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Sample records for cervical spinal canal

  1. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

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    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  2. Cervical spinal canal narrowing in idiopathic syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struck, Aaron F.; Carr, Carrie M.; Shah, Vinil; Hesselink, John R.; Haughton, Victor M.

    2016-01-01

    The cervical spine in Chiari I patient with syringomyelia has significantly different anteroposterior diameters than it does in Chiari I patients without syringomyelia. We tested the hypothesis that patients with idiopathic syringomyelia (IS) also have abnormal cervical spinal canal diameters. The finding in both groups may relate to the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. Local institutional review boards approved this retrospective study. Patients with IS were compared to age-matched controls with normal sagittal spine MR. All subjects had T1-weighted spin-echo (500/20) and T2-weighted fast spin-echo (2000/90) sagittal cervical spine images at 1.5 T. Readers blinded to demographic data and study hypothesis measured anteroposterior diameters at each cervical level. The spinal canal diameters were compared with a Mann-Whitney U test. The overall difference was assessed with a Friedman test. Seventeen subjects were read by two reviewers to assess inter-rater reliability. Fifty IS patients with 50 age-matched controls were studied. IS subjects had one or more syrinxes varying from 1 to 19 spinal segments. Spinal canal diameters narrowed from C1 to C3 and then enlarged from C5 to C7 in both groups. Diameters from C2 to C4 were narrower in the IS group (p < 0.005) than in controls. The ratio of the C3 to the C7 diameters was also smaller (p = 0.004) in IS than controls. Collectively, the spinal canal diameters in the IS were significantly different from controls (Friedman test p < 0.0001). Patients with IS have abnormally narrow upper and mid cervical spinal canal diameters and greater positive tapering between C3 and C7. (orig.)

  3. Cervical spinal canal narrowing in idiopathic syringomyelia

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    Struck, Aaron F. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Boston, MA (United States); Carr, Carrie M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Shah, Vinil [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hesselink, John R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Haughton, Victor M. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The cervical spine in Chiari I patient with syringomyelia has significantly different anteroposterior diameters than it does in Chiari I patients without syringomyelia. We tested the hypothesis that patients with idiopathic syringomyelia (IS) also have abnormal cervical spinal canal diameters. The finding in both groups may relate to the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. Local institutional review boards approved this retrospective study. Patients with IS were compared to age-matched controls with normal sagittal spine MR. All subjects had T1-weighted spin-echo (500/20) and T2-weighted fast spin-echo (2000/90) sagittal cervical spine images at 1.5 T. Readers blinded to demographic data and study hypothesis measured anteroposterior diameters at each cervical level. The spinal canal diameters were compared with a Mann-Whitney U test. The overall difference was assessed with a Friedman test. Seventeen subjects were read by two reviewers to assess inter-rater reliability. Fifty IS patients with 50 age-matched controls were studied. IS subjects had one or more syrinxes varying from 1 to 19 spinal segments. Spinal canal diameters narrowed from C1 to C3 and then enlarged from C5 to C7 in both groups. Diameters from C2 to C4 were narrower in the IS group (p < 0.005) than in controls. The ratio of the C3 to the C7 diameters was also smaller (p = 0.004) in IS than controls. Collectively, the spinal canal diameters in the IS were significantly different from controls (Friedman test p < 0.0001). Patients with IS have abnormally narrow upper and mid cervical spinal canal diameters and greater positive tapering between C3 and C7. (orig.)

  4. Computed tomography of the spinal canal for the cervical spine and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Isao; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Nasu, Kichiro; Shioya, Akihide; Ohhama, Mitsuru

    1983-01-01

    The cervical spinal canal and cervical spinal cord were measured in normal cases and 34 cases of spinal or spinal cord injury. The anteroposterior diameter and area of the normal cervical spinal canal showed a high correlation. The area ratio of the normal cervical spinal canal to the cervical spinal cord showed that the proportion of the cervical spinal cord in the spinal canal was 1/3 - 1/5, Csub(4,5) showing a particularly large proportion. In acute and subacute spinal or spinal cord injury, CT visualized in more details of the spinal canal in cases that x-ray showed definite bone injuries. Computer assisted myelography visualized more clearly the condition of the spinal cord in cases without definite findings bone injuries on x-ray. Demonstrating the morphology of spinal injury in more details, CT is useful for selection of therapy for injured spines. (Chiba, N.)

  5. The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.; Terwey, B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of in vivo measurements of the cervical canal and spinal cord. They indicate that tension in the spinal cord increases during flexion. They conclude that, as the dorsal approach avoids this increased tension of the spinal cord, the surgical treatment in chronic cervical myelopathy using this route seems to be preferable

  6. Morphological analysis of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals using CT myelography

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    Inoue, H.; Ohmori, K.; Takatsu, T.; Teramoto, T.; Ishida, Y.; Suzuki, K.

    1996-01-01

    To verify the conventional concept of ''developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal'', we performed a morphological analysis of the relations of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals. The sagittal diameter, area and circularity of the three structures, and the dispersion of each parameter, were examined on axial sections of CT myelograms of 36 normal subjects. The spinal canal was narrowest at C4, followed by C5, while the spinal cord was largest at C4/5. The area and circularity of the cervical spinal cord were not significantly correlated with any parameter of the spinal canal nor with the sagittal diameter and area of the dural tube at any level examined, and the spinal cord showed less individual variation than the bony canal. Compression of the spinal cord might be expected whenever the sagittal diameter of the spinal canal is below the lower limit of normal, that is about 12 mm on plain radiographs. Thus, we concluded that the concept of ''developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal'' was reasonable and acceptable. (orig.). With 2 figs., 3 tabs

  7. A Cadaveric Study of the Morphometry of the Cervical Spinal Canal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphometry of the cervical spinal canal is of clinical importance in traumatic, degenerative and inflammatory conditions. A small canal diameter has been associated with an increase of injury mainly in athletes who participate in contact or collision sports. Before abnormal spinal morphometry can be determined, it is first ...

  8. Complications of the lateral C1-C2 puncture myelography for cervical spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihale, J.; Traubner, P.

    1998-01-01

    This reviewed the complications of 106 patients of the lateral C1-C2 puncture myelography for cervical spinal canal and cervical spinal cord disorders. Spinal cord puncture and contrast injection, puncture between the occiput and C1, and blood vessel puncture were the main complications. These principally depended on the misdirection of the X ray beam. For preventing major arterial puncture determined the pathway of the vertebral arteries and incidence of anomaly. (authors)

  9. Normal morphology of the cervical spinal cord and spinal canal using MRI in Japanese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Fumihiko; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Suda, Kota; Yamagata, Masatsune; Ueta, Takayoshi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish standard MRI values for the cervical spinal canal, dural tube, and spinal cord in healthy Japanese subjects and to define developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal based on MRI data. To establish standard values for ''finger grip and release in 10 seconds (G and R test)'' and ''10 second step test'' in healthy Japanese subjects. There were approximately 100 volunteers representing each gender and generation, including persons aged in their 20s to 70s. The sagittal diameter of the spinal canal, and the sagittal diameter and axial area of the dural tube and spinal cord were measured on MRIs of 1,211 subjects. From this data, we calculated the spinal cord occupation rate in the dural tube for defining developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal. ''Finger grip and release in 10 seconds (G and R test)'' and ''10 second step test'' were also examined on 1,211 subjects. The spinal canal diameter in sagittal images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 11.7±1.6 mm in males and 11.6±1.5 mm in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 12.9±1.4 mm in males and 12.5±1.3 mm in females. Dural tube diameter in sagittal images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 9.5±1.8 mm in males and 9.6±1.6 mm in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 11.2±1.4 mm in males and 11.1±1.4 mm in females. Dural tube area in axial images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 155.7±32.1 mm 2 in males and 149.6±29.0 mm 2 in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 187.4±32.6 mm 2 in males and 177.0±32.7 mm 2 in females. Spinal cord diameter in sagittal images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 5.9±1.0 mm in males and 5.8±0.9 mm in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 6.5±0.7 mm in males and 6.4±0.7 mm in females. Spinal cord area in axial images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level

  10. Cervical Cord-Canal Mismatch: A New Method for Identifying Predisposition to Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Nouri, Aria; Montejo, Julio; Sun, Xin; Virojanapa, Justin; Kolb, Luis E; Abbed, Khalid M; Cheng, Joseph S

    2017-12-01

    The risk for spinal cord injuries (SCIs) ranging from devastating traumatic injuries, compression because of degenerative pathology, and neurapraxia is increased in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. Classical diagnostic criteria include an absolute anteroposterior diameter of spinal cord, which varies across patients, independent of canal size. Recent large magnetic resonance imaging studies of population cohorts have allowed newer methods to emerge that account for both cord and canal size by measuring a spinal cord occupation ratio (SCOR). A SCOR defined as ≥70% on midsagittal imaging or ≥80% on axial imaging appears to be an effective method of identifying cord-canal mismatch, but requires further validation. Cord-canal size mismatch predisposes patients to SCI because of 1) less space within the canal lowering the amount of degenerative changes needed for cord compression, and 2) less cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord decreasing the ability to absorb kinetic forces directed at the spine. Patients with cord-canal mismatch have been reported to be at a substantially higher risk of traumatic SCI, and present with degenerative cervical myelopathy at a younger age than patients without cord-canal mismatch. However, neurologic outcome after SCI has occurred does not appear to be different in patients with or without a cord-canal mismatch. Recognition that canal and cord size are both factors which predispose to SCI supports that cord-canal size mismatch rather than a narrow cervical canal in isolation should be viewed as the underlying mechanism predisposing to SCI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Modelling of the CSF flow in the spinal canal in cervical stenosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaczmarská, A.; Štěpáník, Z.; Vaněk, P.; Maršík, František; Převorovská, Světlana; Otáhal, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 40, - (2007), s. 477-477 ISSN 0021-9290 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : cerebrospinal fluid flow * spinal canal * cervical stenosis Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.897, year: 2007

  12. Narrow cervical canal in 1211 asymptomatic healthy subjects: the relationship with spinal cord compression on MRI.

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    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Suda, Kota; Yamagata, Masatsune; Ueta, Takayoshi; Kato, Fumihiko

    2016-07-01

    Narrow cervical canal (NCC) has been a suspected risk factor for later development of cervical myelopathy. However, few studies have evaluated the prevalence in asymptomatic subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of NCC in a large cohort of asymptomatic volunteers. This study was a cross-sectional study of 1211 asymptomatic volunteers. Approximately 100 men and 100 women representing each decade of life from the 20s to the 70s were included in this study. Cervical canal anteroposterior diameters at C5 midvertebral level on X-rays, and the prevalence of spinal cord compression (SCC) and increased signal intensity (ISI) changes on MRI were evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to determine the cut-off value of the severity of canal stenosis resulting in SCC. NCC (<14 mm) was observed in 123 (10.2 %) subjects. SCC and ISI were found in 64 (5.3 %) and 28 (2.3 %) subjects, respectively. The prevalence of NCC was significantly higher in females and older subjects, but the occurrence of severe NCC (<12 mm) did not increase with age. The canal size in subjects with SCC or ISI was significantly smaller than in those without SCC (p < 0.0001). The cut-off values of cervical canal stenosis resulting in SCC were 14.8 and 13.9 mm in males and females, respectively. The prevalence of NCC was considerably lower among asymptomatic healthy volunteers; the cervical canal diameter in subjects with SCC or ISI was significantly smaller than in asymptomatic subjects; NCC is a risk factor for SCC.

  13. Reference values for radiological evaluation of cervical vertebral body shape and spinal canal

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    Remes, V.M. [Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Heinaenen, M.T.; Marttinen, E.J. [Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Kinnunen, J.S. [Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, HYKS (Finland)

    2000-03-01

    Background. Defining normal values is essential for reliable evaluation of growth disturbances. Previous studies of the cervical spine have mainly focused on the sagittal canal diameter and interpedicular distances. Values for vertebral body height and depth have been published only in adult men and cadavers.Objectives. To define normal values for vertebral body height (H)/vertebral body depth (D) ratio (H/D ratio) and sagittal canal diameter (S)/vertebral body depth ratio (S/D ratio) in C2-7.Materials and methods. Lateral cervical spine radiographs were available from 441 children and 192 adults. Subjects' ages varied from newborn to 39 years. Vertebral body height and depth and sagittal canal diameter were measured and ratios were calculated. This was a cross-sectional and retrospective study.Results. Vertebral bodies grow relatively more in height than in depth, most actively at puberty. At all levels, the H/D ratio remains below 1, indicating that vertebral body depth is greater than height. The SD ratio is quite stable until 7-8 years of age and then it starts to decline slowly.Conclusions. When estimating platyspondyly, the age of the patient must be taken into consideration because vertebral body height is lower in children. Growth of the spinal canal declines after 7-8 years of age. (orig.)

  14. Reference values for radiological evaluation of cervical vertebral body shape and spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remes, V.M.; Heinaenen, M.T.; Marttinen, E.J.; Kinnunen, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Background. Defining normal values is essential for reliable evaluation of growth disturbances. Previous studies of the cervical spine have mainly focused on the sagittal canal diameter and interpedicular distances. Values for vertebral body height and depth have been published only in adult men and cadavers.Objectives. To define normal values for vertebral body height (H)/vertebral body depth (D) ratio (H/D ratio) and sagittal canal diameter (S)/vertebral body depth ratio (S/D ratio) in C2-7.Materials and methods. Lateral cervical spine radiographs were available from 441 children and 192 adults. Subjects' ages varied from newborn to 39 years. Vertebral body height and depth and sagittal canal diameter were measured and ratios were calculated. This was a cross-sectional and retrospective study.Results. Vertebral bodies grow relatively more in height than in depth, most actively at puberty. At all levels, the H/D ratio remains below 1, indicating that vertebral body depth is greater than height. The SD ratio is quite stable until 7-8 years of age and then it starts to decline slowly.Conclusions. When estimating platyspondyly, the age of the patient must be taken into consideration because vertebral body height is lower in children. Growth of the spinal canal declines after 7-8 years of age. (orig.)

  15. Morphometry of the spinal canal at cervical region in asymptomatic military young men Morfometria do canal vertebral no segmento cervical em militares jovens assintomáticos

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    Augustin Malzac

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal canal measurements obtainned from radiographic imaging studies are an integral part of diagnostic evaluation of cervical spine stenosis. Before abnormal spinal morphometry can be determined, it is first necessary to establish normal values for the specific patient population being evaluated. Cervical spinal canal stenosis increase risk of quadriplegia after "minor trauma" in the head or neck, mainly in athletes who participate in contact or collision sports. Prospective and random selection of 500 plain film of the lateral cervical spine in young militaries population in age group 18-20 years old. Those were performed a hundred set of film were for each geographic region, including Manaus, Recife, São Paulo, Porto Alegre and Campo Grande. The first part of this study established normal values for cervical morphometry. The second part determined the most accurate screenning method for detecting cervical spinal stenosis. Normal spinal canal mean value for C3 was 18,27mm, C4 17,98mm, C5 18,33mm and 18,76mm in C6. The TORG ratio was evaluated as a method to detect significant cervical spinal stenosis and was shown to have sensitivity and high positive predictive value. It was observed TORG's ratio of 0,80 or less in 14,4% of the X-rays.A medição do diâmetro sagital do canal vertebral é parte integrante da avaliação diagnóstica de estenose da coluna cervical. Antes de identificar a morfometria anormal é necessário estabelecer valores normais para uma população específica. A estenose do canal cervical pode se converter em fator agravante na vigência de um "trauma menor" na cabeça ou no pescoço, aumentando o risco de dano medular especialmente naqueles que praticam esporte de contato. Foram selecionadas de maneira prospectiva e randomizada quinhentas radiografias em perfil da coluna cervical de militares jovens assintomáticos na faixa etária dos 18 aos 20 anos, agrupados em cem em cada região geográfica, nas cidades de Manaus

  16. Evolution of spinal cord injuries due to cervical canal stenosis without radiographic evidence of trauma (SCIWORET): a prospective study.

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    Lamothe, G; Muller, F; Vital, J-M; Goossens, D; Barat, M

    2011-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injuries on cervical canal stenosis represent a steadily increasing pathology, of which clinical and functional outcomes remain largely unknown. We present the results of a prospective study of 20 patients followed for one year who had presented with traumatic spinal cord injury involving initially acute neurological symptoms and cervical canal stenosis defined in the imaging by a Torg ratio0.65, without vertebral fracture. Traumatic spinal cord injuries on cervical canal stenosis are caused mainly by falls in the elderly population and by unsafe behaviour among younger subjects. Most of the patients present with initially incomplete tetraplegia, and two thirds have centromedullary syndrome. Association of complete tetraplegia with advanced age would seem to be a predictive factor of death in the early post-traumatic period. For incomplete tetraplegics, the main phase of neurological and functional recovery is observed over the first six months. Radiological data and timing of surgery do not appear to affect the prognosis. This study underlines the need for individualized specialized care of patients with spinal cord injuries on cervical canal stenosis, particularly according to their demographic and lesional characteristics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. MR evaluation of cervical CSF flow. An examination in patients with spinal canal stenosis

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    Iida, Makoto [Miyoshi General Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Kajima, Toshio; Miyasaka, Kenji; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Ono, Chiaki; Ito, Katsuhide

    1999-06-01

    To evaluate the flow dynamics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) throughout the cervical spine, 18 healthy controls and 14 patients with spinal canal stenosis were examined by phase-contrast cine MR. MR imaging was performed using a sagittal technique that is flow-sensitive in the craniocaudal direction. Flow encoding depicted craniocaudal flow as high intensity and caudocranial flow as low intensity. In this technique, either retrospective cardiac or peripheral gating was used to cover the complete cardiac cycle. This pulse sequence yielded 16 quantitative flow-encoded images per cardiac cycle. Using a region-of-interest cursor at each vertebral level, the graphs of flow-velocity versus time were generated. The recorded CSF at each vertebral level in the controls showed almost the same pattern in the change of flow in the craniocaudal direction, indicating that the onset of craniocaudal CSF flow was synchronous with the onset of cardiac systole in these subjects. At all vertebral levels, flow-velocity time curves showed the same variation in pattern. CSF flow was significantly lower in patients than in controls at each vertebral level (p<0.01). In addition, the flow patterns of the patients with spinal canal stenosis differed at each vertebral level. As a results, the total sum of the difference in velocity between graphs of two serial vertebrae at all sampling points (the area between the curves: ABC) per mean velocity amplitude in the patients was significantly higher than controls (p<0.05). Furthermore, the ABC per mean velocity amplitude at the stenotic level was significantly larger in the patients than that at the non-stenotic level (p<0.01). These data suggest that turbulent CSF flow occurs at the stenotic level. Thus, assessment of CSF flow dynamics is a useful adjunct to routine MRI in patients with spinal canal stenosis. (author)

  18. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

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    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  19. Assessment of the narrow cervical spinal canal: a prospective comparison of MRI, myelography and CT-myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reul, J.; Gievers, B.; Weis, J.; Thron, A.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), myelography and computed tomography in the assessment of degenerative cervical spinal stenosis. We prospectively examined a total of 75 spinal segments in 18 patients with suspected cervical spinal canal stenosis, using sagittal spin-echo and axial gradient-echo sequences generated by a 1.5 Tesla imager, conventional myelography, and computed tomography with intrathecal contrast medium (CT-myelography). The degree of stenosis was often overestimated using MRI. This error was most prominent in cases of severe stenosis but was significant with minor to moderate stenosis. In these cases, the clinical consequences of such an overestimation can be serious, because treatment is misdirected. The error is probably caused by pulsation of the cerebrospinal fluid and truncation artefact (Gibbs phenomenon). MRI at 1.5 Tesla is thus frequently inadequate for diagnostic assessment of degenerative cervical spinal stenosis. Myelography and myelographic CT are still useful for decisions on operative treatment, especially in cases of moderate stenosis. This may, however, not apply to imagers operating at 0.5 Tesla as below. (orig.)

  20. An experimental study on the computed tomography of the cervical spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Tsuguru

    1980-01-01

    A study was carried out to investigate how accurately CT could delineate the vertebral canal, vertebral body, lamina, intervertebral foramen and transverse process, and which factor influences the size of the vertebral canal, using cervical vertebrae obtained from four cadavers and one skeleton. EMI CT 5005 scanner was used. CT picture depicted accurate shapes of the vertebral canal, body and transverse process. The sagittal diameter of the vertebral canal of CT picture varied by various conditions, such as difference of scanning chance, scanning angle, window width and level, but variations due to different absorption coefficients of the bone surrounding the vertebral canal were negligible. It was most significantly changed by scanning angle. Permissible scanning angle was within 5 0 , and morphological findings were not influenced up to 15 0 . The size of the vertebral canal was most accurately measured under the condition of 400 in width and 250 in level. The optimal condition for delineation of the spine seemed to be 400 in width and 100 - 150 in level. Under the condition at width 400 and level 100, the vertebral canal was delineated narrower by an average 0.6 mm and 0.2 mm in the sagittal and transverse diameter respectively. In CT picture of the imitational ossified posterior Longitudinal ligament made of plastic and alginate, the average narrowing rate of the vertebral canal was 4.4% greater than the one obtained by lateral view of radiograph, but both correlated well with each other. The narrowing rate of the vertebral canal by CT tended to increase in proportion to the increase in scanning angle. (J.P.N.)

  1. Morphometric analysis of cervical spinal canal diameter, transverse foramen, and pedicle width using computed tomography in Indian population.

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    Sureka, Binit; Mittal, Aliza; Mittal, Mahesh K; Agarwal, Kanhaiya; Sinha, Mukul; Thukral, Brij Bhushan

    2018-01-01

    Accurate and detailed measurements of spinal canal diameter (SCD) and transverse foraminal morphometry are essential for understanding spinal column-related diseases and for surgical planning, especially for transpedicular screw fixation. This is especially because lateral cervical radiographs do not provide accurate measurements. This study was conducted to measure the dimensions of the transverse foramen sagittal and transverse diameters (SFD, TFD), SCD, and the distance of spinal canal from the transverse foramina (dSC-TF) at C1-C7 level in the Indian population. The study population comprised 84 male and 42 female subjects. The mean age of the study group was 44.63 years (range, 19-81 years). A retrospective study was conducted, and data were collected and analyzed for patients who underwent cervical spine computed tomography (CT) imaging for various reasons. One hundred and twenty-six patients were included in the study. Detailed readings were taken at all levels from C1-C7 for SCD, SFD, TFD, and dSc-TF. Values for male and female subjects were separately calculated and compared. For both the groups, the widest SCD were measured at the C1 level and the narrowest SCD at the C4 level. The narrowest SFD was measured at C7 for both male and female subjects on the right and left sides. The widest SFD was measured at C1 both for male and female subjects on the right and left side. The narrowest TFD on the left side was measured at C7 for male and at C1 for female subjects. The narrowest mean distance of dSC-TF was found to be at C4 for both male and female subjects on both left and right side. The computed tomographic (CT) imaging is better than conventional radiographs for the preoperative evaluation of cervical spine and for better understanding cervical spine morphometry. Care must be taken during transpedicular screw fixation, especially in female subjects, more so at the C2, C4, and C6 levels due to a decrease in the distance of dSC-TF.

  2. Cervical spinal canal stenosis first presenting after spinal cord injury due to minor trauma: An insight into the value of preventive decompression.

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    Shigematsu, Hideki; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Mak, Kin-Cheung; Bruzzone, Mauro; Luk, Keith D K

    2017-01-01

    Patients with pre-existing cervical spinal canal stenosis (CSCS) may have minimal or no symptoms. However, performing preventive decompression is controversial as the incidence of CSCS leading to severe cord injury is unknown. Hence, this study aims to revisit the threshold for surgery in "silent" CSCS by reviewing the neurologic outcomes of patients with undiagnosed CSCS who sustained a cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Two groups of subjects were recruited for analysis. Firstly, patients with trauma-induced CSCI without fracture or dislocation were included. Pre-existing CSCS was diagnosed by MRI measurements. The second group consisted of asymptomatic subjects recruited from the general population who also had MRIs performed. Canal sizes were compared between this control group and the patient group. Within the patient group, neurological assessments and outcomes by Frankel classification were performed in patients treated surgically or conservatively. 32 patients with CSCS were recruited. The mean spinal canal sagittal diameter (disc-level) of all CSCS cases was 5.3 ± 1.4 mm (1.3-8.2). In comparison, the diameter was 10.5 ± 1.7 mm (6.6-14.6) in the 47 asymptomatic individuals recruited from the general population. Decompression was performed in 17 patients and conservative treatment in 15. Mean follow-up was 19.3 ± 17.0 months (6-84). At the final follow-up, 3 patients (9.3%) returned to their pre-injury Frankel grade, whereas 26 patients (83.3%) lost one or more neurological grade. Three patients (9.3%) died. Majority of patients with "silent" CSCS who sustained cervical cord injuries did not return to their pre-injury neurological status. All of these subjects have pre-existing canal stenosis hence the risk of cord injury. Given the poor neurological outcome of CSCS, a lower threshold for surgery could be indicated to avoid these disastrous injuries. However, before making any conclusive recommendation we must first identify the prevalence of

  3. Clinical analysis of spinal cord injury with or without cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, spondylosis, and canal stenosis in elderly head injury patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakae, Ryuta; Onda, Hidetaka; Yokobori, Shoji; Araki, Takashi; Fuse, Akira; Toda, Shigeki; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Teramoto, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Patients with degenerative diseases of the cervical spine, such as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, spondylosis, and canal stenosis, sometimes present with acute spinal cord injury caused by minor trauma. However, the relative risk of cervical cord injury with these diseases is unknown. The clinical and radiological features of 94 elderly patients with head injury, 57 men and 37 women aged from 65 to 98 years (mean 76.6 years), were retrospectively analyzed to assess the association of spinal cord injury with degenerative cervical diseases. Degenerative cervical diseases were present in 25 patients, and spinal cord injury was more common in the patients with degenerative diseases (11/25 patients) than in the patients without such diseases (3/69 patients; relative risk=10.2). The incidence of degenerative cervical diseases seems to be increasing in Japan because life expectancy has increased and the elderly are a rapidly growing part of the population. A fall while walking or cycling is a common mechanism of head injury and/or cervical cord injury in the elderly. To decrease the occurrence of cervical myelopathy, prevention by increasing social awareness and avoiding traffic accidents and falls is important. (author)

  4. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  5. The prevalence of cervical myelopathy among subjects with narrow cervical spinal canal in a population-based magnetic resonance imaging study: the Wakayama Spine Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Keiji; Yoshimura, Noriko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Muraki, Shigeyuki; Ishimoto, Yuyu; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Noboru; Nakagawa, Yukihiro; Minamide, Akihito; Oka, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo; Akune, Toru; Yoshida, Munehito

    2014-12-01

    A narrow cervical spinal canal (CSC) is a well-known risk factor for cervical myelopathy (CM). However, no epidemiologic data of the CSC based on a population-based cohort are available. The purpose of the study was to investigate the age-related differences in CSC diameters on plain radiographs and to examine the associated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities including cervical cord compression and increased signal intensity (ISI) as well as the clinical CM with the narrow CSC. This was a cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from the baseline survey of the Wakayama Spine Study that was performed from 2008 to 2010 in a western part of Japan. Finally, a total of 959 subjects (319 men and 640 women; mean age, 66.4 years) were included. The outcome measures included in the study were the CSC diameter at C5 level on plain radiographs, cervical cord compression and ISI on sagittal T2-weighted MRI, and physical signs related to CM (eg, the Hoffmann reflex, hyperreflexia of the patellar tendon, the Babinski reflex, sensory and motor function, and bowel/bladder symptoms). The age-related differences of CSC diameters in men and women were investigated by descriptive statistics. The prevalence of MRI abnormalities and clinical CM was compared among the groups divided by the CSC diameter (less than 13, 13-15, and 15 mm or more). In addition, a logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association of the CSC diameter with cervical cord compression/clinical CM after overall adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index. The CSC diameter was narrower with increasing age in both men and women. The prevalence of cervical cord compression, ISI, and the clinical CM was significantly higher in the narrower CSC group. The prevalence of cervical cord compression, ISI, and CM among subjects with CSC diameter less than 13 mm was 38.0%, 5.4%, and 10.1%, respectively. In the logistic model, the CSC diameter was a significant predictive factor for the

  6. Neuroradiology of the spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.; Molsen, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Radiodiagnostics of the vertebral column and of the spinal cord under normal conditions and under different pathological alterations are elaborated. Especially cervical and thoracal myelography, lumbosacral myeloradiculography, spinal arteriography and phlebography as well as spinal computerized tomography are discussed in detail

  7. An unusual and spectacular case of spindle cell lipoma of the posterior neck invading the spinal cervical canal and posterior cranial fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Damien; Menei, Philippe; Fournier, Henri-Dominique

    2011-11-01

    The authors describe the first case of spindle cell lipoma of the posterior neck invading the upper cervical spinal canal and the posterior cranial fossa. Spindle cell lipoma is an extremely rare variant of benign lipoma. It usually occurs as a solitary subcutaneous well-circumscribed lesion in the posterior neck or shoulders of adult men. Local aggressiveness is unusual. This 61-year-old man presented with an increased left cerebellar syndrome and headaches. He also had a posterior neck tumefaction, which had been known about for a long time. Computed tomography and MR imaging studies revealed a voluminous mass extending to the upper cervical canal and posterior cranial fossa and eroding the neighboring bones. The lesion was well delimited, and contrast enhancement was intense and heterogeneous. The tumor, which had initially developed under the muscles of the posterior neck, was totally resected. Histological assessment revealed numerous fat cells with spindle cells secreting collagen. The large size of the tumor and the submuscular location, bone erosion, and compression of the CNS were unusual in this rare subtype of benign adipose tumor. Its presentation could simulate a sarcoma.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwey, B.; Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.

