories: absence of the disease, (the degree of severity) mild, moderate, and severe. The interface of the system was designed by ASP.Net (Active Server Pages Network Enabled Technology) and the system function was tested in terms of sensitivity (true positive rate) (89%), specificity (true negative rate) (98%), and accuracy (a proportion of true results, both positive and negative) (93%). The system designed in this study can help specialists and general practitioners to diagnose the disease more quickly to improve the quality of care for patients.

  15. Optic neuropathy in a patient with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Juan E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gonzalez, Guido E. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Departmento de Imagenes, Santiago (Chile); Nagao, Karina E.; Walton, David S. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Ophthalmology, Boston, MA (United States); Caruso, Paul A. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is a genetic disorder of mitochondrial metabolism. The clinical manifestations range from severe neonatal lactic acidosis to chronic neurodegeneration. Optic neuropathy is an uncommon clinical sequela and the imaging findings of optic neuropathy in these patients have not previously been described. We present a patient with PDH deficiency with bilateral decreased vision in whom MRI demonstrated bilateral optic neuropathy and chiasmopathy. (orig.)

  16. Multifocal visual evoked potential in optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathy and compressive optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Jayaraman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the effect of optic neuritis (ON, ischemic optic neuropathy (ION and compressive optic neuropathy (CON on multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP amplitudes and latencies, and to compare the parameters among three optic nerve disorders. Materials and Methods: mfVEP was recorded for 71 eyes of controls and 48 eyes of optic nerve disorders with subgroups of optic neuritis (ON, n = 21 eyes, ischemic optic neuropathy (ION, n = 14 eyes, and compressive optic neuropathy (CON, n = 13 eyes. The size of defect in mfVEP amplitude probability plots and relative latency plots were analyzed. The pattern of the defect in amplitude probability plot was classified according to the visual field profile of optic neuritis treatment trail (ONTT. Results: Median of mfVEP amplitude (log SNR averaged across 60 sectors were reduced in ON (0.17 (0.13-0.33, ION (0.14 (0.12-0.21 and CON (0.21 (0.14-0.30 when compared to controls. The median mfVEP relative latencies compared to controls were significantly prolonged in ON and CON group of 10.53 (2.62-15.50 ms and 5.73 (2.67-14.14 ms respectively compared to ION group (2.06 (-4.09-13.02. The common mfVEP amplitude defects observed in probability plots were diffuse pattern in ON, inferior altitudinal defect in ION and temporal hemianopia in CON eyes. Conclusions: Optic nerve disorders cause reduction in mfVEP amplitudes. The extent of delayed latency noted in ischemic optic neuropathy was significantly lesser compared to subjects with optic neuritis and compressive optic neuropathy. mfVEP amplitudes can be used to objectively assess the topography of the visual field defect.

  17. Clinicopathological study of vasculitic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-fang DONG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical features and neuropathological characteristics in patients with vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN. Methods Clinical manifestations, laboratory examination and neuromuscular biopsy characteristics of 11 patients with VPN were retrospectively analyzed. The lesion of nerve, muscle and skin was observed under optical and electron microscope. Immunohistochemical analyses were carried out to detect neurofilament (NF, myelin basic protein (MBP, peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 and S-100 protein (S-100 and further observing the neuropathy of neuraxon, myelin sheath and Schwann cells, and to detect human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR, CD68, CD3 and CD20 to observe inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunofluorescent staining was used to detect the deposition of IgA, IgM, IgG and addiment C3 on vascular wall. The staining of periodic acid-Schiff (PAS, NADH-tetrazolium reductase (NADH-TR and modified Gomori trichrome (MGT were used to judge the myopathy. Results 1 Angiopathies were mainly manifested by small vessels of epineurium and perineurium, and infiltrated inflammatory cells were mainly CD3 + T cells. Three patients had active vasculitis, and 8 patients had non-active vasculitis. Among these 8 patients, 4 patients mainly presented fibrous obliteration of blood vessel, with slight inflammatroy cell infiltration, and the other 4 patients mainly showed perivascular inflammation. 2 Neuropathy: 6 patients had axon degeneration, and 5 patients had axon degeneration associated with demyelination. All of them demonstrated a reduction in myelinated fibers, mainly large diameter myelinated fibers, even on end-stage. 3 Muscle biopsy showed neurogenic atrophy. 4 Clinicopathologic diagnosis: among these 11 patients, 8 patients were diagnosed as systemic vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (SVPN, among whom 5 patients were diagnosed as primary systemic vasculitis [including 1 patient as Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS, 2 patients as

  18. Evaluation of pre-existing neuropathy and bortezomib retreatment as risk factors to develop severe neuropathy in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Jordi; Alé, Albert; Velasco, Roser; Jaramillo, Jessica; Navarro, Xavier; Udina, Esther

    2011-09-01

    Pre-existing neuropathy, a not uncommon feature in oncologic patients, is a potential but non-confirmed risk factor to develop early or severe chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the role of pre-existing neuropathy induced by vincristine (VNC) or bortezomib (BTZ) as a risk factor to develop more severe BTZ-induced neuropathy in a mouse model. VNC, at doses of 1 and 1.5 mg/kg given twice per week for 4 weeks, induced a moderate and severe sensory-motor neuropathy, primarily axonal, with predominant involvement of myelinated sensory axons. The neuropathy induced by BTZ at dose of 1 mg/kg given twice per week for 6 weeks was a mild axonal sensory neuropathy involving myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. The neuropathy in mice previously treated and retreated with the same schedule of BTZ after 4 weeks of washout period was similar in profile and severity to the one observed after the first treatment. When basal neuropathy was classified as moderate (most of BTZ-treated animals) or severe (all VNC-treated animals and two BTZ-treated animals), there was a more marked decline in sensory nerve function during BTZ retreatment in the group with basal severe neuropathy (-86%) than in the groups with basal mild (-57%) or without neuropathy (-52%; p < 0.001). Histopathological findings supported the functional results. Therefore, this study shows that the presence of a severe neuropathy previous to treatment with an antitumoral agent, such as BTZ, results in a more marked involvement of peripheral nerves. © 2011 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  19. Three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in elderly patients with wedge shaped tricortical autologous graft: A consecutive prospective series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Suk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy/radiculopathy is a matter of debate, more so in elderly patients due to compromised physiology. We evaluated the clinical and radiological results of cervical fusion, using wedge-shaped tricortical autologous iliac graft and Orion plate for three-level anterior cervical discectomy in elderly patients. Materials and Methods: Twelve elderly patients with mean age of 69.7 years (65-76 years were treated between April 2000 and March 2005, for three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, using wedge-shaped tricortical autologous iliac graft and Orion plate. Outcome was recorded clinically according to Odom′s criteria and radiologically in terms of correction of lordosis angle and intervertebral disc height span at the time of bony union. The mean follow-up was 29.8 months (12-58 months. Results: All the patients had a complete recovery of clinical symptoms after surgery. Postoperative score according to Odom′s criteria was excellent in six patients and good in remaining six. Bony union was achieved in all the patients with average union time of 12 weeks (8-20 weeks. The mean of sum of three segment graft height collapse was 2.50 mm (SD = 2.47. The average angle of lordosis was corrected from 18.2° (SD = 2.59° preoperatively to 24.9° (SD = 4.54° at the final follow-up. This improvement in the radiological findings is statistically significant (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Cervical fusion with wedge-shaped tricortical autologous iliac graft and Orion plate for three-level anterior cervical discectomy is an acceptable technique in elderly patients. It gives satisfactory results in terms of clinical outcome, predictable early solid bony union, and maintenance of disc space height along with restoration of cervical lordosis.

  20. Development of a self-administered questionnaire to screen patients for cervical myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekiguchi Yasufumi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In primary care, it is often difficult to diagnose cervical myelopathy. However, a delay in treatment could cause irreversible aftereffects. With a brief and effective self-administered questionnaire for cervical myelopathy, cervical myelopathy may be screened more easily and oversight may be avoided. As there is presently no screening tool for cervical myelopathy, the aim of this study was to develop a self-administered questionnaire for the screening of cervical myelopathy. Methods A case-control study was performed with the following two groups at our university hospital from February 2006 to September 2008. Sixty-two patients (48 men, 14 women with cervical myelopathy who underwent operative treatment were included in the myelopathy group. In the control group, 49 patients (20 men, 29 women with symptoms that could be distinguished from those of cervical myelopathy, such as numbness, pain in the upper extremities, and manual clumsiness, were included. The underlying conditions were diagnosed as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, thoracic outlet syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome, diabetes mellitus neuropathy, cervical radiculopathy, and neuralgic amyotrophy. Twenty items for a questionnaire in this study were chosen from the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire, which is a new self-administered questionnaire, as an outcome measure for patients with cervical myelopathy. Data were analyzed by univariate analysis using the chi-square test and by multiple logistic regression analysis. According to the resulting odds ratio, β-coefficients, and p value, items were chosen and assigned a score. Results Eight items were chosen by univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses and assigned a score. The Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic showed p = 0.805. The area under the receiver operation characteristic curve was 0.86. The developed questionnaire had a sensitivity of 93.5% and a

  1. Non-obese diabetic mice rapidly develop dramatic sympathetic neuritic dystrophy: a new experimental model of diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert E; Dorsey, Denise A; Beaudet, Lucie N; Frederick, Kathy E; Parvin, Curtis A; Plurad, Santiago B; Levisetti, Matteo G

    2003-11-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites ("neuritic dystrophy") in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man.

  2. Cervical epidural hematoma: Following interlaminar cervical epidural steroid injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwarkadas Kanhayalal Baheti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical epidural steroid injection is a common procedure performed for patients with cervical radiculopathy. Cervical epidural hematoma is a rare but known complication of Intervention Pain Treatment Procedure (IPTP in healthy patients without coagulopathy. We report a case of cervical epidural hematoma as a complication of cervical epidural steroid injection in an elderly patient with cervical radiculopathy; resulting in right upper limb motor sensory deficit. Patient responded to conservative management and surgery was not performed since symptoms progressively improved.

  3. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Screening for cervical cancer using the Pap test has decreased the number of new cases of ... their chance of dying from cervical cancer . A Pap test is commonly used to screen for cervical cancer. ...

  4. Validation of a translated version of the modified Japanese orthopaedic association score to assess outcomes in cervical spondylotic myelopathy: an approach to globalize outcomes assessment tools.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Benzel, E.C.; Fehlings, M.G.; Guiot, B.H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) originally developed in Japan, the modified English version (mJOA) has become widely used and is arguably now the accepted standard. OBJECTIVE: In order to apply the mJOA successfully at an international level, we have translated it

  5. Etiology of cervical inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavonen, J; Critchlow, C W; DeRouen, T; Stevens, C E; Kiviat, N; Brunham, R C; Stamm, W E; Kuo, C C; Hyde, K E; Corey, L

    1986-03-01

    We studied the relationships of selected microbial, clinical, demographic, and behavioral variables to mucopurulent cervicitis in two clinical settings, a sexually transmitted disease clinic and a student health clinic. From each clinic, we studied a group of women referred for suspected mucopurulent cervicitis and a representative sample of other women attending the clinic. After the women were stratified by patient group and summary odds ratios for all groups were obtained, mucopurulent cervicitis was most strongly associated with the isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis; other variables associated with mucopurulent cervicitis included the isolation of Ureaplasma urealyticum, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Trichomonas vaginalis, the presence of serum antibody to C. trachomatis, the clinical diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis, and oral contraceptive use (positive associations) or isolation of yeast (negative association). After adjustment for cervical culture results for C. trachomatis, mucopurulent cervicitis was positively associated with oral contraceptive use (p = 0.02) and isolation of U. urealyticum (p = 0.02) and negatively associated with isolation of yeast (p = 0.03). Among women with a positive cervical culture for C. trachomatis, isolation of U. urealyticum was significantly associated with mucopurulent cervicitis, while among the subgroup of women with a negative cervical culture for C. trachomatis and positive serum antibody to C. trachomatis, oral contraceptive use was strongly associated with mucopurulent cervicitis. These results confirm that in both clinical settings C. trachomatis is the major cause of mucopurulent cervicitis. The roles of U. urealyticum, T. vaginalis, G. vaginalis, bacterial vaginosis, and oral contraceptive use in the etiology of mucopurulent cervicitis deserve further study.

  6. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc...

  7. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, Jan Willem R.; Wong, Kwok H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited optic neuropathy caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It is also believed that several epigenetic factors have an influence on the development of LHON. Methods: A case series was observed. Results: Three

  8. Treatment of diabetic neuropathy in the lower limb

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The classification of diabetic neuropathy can be done in several ways: clinical presentation (symmetrical, focal or multifocal, or painful, paralytic and ataxic), type of fibres affected (motor, sensory, autonomic), or painful or non-painful. The commonest presentation of peripheral neuropathy in diabetes is that of chronic ...

  9. Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin in chronic autoimmune neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, AEJ; van der Hoeven, JH

    Objective - To investigate the effect of Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin (anti-D) in patients with an autoimmune demyelinating neuropathy. Material and methods - Three patients with an autoimmune mediated neuropathy received 1000 IU anti-D weekly for 2 months. Results - Two patients worsened gradually

  10. Acute toxic neuropathy mimicking guillain barre syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Jasim Abdul Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Case: A 30 year old male presented with numbness of palms and soles followed by weakness of upper limbs and lower limbs of 5 days duration, which was ascending and progressive. Three months back he was treated for oral and genital ulcers with oral steroids. His ulcers improved and shifted to indigenous medication. His clinical examination showed polyneuropathy. CSF study did not show albuminocytological dissociation. Nerve conduction study showed demyelinating polyneuropathy. His blood samples and the ayurvedic drug samples were sent for toxicological analysis. Inference: Acute toxic neuropathy - Arsenic

  11. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy following dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Reshma; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Deshpande, Shrikant; Patkar, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by a flavivirus. This infection is endemic in the tropics and warm temperate regions of the world. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal haemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies, haemorrhage, and oedema. However anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is a rare presentation. Optic nerve ischemia most frequently occurs at the optic nerve head, where structural crowding of nerve fibers and reduction of the vascular supply may combine to impair perfusion to a critical degree and produce optic disc oedema. Here we present a case of anterior ischemic optic neurapathy associated with dengue fever.

  12. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological...... mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction. OBJECTIVE: The primary aim was to define MRI features of LMS and LHON, and to assess the proportions of individuals displaying features typical of MS. Secondarily, we investigated the effect of gender on the risk of developing white matter lesions...

  13. Epidemic optic neuropathy in Cuba. Eye findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadun, A A; Martone, J F; Muci-Mendoza, R; Reyes, L; DuBois, L; Silva, J C; Roman, G; Caballero, B

    1994-05-01

    To characterize and establish a clinical definition of the optic neuropathy that appeared in epidemic form in Cuba in 1992 and 1993. At the invitation of the Cuban Ministry of Health, Havana, members of ORBIS International and the Pan American Health Organization, assembled teams that traveled to Cuba in May 1993. We were initially briefed by Cuban national experts in the areas of virology, nutrition, toxicology, ophthalmology, neurology, and public health. We then examined 20 patients on our own. Thirteen of these patients underwent a comprehensive neuro-ophthalmologic examination, including neurologic examination, ophthalmologic examination, visual fields, optic nerve function studies, contrast sensitivity studies, and funduscopy. We returned 4 months later to perform an additional 12 comprehensive neuro-ophthalmologic and follow-up examinations. Only seven of the 13 patients who were alleged to have the optic form of the epidemic and who were rigorously and systematically examined on the first visit demonstrated a bilateral optic neuropathy. These seven patients had several features that included decreased visual acuity, poor color vision, central scotomas, decreased contrast sensitivity, saccadic eye movements, and most prominent and distinctive of all, nerve fiber layer wedge defects of the papillomacular bundle. Our clinical definition was then implemented by the Cuban ophthalmologists and epidemiologists. On returning 4 months later, we found that all newly presented patients were correctly diagnosed to have the epidemic disease. With the new case definition and the application of a few simple psychophysical tests, the false-positive rate of diagnosis became much lower. After vitamin therapy, we reexamined the patients seen on our initial visit, and all showed marked improvement. The Cuban epidemic was characterized by an optic neuropathy with features that were similar to those of tobacco/alcohol amblyopia and Leber's optic atrophy. Recent political

  14. Saturday Morning Palsy: Closed Traumatic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NN Wazir

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic peripheral neuropathy can occur following fracture, dislocation, forceful reduction or direct compression. During the emergency medical relief mission for earthquake victims in Pakistan, between 30th Oct and 14th Nov 2005, four patients presented with wrist drop and two others with foot drop, all with no underlying fracture or dislocation. All of them were attended by medical teams two to three days for the first time due to difficult rescue work and hard terrain. They were seen in field hospital on their follow up at four to five weeks.

  15. Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy; A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Saygi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy, typically seen as a serious childhood migraine attack which is followed by ptosis and diplopia due to oculomotor nerve palsy. This is regarded as a form of migraine in the previous classifications but according to the latest classification of the International Headache Society has been recognized as cranial neuralgia. Due to the poor pathological and radiological findings of oculomotor nerve during attack, it is difficult to make differential diagnosis. In this manuscript we report 11-year-old female patient with ophtalmoplegic migraine. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 938-941

  16. [Diabetic Retinopathy and Neuropathy: New in 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzen, Christoph

    2015-06-03

    In 2014 interesting new results were published in the field of diabetic microangiopathy: (1) In tensive treatment of type 1 diabetes for a mean of 6,5 years confers a lifelong reduction of the risk of diabetic retinopathy; (2) although the rates of diabetes-related complication have declined since 1990, the burden of disease persists because the prevalence of diabetes tripled during the same time; (3) subjects with diabetic neuropathy have structural brain changes, i.e. gray matter loss, findings with possible implications for the prognosis; (4) over 80% of type 2 diabetics who consider their feet to be normal have serious foot pathology.

  17. Metabolic and cardiovascular responses to epinephrine in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Richter, E; Madsbad, S

    1987-01-01

    Norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction, which is mediated by alpha-adrenergic receptors, is accentuated in patients with autonomic neuropathy. In contrast, responses mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors, including vasodilatation and metabolic changes, have not been evaluated in these patients....... To study these responses, we administered epinephrine in a graded intravenous infusion (0.5 to 5 micrograms per minute) to seven diabetic patients without neuropathy, seven diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy, and seven normal subjects. Mean arterial pressure decreased significantly in the patients...... with autonomic neuropathy than in the other groups (P less than 0.05). These findings indicate that several beta-receptor-mediated responses to epinephrine are enhanced in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated....