    1985-12-01

    170 patients with suspected lesions of the cervical part of the medulla were examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography. 27 cases revealed no pathological changes in the regions of the cervical medulla, the cervical canal and of the cervical spine. 143 cases produced pathological findings whose diagnoses determined therapeutical approach. Verified pathological changes comprised anomalies of the cranio-cervical junction like basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation, various types of cavity formation in the cervical medulla (syringomyelia, hydromyelia), demyelinization processes, intramedullary and extramedullary tumours, intervertebral disk degeneration processes, dislocation of intervertebral disks and spondylophytes with spinal stenoses. Sagittal sections in different functional positions allowed to demonstrate the biomechanical effects of extramedullary masses on the cervical medulla. However, proven tumours could not be differentiated successfully using histological methods. Nevertheless, NMR tomography will replace invasive methods like conventional cervical myelography and CT myelography in diagnostic clarification of diseases of the cervical medulla.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terwey, B.; Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    170 patients with suspected lesions of the cervical part of the medulla were examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography. 27 cases revealed no pathological changes in the regions of the cervical medulla, the cervical canal and of the cervical spine. 143 cases produced pathological findings whose diagnoses determined therapeutical approach. Verified pathological changes comprised anomalies of the cranio-cervical junction like basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation, various types of cavity formation in the cervical medulla (syringomyelia, hydromyelia), demyelinization processes, intramedullary and extramedullary tumours, intervertebral disk degeneration processes, dislocation of intervertebral disks and spondylophytes with spinal stenoses. Sagittal sections in different functional positions allowed to demonstrate the biomechanical effects of extramedullary masses on the cervical medulla. However, proven tumours could not be differentiated successfully using histological methods. Nevertheless, NMR tomography will replace invasive methods like conventional cervical myelography and CT myelography in diagnostic clarification of diseases of the cervical medulla. (orig.) [de

  10. Computer tomographic investigations of cervical spinal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodiek, S.O.

    1983-10-01

    Computed tomography was applied in 29 patients with cervical spinal stenosis. In 8 cases there was a congenital narrowed spinal canal. In 18 cases we found dorsal spondylotic ridges of the vertebral bodies and in three cases an atlanto-dental dislocation. The complaints showed either radicular character or in case of myelopathy came out as para- and quadriplegia. In 25 cases the spinal sagittal diamter was a lot below a critical borderline of about 13 mm. The kind and localisation of the underlying process can be demonstrated very excellent by computed tomography.

  11. Computer tomographic investigations of cervical spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography was applied in 29 patients with cervical spinal stenosis. In 8 cases there was a congenital narrowed spinal canal. In 18 cases we found dorsal spondylotic ridges of the vertebral bodies and in three cases an atlanto-dental dislocation. The complaints showed either radicular character or in case of myelopathy came out as para- and quadriplegia. In 25 cases the spinal sagittal diamter was a lot below a critical borderline of about 13 mm. The kind and localisation of the underlying process can be demonstrated very excellent by computed tomography. (orig.) [de

  12. MRI study on spinal canal content in Western Maharashtrian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanapurkar SV, Kulkarni DO, Bahetee BH, Vahane MI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of the spinal canal content has been studied since the invention of myelography. However, most studies have measured the diameters of the spinal cord only, not the size of the subarachnoid space. The present study complements the current data on the morphology of the spinal contents, and in particular, the spinal subarachnoid space, by analyzing MRI images. Objective: To study morphology of the dural sac, spinal cord & subarachnoid space using MRI. To define the inner geometrical dimensions of spinal canal content that confine the maneuver of an endoscope inserted in cervical spine. 3. To have comprehensive knowledge of the anatomy of cervical spinal canal. Method: Based on MRI images of the spine from 60 normal patients of age between 25-60 years, the dimensions of spinal cord, dural sac & subarachnoid space were measured at mid-vertebral & intervertebral level from C1-C7 vertebrae. The parameters measured were transverse, sagittal diameter of spinal cord & dural sac. The subarachnoid space was measured as anterior, posterior, right, left distance between spinal cord and dura mater. Results: It was found that at each selected transverse level, the subarachnoid space tends to be symmetrical on the right and left sides of the cord, and measures 3.38 mm on an average. However, the anterior and posterior segment, measured on the mid-sagittal plane are generally asymmetric & varies greatly in size ranging 1mm to 6mm with mean 2.57 of anterior & 2.59 of posterior. These measurements match those found in previous studies. The coefficient of variance for the dimensions of the subarachnoid space is as high as 36.16%, while that for the dimensions of the spinal cord (transverse & sagittal are11.08%&13.28%respectively. Conclusion: The findings presented here, expand our knowledge of morphology of spinal canal and show that a thecaloscope must be smaller than 3.38 mm in diameter.

  13. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2011-01-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  14. Radiological evaluation of the cervical spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, W. K.; Koh, B. H.; Hahm, C. K.; Kim, J. J. [School of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-03-15

    Acute injuries of the cervical spine are the most common causes of severe disability following trauma, yet the diagnosis of these injuries are often delayed and the treatment, inadequate. Traumatic injuries of the cervical spine are diagnosed by radiological examinations. And complete evaluations of bony structures and soft tissue changes on conventional radiograms are very important for determining the therapeutic plans and prognoses of the injuries patients. During the period of 5 years from June 1976 to May 1981, the radiological and clinical evaluation had been made on 38 patients suffered from acute cervical spinal injuries which were confirmed by the radiological examinations. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of total 38 patients was broad ranging from 19 years to 72 years. 2. The most common cause of injury was traffic accident, next fall down, other accident respectively. 3. Levels of the cervical spinal injuries were as follows: Upper cervical spine in 15.8%, lower cervical spine in 84.2%, and the most common injuries level was C 5. Most of the lower cervical spinal injuries were located in the vertebral body and spinous process. 4. Anatomical sites of the cervical spinal injuries were as follows; vertebral body in 55.5%, spinous process in 23.7%, neural arch in 15.8%, and locked facet in 18.4%, etc. 5. Most of the patients with severe mental changes were injuries in upper cervical spine rather than lower. And most of the patients with quadriplegia or paraplegia were shown marked disruption of spinal canal.

  15. Radiological evaluation of the cervical spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, W. K.; Koh, B. H.; Hahm, C. K.; Kim, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Acute injuries of the cervical spine are the most common causes of severe disability following trauma, yet the diagnosis of these injuries are often delayed and the treatment, inadequate. Traumatic injuries of the cervical spine are diagnosed by radiological examinations. And complete evaluations of bony structures and soft tissue changes on conventional radiograms are very important for determining the therapeutic plans and prognoses of the injuries patients. During the period of 5 years from June 1976 to May 1981, the radiological and clinical evaluation had been made on 38 patients suffered from acute cervical spinal injuries which were confirmed by the radiological examinations. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of total 38 patients was broad ranging from 19 years to 72 years. 2. The most common cause of injury was traffic accident, next fall down, other accident respectively. 3. Levels of the cervical spinal injuries were as follows: Upper cervical spine in 15.8%, lower cervical spine in 84.2%, and the most common injuries level was C 5. Most of the lower cervical spinal injuries were located in the vertebral body and spinous process. 4. Anatomical sites of the cervical spinal injuries were as follows; vertebral body in 55.5%, spinous process in 23.7%, neural arch in 15.8%, and locked facet in 18.4%, etc. 5. Most of the patients with severe mental changes were injuries in upper cervical spine rather than lower. And most of the patients with quadriplegia or paraplegia were shown marked disruption of spinal canal

  16. Cervical spinal cord injuries in patients with cervical spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenbogen, V S; Rogers, L F; Atlas, S W; Kim, K S

    1986-02-01

    Eighty-eight patients over age 40 with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries were clinically and radiographically evaluated, and comparison was made with 35 spinal cord injury patients under age 36. While most older patients sustained obvious bony and/or ligamentous damage commensurate with their neurologic findings, 25 (28%) of the 88 patients had no demonstrable bony abnormalities and 17 (20%) of the 88 patients had only minimal evidence of bony injury. Of particular interest are the patients with severe cord injuries, yet no bony abnormalities, who seem to form a distinct subgroup of the cervical spinal cord injury patient on the basis of radiographic and clinical features. Of these 25 patients, 24 (96%) had severe cervical spondylosis. Fourteen (56%) of the 25 patients were injured in falls, five (36%) of these 14 being of a seemingly trivial nature. Of the 42 patients with minimal or no demonstrable bony abnormalities, 33 (79%) were evaluated with plain tomography and no occult fractures or other significant pathology was demonstrated. Pantopaque myelography in 27 (64%) of the 42 cases revealed no extruded disk or other surgical lesion in any patient. In large measure, these injuries can be attributed to cervical spondylosis, which narrows the canal and makes the cord more susceptible to compression by the bulging ligamenta flava during hyperextension.

  17. MANAGEMENT OF LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhergee G. S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal stenosis is one of the most common conditions in the elderly. It is defined as a narrowing of the spinal canal. The term stenosis is derived from the Greek word for narrow, which is “Stenos”. The first description of this condition is attributed to Antoine portal in 1803. Verbiest is credited with coining the term spinal stenosis and the associated narrowing of the spinal canal as its potential cause. [1-10] Kirkaldy–Willis subsequently described the degenerative cascade in the lumbar spine as the cause for the altered anatomy and pathophysiology in spinal stenosis. [11-15] If compression does not occur, the canal should be described as narrow but not stenotic. Some studies defined lumbar spinal stenosis as a “narrowing of the osteoligamentous vertebral canal and/or the intervertebral foramina causing compression of the thecal sac and/or the caudal nerve roots; at a single vertebral level, narrowing may affect the whole canal or part of it” (Postacchini 1983. This definition distinguished between disc herniation and stenosis. [16] . The most common type of spinal stenosis is caused by degenerative arthritis of the spine. Hypertrophy and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament which usually are confined to the cervical spine, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH syndrome also may result in an acquired form of spinal stenosis. Congenital forms caused by disorders such as achondroplasia and dysplastic spondylolisthesis are much less common. Congenital spinal stenosis usually is central and is evident or imaging studies. Idiopathic congenital narrowing usually involves the anteroposterior dimension of the canal secondary to short pedicles; the patient otherwise is normal. In contrast, in achondroplasia, the canal is narrowed in the anteroposterior plane owing to shortened pedicles and in lateral dimension because of diminished interpedicular distance. Acquired forms of spinal stenosis usually are

  18. MR determination of neonatal spinal canal depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthurs, Owen; Thayyil, Sudhin; Wade, Angie; Chong, W K Kling; Sebire, Neil J; Taylor, Andrew M

    2012-08-01

    Lumbar punctures (LPs) are frequently performed in neonates and often result in traumatic haemorrhagic taps. Knowledge of the distance from the skin to the middle of the spinal canal (mid-spinal canal depth - MSCD) may reduce the incidence of traumatic taps, but there is little data in extremely premature or low birth weight neonates. Here, we determined the spinal canal depth at post-mortem in perinatal deaths using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Spinal canal depth was measured in 78 post-mortem foetuses and perinatal cases (mean gestation 26 weeks; mean weight 1.04kg) at the L3/L4 inter-vertebral space at post-mortem MRI. Both anterior (ASCD) and posterior (PSCD) spinal canal depth were measured; MSCD was calculated and modelled against weight and gestational age. ASCD and PSCD (mm) correlated significantly with weight and gestational age (all r>0.8). A simple linear model MSCD (mm)=3×Weight (kg)+5 was the best fit, identifying an SCD value within the correct range for 87.2% (68/78) (95% CI (78.0, 92.9%)) cases. Gestational age did not add significantly to the predictive value of the model. There is a significant correlation between MSCD and body weight at post-mortem MRI in foetuses and perinatal deaths. If this association holds in preterm neonates, use of the formula MSCD (mm)=3×Weight (kg)+5 could result in fewer traumatic LPs in this population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. MR determination of neonatal spinal canal depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen, E-mail: owenarthurs@uk2.net [Centre for Cardiovascular MR, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London WC1N 3JH (United Kingdom); Thayyil, Sudhin, E-mail: s.thayyil@ucl.ac.uk [Academic Neonatology, Institute for Women' s Health, London WC1E 6AU (United Kingdom); Wade, Angie, E-mail: a.wade@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Chong, W.K., E-mail: Kling.Chong@gosh.nhs.uk [Paediatric Neuroradiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J., E-mail: Neil.Sebire@gosh.nhs.uk [Histopathology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London WC1E 6AU (United Kingdom); Taylor, Andrew M., E-mail: a.taylor76@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Cardiovascular MR, Cardiorespiratory Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children and UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London WC1E 6AU (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: Lumbar punctures (LPs) are frequently performed in neonates and often result in traumatic haemorrhagic taps. Knowledge of the distance from the skin to the middle of the spinal canal (mid-spinal canal depth - MSCD) may reduce the incidence of traumatic taps, but there is little data in extremely premature or low birth weight neonates. Here, we determined the spinal canal depth at post-mortem in perinatal deaths using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients and methods: Spinal canal depth was measured in 78 post-mortem foetuses and perinatal cases (mean gestation 26 weeks; mean weight 1.04 kg) at the L3/L4 inter-vertebral space at post-mortem MRI. Both anterior (ASCD) and posterior (PSCD) spinal canal depth were measured; MSCD was calculated and modelled against weight and gestational age. Results: ASCD and PSCD (mm) correlated significantly with weight and gestational age (all r > 0.8). A simple linear model MSCD (mm) = 3 Multiplication-Sign Weight (kg) + 5 was the best fit, identifying an SCD value within the correct range for 87.2% (68/78) (95% CI (78.0, 92.9%)) cases. Gestational age did not add significantly to the predictive value of the model. Conclusion: There is a significant correlation between MSCD and body weight at post-mortem MRI in foetuses and perinatal deaths. If this association holds in preterm neonates, use of the formula MSCD (mm) = 3 Multiplication-Sign Weight (kg) + 5 could result in fewer traumatic LPs in this population.

  20. NMR imaging of the vertebral column and the spinal canal. 2. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsting, Michael; Uhlenbrock, Detlev; Wanke, Isabel; Universitaetsklinikum Essen

    2009-01-01

    The book on the MRT (magnetic resonance tomography) of the vertebral cord and spinal canal covers the following topics: physics fundamentals and application; malformation of the spinal canal; degenerative vertebral column diseases; vertebral column and spinal canal carcinomas; inflammatory diseases of the vertebral column and the spinal canal; applicability of MRT in case of acute spinal cord traumata; vascular diseases of the spinal canal

  1. Morphological study of the axial view of the cervical spinal cord by MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Shimamura, Tadashi

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the morphological changes in the cervical spinal cord in patients with cervical myelopathy, we examined the axial anatomy of the cervical spinal cord and the spinal canal using MRI and CT scans. This study involved 35 patients (mean age=56.8) with cervical myelopathy and 118 adult normal volunteers (mean age=48.1) as controls. The transverse area of the spinal cord was measured on MR images (T 1 images), while the transverse area of the spinal canal was measured on CT. In normal subjects, the transverse area, the sagittal diameter, and the coronal diameter of the spinal cord showed a significant positive correlation with body height, and a significant negative correlation with age. No significant difference was identified between males and females. The transverse area, the sagittal diameter, the coronal diameter, and the ratio of the sagittal/coronal diameter of the spinal cord and the spinal canal showed significant positive correlations among each other in normal subjects, but no significant correlation was noted in the patients with cervical myelopathy. These was no significant difference between the normal subjects and the patients in the transverse area or in the ratio of the sagittal/coronal diameter of the spinal cord at the levels without cord compression. However, the transverse area of the spinal canal in the patients with myelopathy was significantly smaller than that of normal subjects. In conclusion, a poor or no correlation between the size of the spinal cord and the spinal canal is a frequent finding in patients with myelopathy. Furthermore, this study suggests that patients with myelopathy present a narrow spinal canal more frequently than do normal subjects. (author)

  2. A study of measurement of the spinal cord of cervical myelopathy with CT-myelography and forecast of operative result from the size of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosawa, Yoshimitsu

    1985-01-01

    The antero-posterior (AP) and transverse (T) diameter and the T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord were measured using CT-myelography (CT-M) in 44 patients with cervical myelopathy (CM) and 20 control subjects. The AP diameter of these canals and cord and the T diameter of the spinal canal were smaller in the CM group than in the control group. Postoperative CT-M showed that the dural canal and spinal cord had an increase in the AP diameter and T area and a decrease in the T diameter. Preoperative symptoms were well correlated with the AP diameter and the T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord, and spinal cord compression. The symptoms tended to be milder with larger AT diameter and T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord and with smaller spinal cord compression and deformity. Functional damage was reversible in patients with slight spinal cord compression. Favorable operative outcome tended to be achieved when the preoperative AP diameter and T area of the spinal cord were ≥ 5 mm and ≥ 50 mm 2 , respectively. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Cervical spinal cord injury without radiological abnormality in adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatoe H

    2000-01-01

    Spinal cord injury occurring without concomitant radiologically demonstrable trauma to the skeletal elements of the spinal canal rim, or compromise of the spinal canal rim without fracture, is a rare event. Though documented in children, the injury is not very well reported in adults. We present seventeen adult patients with spinal cord injury without accompanying fracture of the spinal canal rim, or vertebral dislocation, seen over seven years. None had preexisting spinal canal stenosis or c...

  4. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. Morphological study of the spinal canal content for subarachnoid endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaaroor, M; Kósa, G; Peri-Eran, A; Maharil, I; Shoham, M; Goldsher, D

    2006-08-01

    This study was designed to examine the morphology of the spinal dural sac and contents, using magnetic resonance imaging in order to define the inner geometrical dimensions that confine the manoeuvre of an endoscope inserted in the lumbar region and along the thoracic and cervical spine. The morphology of the spine has been studied since the development of myelography. However, most studies have measured the diameters of the spinal cord only, not the size of the subarachnoid space. In addition, the few studies available on the subarachnoid space have focused on the cervical spine, leaving a near-complete dearth of data on the subarachnoid space dimensions along the thoracic spine. Based on MRI images of the spine from 42 patients, the dimensions of the spinal cord, dural sac, and subarachnoid space were measured at mid-vertebral and inter-vertebral disc levels. It was found that at each selected transverse level, the subarachnoid space tends to be symmetrical on the right and left sides of the cord, and measures 2.5 mm on average. However, the posterior and anterior segments, measured on the mid-sagittal plane, are generally asymmetrical and vary widely in size, ranging from 1 to 5 mm. These measurements match those found in previous studies, where these are available. The coefficient of variance for the dimensions of the subarachnoid space is as high as 42.4%, while that for the dimensions of the spinal cord is 10-15%. The findings presented here expand our knowledge of the spinal canal's morphology, and show that an endoscope designed to travel within the subarachnoid space must be smaller than 2.5 mm in diameter.

  6. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Bae, Sang Jin

    2004-01-01

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance (ρ > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury

  7. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  8. MRI diagnosis of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into central spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Cheng Jingliang; Wang Juan; Li Huali; Ren Cuiping; Zhang Yan; Gao Xuemei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the appearances of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into the central spinal canal, as well as the MRI diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Methods: Eleven cases of intraspinal dermoid ruptured into the central spinal canal were reviewed. Six cases underwent whole spine MRI scan, 2 cases with thoracic and lumbar spine MRI, as well as 3 cases only with lumbar spine MRI. Results: Free fat droplets within spinal cord central canal demonstrated high signal intensity on T 1 WI, slight declined signal intensity on T 2 WI, and extremely low signal on fat suppression sequence. Of the 11 cases, 2 cases broke into neighboring central spinal canal of the dermoid, 3 cases scattered within thoracic spinal cord central canal, 4 cases discontinuously distributed in the whole spinal cord central canal, 2 cases showed continuous distribution. Conclusion: Intraspinal dermoid ruptured in the central spinal canal had specific appearance on MRI, when a dermoid tumor is suspected, MRI of the entire spine were recommended to detect possible leakage of' fat within central spinal canal. (authors)

  9. Brown sequard syndrome following firearm injury with a bullet lodged in the upper cervical canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brohi, S.R.; Brohi, Q.R.

    2008-01-01

    A case of stray bullet injury in a child is reported who presented with Brown-Sequard syndrome and CSF leak from the wound at the nape of neck. Patient was assessed by plain radiography and CT scans showing bullet lying in the cervical spinal canal under the C1 and C2 laminae. Laminectomy at C1/C2 level was done and bullet was carefully removed. Patient improved neurologically and CSF discharge stopped. The case report indicated the atypical neurological presentation and possibility of survival in high cervical spinal firearm injury. (author)

  10. Acute cervical cord injury without fracture or dislocation of the spinal column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, I; Iwasaki, Y; Hida, K; Akino, M; Imamura, H; Abe, H

    2000-07-01

    It is known that the spinal cord can sustain traumatic injury without associated injury of the spinal column in some conditions, such as a flexible spinal column or preexisting narrowed spinal canal. The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical features and to understand the mechanisms in cases of acute cervical cord injury in which fracture or dislocation of the cervical spine has not occurred. Eighty-nine patients who sustained an acute cervical cord injury were treated in our hospitals between 1990 and 1998. In 42 patients (47%) no bone injuries of the cervical spine were demonstrated, and this group was retrospectively analyzed. There were 35 men and seven women, aged 19 to 81 years (mean 58.9 years). The initial neurological examination indicated complete injury in five patients, whereas incomplete injury was demonstrated in 37. In the majority of the patients (90%) the authors found degenerative changes of the cervical spine such as spondylosis (22 cases) or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (16 cases). The mean sagittal diameter of the cervical spinal canal, as measured on computerized tomography scans, was significantly narrower than that obtained in the control patients. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed spinal cord compression in 93% and paravertebral soft-tissue injuries in 58% of the patients. Degenerative changes of the cervical spine and developmental narrowing of the spinal canal are important preexisting factors. In the acute stage MR imaging is useful to understand the level and mechanisms of spinal cord injury. The fact that a significant number of the patients were found to have spinal cord compression despite the absence of bone injuries of the spinal column indicates that future investigations into surgical treatment of this type of injury are necessary.

  11. Technique and results of the spinal computed tomography in the diagnosis of cervical disc disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artmann, H.; Salbeck, R.; Grau, H.

    1985-01-01

    We give a description of a technique of the patient's positioning with traction of the arms during the cervical spinal computed tomography which allows to draw the shoulders downwards by about one to three cervical segments. By this method the quality of the images can be improved in 96% in the cervical segment 6/7 and in 81% in the cervical/thoracal segment 7/1 to such a degree that a reliable judgement of the soft parts in the spinal canal becomes possible. The diagnostic reliability of the computed tomography of the cervical disc herniation is thus improved so that the necessity of a myelography is decreasing. The results of 396 cervical spinal computed tomographies are presented. (orig.) [de

  12. Choroid Plexus in the Central Canal of the Spinal Cord Causing Recurrent Syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtaya, Anan; Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Nicoll, James A R; Nader-Sepahi, Ali

    2018-03-01

    Syringomyelia is a fluid-filled cavitation within the substance of the spinal cord. This condition usually follows a primary pathology that disrupts the normal cerebrospinal fluid circulation or disturbs the microcirculation and cytoarchitecture of the spinal cord parenchyma. However, an etiology of recurrent syringomyelia resulting from an ectopic choroid plexus (CP) has not been discussed. Ectopic CP rests may be found within the central nervous system. Although there has been a single report, describing ectopic intramedullary spinal cord CP, to our knowledge, extra-cranial nonmalignant CP in the central canal of the spinal cord has not been reported. We report CP in the central canal of the spinal cord in a 23-year-old male patient who had developmental delay and diabetes mellitus type I who presented with dissociated sensory changes and muscle wastage predominantly on the right upper and lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a multiloculated spinal cord syringomyelia stretching from cervical (C3) to the conus medullaris causing recurrent neurologic deficits. A biopsy of the central canal spinal cord lesion revealed CP. Decompression and syringosubarachnoid shunt insertion stabilized the patient's neurology. Our illustrative case reveals the presence of CP in the central canal of the spinal cord that may suggest a role in the etiology of recurrent syringomyelia. Although management poses a challenge to neurosurgeons, prompt decompression and shunting of the syringomyelia remains a favorable approach with acceptable outcomes. Further investigation into the pathophysiology of central canal CP ectopic causing recurrent syringomyelia and its correlation with spinal cord development may help future treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arteriovenous malformations of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Shiro; Yoshida, Shinzo; Ishikawa, Masatsune; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Handa, Hajime

    1984-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the cervical spinal cord has been known to constitute 5-13% of all spinal AVMs. In contrast to the AVMs located in thoracic or thoraco-lumbar regions, cervical AVM has several characteristic features such as preponderance in younger generation, high incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intramedullary location of the nidus usually fed by the anterior spinal arterial system. We reported three cases of cervical AVMs, which located intramedullary at the levels of C 4 -C 6 , C 1 -C 4 and C 1 -C 2 , respectively. Although selective angiography (vertebral artery, thyrocervical artery, costocervical artery) was essential for the diagnosis of these lesions, computerized tomographic (CT) study with both intrathecal injection of metrizamide and intravenous infusion of contrast material (dynamic and static study) was found to be extremely advantageous in detecting the topography of AVMs in the concerned horizontal planes of the spinal cord. Removal of AVM was given up in one case because of its possible involvement of the anterior spinal artery and central artery shown by CT scan. Removal of AVMs were performed in other two cases. A lateral approach was tried in one case with the AVM located in C 1 -C 2 level, in which CT scan revealed not only an intramedullary but the associated extramedullary AVM in ventrolateral surface of the spinal cord. This operative approach was found to involve less bone removal and markedly reduce spinal cord manipulation necessary to deal with ventrally situated high cervical lesions, compared with a posterior approach with laminectomy. (author)

  14. Measurement of spinal canal narrowing, interpedicular widening, and vertebral compression in spinal burst fractures: plain radiographs versus multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensch, Frank V.; Koivikko, Mika P.; Koskinen, Seppo K.; Kiuru, Martti J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the reliability of measurements of spinal canal narrowing, vertebral body compression, and interpedicular widening in burst fractures in radiography compared with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Patients who had confirmed acute vertebral burst fractures over an interval of 34 months underwent both MDCT and radiography. Measurements of spinal canal narrowing, vertebral body compression, and interpedicular widening from MDCT and radiography were compared. The 108 patients (30 female, 78 male, aged 16-79 years, mean 39 years) had 121 burst fractures. Eleven patients had multiple fractures, of which seven were not contiguous. Measurements showed a strong positive correlation between radiography and MDCT (Spearman's rank sum test: spinal canal narrowing k = 0.50-0.82, vertebral compression k = 0.55-0.72, and interpedicular widening k = 0.81-0.91, all P 0.25) and for interpedicular widening in the thoracic spine (k = 0.35, P = 0.115). The average difference in measurements between the modalities was 3 mm or fewer. Radiography demonstrates interpedicular widening, spinal canal narrowing and vertebral compression with acceptable precision, with the exception of those of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  15. Spinal canal extension of hyperalimentation catheter without neurologic sequela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasier, M.; Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock; Hassell, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt at placement of a left femoral vein hyperalimentation catheter resulted in entrance of the catheter into the spinal canal. Catheter location was documented by injections of nonionic contrast material into the catheter without neurologic sequellae. (orig.)

  16. Iohexol in investigations of the spinal canal. Multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bories, J.

    1988-01-01

    The author presents the results of a multicentric study of Iohexol in investigation of the spinal canal undertaken at the request of Winthrop Laboratories in 32 Radiological departments. The study involved 329 adults of both sexes. It confirmed the excellent quality of results obtained with this preparation in the literature and its excellent tolerance. On the basis of these results Iohexol may be considered to be definitely one of the best currently available preparations for investigation of the spinal canal [fr

  17. Boomerang deformity of cervical spinal cord migrating between split laminae after laminoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, S; Gomibuchi, F; Shimoda, H; Ikezawa, Y; Segawa, H; Kaneko, F; Uchiyama, S; Homma, T

    2000-04-01

    Patients with cervical compression myelopathy were studied to elucidate the mechanism underlying boomerang deformity, which results from the migration of the cervical spinal cord between split laminae after laminoplasty with median splitting of the spinous processes (boomerang sign). Thirty-nine cases, comprising 25 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, 8 patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, and 6 patients with cervical disc herniation with developmental canal stenosis, were examined. The clinical and radiological findings were retrospectively compared between patients with (B group, 8 cases) and without (C group, 31 cases) boomerang sign. Moderate increase of the grade of this deformity resulted in no clinical recovery, although there was no difference in clinical recovery between the two groups. Most boomerang signs developed at the C4/5 and/or C5/6 level, where maximal posterior movement of the spinal cord was achieved. Widths between lateral hinges and between split laminae in the B group were smaller than in the C group. Flatness of the spinal cord in the B group was more severe than in the C group. In conclusion, the boomerang sign was caused by posterior movement of the spinal cord, narrower enlargement of the spinal canal and flatness of the spinal cord.

  18. Perioperative Vision Loss in Cervical Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Brandon C; Lam, Arthur; Chapman, Jens R; Oskouian, Rod J; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Sebastian, Arjun S; Arnold, Paul M; Hamilton, Steven R; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective multicenter case series. To assess the rate of perioperative vision loss following cervical spinal surgery. Medical records for 17 625 patients from 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, inclusive, were reviewed to identify occurrences of vision loss following surgery. Of the 17 625 patients in the registry, there were 13 946 patients assessed for the complication of blindness. There were 9591 cases that involved only anterior surgical approaches; the remaining 4355 cases were posterior and/or circumferential fusions. There were no cases of blindness or vision loss in the postoperative period reported during the sampling period. Perioperative vision loss following cervical spinal surgery is exceedingly rare.

  19. Lumbar spinal canal size of sciatica patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurme, M.; Alaranta, H.; Aalto, T.; Knuts, L.R.; Vanharanta, H.; Troup, J.D.G. (Turku City Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Surgery; Social Insurance Institution, Turku (Finland). Rehabilitation Research Centre; Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Liverpool Univ. (UK). Dept. of Orthopaedic and Accident Surgery)

    Seven measures at the three lowest lumbar interspaces were recorded from conventional radiographs of the lumbar spines of 160 consecutive patients with low back pain and sciatica admitted for myelography and possible surgery. Eighty-eight patients were operated upon for disc herniation, and of the conservatively-treated 72 patients, 18 had a pathologic and 54 a normal myelogram. The results were evaluated after one year using the occupational handicap scales of WHO. Correlations of radiographic measures to stature were moderate and to age small. After adjusting for stature and age, only the male interpedicular distances and the antero-posterior diameter of intervertebral foramen at L3 were greater than those of females. The males with a pathologic myelogram had smaller posterior disc height at L3 and a smaller interarticular distance at L3 and L4 than those with normal myelogram, likewise the midsagittal diameter at L3 and L4 in females. In all patients other measures besides posterior disc height were smaller than those for low back pain patients (p<0.001) or for cadavers (p<0.001). The only correlation between measures and clinical manifestations was between pedicular length at L3 and limited straight leg raising. Where the disc material had been extruded into the spinal canal, the interpedicular distance was significantly wider. Only anterior disc height at L3 revealed differences between good and poor outcome one year after surgery, as did the interarticular distance at S1 in patients with normal myelogram after conservative treatment. (orig.).