  18. Computer aided diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekh, Viktor; Soliz, Peter; McGrew, Elizabeth; Barriga, Simon; Burge, Mark; Luan, Shuang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) refers to the nerve damage that can occur in diabetes patients. It most often affects the extremities, such as the feet, and can lead to peripheral vascular disease, deformity, infection, ulceration, and even amputation. The key to managing diabetic foot is prevention and early detection. Unfortunately, current existing diagnostic techniques are mostly based on patient sensations and exhibit significant inter- and intra-observer differences. We have developed a computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The thermal response of the feet of diabetic patients following cold stimulus is captured using an infrared camera. The plantar foot in the images from a thermal video are segmented and registered for tracking points or specific regions. The temperature recovery of each point on the plantar foot is extracted using our bio-thermal model and analyzed. The regions that exhibit abnormal ability to recover are automatically identified to aid the physicians to recognize problematic areas. The key to our CAD system is the segmentation of infrared video. The main challenges for segmenting infrared video compared to normal digital video are (1) as the foot warms up, it also warms up the surrounding, creating an ever changing contrast; and (2) there may be significant motion during imaging. To overcome this, a hybrid segmentation algorithm was developed based on a number of techniques such as continuous max-flow, model based segmentation, shape preservation, convex hull, and temperature normalization. Verifications of the automatic segmentation and registration using manual segmentation and markers show good agreement.

  19. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Baburao Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1 gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation. Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes.

  20. Cervical Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... term pregnancies have an increased risk of cervical cancer. Using oral contraceptives for a long time Among women who are ... a 10 year period, the risk of cervical cancer returns to that of women who never used oral contraceptives. Smoking cigarettes Among women who are infected with ...

  1. SCREENING FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    CANCER SCREENING. February 2004 Vol.22 No.2 CME 63. Cervical cancer remains a major health concern worldwide, especially in devel- oping countries. It is the commonest malignancy among black women in South. Africa. The quoted incidence of cervical cancer is approximately 30/100 000 women.1 Mortality is ...

  2. SCREENING FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Cervical cancer remains a major health concern worldwide, especially in devel- oping countries. It is the commonest malignancy ... Based on data from Cali, Colombia, the impact of starting cervical screening at different ages shows that starting .... vated blue-white light is attached to the inner aspect of the upper speculum.

  3. Case Report: Cervical Ectopic Pregnancy presenting as Cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical pregnancy is a rare but serious type of ectopic pregnancy in which the implantation site is within the cervical mucosa that lines the endocervical canal. This is a rare cervical ectopic pregnancy wrongly diagnosed as a cervical fi broid by clinicoradiological examination. The actual diagnosis was revealed by ...

  4. The morphometric analysis of the intervertebral foramen and the spinal nerve root in the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the onset of cervical myelopathy and cervical spondylotic radiculopathy as well as what influence the anatomy of the cervical spine and cervical nerves have on their onset and occurrence of various types of disease state. We conducted imaging and morphological measurements on specimens of cervical spine of Japanese people, focusing attention on the running of intervertebral foramen and dorsal nerve rootlets of the cervical spine. The subjects were cervical spine specimens from 12 cadavers (7 males and 5 females, age at the time of death ranged from 48 to 93 years with a mean of 71 years) obtained at Showa University School of Dentistry in 2005 and 2006. Specimens were prepared by removing the atlas through the 1st thoracic vertebra from the cadavers, then resecting the soft tissue such as muscles to expose the cervical spine in whole circumference. The removed cervical spine specimens, from 1st to 7th cervical spines, were imaged by volume scan of radiographic helical CT at 0.6 mm spatial resolution, and their images were stored as Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data. Image measurement on the vertebral body, vertebral foramen, and intervertebral foramen was conducted based on DICOM data. Furthermore, macroscopic observation and measurement were conducted on the dorsal nerve rootlets of cervical spine specimens. The image measurement of cervical spine specimens showed that the intervertebral foramen at C5/6 was the narrowest, followed by C3/4, C4/5, C6/7, and C2/3, respecting. With regard to angles in the frontal section and horizontal section of the groove for the spinal nerve, there was no significant difference in the angle between the right and the left. In the frontal section, the angle was about 63deg at C3, about 57deg at C4, about 52deg at C5, and about 55deg at C6, showing a significantly acute angle at C5, while in the horizontal section, it was about 54deg at C3, about 59deg at C4, about 63

  5. status and insulin resistance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taslima Akter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complication of diabetes mellitus includes peripheral neuropathy which causes ischemic foot ulceration. Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance may accelerate the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Objective: To assess the glycaemic status and insulin resistance for development of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: This control case control study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka from July 2014 to June 2015. A total number of 150 Type 2 diabetic patients of both sexes were selected with age ranging 40 to 50 years. Among them, 75 patients with peripheral neuropathy were included in study group and 75 patients without peripheral neuropathy were control. For evaluation of glycaemic status, fasting serum glucose (FSG, Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and to calculate insulin resistance by homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, fasting serum insulin (FSI, were estimated. For statistical analysis, unpaired Student’s ‘t’ test was done. Results: In this study, significant increase in FSG, HbA1c, FSI, HOMA-IR were found in diabetic subjects with peripheral neuropathy in comparison to control group. Conclusion: From the study results, it is concluded that poor glycaemic control and greater insulin resistance may be associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  6. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelia Gonçalves Rocha Martin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect in patients undergoing cancer treatment with chemotherapy. This condition can affect patients in several different ways, interfering in their activities of daily living and autonomy. The present study aimed to review the literature on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and its treatment or other possible interventions. The findings reveal that chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common condition that affects patients undergoing treatment with some specific drugs. Besides, several different substances have been used to treat or control this condition, although no significant evidence could be found in these studies.

  7. Spheniodal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika Selvakumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphenoid sinus mucocele comprises only 2% of all paranasal sinus mucoceles. In literature, there is a case report on sphenoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy, with unilateral partial recovery and cranial nerve palsy, but we did not come across any literature with bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia together caused by spheno-ethmoidal mucocele. We present such a rare case of spheno-ethmoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and unilateral sixth nerve palsy who had postsurgery, unilateral good vision recovery, and complete resolution of sixth nerve palsy.

  8. Sciatic neuropathy as first sign of metastasising prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Rastiemadabadi, Zoreh; Smith, Torben Aagaard

    2010-01-01

    idiopathic neuropathy. Here we describe a patient who was initially diagnosed with idiopathic sciatic neuropathy but who was eventually diagnosed with prostate cancer. This is an uncommon manifestation of prostate cancer, and the diagnostic was difficult because prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was normal...... and the positron emission tomography scan negative. Changes in PSA should always raise the suspicion of prostate cancer, just as idiopathic progressive neuropathy should always raise the suspicion of an underlying malignancy, even when standard diagnostics fail to explain the patient's symptoms....

  9. Radiation-induced cranial neuropathy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, X.; Tang, Y.; Lu, K.; Peng, Y. [Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Neurology; Chen, M. [Sun Yat-sen Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the long-term characteristics of radiation-induced cranial nerve injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. We studied cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in 328 NPC patients who received radiotherapy between 1994 and 2006. Follow-up was 93.6% complete as of December 2009. A total of 72 patients with CNP were recruited for analysis (56 men and 16 women). Patients with evidence of residual or recurrent tumor accompanied by CNP were excluded. The characteristics of CNP and the relationship with the radiation fields as well as re-radiotherapy were evaluated. After a mean follow-up of 11.2 years, 72 patients were found to have developed CNP. The latency of palsy ranged from 0.6-16.0 years. For the 67 patients with first course radiation, the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were the most vulnerable combination, occurring in 57 patients (85.1%). Patients with facial-cervical field radiation had a significantly longer latency comparing with that of patients with facial-cervical split fields (p = 0.021). In the first 5 years, 49.3% of patients developed CNP, while 40.3% presented CNP in the second 5-year period. In patients with first course radiation, 61 patients had more than one CNP. With regard to the 5 patients with re-radiation, most of them had multiple upper cranial nerve injuries. Radiation therapy of NPC patients may lead to cranial neuropathy. Patients with facial-cervical radiation fields had a longer latency for the manifestation of CNP compared with those patients who were treated with split fields. In patients with re-radiotherapy, the frequency of upper cranial nerve injury increased greatly.

  10. Does Peripheral Neuropathy Associate with Cranial Nerves Neuropathy in Type 2 diabetes Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Fadhil Jalal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN is the most common complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cranial neuropathies is usually presenting as mononeuropathies coexist with DPN either presented clinically or in subclinical form. The aim of this study is to detect cranial neuropathy in diabetic patients. Eighty three patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM with an age range of 30-69 years were included in the study. The study also involved normal healthy persons whose age and gender are harmonized with that of our patients that were deliberated as control group (60 persons. Diabetic patients with DPN had significant difference in age, highly significant difference in the duration of the disease and highly significance difference in BMI had poor glycemic control reflected by high FBS and HbA1c, while lipid profile picture showed insignificant difference when compared with diabetic patients without DPN. Nerve conduction study (sensory and motor showed a significant difference regarding latency, amplitude, and conduction velocity between diabetic patients with DPN and those without DPN. The results of blink reflex showed highly significant difference between diabetic patients and controls.

  11. Peripheral neuropathy: pathogenic mechanisms and alternative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Kathleen A

    2006-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN), associated with diabetes, neurotoxic chemotherapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/antiretroviral drugs, alcoholism, nutrient deficiencies, heavy metal toxicity, and other etiologies, results in significant morbidity. Conventional pain medications primarily mask symptoms and have significant side effects and addiction profiles. However, a widening body of research indicates alternative medicine may offer significant benefit to this patient population. Alpha-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, benfotiamine, methylcobalamin, and topical capsaicin are among the most well-researched alternative options for the treatment of PN. Other potential nutrient or botanical therapies include vitamin E, glutathione, folate, pyridoxine, biotin, myo-inositol, omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, L-arginine, L-glutamine, taurine, N-acetylcysteine, zinc, magnesium, chromium, and St. John's wort. In the realm of physical medicine, acupuncture, magnetic therapy, and yoga have been found to provide benefit. New cutting-edge conventional therapies, including dual-action peptides, may also hold promise.

  12. Inspection methods progression of diabetic optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing incidence of diabetes, diet restructuring with excessive intake of high-calorie foods closely related with this. Currently diabetes prevalence rate increased from 7% in 2003 to 14% in 2010. Diabetes can cause a variety of eye diseases, such as corneal ulcers, glaucoma, vitreous hemorrhage and so on. Diabetic retinopathy and cataract are the most common and greater impact on patients. At present, study for diabetic retinopathy(DRis wider than diabetes optic neuropathy(DON. Clinical manifestations of DON are not specific, but DON occurred extensively, also contributed to an important cause of blindness.In this paper, we collected a variety of inspection and early diagnosis methods, try to achieve early detection, interventional therapy and good treatment for this disease. Here to make a presentation on the various types of inspection methods.

  13. A case of presumed radiation optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atsumi, Osamu; Sakuraba, Tomoki; Kimura, Satoru; Narita, Kiyoharu; Maeda, Syuji

    1991-01-01

    A case of a 37-year-old woman with radiation optic neuropathy was reported. She had undergone subtotal removal of the right orbital tumor (adenoid cystic carcinoma) by frontal craniotomy, followed by radiation therapy (64 Gy). She had been quite well until she noticed a gradual loss of vision in her right eye 18 months later. Her visual acuity was 0.2 in the right eye and 1.5 in the left eye with right relative afferent pupillary defect and dense central scotoma. Funduscopy revealed optic disc swelling with surrounding retinal edema and small hemorrhage in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography revealed a hypoperfusion area and obstruction of the small retinal vessels in the posterior pole, but this was not large enough to explain the dense central scotoma. Although prednisolone therapy gave temporary improvement, the visual function gradually deteriorated. (author)

  14. Review of Critical Illness Myopathy and Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Starane; Batra, Ayush; Lerner, David P

    2017-01-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) and neuropathy are underdiagnosed conditions within the intensive care setting and contribute to prolonged mechanical ventilation and ventilator wean failure and ultimately lead to significant morbidity and mortality. These conditions are often further subdivided into CIM, critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP), or the combination-critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPNM). In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CIM, CIP, and CIPNM, along with diagnostic considerations such as detailed clinical examination, electrophysiological studies, and histopathological review of muscle biopsy specimens. We also review current available treatments and prognosis. Increased awareness and early recognition of CIM, CIP, and CIPNM in the intensive care unit setting may lead to earlier treatments and rehabilitation, improving patient outcomes.

  15. Chronic Pain and Neuropathy Following Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventzel, Lise; Madsen, Caspar S; Karlsson, Páll

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine symptoms and characteristics of chronic sensory neuropathy in patients treated with oxaliplatin and docetaxel, including patterns of somatosensory abnormalities, pain descriptors, and psychological functioning. Design: A retrospective cross-sectional study. Setting......: A chronic pain research center. Subjects: Thirty-eight patients with chronic peripheral pain and/or dysesthesia following chemotherapy. Methods:  Sensory profiles, psychological functioning, and quality of life were assessed using standardized questionnaires. In addition, standardized quantitative sensory...... with decreased mechanical and vibration detection thresholds. A high frequency of abnormalities in thermal sensory limen and the presence of paradoxical heat sensation seem to be sensitive markers of small fiber loss. Both groups had mainly sensory, axonal large fiber or mixed fiber polyneuropathy, which tended...

  16. A case of presumed radiation optic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atsumi, Osamu; Sakuraba, Tomoki; Kimura, Satoru; Narita, Kiyoharu; Maeda, Syuji (Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-05-01

    A case of a 37-year-old woman with radiation optic neuropathy was reported. She had undergone subtotal removal of the right orbital tumor (adenoid cystic carcinoma) by frontal craniotomy, followed by radiation therapy (64 Gy). She had been quite well until she noticed a gradual loss of vision in her right eye 18 months later. Her visual acuity was 0.2 in the right eye and 1.5 in the left eye with right relative afferent pupillary defect and dense central scotoma. Funduscopy revealed optic disc swelling with surrounding retinal edema and small hemorrhage in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography revealed a hypoperfusion area and obstruction of the small retinal vessels in the posterior pole, but this was not large enough to explain the dense central scotoma. Although prednisolone therapy gave temporary improvement, the visual function gradually deteriorated. (author).

  17. Chikungunya fever presenting with acute optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Abhijit Anand; Agius-Fernandez, Adriana

    2015-07-28

    Chikungunya fever is a vector borne virus that typically causes a self-limiting systemic illness with fever, skin rash and joint aches 2 weeks after infection. We present the case of a 69-year-old woman presenting with an acute unilateral optic neuropathy as a delayed complication of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection contracted during a recent trip to the West Indies. She presented to our ophthalmology department with acute painless visual field loss in the right eye and a recent flu-like illness. She was found to have a right relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) with unilateral optic disc swelling. Serology confirmed recent CHIKV infection. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone was delayed while awaiting MRI scans and serology results. At 5-month follow-up, there was a persistent right RAPD and marked optic atrophy with a corresponding inferior scotoma in the visual field. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Vasculitic neuropathy following exposure to minocycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratta, John M; Dyck, P James B; Brand, Patricio; Thaisetthawatkul, Pariwat; Dyck, Peter J; Engelstad, JaNean K; Goodman, Brent; Karam, Chafic

    2016-02-01

    To report 3 patients with minocycline-induced autoimmunity resulting in peripheral nerve vasculitis. We report 3 patients who, during minocycline treatment for acne vulgaris, developed subacute onset of pain and weakness caused by vasculitis in single and multiple mononeuropathy patterns. Each patient underwent either a nerve or muscle biopsy that confirmed vasculitis. One patient additionally developed systemic symptoms (including fever, fatigue, and night sweats) and another had a posterior circulation stroke. Symptoms developed with either early or prolonged use of minocycline. Despite withdrawal of minocycline, patients needed long-term immunotherapy to gain neurologic improvement. Our findings suggest that the typical neuropathy associated with minocycline use is painful single or multiple mononeuropathy due to peripheral nerve vasculitis, which may also be accompanied by presumed CNS vasculitis (presenting as stroke).

  19. Cervical intervertebral disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Garrick W; Herkowitz, Harry N

    2013-02-06

    Symptomatic adjacent-level disease after cervical fusion has led to the development and testing of several disc-replacement prostheses. Randomized controlled trials of cervical disc replacement (CDR) compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) have demonstrated at least equivalent clinical results for CDR with similar or lower complication rates. Biomechanical, kinematic, and radiographic studies of CDR reveal that the surgical level and adjacent vertebral level motion and center of rotation more closely mimic the native state. Lower intradiscal pressures adjacent to CDR may help decrease the incidence of adjacent spinal-level disease, but long-term follow-up is necessary to evaluate this theory.

  20. Chronic pain coping styles in patients with herniated lumbar discs and coexisting spondylotic changes treated surgically: Considering clinical pain characteristics, degenerative changes, disability, mood disturbances, and beliefs about pain control

    OpenAIRE

    Misterska, Ewa; Jankowski, Roman; Głowacki, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain catastrophizing, appraisals of pain control, styles of coping, and social support have been suggested to affect functioning in patients with low back pain. We investigated the relation of chronic pain coping strategies to psychological variables and clinical data, in patients treated surgically due to lumbar disc herniation and coexisting spondylotic changes. Material/Methods The average age of study participants (n=90) was 43.47 years (SD 10.21). Patients completed the Polish...

  1. Medial arterial calcification in diabetes and its relationship to neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeffcoate, W J; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Hofbauer, L C

    2009-01-01

    Calcification of the media of arterial walls is common in diabetes and is particularly associated with distal symmetrical neuropathy. Arterial calcification also complicates chronic kidney disease and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The term calcification......, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, which are inherently protective. The association between distal symmetrical neuropathy and calcification of the arterial wall highlights the fact that neuropathy may be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality.......Calcification of the media of arterial walls is common in diabetes and is particularly associated with distal symmetrical neuropathy. Arterial calcification also complicates chronic kidney disease and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The term calcification...

  2. Prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy measured by simple bedside tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrberg, Torben Bech; Benn, Jette; Christiansen, J S

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, five simple bedside tests, beat-to-beat variation during quiet respiration, beat-to-beat variation during forced respiration, heart rate and blood pressure response to standing, heart rate response to exercise, and heart rate response....... The prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy in the whole diabetic population indicated by abnormal response in beat-to-beat variation during forced respiration was 27%. Diabetic autonimic neuropathy increased in frequency with duration of disease. Patients with nephropathy or proliferative retinopathy had...... a significantly higher prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy as indicated by abnormal beat-to-beat variation during forced respirations (p less than 0.01) than patients without these complications....

  3. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neuropathy, type II change single protein building blocks ( amino acids ) in the protein sequence. If either protein is altered, they may be more likely to cluster together and form clumps (aggregates). Aggregates of heat shock proteins may ...

  4. African Mitochondrial DNA Subhaplogroups and Peripheral Neuropathy during Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canter, Jeffrey A.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Selph, Doug; Clifford, David B.; Kallianpur, Asha R.; Shafer, Robert; Levy, Shawn; Murdock, Deborah G.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Haas, David W.; Hulgan, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility to peripheral neuropathy during antiretroviral therapy with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) was previously associated with a European mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup among non-Hispanic white persons. To determine if NRTI-associated peripheral neuropathy was related to mtDNA variation in non-Hispanic black persons, we sequenced mtDNA of participants from AIDS Clinical Trials Group study 384. Of 156 non-Hispanic blacks with genomic data, 51 (33%) developed peripheral neuropathy. In a multivariate model, African mtDNA subhaplogroup L1c was an independent predictor of peripheral neuropathy (OR=3.7, 95% CI 1.1-12.0). An African mtDNA subhaplogroup is for the first time implicated in susceptibility to NRTI-associated toxicity. PMID:20402593

  5. Antioxidant Strategies in the Management of Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodeji Babatunde Oyenihi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hyperglycaemia (an abnormally high glucose concentration in the blood resulting from defects in insulin secretion/action, or both, is the major hallmark of diabetes in which it is known to be involved in the progression of the condition to different complications that include diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy (diabetes-induced nerve damage is the most common diabetic complication and can be devastating because it can lead to disability. There is an increasing body of evidence associating diabetic neuropathy with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress results from the production of oxygen free radicals in the body in excess of its ability to eliminate them by antioxidant activity. Antioxidants have different mechanisms and sites of actions by which they exert their biochemical effects and ameliorate nerve dysfunction in diabetes by acting directly against oxidative damage. This review will examine different strategies for managing diabetic neuropathy which rely on exogenous antioxidants.