  20. Lumbar spinal canal size of sciatica patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurme, M.; Alaranta, H.; Aalto, T.; Knuts, L.R.; Vanharanta, H.; Troup, J.D.G.; Social Insurance Institution, Turku; Helsinki Univ.; Liverpool Univ.

    1989-01-01

    Seven measures at the three lowest lumbar interspaces were recorded from conventional radiographs of the lumbar spines of 160 consecutive patients with low back pain and sciatica admitted for myelography and possible surgery. Eighty-eight patients were operated upon for disc herniation, and of the conservatively-treated 72 patients, 18 had a pathologic and 54 a normal myelogram. The results were evaluated after one year using the occupational handicap scales of WHO. Correlations of radiographic measures to stature were moderate and to age small. After adjusting for stature and age, only the male interpedicular distances and the antero-posterior diameter of intervertebral foramen at L3 were greater than those of females. The males with a pathologic myelogram had smaller posterior disc height at L3 and a smaller interarticular distance at L3 and L4 than those with normal myelogram, likewise the midsagittal diameter at L3 and L4 in females. In all patients other measures besides posterior disc height were smaller than those for low back pain patients (p<0.001) or for cadavers (p<0.001). The only correlation between measures and clinical manifestations was between pedicular length at L3 and limited straight leg raising. Where the disc material had been extruded into the spinal canal, the interpedicular distance was significantly wider. Only anterior disc height at L3 revealed differences between good and poor outcome one year after surgery, as did the interarticular distance at S1 in patients with normal myelogram after conservative treatment. (orig.)

  1. The Outcomes of Anterior Spinal Fusion for Cervical Compressive Myelopathy—A Retrospective Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz-King Suen

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Anterior cervical decompression with bone fusion is a viable surgical option for patients with one level of anterior cervical cord compression, especially for patients with kyphosis or straight canal spine. For patients with two- to three-level involvement, anterior cervical decompression with bone fusion provides good functional result in proper selection of cases. We also identified some prognostic factors (male sex, symptoms less than 1 year, and age less than 70 years in predicting a favourable outcome of anterior spinal fusion for CCM.

  2. Spinal surgery - cervical - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems include: pain that interferes with daily activities neck pain that extends (radiates) to the shoulder or arm ... done while the patient is deep asleep and pain-free (general anesthesia). For the neck (cervical spine), an incision may be made either in ...

  3. The Torg-Pavlov ratio for the prediction of acute spinal cord injury after a minor trauma to the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebli, Nikolaus; Wicki, Anina G; Rüegg, Tabea B; Petrou, Nassos; Eisenlohr, Heidrun; Krebs, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    Acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) has been observed in some patients after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. The discrepancy between the severity of the trauma and the clinical symptoms has been attributed to spinal canal stenosis. However, to date, there is no universally established radiological parameter for identifying critical spinal stenosis in these patients. The spinal canal-to-vertebral body ratio (Torg-Pavlov ratio) has been proposed for assessing developmental spinal canal stenosis. The relevance of the Torg-Pavlov ratio for predicting the occurrence and severity of acute cervical SCI after a minor trauma to the cervical spine has not yet been established. To investigate the Torg-Pavlov ratio values of the cervical spine in patients suffering from acute cervical SCI after a minor trauma to the cervical spine and the use of the Torg-Pavlov ratio for identifying patients at risk of cervical SCI and predicting the severity and course of symptoms. Retrospective radiological study of consecutive patients. Forty-five patients suffering from acute cervical SCI and 68 patients showing no neurologic symptoms after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. Midvertebral sagittal cervical spinal canal diameter and the sagittal vertebral body diameter. Calculation of the Torg-Pavlov ratio values. Conventional lateral radiographs of the cervical spine (C3-C7) were analyzed to determine the Torg-Pavlov ratio values. Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated for evaluating the classification accuracy of the Torg-Pavlov ratio for predicting SCI. The Torg-Pavlov ratio values in the SCI group were significantly (pPavlov ratio cutoff value of 0.7 yielded the greatest positive likelihood ratio for predicting the occurrence of SCI. However, there were no significant differences in the Torg-Pavlov ratio values between the different American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Score groups and between patients with complete, partial, and no recovery of

  4. Treat high cervical spinal arteriovenous malformation with Cyberknife radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of CyberKnife radiosurgery in the treatment of accidentally found cervical spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM. We present the case of a patient with cervical spinal AVM, who developed progressive neck pain, gait disturbance, urine and stool incontinence 2 weeks after the fell down accident. The patient underwent CyberKnife radiosurgery. After CyberKnife radiosurgery for 2 years, the patient′s neck pain diminished and was able to keep the walk without any assistance. The management of cervical spinal AVM varies. This patient demonstrated a successful treatment of cervical spinal AVM with CyberKnife radiosurgery.

  5. Assessment of lumbar spinal canal stenosis by magnetic resonance phlebography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaka, Masakazu; Komagata, Masashi; Endo, Kenji; Imakiire, Atsuhiro

    2003-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that cauda equina intermittent claudication is caused by local circulatory disturbances in the cauda equina as well as compression of the cauda equina. We evaluated the role of magnetic resonance phlebography (MRP) in identifying circulatory disturbances of the vertebral venous system in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Extensive filling defects of the anterior internal vertebral venous plexus were evident in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (n=53), whereas only milder abnormalities were noted in patients with other lumber diseases (n=16) and none in normal subjects (n=13). The extent of the defect on MRP correlated with the time at which intermittent claudication appeared. In patients with lumber spinal canal stenosis, extensive defects of the internal vertebral venous plexus on MRP were noted in the neutral spine position, but the defect diminished with anterior flexion of the spine. This phenomenon correlated closely with the time at which intermittent claudication appeared. Our results highlight the importance of MRP for assessing the underlying mechanism of cauda equina intermittent claudication in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis and suggest that congestive venous ischemia is involved in the development of intermittent claudication in these patients. (author)

  6. MRI diagnosis of embryonal tumors in the spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jilin; Zhang Xinchuan; Zhang Huaning; Liu Lianxiang; Wu Yujin

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate MRI diagnostic value of the embryonal tumors in the spinal canal. Materials and methods: The MRI appearances of 15 cases of histologically confirmed embryonal tumors in the spinal canal were analyzed. (1) Lipoma (3 cases) had characteristic MRI appearance, demonstrating high signal intensity on T 1 WI, and moderately high signal on T 2 WI. High signal intensity of the lipoma was turned into low signal intensity by fat suppression technique. (2) Dermoids (2 cases) and epidermoid (7 cases) exhibiting low or iso-low signal on T 1 WI and high or iso-high signal on T 2 WI. All had an iso-intense capsule on T 1 WI. However, the two tumors could not be distinguished from each other. (3) Teratoma (3 cases) appeared as a mass of inhomo-generous signals in the spinal canal including soft tissue, fatty tissue and calcification within the same tumor. The diagnosis of embryonal tumors in the spinal canal mainly depend on their MRI appearances, specific tumor location and patient's age

  7. NMR imaging of the vertebral column and the spinal canal. 2. rev. and enl. ed.; MRT der Wirbelsaeule und des Spinalkanals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsting, Michael [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Uhlenbrock, Detlev [St.-Josefs-Hospital, Dortmund (Germany). MVZ Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie; Wanke, Isabel [Privatklinikengruppe Hirslanden, Zurich (Switzerland); Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2009-07-01

    The book on the MRT (magnetic resonance tomography) of the vertebral cord and spinal canal covers the following topics: physics fundamentals and application; malformation of the spinal canal; degenerative vertebral column diseases; vertebral column and spinal canal carcinomas; inflammatory diseases of the vertebral column and the spinal canal; applicability of MRT in case of acute spinal cord traumata; vascular diseases of the spinal canal.

  8. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCunniff, A.J.; Liang, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of permanent injury to the spinal cord as a complication of radiation therapy generally correlates positively with total radiation dosage. However, several reports in the literature have indicated that fraction size is also an important factor in the development or nondevelopment of late injuries in normal tissue. To determine the effect of fraction size on the incidence of radiation-induced spinal cord injuries, we reviewed 144 cases of head and neck cancer treated at our institution between 1971 and 1980 with radiation greater than 5600 cGy to a portion of the cervical spinal cord. Most of these patients received greater than or equal to 6000 cGy, with fraction sizes ranging from 133 cGy to 200 cGy. Fifty-three of the 144 patients have been followed up for 2 years or more. Nearly half of these (26 patients) received greater than 6000 cGy with fraction sizes of 133 cGy to 180 cGy. Only 1 of the 53 (1.9%) has sustained permanent spinal cord injury; 20 months after completion of radiation treatments he developed Brown-Sequard syndrome. Our experience suggests that radiation injuries to the spinal cord correlate not only with total radiation dosage, but also with fraction size; low fraction sizes appear to decrease the incidence of such injuries

  9. Prominent central spinal canal on MRI - normal variant or pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugal, T.P.; Brazier, D.; Roche, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The sensitivity of MRI can make differentiation of normal from abnormal challenging.The study investigates whether a visible central spinal canal is pathological or a normal variant. We review eight MRI (mostly on a 1.5 Tesla unit) cases where there is a visible central cavity in keeping with a central canal and review the literature. The central canal is a space in the medial part of the grey-matter commissure between the anterior and posterior horns. Histopathological studies show that the canal is present at birth with the majority showing subsequent involution but is uncommonly imaged on MRI. The main differential diagnosis is syringomyelia which usually presents with deficits in pain and sensation corresponding to the appropriate level often with a demonstrable aetiology. Two thirds of our patients were female with an average age of thirty-six years (range 26-45). The patients were largely asymptomatic or their symptoms appeared unrelated to the imaging findings. Three patients had minor previous trauma and two others had non-bacterial meningitis up to twenty years earlier. No patient had known spinal surgery or trauma.The cavity corresponded tomographically to the expected site of the central canal. The canal was in the thoracic location. The canal diameter ranged from one to five millimetres and its length varied from one half a vertebral body height to extending over the entire thoracic region. Its configuration was either filiform or fusiform, with smooth contours. No predisposing features to suggest syringomyelia or other structural abnormalities were noted. Where Gadolinium was given no abnormal enhancement was observed. These cases add to the literature and suggest that these prominent canals are largely asymptomatic and should be viewed as normal variants. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  10. [Traumatic spinal complications of cervical arthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstichel, P; Berthelot, J L; Randriananja, H; Crozier, S; Masson, C

    1996-02-17

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is usually a chronic and progressive disease. In a few cases, however, dramatic tetraplegia sometimes occurs after even minor injury. We report seven patients (6 males, 1 female, aged from 41 to 63), who suffered from acute myelopathy after an injury. In 5 cases, the injury revealed the cervical spondylotic myelopathy. A hyperextension of the cervical spine was found in 5 cases. The injury was severe in only one case, but there was no bony abnormalities, except arthrosis. The most common cause was a fall. In contrast, severe tetraplegia was found in 4 cases. Spontaneous, but incomplete, recuperation occurred in 4 patients. In all 7 cases, CT scan and MRI showed congenital cervical stenosis associated with cervical spondylosis. The level of disco-osteophytic changes was mainly in C4, C5, C6. On T2-weighted spin-echo image, an increased signal intensity was present in the cord of 3 patients, but was not correlated with the severity of the symptoms, nor with improvement. Surgical treatment was performed in 6 cases: 3 laminectomies, 3 anterior or antero-lateral approaches. Improvement after operative decompression was observed in all but one case, even when the motor or sensory deficit persists for more than one year. Motricity of the inferior limbs improved better than the other deficits, perhaps because of the location of non-reversible lesions in the spinal gray matter. The acute medullary syndrome of cervical spondylotic myelopathy is serious and can cause major handicaps. This complication justifies a preventive surgical attitude when medullar signs are moderate, and cervical imagery shows a spondylotic compression of the cord with congenital stenosis.

  11. Kyphoplasty for osteoporotic fractures with spinal canal compromise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan Minfeng; Yang Huilin; Zou Jun; Wang Genlin; Mei Xin; Zhou Feng; Chen Liang; Jiang Weimin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility and clinical outcome of kyphoplasty in the treatment of osteoporotic fractures with canal compromise. Methods: A total of 16 patients with osteoporotic fractures with canal compromise without neurological deficit were attempted to be treated by kyphoplasty. During kyphoplasty, modified techniques including staged bone cement injection and dynamic fluoroscopic monitoring were used. Pain was measured using the self-reporting Visual Analogue pain Scale (VAS) preoperatively, postoperatively and in the final follow-up. Disability was measured using the Oswestry Disability questionnaire (ODI) preoperatively, postoperatively and in the final follow-up. The height of the compromised vertebral body, the kyphotic angle and the spinal canal compromise were measured preoperatively, postoperatively and in the final follow-up. Results: Operations were completed smoothly, with the exception of one patient with less cement leakage but without clinical symptom occurred. Relief of pain was achieved after kyphoplasty. The mean VAS score of these patients decreased from 8.1 ± 1.2 pre-operatively to 2.7 ± 0.6 post-operatively (P 0.05). In the final follow-up, the spinal canal compromise was (14.4 ± 3.1)%. Conclusion: Kyphoplasty is a relatively safe and effective method for the treatment of osteoporotic fractures with canal compromise without neurological deficit. (authors)

  12. The advantages of computed tomography over conventional x-ray examination in the treatment of cervical spinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hideo; Yamaura, Akira; Makino, Hiroyasu

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the cervical spinal column was carried out in 42 patients using a General Electric CT/T of a Toshiba TCT60 Type A scanner. There were 22 cervical disk lesions, 4 spinal neoplasms, 6 narrow spinal canals with or without ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, 2 syringomyelias, 6 traumas and 2 Arnold-Chiari malformations. In all patients, CT-examination followed conventional spinal X-ray studies. Correlation between the CT and conventional X-ray findings revealed the better diagnostic capability of the CT. For example, the measured midline sagittal diameter of the spinal canal in a patient with the narrowest canal in this series was 7.4 mm on the CT and 9.6 mm on the conventioned plain film at the C 5 level. To know the precise sagittal diameter of the cord itself, CT myelography (CTM) is indispensable. CTM is useful in determining the nature of the disease, the risk and approach of surgery, and for evaluation after the surgical procedure. Although the range of motion of cervical joints and intervertebral foramen are visible with conventional films, the size and extension of a tumor, the degree of bony errosion and the spinal subarachnoid space can be precisely identified only by CT. CT study of the spine and spinal cord is a simple procedure and less likely to produce complication, even with CTM, although there are certain limitations in the examination which are also presented. (author)

  13. Advantages of computed tomography over conventional x-ray examination in the treatment of cervical spinal diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hideo; Yamaura, Akira; Makino, Hiroyasu (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the cervical spinal column was carried out in 42 patients using a General Electric CT/T of a Toshiba TCT60 Type A scanner. There were 22 cervical disk lesions, 4 spinal neoplasms, 6 narrow spinal canals with or without ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, 2 syringomyelias, 6 traumas and 2 Arnold-Chiari malformations. In all patients, CT-examination followed conventional spinal X-ray studies. Correlation between the CT and conventional X-ray findings revealed the better diagnostic capability of the CT. For example, the measured midline sagittal diameter of the spinal canal in a patient with the narrowest canal in this series was 7.4 mm on the CT and 9.6 mm on the conventioned plain film at the C/sub 5/ level. To know the precise sagittal diameter of the cord itself, CT myelography (CTM) is indispensable. CTM is useful in determining the nature of the disease, the risk and approach of surgery, and for evaluation after the surgical procedure. Although the range of motion of cervical joints and intervertebral foramen are visible with conventional films, the size and extension of a tumor, the degree of bony errosion and the spinal subarachnoid space can be precisely identified only by CT. CT study of the spine and spinal cord is a simple procedure and less likely to produce complication, even with CTM, although there are certain limitations in the examination which are also presented.

  14. Magnetic resonance tomography of the vertebral column and spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenbrock, D.; Brueckmann, H.; Bunke, J.; Giesecke, J.; Heinzerling, J.; Kunze, V.; Mirvis, S.E.; Weidner, A.; Wolf, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to all the aspects pertinent to diagnostic procedures in the vertebral column and spinal canal this pocket book provides complete coverage of congenital and acquired disorders in the fields of orthopedics, neurology and neurosurgery - including malformations of the spinal canal, degenerative vertebral diseases, tumours, inflammatory changes and vascular diseases, to mention only a few. The authors discuss the question of how image qualities can be influenced and the most information obtained from the different pulse sequences. They outline future development trends and give advice on the reduction of artefacts. The principles that must be adhered to in surgical intervention and nmr imaging for the post-operative assessment of vertebral disk syndromes and tumours are just as important an issue here as is the information the surgeon expects to obtain through diagnostic nmr imaging and the recommendations to be given by the radiologist. (orig.) With 265 figs [de

  15. Minimally Invasive Drainage of a Post-Laminectomy Subfascial Seroma with Cervical Spinal Cord Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitshoff, Adriaan Mynhardt; Van Goethem, Bart; Cornelis, Ine; Combes, Anais; Dvm, Ingeborgh Polis; Gielen, Ingrid; Vandekerckhove, Peter; de Rooster, Hilde

    2016-01-01

    A 14 mo old female neutered Doberman pinscher was evaluated for difficulty in rising, a wide based stance, pelvic limb gait abnormalities, and cervical pain of 2 mo duration. Neurologic examination revealed pelvic limb ataxia and cervical spinal hyperesthesia. Spinal reflexes and cranial nerve examination were normal. The pathology was localized to the C1-C5 or C6-T2 spinal cord segments. Computed tomography (CT) findings indicated bony proliferation of the caudal articular processes of C6 and the cranial articular processes of C7, resulting in bilateral dorsolateral spinal cord compression that was more pronounced on the left side. A limited dorsal laminectomy was performed at C6-C7. Due to progressive neurological deterioration, follow-up CT examination was performed 4 days postoperatively. At the level of the laminectomy defect, a subfacial seroma had developed, entering the spinal canal and causing significant spinal cord compression. Under ultrasonographic guidance a closed-suction wound catheter was placed. Drainage of the seroma successfully relieved its compressive effects on the spinal cord and the patient's neurological status improved. CT was a valuable tool in assessing spinal cord compression as a result of a postoperative subfascial seroma. Minimally invasive application of a wound catheter can be successfully used to manage this condition.

  16. Congenital spondylolysis of the cervical spine with spinal cord compression: MR and CT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M.J.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Molla, E.; Poyatos, C.; Cerda, E. de la; Urrizola, J.

    1997-01-01

    Spondylolysis of the cervical spine is a rare disorder that is characterized by a defect in the articular mass between the superior and inferior facets of a cervical vertebra. It is considered to be congenital because it is usually associated with dysplastic changes, especially involving the posterior arch of the vertebra, which differentiates it from its traumatic equivalent. We present two cases of spondylolysis of the cervical spine without spondylolisthesis, which were studied by means of magnetic resonance (MR) and computerized tomography (CT). One patient showed contralateral involvement at two levels and the other had a single lesion presenting canal stenosis with chronic spinal cord compression, an unusual association in previously reported series. the combination of MR and CT makes it possible to limit the spectrum of bone changes and their impact on the spinal cord in these patients. (Author) 12 refs

  17. Morphometric study of the lumbar spinal canal in the Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H M; Kim, N H; Kim, H J; Chung, I H

    1995-08-01

    The anatomic dimensions of the vertebral body and spinal canal of the lumbar spine were analyzed in Koreans. To determine the normal dimension of the lumbar spinal canal in Koreans, to determine whether there are any racial differences in the morphometry of the lumbar spinal canal, and to provide criteria for diagnosing spinal stenosis in the Far Eastern Asian. Some radiologic and anatomic studies have been conducted regarding the size of the lumbar spinal canal of whites and blacks in western and African countries. One-thousand-eight-hundred measurements were performed on the transverse and sagittal diameters of vertebral bodies and spinal canals using complete sets of 90 lumbar vertebrae. The mean mid-sagittal diameter of the lumbar spinal canal in the Korean population was less than that measured in white and African populations, but there was no significant differences between the Korean, white, and African populations regarding the transverse diameter of the lumbar spinal canal. The mid-sagittal diameter of the lumbar spinal canal is narrowest in the Far Eastern Asian population; the radiologic criteria of spinal stenosis should be reconsidered for these people.

  18. X-ray signs of traumas of the cervical region of the spinal cord in the acute period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodskaya, Z.L.

    1983-01-01

    The results are analyzed of an X-ray examination of 208 patients with traumas of the cervical region of the spinal column and spinal cord in the acute period of trauma. The authors proposed a scheme that included telespondylography in standard and oblique projections, flebospondylography, discography and pneumomyelography in the Schantz collar with a patient lying on the back. Four types of the spinal cord traumas were diagnosed: compression with osseous elements (76.92%), with sharp discs and strained epidural hematomas (3.85%), isolated contusion of the spinal cord (10.1%) and disorder of the spinal circulation (9.13%). Special emphasis was laid on clinicospondylographic correlations, a critical distance, congenital narrowing of the vertebral canal. The concept of traumatic decompression of the spinal cord was stressed. Symptoms of its contusion and trauma of the spinal circulation were indicated

  19. MR microscopy of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvlin, M.J.; Asato, R.; Hackney, D.B.; Kassab, E.A.; Muraki, A.S.; Joseph, P.M.; Fielding, R.M.; Hennessy, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed on ten fresh cadaver cervical spinal cords in order to identify internal features of the spinal cord and to distinguish anatomy from artifact. Axial, sagittal, and coronal long repetition time (TR), long echo time (TE) and short TR, short TE spin-echo, gradient-echo, and inversion-recovery images were acquired at 1.5 T (Siemens), 1.9T, and 4.7T (Varian/Sisco) with an inplane resolution of 0.05-1mm. The dorsal and ventral horns of the gray matter as well as the lateral and posterior funiculi of the white matter were distinctly resolved from truncation artifacts in sagittal and axial images. In short TR, short TE, long TR, long TE spin-echo and gradient-echo (TR, 35 msec; TE, 7 msec; flip angle, 10 0 -90 0 ) images, the central gray matter demonstrated higher signal intensity than the white matter. These findings are in contradistinction to the image contrast typically observed in brain. High-resolution MR imaging techniques capable of demonstrating this anatomy in vivo are being developed

  20. Spinal canal stenosis at the level of Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchanda Bhattacharjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here a rare case of high cervical stenosis at the level of atlas who presented with progressively deteriorating quadriparesis and respiratory distress. A 10-year-old boy presented with above symptoms of one-year duration with a preceding history of trivial trauma prior to onset of such symptoms. Cervical spine MRI revealed a significant stenosis at the level of atlas from the posterior side with a syrinx extending above and below. High-resolution computed tomography of the above level yielded an ill-defined osseous bar compressing the canal at the level of C 1 posterior arch, which appeared bifid in the midline. The patient was immediately taken up for surgery in view of his respiratory complaints. The child showed an excellent recovery after excision of the posterior arch of atlas and removal of the compressing osseous structure.

  1. The influence of changes in cervical lordosis on bulging disk and spinal stenosis: functional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Joon; Eun, Choong Ki

    2001-01-01

    To assess the effect of lordotic curve change of the cervical spine on disk bulging and spinal stenosis by means of functional cervical MR imaging at the flexion and extension position. Using a 1.5T imager, kinematic MR examinations of 25 patients with degenerative spondylosis (average age, 41 years) were performed at the neutral, flexed and extended position of the cervical spine. Sagittal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images were obtained during each of the three phases. Lordotic angle, bulging thickness of the disk, AP diameter of the spinal canal, and distance between the disk and spinal cord were measured on the workstation at each disk level. After qualitative independent observation of disk bulging, one of four grades(0, normal; 1, mild; 2, moderate; 3, marked) was assigned at each phase, and after further comparative observation, one of five scores (-2, prominent decrease; -1, mild decrease; 0, no change; 1, notable increase; 2 prominent increase) was also assigned. In addition, bulging thickness of the disk was measured and compared at the neutral, flexed, and extended positions. Average angles of the cervical spine were 160.5±5.9 deg (neutral position, lordotic angle); 185.4±8.5 deg (flexion, kyphotic angle); and 143.7±6.7 deg (extension, lordotic angle). Average grades of disk bulging were 0.55 at the neutral position. 0.16 at flexion, and 0.7 at extension. Comparative observation showed that average scores of disk bulging were -0.39 at flexion and 0.31 at extension. The bulging thickness of the disk decreased by 24.2% at flexion and increased by 30.3% at extension, while the diameter of the spinal canal increased by 4.5% at flexion and decreased by 3.6% at extension. The distance from the posterior margin of the disk to the anterior margin of the spinal cord decreased at both flexion(6.6%) and extension(19.1%). Functional MRI showed that compared with the neutral position, disk bulging and spinal stenosis are less prominent at flexion and accentuated

  2. The influence of changes in cervical lordosis on bulging disk and spinal stenosis: functional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Joon; Eun, Choong Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To assess the effect of lordotic curve change of the cervical spine on disk bulging and spinal stenosis by means of functional cervical MR imaging at the flexion and extension position. Using a 1.5T imager, kinematic MR examinations of 25 patients with degenerative spondylosis (average age, 41 years) were performed at the neutral, flexed and extended position of the cervical spine. Sagittal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images were obtained during each of the three phases. Lordotic angle, bulging thickness of the disk, AP diameter of the spinal canal, and distance between the disk and spinal cord were measured on the workstation at each disk level. After qualitative independent observation of disk bulging, one of four grades(0, normal; 1, mild; 2, moderate; 3, marked) was assigned at each phase, and after further comparative observation, one of five scores (-2, prominent decrease; -1, mild decrease; 0, no change; 1, notable increase; 2 prominent increase) was also assigned. In addition, bulging thickness of the disk was measured and compared at the neutral, flexed, and extended positions. Average angles of the cervical spine were 160.5{+-}5.9 deg (neutral position, lordotic angle); 185.4{+-}8.5 deg (flexion, kyphotic angle); and 143.7{+-}6.7 deg (extension, lordotic angle). Average grades of disk bulging were 0.55 at the neutral position. 0.16 at flexion, and 0.7 at extension. Comparative observation showed that average scores of disk bulging were -0.39 at flexion and 0.31 at extension. The bulging thickness of the disk decreased by 24.2% at flexion and increased by 30.3% at extension, while the diameter of the spinal canal increased by 4.5% at flexion and decreased by 3.6% at extension. The distance from the posterior margin of the disk to the anterior margin of the spinal cord decreased at both flexion(6.6%) and extension(19.1%). Functional MRI showed that compared with the neutral position, disk bulging and spinal stenosis are less prominent at flexion and

  3. Controversies in the differential diagnosis of Brown-Sequard syndrome due to cervical spinal disease from stroke: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaner Koksal, M.D.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is generally considered to be the first preliminary diagnosis in patients presenting with acute hemiparesia in the emergency department. But rarely in unexpected spontaneous neurological pathologies that may lead to hemiparesis. The data from 8 non-traumatic patients who underwent surgical treatment for brown-sequard syndrome (BSS were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were initially misdiagnosed with strokes. Two of the patients had spinal canal stenosis, two had spinal epidural hematomas, one had an ossified herniated disc and three had soft herniated discs. None of the patients complained of significant pain at the initial presentation. All of the patients had a mild sensory deficit that was initially unrecognized. The pain of the patients began to become evident after hospitalization and, patients transferred to neurosurgery department. Cervical spinal pathologies compressing the corticospinal tract in one-half of the cervical spinal canal may present with only hemiparesis, without neck and radicular pain. If it's too late, permanent neurological damage may become inevitable while it is a correctable pathology. Keywords: Brown-Sequard syndrome, Cervical cord, Herniated disc, Spinal epidural hematoma, Stroke

  4. Spinal CT scan, 1. Cervical and thoracic spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi (Aichi Medical Univ. (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections.

  5. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury Resulting From Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lord, Elizabeth L; Buser, Zorica; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Sebastian, Arjun S; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data. To examine the incidence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following elective cervical spine surgery. A retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was conducted. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, were reviewed to identify occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury. In total, 3 cases of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery were identified. Institutional incidence rates ranged from 0.0% to 0.24%. Of the 3 patients with quadriplegia, one underwent anterior-only surgery with 2-level cervical corpectomy, one underwent anterior surgery with corpectomy in addition to posterior surgery, and one underwent posterior decompression and fusion surgery alone. One patient had complete neurologic recovery, one partially recovered, and one did not recover motor function. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery is a rare and devastating adverse event. No standard protocol exists that can guarantee prevention of this complication, and there is a lack of consensus regarding evaluation and treatment when it does occur. Emergent imaging with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography myelography to evaluate for compressive etiology or malpositioned instrumentation and avoidance of hypotension should be performed in cases of intraoperative and postoperative spinal cord injury.

  6. Pedicle distraction increases intervertebral and spinal canal area in a cadaver and bone model

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes Matthew; Papadakos Nikolaos; Bishop Tim; Bernard Jason

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Lumbar spinal stenosis is degenerative narrowing of the spinal canal and/or intervertebral foramen causing compression of the spinal cord and nerve roots. Traditional decompression techniques can often cause significant trauma and vertebral instability. This paper evaluates a method of increasing pedicle length to decompress the spinal and intervertebral foramen, which could be done minimally invasive. Methods: Three Sawbone (Sawbones Europe, Sweden) and 1 cadaveric lumbar sp...

  7. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury Resulting From Cervical Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, Alan H.; Hart, Robert A.; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Fish, David E.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Lord, Elizabeth L.; Buser, Zorica; Tortolani, P. Justin; Stroh, D. Alex; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L.; Sebastian, Arjun S.; Arnold, Paul M.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Mroz, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data. Objective: To examine the incidence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following elective cervical spine surgery. Methods: A retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was conducted. Medical records for 17?625 patients who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011,...

  8. Measurement of normal cervical spinal cord in metrizamide CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fumio; Koyama, Tsunemaro; Aii, Heihachirou

    1985-01-01

    The shape of the spinal cord is the most important factor in diagnosis of spinal disorders by metrizamide CT myelography (met. CT). Even in cases where the spinal cord looks normal in shape its size might be abnormal, for example in cases with spinal cord atrophy, syringomyelia, intramedullary tumor and several other conditions. In detecting the slightest abnormality in such cases, it is absolutely necessary to have in hand the knowledge of the nomal size of the spinal cord at each level. We measured, therefore, the sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord in 55 patients with no known lesions on met. CT (Fig. 1). Comparing our results with those by others, we found some differences as to the size of the spinal cord. We assume that these differences are due to the differences in resolution of the CT scanners used. The size of the spinal cord tends to measure larger with a CT scanner with high resolution than with others. Previous authors reported that the size of the spinal cord would vary by window center settings. Our experimental results indicate, however, that window center settings do not significantly affect the measurements. It is concluded that the normal values of the spinal cord dimensions at each level somewhat differ by CT equipments used. One should have normal values with one's own equipment in hand in order to take full advantage of this sophisticated diagnostic technique. (author)

  9. QUANTITATIVE SIZE ASSESSMENT OF THE LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL BY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Midia Z. Miabi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available By determining normal ranges of spinal canal diameters we can make early diagnosis in persons who have lower diameters of spinal canal. These persons are predisposed to spinal canal stenosis that is a major cause of spinal radiculopathies. In different studies performed in several countries, minimum and maximum ranges of spinal canal diameters were different for each population. In this study, we tried to determine the mean values of normal spinal canal diameters and areas in Tabriz and its suburb. 39 healthy, young to mid-age cases were selected. Our study was focused on L3-L4 and L4-L5. The following parameters were measured: the area of cross-section of the vertebral body, the area of cross-section of the dural sac, interarticular diameter, interligamentous diameter, antero-posterior diameter of the lumbar canal, inter-pedicular diameter, and the area of cross-section of the vertebral canal. A correlation between the parameters studied and the height of subjects was significant for interligamentous diameter (for L3/L4 and L4/L5 and interarticular diameter (only at L3/L4, cross-section area of the vertebrae (both L3 and L4, cross-section area of vertebral canal (only at L5 level, area of dural sac (at L3/L4 and L4. It was suggested that these diameters and areas should be interpreted as a unction of height of the subject. Most of diameters studied had smaller means than those in previous studies. This can be attributed to differences between populations and it can be interpreted as predisposition to spinal canal stenosis in our population.

  10. Pain during diagnostic hysteroscopy: what is the role of the cervical canal? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzon, Ivan; Favilli, Alessandro; Horvath, Stefano; Grasso, Mario; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Laurenti, Elena; Bini, Vittorio; Gerli, Sandro

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate whether a correlation exists between the pain perceived during diagnostic anesthesia-free hysteroscopy and the characteristics of the cervical canal. Prospective observational pilot study of 255 women undergoing diagnostic hysteroscopy. Data analysis included characteristics of the patient and the cervical canal, and the pain experience during the procedure, assessed by visual analog score (VAS). A multiple logistic regression was then carried out in order to exclude confounding factors. The degree of pain during hysteroscopy was equal to a median VAS score of 2 (range 0-10). Bivariate analysis between patients with VAS>3 and patients with VAS≤3 demonstrated a significant correlation between pain and the presence of synechiae in the cervical canal (P=0.022), the patient's age (P=0.003) and parity (P=0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of cervical synechiae (P=0.0001) [OR=4.99 (95% CI 2.13-11.70)] and parity (P=0.014) [OR=0.42 (95% CI 0.21-0.83)] were significantly correlated with pain. There was no significant correlation with the different angles of the cervical canal. Cervical synechiae appear as a major factor influencing pain during hysteroscopy. While parity acts as a protective factor, the angle of the cervical canal does not seem to play an important role for pain during diagnostic hysteroscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Antonio L.; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) is secreted in the choroid plexus in the lateral sinuses of the brain and fills the subarachnoid space bathing the external surfaces of the brain and the spinal canal. Absence of CSF circulation has been shown to impede its physiological function that includes, among others, supplying nutrients to neuronal and glial cells and removing the waste products of cellular metabolism. Radionuclide scanning images published by Di Chiro in 1964 showed upward migration of particle tracers from the lumbar region of the spinal canal, thereby suggesting the presence of an active bulk circulation responsible for bringing fresh CSF into the spinal canal and returning a portion of it to the cranial vault. However, the existence of this slow moving bulk circulation in the spinal canal has been a subject of dispute for the last 50 years. To date, there has been no physical explanation for the mechanism responsible for the establishment of such a bulk motion. We present a perturbation analysis of the flow in an idealized model of the spinal canal and show how steady streaming could be responsible for the establishment of such a circulation. The results of this analysis are compared to flow measurements conducted on in-vitro models of the spinal canal of adult humans.

  12. Lateral cervical puncture for cervical myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seol, Hae Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Yoon Hwan; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1985-01-01

    Eleven cervical myelograms were performed by lateral cervical puncture using Metrizamide. So, following results were obtained: 1. Site of lateral cervical puncture; Posterior one third of bony cervical canal at C 1-2 level. 2. Advantages as compared with lumbar puncture for cervical myelograms; 1) Small amount of contrast media 2) Excellent image 3) Less position charge 4) Short time 5) Well visualization of superior margin of obstructive lesion in spinal canal 3. Cessation of lateral cervical puncture, when; 1) Pain during injection of contrast media 2) Localized collection of contrast media

  13. Lateral cervical puncture for cervical myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Hae Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Yoon Hwan; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    Eleven cervical myelograms were performed by lateral cervical puncture using Metrizamide. So, following results were obtained: 1. Site of lateral cervical puncture; Posterior one third of bony cervical canal at C 1-2 level. 2. Advantages as compared with lumbar puncture for cervical myelograms; 1) Small amount of contrast media 2) Excellent image 3) Less position charge 4) Short time 5) Well visualization of superior margin of obstructive lesion in spinal canal 3. Cessation of lateral cervical puncture, when; 1) Pain during injection of contrast media 2) Localized collection of contrast media.

  14. Cervical spondylodiscitis with spinal epidural abscess caused by Aggregatibacter aphrophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Leonella; Mencacci, Antonella; Scarponi, Anna Maria; Leli, Christian; Fabbriciani, Gianluigi; Callarelli, Laura; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Bistoni, Francesco; Mannarino, Elmo

    2008-05-01

    Spondylodiscitis caused by Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, formerly known as Haemophilus paraphrophilus, is an unusual condition and can be very difficult to diagnose. We report a case of cervical spondylodiscitis complicated by spinal epidural abscess in a 63-year-old woman, without underlying predisposing conditions. The source of infection was identified as a periodontal infection. The patient was successfully treated with systemic antibiotics.

  15. Distracted cervical spinal fusion for management of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy in large-breed dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, G. W.; Seim, III, H. B.; Clemmons, R. M.

    1988-08-15

    Using an autogenous bone graft (obtained from the iliac crest), 4-mm cancellous bone screws, and polymethylmethacrylate, a distracted cervical spinal fusion technique was performed on 10 dogs with myelographic evidence of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. All dogs had evidence of dynamic soft tissue spinal cord compression, as indicated by flexion, extension, and traction myelographic views. Of the 10 dogs, 4 previously had undergone surgery by use of ventral slot or cervical disk fenestration techniques, and their neurologic status had deteriorated after the original surgery. Preoperative neurologic status of the 10 dogs included nonambulatory tetraparesis (n = 5), severe ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 2), and mild ambulatory ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 3). Five dogs had signs of various degrees of cervical pain. Clinical improvement was observed in 8 of 10 dogs--either improved neurologic status or elimination of cervical pain. Implant loosening developed in 3 dogs; 2 of them were euthanatized because of lack of neurologic improvement. Radiographic evidence of bony cervical fusion was observed during a 9- to 24-week period in 6 of the 8 surviving dogs. The distracted cervical fusion technique appears to be a valid surgical procedure to manage cervical spondylomyelopathy in those dogs in which the lesions are limited to one cervical intervertebral disk space.

  16. Distracted cervical spinal fusion for management of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy in large-breed dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, G.W.; Seim, H.B. III; Clemmons, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Using an autogenous bone graft (obtained from the iliac crest), 4-mm cancellous bone screws, and polymethylmethacrylate, a distracted cervical spinal fusion technique was performed on 10 dogs with myelographic evidence of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. All dogs had evidence of dynamic soft tissue spinal cord compression, as indicated by flexion, extension, and traction myelographic views. Of the 10 dogs, 4 previously had undergone surgery by use of ventral slot or cervical disk fenestration techniques, and their neurologic status had deteriorated after the original surgery. Preoperative neurologic status of the 10 dogs included nonambulatory tetraparesis (n = 5), severe ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 2), and mild ambulatory ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 3). Five dogs had signs of various degrees of cervical pain. Clinical improvement was observed in 8 of 10 dogs--either improved neurologic status or elimination of cervical pain. Implant loosening developed in 3 dogs; 2 of them were euthanatized because of lack of neurologic improvement. Radiographic evidence of bony cervical fusion was observed during a 9- to 24-week period in 6 of the 8 surviving dogs. The distracted cervical fusion technique appears to be a valid surgical procedure to manage cervical spondylomyelopathy in those dogs in which the lesions are limited to one cervical intervertebral disk space

  17. Dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal: variations and correlations with somatometric parameters using CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karantanas, A.H. [Department of CT-MRI, Larissa General Hospital (Greece); Zibis, A.H.; Papaliaga, M.; Georgiou, E.; Rousogiannis, S. [Larissa Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of vertebral dimensions with somatometric parameters in patients without clinical symptoms and radiological signs of central lumbar spinal stenosis. One hundred patients presenting with low back pain or sciatica were studied with CT. In each of the L3, L4 and L5 vertebra three slices were taken with the following measurements: 1. Slice through the intervertebral disc: (a) spinal canal area; (b) interarticular diameter; (c) interligamentous diameter. 2. Slice below the vertebral arcus: (a) dural sac area; (b) vertebral body area. 3. Pediculolaminar level: (a) anteroposterior diameter and interpedicular diameter of the spinal canal; (b) spinal canal area; (c) width of the lateral recesses. The Jones-Thomson index was also estimated. The results of the present study showed that there is a statistically significant correlation of height, weight and age with various vertebral indices. The conventional, widely accepted, anteroposterior diameter of 11.5 mm of the lumbar spinal canal is independent of somatometric parameters, and it is the only constant measurement for the estimation of lumbar spinal stenosis with a single value. The present study suggests that there are variations of the dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal and correlations with height, weight and age of the patient. (orig.) With 1 fig., 6 tabs., 24 refs.

  18. Dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal: variations and correlations with somatometric parameters using CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karantanas, A.H.; Zibis, A.H.; Papaliaga, M.; Georgiou, E.; Rousogiannis, S.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of vertebral dimensions with somatometric parameters in patients without clinical symptoms and radiological signs of central lumbar spinal stenosis. One hundred patients presenting with low back pain or sciatica were studied with CT. In each of the L3, L4 and L5 vertebra three slices were taken with the following measurements: 1. Slice through the intervertebral disc: (a) spinal canal area; (b) interarticular diameter; (c) interligamentous diameter. 2. Slice below the vertebral arcus: (a) dural sac area; (b) vertebral body area. 3. Pediculolaminar level: (a) anteroposterior diameter and interpedicular diameter of the spinal canal; (b) spinal canal area; (c) width of the lateral recesses. The Jones-Thomson index was also estimated. The results of the present study showed that there is a statistically significant correlation of height, weight and age with various vertebral indices. The conventional, widely accepted, anteroposterior diameter of 11.5 mm of the lumbar spinal canal is independent of somatometric parameters, and it is the only constant measurement for the estimation of lumbar spinal stenosis with a single value. The present study suggests that there are variations of the dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal and correlations with height, weight and age of the patient. (orig.)

  19. Characterizing the location of spinal and vertebral levels in the human cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadotte, D W; Cadotte, A; Cohen-Adad, J; Fleet, D; Livne, M; Wilson, J R; Mikulis, D; Nugaeva, N; Fehlings, M G

    2015-04-01

    Advanced MR imaging techniques are critical to understanding the pathophysiology of conditions involving the spinal cord. We provide a novel, quantitative solution to map vertebral and spinal cord levels accounting for anatomic variability within the human spinal cord. For the first time, we report a population distribution of the segmental anatomy of the cervical spinal cord that has direct implications for the interpretation of advanced imaging studies most often conducted across groups of subjects. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent a T2-weighted, 3T MRI of the cervical spinal cord. Two experts marked the C3-C8 cervical nerve rootlets, C3-C7 vertebral bodies, and pontomedullary junction. A semiautomated algorithm was used to locate the centerline of the spinal cord and measure rostral-caudal distances from a fixed point in the brain stem, the pontomedullary junction, to each of the spinal rootlets and vertebral bodies. Distances to each location were compared across subjects. Six volunteers had 2 additional scans in neck flexion and extension to measure the effects of patient positioning in the scanner. We demonstrated that substantial variation exists in the rostral-caudal position of spinal cord segments among individuals and that prior methods of predicting spinal segments are imprecise. We also show that neck flexion or extension has little effect on the relative location of vertebral-versus-spinal levels. Accounting for spinal level variation is lacking in existing imaging studies. Future studies should account for this variation for accurate interpretation of the neuroanatomic origin of acquired MR signals. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  20. Preliminary clinical applications of DTI in human cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Ting; Mai Weiwen; Liang Biling; Shen Jun; Huang Suiqiao; Hu Chunhong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To condcut preliminary study of the value of DTI(diffusion tensor imaging) in human cervical spinal cord. Methods: Twenty-one patients suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy and twenty volunteers without any clinical symptoms underwent routine MRI and DTI examination. DTI was performed in six non-collinear directions with single-shot fast spin echo echo, planar imaging sequence(b value = 400 s·mm -2 ). ADC(apparent diffusion coefficient) and FA(fractional anisotropy)values were measured by ROIs(regions of interest) in 4 different level segment spinal cord (C 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 ) in normal volunteers, in lesions and normal segmental spinal cord in clinical cases respectively. DTI original images were automatically processed by using IDL (Version 5.6) soft- ware to produce color tensor images. SPSS11.0 software for windows was used for t-test and one-way ANOVA analysis. The difference was considered statistically significant if P 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 , were analyzed and it was found that FA value between them had a significant difference by ANOVA, F=159.24, P 2/3 level. However, ADC value between 4 segments had no significant difference(F=2.191, P>0.05). (2)In patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, routine MRI T2WI showed abnormal signal in 9 cases, and showed no abnormal signal in 12 dases. In sixteen cases it was found that abnormal patchy green signal on colorized tensor maps appeared on the normal blue spinal cord. Also, in patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, there was significant difference in ADC and FA value between lesions and normal spinal cord (paired t test, for ADC, t=2.88, P 2/3 level segment spinal cord in normal volunteers (0.85 ± 0.03) is the highest among other segments. FA value decreases gradually along cervical spinal cord towards the caudal direction. However, the difference of ADC values amongst 4 segments is not significant. DTI colorized tensor maps can show more lesions than routine MRI

  1. Cervical spine disease may result in a negative lumbar spinal drainage trial in normal pressure hydrocephalus: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komotar, Ricardo J; Zacharia, Brad E; Mocco, J; Kaiser, Michael G; Frucht, Stephen J; McKhann, Guy M

    2008-10-01

    In this case report, we present a patient with normal pressure hydrocephalus in whom a lumbar drainage trial yielded a false-negative result secondary to cervical spondylosis. An 80-year-old woman presented with classic symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus as well as evidence of cervical myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine showed enlarged ventricles and single-level cervical canal narrowing. An initial lumbar drainage trial was performed, which revealed negative results. The patient then underwent cervical decompression and fusion. Despite this procedure, the patient's symptoms continued to worsen. A repeat lumbar drainage trial was performed with positive results. Subsequently, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed, resulting in significant improvement of her symptoms. This case report illustrates how altered cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics may impact the accuracy of the lumbar spinal drainage trial in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus.

  2. Regional differences in radiosensitivity across the rat cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijl, Hendrik P.; Luijk, Peter van; Coppes, Rob P.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study regional differences in radiosensitivity within the rat cervical spinal cord. Methods and materials: Three types of inhomogeneous dose distributions were applied to compare the radiosensitivity of the lateral and central parts of the rat cervical spinal cord. The left lateral half of the spinal cord was irradiated with two grazing proton beams, each with a different penumbra (20-80% isodoses): lateral wide (penumbra = 1.1 mm) and lateral tight (penumbra = 0.8 mm). In the third experiment, the midline of the cord was irradiated with a narrow proton beam with a penumbra of 0.8 mm. The irradiated spinal cord length (CT-2) was 20 mm in all experiments. The animals were irradiated with variable single doses of unmodulated protons (150 MeV) with the shoot-through method, whereby the plateau of the depth-dose profile is used rather than the Bragg peak. The endpoint for estimating isoeffective dose (ED 50 ) values was paralysis of fore and/or hind limbs within 210 days after irradiation. Histology of the spinal cords was performed to assess the radiation-induced tissue damage. Results: High-precision proton irradiation of the lateral or the central part of the spinal cord resulted in a shift of dose-response curves to higher dose values compared with the homogeneously irradiated cervical cord to the same 20-mm length. The ED 50 values were 28.9 Gy and 33.4 Gy for the lateral wide and lateral tight irradiations, respectively, and as high as 71.9 Gy for the central beam experiment, compared with 20.4 Gy for the homogeneously irradiated 20-mm length of cervical cord. Histologic analysis of the spinal cords showed that the paralysis was due to white matter necrosis. The radiosensitivity was inhomogeneously distributed across the spinal cord, with a much more radioresistant central white matter (ED 50 = 71.9 Gy) compared with lateral white matter (ED 50 values = 28.9 Gy and 33.4 Gy). The gray matter did not show any noticeable lesions, such as necrosis or

  3. The epidemiologic role of cervical spinal stenosis in quadriplegia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverstein, G.S.; Kohn, M.I.; Peyster, R.G.; Teplick, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Plain lateral films of 45 quadriplegic and 100 control patients were compared, with the spinal canal-vertebral body ration method used to assess sagittal canal size. Statistical analysis revealed that a ration below 0.86 indicated significant stenosis. Using this threshold, 73% of quadriplegics had preexisting stenosis at the level of injury, compared with 19% of controls. Stenosis was found to be a strong contributing factor in quadriplegia following burst fracture or subluxation and a prerequisite for cord injury without fracture or dislocation. Selective plain film screening for stenosis might be justified in an attempt to prevent catastrophic cord injuries by appropriate patient counseling

  4. MRI of anterior spinal artery syndrome of the cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Yamada, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Ishii, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Saito, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Tanji, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Kobayashi, T. (Inst. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Miyagi (Japan)); Soma, Y. (Div. of Neurology, Takeda Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu (Japan)); Sakamoto, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Cervical spinal cord lesions in the anterior spinal artery syndrome were delineated on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in four patients. The lesion was always seen anteriorly in the cervical cord. On T2-weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense relative to the normal spinal cord, while on T1-weighted images, two chronic lesions appeared hypointense, with local atrophy of the cord. In one case, repeated T1-weighted images showed no signal abnormality 4 days after the ictus, but the lesion became hypointense 18 days later, when contrast enhancement was also recognized after injection of Gd-DTPA; this sequence of intensity changes was similar to that of cerebral infarction. The extent of the lesion seen MRI correlated closely with neurological findings in all cases. Although the findings may not be specific, MRI is now the modality of choice for confirming the diagnosis in patients suspected of having an anterior spinal artery syndrome. (orig.)

  5. Thermal Stimulation Alters Cervical Spinal Cord Functional Connectivity in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kenneth A; Sentis, Amy I; Bernadel-Huey, Olivia N; Chen, Yufen; Wang, Xue; Parrish, Todd B; Mackey, Sean

    2018-01-15

    The spinal cord has an active role in the modulation and transmission of the neural signals traveling between the body and the brain. Recent advancements in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have made the in vivo examination of spinal cord function in humans now possible. This technology has been recently extended to the investigation of resting state functional networks in the spinal cord, leading to the identification of distinct patterns of spinal cord functional connectivity. In this study, we expand on the previous work and further investigate resting state cervical spinal cord functional connectivity in healthy participants (n = 15) using high resolution imaging coupled with both seed-based functional connectivity analyses and graph theory-based metrics. Within spinal cord segment functional connectivity was present between the left and right ventral horns (bilateral motor network), left and right dorsal horns (bilateral sensory network), and the ipsilateral ventral and dorsal horns (unilateral sensory-motor network). Functional connectivity between the spinal cord segments was less apparent with the connectivity centered at the region of interest and spanning spinal cord functional network was demonstrated to be state-dependent as thermal stimulation of the right ventrolateral forearm resulted in significant disruption of the bilateral sensory network, increased network global efficiency, and decreased network modularity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Computed tomography in the treatment of cervical spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hideo

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the cervical and thoracic spinal column was carried out in 12 patients of spinal cord tumor. There were 6 schwannomas, 2 metastatic tumors and other 4 cases of different tumors, which were studied by either a General Electric CT/T or a Toshiba TCT 60 Type A scanner. In all patients, CT-examination followed conventional spinal X-ray studies. The usefulness of the plain spinal CT (PCT: CT without any contrast enhancement neither intravenously nor intrathecally) was to detect subtle bony changes as well as paraspinal soft tissue abnormalities, although it was hard to distinguish the spinal cord by PCT. Metrizamide CT myelography (CTM: CT with intrathecal instillation of metrizamide) was indispensable to identify the intracanalicular architecture. It provided the clue to determine the site and the size of tumor, and it was also useful after surgical procedure. CTM with intravenous contrast enhancement (CTM-CE) together with CTM distinguished the spinal tumor from the spinal cord very well, particularly in the cases of schwannoma. The author supports significant reliability of PCT, CTM and CTM-CE in identifying the presence, the extension and the bony involvement of spinal cord tumors. (author)

  7. MR imaging of a ruptured intraspinal dermoid tumour with fat droplets in the central spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadag, D.; Karaguelle, A.T.; Erden, A.; Erden, I.

    2002-01-01

    We report a patient with intramedullary ruptured spinal dermoid tumour. The MR imaging revealed an intramedullary lumbar mass heterogenous in intensity in all sequences. Fat droplets were observed in the subarachnoid space as well as in the dilated central spinal canal. Fat droplets in the subarachnoid space are frequently seen in the rupture of intraspinal dermoid tumours; however, fat droplets within the central canal is quite rare and was unexpected. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful tool in the determination of spinal pathologies before they become large enough to cause severe symptoms and/or morbidity. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Quantification of Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis in Symptomatic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddarth Ragupathi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low backache is a common condition to occur in the middle age. It is mainly caused by the degeneration of the intervertebral disc which forms the main support to the vertebral column. Lumbar spinal canal stenosis results in the compression of spinal cord and nerves at the level of lumbar vertebra. Aim: The purpose of this study is to measure the spinal canal dimensions and correlate with the clinical symptoms to establish a radiological criterion based on MRI for diagnosis of lumbar canal stenosis. This study is done to improve the diagnostic accuracy of lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Materials and Methods: Two hundred subjects with complaints of low backache without a traumatic history underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI after assessment of pain by two methods: 1. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI scoring and 2. Wong Baker Facial Expression scale. All the images were qualitatively analyzed to obtain the MRI grading for central canal at various levels from L1 to S1 vertebra after making sure that the neural foramina is not involved. Anteroposterior (AP and transverse diameter of spinal canal at intervertebral disc and upper part of vertebral body levels and spinal canal area are measurements that are taken. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis has been carried out in the present study. Results on continuous measurements are presented on mean±SD (min-max and results on categorical measurements are presented in number (%. Significance is assessed at 5% level of significance. Results: The spinal canal diameter measured along its AP and transverse direction is found to be correlating with the severity of low backache complained by the patient. Comparing the two methods of clinical assessment, ODI scoring was found to be more significant. Conclusion: The spinal canal measurements can be used as a radiologic criterion for diagnosis of acquired lumbar spinal canal stenosis. This will improve the diagnostic accuracy. However

  9. Diagnosis and management of traumatic cervical central spinal cord injury: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E; Hollingsworth, Renee

    2015-01-01

    The classical clinical presentation, neuroradiographic features, and conservative vs. surgical management of traumatic cervical central spinal cord (CSS) injury remain controversial. CSS injuries, occurring in approximately 9.2% of all cord injuries, are usually attributed to significant hyperextension trauma combined with congenital/acquired cervical stenosis/spondylosis. Patients typically present with greater motor deficits in the upper vs. lower extremities accompanied by patchy sensory loss. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) scans usually show hyperintense T2 intramedullary signals reflecting acute edema along with ligamentous injury, while noncontrast computed tomography (CT) studies typically show no attendant bony pathology (e.g. no fracture, dislocation). CSS constitute only a small percentage of all traumatic spinal cord injuries. Aarabi et al. found CSS patients averaged 58.3 years of age, 83% were male and 52.4% involved accidents/falls in patients with narrowed spinal canals (average 5.6 mm); their average American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor score was 63.8, and most pathology was at the C3-C4 and C4-C5 levels (71%). Surgery was performed within 24 h (9 patients), 24-48 h (10 patients), or after 48 h (23 patients). In the Brodell et al. study of 16,134 patients with CSS, 39.7% had surgery. In the Gu et al. series, those with CSS and stenosis/ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) exhibited better outcomes following laminoplasty. Recognizing the unique features of CSS is critical, as the clinical, neuroradiological, and management strategies (e.g. conservative vs. surgical management: early vs. late) differ from those utilized for other spinal cord trauma. Increased T2-weighted MR images best document CSS, while CT studies confirm the absence of fracture/dislocation.

  10. Burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine : changes of the spinal canal during operative treatment and follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, VJM; Nijboer, JMM; Zimmerman, KW; Veldhuis, EFM; ten Vergert, EM; ten Duis, HJ

    Although multiple studies have concluded operative decompression of a traumatically narrowed spinal canal is not indicated because of spontaneous remodeling, instrumental decompression is frequently used as part of the operative treatment of spinal fractures. To investigate the process of

  11. Diagnosis of cervical spinal cord disorders with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Naohito; Iizuka, Tadashi

    1991-01-01

    From September 1987 through May 1989, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been performed in 58 patients with myelopathy and 9 patients with spinal cord injuries. This study was designed to determine the rate of spinal cord stricture and changes of signal intensities. Increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images was more frequently observed than decreased intensity on T1-weighted images in the group of myelopathy (19/58 vs 10/58). In the group of spinal cord injuries, however, there was no significant difference in the incidence between increased intensity on T2-weighted images (4/9) and decreased intensity on T1-weighted images (7/9). Twelve patients with chronic compressive spinal myelopathy tended to have an increased intensity on T2-weighted images. In such cases, although JOA scores were low before surgery, signal intensity returned to that without marked signal changes. In chronic compressive cervical myelopathy, the degree of preoperative compression was the same as the postoperative JOA scores. Regarding cervical spinal injury, there was a good correlation between the size of low signal area and the degree of paralysis. (N.K.)

  12. Morphology of the cervical spinal cord on computed myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thijssen, H O.M. [Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Keyser, A; Horstink, M W.M. [Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology; Meijer, E [Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    1979-01-01

    To ensure adequate use of the technique of computed myelography (CM) it is necessary to have an exact picture of the morphology of the normal spinal cord as demonstrated by this technique. This has been obtained by studying the morphology and measuring the frontal and sagittal diameter of the cervical cord in 20 patients. The normal values are presented. The changes of this morphology in one patient with a tumour, one patient with atrophy of the spinal cord and in some patients with congenital malformations are also reported.

  13. Cervical spinal tuberculosis with tuberculous otitis media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prompt and effective response to anti tuberculosis drugs informed the diagnosis of tuberculosis of the cervical vertebra and tuberculous otitis media with multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case underscores the value of high index of suspicion, thorough and complete clinical evaluation in any patient with chronic symptoms ...

  14. CT imaging of cervical spinal vascular malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Takashi; Iwamoto, Munehisa; Miyamoto, Etsuo; Kuriyama, Tsuyoshi; Hayama, Tsuneto

    1982-01-01

    The patient had a history of the onset of motor paralysis of the right upper and lower extremities. Eight years later, numbness of the right upper extremity and a severe neck pain developed, and transverse paralysis of the lower extremities appeared in about 10 hours. CT demonstrated the presence of spinal vascular abnormality. Angiography suggested arteriovenous malformation of glomus type. (Chiba, N.)

  15. CT imaging of cervical spinal vascular malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takashi; Iwamoto, Munehisa; Miyamoto, Etsuo; Kuriyama, Tsuyoshi; Hayama, Tsuneto [Wakayama Red Cross Hospital, Wakayama (Japan)

    1982-05-01

    The patient had a history of the onset of motor paralysis of the right upper and lower extremities. Eight years later, numbness of the right upper extremity and a severe neck pain developed, and transverse paralysis of the lower extremities appeared in about 10 hours. CT demonstrated the presence of spinal vascular abnormality. Angiography suggested arteriovenous malformation of glomus type.

  16. Periosteal chondroma with spinal cord compression in the thoracic spinal canal: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Hyeok; Kang, Byeong Seong; Kwon, Woon Jung; Sim, Hong Bo; Kim, Misung

    2016-01-01

    Periosteal chondroma is a very unusual cartilaginous neoplasm of the spinal canal. We herein report a case of periosteal chondroma in a 41-year-old male who presented with gait disturbance and paresthesia of both lower extremities. Magnetic resonance (MR) images showed an extradural mass which caused compression of the spinal cord at the T5/6 level. The mass showed iso-signal intensity on T1-weighted images, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and nodular and peripheral rim enhancement on post-contrast T1-weighted images. Computed tomography (CT) images showed a mass with punctate calcifications and extension into the left T5/6 neural foramen. MR and CT images showed extrinsic cortical bone erosion of the posterior inferior body of T5 and superior pedicle of T6, bone remodeling with overhanging margins, and sclerosis adjacent to the tumor. The patient underwent a complete excision of the mass by left T5/6 hemi-laminectomy and exhibited complete resolution of his symptoms. Histopathologic examination revealed periosteal chondroma. Tumor recurrence was not recorded during the 18-month follow-up period. (orig.)