  6. [Peripheral neuropathy during Infliximab therapy: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinebi, Ali; Akhouad, Youssef; Rkiouak, Adil; Reggad, Ahmed; Kasmy, Zohour; Boudlal, Mostafa; Rabhi, Monsef; Ennibi, Khalid; Chaari, Jilali

    2016-01-01

    Anti TNF alpha treatments are wide spectrum therapies. Multiple side effects have been reported in recent years, particularly peripheral neuropathies. We report a case of axonal neuropathy occurring three months after starting treatment with Infliximab. Our study focused on a 60-year old female patient treated for therapy-resistant hemorrhagic rectocolitis, requiring treatment with infliximab. Three months later, the patient had sensory axonal neuropathy. Etiologic assessment remained negative and dose reduction was accompanied by an improvement in symptoms. The time between initiation of treatment with Infliximab and the onset of clinical manifestations as well as improvement after dose reduction advocate the responsibility of infliximab in the occurrence of sensory neuropathy. Its management is not standardized and should be discussed case by case.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of myelopathic cervical spondylosis after open door laminoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shoji; Egawa, Tadashi; Sagara, Kozo; Takahara, Kazuhiro [Nagasaki Municipal Hospital (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Thirteen patients were examined for cervical spondylotic myelopathy by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. All patients were male and the operative procedure was open door laminoplasty. On the sagittal scans, a low or high signal intensity lesion within the spinal cord, the distance from the posterior edge of the vertebral body to the spinal cord and spinal atrophy were investigated their relationship with the JOA score improvement rate was analyzed. On T2-weighted scans, a high signal intensity loesion was observed in 5 cases. And 2 of them had a low signal intensity lesion on T1-weighted scans. Postoperative results of patients with T2 high signal intensity lesions were poor and their mean improvement rate was 18.4%, while those without T2 high signal intensity was 64.7%. There was a relationship between distance and improvement rate of those without T2 high signal intensity lesions. We concluded that the T2 high signal intensity lesion and the distance from the posterior edge of the vertebral body to the spinal cord carry prognostic significance in postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  8. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, Anusha; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-09-15

    We read with great interest, the case report on ischemic optic neuropathy (1). We would like to add a few points concerning the blood supply of the optic nerve and the correlation with the development of post-operative ischemic neuropathy. Actually, the perioperative or post-operative vision loss (postoperative ischemic neuropathy) is most likely due to ischemic optic neuropathy. Ischemic optic neuropathy (2) is classified as an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). This classification is based on the fact that blood supply (2) to the anterior segment of the optic nerve (part of the optic nerve in the scleral canal and the optic disc) is supplied by short posterior ciliary vessels or anastamotic ring branches around the optic nerve. The posterior part of the optic canal is relatively less perfused, and is supplied by ophthalmic artery and central fibres are perfused by a central retinal artery. So, in the post-operative period, the posterior part of the optic nerve is more vulnerable for ischemia, especially, after major surgeries (3), one of the theories being hypotension or anaemia (2) and resultant decreased perfusion. The onset of PION is slower than the anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. AION on the other hand, is usually spontaneous (idiopathic) or due to arteritis, and is usually sudden in its onset. The reported case is most likely a case of PION. The role of imaging, especially the diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, is very important because the ophthalmoscopic findings in early stages of PION is normal, and it may delay the diagnosis. On the other hand, edema of the disc is usually seen in the early stages of AION.

  9. Peripheral neuropathy following intentional inhalation of naphtha fumes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tenenbein, M; deGroot, W; Rajani, K R

    1984-01-01

    Two adolescent native Canadians who presented with peripheral neuropathy secondary to the abuse of volatile hydrocarbons are described. They were initially thought to have been sniffing leaded gasoline fumes, but public health investigation revealed that they had been sniffing naphtha fumes. Naphtha contains a significant amount of n-hexane, a known inducer of neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies and nerve biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of naphtha abuse. These cases emphasize the need to spec...

  10. Mobile phone generated vibrations used to detect diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jonathan David; Morris, Matthew William John

    2017-12-01

    In the current United Kingdom population the incidence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is increasing. The presence of diabetic neuropathy affects decision making and treatment options. This study seeks to evaluate if the vibrations generated from a mobile phone can be used to screen patients for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This study comprised of 61 patients; a control group of 21 patients; a lower limb injury group of 19 patients; a diabetic peripheral neuropathy group of 21 patients. The control and injury group were recruited randomly from fracture clinics. The diabetic peripheral neuropathy group were randomly recruited from the diabetic foot clinic. The 61 patients were examined using a 10g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament, a 128Hz tuning fork and a vibrating mobile phone. The points tested were, index finger, patella, lateral malleoli, medial malleoli, heel, first and fifth metatarsal heads. The most accurate location of all the clinical tests was the head of the 1st metatarsal at 0.86. The overall accuracy of the tuning fork was 0.77, the ten gram monofilament 0.79 and the mobile phone accuracy was 0.88. The control group felt 420 of 441 tests (95%). The injury group felt 349 of 399 tests (87%). The neuropathic group felt 216 of 441 tests (48%). There is a significant difference in the number of tests felt between the control and both the injury and neuropathic groups. pmobile phone is an accurate screening tool for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The most accurate location to test for diabetic peripheral neuropathy is the head of the 1st metatarsal. Screening for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the index finger and patella were inaccurate. An injury to the lower limb affects the patient's vibration sensation, we would therefore recommend screening the contralateral limb to the injury. This study represents level II evidence of a new diagnostic investigation. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Nongonococcal and Nonchlamydial Cervicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirjesy, Paul

    2001-12-01

    Cervicitis encompasses a variety of gynecologic conditions. Although inflammation on a Papanicolaou smear may be indicative of true cervical inflammation, establishing a diagnosis of mucopurulent cervicitis (MCP) is more clinically useful. MCP seems to be analogous to nongonococcal urethritis in men. Many cases of MCP are related to Chlamydia trachomatis infection, but the majority of cases have other potential causes. Other possible pathogens include Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma genitalium, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus. Many cases may be related to cervical ectopy. MCP is a marker for endometritis, salpingitis, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Given the current shortcomings in our understanding of this disease, an empiric approach to evaluation and treatment is suggested.

  12. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  13. Screening for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cervical cancer: • Cytology: This test, also called a Pap test or Pap smear, looks for abnormal changes in ... women ages 21 to 65, screening with a Pap test every 3 years has the highest benefits with ...

  14. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for unilateral cervical radiculopathy: Comparison of midline and paramedian approaches for efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol; Lee, Jong Seok

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis.

  15. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for unilateral cervical radiculopathy: Comparison of midline and paramedian approaches for efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Seok [School of Business Administration, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis.

  16. Dyslipidemia as a contributory factor in etiopathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhir S Al-Ani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The pathogenesis of neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus is multifactorial.Dyslipidemia may contribute to the development of diabetic neuropathy. This study aimed to assess the atherogenic lipid indices in type 2 diabetic patients with neuropathy.Material and Methods: Fifty-one patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 31 healthy subjects were studied in the Unit of Neurophysiology at the University Hospital of Medical College, Al-Nahrin University in Baghdad, Iraq, from January 2002 to January 2003. Neuropathy total symptom score (NTSS, neuropathy impairment score in the lower leg (NIS-LL, and electrophysiological study of sensory (ulnar and sural and motor (ulnar and common peroneal nerves were used to assess nerve function. Fasting venous blood was obtained from each participant for determination of lipid profile and atherogenic lipid ratios. Results: The frequency of high blood pressure was significantly higher in neuropathic patients. The electrophysiology study revealed significant decrease in conduction velocity of ulnar (sensory and motor components, sural, and common peroneal nerves. The minimum F-wave latency of motor nerve was significantly prolonged. Among the lipid fractions, only high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was significantly reduced by 14% of healthy participant′s value. Atherogenic lipid ratios were significantly higher in diabetic patients than corresponding healthy ratios. Conclusion: Metabolic lipid disturbances in terms of atherogenicity co-existwith neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus, irrespective of duration of disease.

  17. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

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    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  18. Potential risk factors for diabetic neuropathy: a case control study

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    Nooraei Mahdi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus type II afflicts at least 2 million people in Iran. Neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes and lowers the patient's quality of life. Since neuropathy often leads to ulceration and amputation, we have tried to elucidate the factors that can affect its progression. Methods In this case-control study, 110 diabetic patients were selected from the Shariati Hospital diabetes clinic. Michigan Neuropathic Diabetic Scoring (MNDS was used to differentiate cases from controls. The diagnosis of neuropathy was confirmed by nerve conduction studies (nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. The multiple factors compared between the two groups included consumption of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, blood pressure, serum lipid level, sex, smoking, method of diabetes control and its quality. Results Statistically significant relationships were found between neuropathy and age, gender, quality of diabetes control and duration of disease (P values in the order: 0.04, 0.04, Conclusion In this study, hyperglycemia was the only modifiable risk factor for diabetic neuropathy. Glycemic control reduces the incidence of neuropathy, slows its progression and improves the diabetic patient's quality of life. More attention must be paid to elderly male diabetic patients with poor diabetes control with regard to regular foot examinations and more practical education.

  19. Dolor cervical incoercible

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    Adrián F Narváez-Muñoz

    2014-03-01

    Astrocytomas are relatively common glial neoplasm of the central nervous system, but only a small percentage of them are located in the spinal cord, with a predilection for the cervical and dorsal regions. In most cases, extend longitudinally, affecting several cord segments. Pain is a frequent symptom of local character bone segments involving the tumor, associated with sensory deficit and / or motor. The following is the case of a 60 year old woman with cervical cord astrocytoma extended to the brainstem.

  20. [Results to 4-year follow-up of the treatment of the cervical stenosis by corpectomy, titanium mesh cage and anterior plate fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Sánchez, Alejandro Antonio; Gameros Castañeda, Luis Alberto; Obil Chavarría, Claudia; Alpizar Aguirre, Armando; Zárate Kalfópulos, Barón; Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is caused by cervical stenosis. Several techniques have been described for the treatment of multilevel disease, such as the anterior corpectomy with titanium mesh cage and anterior cervical plate placement, which has the advantage of performing a wider decompression and using the same bone as graft. However, it has caused controversy since the collapse of the mesh cage continues being a major limitation of this procedure. A prospective 4-year follow-up study was conducted in 7 patients diagnosed with cervical stenosis, who were treated surgically by one level corpectomy with titanium mesh cage and anterior cervical plate placement, evaluating them by radiographs and clinical scales. 7 patients, 5 women and 2 males were studied. The most common level was C5 corpectomy (n=4). The Neck Disability Index (NDI) preoperative average was 30.01±24.32 and 4-year postoperative 16.90±32.05, with p=0.801. The preoperative and 4-year postoperative Nürick was 3.28± 48 and 3.14±1.21 respectively, with p=0.766. Preoperative lordosis was 14.42±8.03 and 4-year postoperative 17±11.67 degrees, with p=0.660. The immediate postoperative and 4-year postoperative subsidence was 2.69±2.8 and 6.11±1.61 millimeters respectively, with p=0.0001. Despite the small sample, the subsidence of the mesh cage is common in this procedure. No statistically significant changes were observed in the lordosis or Nürick scale and NDI. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk Factors for and Clinical Outcomes of Dysphagia After Anterior Cervical Surgery for Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: Results from the AOSpine International and North America Studies.

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    Nagoshi, Narihito; Tetreault, Lindsay; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Arnold, Paul M; Barbagallo, Giuseppe; Kopjar, Branko; Fehlings, Michael G

    2017-07-05

    Although dysphagia is a common complication after anterior cervical decompression and fusion, important risk factors have not been rigorously evaluated. Furthermore, the impact of dysphagia on neurological and quality-of-life outcomes is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for dysphagia, and the impact of this complication on short and long-term clinical outcomes, in patients treated with anterior cervical decompression and fusion. Four hundred and seventy patients undergoing a 1-stage anterior or 2-stage anteroposterior cervical decompression and fusion were enrolled in the prospective AOSpine CSM (Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy) North America or International study at 26 global sites. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine important clinical and surgical predictors of perioperative dysphagia. Preoperatively and at each follow-up visit, patients were evaluated using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale (mJOA), Nurick score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). A 2-way repeated-measures analysis of covariance was used to evaluate differences in outcomes at 6 and 24 months between patients with and those without dysphagia, while controlling for relevant baseline characteristics and surgical factors. The overall prevalence of dysphagia was 6.2%. Bivariate analysis showed the major risk factors for perioperative dysphagia to be a higher comorbidity score, older age, a cardiovascular or endocrine disorder, a lower SF-36 Physical Component Summary score, 2-stage surgery, and a greater number of decompressed levels. Multivariable analysis showed patients to be at an increased risk of perioperative dysphagia if they had an endocrine disorder, a greater number of decompressed segments, or 2-stage surgery. Both short and long-term improvements in functional, disability, and quality-of-life scores were comparable between patients with and those

  2. Nerve ultrasound as follow-up tool in treated multifocal motor neuropathy.

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    Rattay, T W; Winter, N; Décard, B F; Dammeier, N M; Härtig, F; Ceanga, M; Axer, H; Grimm, A

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution ultrasound is a valuable tool in supporting the diagnosis of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) but longitudinal data under therapy are lacking. The change in peripheral nerve ultrasound pattern in patients with MMN was assessed over time. Patients with MMN received a thorough initial examination and follow-up over a period of 6-12 months using high-resolution ultrasound of the cervical roots and the nerves of the arms and legs, nerve conduction studies, Medical Research Council Sum Score (MRCSS) and Rotterdam Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment Group (INCAT) score to evaluate changes under treatment. The Ultrasound Pattern Sum Score (UPSS) was used as standardized peripheral nerve ultrasound protocol. Seventeen patients with MMN received initial examinations of whom 12 were successfully followed up. All patients with MMN showed at least localized but often multifocal peripheral nerve enlargement. An enlarged overall cross-sectional area as well as enlarged single fascicles (>3 mm²) in clinically and electrophysiologically affected (>90%) and unaffected (>70%) nerves were found. The UPSS did not correlate with clinical disability at both visits. However, the change in clinical disability (evaluated as difference in MRCSS) and the change in UPSS correlated significantly inversely (P = 0.004). High-resolution sonography of peripheral nerves revealed multifocal nerve enlargement in MMN. Distinct enlargement patterns may support the diagnosis. Ultrasound findings did not correlate well with clinical severity or electrophysiological findings at initial presentation. As changes in UPSS correlated significantly with the clinical course in terms of muscle strength (MRCSS), sonographic assessment may represent a useful tool for therapeutic monitoring. © 2017 EAN.

  3. [Cervical discopathy, cervical migraine and vertebrobasilar arterial insufficiency: Clinical correlations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domzał, T; Zaleska, B; Kwasucki, J

    1978-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cervical migraine may suggest that a connection exists between it and cervical discopathy and also vertebrobasilar arterial insufficiency. This correlation was studied in a group of 103 patients subjected to clinical observations. In 83 of them cervical discopathy was found, in 69 cervical migraine and in 40 vertebrobasilar insufficiency were present. Among those with discopathy migraine was present in 63.6% of cases, and vertebrobasilar insufficiency in 31%. In patients with cervical migraine degenerative changes of the type of cervical discopathy were present in 90% of cases, although in only 56.5% of cases clinical signs were present connected with these changes. Vertebrobasilar insufficiency was present in 45% of patients with cervical migraine, that is more frequently than in discopathy. In the group with vertebrobasilar insufficiency radiological changes in the cervical spine were present in 77.5% of cases and the same proportion of patients in this group had cervical migraine. These numbers confirm the connection between cervical migraine and radiological changes and clinical manifestations of discopathy, and they indicate also that cervical migraine may be a successive stage of vascular changes leading to circulatory failure in the area supplied by vertebral arteries. This failure may have a different course and pathological mechanism. In 12.5% of patients in this group no cervical migraine or radiological changes were demonstrated. The term "cervical migraine" seems inappropriate since this type of headache has another substrate and mechanism than true migraine.

  4. Radiation Therapy Plus Cisplatin and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of DTRAX® posterior cervical cage stabilization with and without lateral mass fixation

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    Voronov LI

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Leonard I Voronov,1,2 Krzysztof B Siemionow,3 Robert M Havey,1,2 Gerard Carandang,2 Avinash G Patwardhan1,2 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, 2Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Laboratory, Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, Hines, 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Introduction: Lateral mass screw (LMS fixation with plates or rods is the current standard procedure for posterior cervical fusion. Recently, implants placed between the facet joints have become available as an alternative to LMS or transfacet screws for patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of the DTRAX® cervical cage for single- and two-level fusion and compare this to the stability achieved with LMS fixation with rods in a two-level construct.Methods: Seven cadaveric cervical spine (C3–C7 specimens were tested in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation to ±1.5 Nm moment without preload (0 N in the following conditions: 1 intact (C3–C7, 2 LMS and rods at C4–C5 and C5–C6, 3 removal of all rods (LMS retained and placement of bilateral posterior cages at C5–C6, 4 bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 (without LMS and rods, and 5 C4–C5 and C5–C6 bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 with rods reinserted.Results: Bilateral posterior cervical cages significantly reduced range of motion in all tested directions in both single- and multilevel constructs (P<0.05. Similar stability was achieved with bilateral posterior cages and LMS in a two-level construct: 0.6°±0.3° vs 1.2°±0.4° in flexion–­extension (P=0.001, (5.0°±2.6° vs 3.1°±1.3° in lateral bending (P=0.053, (1.3°±1.0° vs 2.2°±0.9° in axial rotation (P=0.091 for posterior cages and LMS, respectively. Posterior cages, when placed as an adjunct to LMS, further reduced

  6. Peripheral Neuropathy in Chlamydia Reactive Arthritis

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    O.V. Syniachenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Relevance. Peripheral neuropathy (PNP in urogenital chlamydia reactive arthritis (CRA is described as single observations, and many clinical and pathogenetic aspects of this lesion of the nervous system remain unclear. Objective of the study: to evaluate the incidence and nature of the clinical course of PNP in CRA, the connection of the nerve and joint injuries, to explore the questions of pathogenetic constructions of this neuropathy, to identify risk factors. Material and methods. We observed 101 patients with CRA, mean age of them was 32 years, disease duration — 4 years, and the male to female ratio — 1 : 1. In 90 % of CRA cases, Chlamydia trochamatis was found in prostatic secretions, in scraps from the urethra, the cervix, the vaginal wall, in 83 % — positive serologic tests for chlamydia infection. Results. Signs of PNP in CRA were in 19 % of patients in the ratio of mononeuropathy to polyneuropathy as 1 : 1, with motor, sensory and mixed disorders in a ratio of 1 : 3 : 6, the presence of autonomic changes in every second patient and more frequent distal localization of the process in the hands, which is influenced by the severity of the articular syndrome, high levels of antichlamydia antibodies in the blood, and the axonal and demyelinating indicators of electroneuromyography — by the severity of urogenital lesions and the presence of Guillain-Barre syndrome. A high rate of arthritis progression is a prognosis-negative sign of PNP course in patients with CRA. The pathogenic constructions of PNP involve the inflammatory immune proteins, disturbances of vascular endothelial function and physicochemical surface rheological pro­perties of the serum. Conclusion. PNP takes place in every fifth patient with CRA, correlates with clinical and laboratory signs of joint disease, and in the future will be useful to identify actively this pathology of the nervous system for the subsequent timely rehabilitation, and CRA

  7. Cervical syphilitic lesions mimicking cervical cancer: a rare case report

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    Xiaoqing Zhu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A woman presented to the hospital due to postcoital vaginal bleeding. The patient was initially diagnosed with cervical carcinoma by clinicians at a local hospital. However, a biopsy of the cervical lesions revealed chronic inflammation and erosion of the cervical mucosa, and the rapid plasma reagin ratio titer was 1:256. The patient was eventually diagnosed with syphilitic cervicitis and treated with minocycline 0.1 g twice a day. The patient was cured with this treatment.

  8. Revision surgery after cervical laminoplasty: report of five cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Hideki; Koizumi, Munehisa; Matsumori, Hiroaki; Iwata, Eiichiro; Kura, Tomohiko; Okuda, Akinori; Ueda, Yurito; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2015-06-01

    Revision surgery after laminoplasty is rarely performed, and there are few reports of this procedure in the English literature. To evaluate the reasons why patients underwent revision surgery after laminoplasty and to discuss methods of preventing the need for revision surgery. A literature review with a comparative analysis between previous reports and present cases was also performed. Case report and literature review. Five patients who underwent revision surgery after laminoplasty. Diagnosis was based on the preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Neurologic findings were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopedic Association score. A total of 237 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy from 1990 to 2010 were reviewed. Patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, renal dialysis, infection, tumor, or rheumatoid arthritis were excluded. Five patients who underwent revision surgery for symptoms of recurrent myelopathy or radiculopathy were identified, and the clinical courses and radiological findings of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. The average interval from the initial surgery to revision surgery was 15.0 (range 9-19) years. The patients were four men and one woman with an average age at the time of the initial operation of 49.8 (range 34-65) years. Four patients developed symptoms of recurrent myelopathy after their initial surgery, for the following reasons: adjacent segment canal stenosis, restenosis after inadequate opening of the lamina with degenerative changes, and trauma after inadequate opening of the lamina. One patient developed new radiculopathy symptoms because of foraminal stenosis secondary to osteoarthritis at the Luschka and zygapophyseal joints. All patients experienced resolution of their symptoms after revision surgery. Revision surgery after laminoplasty is rare. Inadequate opening of the lamina is one of the important reasons for

  9. Frequency of sensory motor neuropathy in type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ather, N.A.; Sattar, R.A.; Ara, J.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of sensory motor neuropathy in type 2 diabetics at the time of presentation to the hospital. The study was conducted at Medical Unit-1, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center, Karachi, from November 2005 to April 2006. Patients of different ages and either gender with history of confirmed diabetes for ten years and above, on regular follow up were included. Those with non-diabetic causes of hyperglycemia or neuropathy were excluded. Relevant features like age, gender, treatment, symptoms , signs, nerve conduction study (NCS) results, duration of Diabetes mellitus (DM), fasting blood sugar (FBS) and serum values of glycosylated hemoglobin (HB1Ac) were recorded. Out of a total of 300 patients, there were 111 female and 189 male patients. Mean age was 58 +- 11.23 years. Mean duration of diabetes was 13.6+-5.48 years. One hundred and twenty three patients had symptoms of neuropathy. Clinical examination revealed mixed sensory and motor signs in 135 (45%) patients. Nerve conduction studies revealed abnormalities in 159 (53%) patients. Among patients having an abnormal NCS, the fasting blood glucose (FBS) was 120mg/dl in 147 (91%) patients. The glycosylated hemoglobin ranged from 4-15% with mean of 8.1% and standard deviation of 2.5%. This showed significant association (p <0.001) of peripheral neuropathy with abnormal FBS, HB1Ac and duration of diabetes. NCS diagnosed the neuropathy in more than half of the total number of patients, including both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Majority of the patients revealed symmetrical and a mixed type (motor and sensory) polyneuropathy. This shows that nerve conduction may not be concordant with the clinical signs and symptoms. NCS detects neuropathy much earlier, before it becomes evident clinically. The neuropathy is associated with abonromal fasting blood sugar, HBIAC and duration of diabetes. (author)

  10. Somatosensory evoked potentials for the diagnosis of proximal sensory median neuropathy with preserved distal sensory action potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, P E; Joan, N; Varnet, O; Dupuy-Sonntag, D; Perin, B; Macron, J M

    2003-12-01

    A 33 year-old-man with paresthesia in first three fingers of the right hand after minor trauma of the arm was examined electrophysiologically. The proximal sensory median neuropathy was isolated which it is unusual in traumatic lesion. Motor and distal sensory conduction studies were normal but sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were abnormal by right median nerve stimulation at the wrist level with decrease in amplitude of peripheral potential at the Erb's point, the cervical and contralateral parietal levels. This pattern, preserved distal sensory action potential and abnormal peripheral SEPs were suggesting the presence of proximal sensory block conduction without wallerian degeneration. The recovery was complete and fast in correlation with the absence of axonopathy.

  11. Seizure, spinal schwannoma, peripheral neuropathy and pulmonary stenosis - A rare combination in a patient of Neurofibromatosis 1

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    Avas Chandra Ray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1 is the most common neurocutaneous syndrome. It is estimated to occur in approximately 1 out of every 3300 infants. The manifestations of this condition are diverse and can arise from almost any system in the body. The neurofibroma is the hallmark lesion of NF1 that develops from peripheral nerves. Here, we are reporting an 18-year-old girl with NF1. Clinical diagnosis was made according to the diagnostic criteria established by the National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference in 1987. She presented with quadriparesis due to dumbbell-shaped spinal schwannoma in the cervical region. She had history of recurrent seizures in the past, with poor scholastic performance. There were clinical and electrophysiological features of peripheral neuropathy and clinical and echocardiographical features of pulmonary stenosis. These are uncommon features of NF 1. The presence of all these features in a single patient makes it a unique case.

  12. Nutritional optic neuropathy following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka-Pierko, Anna; Obuchowska, Iwona; Hady, Razak Hady; Mariak, Zofia; Dadan, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Bariatric procedures, associated with gastrointestinal malabsorption of vitamins and microelements, may constitute a risk factor for nutritional optic neuropathy (NON). We present a case of a 34-year-old female patient who developed bilateral NON after sleeve gastrectomy. Despite postoperative ophthalmological supervision, 10 months after the procedure the woman presented with a bilateral decrease in visual acuity down to 0.8, bilateral visual field loss and abnormal visual evoked potential recordings. Laboratory abnormalities included decreased serum concentration of vitamin B12 (161 pg/ml). Treatment was based on intramuscular injections of vitamin B12 (1000 units per day). After 1 week of the treatment, we observed more than a three-fold increase in the serum concentration of vitamin B12 and resolution of the bilateral symptoms of NON. The incidence of NON is likely to increase due to the growing number of these bariatric procedures performed worldwide. Therefore, all persons subjected to such surgery should receive long-term ophthalmological follow-up and supplementation with vitamins and microelements.

  13. Malignant mental nerve neuropathy: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán Gil, Sónnica; Peñarrocha Diago, Maria; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2008-10-01

    Malignant mental neuropathy (MMN) is a neurological manifestation of cancer, characterized by the presence of hypoesthesia or anesthesia restricted to the territory of the mental branch of the mandibular nerve. A systematic review of the literature has been made on MMN, analyzing the etiology, pathogeny, clinical characteristics, complementary tests and the prognosis. Sixteen studies, providing 136 cases were selected. Breast cancer and lymphomas were the most frequently associated malignant diseases. The most frequent pathogenic mechanisms producing neurological involvement were: peripherally, mandibular lesions; and centrally, tumors at the base of the cranium. Regarding clinical characteristics, manifestation of MMN was the primary symptom of malignant disease in 27.7% of cases, and a first symptom of recurrence in 37.7%. The group of selected studies included 50 orthopantomographs, 9 mandibular computed tomographies and 50 radiographic examinations of the cranial region. The most affected region was the mandible. The appearance of MMN is an ominous prognosis for the progression of the disease, with a mortality of 78.5% within a mean of 6.9 months.

  14. Toxic optic neuropathy: An unusual cause

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    Hema L Ramkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old woman with a history of chronic alcoholism and tobacco use presented with the complaint of a painless decrease in vision in both eyes. She lost vision first in the left eye then in the right eye. She admitted consuming at least one 16 ounce bottle of over the counter mouthwash daily and denied consumption of any other alcohols, methanol, or antifreeze. She stated that her vision had been continuing to deteriorate in both eyes. Her best-corrected visual acuity was 4/200 in each eye. Color vision was nil in each eye. Her pupils were sluggish bilaterally, and her optic discs were flat and hyperemic with peripapillary hemorrhages. Her visual fields revealed central scotomas bilaterally. The magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and lumbar puncture were within normal limits. Antinuclear antibody, human leukocyte antigen-B27 genotyping, and B12 were normal; serum thiamine was low. While continuing to ingest mouthwash, her vision decreased to count fingers at 2 feet, and maculopapillary bundle pallor developed. She was started on folate and thiamine supplementation. Once she discontinued mouthwash, her vision improved to 20/400 bilaterally, and her central scotomas improved. This case demonstrates an alcohol-induced toxic optic neuropathy from mouthwash ingestion with some visual recovery after discontinuation of the offending agent.

  15. Painful diabetic neuropathy: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartemann, A; Attal, N; Bouhassira, D; Dumont, I; Gin, H; Jeanne, S; Said, G; Richard, J-L

    2011-11-01

    The prevalence of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDN) is about 20% in patients with type 2 diabetes and 5% in those with type 1. Patients should be systematically questioned concerning suggestive symptoms, as they are not usually volunteers. As PDN is due to small-fibre injury, the 10 g monofilament pressure test as well as the standard electrophysiological procedures may be normal. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings: type of pain (burning discomfort, electric shock-like sensation, aching coldness in the lower limbs); time of occurrence (mostly at rest and at night); and abnormal sensations (such as tingling or numbness). The DN4 questionnaire is an easy-to-use validated diagnostic tool. Three classes of drugs are of equal value in treating PDN: tricyclic antidepressants; anticonvulsants; and selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. These compounds may be prescribed as first-line therapy following pain assessment using a visual analogue scale. If the initial drug at its maximum tolerated dose does not lead to a decrease in pain of at least 30%, another drug class should be prescribed; if the pain is decreased by 30% but remains greater than 3/10, a drug from a different class may be given in association. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, Georgios; Giamouzis, Gregory; Cokkinos, Dennis V; Skoularigis, John; Triposkiadis, Filippos

    2012-06-01

    Diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DCAN), the impairment of the autonomic balance of the cardiovascular system in the setting of diabetes mellitus (DM), is frequently observed in both Type 1 and 2 DM, has detrimental effects on the quality of life and portends increased mortality. Clinical manifestations include: resting heart rate disorders, exercise intolerance, intraoperative cardiovascular lability, orthostatic alterations in heart rate and blood pressure, QT-interval prolongation, abnormal diurnal and nocturnal blood pressure variation, silent myocardial ischemia and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Clinical tests for autonomic nervous system evaluation, heart rate variability analysis, autonomic innervation imaging techniques, microneurography and baroreflex analysis are the main diagnostic tools for DCAN detection. Aldose reductase inhibitors and antioxidants may be helpful in DCAN therapy, but a regular, more generalized and multifactorial approach should be adopted with inclusion of lifestyle modifications, strict glycemic control and treatment of concomitant traditional cardiovascular risk factors, in order to achieve the best therapeutic results. In the present review, the authors provide aspects of DCAN pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and an algorithm regarding the evaluation and management of DCAN in DM patients.

  17. "Isolated" Suprascapular Neuropathy: Compression, Traction, or Inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hanneur, Malo; Maldonado, Andres A; Howe, Benjamin M; Mauermann, Michelle L; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-02-26

    Several hypotheses have been proposed for the pathophysiology of suprascapular nerve (SSN) palsy, including compression, traction, and nerve inflammation. To provide insight into the pathophysiology of isolated nontraumatic SSN palsy by performing critical reinterpretations of electrodiagnostic (EDX) studies and magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with such diagnosis. We retrospectively reviewed all patients referred to our institution for the past 20 yr with a diagnosis of nontraumatic isolated suprascapular neuropathy who had an upper extremity EDX study and a shoulder or brachial plexus MR scan. Patient charts were reviewed to analyze their initial clinical examination, and their original EDX study and MR images were reinterpreted by an experienced neurologist and a musculoskeletal radiologist, respectively, both blinded from the authors' hypothesis and from each other's findings. Fifty-nine patients were included. Fifty of them (85%) presented with at least 1 finding that was inconsistent with an isolated SSN palsy. Forty patients (68%) had signs on physical examination beyond the SSN distribution. Thirty-one patients (53%) had abnormalities on their EDX studies not related to the SSN. Twenty-two patients (37%) had denervation atrophy in other muscles than the spinati, or neural hyperintensity in other nerves than the SSN on their MR scans, without any evidence of SSN extrinsic compression. The great majority of patients with presumed isolated SSN palsy had clinical, electrophysiological, and/or imaging evidence of a more diffuse pattern of neuromuscular involvement. These data strongly support an inflammatory pathophysiology in many cases of "isolated" SSN palsy.

  18. January Monthly Spotlight: Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    In January, CRCHD joins the nation in raising awareness for Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities. This month we share a special focus on NCI/CRCHD research programs that are trying to reduce cervical cancer disparities in underserved communities and the people who are spreading the word about the importance of early detection.

  19. The Importance of Rare Subtypes in Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Brian C; Price, Raymond S; Chen, Kevin S; Feldman, Eva L

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent condition that usually warrants a thorough history and examination but has limited diagnostic evaluation. However, rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy often require more extensive diagnostic testing and different treatments. To describe rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, including the appropriate diagnostic evaluation and available treatments. References were identified from PubMed searches conducted on May 29, 2015, with an emphasis on systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials. Articles were also identified through the use of the authors' own files. Search terms included common rare neuropathy localizations and their causes, as well as epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies, multiple mononeuropathies, polyradiculopathies, plexopathies, and radiculoplexus neuropathies are rare peripheral neuropathy localizations that often require extensive diagnostic testing. Atypical neuropathy features, such as acute/subacute onset, asymmetry, and/or motor predominant signs, are frequently present. The most common diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies are Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Effective disease-modifying therapies exist for many diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies including Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and some paraprotein-associated demyelinating neuropathies. Vasculitic neuropathy (multiple mononeuropathy) also has efficacious treatment options, but definitive evidence of a treatment effect for IgM anti-MAG neuropathy and diabetic amyotrophy (radiculoplexus neuropathy) is lacking. Recognition of rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy is essential given the implications for diagnostic testing and treatment. Electrodiagnostic studies are an important

  20. Spectrum of peripheral neuropathies associated with surgical interventions; A neurophysiological assessment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saidha, Shiv

    2010-04-19

    Abstract Background We hypothesized that a wide range of surgical procedures may be complicated by neuropathies, not just in close proximity but also remote from procedural sites. The aim of this study was to classify post-operative neuropathies and the procedures associated with them. Methods We retrospectively identified 66 patients diagnosed with post-procedure neuropathies between January 2005 and June 2008. We reviewed their referral cards and medical records for patient demographics, information on procedures, symptoms, as well as clinical and neurophysiological findings. Results Thirty patients (45.4%) had neuropathies remote from procedural sites and 36 patients (54.5%) had neuropathies in close proximity to procedural sites. Half of the remote neuropathies (15\\/30) developed following relatively short procedures. In 27% of cases (8\\/30) remote neuropathies were bilateral. Seven patients developed neuropathies remote from operative sites following hip arthroplasties (7\\/30: 23.3%), making hip arthroplasty the most common procedure associated with remote neuropathies. Sciatic neuropathies due to hip arthroplasty (12\\/36, 33.3%) accounted for the majority of neuropathies occurring in close proximity to operative sites. Five medial cutaneous nerve of forearm neuropathies occurred following arterio-venous fistula (AVF) formation. Conclusions An array of surgical procedures may be complicated by neuropathy. Almost half of post-procedure neuropathies occur remote from the site of procedure, emphasizing the need to try to prevent not just local, but also remote neuropathies. Mechanical factors and patient positioning should be considered in the prevention of post-operative neuropathies. There is a possible association between AVF formation and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm neuropathy, which requires further study for validation.

  1. Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FIND A SPECIALIST Conditions Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy Raj Rao MD Raj Rao MD Updated 5/ ... of the spinal cord within the neck. Cervical radiculopathy refers to a loss of function in a ...

  2. Cervical myelopathy due to single level disc herniation presenting as intramedullary mass lesion: What to do first?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Sakir Eksi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical myelopathy (CM is mostly a degenerative process ending in myelopathic and/or radiculopathic syndromes. On T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, CM appears as a hyperintense area near the spondylotic spine. This high intensity signal depends on the impact of outer forces and their duration. It also determines the prognosis of the surgical candidate. A 40-year-old male patient admitted to our clinic with right upper extremity weakness and hypoesthesia that had started 2 months earlier. On neurological examination there was 2/5 motor weakness of right biceps brachii, and hypoesthesia over right C6 dermatome. Right upper extremity deep tendon reflexes were hypoactive, but lower ones were hyperactive. After clinical and radiological work-up, preliminary diagnosis was directed to a spinal intramedullary tumor. Total resection of the herniated cervical disc fragment and the mass lesion was managed. Pathology of the mass lesion was compatible with subacute infarct tissue and inflammatory response. Final diagnosis was CM under effect of cervical disc herniation. Contrast-enhanced spinal cord myelopathic lesions are very rare and resemble much more tumors and inflammatory processes. However, the principal treatment approach totally differs depending on pathology. When there are both a disc herniation and a high clinical suspicion; biopsy should be delayed. The most probable solution will be surgery for the disc disease with thorough preoperative scanning of vascular malformations; clinical and radiological close follow-up after surgery. Biopsy or surgical resection can be performed if patient deteriorates despite the primary surgery.