  17. Morphology of the cervical spinal cord with myelopathy on computed myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Hiroaki; Asano, Masafumi; Yokota, Hidemaro

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between morphological changes in the spinal cord shown on computer-assisted myelography and symptoms was investigated in 73 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Flatness of the spinal cord was seen in many of the patients. Symptoms were likely to be severer with increasing the degree of flatness of the spinal cord. The length of the flat spinal cord will help to select the operative method for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. The increased prevalence of cervical spondylosis in patients with adult thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, William W; Carrer, Alexandra; Lu, Michael; Hu, Serena S

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess the concomitance of cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity. Patients with degenerative cervical spine disease have higher rates of degeneration in the lumbar spine. In addition, degenerative cervical spine changes have been observed in adult patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformities. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies quantifying the association between cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity in adult patients. Patients seen by a spine surgeon or spine specialist at a single institution were assessed for cervical spondylosis and/or thoracolumbar spinal deformity using an administrative claims database. Spinal radiographic utilization and surgical intervention were used to infer severity of spinal disease. The relative prevalence of each spinal diagnosis was assessed in patients with and without the other diagnosis. A total of 47,560 patients were included in this study. Cervical spondylosis occurred in 13.1% overall, but was found in 31.0% of patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformity (OR=3.27, Pspondylosis (OR=3.26, Pspondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity had significantly higher rates of the other spinal diagnosis. This correlation was increased with increased severity of disease. Patients with both diagnoses were significantly more likely to have received a spine fusion. Further research is warranted to establish the cause of this correlation. Clinicians should use this information to both screen and counsel patients who present for cervical spondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

  19. Fast spin-echo MR assessment of patients with poor outcome following spinal cervical surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, W.; Thuomas, K.AA.; Hedlund, R.; Leszniewski, W.; Vavruch, L.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to evaluate poor outcome following spinal cervical surgery. A total of 146 consecutive patients operated with anterior discectomy and fusion (ADF) with the Cloward technique were investigated. Clinical notes, plain radiography, CT, and fast spin-echo (FSE) images were retrospectively evaluated. Some 30% of the patients had unsatisfactory clinical results within 12 months after surgery; 13% had initial improvement followed by deterioration of the preoperative symptoms, while 14.4% were not improved or worsened. Disc herniation and bony stenosis above, below, or at the fused level were the most common findings. In 45% of patients, surgery failed to decompress the spinal canal. In only 4 patients was no cause of remaining myelopathy and/or radiculopathy found. FSE demonstrated a large variety of pathological findings in the patients with poor clinical outcome after ADF. Postoperatively, patients with good clinical outcome had a lower incidence of pathological changes. FSE is considered the primary imaging modality for the cervical spine. However, CT is a useful complement in the axial projection to visualize bone changes. (orig.)

  20. MR imaging of spinal factors and compression of the spinal cord in cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minoru; Ishii, Sukenobu; Tani, Shotaro; Sato, Tetsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of surgical 109 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were retrospectively reviewed to examine whether MR imaging would replace conventional radiological procedures in determining spinal factors and spinal cord compression in this disease. MR imaging was useful in determining spondylotic herniation, continuous type of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, and calcification of yellow ligament, probably replacing CT myelography, discography, and CT discography. When total defect of the subarachnoid space on T2-weighted images and block on myelograms were compared in determining spinal cord compression, the spinal cord was affected more extensively by 1.3 intervertebral distance (IVD) on T2-weighted images. When indentation of one third or more in anterior and posterior diameter of the spinal cord was used as spinal cord compression, the difference in the affected extension between myelography and MR imaging was 0.2 IVD on T1-weighted images and 0.6 IVD on T2-weighted images. However, when block was seen in 3 or more IVD on myelograms, the range of spinal cord compression tended to be larger on T1-weighted images. For a small range of spinal cord compression, T1-weighted imaging seems to be helpful in determining the range of decompression. When using T2-weighted imaging, the range of decompression becomes large, frequently including posterior decompression. (N.K.)

  1. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulames, Vanessa M.; Plant, Giles W.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient’s own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI—even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in cervical spinal cord compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Giammona

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available In patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy MRI sometimes shows increased signal intensity zones on the T2-weighted images. It has been suggested that these findings carry prognostic significance. We studied 56 subjects with cervical spinal cord compression. Twelve patients showed an increased signal intensity (21.4% and a prevalence of narrowing of the AP-diameter (62% vs 24%. Furthemore, in this group, there was evidence of a longer mean duration of the symptoms and, in most of the patients, of more serious clinical conditions. The importance of these predisposing factors remains, however, to be clarified since they are also present in some patients without the increased signal intensity.

  3. Adjacent segment pathology following anterior decompression and fusion using cage and plate for the treatment of degenerative cervical spinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Byung-Wan; Kim, Jong-Kil

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective study. To analyze the incidence and prevalence of clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) following anterior decompression and fusion with cage and plate augmentation for degenerative cervical diseases. No long-term data on the use of cage and plate augmentation have been reported. The study population consisted of 231 patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with cage and plate for degenerative cervical spinal disease. The incidence and prevalence of CASP was determined by using the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. To analyze the factors that influence CASP, data on preoperative and postoperative sagittal alignment, spinal canal diameter, the distance between the plate and adjacent disc, extent of fusion level, and the presence or absence of adjacent segment degenerative changes by imaging studies were evaluated. CASP occurred in 15 of the cases, of which 9 required additional surgery. At 8-year follow-up, the average yearly incidence was 1.1%. The rate of disease-free survival based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was 93.6% at 5 years and 90.2% at 8 years. No statistically significant differences in CASP incidence based on radiological analysis were observed. Significantly high incidence of CASP was observed in the presence of increased adjacent segment degenerative changes (pdegenerative cervical disease is associated with a lower incidence in CSAP by 1.1% per year, and the extent of preoperative adjacent segment degenerative changes has been shown as a risk factor for CASP.

  4. Rapid myelin water imaging in human cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Emil; Vavasour, Irene; Tam, Roger; Yoo, Youngjin; Rauscher, Alexander; Li, David K B; Traboulsee, Anthony; MacKay, Alex; Kolind, Shannon

    2017-10-01

    Myelin water imaging (MWI) using multi-echo T 2 relaxation is a quantitative MRI technique that can be used as an in vivo biomarker for myelin in the central nervous system. MWI using a multi-echo spin echo sequence currently takes more than 20 min to acquire eight axial slices (5 mm thickness) in the cervical spinal cord, making spinal cord MWI impractical for implementation in clinical studies. In this study, an accelerated gradient and spin echo sequence (GRASE), previously validated for brain MWI, was adapted for spinal cord MWI. Ten healthy volunteers were scanned with the GRASE sequence (acquisition time 8.5 min) and compared with the multi-echo spin echo sequence (acquisition time 23.5 min). Using region of interest analysis, myelin estimates obtained from the two sequences were found to be in good agreement (mean difference = -0.0092, 95% confidence interval =  - 0.0092 ± 0.061; regression slope = 1.01, ρ = 0.9). MWI using GRASE was shown to be highly reproducible with an average coefficient of variation of 6.1%. The results from this study show that MWI can be performed in the cervical spinal cord in less than 10 min, allowing for practical implementation in multimodal clinical studies. Magn Reson Med 78:1482-1487, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Visual and quantitative assessment of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis with magnetic resonance imaging

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    Sipola, Petri; Vanninen, Ritva; Manninen, Hannu (Univ. of Eastern Finland, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Clinical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland)), email: petri.sipola@kuh.fi; Leinonen, Ville (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kuopio (Finland)); Niemelaeinen, Riikka (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Clinical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)); Aalto, Timo (Kyyhkylae Rehabilitation Center and Hospital, Mikkeli (Finland)); Airaksinen, Olavi (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine and Univ. of Eastern Finland, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Kuopio (Finland)); Battie, Michele C. (Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis is a common etiology of lumbar radicular symptoms. Quantitative measurements have commonly demonstrated better repeatability than visual assessments. We are not aware of any studies examining the repeatability of quantitative assessment of the lateral canal. Purpose. To evaluate the repeatability of visual assessments and newly developed quantitative measurements of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods. Twenty-eight patients with lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis or prior spinal surgery with recurrent symptoms were imaged with MRI. A radiologist, a neurosurgeon and a spine research trainee graded visually and quantitatively subarticular (n = 188) and foraminal zones (n = 260) of the lateral spinal canal. Quantitative measurements included the minimal subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen. Results. The repeatability of visual assessment at the subarticular zone and foraminal zones between raters varied from 0.45-0.59 and 0.42-0.53, respectively. Similarly, the intraclass correlation coefficients for the quantitative measurements varied from 0.67-0.71 and 0.66-0.76, respectively. The intra-rater repeatability for the visual assessments of the subarticular and foraminal zones was 0.70 and 0.62, respectively, while the corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients for quantitative measurements were 0.83 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion. Inter-rater repeatability of visual assessments of lateral stenosis is moderate, whereas quantitative measurements of both subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen have substantial reproducibility and may be particularly useful for longitudinal studies and research purposes. The clinical value of these parameters requires further study

  6. Visual and quantitative assessment of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipola, Petri; Vanninen, Ritva; Manninen, Hannu; Leinonen, Ville; Niemelaeinen, Riikka; Aalto, Timo; Airaksinen, Olavi; Battie, Michele C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis is a common etiology of lumbar radicular symptoms. Quantitative measurements have commonly demonstrated better repeatability than visual assessments. We are not aware of any studies examining the repeatability of quantitative assessment of the lateral canal. Purpose. To evaluate the repeatability of visual assessments and newly developed quantitative measurements of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods. Twenty-eight patients with lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis or prior spinal surgery with recurrent symptoms were imaged with MRI. A radiologist, a neurosurgeon and a spine research trainee graded visually and quantitatively subarticular (n = 188) and foraminal zones (n = 260) of the lateral spinal canal. Quantitative measurements included the minimal subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen. Results. The repeatability of visual assessment at the subarticular zone and foraminal zones between raters varied from 0.45-0.59 and 0.42-0.53, respectively. Similarly, the intraclass correlation coefficients for the quantitative measurements varied from 0.67-0.71 and 0.66-0.76, respectively. The intra-rater repeatability for the visual assessments of the subarticular and foraminal zones was 0.70 and 0.62, respectively, while the corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients for quantitative measurements were 0.83 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion. Inter-rater repeatability of visual assessments of lateral stenosis is moderate, whereas quantitative measurements of both subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen have substantial reproducibility and may be particularly useful for longitudinal studies and research purposes. The clinical value of these parameters requires further study

  7. Esophageal carcinoma extending into the spinal canal - case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Linei A.B.D.; Rogacheski, Enio; Ledesma, Jorge A.; Zaparolli, Mauricio; Duarte, Maria Cecilia B.; Sakamoto, Danielle G.

    2002-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 62-year-old male with a 4 month history of weight loss and a 2 day complaint of weakness and paraesthesia on the lower limbs. A computed tomography myelogram revealed a mass in the posterior mediastinum associated with destruction of the vertebral body, spinal canal extension and irregular esophageal wall thickening. The patient was later submitted to a barium esophagogram that showed an irregular filling defect. A biopsy confirmed the presence of a squamous cell carcinoma. This is the first report in the Latin-American literature (Lilacs) of a patient with an esophageal carcinoma with spinal canal extension and spinal cord compression syndrome at initial presentation. (author)

  8. Improving Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0378 TITLE: Improving Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE CordCorInjury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Improvi g Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function After Cervical Spinal Cord...care. However, despite these drastic interventions, the cervical injured patient is still susceptible to death due to respiratory complications

  9. Measurements of the lumbar spinal canal by computed tomography in lumbar diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Kenji; Kawai, Shinya; Oda, Hirotane; Saika, Minoru; Uminaga, Yasuo; Takano, Shinichi; Akiho, Yasushi

    1986-01-01

    To assess the significance of computed tomography (CT) in the elucidation of morphology of the lumbar spinal canal (LSC), the antero-posterior (AP) and transverse (T) diameter, and T area of the soft and bony LSC, and dural canal (DC) were measured by CT in 15 patients with lumbar canal stenosis, 45 patient with spondylosis, and 33 control subjects. The AP diameter failed to indicate the degree of stenosis because it was independent of morphology of the LSC. The T area of the LSC did not always help to determine the degree of DC compression, but showed some degree of stenosis. The T area of the DC was useful in determining the degree of stenosis and morphology of the stenosed site. With the use of the T area of the DC, the upper margin of articular segment was found to be most stenosed in patients with lumbar canal stenosis. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Cervical Intradural Disc Herniation Causing Progressive Quadriparesis After Spinal Manipulation Therapy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hwan-Seo; Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2016-02-01

    Cervical intradural disc herniation (IDH) is an extremely rare condition, comprising only 0.27% of all disc herniations. Three percent of IDHs occur in the cervical, 5% in the thoracic, and over 92% in the lumbar spinal canal. There have been a total of 31 cervical IDHs reported in the literature. The pathogenesis and imaging characteristics of IDH are not fully understood. A preoperative diagnosis is key to facilitating prompt intradural exploration in patients with ambivalent findings, as well as in preventing reoperation. The purpose of reporting our case is to remind clinicians to consider the possibility of cervical IDH during spinal manipulation therapy in patient with chronic neck pain.The patient signed informed consent for publication of this case report and any accompanying image. The ethical approval of this study was waived by the ethics committee of Chonbuk National University Hospital, because this study was case report and the number of patients was manipulation for chronic neck pain over the course of a month. The day prior, he had noticed neck pain and tingling in the bilateral upper and lower extremities during the manipulation procedure. The following day, he presented with bilateral weakness of all 4 extremities, which rendered him unable to walk. Neurological examination demonstrated a positive Hoffmann sign and ankle clonus bilaterally, hypoesthesia below the C5 dermatome, 3/5 strength in the bilateral upper extremities, and 2/5 strength in the lower extremities. This motor weakness was progressive, and he further complained of voiding difficulty.Urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine revealed large, central disc herniations at C4-C5 and C5-C6 that caused severe spinal cord compression and surrounding edema. We performed C4-C5-C6 anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.The patient's limb weakness improved rapidly within 1 day postoperatively, and he was discharged 4 weeks later. At his 12-month follow-up, the patient had

  11. Catastrophic cervical spinal injury in an amateur college wrestler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Kurup, Jayakrishnan Kelamangalathu; Jampani, Ravitheja; Mohanty, Simanchal P

    2017-07-18

    A young amateur wrestler presented with a burst fracture of the seventh cervical vertebra with complete paraplegia. He was treated with surgery for spine stabilisation and was actively rehabilitated. Adolescents and teenagers are indulging in high-contact sports like wrestling, without proper training and technical know-how, which can lead to severe injuries and possibly, permanent handicap or death. Trainers, assistants and institutions should be well equipped to diagnose and provide initial care of people with a spinal injury to prevent a partial injury from progressing to complete injury. Athletes, coaches and the public should be aware of methods of first aid and how to transport a patient with a cervical spine injury. Authorities should take steps to improve infrastructures in training institutions and ambulance services. Specialised spinal centres should be established throughout the country for management and rehabilitation of patients with paraplegia. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Enlargement of lumbar spinal canal in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Evaluation with three-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunishi, Yoshihiko

    2003-01-01

    A number of clinical studies have demonstrated that enlargement of the lumbar spinal canal is one of the effective surgical procedures for the treatment of the lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and provides a good result. In the present study, we have evaluated the long-term outcome of the enlargement of the lumbar canal without fusion in thirty eight patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis using three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) The improvement rate was excellent in 80% of the patients (mean improvement ratio, 83%) according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scoring system. We found that the sufficient enlargement of the canal was obtained by the surgery and maintained for a long period of time. The results from 3D-CT suggested that a round shape was maintained in the canal after the surgery because of pressures of the dura mater against to the bony canal. None of patients showed lumbar instability. In conclusion, enlargement of lumbar canal without fusion is useful for the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, and the enlarged canal has been maintained for a long period of time after the surgery. The results demonstrated the clinical utility of 3D-CT to evaluate the preoperative and postoperative shape of the spine. (author)

  13. PARAMETERS OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN PATIENTS WITH CONGENITAL NARROWING OF THE LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELIU HAZAEL MORALES-RANGEL

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the morphological parameters of magnetic resonance in patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal with patients with low back pain. Methods: A descriptive, retrospective, observational study was conducted with measurements in the axial and sagittal magnetic resonance sections of the vertebral body and canal of the lumbar spine of 64 patients with diagnosis of low back pain, which were compared with resonance images taken from 31 Mexican patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal. Results: The results show that patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal in the axial sections have a difference in diameters, being L2<13.9 mm, L3<13.3 mm, L4<12.9 mm, L5<13.1 mm, compared with controls L2<20.5 mm, L3<20.5 mm, L4<19.3 mm, L5<18.1 mm with p = 0.000. Conclusions: We found different measurements in the Mexican population compared to those found by similar studies. With the parameters obtained, it would be possible to make the proper diagnosis, surgical planning, and treatment.

  14. Clinical evidence for cervical myelopathy due to Chiari malformation and spinal stenosis in a non-randomized group of patients with the diagnosis of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffez, Dan S; Ross, Ruth E; Shade-Zeldow, Yvonne; Kostas, Konstantinos; Shah, Sagar; Gottschalk, Robert; Elias, Dean A; Shepard, Alan; Leurgans, Sue E; Moore, Charity G

    2004-10-01

    While patients with fibromyalgia report symptoms consistent with cervical myelopathy, a detailed neurological evaluation is not routine. We sought to determine if patients with fibromyalgia manifest objective neurological signs of cervical myelopathy. Two hundred and seventy patients, 18 years and older, who carried the diagnosis of fibromyalgia but who had no previously recognized neurological disease underwent detailed clinical neurological and neuroradiological evaluation for the prevalence of objective evidence of cervical myelopathy and radiological evidence of cerebellar tonsillar herniation (Chiari 1 malformation) or cervical spinal canal stenosis. Patients were primarily women (87%), of mean age 44 years, who had been symptomatic for 8 years (standard deviation, 6.3 years). The predominant complaints were neck/back pain (95%), fatigue (95%), exertional fatigue (96%), cognitive impairment (92%), instability of gait (85%), grip weakness (83%), paresthesiae (80%), dizziness (71%) and numbness (69%). Eighty-eight percent of patients reported worsening symptoms with neck extension. The neurological examination was consistent with cervical myelopathy: upper thoracic spinothalamic sensory level (83%), hyperreflexia (64%), inversion of the radial periosteal reflex (57%), positive Romberg sign (28%), ankle clonus (25%), positive Hoffman sign (26%), impaired tandem walk (23%), dysmetria (15%) and dysdiadochokinesia (13%). MRI and contrast-enhanced CT imaging of the cervical spine revealed stenosis. The mean antero-posterior (AP) spinal canal diameter at C2/3, C3/4, C4/5, C5/6, C6/7 and C7/T1 was 13.5 mm, 11.8 mm, 11.5 mm, 10.4 mm, 11.3 mm and 14.5 mm respectively, (CT images). In 46% of patients, the AP spinal diameter at C5/6 measured 10 mm, or less, with the neck positioned in mild extension, i.e., clinically significant spinal canal stenosis. MRI of the brain revealed tonsillar ectopia >5 mm in 20% of patients (mean=7.1+/-1.8 mm), i.e., Chiari 1 malformation

  15. Central canal ependymal cells proliferate extensively in response to traumatic spinal cord injury but not demyelinating lesions.

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    Steve Lacroix

    Full Text Available The adult mammalian spinal cord has limited regenerative capacity in settings such as spinal cord injury (SCI and multiple sclerosis (MS. Recent studies have revealed that ependymal cells lining the central canal possess latent neural stem cell potential, undergoing proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation following experimental SCI. To determine whether reactive ependymal cells are a realistic endogenous cell population to target in order to promote spinal cord repair, we assessed the spatiotemporal dynamics of ependymal cell proliferation for up to 35 days in three models of spinal pathologies: contusion SCI using the Infinite Horizon impactor, focal demyelination by intraspinal injection of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, and autoimmune-mediated multi-focal demyelination using the active experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model of MS. Contusion SCI at the T9-10 thoracic level stimulated a robust, long-lasting and long-distance wave of ependymal proliferation that peaked at 3 days in the lesion segment, 14 days in the rostral segment, and was still detectable at the cervical level, where it peaked at 21 days. This proliferative wave was suppressed distal to the contusion. Unlike SCI, neither chemical- nor autoimmune-mediated demyelination triggered ependymal cell proliferation at any time point, despite the occurrence of demyelination (LPC and EAE, remyelination (LPC and significant locomotor defects (EAE. Thus, traumatic SCI induces widespread and enduring activation of reactive ependymal cells, identifying them as a robust cell population to target for therapeutic manipulation after contusion; conversely, neither demyelination, remyelination nor autoimmunity appears sufficient to trigger proliferation of quiescent ependymal cells in models of MS-like demyelinating diseases.

  16. Bimanual reach to grasp movements after cervical spinal cord injury.

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    Laura Britten

    Full Text Available Injury to the cervical spinal cord results in bilateral deficits in arm/hand function reducing functional independence and quality of life. To date little research has been undertaken to investigate control strategies of arm/hand movements following cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI. This study aimed to investigate unimanual and bimanual coordination in patients with acute cSCI using 3D kinematic analysis as they performed naturalistic reach to grasp actions with one hand, or with both hands together (symmetrical task, and compare this to the movement patterns of uninjured younger and older adults. Eighteen adults with a cSCI (mean 61.61 years with lesions at C4-C8, with an American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA grade B to D and 16 uninjured younger adults (mean 23.68 years and sixteen uninjured older adults (mean 70.92 years were recruited. Participants with a cSCI produced reach-to-grasp actions which took longer, were slower, and had longer deceleration phases than uninjured participants. These differences were exacerbated during bimanual reach-to-grasp tasks. Maximal grasp aperture was no different between groups, but reached earlier by people with cSCI. Participants with a cSCI were less synchronous than younger and older adults but all groups used the deceleration phase for error correction to end the movement in a synchronous fashion. Overall, this study suggests that after cSCI a level of bimanual coordination is retained. While there seems to be a greater reliance on feedback to produce both the reach to grasp, we observed minimal disruption of the more impaired limb on the less impaired limb. This suggests that bimanual movements should be integrated into therapy.

  17. Pedicle distraction increases intervertebral and spinal canal area in a cadaver and bone model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Matthew; Papadakos, Nikolaos; Bishop, Tim; Bernard, Jason

    2018-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is degenerative narrowing of the spinal canal and/or intervertebral foramen causing compression of the spinal cord and nerve roots. Traditional decompression techniques can often cause significant trauma and vertebral instability. This paper evaluates a method of increasing pedicle length to decompress the spinal and intervertebral foramen, which could be done minimally invasive. Three Sawbone (Sawbones Europe, Sweden) and 1 cadaveric lumbar spine underwent bilateral pedicle distraction at L4. A pedicle channel was drilled between the superior articular process and transverse process into the vertebral body. The pedicles underwent osteotomy at the midpoint. Screws were inserted bilaterally and fixated distraction of 0 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm and 6 mm. CT images were taken at each level of distraction. Foramen area was measured in the sagittal plane at L3/4. Spinal canal area was measured at L4 in the axial images. The cadaver was used to evaluate safety of osteotomy and soft tissue interactions preventing distraction. Statistical analysis was by student paired t-test and Pearson rank test. Increasing distraction led to greater Spinal canal area. From 4.27 cm 2 to 5.72 cm 2 (p = 0.002) with 6 mm distraction. A Maximal increase of 34.1%. Vertebral foramen area also increased with increasing pedicle distraction. From 2.43 cm 2 to 3.22 cm 2 (p = 0.022) with 6 mm distraction. A maximal increase of 32.3%. The cadaver spinal canal increased in area by 21.7%. The vertebral foramen increased in area by 36.2% (left) and 22.6% (right). For each increase in pedicle distraction the area of the spinal and vertebral foramen increases. Pedicle distraction could potentially be used to alleviate spinal stenosis and root impingement. A potential osteotomy plane could be at the midpoint of the pedicle with minimal risk to nerve roots and soft tissue restrictions to prevent distraction. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2018.

  18. HOMICIDE BY CERVICAL SPINAL CORD GUNSHOT INJURY WITH SHOTGUN FIRE PELLETS: CASE REPORT

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    Dana Turliuc, Serban Turliuc, Iustin Mihailov, Andrei Cucu, Gabriel Dumitrescu,Claudia Costea

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This case present a rare forensic case of cervical spinal gunshot injury of a female by her husband, a professional hunter, during a family fight with a shotgun fire pellets. The gunshot destroyed completely the cervical spinal cord, without injury to the neck vessels and organs and with the patient survival for seven days. We discuss notions of judicial ballistics, assessment of the patient with spinal cord gunshot injury and therapeutic strategies. Even if cervical spine gunshot injuries are most of the times lethal for majority of patients, the surviving patients need the coordination of a multidisciplinary surgical team to ensure the optimal functional prognostic.

  19. Correlation between cervical lordosis and adjacent segment pathology after anterior cervical spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the incidence and risk factors for adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after anterior cervical spinal surgery. Fourteen patients (12 male, mean age 47.1 years) who underwent single-level cervical disk arthroplasty (CDA group) and 28 case-matched patients (24 male, mean age 53.6 years) who underwent single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF group) were included. Presence of radiologic ASP (RASP) was based on observed changes in anterior osteophytes, disks, and calcification of the anterior longitudinal ligament on lateral radiographs. The mean follow-up period was 43.4 months in the CDA group and 44.6 months in the ACDF group. At final follow-up, ASP was observed in 5 (35.7%) CDA patients and 16 (57.1%) ACDF patients (p = 0.272). The interval between surgery and ASP development was 33.8 months in the CDA group and 16.3 months in the ACDF group (p = 0.046). The ASP risk factor analysis indicated postoperative cervical angle at C3-7 being more lordotic in non-ASP patients in both groups. Restoration of lordosis occurred in the CDA group regardless of the presence of ASP, but heterotopic ossification development was associated with the presence of ASP in the CDA group. And the CDA group had significantly greater clinical improvements than those in the ACDF group when ASP was present. In both CDA and ACDF patients, RASP developed, but CDA was associated with a delay in ASP development. A good clinical outcome was expected in CDA group, even when ASP developed. Restoration of cervical lordosis was an important factor in anterior cervical spine surgery.

  20. Comparison of CT myelography performed in the prone and supine positions in the detection of cervical spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blease Graham, Cole III; Wippold, Franz J. II; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Pilgram, Thomas K.; Shaibani, Ali; Kido, Daniel K.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To quantify the change in the cross-sectional area of the cervical spinal cord and subarachnoid space (SAS) in the supine neutral vs prone extension positions in patients with myelopathy undergoing cervical CT myelography. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Axial CT myelgrams of 21 myelopathic patients were performed in both the supine neutral and prone extension positions. The SAS and cord cross-sectional areas were then measured at the disk spaces and mid-pedicle levels from C2 to T1 in both the supine and prone positions using a public domain NIH Image program, version 156b18. Mean area measurements in both positions were then compared for each level examined. RESULTS: Mean SAS cross-sectional area in the prone position was notably reduced compared with the supine position at C4-C5 [128.8 mm 2 vs 168.1 mm 2 (P 2 vs 143.2 mm 2 (P< .05)] disk levels. The mean cord cross-sectional area failed to change signficantly with positioning. CONCLUSIONS: Prone myelography may demonstrate a greater degree of cervical spine stenosis compared with CT myelography performed in the supine position in myelopathic patients. Imaging with the patient prone with neck extended in both myelography and CTM may improve precision in the results of measurements of the stenotic spinal canal when comparing these two methods. Blease Graham III, C. (2001)

  1. MR imaging of spine and spinal canal neoplasms: value of Gd-DTPA contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paprzycki, W.; Gradzki, J.; Sosnowski, P.; Stajgis, M.

    1994-01-01

    Value of Gadolinium-DTPA contrast enhancement in diagnosis of neoplastic diseases of spinal canal was estimated on the basis of retrospective analysis of MR examinations performed in 75 patients. The analyzed material consisted of 15 cases of intramedullary tumors (group 1.), 38 of subdural extramedullary (group 2.) and 22 extradural ones (group 3.). Contrast enhanced MR contributed significant information to the final diagnosis in all groups. The utmost significance of Gd-DTPA contrast enhancement was ascertained in group 1. Authors conclude that contrast enhancement with Gd-DTPA is indispensable in all these cases of spinal canal neoplasms, where non-contrast MR did not reveal pathologic changes in optimal manner. (author)

  2. MR imaging in severe upper cervical spinal cord injury in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, H.J.; Steele, N.; Tilton, A.; Bodin, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that MR imaging of the cervical spine in patients with upper cervical spinal cord injury can accurately define the extent of cord injury for prognostic and rehabilitative purpose. Seven patients, ages newborn to 11 y, had acute upper cervical spinal cord injury and required continuous respiratory assistance. All patients had cervical spine radiography initially, but the extent of injuries precluded transport for early MR imaging. One or more MR imaging studies were done when the acute injury phase subsided. Manual ventilatory support by Ambu bag with oxygen was combined with careful respiratory and cardiac monitoring during imaging

  3. MR spectroscopy of cervical spinal cord in patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karaguelle; Kendi, Mustafa; Tan, Funda Uysal; Tellioglu, Serdar; Huvaj, Sinef

    2004-01-01

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain in patients with multiple sclerosis has been well studied. However, in vivo MRS of the spinal cord in patients with MR spectroscopy has not been reported to our knowledge. We performed MRS of normal-appearing cervical spinal cords in multiple sclerosis patients and in healthy controls. N-acetyl aspartate was shown to be reduced within the cervical spinal cord of multiple sclerosis patients when compared with healthy controls. This finding supports axonal loss and damage within even normal-appearing spinal cords of multiple sclerosis patients. (orig.)