  3. [Usefulness of botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of postoperative pain after cervical spine surgery: Preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finiels, P-J; Batifol, D

    2010-10-01

    Postoperative neck pain after cervical spinal surgery is a common occurrence, the prevalence of which can reach up to 60%. Since 2005 a prospective study, still in progress, is attempting to show the efficacy of botulinum toxin injections in its treatment. Two hundred and fifteen patients operated on in the same institution for cervical spondylotic myelopathy were prospectively followed-up; 38 of them presented postoperative neck pain and were enrolled either in a course of botulinum toxin injections (19) or in conservative treatment (19). The muscles injected, in descending order, were: trapezius, supraspinalis, splenius capitis, and rhomboids. Injections were made using Type A-botulinum toxin (Botox*-Allergan Pharmaceuticals, Westport, Ireland), increasing from 20 to 100U Botox* without exceeding 300U once in the same patient, performed every 3 months if necessary. The conservative treatment consisted of a course of thiocolchicoside (16mg/day) and physical rehabilitation. The lordosis angle was calculated on lateral sitting radiographs in the neutral position immediately postoperatively and 1.5 months after injection and correlated to pain improvement evaluated by the visual analogic scale (VAS). No visible improvement was found on x-rays in three patients after injection, and in 11 after conservative treatment. In 16 cases, after an average of three injections, the gain in lordosis averaged 11.3° and the VAS score was decreased by 4.6 points versus 4.7° and a decrease of 0.6 points after conservative treatment. Regardless of its limitations, the present study would seem to show potential value in the use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of postoperative pain after cervical spinal surgery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trammell, Samuel A J; Weidemann, Benjamin J; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2016-05-27

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD(+) metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP(+) and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies.

  5. Neurotrophin-3 is increased in skin in human diabetic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, A; Wellmer, A; Facer, P; Saldanha, G; Kopelman, P; Lindsay, R; Anand, P

    1998-01-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), a member of the neurotrophin family, has been shown to be necessary for the development of muscle spindle and Merkel cell afferent nerve fibres in animal models.The presence of NT-3 in the suprabasal epidermis, where many unmyelinated sensory fibres terminate, has been shown for the first time. As these fibres are affected in early diabetic neuropathy and a clinical trial of recombinant human NT-3 in diabetic neuropathy is in progress, the concentrations of endogenous NT-3 in skin of 24 patients at different stages of diabetic polyneuropathy have been investigated. NT-3 concentrations, measured with a specific immunoassay, were significantly higher in affected skin biopsies from patients with diabetic neuropathy than matched control skin (diabetic skin 6.32(1.18) pg/mg v control skin 1.28 (0.05) (mean (SEM)); p<0.004, Mann-Whitney U test), particularly in the later stages. The optical density of NT-3-immunostaining was also significantly greater in the epidermis in diabetic patients (diabetic epidermis 0.30(0.06) v controls 0.24 (0.01); p<0.02). No correlation was found between individual quantitative sensory tests and the increase of NT-3 concentration. The increase of NT-3 seems to reflect the degree of skin denervation in diabetic neuropathy, and may represent a compensatory mechanism. The concentrations of NT-3 in other peripheral targets deserve study in diabetic neuropathy.

 PMID:9728960

  6. Assessment of sensory neuropathy in patients with diabetic foot problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of three different modalities for testing sensory neuropathy in diabetic patients with and without diabetic foot problems. The three devices used included the pin-prick testing using the Neurotip® (PPT, the Semmes–Weinstein 5.07/10 g monofilament testing (SWMT, and the rapid-current perception threshold (R-CPT measurements using the Neurometer® testing. Our study population consisted of 54 patients (108 feet with diabetic foot problems treated at the National University Hospital in Singapore by our multi-disciplinary diabetic foot care team. Our results showed no difference in sensory neuropathy detected by PPT and 5.07/10 g SWMT in both the pathological and normal foot. In the pathological foot, there was significant increase in sensory neuropathy detected by the Neurometer® device at both the big toe and ankle sites as compared to PPT and 5.07/10 g SWMT. In the normal foot, there was a significant increase in sensory neuropathy detected by the Neurometer® device at the big toe site only as compared to PPT and 5.07/10 g SWMT. Finally, the Neurometer® measurements detected a statistically higher proportion of feet with sensory neuropathy as compared to detection by the PPT or 5.07/10 g SWMT.

  7. [Toronto clinical scoring system in diabetic peripheral neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Mao, Ji-Ping; Yan, Xiang

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the application value of Toronto clinical scoring system (TCSS) and its grading of neuropathy for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and to explore the relationship between TCSS grading of neuropathy and the grading of diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy. A total of 209 patients of Type 2 diabtes (T2DM) underwent TCSS. Taking electrophysiological examination as a gold standard for diagnosing DPN, We compared the results of TCSS score > or = 6 with electrophysiological examination, and tried to select the optimal cut-off points of TCSS. The corresponding accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of TCSS score > or = 6 were 76.6%, 77.2%, and 75.6%, respectively.The Youden index and Kappa were 0.53 and 0.52, which implied TCSS score > or = 6 had a moderate consistency with electrophysiological examination. There was a linear positive correlation between TCSS grading of neuropathy and the grading of diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy (P<0.05). The optimal cut-off point was 5 or 6 among these patients. TCSS is reliable in diagnosing DPN and its grading of neuropathy has clinical value.

  8. Vasculitis syndromes : Peripheral neuropathy in AAV--when vasculitis hits a nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, Abraham; Kallenberg, Cornelis

    Peripheral neuropathy can be a manifestation of small-vessel vasculitides such as antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. Diagnosing vasculitic neuropathy is, however, difficult in many cases. Early treatment focused on achieving remission of the underlying vasculitic process is

  9. Diabetic neuropathies: update on definitions, diagnostic criteria, estimation of severity, and treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Boulton, Andrew J M; Dyck, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Preceding the joint meeting of the 19th annual Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (NEURODIAB) and the 8th International Symposium on Diabetic Neuropathy in Toronto, Canada, 13-18 October 2009, expert panels were convened to provide updates on cla...... on classification, definitions, diagnostic criteria, and treatments of diabetic peripheral neuropathies (DPNs), autonomic neuropathy, painful DPNs, and structural alterations in DPNs....

  10. Short cervical length dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhag, Anju; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2015-06-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. With research efforts, the rate of PTB decreased to 11.4% in 2013. Transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) cervical length (CL) screening predicts PTB. In asymptomatic singletons without prior spontaneous PTB (sPTB), TVU CL screening should be done. If the cervix is 20 mm or less, vaginal progesterone is indicated. In asymptomatic singletons with prior sPTB, serial CL screening is indicated. In multiple gestations, routine cervical screening is not indicated. In symptomatic women with preterm labor, TVU CL screening and fetal fibronectin testing is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. HIV-related neuropathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schütz SG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sonja G Schütz, Jessica Robinson-Papp Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is one of the most common neurologic complications of HIV, possibly affecting as many as 50% of all individuals infected with HIV. Two potentially neurotoxic mechanisms have been proposed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HIV DSP: neurotoxicity resulting from the virus and its products; as well as adverse neurotoxic effects of medications used in the treatment of HIV. Clinically, HIV DSP is characterized by a combination of signs and symptoms that include decreased deep tendon reflexes at the ankles and decreased sensation in the distal extremities as well as paresthesias, dysesthesias, and pain in a symmetric stocking–glove distribution. These symptoms are generally static or slowly progressive over time, and depending on the severity, may interfere significantly with the patient's daily activities. In addition to the clinical picture, nerve conduction studies and skin biopsies are often pursued to support the diagnosis of HIV DSP. Anticonvulsants, antidepressants, topical agents, and nonspecific analgesics may help relieve neuropathic pain. Specifically, gabapentin, lamotrigine, pregabalin, amitriptyline, duloxetine, and high-dose topical capsaicin patches have been used in research and clinical practice. Further research is needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of HIV DSP, thus facilitating the development of novel treatment strategies. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, and management of DSP in the setting of HIV. Keywords: neuropathy, human immunodeficiency virus, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, DSP, pain

  12. Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathy in Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaskowski, Christine; Mastick, Judy; Paul, Steven M; Topp, Kimberly; Smoot, Betty; Abrams, Gary; Chen, Lee-May; Kober, Kord M; Conley, Yvette P; Chesney, Margaret; Bolla, Kay; Mausisa, Grace; Mazor, Melissa; Wong, Melisa; Schumacher, Mark; Levine, Jon D

    2017-08-01

    Evidence suggests that chemotherapy-induced neuropathy (CIN) is a significant problem for cancer survivors. However, a detailed phenotypic characterization of CIN in cancer survivors is not available. To evaluate between-group differences in demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as in measures of sensation, function, and postural control, in a sample of cancer survivors who received a platinum and/or a taxane-based CTX regimen and did (n = 426) and did not (n = 197) develop CIN. Survivors completed self-report questionnaires and underwent objective testing (i.e., light touch, pain sensation, cold sensation, vibration, muscle strength, grip strength, Purdue Pegboard test, Timed Get Up and Go test, Fullerton Advanced Balance test). Parametric and nonparametric statistics were used to compare between-group differences in study outcomes. Of the 426 survivors with CIN, 4.9% had CIN only in their upper extremities, 27.0% only in their lower extremities, and 68.1% in both their upper and lower extremities. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with CIN included the following: older age, lower annual income, higher body mass index, a higher level of comorbidity, being born prematurely, receipt of a higher cumulative dose of chemotherapy, and a poorer functional status. Survivors with CIN had worse outcomes for all of the following objective measures: light touch, pain, temperature, vibration, upper and lower extremity function, and balance. This study is the first to provide a detailed phenotypic characterization of CIN in cancer survivors who received a platinum and/or a taxane compound. These data can serve as a benchmark for future studies of CIN in cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Pseudo-conduction block in nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabón Meneses, R M; Gila, L; Urriza, J; Imirizaldu, L; Arrechea, M; Lacruz, F

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy (NSVN) is an inflammatory disorder of the vasa nervorum which usually is expressed as a mononeuritis multiplex. We present a patient with NSVN with histological confirmination focused on the neurophysiological findings at the early stages. A 36 years-old woman presented with paresthesia and weakness in her right hand followed by left footdrop. The first neurophysiologic examination showed low amplitude of the right median nerve (RMN) CMAP with proximal stimulation. A second examination showed signs of axonal damage in several nerves, including the RMN. The acute ischemic damage of a nerve can give a pattern of conduction block in the electroneurographic study as in the RMN of the presented case. This phenomenon is referred as "pseudo-conduction block", since it is transient and evolves towards a definite pattern of axonal neuropathy. When a vasculitic neuropathy is suspected, repeated neurophysiologic studies are necessary in order to ensure a proper (appropriate) characterization of the lesional patterns.

  14. Painful neuropathies: the emerging role of sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Brigitte A; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Gerrits, Monique M; Waxman, Stephen G; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a frequent debilitating feature reported in peripheral neuropathies with involvement of small nerve (Aδ and C) fibers. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the generation and conduction of action potentials in the peripheral nociceptive neuronal pathway where NaV 1.7, NaV 1.8, and NaV 1.9 sodium channels (encoded by SCN9A, SCN10A, and SCN11A) are preferentially expressed. The human genetic pain conditions inherited erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder were the first to be linked to gain-of-function SCN9A mutations. Recent studies have expanded this spectrum with gain-of-function SCN9A mutations in patients with small fiber neuropathy and in a new syndrome of pain, dysautonomia, and small hands and small feet (acromesomelia). In addition, painful neuropathies have been recently linked to SCN10A mutations. Patch-clamp studies have shown that the effect of SCN9A mutations is dependent upon the cell-type background. The functional effects of a mutation in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and sympathetic neuron cells may differ per mutation, reflecting the pattern of expression of autonomic symptoms in patients with painful neuropathies who carry the mutation in question. Peripheral neuropathies may not always be length-dependent, as demonstrated in patients with initial facial and scalp pain symptoms with SCN9A mutations showing hyperexcitability in both trigeminal ganglion and DRG neurons. There is some evidence suggesting that gain-of-function SCN9A mutations can lead to degeneration of peripheral axons. This review will focus on the emerging role of sodium channelopathies in painful peripheral neuropathies, which could serve as a basis for novel therapeutic strategies. © 2014 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  15. Propionic acidemia and optic neuropathy: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Carolina; Raimann, Erna; Peredo, Pilar; Cabello, Juan Francisco; Castro, Gabriela; Valiente, Alf; de la Parra, Alicia; Bravo, Paulina; Okuma, Cecilia; Cornejo, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Propionic acidemia is a metabolic disease produced by a deficiency of the enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase. It can lead to coma, with severe neurologic encephalopathy or present later in life with vomiting, hypotonia, and seizures. An early diagnosis with adequate treatment helps to prevent the sequelae. Among the described complications is optic neuropathy, although not commonly reported, it is very disabling. To describe two patients with propionic acidemia and optic neuropathy. Patient 1: 16 years old, male, parents without consanguinity. He was diagnosed at 5 months of age because of hypotonia and seizures. Until the age of 9 years, he evolved satisfactorily; therefore, he stopped treatment. At 13 years, he presented bilateral optic neuropathy. Patient 2: 20 years, female, parents without consanguinity. She was diagnosed with PA at 11 months of age because of hypotonia and seizures. She evolved satisfactorily until the age of 9 years when she presented a metabolic decompensation followed by a bad metabolic control. At 18 years, she presented bilateral progressive optic neuropathy. Both patients have psychometric scores with borderline IQ 84-75 (WISC-R) beside optic neuropathy. They were evaluated by an ophthalmologist and also by neuroimaging (MRI of optic pathway). Pathophysiology of optic neuropathy is not completely understood. There is evidence that the damage is due to an accumulation of neurotoxic compounds secondary to the metabolic block increasing the oxidative stress. We suggest an annual ophthalmologic evaluation in the long-term follow-up of organic acidurias with visual loss, in order to detect this disabling sequela at an earlier stage.

  16. Reversible optic neuropathy with OPA1 exon 5b mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornille, K.; Milea, D.; Amati-Bonneau, P.

    2008-01-01

    A new c.740G>A (R247H) mutation in OPA1 alternate spliced exon 5b was found in a patient presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy followed by partial, spontaneous visual recovery. R247H fibroblasts from the patient and his unaffected father presented unusual highly tubular mitochondrial network......, significant increased susceptibility to apoptosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, and altered OPA1 protein profile, supporting the pathogenicity of this mutation. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of the OPA1-associated optic neuropathies may be larger than previously described......, and that spontaneous recovery may occur in cases harboring an exon 5b mutation Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  17. The significance of computed tomography in optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awai, Tsugumi; Yasutake, Hirohide; Ono, Yoshiko; Kumagai, Kazuhisa; Kairada, Kensuke

    1981-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT scan) has become one of the important and useful modes of examination for ophthalmological and neuro-ophthalmological disorders. CT scan (EMI scan) was performed on 21 patients with optic neuropathy in order to detect the cause. Of these 21 patients, the CT scan was abnormal in six. These six patients were verified, histopathologically, as having chromophobe pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, plasmocytoma from sphenoidal sinus, optic nerve glioma and giant aneurysma of anterior communicating artery. The practical diagnostic value of CT scan for optic neuropathy is discussed. (author)

  18. Clinical course of uremic neuropathy in long-term hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jurčić, Dragan; Bilić, Ante; Schwarz, Dragan; Oršanić, Dubravka; Gabrić, Maruška; Špoljarić, Ljubica; Mihanović, Mate

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and thirty-one patients on long-term hemodialysis were examined for the presence of clinical symptoms and signs, and for the effects of dialytic age, age and sex on uremic neuropathy. According to dialysis age, the patients were divided into three subgroups: low dialysis age, 10 years of dialysis (n=34). Two patient subgroups were differentiated according to mean age of 53.2 years: younger (n=57) and older (n=74). Clinical grading of uremic neuropathy was based on Niel...

  19. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain...

  20. MRI of suprascapular neuropathy in a weight lifter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiss, J; Woldenberg, L S; Saddemi, S R; Ebraheim, N A

    1993-01-01

    Suprascapular neuropathy results from abnormal compression of the suprascapular nerve, typically at the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notch. This may be produced by either mass effect such as ganglion cyst or by certain repetitive shoulder motions producing wide scapular excursion (e.g., hyperabduction), which causes traction upon the nerve. Certain sports activities such as weight lifting predispose to this type of neuropathy. The clinical presentation is frequently not specific and the patient may be sent for MR evaluation to rule out rotator cuff tear or other more common shoulder abnormalities. This entity should be suspected if MR images demonstrate selective atrophy of the spinatus muscles with a structurally intact rotator cuff.

  1. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Young; Lee, In Ho; Song, Chang June [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hee Youn [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    A 57-year-old woman experienced bilateral acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery. Routine MR imaging sequence, T2-weighted image, showed subtle high signal intensity on bilateral optic nerves. A contrast-enhanced T1 weighted image showed enhancement along the bilateral optic nerve sheath. Moreover, diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and an apparent diffusion coefficient map showed markedly restricted diffusion on bilateral optic nerves. Although MR findings of T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images may be nonspecific, the DWI finding of cytotoxic edema of bilateral optic nerves will be helpful for the diagnosis of acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery.

  2. [A case of brachial plexus neuropathy who presented with acute paralysis of the hand after sleep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Makiko; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Ohizumi, Hideki; Fujishima, Kenji; Goto, Keigo; Mizuno, Yoshikuni

    2002-09-01

    We report a 46-year-old woman who presented with acute paresis of the right hand and arm. She was well until when she noted a paresis and dysesthesia in her right hand in the morning. Neurological examination revealed weakness in the muscles which were supplied by lower cervical segments, with increased deep tendon reflexes in the right arm. Allen's test and Wright's test were positive. The nerve conduction studies disclosed a reduced CMAPs more severely by right median than ulnar nerve stimulation. The frequency and amplitude of the F waves was also reduced. Needle electromyogram showed a mild neurogenic pattern in the right hand muscles. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a tapering of the subclavian artery when the right arm was abducted. She underwent decompression surgery. A remarkable improvement of the symptoms was observed after surgery. Our patient suggests that brachial plexus neuropathy should be considered in the acute paresis of the hand after sleep, and that surgical procedure would lead to a successful outcome.