  4. Spinal cord edema with contrast enhancement mimicking intramedullary tumor in patient with cervical myelopathy: A case report and a brief literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Chourmouzi, Danai; Karagiannidis, Apostolos; Kapetanakis, Stylianos

    2017-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy (CM) is a clinical diagnosis that may be associated with hyperintense areas on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. The use of contrast enhancement in such areas to differentiate between neoplastic and degenerative disease has rarely been described. We present a 41-year-old female with a 5-month course of progressive CM. The cervical MRI revealed spinal cord swelling, stenosis, and a hyperintense signal at the C5-C6 and C5-C7 levels. Both the neurologic and radiologic examinations were consistent with an intramedullary cervical cord tumor. To decompress the spinal canal, an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was performed from C5 to C7 level. This resulted in immediate and significant improvement of the myelopathy. Postoperatively, over 1.5 years, the hyperintense, enhancing intramedullary lesion gradually regressed on multiple postoperative MRI scans. Spinal cord edema is occasionally seen on MR studies of the cervical spine in patients with degenerative CM. Contrast-enhanced MR studies may help differentiate hyperintense cord signals due to edema vs. atypical intramedullary tumors. Routine successive postoperative MRI evaluations are crucial to confirm the diagnosis of degenerative vs. neoplastic disease.

  5. Sagittal MR findings of L5 spondylolysis : changes of spinal canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Kim, Ihn Sub; Yoon, Yup [Kyunghee Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    To evaluate changes in the spinal canal in cases of L5 spondylolysis, as seen on sagittal MR images. We retrospectively analysed the MR findings of 27 patients suffering from L5 spondylolysis without spondylolisthesis and compared them with 100 control subjects. Spondylolysis had been confirmed by conventional radiography. On midsagittal MR images, sagittal canal ratio (SCR) was defined as midsagittal canal diameter at L5 devided by that at L1. We analysed the frequency of posterior epidural fat deposition(posterior epidural fat between the posterior margin of the dural sac and the anterior cortical margin of the spinous process on the midsagittal line), and compared this with the frequency in 100 control subjects. Mean SCR value in 27 patients with L5 spondylolysis(1.22) was significantly greater than 100 control subjects(0.96, p<0.001). Mean SCR value in 17 patients with L5 spondylolysis and posterior epidural fat deposition(1.27) was significantly higher than in nine control subjects with posterior epidural fat deposition(0.97). Posterior epidural fat deposition was more frequently indentified in patients with L5 spondylolysis(63%) than in control subjects(9%). The possibility of L5 spondylolysis is suggested when on midsaggital MR imaging, the anteroposterior diameter of the L5 spinal canal is seen to be widened and posterior epidural fat deposition is noted.

  6. Sagittal MR findings of L5 spondylolysis : changes of spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Kim, Ihn Sub; Yoon, Yup

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate changes in the spinal canal in cases of L5 spondylolysis, as seen on sagittal MR images. We retrospectively analysed the MR findings of 27 patients suffering from L5 spondylolysis without spondylolisthesis and compared them with 100 control subjects. Spondylolysis had been confirmed by conventional radiography. On midsagittal MR images, sagittal canal ratio (SCR) was defined as midsagittal canal diameter at L5 devided by that at L1. We analysed the frequency of posterior epidural fat deposition(posterior epidural fat between the posterior margin of the dural sac and the anterior cortical margin of the spinous process on the midsagittal line), and compared this with the frequency in 100 control subjects. Mean SCR value in 27 patients with L5 spondylolysis(1.22) was significantly greater than 100 control subjects(0.96, p<0.001). Mean SCR value in 17 patients with L5 spondylolysis and posterior epidural fat deposition(1.27) was significantly higher than in nine control subjects with posterior epidural fat deposition(0.97). Posterior epidural fat deposition was more frequently indentified in patients with L5 spondylolysis(63%) than in control subjects(9%). The possibility of L5 spondylolysis is suggested when on midsaggital MR imaging, the anteroposterior diameter of the L5 spinal canal is seen to be widened and posterior epidural fat deposition is noted

  7. The effect of body position and axial load on spinal canal morphology: an MRI study of central spinal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Rasmus; Jensen, Tue Secher; Pope, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A method comparison study. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of body position and axial load of the lumbar spine on disc height, lumbar lordosis, and dural sac cross-sectional area (DCSA). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: The effects of flexion and extension on spinal canal diameters...... with applied axial loading. Disc height, lumbar lordosis, and DCSA were measured and the different positions were compared. RESULTS: In section 1, the only significant difference between positions was a reduced lumbar lordosis during standing when compared with lying (P = 0.04), most probably a consequence...

  8. Phrenic motoneuron discharge patterns following chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Dougherty, Brendan J.; Sandhu, Milapjit S.; Lane, Michael A.; Reier, Paul J.; Fuller, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) dramatically disrupts synaptic inputs and triggers biochemical, as well as morphological, plasticity in relation to the phrenic motor neuron (PhMN) pool. Accordingly, our primary purpose was to determine if chronic SCI induces fundamental changes in the recruitment profile and discharge patterns of PhMNs. Individual PhMN action potentials were recorded from the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to lateral cervical (C2) hemisection injury (C2Hx) in anesthetized adult male rats at 2, 4 or 8 wks post-injury and in uninjured controls. PhMNs were phenotypically classified as early (Early-I) or late inspiratory (Late-I), or silent according to discharge patterns. Following C2Hx, the distribution of PhMNs was dominated by Late-I and silent cells. Late-I burst parameters (e.g., spikes per breath, burst frequency and duration) were initially reduced but returned towards control values by 8 wks post-injury. In addition, a unique PhMN burst pattern emerged after C2Hx in which Early-I cells burst tonically during hypocapnic inspiratory apnea. We also quantified the impact of gradual reductions in end-tidal CO2 partial pressure (PETCO2) on bilateral phrenic nerve activity. Compared to control rats, as PETCO2 declined, the C2Hx animals had greater inspiratory frequencies (breaths*min−1) and more substantial decreases in ipsilateral phrenic burst amplitude. We conclude that the primary physiological impact of C2Hx on ipsilateral PhMN burst patterns is a persistent delay in burst onset, transient reductions in burst frequency, and the emergence of tonic burst patterns. The inspiratory frequency data suggest that plasticity in brainstem networks is likely to play an important role in phrenic motor output after cervical SCI. PMID:23954215

  9. Phrenic motoneuron discharge patterns following chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Dougherty, Brendan J; Sandhu, Milapjit S; Lane, Michael A; Reier, Paul J; Fuller, David D

    2013-11-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) dramatically disrupts synaptic inputs and triggers biochemical, as well as morphological, plasticity in relation to the phrenic motor neuron (PhMN) pool. Accordingly, our primary purpose was to determine if chronic SCI induces fundamental changes in the recruitment profile and discharge patterns of PhMNs. Individual PhMN action potentials were recorded from the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to lateral cervical (C2) hemisection injury (C2Hx) in anesthetized adult male rats at 2, 4 or 8 wks post-injury and in uninjured controls. PhMNs were phenotypically classified as early (Early-I) or late inspiratory (Late-I), or silent according to discharge patterns. Following C2Hx, the distribution of PhMNs was dominated by Late-I and silent cells. Late-I burst parameters (e.g., spikes per breath, burst frequency and duration) were initially reduced but returned towards control values by 8wks post-injury. In addition, a unique PhMN burst pattern emerged after C2Hx in which Early-I cells burst tonically during hypocapnic inspiratory apnea. We also quantified the impact of gradual reductions in end-tidal CO2 partial pressure (PETCO2) on bilateral phrenic nerve activity. Compared to control rats, as PETCO2 declined, the C2Hx animals had greater inspiratory frequencies (breaths∗min(-1)) and more substantial decreases in ipsilateral phrenic burst amplitude. We conclude that the primary physiological impact of C2Hx on ipsilateral PhMN burst patterns is a persistent delay in burst onset, transient reductions in burst frequency, and the emergence of tonic burst patterns. The inspiratory frequency data suggest that plasticity in brainstem networks is likely to play an important role in phrenic motor output after cervical SCI. © 2013.

  10. Fat-containing lesions in vertebrae and spinal canal: a pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jeong A; Yoo, Won Jong; Lim, Yeon Soo; Kim, Young Joo; Lee, Eun Ja; Sung, Mi Sook; Chung, Myung Hee; Lee, Hae Giu

    2007-01-01

    The recent development of image techniques, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of spinal disease. A variety of lesions in the spine may contain fat tissue, and these lesions have the possibility of being benign or malignancy. The principle of treatment varies depending on the characteristics of the lesions. The purpose of this pictorial assay is to document the radiologic findings to help physicians make the correct diagnosis, to confirm the characteristics and the extent of the lesion, to anticipate the prognosis and to select and decide upon the therapeutic method when a fat-containing lesion is located in the spinal vertebrae and/or spinal canal

  11. Intrinsic Vertebral Markers for Spinal Level Localization in Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Deepak Kumar; Thakur, Anil; Jain, Mukul; Arya, Arvind; Tripathi, Chandrabhushan; Kumari, Rima; Kushwaha, Suman

    2016-12-01

    Prospective clinical study. To observe the usefulness of anterior cervical osteophytes as intrinsic markers for spinal level localization (SLL) during sub-axial cervical spinal surgery via the anterior approach. Various landmarks, such as the mandibular angle, hyoid bone, thyroid cartilage, first cricoid ring, and C6 carotid tubercle, are used for gross cervical SLL; however, none are used during cervical spinal surgery via the anterior approach. We present our preliminary assessment of SLL over anterior vertebral surfaces (i.e., intrinsic markers) in 48 consecutive cases of anterior cervical spinal surgeries for the disc-osteophyte complex (DOC) in degenerative diseases and granulation or tumor tissue associated with infectious or neoplastic diseases, respectively, at an ill-equipped center. This prospective study on patients undergoing anterior cervical surgery for various sub-axial cervical spinal pathologies aimed to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of SLL via intraoperative palpation of disease-related morphological changes on anterior vertebral surfaces visible on preoperative midline sagittal T1/2-weighted magnetic resonance images. During a 3-year period, 48 patients (38 males,10 females; average age, 43.58 years) who underwent surgery via the anterior approach for various sub-axial cervical spinal pathologies, including degenerative disease (n= 42), tubercular infection (Pott's disease; n=3), traumatic prolapsed disc (n=2), and a metastatic lesion from thyroid carcinoma (n=1), comprised the study group. Intrinsic marker palpation yielded accurate SLL in 79% of patients (n=38). Among those with degenerative diseases (n=42), intrinsic marker palpation yielded accurate SLL in 76% of patients (n=32). Intrinsic marker palpation is an attractive potential adjunct for SLL during cervical spinal surgeries via the anterior approach in well-selected patients at ill-equipped centers (e.g., those found in developing countries). This technique may prove helpful

  12. Preliminary study of diffusion tensor MR on the cervical spinal cord in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Kuihong; Ma Lin; Guo Xinggao; Liang Li

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a simplified and practical strategy for MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the cervical spinal cord and acquire the normal values of DTI parameters in normal subjects, and to offer the basis for the research of the cervical spinal cord disorders. Methods: DTI examinations were performed in 36 consecutive healthy subjects by using SE-EPI sequence on the cervical spinal cord. The values of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), λ 1 , λ 2 , and λ 3 were measured in regions of interest positioned in the normal cervical cords. Results: All 36 subjects completed the examinations. The cervical spinal cords were clearly demonstrated on the postprocessing images, and there were no obvious artifacts on the diffusion tensor images. The average value of ADC was (914.44±82.61) x 10 -6 mm 2 /s and FA was (593.84±52.22) x 10 -3 . The diffusivity components parallel (λ 1 ) and orthogonal (λ 2 and λ 3 ) to the longitudinal axes of the spinal cord were (1585.10±130.07) x 10 -6 mm 2 /s, (559.84±66.49) x 10 -6 mm 2 /s, and (613.28±128.71) x 10 -6 mm 2 /s, respectively. The value of λ 1 was significantly higher than that of λ 2 and λ 3 (P 2 and λ 3 (P>0.05). The value of 2λ 1 /(λ 2 +λ 3 ) was 2.74± 0.32. Conclusion: The normal cervical spinal cord can be well demonstrated in vivo by using DTI with SE-EPI sequence, and various parameters acquired on DTI are stable. The water diffusivity in the direction parallel to the longitudinal axes of the spinal cord is found to be higher than that in directions perpendicular to the longitudinal axes of the spinal cord, thus suggesting the cylindrical anisotropic characteristics in the cervical spinal cord. (authors)

  13. Corticobulbar motor evoked potentials from tongue muscles used as a control in cervical spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Gun Kim

    Full Text Available Objective: Motor evoked potentials (MEPs changes might be caused to the non-surgically induced factors during cervical spinal surgery. Therefore, control MEPs recorded cranially to the exit of the C5 root are highly recommendable in cervical spinal surgery. We studied whether corticobulbar MEPs (C-MEPs from tongue muscle could be used as a control MEPs in cervical spinal surgery. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive cervical spinal surgeries were analyzed. Stimulation of motor area for tongue was done by subcutaneous electrodes placed at C3/C4 (10–20 EEG System, and recording was done from both sides of tongue. Results: C-MEPs were recorded successfully 24 out of the 25 (96% tested patients. Forty-six out of fifty MEPs (92% from tongue muscles were monitorable from the baseline. In two patients, we could obtain only unilateral C-MEPs. Mean MEPs latencies obtained from the left and right side of the tongue were 11.5 ± 1 ms and 11.5 ± 0.8 ms, respectively. Conclusions: Monitoring C-MEPs from tongue muscles might be useful control in cervical spinal surgery. They were easily elicited and relatively free from phenomenon of peripheral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves. Significance: This is first study to identify the usefulness of C-MEPs as a control of cervical spinal surgery. Keywords: Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, Motor-evoked potential, Corticospinal tract, Corticobulbar MEPs, Hypoglossal nerve

  14. Life threatening spinal shock and complete neurological recovery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mild to moderate trauma to the spinal cord that is complicated by existing cervical canal stenosis or spondylosis can be a life threatening event. It is against this background that we present a 41 year old male with cervical spinal stenosis who developed marked quadriparesis and respiratory embarrassment following ...

  15. Generation patterns of four groups of cholinergic neurons in rat cervical spinal cord: a combined tritiated thymidine autoradiographic and choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, P.E.; Barber, R.P.; Vaughn, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    This report examines the generation of cholinergic neurons in the spinal cord in order to determine whether the transmitter phenotype of neurons is associated with specific patterns of neurogenesis. Previous immunocytochemical studies identified four groups of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive neurons in the cervical enlargement of the rat spinal cord. These cell groups vary in both somatic size and location along the previously described ventrodorsal neurogenic gradient of the spinal cord. Thus, large (and small) motoneurons are located in the ventral horn, medium-sized partition cells are found in the intermediate gray matter, small central canal cluster cells are situated within lamina X, and small dorsal horn neurons are scattered predominantly through laminae III-V. The relationships among the birthdays of these four subsets of cholinergic neurons have been examined by combining 3H-thymidine autoradiography and ChAT immunocytochemistry. Embryonic day 11 was the earliest time that neurons were generated within the cervical enlargement. Large and small ChAT-positive motoneurons were produced on E11 and 12, with 70% of both groups being born on E11. ChAT-positive partition cells were produced between E11 and 13, with their peak generation occurring on E12. Approximately 70% of the cholinergic central canal cluster and dorsal horn cells were born on E13, and the remainder of each of these groups was generated on E14. Other investigators have shown that all neurons within the rat cervical spinal cord are produced in a ventrodorsal sequence between E11 and E16. In contrast, ChAT-positive neurons are born only from E11 to E14 and are among the earliest cells generated in the ventral, intermediate, and dorsal subdivisions of the spinal cord

  16. Use of versapoint to refashion the cervical canal to overcome unusually difficult embryo transfers and improve in-vitro fertilization-embryo transfer outcome: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Mahajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Smooth atraumatic embryo transfer is paramount for the success of in-vitro fertilization (IVF. In difficult cases, cervical canal manipulation may be required. Aim : To see if surgical correction of the cervical canal or cervical canal refashioning could improve ease of embryo transfer. Setting : Private infertility and IVF hospital. Design : Prospective study. Materials and Methods : Patients: 11 women with failed 1-3 IVF cycles with history of extremely difficult embryo transfers (ETs despite undergoing cervical dilatation in the cycle prior to IVF. Interventions : Operative hysteroscopy using Versapoint for refashioning of the cervical canal. Main Outcome Measures : Ease of ET in the subsequent IVF cycle. Secondary outcome measure was to assess reproductive outcome. Results : Easy and atraumatic ET in the IVF cycle after procedure in 100% patients. PR was 46.5%. Conclusions : Use of Versapoint for refashioning the cervical canal can improve the quality of ET and PR.

  17. Comparing the radiosensitivity of cervical and thoracic spinal cord using the relative seriality model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamus-Gorka, M.; Lind, B.K.; Brahme, A.

    2003-01-01

    Spinal cord is one of the most important normal tissues that are aimed to be spared during radiation therapy of cancer. This organ has been known for its strongly serial character and its high sensitivity to radiation. In order to compare the sensitivity of different parts of spinal cord, the early data (1970's) for radiation myelopathy available in the literature could be used. In the present study the relative seriality model (Kallman et al. 1992) has been fitted to two different sets of clinical data for spinal cord irradiation: radiation myelitis of cervical spinal cord after treating 248 patients for malignant disease of head and neck (Abbatucci et al. 1978) and radiation myelitis of thoracic spinal cord after radiation treating 43 patients with lung carcinoma (Reinhold et al. 1976). The maximum likelihood method was applied for the fitting and the corresponding parameters together with their 68% confidence intervals calculated for each of the datasets respectively. The alpha-beta ratio for the thoracic survival was also obtained. On the basis of the present study the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. radiation myelopathy is a strongly serial endpoint, 2. it appears to be differences in radiosensitivity between the cervical and thoracic region of spinal cord, 3. thoracic spinal cord revealed very serial characteristic of dose response, while the cervical myelopathy seems to be a bit less serial endpoint, 4. the dose-response curve is much steeper in case of myelopathy of cervical spinal cord, due to the much higher gamma value for this region. This work compares the fitting of NTCP model to the cervical and thoracic regions of the spinal cord and shows quite different responses. In the future more data should be tested for better understanding the mechanism of spinal cord sensitivity to radiation

  18. Cervical spinal cord injury during cerebral angiography with MRI confirmation: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejjani, G.K.; Rizkallah, R.G.; Tzortidis, F. [Department of Neurosurgery, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Mark, A.S. [Department of Neuroradiology, Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-01-01

    We report the first case of MRI-documented cervical spinal cord injury during cerebral angiography. A 54-year-old woman underwent an angiogram for subarachnoid hemorrhage. Her head was secured in a plastic head-holder. At the end of the procedure, she was found to have a left hemiparesis. MRI revealed high signal in the cervical spinal cord. The etiology may have been mechanical due to patient positioning, or toxic, from contrast medium injection in the vessels feeding the spinal cord, or a combination of both. (orig.) With 3 figs., 26 refs.

  19. Steady-streaming effects on the motion of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jenna; Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio; Lasheras, Juan

    2017-11-01

    With each heart beat the oscillatory blood supply to the rigid cranial vault produces a time-periodic variation of the intracranial pressure that drives the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) periodically in and out of the compliant spinal canal. We have recently conducted an analysis of this flow-structure interaction problem taking advantage of the small compliance of the dura membrane bounding externally the CSF and of the disparity of length scales associated with the geometry of the subarachnoid space. We have shown in an idealized geometry that the steady-streaming motion associated with this periodic flow, resulting from the nonlinear cumulative effects of convective acceleration, causes a bulk recirculation of CSF inside the spinal canal, which has been observed in many radiological studies. We extend here our study to investigate the possible contribution arising from the flow around the nerve roots protruding from the spinal cord, an effect that was neglected in our previous work. For this purpose, we consider the oscillatory motion around a cylindrical post confined between two parallel plates. For large values of the relevant Strouhal number we find at leading order a harmonic Stokes flow, whereas steady-streaming effects enter in the first-order corrections, which are computed for realistic values of the Womersley number and of the cylinder height-to-radius ratio.

  20. CT-guided percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with 125I-seed implantation for metastatic vertebral carcinoma involving the spinal canal: analysis of 23 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Xiaoxi; Lu Yinxiang; Ji Yong; Wang Xiaowei; Zhang Guodong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) combined with 125 I-seed implantation for the treatment of metastatic vertebral carcinoma involving the spinal canal. Methods: A total of 28 involved vertebrae were detected in 23 patients with metastatic vertebral carcinoma. Each patient had 1-2 diseased vertebrae. The lesions included cervical vertebra (n=4), thoracic vertebra (n=13) and lumbar vertebra (n=11). Destroyed posterior vertebral wall was seen in all involved vertebrae. Thirteen vertebrae found in 12 patients showed involvement of the epidural space. According to treatment planning system (TPS) CT-guided implantation of 125 I seeds was carried out first for cervical lesions, which was followed by PVP. For the thoracic and lumbar lesions, unilateral or bilateral puncturing with several particle needles was employed to implant the 125 I seeds, then, PVP with bone cement injection was performed. The complications and the clinical efficacy were analyzed. Results: Successful operation was obtained in all patients. The number of implanted 125 I seeds ranged from 4 to 30 per vertebra, and the volume of injected bone cement was 1-6 ml per vertebra. After the operation the pain relief rate was 86.9% (n=20). The incidence of bone cement leakage was 17.8% (5/28). One patient had radicular pain caused by neuropore leakage, which was relieved after medication. No serious complications, such as spinal cord injury or radiation myelitis, occurred. Conclusion: CT-guided PVP combined with 125 I-seed implantation is effective and safe for the treatment of metastatic vertebral carcinoma involving the spinal canal. This therapy can effectively relieve the pain and control the deterioration of tumor, besides, the incidence of bone cement leakage is very low. (authors)

  1. Follow-up CT myelography of severe cervical spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Keiichi; Onoda, Kimio; Kawashima, Yasuhiro; Muto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yoichi

    1987-11-01

    There are many reports describing gross anatomical and microscopical findings of severely injured cervical cords in autopsy of the acute and chronic state, but no morphological findings of a severe cervical spinal cord injury in a chronic state by follow-up CT myelography have been found in the literature so far. The sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord and subarachnoid space of 9 out of 14 severe cervical spinal cord injury patients were measured with CT myelography within 7.5 years after the tranuma and their size compared with a control group which was made up of 29 patients with slight radiculopathy due to cervical spondylosis and whiplash injuries. Injured cord levels were C4 4 cases, C5 4 cases and C6 1 case. Remarkable spinal cord atrophy was recogniged in the sagittal diameter from C1 to C7 and in the transverse diameter below C4 and narrowing of the cervical subarachnoid space in the sagittal diameter from C2 to C5. The significance level was set at 1 - 5 %. From these fingings, we have concluded that atrophy appeared not only in the injured segment but also the whole cervical cord after the trauma. There was less cord atrophy in a good functional prognosis than in a poor prognosis.

  2. Follow-up CT myelography of severe cervical spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Keiichi; Onoda, Kimio; Kawashima, Yasuhiro; Muto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yoichi

    1987-01-01

    There are many reports describing gross anatomical and microscopical findings of severely injured cervical cords in autopsy of the acute and chronic state, but no morphological findings of a severe cervical spinal cord injury in a chronic state by follow-up CT myelography have been found in the literature so far. The sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord and subarachnoid space of 9 out of 14 severe cervical spinal cord injury patients were measured with CT myelography within 7.5 years after the tranuma and their size compared with a control group which was made up of 29 patients with slight radiculopathy due to cervical spondylosis and whiplash injuries. Injured cord levels were C4 4 cases, C5 4 cases and C6 1 case. Remarkable spinal cord atrophy was recogniged in the sagittal diameter from C1 to C7 and in the transverse diameter below C4 and narrowing of the cervical subarachnoid space in the sagittal diameter from C2 to C5. The significance level was set at 1 - 5 %. From these fingings, we have concluded that atrophy appeared not only in the injured segment but also the whole cervical cord after the trauma. There was less cord atrophy in a good functional prognosis than in a poor prognosis. (author)

  3. Lhermitte's sign: Incidence and treatment variables influencing risk after irradiation of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fein, D.A.; Marcus, R.B. Jr.; Parsons, J.T.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Million, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Lhermitte's sign is a relatively infrequent sequela of irradiation of the cervical spinal cord. In this study, the authors sought to determine whether various treatment parameters influenced the likelihood of developing Lhermitte's sign. Between October 1964 and December 1987, 2901 patients with malignancies of the upper respiratory tract were treated at the University of Florida. The dose of radiation to the cervical spinal cord was calculated for those patients who had a minimum 1-year follow-up. A total of 1112 patients who received a minimum of 3000 cGy to at least 2 cm of cervical spinal cord were included in this analysis. Forty patients (3.6%) developed Lhermitte's sign. The mean time to development of Lhermitte's sign after irradiation was 3 months, and the mean duration of symptoms was 6 months. No patient with Lhermitte's sign developed transverse myelitis. Several variables were examined in a univariate analysis, including total dose to the cervical spinal cord, length of cervical spinal cord irradiated, dose per fraction, continuous-course compared with split-course radiotherapy, and once-daily compared with twice-daily irradiation. Only two variables proved to be significant. Six (8%) of 75 patients who received > 5000 cGy to the cervical spinal cord developed Lhermitte's sign compared with 34 (3.3%) of 1037 patients who received < 5000 cGy (p = .04). For patients treated with once-daily fractionation, 28 (3.4%) of 821 patients who received < 200 cGy per fraction developed Lhermitte's sign compared with 6 (10%) of 58 patients who received ≥ 200 cGy (p = .02). An increased risk of developing Lhermitte's sign was demonstrated for patients who received either ≥ 200 cGy per fraction (one fraction per day) or ≥ 5000 cGy total dose to the cervical spinal cord. 29 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  4. Synergistic impact of acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury on the weaning outcome of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Kuang; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Ho, Li-Ing; Wang, Jia-Horng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory neuromuscular impairment severity is known to predict weaning outcome among patients with cervical spinal cord injury; however, the impact of non-neuromuscular complications remains unexplored. This study was to evaluate possible neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular factors that may negatively impact weaning outcome. From September 2002 to October 2012, acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury patients who had received mechanical ventilation for >48h were enrolled and divided into successful (n=54) and unsuccessful weaning groups (n=19). Various neuromuscular, non-neuromuscular factors and events during the intensive care unit stay were extracted from medical charts and electronic medical records. Variables presenting with a significant difference (pspinal cord injury (C1-3), lower pulse rates, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, higher peak blood urea nitrogen, lower trough albumin, and lower trough blood leukocyte counts. Furthermore, unsuccessful weaning patients had a higher incidence of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock and acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury were independent risk factors for failure of weaning. Importantly, patients with both risk factors showed a large increase in odds ratio for unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation (pinjury during the intensive care unit stay and high level of cervical spinal injury are two independent risk factors that synergistically work together producing a negative impact on weaning outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cervical stenosis in spinal cord injury and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Stephen P; Weaver, Frances; Chin, Amy; Svircev, Jelena; Carbone, Laura

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize etiologies of spinal cord injury and disorders (SCI/D) in persons with and without cervical stenosis/spondylosis (CSS) and to describe clinical characteristics and underlying comorbidities in these populations. We reviewed administrative data for 1954 Veterans who had onset of traumatic or non-traumatic tetraplegia during FY 1999-2007. This included 1037 with a diagnosis of CSS at or in the two years prior to SCI onset of SCI/D and 917 without a diagnosis of CSS. Demographics, etiologies of SCI/D and comorbidities by CSS status. Veterans with SCI/D and CSS were older, more likely to have incomplete injuries and more likely to be Black than those with SCI/D and no CSS. Of patients with traumatic etiologies for SCI, 35.1% had a diagnosis of CSS at the time of or in the 2 years prior to SCI onset. Of those with tetraplegia due to falls, 40.0% had CSS, whereas for other known traumatic etiologies the percentages with CSS were lower: vehicular (25.0%); sports (16.1%); and acts of violence (10.2%). Total comorbidity scores measured by the Charlson co morbidity index and CMS Hierarchical Condition Category (CMS-HCC) were higher in those with CSS and SCI/D compared to those with SCI/D without CSS (P traumatic tetraplegia. Falls are a particularly important potentially modifiable risk for SCI in patients with CSS.

  6. Congenital abdominal dumbbell fashion neuroblastoma with invasion of spinal canal detected by ultrasonography - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosiak, W.; Czarniak, P.; Swieton, D.; Piskunowicz, M.; Drozynska, E.; Szolkiewicz, A.

    2007-01-01

    A case of congenital abdominal dumbbell fashion neuroblastoma with invasion of the spinal canal detected by ultrasonography (US) is presented. A 3-week-old male neonate was admitted to the hospital with a palpable mass in the left lumbar region. Ultrasound examination was performed on the same day. It disclosed a pathologic mass filling the left side of the retroperitoneal space - displacing laterally and inferiorly the left kidney. The second part of the tumor was located above the Gerot's fascia in the muscles and infiltrated the tomography scanning confirmed the presence of solid masses in these locations. Urinary excretion of vanillin-mandelic acid (VMA) was within normal range, ferritin level was elevated (447 μg/ml). Bone scintigraphy showed metastases to the left clavicle. There were no changes in bone marrow. Diagnosis of an undifferentiated malignant neuroblastoma was established in histopathological examination. Spinal ultrasonography is highly recommended in neonates and infants with retroperitoneal tumors. (author)

  7. Anatomical Recruitment of Spinal V2a Interneurons into Phrenic Motor Circuitry after High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zholudeva, Lyandysha V; Karliner, Jordyn S; Dougherty, Kimberly J; Lane, Michael A

    2017-11-01

    More than half of all spinal cord injuries (SCIs) occur at the cervical level, often resulting in impaired respiration. Despite this devastating outcome, there is substantial evidence for endogenous neuroplasticity after cervical SCI. Spinal interneurons are widely recognized as being an essential anatomical component of this plasticity by contributing to novel neuronal pathways that can result in functional improvement. The identity of spinal interneurons involved with respiratory plasticity post-SCI, however, has remained largely unknown. Using a transgenic Chx10-eGFP mouse line (Strain 011391-UCD), the present study is the first to demonstrate the recruitment of excitatory interneurons into injured phrenic circuitry after a high cervical SCI. Diaphragm electromyography and anatomical analysis were used to confirm lesion-induced functional deficits and document extent of the lesion, respectively. Transneuronal tracing with pseudorabies virus (PRV) was used to identify interneurons within the phrenic circuitry. There was a robust increase in the number of PRV-labeled V2a interneurons ipsilateral to the C2 hemisection, demonstrating that significant numbers of these excitatory spinal interneurons were anatomically recruited into the phrenic motor pathway two weeks after injury, a time known to correspond with functional phrenic plasticity. Understanding this anatomical spinal plasticity and the neural substrates associated with functional compensation or recovery post-SCI in a controlled, experimental setting may help shed light onto possible cellular therapeutic candidates that can be targeted to enhance spontaneous recovery.