  3. Minoxidil is a potential neuroprotective drug for paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Fan; Chen, Li-Hsien; Yeh, Yu-Min; Wu, Pei-Ying; Chen, Yih-Fung; Chang, Lian-Yun; Chang, Jang-Yang; Shen, Meng-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of cancer treatment. No medication has been shown to be effective in the treatment of CIPN. This study aims to integrate the image-based high-content screening, mouse behavior models and mechanistic cell-based assays to discover potential neuroprotective drugs. Among screened compounds, minoxidil showed the most potent neuroprotective effect against paclitaxel, with regard to neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Minoxidil protected mice from thermal insensitivity and alleviated mechanical allodynia in paclitaxel-treated mice. The ultrastructure and quantified G-ratio of myelin integrity of sciatic nerve tissues supported the observations in mouse behavioral tests. The mechanistic study on DRG neurons suggested that minoxidil suppressed neuroinflammation and remodeled the dysregulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis provoked by paclitaxel. Importantly, minoxidil showed a synergistic anti-tumor effect with paclitaxel both in tumor xenograft models of cervical and breast cancer. Interestingly, the quantitative assays on hair length and hair growth both exhibited that minoxidil significantly improved the hair quality after chemotherapy. Since minoxidil is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the safety and biocompatibility are well documented. The immediate next step is to launch an early-stage clinical trial intending to prevent CIPN by minoxidil. PMID:28349969

  4. [Cervical lift: An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, D; Guerreschi, P

    2017-10-01

    The neck is an aesthetic unit for which a rejuvenation request is sometimes very targeted or ore often encompassed in a global surgical project of face-lift. To obtain a long lasting outcome, the plastic surgeon has to make a full, detailed, and exhaustive analysis of the neck in order to choose the best indication within the multiple surgical tools. A full clinical examination is the key point, every aspects are outlined. The numerous surgical choices are described, illustrated, and sometimes revisited in the light of targeted anatomical studies. A didactic and graduated way is used to explain the recent evolutions of the surgical tools of the cervical lifting. Complications and insufficiencies in outcomes must be identified and explained. Finally, we illustrate this development by clinical cases. The surgical improvement of the cervical region is, for us, centered on the reconstruction of a cervical retaining structure: the Cervico-Mandibular Angle Suspensor (CMAS) ligament. This element makes it possible to understand and integrate the large number of technical proposals for cervical lifting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevent Cervical Cancer!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-08

    Cervical cancer can be prevented. Listen as two friends—one a doctor—talk about screening tests and early detection. Learn what test you might need.  Created: 1/8/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/8/2015.

  6. Preventing cervical cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer remains the most common cancer diagnosed in women in southern Africa, with an estimated lifetime risk of 1 in. 26.1. Unfortunately most of these cancers are also diagnosed at a late stage, with subsequent poor prognosis for long-term survival. This very high incidence is particularly sad in an era where.

  7. Hereditary neuropathies: systematization and diagnostics (clinical case of hereditary motor and sensor neuropathy of the IA type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokolova A.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the value of routine methods (clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and results of DNA analysis in diagnostics of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type IA in outpatient clinics. Material and Methods. The review of foreign literature is represented. The phenotypic polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity and the difficulties of diagnostics are identified. A family with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype is presented, which was diagnosed on the base of available methods in outpatient practice (clinical symptoms, genealogical method, electro-physiological findings and DNA analysis results. Results. Routine algorithm (consistent valuation of clinical symptoms, neurophysiologic findings and the results of DNA analysis helped to verify the diagnosis of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype in outpatient practice after more than 20 years of the onset of the disease. Conclusion. The neurologists of outpatient clinics and other specialists must be informed about the availability of diagnostics of hereditary diseases of nervous system.

  8. Peripheral neuropathy in persons with tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold T Mafukidze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy (PN is a serious condition affecting the nerves that is commonly seen in patients with tuberculosis (TB. Causes of PN in patients with TB are multiple, and can include TB itself, other co-morbid conditions, such as Human Immune-deficiency virus (HIV disease, malnutrition, or diabetes mellitus (DM, and several anti-tuberculous medications. The condition can manifest with a variety of symptoms, and a diagnosis can usually be made on a clinical basis. Treatment and prognosis of PN vary depending on the underlying cause, but often the condition can lead to permanent disability in individuals with TB. For this reason, primary prevention is key as is early identification and management of symptoms. Treatment can include withdrawal of possible offending agents, vitamin supplementation, physical therapy, analgesics, and targeted agents, including tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and gabapentin. Additional research is needed to better describe the morbidity and disability associated with PN in persons with TB and to improve management strategies for persons at risk for and affected by this condition. Case review: RM is a 47 year-old man who is in his third month of treatment for drug-resistant TB (DR-TB. His treatment regimen consists of kanamycin (1 gm intramuscular daily, levofloxacin (1000 mg by mouth daily, cycloserine (750 mg by mouth daily, ethionamide (750 mg by mouth daily, pyrazinamide (1500 mg by mouth daily, and Para-Amino Salicylate (12 gm by mouth daily. He is HIV-infected with a CD4 count of 470 cell/µl and on a stable antiretroviral therapy regimen of tenofovir, lamivudine, and efavirenz, which he started 8 weeks ago. He works in a platinum mine, denies smoking, reports drinking beer “on the weekend” and denies other drugs. He presents for his 3 month clinical visit for his DR-TB follow-up and states he is doing well, but he does report some

  9. [Our experience with laminectomy in the treatment of spinal cord disease caused by cervical arthrosis: apropos of 42 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, E M; Sakho, Y; Badiane, S B; Ba, M C; Ndoye, N; Diene, S M; Gueye, M

    1999-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic arthRosis may lead to a myelopathy and the question which can rise is: posterior surgical decompression is adequate regarding the others surgical technics discussed? In this paper the authors describe the postoperative results of 42 patients who have been operated on by laminectomy from 1971 to 1995 at Fann Hospital in Dakar. The median age was 42 years and the median delay between the onset of neurological disorders and operation was 5.9 months. All patients showed symptoms of spinal cord and root disturbances. Neuro-imaging studies with plan X-rays and myelography reveal arthrosis and the impact of this arthrosis on nervous system. With a follow up of 6 months we found a mortality rate of 4.7% (two cases of death), 66.8% of good results and 28.5% of fail. Eighteen months post surgery results were respectively 52.3% and 45.7% of good and poor results. The complications of the laminectomy were peri operative hemorrhage (19%); sepsis (21.4%); spine cord traumatic injuries (9.5%) spondylolisthesis (4.7%). Laminectomy has been found to improve "spine syndrome"; paresthesia; fasciculations, and sensory deficits. Also three level laminectomy and surgery which can take place before six months are good prognosis factors. The authors stressed on laminectomy because of our low medical care situations particularly that no other surgical procedures through the modern literature leads to better results.

  10. Sight-threatening optic neuropathy is associated with paranasal lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Hayashi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Takahiko Hayashi1, Ken Watanabe2, Yukio Tsuura3, Gengo Tsuji4, Shingo Koyama4, Jun Yoshigi4, Naoko Hirata1, Shin Yamane1, Yasuhito Iizima5, Shigeo Toyota6, Satoshi Takeuchi11Department of Ophthalmology, Yokosuka Kyosai Hospital, Japan; 2Department of Hematology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan; 3Department of Pathology, Yokosuka Kyosai Hospital, Japan; 4Department of Radiology, Yokosuka Kyosai Hospital, Japan; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Yokohama City University, Japan; 6Department of Internal Medicine, Yokosuka Kyosai Hospital, JapanAbstract: Malignant lymphoma around the orbit is very rare. We present a rare case of optic neuropathy caused by lymphoma. A 61-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of idiopathic optic neuropathy affecting her right eye. The patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy (methyl-predonisolone 1 g daily for 3 days with a presumed diagnosis of idiopathic optic neuritis. After she had been switched to oral steroid therapy, endoscopic sinus surgery had been performed, which revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the ethmoidal sinus. Although R-CHOP therapy was immediately started, prolonged optic nerve compression resulted in irreversible blindness. Accordingly, patients with suspected idiopathic optic neuritis should be carefully assessed when they show a poor response, and imaging of the orbits and brain should always be done for initial diagnosis because they may have compression by a tumor.Keywords: optic neuropathy, malignant lymphoma, paranasal lymphoma, rhinogenic optic neuropathy

  11. Spinal MRI of vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea); Sung, Ki Woong [Department of Paediatrics, Samsung Medical Centre, Seoul 135-710 (Korea)

    2003-11-01

    A 4.3-year-old girl with acute leukaemia, who was being treated with chemotherapy (including vincristine), developed paraplegia. Spinal MRI showed diffusely enhancing nerve roots on contrast-enhanced images. Spinal fluid analysis showed a normal protein level. Vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome is thought to be the cause of the MRI abnormalities. (orig.)

  12. Spinal MRI of vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Jae Min; Sung, Ki Woong

    2003-01-01

    A 4.3-year-old girl with acute leukaemia, who was being treated with chemotherapy (including vincristine), developed paraplegia. Spinal MRI showed diffusely enhancing nerve roots on contrast-enhanced images. Spinal fluid analysis showed a normal protein level. Vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome is thought to be the cause of the MRI abnormalities. (orig.)

  13. Neuropathy in hepatic disorders. A clinical, electrophysiological and histopathological appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, V R; Katiyar, B C; Rastogi, B L; Bhattacharya, S K

    1977-01-01

    The present study deals with 30 patients with cirrhosis of the liver and 12 patients with infective hepatitis who were studied clinically, neurophysiologically and histopathologically for the presence of neuropathy. Simultaneously, 13 healthy individuals were evaluated as controls. Clinical evidence of neuropathy was found in 63.3% of the patients with hepatic cirrhosis and in 16.6% of the patients with infective hepatitis. In hepatic cirrhosis, the conduction velocities were abnormal in 33.3% and histopathological demyelination was found in 80% of the patients. In infective hepatitis, on the other hand, altered nerve conduction velocities were found in 41.6% and segmental demyelination in 75% of the patients. Our data reveal that peripheral nerve involvement is seen both in chronic and acute liver disorders. The neuropathy in hepatic cirrhosis is unrelated to diabetes, alchoholism or portacaval shunt and may be due to unknown metabolic abnormality or to toxins. In infective hepatitis, the neuropathy may either be due to some acute metabolic derangement or may be purely viral in origin.

  14. Peripheral Neuropathy: Not a Feature of Childhood Thalassemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sedat Işıkay

    an iron chelator, used for transfusion dependent thalassemia patients has been associated with sensorineural and sensorimotor neurotoxicity.[7,8] However, the data in literature regarding the peripheral neuropathy and beta thalassemia is limited. Moreover, there is a gap in literature about the factors that have a role in.

  15. Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculo-neuropathy following Antirabies Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Newer generation cell culture anti-rabies vaccines have become the preferred choice because of the paucity of the neurological complications. We report a case of acute inflammatory polyradiculo-neuropathy following the administration of purified chick embryo cell culture anti-rabies baccine for post exposure prophylaxis.

  16. Treatment of diabetic neuropathy in the lower limb: Signs and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is defined as 'the presence of symptoms and/or signs of peripheral nerve dysfunction in people with diabetes after exclusion of other causes: the diagnosis cannot be made without a clinical examination'. In fact, many of these symptoms and signs may precede the onset of diabetes.

  17. Unusual recovery from acute panautonomic neuropathy after immunoglobulin therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A. A.; Vermeulen, M.; Koelman, J. H.; Wieling, W.

    1997-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman with acute idiopathic postganglionic panautonomic neuropathy experienced prompt recovery of all dysautonomic symptoms after receiving high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Her recovery was complete within 6 months after onset of disease. This unusually rapid and complete

  18. Machado-Joseph disease presenting as severe asymmetric proximal neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, I. N.; Jöbsis, G. J.; Vermeulen, M.; Keizers, H.; Bolhuis, P. A.; de Visser, M.

    1997-01-01

    Despite much effort, a 74 year old man with progressive proximal weakness and sensory disturbances due to axonal neuropathy remained a diagnostic problem. Investigation of his family disclosed an additional patient with a cerebellar syndrome and a family member with mainly pyramidal features.

  19. Calf enlargement in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Hoogendijk, J. E.; Ongerboer, B. W.; Verbeeten, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    Six members originating from two families with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (hypertrophic and neuronal types) were noted to have enlarged calf muscles. Muscle computed tomography revealed that muscle enlargement in the propositus of the family with the hypertrophic type of HMSN was due to

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is found in the cells of the nervous system, including sensory neurons. The mutations involved in HSAN2A result in ... Samuels M, Rouleau GA. Mutations in the nervous system--specific HSN2 exon of WNK1 cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type II. J Clin Invest. 2008 Jul; ...

  1. Clinical peripheral neuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus in 3 dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Megan J.; Vite, Charles H.; Radhakrishnan, Anant; Hess, Rebecka S.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in 3 spontaneously diabetic dogs with clinical peripheral neuropathy (PN) are reported. Clinical signs of a PN may develop in diabetic dogs with adequate glycemic control. In addition, laryngeal paralysis may develop in association with diabetes mellitus in dogs with clinical PN.

  2. Clinical peripheral neuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus in 3 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Megan J; Vite, Charles H; Radhakrishnan, Anant; Hess, Rebecka S

    2008-06-01

    Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in 3 spontaneously diabetic dogs with clinical peripheral neuropathy (PN) are reported. Clinical signs of a PN may develop in diabetic dogs with adequate glycemic control. In addition, laryngeal paralysis may develop in association with diabetes mellitus in dogs with clinical PN.

  3. Vasculitic neuropathy in panarteritis nodosa: clinical and ultrastructural findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussone, G; La Mantia, L; Frediani, F; Tredici, G; Petruccioli Pizzini, M G

    1986-04-01

    Clinical involvement of the peripheral nervous system in panarteritis nodosa is common, but the histological aspects are little known. We describe the sural nerve, muscle and skin biopsy findings in a patient with panarteritis nodosa, affected by mononeuritis multiplex. The data are compared to those reported in other types of vasculitis neuropathy.

  4. Non-glaucomatous optic neuropathy in Ibadan: Extrapolations to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NGON as a major cause of visual disability among neuro-ophthalmic patients in this setting. Diagnostic constraints must be addressed, to facilitate neuroophthalmology patient care, within our limited resources. Key words: Optic atrophy, Non-glaucomatous optic neuropathy, Neuroophthalmology, Aetiology, Healthcare ...

  5. [Diabetic neuropathy: therapeutic nihilism is no longer acceptable].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslbeck, Manfred

    2007-05-21

    The repeatedly expressed doubts about the value of an effective therapy for diabetic neuropathies are no longer acceptable. Today a number of excellent longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, i.e. DCCT, Steno 2, DCCT/EDIC, European Diabetes Prospective Complications Study, are available. The attending physician should make every effort to diagnose diabetic neuropathies as soon as possible with all their multivarious manifestations. Treatment must be promptly, aggressively and multifactorially as described in evidence-based guidelines. In principle, the same risk factors apply to neuropathy in type 1 and type 2 diabetes as for macro-angiopathy and microangiopathy. Therapy focuses on establishing near-normal diabetes and blood pressure control, lipid management, intensive patient education, avoidance of exogenous noxae such as alcohol and nicotine and if necessary, an effective therapy of neuropathic pain. The objective of all diagnostic and preventive efforts must be always to avoid the development of the diabetic neuropathic foot syndrome, which is the most important end stage of somatic and autonomic diabetic neuropathy.

  6. “Symptomatic” Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Using Two Methods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Presence of symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (PN) in diabetes mellitus (DM) does not invariably indicate presence of underlying PN. Objective: To evaluate the objectivity of the symptoms of PN among DM subjects using two objective diagnostic instruments for PN – the United Kingdom Screening Test ...

  7. Diabetic Neuropathy | Enesi | Journal of the Obafemi Awolowo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by persistent hyperglycaemia. The prevalence of diabetes is increasing in epidemic proportions worldwide. Diabetic neuropathy is a common clinical complication of Diabetes mellitus, as almost all of diabetic patients will have some form of nerve damage. Majority are ...

  8. Peripheral Neuropathy: Not a Feature of Childhood Thalassemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic anemia in thalassemia patients may cause multiple complications such as bone deformities, growth retardation, and peripheral neuropathy. Aim: To examine the presence of possible electrophysiological changes in children diagnosed with thalassemia and to investigate the clinical factors affecting the ...

  9. Progress in the treatment of small fiber peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Pan, Chun-Liang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2015-03-01

    Small fiber neuropathy is a syndrome of diverse disease etiology because of multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms with major presentations of neuropathic pain and autonomic symptoms. Over the past decade, there has been substantial progress in the treatments for neuropathic pain, dysautonomia and disease-modifying strategy. In particular, anticonvulsants and antidepressants alleviate neuropathic pain based on randomized clinical trials.

  10. Reappraising entrapment neuropathies--mechanisms, diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Annina B; Nee, Robert J; Coppieters, Michel W

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis of entrapment neuropathies can be difficult because symptoms and signs often do not follow textbook descriptions and vary significantly between patients with the same diagnosis. Signs and symptoms which spread outside of the innervation territory of the affected nerve or nerve root are common. This Masterclass provides insight into relevant mechanisms that may account for this extraterritorial spread in patients with entrapment neuropathies, with an emphasis on neuroinflammation at the level of the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord, as well as changes in subcortical and cortical regions. Furthermore, we describe how clinical tests and technical investigations may identify these mechanisms if interpreted in the context of gain or loss of function. The management of neuropathies also remains challenging. Common treatment strategies such as joint mobilisation, neurodynamic exercises, education, and medications are discussed in terms of their potential to influence certain mechanisms at the site of nerve injury or in the central nervous system. The mechanism-oriented approach for this Masterclass seems warranted given the limitations in the current evidence for the diagnosis and management of entrapment neuropathies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Houlden H, King R, Blake J, Groves M, Love S, Woodward C, Hammans S, Nicoll J, Lennox G, O'Donovan DG, Gabriel C, Thomas PK, Reilly MM. Clinical, pathological and genetic characterization of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN I). Brain. 2006 Feb;129(Pt 2):411-25. Epub ...

  12. Nephropathy and Neuropathy in Diabetic Patients with Chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nephropathy and Neuropathy in Diabetic Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection. ... M Aziz, M El-Bendary, M El-Arman. Abstract. Introduction: Several reports described an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Chronic HCV infection is prevalent in Egypt.

  13. Acrodystrophic neuropathy of Bureau and Barriere in Sudanese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to show Keratinized tissue. The condition as mentioned is extremely rare, where misdiagnosed as Epidermolysis Bullosa Dystrophica. Keywords: Acrodystrophic neuropathy of Bureau and Barriere, Ulcerative-mutilating acropathy, Bureau-Barriere syndrome, Sudan. Sudanese Journal of Dermatology Vol. 5 (2) 2008: pp.

  14. Small fiber neuropathy : a disabling and underrecognized syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, Mareye; Fritz, Daan; Vogels, Oscar J M; Eftimov, Filip; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Drent, Marjolein

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss cause, clinical manifestations, diagnostics, and treatment of small fiber neuropathy (SFN). The diagnosis is difficult and can be easily missed. RECENT FINDINGS: SFN causes high morbidity with disabling symptoms and impact on quality of life. Patients may benefit from

  15. Small fiber neuropathy: a disabling and underrecognized syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, Mareye; Fritz, Daan; Vogels, Oscar J. M.; Eftimov, Filip; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Drent, Marjolein

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss cause, clinical manifestations, diagnostics, and treatment of small fiber neuropathy (SFN). The diagnosis is difficult and can be easily missed. Recent findings SFN causes high morbidity with disabling symptoms and impact on quality of life. Patients may benefit from

  16. Peripheral Neuropathy in Military Aircraft Maintenance Workers in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guest, Maya; Attia, John R.; D'Este, Catherine A.; Boggess, May M.; Brown, Anthony M.; Gibson, Richard E.; Tavener, Meredith A.; Ross, James; Gardner, Ian; Harrex, Warren

    Objective: This study aimed to examine possible persisting peripheral neuropathy in a group who undertook fuel tank repairs on F-111 aircraft, relative to two contemporaneous comparison groups. Methods: Vibration perception threshold (VPT) was tested using biothesiometry in 614 exposed personnel,

  17. Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy in Association with Hepatitis E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araz Al-Saffar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS is an acute peripheral neuropathy that develops as a result of post-infectious immune-mediated nerve injury. It can be classified into classic and variant GBS. Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN is a subtype of GBS with the key clinical features of pure motor weakness, areflexia, absence of sensory symptoms, and lack of neurophysiologic evidence of demyelination. We reported a case of acute motor axonal neuropathy in association with hepatitis E infection. A young woman was referred to us after a period of nausea, fever, and diarrhea. She had unexplained muscle weakness at admission and has been diagnosed with acute hepatitis E infection. A rigorous clinical neurological assessment revealed bilateral symmetrical weakness, which affects the lower limbs more than the upper limbs, with no evidence of sensory involvement. Neurophysiological measurements indicated acute axonal injury without clues to demyelination. A diagnosis of acute motor axonal neuropathy subtype has been made, to which she only received supportive therapy. The symptoms resolved spontaneously and full recovery of motor function was attained after 35 days of weakness onset with complete normalization of neurophysiologic parameters.

  18. Glucose control and diabetic neuropathy: lessons from recent large clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Lynn; Jaiswal, Mamta; Martin, Catherine; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral and autonomic neuropathies are common complications of diabetes with broad spectrums of clinical manifestations and high morbidity. Studies using various agents to target the pathways implicated in the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy were promising in animal models. In humans, however, randomized controlled studies have failed to show efficacy on objective measures of neuropathy. The complex anatomy of the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems, the multitude of pathogenic mechanisms involved, and the lack of uniformity of neuropathy measures have likely contributed to these failures. To date, tight glycemic control is the only strategy convincingly shown to prevent or delay the development of neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes and to slow the progression of neuropathy in some patients with type 2 diabetes. Lessons learned about the role of glycemic control on distal symmetrical polyneuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy are discussed in this review.

  19. The role of serum methylglyoxal on diabetic peripheral and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. S.; Jensen, T.M.; Jensen, J S

    2015-01-01

    -detected Type 2 diabetes (duration ~ 5.8 years). METHODS: The patients were well controlled with regard to HbA(1c), lipids and blood pressure. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was assessed by measures of resting heart rate variability and cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy...... and cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests or any measures of diabetic peripheral neuropathy or painful diabetic neuropathy were observed. However, a positive association between methylglyoxal and several heart rate variability indices was observed, although these associations were not statistically significant when......AIMS: Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are common diabetic complications and independent predictors of cardiovascular disease. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal has been suggested to play a causal role in the pathogeneses of diabetic peripheral neuropathy...

  20. Clinical and radiological outcome after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with stand-alone empty polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiban, Ehab; Gapon, Karina; Wostrack, Maria; Meyer, Bernhard; Lehmberg, Jens

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate long-term results after one-, two-, and three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with stand-alone empty polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. We performed a retrospective review of a consecutive patient cohort that underwent ACDF with stand-alone empty PEEK cages between 2007 and 2010 with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Radiographic follow-up included static and flexion/extension radiographs. Changes in the operated segments were measured and compared to radiographs directly after surgery. Clinical outcome was evaluated by a physical examination, pain visual analog scale (VAS), and health-related quality of life (HRQL) using the EuroQOL questionnaire (EQ-5D). Analysis of associations between fusion, subsidence, cervical alignment, and clinical outcome parameters were performed. Of 407 consecutive cases, 318 met all inclusion criteria. Follow-up data were obtained from 265 (83 %) cases. The mean age at presentation was 55 years and 139 patients were male (52 %). In the sample, 127, 125, and 13 patients had one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively; 132 (49 %) presented with spondylotic cervical myelopathy and 133 (50 %) with cervical radiculopathy. Fusion was achieved in 85, 95, and 94 % of segments in one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively. Non-fusion was associated with higher VAS pain levels. Radiographic adjacent segment disease (ASD) was observed in 20, 29, and 15 % in one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively. ASD was associated with lower HRQL. Subsidence was observed in 25, 27, and 15 % of segments in one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively. However, this had no influence on clinical outcome. Follow-up operations for symptomatic adjacent disc disease and implant failure at index level were needed in 16 (6 %) and four (1.5 %) cases, respectively. Younger age was associated with better clinical outcome. Multilevel surgery favored better myelopathy outcomes and fusion reduced overall

  1. The role of aberrant mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subir K Roy; Smith, Darrell R; Fernyhough, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a neurological complication of diabetes that causes significant morbidity and, because of the obesity-driven rise in incidence of type 2 diabetes, is becoming a major international health problem. Mitochondrial phenotype is abnormal in sensory neurons in diabetes and may contribute to the etiology of diabetic neuropathy where a distal dying-back neurodegenerative process is a key component contributing to fiber loss. This review summarizes the major features of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons and Schwann cells in human diabetic patients and in experimental animal models (primarily exhibiting type 1 diabetes). This article attempts to relate these findings to the development of critical neuropathological hallmarks of the disease. Recent work reveals that hyperglycemia in diabetes triggers nutrient excess in neurons that, in turn, mediates a phenotypic change in mitochondrial biology through alteration of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) signaling axis. This vital energy sensing metabolic pathway modulates mitochondrial function, biogenesis and regeneration. The bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria in diabetic neurons is aberrant due to deleterious alterations in expression and activity of respiratory chain components as a direct consequence of abnormal AMPK/PGC-1α signaling. Utilization of innovative respirometry equipment to analyze mitochondrial function of cultured adult sensory neurons from diabetic rodents shows that the outcome for cellular bioenergetics is a reduced adaptability to fluctuations in ATP demand. The diabetes-induced maladaptive process is hypothesized to result in exhaustion of the ATP supply in the distal nerve compartment and induction of nerve fiber dissolution. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of diabetic neuropathy is compared with other types of neuropathy with a distal dying-back pathology such as Friedreich

  2. Uncovering sensory axonal dysfunction in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available This study investigated sensory and motor nerve excitability properties to elucidate the development of diabetic neuropathy. A total of 109 type 2 diabetes patients were recruited, and 106 were analyzed. According to neuropathy severity, patients were categorized into G0, G1, and G2+3 groups using the total neuropathy score-reduced (TNSr. Patients in the G0 group were asymptomatic and had a TNSr score of 0. Sensory and motor nerve excitability data from diabetic patients were compared with data from 33 healthy controls. Clinical assessment, nerve conduction studies, and sensory and motor nerve excitability testing data were analyzed to determine axonal dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy. In the G0 group, sensory excitability testing revealed increased stimulus for the 50% sensory nerve action potential (P<0.05, shortened strength-duration time constant (P<0.01, increased superexcitability (P<0.01, decreased subexcitability (P<0.05, decreased accommodation to depolarizing current (P<0.01, and a trend of decreased accommodation to hyperpolarizing current in threshold electrotonus. All the changes progressed into G1 (TNSr 1-8 and G2+3 (TNSr 9-24 groups. In contrast, motor excitability only had significantly increased stimulus for the 50% compound motor nerve action potential (P<0.01 in the G0 group. This study revealed that the development of axonal dysfunction in sensory axons occurred prior to and in a different fashion from motor axons. Additionally, sensory nerve excitability tests can detect axonal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. These insights further our understanding of diabetic neuropathy and enable the early detection of sensory axonal abnormalities, which may provide a basis for neuroprotective therapeutic approaches.

  3. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  4. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  5. Cervical cancer: what's new?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Sadalla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Cervical cancer is the most common gynecological cancer in Brazil. Among women, it is the second most frequent, second only to breast cancer. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the country, with estimated 15,590 new cases (2014 and 5,430 deaths (2013. In order to update information to improve outcomes, reduce morbidity and optimize the treatment of this cancer, this article will address the advancement of knowledge on cervical cancer. The topics covered include the role of surgery in different stages, treatment of locally advanced carcinomas, fertility preservation, the role of the sentinel lymph node technique, indications and techniques of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and some special situations.

  6. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeet Kumar Meher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms.

  7. Mucopurulent cervicitis: a clinical entity?

    OpenAIRE

    Willmott, F E

    1988-01-01

    Of 297 women attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic who were examined for the presence of mucopurulent cervicitis, 96 (32%) satisfied the diagnostic criteria. Mucopurulent cervicitis was strongly associated with the isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. It was also associated with bacterial vaginosis, the use of oral contraceptives, and sexual contact with men who had non-gonococcal urethritis. Conversely, the presence of opaque cervical secretions did not sho...

  8. A comparative study of brachial plexus sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedee, H S; Jongbloed, B A; van Asseldonk, J.T.H.; Hendrikse, J; Vrancken, A F J E; Franssen, H; Nikolakopoulos, S; Visser, L H; van der Pol, W L; van den Berg, L H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To compare the performance of neuroimaging techniques, i.e. high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when applied to the brachial plexus, as part of the diagnostic work-up of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal

  9. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  10. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  11. Future Directions - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about possible changes in cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  12. Diagnostic value of combined magnetic resonance imaging examination of brachial plexus and electrophysiological studies in multifocal motor neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basta Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by slowly progressive asymetrical weakness of limbs without sensory loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the involvement of brachial plexus using combined cervical magnetic stimulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of plexus brachialis in patients with MMN. We payed special attention to the nerve roots forming nerves inervating weak muscles, but without detectable conduction block (CB using conventional nerve conduction studies. Methods. Nine patients with proven MMN were included in the study. In all of them MRI of the cervical spine and brachial plexus was performed using a Siemens Avanto 1.5 T unit, applying T1 and turbo spinecho T1 sequence, axial turbo spin-echo T2 sequence and a coronal fat-saturated turbo spin-echo T2 sequence. Results. In all the patients severe asymmetric distal weakness of muscles inervated by radial, ulnar, median and peroneal nerves was observed and the most striking presentation was bilateral wrist and finger drop. Three of them had additional proximal weakness of muscles inervated by axillar and femoral nerves. The majority of the patients had slightly increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF protein content. Six of the patients had positive serum polyclonal IgM anti-GM1 antibodies. Electromyoneurography (EMG showed neurogenic changes, the most severe in distal muscles inervated by radial nerves. All the patients had persistent partial CBs outside the usual sites of nerve compression in radial, ulnar, median and peroneal nerves. In three of the patients cervical magnetic stimulation suggested proximal CBs between cervical root emergence and Erb’s point (prolonged motor root conduction time. In all the patients T2-weighted MRI revealed increased signal intensity in at least one cervical root, truncus or fasciculus of brachial plexus. Conclusion. We found clinical correlation between muscle weakness

  13. Traumatic cervical artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeltchev, Krassen; Baumgartner, Ralf W

    2005-01-01

    Traumatic cervical artery dissection (TCAD) is a complication of severe blunt head or neck trauma, the main cause being motor vehicle accidents. TCAD are increasingly recognized, and incidences of up to 0.86% for internal carotid and 0.53% for traumatic vertebral artery dissections (TVAD) among blunt trauma victims are reported. Diagnostic evaluation for TCAD is mandatory in the presence of (1) hemorrhage of potential arterial origin originating from the nose, ears, mouth, or a wound; (2) expanding cervical hematoma; (3) cervical bruit in a patient >50 years of age; (4) evidence of acute infarct at brain imaging; (5) unexplained central or lateralizing neurological deficit or transient ischemic attack, or (6) Horner syndrome, neck or head pain. In addition, a number of centers screen asymptomatic patients with blunt trauma for TCAD. Catheter angiography is the standard of reference for diagnosis of TCAD. Color duplex ultrasound, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance angiography are noninvasive screening alternatives, but each method has its diagnostic limitations compared to catheter angiography. Anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs may prevent ischemic stroke, but bleeding from traumatized tissues may offset the benefits of antithrombotic treatment. Endovascular therapy of dissected vessels, thrombarterectomy, direct suture of intimal tears, and extracranial-intracranial bypass should be considered in exceptional cases. Neurological outcome is probably worse in TCAD compared to spontaneous CAD, although it is unclear whether this is due to dissection-induced ischemic stroke or associated traumatic lesions.

  14. [Cervical spine trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, U; Hellen, P

    2016-08-01

    In the emergency department 65 % of spinal injuries and 2-5 % of blunt force injuries involve the cervical spine. Of these injuries approximately 50 % involve C5 and/or C6 and 30 % involve C2. Older patients tend to have higher spinal injuries and younger patients tend to have lower injuries. The anatomical and development-related characteristics of the pediatric spine as well as degenerative and comorbid pathological changes of the spine in the elderly can make the radiological evaluation of spinal injuries difficult with respect to possible trauma sequelae in young and old patients. Two different North American studies have investigated clinical criteria to rule out cervical spine injuries with sufficient certainty and without using imaging. Imaging of cervical trauma should be performed when injuries cannot be clinically excluded according to evidence-based criteria. Degenerative changes and anatomical differences have to be taken into account in the evaluation of imaging of elderly and pediatric patients.

  15. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  16. Spondilitis Tuberkulosa Cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Eka Saputra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Spondilitis tuberkulosa servikalis adalah penyakit yang cukup jarang dijumpai, hanya berkisar 2-3% dariseluruh kasus spondilitis tuberkulosa. Gambaran klinis sangat bervariasi, mulai dari gejala ringan dan tidak spesifikhingga komplikasi neurologis yang berat. Seorang wanita berusia 29 tahun datang dengan keluhan lemah keempatanggota gerak yang semakin memberat dalam 10 hari terakhir yang didahului oleh nyeri leher yang menjalar ke bahudan lengan sejak 6 bulan sebelumnya. Nyeri awalnya dirasakan sebagai keterbatasan gerakan leher saat menolehkesamping kiri dan kanan serta menundukkan kepala. Nyeri dirasakan semakin berat dengan pergerakan danberkurang jika istirahat. Pasien mengalami penurunan berat badan sejak 2 bulan terakhir. Tidak dijumpai riwayat batukatau nyeri dada. Pemeriksaan neurologis menunjukkan kelemahan  pada keempat ekstremitas. Hasil laboratoriumditemukan peningkatan Laju Endap Darah (LED. Rontgen foto toraks dalam batas normal. Roentgen foto cervicalmenunjukkan destruksi setinggi C5. MRI cervical menunjukkan destruksi pada korpus C5-6 dengan penyempitan padadiscus intervertebrae C5-6 disertai dengan  massa/abses paravertebral dengan penekanan ke posterior. MRI Thorakaltampak destruksi corpus verebre T4,5 dengan diskus intervertebralis yang menyempit. Sugestif suatu spondilitistuberkulosa. Pasien dilakukan tindakan pembedahan anterior corpectomi melalui microscopic surgery dengan graftdari iliac sinistra, serta insersi anterior plate 1 level. Hasil pemeriksaan patologi anatomi menunjukkan spodilitis TBCkaseosa. Pada spondilitis vertebre T4,5 dilakukan laminectomi, debridement costotrasversektomi, dan stabilisasidengan pedicle screw T2, T3, dan T5. Pasien diterapi dengan obat antituberkulosis. Keadaan pasien saat ini, pasiensudah bisa beraktifitas normal dengan motorik dan sensorik baik. Spondilitis tuberkulosa merupakan bentuktuberkulosa tulang yang paling sering dijumpai. Spondilitis tuberkulosa cervical berkisar 2

  17. Evaluation Of Cervical Punch Biopsy In The Diagnosis Of Cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cancer of the cervix uteri is the second leading cause of death in reproductive age women in developing countries. Its early detection and management can reduce the attendant mortality. Aim: To determine the adequacy of cervical punch biopsy technique in the diagnosis of cervical cancer. Methods: A ...

  18. Cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relative incidences of cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive cervical cancer were studied in black and white patients at the academic hospitals of the University of the Orange Free State. A statistically highly significant difference was found between black and white patients, with a higher incidence of ...

  19. Laser Doppler Flare Imaging and Quantitative Thermal Thresholds Testing Performance in Small and Mixed Fiber Neuropathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Abraham

    Full Text Available Small fiber neuropathy might be a part of typical mixed small and large fiber neuropathy, or a distinct entity, affecting exclusively small nerve fibers.Explore the utility of small nerve fiber testing in patients with clinical presentation suggesting small fiber neuropathy, with and without evidence for concomitant large fiber neuropathy.Patients attending the neuromuscular clinic from 2012 to 2015 with a clinical presentation suggesting small nerve fiber impairment, who had Laser Doppler flare imaging (LDIFlare and quantitative thermal testing (QTT were evaluated for this study. Patients with clinical or electrophysiological evidence for concomitant large fiber neuropathy were not excluded.The sensitivities of LDIFlare, cooling and heat threshold testing were 64%, 36%, and 0% respectively for clinically highly suggestive small fiber neuropathy, 64%, 56%, and 19% respectively for mixed fiber neuropathy, and 86%, 79%, and 29% respectively for diabetic mixed fiber neuropathy.LDIFlare and cooling thresholds testing are non-invasive small nerve fiber testing modalities, with moderate performance in patients with small and mixed fiber neuropathy, and excellent performance in diabetic mixed fiber neuropathy.

  20. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  1. Flexion/extension cervical spine views in blunt cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Sadaf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To examine the contribution of flexion and extension radiographs in the evaluation of ligamentous injury in awake adults with acute blunt cervical spine trauma, who show loss of cervical lordosis and neck pain. Methods: All patients who presented to our emer-gency department following blunt trauma were enrolled in this study, except those with schiwora, neurological defi-cits or fracture demonstrated on cross-table cervical spine X-rays, and those who were either obtunded or presented after cervical spine surgery. Adequacy of flexion and exten-sion views was checked by the neurosurgery and radiology team members. All these patients underwent cross-table cervical spine view followed by flexion/extension views based on the loss of lordosis on cross-table imaging and the presence of neck pain. Results: A total of 200 cases were reviewed, of whom 90 (45% underwent repeat X-rays because of either inadequate exposure or limited motion. None of the patients with loss of lordosis on cross-table view had positive flexion and extension views of cervical spine for instability. Conclusions: Our results show that in patients who underwent acute radiographic evaluation of blunt cervical spine trauma, flexion and extension views of the cervical spine are unlikely to yield positive results in the presence of axial neck pain and/or loss of cervical lordosis. We can also hypothesize that performing flexion and extension views will be more useful once the acute neck pain has settled. Key words: X-rays; Cervical vertebrae; Lordosis

  2. Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Following Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Pakravan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To report a case of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION following percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL. CASE REPORT: A 57-year-old man with history of diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia and mild anemia underwent PCNL for treatment of nephrolithiasis. He noticed painless visual loss in both eyes immediately after the procedure. Visual acuity was light perception, however ophthalmologic examinations were unremarkable and the optic discs were pink with no swelling. Visual fields were severely affected, but neuro-imaging was normal. Within three months, visual acuity and visual fields improved dramatically but the optic discs became slightly pale. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of PION following PCNL. PION is a rare cause of severe visual loss following surgery. Severe blood loss, hypotension, anemia and body position during surgery are the most important risk factors. Ophthalmologists, urologists and anesthesiologists should be aware of this condition and this rare possibility should be considered prior to surgery.