  8. Pathophysiology of cervical myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, Darryl C; Fehlings, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy is a group of closely related disorders usually caused by spondylosis or by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and is characterized by compression of the cervical spinal cord or nerve roots by varying degrees and number of levels. The decrease in diameter of the vertebral canal secondary to disc degeneration and osteophytic spurs compresses the spinal cord and nerve roots at one or several levels, producing direct damage and often secondary ischemic changes. Clinicians who treat cervical myelopathy cord injuries should have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology and the processes that are initiated after the spinal cord has been injured. Literature review. Literature review of human cervical myelopathy and clinically relevant animal models to further our understanding of the pathological mechanisms involved. The pathophysiology of cervical myelopathy involves static factors, which result in acquired or developmental stenosis of the cervical canal and dynamic factors, which involve repetitive injury to the cervical cord. These mechanical factors in turn result in direct injury to neurons and glia as well as a secondary cascade of events including ischemia, excitotoxicity, and apoptosis; a pathobiology similar to that occurring in traumatic spinal cord injury. This review summarizes some of the significant pathophysiological processes involved in cervical myelopathy.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in the management of suspected spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loughrey, Gareth J.; Collins, Conor D.; Todd, Susan M.; Brown, Nicola M.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and fifty-five patients underwent a total of 159 spinal MRI examinations over a three-year period. Patients were examined using a 1.0T magnet and a phased array surface spine coil. Sagittal T1 weighted spin echo and STIR sequences were routinely employed. Axial T1 and T2 weighted spin echo images were obtained at sites of identified pathology. Contrast enhanced sagittal and axial T1 weighted spin echo images were acquired when the unenhanced appearances did not correlate with the clinical findings or when the images suggested intradural or intramedullary disease. RESULTS: Malignant disease affecting the spinal cord or cauda equina was noted in 104/159 (65%) patients (extradural n= 78, intradural n= 20, intramedullary n= 7); one patient had evidence of both intradural and intramedullary deposits. Multiple levels of extradural cord/cauda equina compression were present in 18/78 patients (23%). The thoracic spine was the most frequently affected (74%). Bone elements were the major component of extradural compression in 11/78 patients (14%). Intradural metastases were multiple in 15/20 patients (75%). Four of the six solitary intramedullary metastases were situated in the conus medullaris. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging of the entire spine is the investigation of choice in patients with known malignancy and suspected spinal canal disease. Contrast-enhanced images should be acquired when the unenhanced appearances do not correlate with the clinical findings or when they suggest intradural or intramedullary disease. Loughrey, G.J. (2000)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in the management of suspected spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughrey, Gareth J.; Collins, Conor D.; Todd, Susan M.; Brown, Nicola M.; Johnson, Richard J

    2000-11-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and fifty-five patients underwent a total of 159 spinal MRI examinations over a three-year period. Patients were examined using a 1.0T magnet and a phased array surface spine coil. Sagittal T1 weighted spin echo and STIR sequences were routinely employed. Axial T1 and T2 weighted spin echo images were obtained at sites of identified pathology. Contrast enhanced sagittal and axial T1 weighted spin echo images were acquired when the unenhanced appearances did not correlate with the clinical findings or when the images suggested intradural or intramedullary disease. RESULTS: Malignant disease affecting the spinal cord or cauda equina was noted in 104/159 (65%) patients (extradural n= 78, intradural n= 20, intramedullary n= 7); one patient had evidence of both intradural and intramedullary deposits. Multiple levels of extradural cord/cauda equina compression were present in 18/78 patients (23%). The thoracic spine was the most frequently affected (74%). Bone elements were the major component of extradural compression in 11/78 patients (14%). Intradural metastases were multiple in 15/20 patients (75%). Four of the six solitary intramedullary metastases were situated in the conus medullaris. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging of the entire spine is the investigation of choice in patients with known malignancy and suspected spinal canal disease. Contrast-enhanced images should be acquired when the unenhanced appearances do not correlate with the clinical findings or when they suggest intradural or intramedullary disease. Loughrey, G.J. (2000)

  11. Cervical Spinal Cord Injury at the Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service: Epidemiology of the Last Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C.P. Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI is a significant medical and socioeconomic problem. In Victoria, Australia, there has been limited research into the incidence of CSCI. The Austin Hospital's Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service (VSCIS is a tertiary referral hospital that accepts referrals for surgical management and ongoing neurological rehabilitation for south eastern Australia. The aim of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of CSCI managed operatively at the VSCIS over the last decade, in order to help fashion public health campaigns. Methods This was a retrospective review of medical records from January 2000 to December 2009 of all patients who underwent surgical management of acute CSCI in the VSCIS catchment region. Patients treated non-operatively were excluded. Outcome measures included: demographics, mechanism of injury and associated factors (like alcohol and patient neurological status. Results Men were much more likely to have CSCI than women, with a 4:1 ratio, and the highest incidence of CSCI for men was in their 20s (39%. The most common cause of CSCI was transport related (52%, followed by falls (23% and water-related incidents (16%. Falls were more prevalent among those >50 years. Alcohol was associated in 22% of all CSCIs, including 42% of water-related injuries. Discussion Our retrospective epidemiological study identified at-risk groups presenting to our spinal injury service. Young males in their 20s were associated with an increased risk of transport-related accidents, water-related incidents in the summer months and accidents associated with alcohol. Another high risk group were men >50 years who suffer falls, both from standing and from greater heights. Public awareness campaigns should target these groups to lower incidence of CSCI.

  12. Extradural spinal schwannoma at cervical spine in 12 year old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madoori Srinivas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal schwannomas are benign tumors arising from spinal nerve root sheaths. It is a primary spinal tumor which are rare in children. We report a case of a 12 year old girl who presented with weakness of all limbs and unable to walk. Imaging studies demonstrated an extradural spinal tumor at cervical spine. The patient was operated and tumor was totally removed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. After surgery there was improvement in signs and symptoms. After two months of operation, child could able to walk normally.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical and thoracic spine and the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR), using a 0.3 T resistive scanner with an iron core and a vertical magnetic field, was evaluated in patients with different diseases affecting the cervical and thoracic spine and the spinal cord. The results indicate that MR is well suited as the procedure of choice for emergency examination of patients with spinal cord symptoms, for examination of patients with suspected spinal multiple sclerosis and for pre-operative evaluation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis with neurological symptoms emanating from the cranio-cervical junction. In patients with cervical radiculapathy and/or myelopathy, caused by spondylosis or disk herniation, MR was found to be equivalent with myelography and CT myelography but MR has several practical advantages. MR at 0.3 T using a vertical magnetic field provided information comparable to that reported from examinations performed with superconducting MR scanners. In order to optimize the MR examinations of the spine, the signal characteristics of different coils available when using a vertical magnetic field were determined by phantom studies. Recommendations for optimal coil selection for different levels of the cervical and thoracic spine are given. In addition, the paramagnetic contrast medium gadolinium-DTPA was administered intravenously to patients with suspected spinal multiple sclerosis. Enhancement of clinically active lesions in the cervical spinal cord was observed. Serial MR examinations with gadolinium-DTPA showed that a decrease in enhancement could be correlated with decrease in clinical symptoms and signs. (author)

  14. Widening of the spinal canal and dural ectasia in Marfan's syndrome: assessment by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeirs, G.M.; Verstraete, K.L.; Kunnen, M.F.; Tongerloo, A.J. van; Paepe, A.M. de

    1999-01-01

    We describe a method for diagnosing dural ectasia (DE) and spinal canal widening (SCW) using CT. We examined 23 patients with Marfan's syndrome (MFS), 17 with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and 29 normal subjects, using six axial slices at the level of the L1-S1 pedicles. Transverse diameters of the vertebral bodies, spinal canal and dural sac were measured and indices were defined to differentiate patients with DE and SCW from normal. Statistical significance was assessed using Student's t -test, χ 2 -test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. DE and SCW occurred in 69.6 % and 60.9 % of cases of MFS and in 23.5 % and 35.3 % of EDS respectively. In MFS, prevalence was significantly higher than in the control group. DE was significantly more frequent in MFS than in EDS. A strong correlation existed between DE and SCW in MFS and the control group, but not in EDS. Our system enables quantitative assessment of SCW and DE. The latter is particularly important in subjects suspected of having MFS, in whom it is a common and characteristic sign. (orig.)

  15. Rod Migration Into the Spinal Canal After Posterior Instrumented Fusion Causing Late-Onset Neurological Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavese, Federico; Dmitriev, Petru; Deslandes, Jacques; Samba, Antoine; Dimeglio, Alain; Mansour, Mounira; Rousset, Marie; Dubousset, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Rod migration into the spinal canal after posterior instrumented fusion is a rare complication causing late-onset neurological symptoms. The purpose of the present study is to report a case of a 13-year-old boy with spastic cerebral palsy and related neuromuscular kyphoscoliosis who developed late-onset neurological deterioration secondary to progressive implant migration into the spinal canal over a 5-year period. A decision was made to remove both rods to achieve decompression. Intraoperative findings were consistent with information gained from preoperative imaging. The rods were found to have an intracanal trajectory at T9-T10 for the right rod and T12-L2 for the left rod. The cause of implant migration, with progressive laminar erosion slow enough to generate a solid mass behind, was progressive kyphosis in a skeletally immature patient with neuromuscular compromise. Fixation type, early surgery, and spasticity management contributed significantly to the presenting condition. Mechanical factors and timing of surgery played a decisive role in this particular presentation. Level IV--Case report and review of the literature.

  16. Cervical Lordosis Actually Increases With Aging and Progressive Degeneration in Spinal Deformity Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Jo; Lenke, Lawrence G; Oshima, Yasushi; Chuntarapas, Tapanut; Mesfin, Addisu; Hershman, Stuart; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Riew, K Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Retrospective. The authors hypothesized that cervical lordosis (CL) would decrease with aging and increasing degeneration. It is theorized that with age and degeneration, the cervical spine loses lordosis and becomes progressively more kyphotic; however, no studies support these conclusions in patients with various spinal deformities. The authors performed a radiographic analysis of asymptomatic adults (referring to their cervical spine) of varying ages, with differing forms of spinal deformity to the thoracic/lumbar spine to see how cervical lordosis changes with increasing age. A total of 104 total spine EOS X-rays of adult (aged >18 years) spinal deformity patients without documented neck pain, prior neck surgery, or cervical deformity were reviewed. The researchers only reviewed EOS X-rays because they allow complete visualization from occiput to feet. Cervical lordosis, standard Cobb measurements, sagittal balance parameters, and cervical degeneration were quantified radiographically by the method previously described by Gore et al. Statistical analysis was performed with 1-way analysis of variance to compare significant differences between groups aged 60 years as well as changes in sagittal balance. A p-value 60 years, respectively; p 60 years, respectively; p < .01), with the highest degeneration at the C5-6 and C6-7 disc spaces (3.7 ± 3.3 and 3.2 ± 2.9, respectively; p < .01). This increase did not correlate with the increase in CL seen with aging (r = 0.02; p = .84). Cervical lordosis increased with aging in adult spinal deformity patients. There was no relationship between cervical degeneration and lordosis despite the strong relationship seen between increasing CL in older age groups. Copyright © 2014 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intrathecal volume changes in lumbar spinal canal stenosis following extension and flexion: An experimental cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Wolfram; Schwert, Martin; Zirke, Sonja; von Schulze Pellengahr, Christoph; Wiese, Matthias; Lahner, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The spinal canal stenosis is a common disease in elderly. The thecal sac narrowing is considered as the anatomical cause for the disease. There is evidence that the anatomical proportions of the lumbar spinal canal are influenced by postural changes. The liquor volume shift during these postural changes is a valuable parameter to estimate the dynamic qualities of this disease. The aim of this human cadaver study was the determination of intrathecal fluid volume changes during the lumbar flexion and the extension. A special measuring device was designed and built for the study to investigate this issue under controlled conditions. The measuring apparatus fixed the lumbar spine firmly and allowed only flexion and extension. The dural sac was closed water tight. The in vitro changes of the intrathecal volumes during the motion cycle were determined according to the principle of communicating vessels. Thirteen human cadaver spines from the Institute of Anatomy were examined in a test setting with a continuous adjustment of motion. The diagnosis of the lumbar spinal stenosis was confirmed by a positive computer tomography prior testing. The volume changes during flexion and extension cycles were measured stepwise in a 2 degree distance between 18° flexion and 18° extension. Three complete series of measurements were performed for each cadaver. Two specimens were excluded because of fluid leaks from further investigation. The flexion of the lumbar spine resulted in an intrathecal volume increase. The maximum volume effects were seen in the early flexion positions of 2° and 4°. The spine reclination resulted in a volume reduction. The maximum extension effect was seen between 14° and 16°. According to our results, remarkable volume effects were seen in the early movements of the lumbar spine especially for the flexion. The results support the concept of the spinal stenosis as a dynamic disease and allow a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this

  18. SSFSE sequence functional MRI of the human cervical spinal cord with complex finger tapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Chuhai; Kong Kangmei; Guan Jitian; Chen Yexi; He Jiankang; Qi Weili; Wang Xinjia; Shen Zhiwei; Wu Renhua

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Functional MR imaging of the human cervical spinal cord was carried out on volunteers during alternated rest and a complex finger tapping task, in order to detect image intensity changes arising from neuronal activity. Methods: Functional MR imaging data using single-shot fast spin-echo sequence (SSFSE) with echo time 42.4 ms on a 1.5 T GE Clinical System were acquired in eight subjects performing a complex finger tapping task. Cervical spinal cord activation was measured both in the sagittal and transverse imaging planes. Postprocessing was performed by AFNI (Analysis of Functional Neuroimages) software system. Results: Intensity changes (5.5-7.6%) were correlated with the time course of stimulation and were consistently detected in both sagittal and transverse imaging planes of the cervical spinal cord. The activated regions localized to the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord in agreement with the neural anatomy. Conclusion: Functional MR imaging signals can be reliably detected with finger tapping activity in the human cervical spinal cord using a SSFSE sequence with 42.4 ms echo time. The anatomic location of neural activity correlates with the muscles used in the finger tapping task.

  19. Diagnosis and management of traumatic cervical central spinal cord injury: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Hollingsworth, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Background: The classical clinical presentation, neuroradiographic features, and conservative vs. surgical management of traumatic cervical central spinal cord (CSS) injury remain controversial. Methods: CSS injuries, occurring in approximately 9.2% of all cord injuries, are usually attributed to significant hyperextension trauma combined with congenital/acquired cervical stenosis/spondylosis. Patients typically present with greater motor deficits in the upper vs. lower extremities accomp...

  20. The natural history and clinical syndromes of degenerative cervical spondylosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, John C

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a broad term which describes the age related chronic disc degeneration, which can also affect the cervical vertebrae, the facet and other joints and their associated soft tissue supports. Evidence of spondylitic change is frequently found in many asymptomatic adults. Radiculopathy is a result of intervertebral foramina narrowing. Narrowing of the spinal canal can result in spinal cord compression, ultimately resulting in cervical spondylosis myelopathy. This review article examines the current literature in relation to the cervical spondylosis and describes the three clinical syndromes of axial neck pain, cervical radiculopathy and cervical myelopathy.

  1. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, Paavel G.; Sanchez, Katherine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge; Ozcan, Fidan; Feydy, Antoine; Maier, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. (orig.)

  2. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, Paavel G. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Centre de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, Inserm U894, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Sanchez, Katherine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, APHP, CHU Cochin, Paris (France); INSERM U1153 Epidemiologie Clinique des Maladies Osteo-Articulaires, Paris (France); Ozcan, Fidan [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Feydy, Antoine [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Maier, Marc A. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. (orig.)

  3. Contribution of 5-HT2A receptors on diaphragmatic recovery after chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J

    2017-10-01

    Unilateral C2 spinal cord hemisection (C2Hx) interrupts bulbospinal respiratory pathways innervating ipsilateral phrenic motoneurons, resulting in cessation of ipsilateral diaphragm motor output. Plasticity within the spinal neural circuitry controlling the diaphragm can induce partial recovery of phrenic bursting which correlates with the time-dependent return of spinal serotonin (5-HT) immunoreactivity in the vicinity of phrenic motoneurons. The 5-HT 2A receptor subtype is present on phrenic motoneurons and its expression is up-regulated after cervical spinal cord injury; however the functional role of these receptors following injury has not been clearly defined. The present study evaluated the functional role of 5-HT 2A receptors by testing the hypothesis that pharmacologic blockade would attenuate diaphragm activity in rats with chronic cervical spinal cord injury. Bilateral diaphragm electromyography (EMG) was performed in vagal-intact and spontaneously breathing rats before and after intravenous administration of the 5-HT 2A receptor antagonist Ketanserin (1mg/kg). Intravenous ketanserin significantly attenuated ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity in C2Hx animals but had no impact on diaphragm output in uninjured animals. We conclude that 5-HT 2A receptor activation contributes to the recovery of ipsilateral phrenic motor output after chronic cervical spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas before and during spinal anesthesia for application of brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitmann, H.D.; Knocke, T.H.; Poetter, R.; Gustorff, B.; Vaupel, P.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To date, no information is available concerning the impact of spinal anesthesia on the oxygenation status of carcinomas of the uterine cervix. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the influence of spinal anesthesia on the oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas. Patients and Methods: In ten patients with cervical carcinoma who received spinal anesthesia for a first application of brachytherapy, intratumoral pO 2 measurements (pO 2 histography system, Eppendorf-Netheler-Hinz, Hamburg, Germany) were performed. Systemic parameters were documented prior to and during spinal anesthesia. Patients breathed room air spontaneously. For further evaluation, all intratumoral pO 2 values were pooled, and overall median pO 2 values and fractions of hypoxic pO 2 values ≤ 5 mm Hg were calculated. Overall median pO 2 values in the subcutis were also calculated. Results: There were no significant changes of systemic parameters, median subcutaneous pO 2 values, median intratumoral pO 2 values, and the fractions of hypoxic pO 2 values ≤ 5 mm Hg in the tumor upon administration of spinal anesthesia. The variability of measured pO 2 values increased during spinal anesthesia, although substantial changes in the oxygenation status were only seen in individual cases (n = 2). Conclusion: This study shows for the first time that the oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas, in general, is not influenced by spinal anesthesia prior to application of brachytherapy. To conclude, the data presented suggest that reliable pO 2 measurements can be performed under spinal anesthesia. At the same time, since no substantial changes in tumor oxygenation were observed, spinal anesthesia should not affect the O 2 -related efficacy of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. (orig.)

  5. Reproducibility, temporal stability, and functional correlation of diffusion MR measurements within the spinal cord in patients with asymptomatic cervical stenosis or cervical myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Benjamin M; Salamon, Noriko; Woodworth, Davis C; Yokota, Hajime; Holly, Langston T

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to quantify the reproducibility, temporal stability, and functional correlation of diffusion MR characteristics in the spinal cord in patients with cervical stenosis with or without myelopathy. The association between longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements and serial neurological function assessment was explored at both the group and individual level. METHODS Sixty-six nonoperatively treated patients with cervical stenosis were prospectively followed (3 months to > 5 years) using synchronous serial MRI and functional outcome assessment. A total of 183 separate MRI examinations were performed, separated by at least 3 months, and each patient had a minimum of 2 MRI scans (range 2-5 scans). Anatomical and DTI measurements were performed within the spinal cord at the C1-2 region as well as at the area of highest compression. Coefficients of variance (COVs) were compared across measurements in both reference tissue and areas of compression for anatomical measurements, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD). The correlation between diffusion MR measures at the site of compression and evaluations of neurological function assessed using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale at multiple time points was evaluated. RESULTS The COVs for anatomical measurements (Torg ratio and canal diameter) were between 7% and 10%. The median COV for FA measurements at the site of compression was 9%, and for reference tissue at C1-2 it was 6%. The median COV for MD at the site of compression was approximately 12%, and for reference tissue at C1-2 it was 10%. The FA and MD measurements of C1-2 averaged 0.61 and 0.91 μm 2 /msec, respectively, whereas the FA and MD measurements at the site of compression averaged 0.51 and 1.26 μm 2 /msec, respectively. Both FA (slope = 0.037; R 2 = 0.3281, p slope = -0.074; R 2 = 0.1101, p = 0.0084) were significantly correlated with the mJOA score. The FA decreased

  6. Disc-like herniation in association with gas collection in the spinal canal: CT evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsitouridis, Ioannis [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece)]. E-mail: hanjk@radcom.snu.ac.kr; Sayegh, Fares E. [3rd Orthopaedic Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Papapostolou, Panagiota [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece); Chondromatidou, Stella [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece); Goutsaridou, Fotini [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece); Emmanouilidou, Maria [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece); Sidiropoulou, Maria S. [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kapetanos, George A. [3rd Orthopaedic Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2005-10-01

    Gas production as a part of disk degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. Few cases have been reported in which lumbar intraspinal epidural gas cause nerve root compression symptoms. We present 12 cases of gas collection in the spinal canal that were presented to the orthopaedic out-patient department with symptoms of low back pain and sciatica. CT showed the presence of free epidural gas collections adjacent to or over the affected nerve roots. Relief of symptoms was noted with the change of positions, lying down or sleeping. In this study, we conclude that the presence of lumbar intraspinal epidural gas that causes radicular compressing phenomena, can be easily detected with the use of CT.

  7. Disc-like herniation in association with gas collection in the spinal canal: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Sayegh, Fares E.; Papapostolou, Panagiota; Chondromatidou, Stella; Goutsaridou, Fotini; Emmanouilidou, Maria; Sidiropoulou, Maria S.; Kapetanos, George A.

    2005-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disk degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. Few cases have been reported in which lumbar intraspinal epidural gas cause nerve root compression symptoms. We present 12 cases of gas collection in the spinal canal that were presented to the orthopaedic out-patient department with symptoms of low back pain and sciatica. CT showed the presence of free epidural gas collections adjacent to or over the affected nerve roots. Relief of symptoms was noted with the change of positions, lying down or sleeping. In this study, we conclude that the presence of lumbar intraspinal epidural gas that causes radicular compressing phenomena, can be easily detected with the use of CT

  8. Systemic hypothermia for the treatment of acute cervical spinal cord injury in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, William Dalton; Cappuccino, Andrew; Cappuccino, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that affects approximately 12,000 patients each year in the United States. Major causes for spinal cord injury include motor vehicle accidents, sports-related injuries, and direct trauma. Moderate hypothermia has gained attention as a potential therapy due to recent experimental and clinical studies and the use of modest systemic hypothermia (MSH) in high profile case of spinal cord injury in a National Football League (NFL) player. In experimental models of spinal cord injury, moderate hypothermia has been shown to improve functional recovery and reduce overall structural damage. In a recent Phase I clinical trial, systemic hypothermia has been shown to be safe and provide some encouraging results in terms of functional recovery. This review will summarize recent preclinical data, as well as clinical findings that support the continued investigations for the use of hypothermia in severe cervical spinal cord injury.

  9. Adverse events after cervical spinal manipulative therapy: consensus based classification and definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. C.P. van der Schans; M. Schmitt; dr. S.E. Lakke; H.A. Kranenburg

    2015-01-01

    Cervical spinal manipulations (CSM) are frequently employed techniques to alleviate neck pain and headache. Minor and major complications following CSM have been described, though clear consensus on definition and the classification of the complications had not yet been achieved. As a result,

  10. Adverse events after cervical spinal manipulative therapy: consensus based classification and definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, Rik; Jorna-Lakke, Sandra; Schmitt, M.A.; van der Schans, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spinal manipulations (CSM) are frequently employed techniques to alleviate neck pain and headache. Minor and major complications following CSM have been described, though clear consensus on definition and the classification of the complications had not yet been achieved. As a result,

  11. Rate of perioperative neurological complications after surgery for cervical spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew K; Winkler, Ethan A; Jacques, Line

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical spinal cord stimulation (cSCS) is used to treat pain of the cervical region and upper extremities. Case reports and small series have shown a relatively low risk of complication after cSCS, with only a single reported case of perioperative spinal cord injury in the literature. Catastrophic cSCS-associated spinal cord injury remains a concern as a result of underreporting. To aid in preoperative counseling, it is necessary to establish a minimum rate of spinal cord injury and surgical complication following cSCS. METHODS The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) is a stratified sample of 20% of all patient discharges from nonfederal hospitals in the United States. The authors identified discharges with a primary procedure code for spinal cord stimulation (ICD-9 03.93) associated with a primary diagnosis of cervical pathology from 2002 to 2011. They then analyzed short-term safety outcomes including the presence of spinal cord injury and neurological, medical, and general perioperative complications and compared outcomes using univariate analysis. RESULTS Between 2002 and 2011, there were 2053 discharges for cSCS. The spinal cord injury rate was 0.5%. The rates of any neurological, medical, and general perioperative complications were 1.1%, 1.4%, and 11.7%, respectively. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS In the largest series of cSCS, the risk of spinal cord injury was higher than previously reported (0.5%). Nonetheless, this procedure remains relatively safe, and physicians may use these data to corroborate the safety of cSCS in an appropriately selected patient population. This may become a key treatment option in an increasingly opioid-dependent, aging population.

  12. Dynamic changes in the dural space and spinal cord cross-sectional area during flexion and extension in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machino, Masaaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Ito, Keigo; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Kato, Fumihiko

    2009-01-01

    The number of patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is increasing with the aging of the population. The patients' during spinal cord tends to be compressed neck extension, because the yellow ligaments and intervertebral discs protrude into the spinal canal during neck extension (pincer mechanism). A total of 100 patients with CSM were prospectively enrolled in this study. After preoperative myelography, multi-detector-row CT (MDCT) scans were acquired in flexion and extension, and the dural space and spinal cord cross-sectional area at each disc level from C2/3 to C7/Th1 were measured by using Scion imaging software. The average dural space and average spinal cord cross-sectional area were smaller in extension than in flexion from the C3/4 to C7/Th1 disc level, and the greatest dynamic changes were seen at the C5/6 level. MDCT demonstrated dynamic factors in patients with CSM. The spinal cord cross-sectional area became narrower during extension in patients with CSM. (author)

  13. Diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; David, P.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays plays a predominant role in the diagnosis and evaluation of spinal canal pathologies and has reduced the other exploratory methods, including computerized tomography (CT) and myelography, to an ancillary role. These pathologies are divided into three groups: those where MRI is the only imaging method (syringomyela, tumours in the spinal canal, phakomatoses, external pachimeningitis, spinal cord injuries, myelitis); those where MRI is the initial method and is completed by other examinations (vascular malformations, dysraphism, myelopathies due to cervical osteoarthritis) and those where MRI still play a lesser role than CT (degenerative lesions of the lumbar column) [fr

  14. Conservative Management Of Third Trimester Cervical Spinal Cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal cord injury, though an important cause of morbidity appears to be uncommon in pregnant women or perhaps, has not been accurately documented among them. Superimposed on the many impairments resulting from spinal cord injury is the presence of the foetus in the womb, which in itself normally brings about ...

  15. [Carcinoma of the uterine cervical canal. Staging and biometric assessment with magnetic resonance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischetti, S G; Politi, G; Lomeo, E; Garozzo, G; Di Leo, S; Nuciforo, G

    1994-10-01

    In uterine cervical canal carcinoma, the current clinical FIGO criteria often fail not only to differentiate stage IA2 from stage IB but also to demonstrate possible parametrial involvement. Moreover, the analysis of tumor volume and of the depth of neoplastic stromal invasion is not very reliable. The authors investigated MR accuracy in the definition of such variables: to this purpose, 24 patients with histologically confirmed endocervical adenocarcinoma were submitted to MRI, which was performed with an 0.5-T superconductive magnet. Sagittal and oblique transverse or sometimes coronal SE images, oriented so as to be perpendicular to longitudinal cervical major axis were obtained with T2 weighting (TR 1800 ms, TE 25-90 ms). MR data were correlated with pathologic findings. MR accuracy in demonstrating parametrial involvement was 92%, its sensitivity was 86% and specificity 97%. Volumetric MR data showed a high correlation (r = 0.970) with those derived from pathologic findings. In 92% of cases stromal invasion exceeded 5 mm. MRI, thanks to its high accuracy, should be included in diagnostic pretreatment protocols, even though FIGO criteria do not require it yet, especially in the presence of an endocervical adenocarcinoma. Moreover, the accurate definition of tumor volume can allow less extensive surgery with the same survival rates and fewer complications, which are frequently observed after radical hysterectomy.

  16. Approach to the irradiation of extensive cervical and upper thoracic spinal astrocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, E.