  1. Penetrating orbital trauma by stiletto causing complex cranial neuropathies

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, G; Nischal, K K; Jones, C A

    2006-01-01

    Penetrating orbital injuries pose a serious threat to vision, ocular motility, and in some cases, life. Long, sharp stiletto objects may penetrate deeply, causing catastrophic damage to orbital structures, despite seemingly trivial entry wounds. The authors present two cases of penetrating orbital injuries by stiletto objects, both entering via small eyelid wounds. Traumatic optic neuropathy occurred in both cases, and was treated with corticosteroids, however the globes escaped direct injury...

  2. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy precipitated by acute primary angle closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhari Nikhil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old man with a history of longstanding systemic hypotension developed asymmetric non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION apparently precipitated by bilateral sequential acute primary angle closure. NAION is very rarely reported in association with raised intraocular pressure. In contrast to optical coherence tomography, the failure of scanning laser polarimetry to detect axonal swelling was another interesting finding. Possible reasoning for these observations is discussed.

  3. Biofeedback for foot offloading in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Z; de León Rodriguez, D; Allet, L; Golay, A; Assal, M; Assal, J-P; Hauert, C-A

    2010-01-01

    The reduction of high plantar pressure in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy is mandatory for prevention of foot ulcers and amputations. We used a new biofeedback-based method to reduce the plantar pressure at an at-risk area of foot in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. Thirteen diabetic patients (age 60.8 +/- 12.3 years, body mass index 29.0 +/- 5.0 kg/m(2)) with peripheral neuropathy of the lower limbs were studied. Patients with memory impairment were excluded. The portable in-shoe foot pressure measurement system (PEDAR) was used for foot offloading training by biofeedback. The learning procedure consisted in sequences of walking (10 steps), each followed by a subjective estimation of performance and objective feedback. The goal was to achieve three consecutive walking cycles of 10 steps, with a minimum of seven steps inside the range of 40-80% of the baseline peak plantar pressure. The peak plantar pressure was assessed during the learning period and at retention tests. A significant difference in peak plantar pressure was recorded between the beginning and the end of the learning period (when the target for plantar pressure was achieved) (262 +/- 70 vs. 191 +/- 53 kPa; P = 0.002). The statistically significant difference between the beginning of learning and all retention tests persisted, even at the 10-day follow-up. Terminal augmented feedback training may positively affect motor learning in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy and could possibly lead to suitable foot offloading. Additional research is needed to confirm the maintenance of offloading in the long term.

  4. Delayed diagnosed intermuscular lipoma causing a posterior interosseous nerve palsy in a patient with cervical spondylosis: the "priceless" value of the clinical examination in the technological era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasanti, R; Iacoangeli, M; Di Rienzo, A; Dobran, M; Di Somma, L; Nocchi, N; Scerrati, M

    2016-01-01

    Posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy may present with various symptoms, and may resemble cervical spondylosis. We report about a 59-year-old patient with cervical spondylosis which delayed the diagnosis of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy due to an intermuscular lipoma. Initial right hand paraesthesias and clumsiness, together with MR findings of right C5-C6 and C6-C7 foraminal stenosis, misled the diagnostic investigation. The progressive loss of extension of all right hand fingers brought to detect a painless mass compressing the PIN. Electrophysiological studies confirmed a right radial motor neuropathy at the level of the forearm. Surgical tumor removal and nerve decompression resulted in a gradual motor deficits recovery. A thorough clinical examination is paramount, and electrophysiology may differentiate between cervical and peripheral nerve lesions. Ultrasonography and MR offer an effective evaluation of lipomas, which represent a rare cause of PIN palsy. Surgical decompression and lipoma removal generally determine excellent prognoses, with very few recurrences.

  5. Evidence for small fiber neuropathy in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorny, Peter J; Suchowersky, Oksana; Romanchuk, Kenneth G; Feasby, Thomas E

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is neurodegenerative movement disorder affecting primarily the central nervous system with several recognized non-motor symptoms that can occur at various stages of the disease. Recently it has been shown that patients with PD may be prone to peripheral nervous system pathology in the form of a peripheral neuropathy (PN). It is unclear if PN is an inherent feature of PD or if it is an iatrogenic effect of the mainstay PD treatment Levodopa. To determine if peripheral neuropathy occurs in early untreated PD we employed a case-control study design using gold standard tests for PN, including neurological examination according to the Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS) and nerve conduction studies, as well as new, more sensitive and informative tests for PN including the skin biopsy and corneal confocal microscopy (CCM). We studied 26 patients with PD and 22 controls using the neurological examination and nerve conduction studies (NCS) and found no significant difference between groups except for some reduced vibration sense in the PD group. Epidermal nerve densities in the skin biopsies were similar between our cohorts. However, using CCM - a more sensitive test and a surrogate marker of small fiber damage in PN, we found that patients with PD had significantly reduced corneal nerve fiber densities and lengths as compared to controls. We conclude that our positive CCM results provide evidence of preclinical PN in newly diagnosed PD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Protection of Trigonelline on Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yin Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to diabetic peripheral neuropathy are complex and there is no effective drug to treat it. As an active component of several traditional Chinese medicines, trigonelline has beneficial effects on diabetes with hyperlipidemia. The protective effects and the mechanism of trigonelline on diabetic peripheral neuropathy were evaluated in streptozotocin- and high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet-induced diabetic rats. Rats were divided into four groups at the end of week 2: control, diabetes, diabetes + trigonelline (40 mg/kg, and diabetes + sitagliptin (4 mg/kg. After 48-week treatment, technologies of nerve conduction, cold and hot immersion test, transmission electron microscopy, real-time PCR, and Western blotting were applied. Serum glucose, serum insulin, insulin sensitivity index, lipid parameters, body weight, sciatic nerve conduction velocity, nociception, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor mRNA and protein, total and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases protein expression, malonaldehyde content, and superoxide dismutase activity were altered in diabetic rats, and were near control levels treated with trigonelline. Slight micropathological changes existed in sciatic nerve of trigonelline-treated diabetic rats. These findings suggest that trigonelline has beneficial effects for diabetic peripheral neuropathy through glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathway, nerve conduction velocity, antioxidant enzyme activity, improving micropathological changes of sciatic nerve and decreasing lipid peroxidation.

  7. Iatrogenic axillary neuropathy after intramuscular injection of the deltoid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Loren T; Carter, Gregory T; Kilmer, David D; Han, Jay J

    2007-06-01

    A previously healthy 26-yr-old male presented for an electrodiagnostic evaluation with complaints of significant right deltoid muscle atrophy and shoulder abduction weakness after receiving an intramuscular (IM) deltoid injection of an antiemetic 4 wk earlier. Electrodiagnostic evaluation confirmed an acute axillary neuropathy. We hypothesize that direct mechanical trauma to the anterior branch of the axillary nerve resulted in axillary mononeuropathy with axonal loss, although chemically induced nerve injury cannot be excluded. Injections in and about the shoulder complex are performed routinely for the purposes of vaccination, IM medication administration, deltoid trigger-point injections, and intra-articular and bursal steroid injections. Although such injections are considered routine office procedures, there is increased risk of neurovascular injury if they are performed incorrectly. The purpose of this brief report is to make practitioners aware of the potential for axillary neuropathy with such procedures, to review the salient anatomy, and to propose a potential guideline for clinical practice to minimize iatrogenic axillary neuropathy.

  8. Pharmacological intervention of early neuropathy in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min Jee; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, TaeSoo; Lee, Sung Bae

    2017-05-01

    Extensive studies have reported the significant roles of numerous cellular features and processes in properly maintaining neuronal morphology and function throughout the lifespan of an animal. Any alterations in their homeostasis appear to be strongly associated with neuronal aging and the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases, even before the occurrence of prominent neuronal death. However, until recently, the primary focus of studies regarding many neurodegenerative diseases has been on the massive cell death occurring at the late stages of disease progression. Thus, our understanding on early neuropathy in these diseases remains relatively limited. The complicated nature of various neuropathic features manifested early in neurodegenerative diseases suggests the involvement of a system-wide transcriptional regulation and epigenetic control. Epigenetic alterations and consequent changes in the neuronal transcriptome are now begun to be extensively studied in various neurodegenerative diseases. Upon the catastrophic incident of neuronal death in disease progression, it is utterly difficult to reverse the deleterious defects by pharmacological treatments, and therefore, therapeutics targeting the system-wide transcriptional dysregulation associated with specific early neuropathy is considered a better option. Here, we review our current understanding on the system-wide transcriptional dysregulation that is likely associated with early neuropathy shown in various neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the possible future developments of pharmaceutical therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pathological Confirmation of Optic Neuropathy in Familial Dysautonomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Hedges, Thomas R.; Laver, Nora V.; Farhat, Nada; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Clinical data suggest that optic neuropathy and retinal ganglion cell loss are the main cause of visual decline in patients with familial dysautonomia, but this has not previously been confirmed by pathological analyses. We studied retinas and optic nerves in 6 eyes from 3 affected patients obtained at autopsy. Analyses included routine neurohistology and immunohistochemistry for neurofilaments, cytochrome c oxidase (COX), and melanopsin-containing ganglion cells. We observed profound axon loss in the temporal portions of optic nerves with relative preservation in the nasal portions; this correlated with clinical and optical coherence tomography findings in 1 patient. Retinal ganglion cell layers were markedly reduced in the central retina, whereas melanopsin-containing ganglion cells were relatively spared. COX staining was reduced in the temporal portions of the optic nerve indicating reduced mitochondrial density. Axonal swelling with degenerating lysosomes and mitochondria were observed by electron microscopy. These findings support the concept that there is a specific optic neuropathy and retinopathy in patients with familial dysautonomia similar to that seen in other optic neuropathies with mitochondrial dysfunction. This raises the possibility that defective expression of the IkB kinase complex-associated protein (IKAP) resulting from mutations in IKBKAP affects mitochondrial function in the metabolism-dependent retinal parvocellular ganglion cells in this condition. PMID:28395083

  10. Bilateral optic neuropathy in acute cr yptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhe Ngoo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We reported a case of cryptococcal meningitis presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy in an immunocompetent patient. A 64-year-old Malay gentleman with no medical comorbidities presented with acute bilateral blurring of vision for a week, which was associated with generalised throbbing headache and low grade fever. He also had somnolence and altered consciousness. Visual acuity in both eyes was no perception of light with poor pupillary reflexes. Extraocular muscle movements were normal. Anterior segments were unremarkable bilaterally. Fundoscopy revealed bilateral optic disc swelling. CT scan of the brain showed multifocal infarct, but no meningeal enhancement or mass. Cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure was normal, while its culture grew Cryptococcus neoformans. A diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis with bilateral optic neuropathy was made. Patient was treated with a six-week course of intravenous fluconazole and started concomitantly on a fortnight's course of intravenous amphotericin B. After that, his general condition improved, but there was still no improvement in his visual acuity. On reviewing at two months post-initiation of treatment, fundi showed bilateral optic atrophy. Bilateral optic neuropathy secondary to cryptococcal meningitis was rare. The prognosis was guarded due to the sequelae of optic atrophy. Anti-fungal medication alone may not be sufficient to manage this condition. However, evidence for other treatment modalities is still lacking and further clinical studies are required.

  11. Japanese neuropathy patients with peripheral myelin protein-22 gene aneuploidy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebo, R.V.; Li, L.Y.; Flandermeyer, R.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Peripheral myelin protein (PMP-22) gene aneuploidy results in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 1A (CMT1A) and the Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy (HNPP) in Japanese patients as well as Caucasian Americans. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common genetic neuropathy, results when expression of one of at least seven genes is defective. CMT1A, about half of all CMT mutations, is usually associated with a duplication spanning the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene on distal chromosome band 17p11.2. Autosomal dominant HNPP (hereditary pressure and sensory neuropathy, HPSN) results from a deletion of the CMT1A gene region. Multicolor in situ hybridization with PMP-22 gene region probe characterized HNPP deletion reliably and detected all different size duplications reported previously. In summary, 72% of 28 Japanese CMT1 (HMSNI) patients tested had the CMT1A duplication, while none of the CMT2 (HMSNII) or CMT3 (HMSNIII) patients had a duplication. Three cases of HNPP were identified by deletion of the CMT1A gene region on chromosome 17p. HNPP and CMT1A have been reported to result simultaneously from the same unequal recombination event. The lower frequency of HNPP compared to CMT1A suggests that HNPP patients have a lower reproductive fitness than CMT1A patients. This result, along with a CMT1A duplication found in an Asian Indian family, demonstrates the broad geographic distribution and high frequency of PMP-22 gene aneuploidy.

  12. Cervical radiculopathy combined with cervical myelopathy: prevalence and characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byung-Wan; Kim, Sung-Soo; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Wan

    2017-10-01

    Patients with cervical myelopathy may experience symptoms of radiculopathy, and it is not easy to determine whether these symptoms are caused by the myelopathy itself or by a radiculopathy accompanied by root compression. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of radiculopathy combined with cervical myelopathy and to evaluate the characteristics of cervical myelopathy with or without radiculopathy. We enrolled 127 patients with cervical myelopathy in this retrospective study and reviewed their medical records and magnetic resonance imaging findings. They were divided into two groups according to the presence of cervical radiculopathy, and their age, sex, involved spinal segment, cord signal change, surgical method, clinical status were compared, and postsurgical recovery was compared using four clinical questionnaires. The incidence and level of radiculopathy combined with myelopathy were investigated. Combined cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy was diagnosed in 66 patients (51.9%, group 1), whereas 61 patients did not have radiculopathy (group 2). There was no difference in sex, age, cord signal change, preoperative Japanese Orthopedic Association score, neck disability index, and neck visual analogue scale (VAS) between the two groups, but group 1 showed higher preoperative arm VAS score (p = 0.001). Postoperative arm and neck VAS scores were significantly improved in group 1 (p = 0.001 and 0.009). Half of the patients had combined cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy. A high preoperative arm VAS score was a characteristic of radiculopathy combined with myelopathy.

  13. A dietary intervention for chronic diabetic neuropathy pain: a randomized controlled pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Bunner, A E; Wells, C L; Gonzales, J; Agarwal, U; Bayat, E; Barnard, N D

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic neuropathy is a common and often debilitating condition for which available treatments are limited. Because a low-fat plant-based diet has been shown to improve glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes, we hypothesized that such a diet would reduce painful symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Methods: In this 20-week pilot study, individuals with type 2 diabetes and painful diabetic neuropathy were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group was asked ...

  14. Role of nitrosative and oxidative stress in neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan S Al-Nimer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Evidences of oxidative and/or nitrosative stress in type 2 diabetes mellitus were demonstrated in experimental and human studies. This study is aimed to assess the serum peroxynitrite and oxidized lipoproteins in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with clinical and laboratory evidences of peripheral neuropathy. Materials and Methods : Eighty four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (51 of them had neuropathy and 31 apparent healthy subjects were studied in the unit of neurophysiology at the University Hospital of Medical College, Al-Nahrin University in Baghdad, Iraq. Neuropathy total symptom score (NTSS, neuropathy impairment score in the lower leg (NIS-LL, and nerve conduction velocity of sensory (ulnar and sural and motor (ulnar and common peroneal nerves were used to assess the neuropathy. Fasting venous blood was obtained from each participant for the determination of serum glucose and oxidized lipoproteins. Results: The electrophysiology study revealed significant decrease in conduction velocity of ulnar (sensory and motor components, sural, and common peroneal nerves in diabetic neuropathy compared to diabetics without neuropathy and healthy subjects. Significant high level of serum peroxynitrite was found in diabetic patients with or without neuropathy compared with non-diabetics. The changes in serum-oxidized lipoproteins in patients with diabetics with or without neuropathy were non-significantly differed from healthy subjects. Neither nitrosative stress nor oxidative stress indices correlated with the variables that are related to the neuropathy. Conclusion: It concludes that evidence of nitrosative and to less extent the oxidative stress is associated with neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus and their indices not correlated with variables related to neuropathy.

  15. An Analysis of the Symptomatic Domains Most Relevant to Charcot Marie Tooth Neuropathy (CMT) Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    Charcot Marie Tooth Disease (CMT); Hereditary Sensory and Motor Neuropathy; Nerve Compression Syndromes; Tooth Diseases; Congenital Abnormalities; Genetic Diseases, Inborn; Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System

  16. No response of pancreatic hormones to hypoglycemia in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Krarup, T

    1982-01-01

    The responses of pancreatic hormones (i.e. glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin) to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were investigated in 18 insulin-dependent diabetics without residual beta-cell function and in 6 normal subjects. Nine of the diabetics had autonomic neuropathy, and 9 had...... no neuropathy. After hypoglycemia, no significant increase in any of the 3 pancreatic hormones was found in the diabetics with autonomic neuropathy, whereas significant increments were found in the diabetics without neuropathy and in the normal subjects. These results suggest that autonomic nervous activity...... is of major importance for pancreatic hormone release during hypoglycemia in man....

  17. [Primary cervical cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel; Tovar-Rodríguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Cervico-uterine cancer screening with cytology decrease incidence by more than 50%. The cause of this cancer is the human papilloma virus high risk, and requires a sensitive test to provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection and greater interval period when the results are negative. The test of the human papilloma virus high risk, is effective and safe because of its excellent sensitivity, negative predictive value and optimal reproducibility, especially when combined with liquid-based cytology or biomarkers with viral load, with higher sensitivity and specificity, by reducing false positives for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater injury, with excellent clinical benefits to cervical cancer screening and related infection of human papilloma virus diseases, is currently the best test for early detection infection of human papillomavirus and the risk of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

  19. Definition and diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy: consensus from the Peripheral Neuropathy Scientific Department of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Aquino Gondim

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to describe the results of a Brazilian Consensus on Small Fiber Neuropathy (SFN. Fifteen neurologists (members of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology reviewed a preliminary draft. Eleven panelists got together in the city of Fortaleza to discuss and finish the text for the manuscript submission. Small fiber neuropathy can be defined as a subtype of neuropathy characterized by selective involvement of unmyelinated or thinly myelinated sensory fibers. Its clinical picture includes both negative and positive manifestations: sensory (pain/dysesthesias/pruritus or combined sensory and autonomic complaints, associated with an almost entirely normal neurological examination. Standard electromyography is normal. A growing list of medical conditions is associated with SFN. The classification of SFN may also serve as a useful terminology to uncover minor discrepancies in the normal values from different neurophysiology laboratories. Several techniques may disclose sensory and/or autonomic impairment. Further studies are necessary to refine these techniques and develop specific therapies.

  20. Tuina treatment in cervical spondylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Mihai Hinoveanu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylosis is a common, chronic degenerative condition of the cervical spine that affects the vertebral bodies and intervertebral disks of the neck as well as the contents of the spinal canal. Common clinical syndromes associated with cervical spondylosis include cervical pain, cervical radiculopathy and/or mielopathy. This study show the main principles, indication and side effects of tuina in cervical spondylosis´ treatment; tuina is one of the external methods based on the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM, especially suitable for use on the elderly population and on infants. While performing Tuina, the therapist concentrates his mind, regulates his breathing, and actuates the Qi and power of his entire body towards his hands. For a better result is recommended to try to combine acupuncture with tuina treatment. Tuina can help relieve the pain associated with spondylosis. After this kind of treatment, the symptomes produced by irritated nerves and sore muscles can find some relief. Tuina helps patients with cervical spondylosis regain muscle control, nerve function and flexibility, all through the restoration of the life force flow.