    1981-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord tumors are relatively rare, especially to the extent presented in this report. A 31-year-old woman had been diagnosed as having an inoperable astrocytoma, grade I-II, involving the entire cervical spinal cord and two upper thoracic segments. After decompressive laminectomy, she was referred for a radical course of radiation therapy. An irradiation technique was devised which allowed treatment of a single cylindrical volume of tissue encompassing the known tumor. Field fractionation with undesirable gaps and/or excessive dose to overlying normal structures was avoided. To the cervical spinal cord she received 5590 cGy in 29 fractions over 42 days. By this schedule she received at the same time 4820 cGy to the medulla oblongata and 4880 cGy to the upper thoracic cord. Partial neurological improvement occurred at the end of the treatment. The treatment approach is discussed in the background of the literature data. (orig.) [de

  17. 7 Tesla 22-channel wrap-around coil array for cervical spinal cord and brainstem imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bei; Seifert, Alan C; Kim, Joo-Won; Borrello, Joseph; Xu, Junqian

    2017-10-01

    Increased signal-to-noise ratio and blood oxygenation level-dependent sensitivity at 7 Tesla (T) have the potential to enable high-resolution imaging of the human cervical spinal cord and brainstem. We propose a new two-panel radiofrequency coil design for these regions to fully exploit the advantages of ultra-high field. A two-panel array, containing four transmit/receive and 18 receive-only elements fully encircling the head and neck, was constructed following simulations demonstrating the B1+ and specific absorption rate (SAR) benefits of two-panel over one-panel arrays. This array was compared with a previously reported posterior-only array and tested for safety using a phantom. Its anatomical, functional, and diffusion MRI performance was demonstrated in vivo. The two-panel array produced more uniform B1+ across the brainstem and cervical spinal cord without compromising SAR, and achieved 70% greater receive sensitivity than the posterior-only array. The two-panel design enabled acceleration of R = 2 × 2 in two dimensions or R = 3 in a single dimension. High quality in vivo anatomical, functional, and diffusion images of the human cervical spinal cord and brainstem were acquired. We have designed and constructed a wrap-around coil array with excellent performance for cervical spinal cord and brainstem MRI at 7T, which enables simultaneous human cervical spinal cord and brainstem functional MRI. Magn Reson Med 78:1623-1634, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Scissors stab wound to the cervical spinal cord at the craniocervical junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Ying-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Stab wounds resulting in spinal cord injury of the craniocervical junction are rare. A scissors stab wound to the cervical spinal cord has been reported only once in the literature. This paper aimed to report a case of Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome in an 8-year-old boy secondary to a scissors stab wound at the craniocervical junction. Case report and review of the literature. Case report of an 8-year-old boy accidentally stabbed in the neck by scissors, which were thrown as a dart. The case study of an 8-year-old boy who was hospitalized because of a scissors stab wound at the craniocervical junction. The patient developed Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome on the left side of the body. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a laceration of the spinal cord at the craniocervical junction with cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Careful cleansing and interrupted sutures of the wounds were performed to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Rehabilitation therapy was performed 2 days later. A follow-up examination revealed complete recovery of the neurologic deficit 8 months post-injury. Treatment of scissors stab wounds to the cervical spinal cord, whether conservative management or thorough surgical exploration, should be individualized based on history, examination, and imaging. As shown in this case report, despite conservative management, complete recovery, which was unexpected, was attributed to the initial mild laceration of the spinal cord and ipsilateral spinal cord functional compensation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with extension of the central canal of the spinal cord according to magnetic resonance imaging data

    OpenAIRE

    E. G. Mendelevich; G. R. Mukhamedzhanova; E. I. Bogdanov

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes an atypical case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) concurrent with extension of the central canal – hydromyelia.Diagnostic difficulty is due to the presence of symptoms which are atypical for ALS, such as early age of onset, slow progression with long-term involvement of one leg, as well as extension of the central canal of the spinal cord at the level of TIII-IX bodies, as evidenced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The paper presents a clinical case, a review of ...

  20. Cervical spondylosis with spinal cord encroachment: should preventive surgery be recommended?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Donald R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been stated that individuals who have spondylotic encroachment on the cervical spinal cord without myelopathy are at increased risk of spinal cord injury if they experience minor trauma. Preventive decompression surgery has been recommended for these individuals. The purpose of this paper is to provide the non-surgical spine specialist with information upon which to base advice to patients. The evidence behind claims of increased risk is investigated as well as the evidence regarding the risk of decompression surgery. Methods A literature search was conducted on the risk of spinal cord injury in individuals with asymptomatic cord encroachment and the risk and benefit of preventive decompression surgery. Results Three studies on the risk of spinal cord injury in this population met the inclusion criteria. All reported increased risk. However, none were prospective cohort studies or case-control studies, so the designs did not allow firm conclusions to be drawn. A number of studies and reviews of the risks and benefits of decompression surgery in patients with cervical myelopathy were found, but no studies were found that addressed surgery in asymptomatic individuals thought to be at risk. The complications of decompression surgery range from transient hoarseness to spinal cord injury, with rates ranging from 0.3% to 60%. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence that individuals with spondylotic spinal cord encroachment are at increased risk of spinal cord injury from minor trauma. Prospective cohort or case-control studies are needed to assess this risk. There is no evidence that prophylactic decompression surgery is helpful in this patient population. Decompression surgery appears to be helpful in patients with cervical myelopathy, but the significant risks may outweigh the unknown benefit in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, broad recommendations for decompression surgery in suspected at-risk individuals cannot be made

  1. Mechanical Design and Analysis of a Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion Injury Model in Non-Human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrey, Carolyn J; Salegio, Ernesto A; Camisa, William; Tam, Horace; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C

    2016-06-15

    Non-human primate (NHP) models of spinal cord injury better reflect human injury and provide a better foundation to evaluate potential treatments and functional outcomes. We combined finite element (FE) and surrogate models with impact data derived from in vivo experiments to define the impact mechanics needed to generate a moderate severity unilateral cervical contusion injury in NHPs (Macaca mulatta). Three independent variables (impactor displacement, alignment, and pre-load) were examined to determine their effects on tissue level stresses and strains. Mechanical measures of peak force, peak displacement, peak energy, and tissue stiffness were analyzed as potential determinants of injury severity. Data generated from FE simulations predicted a lateral shift of the spinal cord at high levels of compression (>64%) during impact. Submillimeter changes in mediolateral impactor position over the midline increased peak impact forces (>50%). Surrogate cords established a 0.5 N pre-load protocol for positioning the impactor tip onto the dural surface to define a consistent dorsoventral baseline position before impact, which corresponded with cerebrospinal fluid displacement and entrapment of the spinal cord against the vertebral canal. Based on our simulations, impactor alignment and pre-load were strong contributors to the variable mechanical and functional outcomes observed in in vivo experiments. Peak displacement of 4 mm after a 0.5N pre-load aligned 0.5-1.0 mm over the midline should result in a moderate severity injury; however, the observed peak force and calculated peak energy and tissue stiffness are required to properly characterize the severity and variability of in vivo NHP contusion injuries.

  2. Extraction of motor activity from the cervical spinal cord of behaving rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Abhishek; Sahin, Mesut

    2006-12-01

    Injury at the cervical region of the spinal cord results in the loss of the skeletal muscle control from below the shoulders and hence causes quadriplegia. The brain-computer interface technique is one way of generating a substitute for the lost command signals in these severely paralyzed individuals using the neural signals from the brain. In this study, we are investigating the feasibility of an alternative method where the volitional signals are extracted from the cervical spinal cord above the point of injury. A microelectrode array assembly was implanted chronically at the C5-C6 level of the spinal cord in rats. Neural recordings were made during the face cleaning behavior with forelimbs as this task involves cyclic forelimb movements and does not require any training. The correlation between the volitional motor signals and the elbow movements was studied. Linear regression technique was used to reconstruct the arm movement from the rectified-integrated version of the principal neural components. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of extracting the motor signals from the cervical spinal cord and using them for reconstruction of the elbow movements.

  3. Should suspected cervical spinal cord injury be immobilised?: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteir, Ala'a O; Smith, Karen; Stoelwinder, Johannes U; Middleton, James; Jennings, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    Spinal cord injuries occur worldwide; often being life-threatening with devastating long term impacts on functioning, independence, health, and quality of life. Systematic review of the literature to determine the efficacy of cervical spinal immobilisation (vs no immobilisation) in patients with suspected cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI); and to provide recommendations for prehospital spinal immobilisation. Searches were conducted of the Cochrane library, CINAHL, EMBASE, Pubmed, Scopus, Web of science, Google scholar, and OvidSP (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and DARE) databases. Studies were included if they were relevant to the research question, published in English, based in the prehospital setting, and included adult patients with traumatic injury. The search identified 1471 citations, of which eight observational studies of variable quality were included. Four studies were retrospective cohorts, three were case series and one a case report. Cervical collar application was reported in penetrating trauma to be associated with unadjusted increased risk of mortality in two studies [(OR, 8.82; 95% CI, 1.09-194; p=0.038) & (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.35-3.13)], concealment of neck injuries in one study and increased scene time in another study. While, in blunt trauma, one study indicated that immobilisation might be associated with worsened neurological outcome (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.03-3.99; p=0.04, unadjusted). We did not attempt to combine study results due to significant heterogeneity of study design and outcome measures. There is a lack of high-level evidence on the effect of prehospital cervical spine immobilisation on patient outcomes. There is a clear need for large prospective studies to determine the clinical benefit of prehospital spinal immobilisation as well as to identify the subgroup of patients most likely to benefit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Migration d'une broche dans le canal médullaire cervical après une ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Migration d'une broche dans le canal médullaire cervical après une ostéosynthèse de l'articulation acromio-claviculaire. Bah Aliou, El Alaoui Adil. Abstract. We report the case of a 49 year-old right-handed chef with left shoulder trauma occurred during a football game. The diagnosis was fracture of the distal quarter of ...

  5. Reversible Parkinson-Like Symptoms in Patient with Bilateral Chronic Subdural Hematomas and Cervical Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guppy, Kern H; Khandhar, Suketu M; Ochi, Calvin

    2018-01-01

    Gait abnormalities have been seen in patients with Parkinson disease or Parkinson-like (P-L) disorders and cervical spinal stenosis. Acute presentation of P-L symptoms has been reported in 24 cases caused by chronic subdural hematomas with 11 cases due to bilateral chronic subdural hematomas. When a patient also presents with cervical spinal stenosis, the correct therapeutic decision between P-L disorders and myelopathy is challenging. An 80-year-old male presented with a 2-week history of weakness in his left leg. A few days before presentation, his gait had deteriorated quite dramatically. Neurologic examination showed mild leg weakness, hyperreflexia, and a gait that was slow and wide based, at times festinating but with relatively spared arm movement. He also had masked facial features with increased tone in his extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed cervical stenosis at C5-6, and computed tomography of the head showed large bilateral subdural hematomas. The subdural hematomas were drained. Immediate improvement in his symptoms was observed with complete resolution by his third month of follow-up. The patient never had a history of Parkinson disease. This paper reports for the first time a patient who presented with acute P-L symptoms and cervical myelopathy with findings of both bilateral chronic subdural hematomas and cervical spinal stenosis. The decision to drain the subdural hematoma in our case resulted in full recovery of the patient's gait and other extrapyramidal symptoms. This paper reviews the literature on reversible P-L symptoms caused by bilateral chronic subdural hematomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ascending central canal dilation and progressive ependymal disruption in a contusion model of rodent chronic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keirstead Hans S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI can lead to an insidious decline in motor and sensory function in individuals even years after the initial injury and is accompanied by a slow and progressive cytoarchitectural destruction. At present, no pathological mechanisms satisfactorily explain the ongoing degeneration. Methods Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized laminectomized at T10 and received spinal cord contusion injuries with a force of 250 kilodynes using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Animals were randomly distributed into 5 groups and killed 1 (n = 4, 28 (n = 4, 120 (n = 4, 450 (n = 5, or 540 (n = 5 days after injury. Morphometric and immunohistochemical studies were then performed on 1 mm block sections, 6 mm cranial and 6 mm caudal to the lesion epicenter. The SPSS 11.5 t test was used to determine differences between quantitative measures. Results Here, we document the first report of an ascending central canal dilation and progressive ependymal disruption cranial to the epicenter of injury in a contusion model of chronic SCI, which was characterized by extensive dural fibrosis and intraparenchymal cystic cavitation. Expansion of the central canal lumen beyond a critical diameter corresponded with ependymal cell ciliary loss, an empirically predictable thinning of the ependymal region, and a decrease in cell proliferation in the ependymal region. Large, aneurysmal dilations of the central canal were accompanied by disruptions in the ependymal layer, periependymal edema and gliosis, and destruction of the adjacent neuropil. Conclusion Cells of the ependymal region play an important role in CSF homeostasis, cellular signaling and wound repair in the spinal cord. The possible effects of this ascending pathology on ependymal function are discussed. Our studies suggest central canal dilation and ependymal region disruption as steps in the pathogenesis of chronic SCI, identify central canal dilation as a marker of

  7. MR imaging in neuroborreliosis of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattingen, Elke; Weidauer, Stefan; Zanella, Friedhelm E.; Kieslich, Matthias; Boda, Volker

    2004-01-01

    The central nervous system is involved in 10-20% of cases in Lyme disease. The neurological symptoms, time course of the disease and imaging findings are multifaceted. We report two patients with cervical radiculitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed strong enhancement of the cervical nerve roots on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. These imaging patterns of borrelia-associated radiculitis have not been reported before. Knowledge of these imaging features may help to diagnose neuroborreliosis, which presents with non-specific symptoms. (orig.)

  8. MR imaging in neuroborreliosis of the cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattingen, Elke; Weidauer, Stefan; Zanella, Friedhelm E. [University of Frankfurt, Institute of Neuroradiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Kieslich, Matthias; Boda, Volker [University of Frankfurt, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    The central nervous system is involved in 10-20% of cases in Lyme disease. The neurological symptoms, time course of the disease and imaging findings are multifaceted. We report two patients with cervical radiculitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed strong enhancement of the cervical nerve roots on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. These imaging patterns of borrelia-associated radiculitis have not been reported before. Knowledge of these imaging features may help to diagnose neuroborreliosis, which presents with non-specific symptoms. (orig.)

  9. MR-myelography in patients with spinal canal stenosis; MR-Myelographie bei Spinalkanalstenosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, M.; Hutzelmann, A.; Steffens, J.C.; Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel (Germany); Buhl, R. [Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel (Germany)

    1997-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical value of 3D-MR-myelography (3D-MRM) in comparison to myelography and intra-operative findings. Material and Methods: 25 patients with suspected lumbar spinal canal stenosis were studied via myelography and 3D-MRM (volume-data set, 3D-FISP sequenz, T{sub R} 73 ms, T{sub E} 21 ms, flipangle 7 , sagittal slices) besides the routinely acquired sagittal and axial T{sub 1}- and T{sub 2}-weighted images. Diagnoses were made by two radiologists and one neurosurgeon without knowing the clinical history and symptoms, in two separate sessions. Results were compared to intraoperative findings. Results: 3D-MRM has the same diagnostic sensitivity (25/25=100%) as conventional X-ray myelography (25/25=100%) compared to intraoperative findings, but is not invasive and shows more diagnostic details than myelography. Especially in cases of high-grade spinal canal stenosis there is often a lack of intrathecal contrast medium distally of the stenosis. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Bewertung der 3D-MR-Myelographie (3D-MRM) in der Diagnostik lumbaler Spinalkanalstenosen im Vergleich zu Myelographie und Korrelation mit intraoperativem Befund. Material und Methode: In einer fortlaufenden, prospektiven Studie wurden 25 Patienten mit den Symptomen einer lumbalen Spinalkanalstenose kernspintomographisch untersucht. Neben den ueblichen sagittalen und axialen T{sub 1}- und T{sub 2}-gewichteten Aufnahmen wurde ein Volumendatensatz mit einer 3D-FISP Sequenz (T{sub R} 73 ms, T{sub E} 21 ms, Flipwinkel 7 ) akquisiert. Die Nachverarbeitung erfolgte mittels Maximum Intensitaets-Projektion (MIP): 18 Projektionen von 0 -180 . Die 3D-MRM wurde der Myelographie gegenuebergestellt, beide Untersuchungen wurden getrennt von drei Untersuchern blind ausgewertet. Ergebnisse: Sowohl die 3D-MRM als auch die der Myelographie zeigten bei Patienten mit lumbaler Spinalkanalstenose in Korrelation zum intraoperativen Befund eine Uebereinstimmung

  10. The relationship between central motor conduction time and spinal cord compression in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikita, T; Tanaka, N; Nakanishi, K; Kamei, N; Sumiyoshi, N; Kotaka, S; Adachi, N; Ochi, M

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective study. Few studies have reported a relationship between central motor conduction time (CMCT), which evaluates corticospinal function, and degree of spinal cord compression in patients with myelopathy. Thus, there is no consensus on predicting the degree of prolonged CMCT on the basis of the degree of spinal cord compression. If a correlation exists between CMCT and spinal cord compression, then spinal cord compression may be a useful noninvasive clinical indicator of corticospinal function. Therefore, this study evaluated the relationship between CMCT and cervical spinal cord compression measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Hiroshima University Hospital in Japan. We studied 33 patients undergoing laminoplasty. Patients exhibited significant cervical spinal cord compression on both MRI and intraoperative electrophysiological examination. We assessed transcranial magnetic stimulation measurement of CMCT; spinal cord compression parameters such as area, lateral diameter, anteroposterior diameter and flattening of the spinal cord at the lesion site and C2/3 levels on MRI; and pre- versus postoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. Correlations between CMCT and flattening as well as anteroposterior diameter of the spinal cord at the lesion level were observed. Strong correlations between CMCT and the ratio of the flattening and anteroposterior diameter parameters at the lesion level to that at the C2/3 level were also observed. Measurement of spinal cord compression may be useful for the evaluation of corticospinal function as a proxy for CMCT in patients with CSM.

  11. Intraoperative Death During Cervical Spinal Surgery: A Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeffrey C; Buser, Zorica; Fish, David E; Lord, Elizabeth L; Roe, Allison K; Chatterjee, Dhananjay; Gee, Erica L; Mayer, Erik N; Yanez, Marisa Y; McBride, Owen J; Cha, Peter I; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A retrospective multicenter study. Routine cervical spine surgeries are typically associated with low complication rates, but serious complications can occur. Intraoperative death is a very rare complication and there is no literature on its incidence. The purpose of this study was to determine the intraoperative mortality rates and associated risk factors in patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. Twenty-one surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network participated in the study. Medical records of patients who received cervical spine surgery from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011, were reviewed to identify occurrence of intraoperative death. A total of 258 patients across 21 centers met the inclusion criteria. Most of the surgeries were done using the anterior approach (53.9%), followed by posterior (39.1%) and circumferential (7%). Average patient age was 57.1 ± 13.2 years, and there were more male patients (54.7% male and 45.3% female). There was no case of intraoperative death. Death during cervical spine surgery is a very rare complication. In our multicenter study, there was a 0% mortality rate. Using an adequate surgical approach for patient diagnosis and comorbidities may be the reason how the occurrence of this catastrophic adverse event was prevented in our patient population.

  12. Cervical spondylosis anatomy: pathophysiology and biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedid, Daniel; Benzel, Edward C

    2007-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is the most common progressive disorder in the aging cervical spine. It results from the process of degeneration of the intervertebral discs and facet joints of the cervical spine. Biomechanically, the disc and the facets are the connecting structures between the vertebrae for the transmission of external forces. They also facilitate cervical spine mobility. Symptoms related to myelopathy and radiculopathy are caused by the formation of osteophytes, which compromise the diameter of the spinal canal. This compromise may also be partially developmental. The developmental process, together with the degenerative process, may cause mechanical pressure on the spinal cord at one or multiple levels. This pressure may produce direct neurological damage or ischemic changes and, thus, lead to spinal cord disturbances. A thorough understanding of the biomechanics, the pathology, the clinical presentation, the radiological evaluation, as well as the surgical indications of cervical spondylosis, is essential for the management of patients with cervical spondylosis.

  13. CASE REPORT Endovascular embolisation of a cervical spinal AVF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corresponding author: N Mahomed (nasreen.mahomed@wits.ac.za). History. A 38-year-old ... Spinal arterio-venous fistula (AVF) is a rare finding in NF1 and ... 1 may present with a spectrum of vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system .... DSA post embolisation with the catheter tip in left (contra-lateral) vertebral ...

  14. Diseases in the cranio-cervical junction: Anatomical and pathological aspects and detailed clinical accounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voth, D.; Glees, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclide imaging of the cranio-cervical region; Magnetic resonance imaging in the cranio-cervical region: Experiences in 194 cases; NMR-finding in a case of Morquio's syndrome with syncope; The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement; and A review of clinical and radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis of head joints

  15. Diseases in the cranio-cervical junction: Anatomical and pathological aspects and detailed clinical accounts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voth, D.; Glees, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclide imaging of the cranio-cervical region; Magnetic resonance imaging in the cranio-cervical region: Experiences in 194 cases; NMR-finding in a case of Morquio's syndrome with syncope; The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement; and A review of clinical and radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis of head joints.

  16. A Case Involving Needles in the Medulla Oblongata, Cervical Spinal Cord, and Abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao-Yu; Li, Da; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Li-Wei; Zhang, Jun-Ting

    2014-10-01

    It is extremely rare to encounter intracranial foreign bodies caused by penetrating injuries other than gunshot wounds or low-velocity wounds. We present a case describing a 5-year-old girl with metallic foreign bodies in the medulla oblongata, cervical spinal cord, and abdomen. The foreign bodies may have been there and remained silent for several years until the patient developed nausea and vomiting that persisted for 3 months. A craniotomy and a laparotomy were performed after a thorough discussion. Five pieces of metallic foreign bodies were removed, and the patient had a good outcome. Despite the precarious location of the needles in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord, this rare case supports the use of surgery to remove the foreign bodies.

  17. Increased intracranial pressure in a case of spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme: analysis of these two rare conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. de Castro-Costa

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a rare case of increased intracranial hypertension consequent to a spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme in a young patient. They analyse the physiopathology of intracranial hypertension in spinal tumors and the rarity of such kind of tumor in this location, and its clinico-pathological aspects.

  18. Comparison of effects of ProTaper, HeroShaper, and Gates Glidden Burs on cervical dentin thickness and root canal volume by using multislice computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahran, Abeer H; AboEl-Fotouh, Mona M

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different instruments used to prepare curved root canals on the remaining cervical dentin thickness and total amount of dentin removed from root canals during instrumentation by using multislice computed tomography. Mesiobuccal canals of 45 mandibular first molars with curvature between 30-40 degrees were divided into 3 equal groups: ProTaper, Hero Shaper, and Gates Glidden Bur with Flex-R hand file. Cervical dentin thickness and canal volume were measured before and after instrumentation by using multislice computed tomography and image analysis software. The results indicated that ProTaper removed significantly less cervical dentin from distal wall of the root (dangerous zone) than HeroShaper and Gates Glidden Bur (P ProTaper system (P < .05).

  19. Activation of Central Pattern Generator for Respiration Following Complete High Cervical Spinal Cord Interruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...neurotransmitter profile (GABAa- and Glycine-ergic). Epidural stimulation applied at frequencies 100-300 Hz to the area of phrenic nucleus location...C4 cervical segment) in spinal (C1-transected) rats induced time -frequency depended facilitation of phrenic nerve activity and was able to maintain

  20. Fast and accurate semi-automated segmentation method of spinal cord MR images at 3T applied to the construction of a cervical spinal cord template.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed-Mounir El Mendili

    Full Text Available To design a fast and accurate semi-automated segmentation method for spinal cord 3T MR images and to construct a template of the cervical spinal cord.A semi-automated double threshold-based method (DTbM was proposed enabling both cross-sectional and volumetric measures from 3D T2-weighted turbo spin echo MR scans of the spinal cord at 3T. Eighty-two healthy subjects, 10 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 10 with spinal muscular atrophy and 10 with spinal cord injuries were studied. DTbM was compared with active surface method (ASM, threshold-based method (TbM and manual outlining (ground truth. Accuracy of segmentations was scored visually by a radiologist in cervical and thoracic cord regions. Accuracy was also quantified at the cervical and thoracic levels as well as at C2 vertebral level. To construct a cervical template from healthy subjects' images (n=59, a standardization pipeline was designed leading to well-centered straight spinal cord images and accurate probability tissue map.Visual scoring showed better performance for DTbM than for ASM. Mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC was 95.71% for DTbM and 90.78% for ASM at the cervical level and 94.27% for DTbM and 89.93% for ASM at the thoracic level. Finally, at C2 vertebral level, mean DSC was 97.98% for DTbM compared with 98.02% for TbM and 96.76% for ASM. DTbM showed similar accuracy compared with TbM, but with the advantage of limited manual interaction.A semi-automated segmentation method with limited manual intervention was introduced and validated on 3T images, enabling the construction of a cervical spinal cord template.

  1. Fast and accurate semi-automated segmentation method of spinal cord MR images at 3T applied to the construction of a cervical spinal cord template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mendili, Mohamed-Mounir; Chen, Raphaël; Tiret, Brice; Villard, Noémie; Trunet, Stéphanie; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélanie; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Pradat, Pierre-François; Benali, Habib

    2015-01-01

    To design a fast and accurate semi-automated segmentation method for spinal cord 3T MR images and to construct a template of the cervical spinal cord. A semi-automated double threshold-based method (DTbM) was proposed enabling both cross-sectional and volumetric measures from 3D T2-weighted turbo spin echo MR scans of the spinal cord at 3T. Eighty-two healthy subjects, 10 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 10 with spinal muscular atrophy and 10 with spinal cord injuries were studied. DTbM was compared with active surface method (ASM), threshold-based method (TbM) and manual outlining (ground truth). Accuracy of segmentations was scored visually by a radiologist in cervical and thoracic cord regions. Accuracy was also quantified at the cervical and thoracic levels as well as at C2 vertebral level. To construct a cervical template from healthy subjects' images (n=59), a standardization pipeline was designed leading to well-centered straight spinal cord images and accurate probability tissue map. Visual scoring showed better performance for DTbM than for ASM. Mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was 95.71% for DTbM and 90.78% for ASM at the cervical level and 94.27% for DTbM and 89.93% for ASM at the thoracic level. Finally, at C2 vertebral level, mean DSC was 97.98% for DTbM compared with 98.02% for TbM and 96.76% for ASM. DTbM showed similar accuracy compared with TbM, but with the advantage of limited manual interaction. A semi-automated segmentation method with limited manual intervention was introduced and validated on 3T images, enabling the construction of a cervical spinal cord template.

  2. Temporary occipital fixation in young children with severe cervical-thoracic spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Brian J; Minkara, Anas A; Angevine, Peter D; Vitale, Michael G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Anderson, Richard C E

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects of instrumentation and fusion of the occipital-cervical-thoracic spine on spinal growth in young children are poorly understood. To mitigate the effects of this surgery on the growing pediatric spine, the authors report a novel technique used in 4 children with severe cervical-thoracic instability. These patients underwent instrumentation from the occiput to the upper thoracic region for stabilization, but without bone graft at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). Subsequent surgery was then performed to remove the occipital instrumentation, thereby allowing further growth and increased motion across the CVJ. METHODS Three very young children (15, 30, and 30 months old) underwent occipital to thoracic posterior segmental instrumentation due to cervical or upper thoracic dislocation, progressive kyphosis, and myelopathy. The fourth child (10 years old) underwent similar instrumentation for progressive cervical-thoracic scoliosis. Bone graft was placed at and distal to C-2 only. After follow-up CT scans demonstrated posterior arthrodesis without unintended fusion from the occiput to C-2, 3 patients underwent removal of the occipital instrumentation. RESULTS Follow-up cervical spine flexion/extension radiographs demonstrated partial restoration of motion at the CVJ. One patient has not had the occipital instrumentation removed yet, because only 4 months have elapsed since her operation. CONCLUSIONS Temporary fixation to the occiput provides increased biomechanical stability for spinal stabilization in young children, without permanently eliminating motion and growth at the CVJ. This technique can be considered in children who require longer instrumentation constructs for temporary stabilization, but who only need fusion in more limited areas where spinal instability exists.

  3. Magnetisation transfer ratio measurement in the cervical spinal cord: a preliminary study in multiple sclerosis

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    Silver, N.C. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Barker, G.J. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Losseff, N.A. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Gawne-Cain, M.L. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); MacManus, D.G. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Thompson, A.J. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Miller, D.H. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom)

    1997-06-01

    MRI readily detects the lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the brain and spinal cord. Conventional MRI sequences do not, however, permit distinction between the various pathological characteristics (oedema, demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis) of lesions in MS. Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging may be more specific in distinguishing the pathologies responsible for disability in MS, namely demyelination and axonal loss, and therefore may have a potential role in monitoring treatment. We have applied MT imaging to the cervical spinal cord to see if it is feasible to measure MT ratios (MTR) in this region where pathological changes may result in considerable disability. We studied 12 patients with MS and 12 age- and sex-matched normal controls using a sagittal T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequence with and without an MT pulse. The median value for cervical cord mean MTR measurement in normal controls was 19.30 % units (interquartile range 19.05-19.55), whereas values were significantly lower in MS patients (median = 17.95 % units, interquartile range 17.25-19.00, P = 0.0004). There was a low intrarater variability for repeated mean MTR measurements. We conclude that it is possible to measure MTR in the cervical spinal cord, that a significant reduction occurs in patients with MS, and that there may be a role for this measure in future MS treatment trials. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Magnetisation transfer ratio measurement in the cervical spinal cord: a preliminary study in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, N.C.; Barker, G.J.; Losseff, N.A.; Gawne-Cain, M.L.; MacManus, D.G.; Thompson, A.J.; Miller, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    MRI readily detects the lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the brain and spinal cord. Conventional MRI sequences do not, however, permit distinction between the various pathological characteristics (oedema, demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis) of lesions in MS. Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging may be more specific in distinguishing the pathologies responsible for disability in MS, namely demyelination and axonal loss, and therefore may have a potential role in monitoring treatment. We have applied MT imaging to the cervical spinal cord to see if it is feasible to measure MT ratios (MTR) in this region where pathological changes may result in considerable disability. We studied 12 patients with MS and 12 age- and sex-matched normal controls using a sagittal T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequence with and without an MT pulse. The median value for cervical cord mean MTR measurement in normal controls was 19.30 % units (interquartile range 19.05-19.55), whereas values were significantly lower in MS patients (median = 17.95 % units, interquartile range 17.25-19.00, P 0.0004). There was a low intrarater variability for repeated mean MTR measurements. We conclude that it is possible to measure MTR in the cervical spinal cord, that a significant reduction occurs in patients with MS, and that there may be a role for this measure in future MS treatment trials. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Hemiparesis Caused by Cervical Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma: A Report of 3 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinya Nakanishi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH with hemiparesis. The first patient was a 73-year-old woman who presented with left hemiparesis, neck pain, and left shoulder pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a left posterolateral epidural hematoma at the C3–C6 level. The condition of the patient improved after laminectomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. The second patient was a 62-year-old man who presented with right hemiparesis and neck pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a right posterolateral dominant epidural hematoma at the C6-T1 level. The condition of the patient improved after laminectomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. The third patient was a 60-year-old woman who presented with left hemiparesis and neck pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a left posterolateral epidural hematoma at the C2–C4 level. The condition of the patient improved with conservative treatment. The classical clinical presentation of SSEH is acute onset of severe irradiating back pain followed by progression to paralysis, whereas SSEH with hemiparesis is less common. Our cases suggest that acute cervical spinal epidural hematoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with clinical symptoms of sudden neck pain and radicular pain with progression to hemiparesis.

  6. Chronic spinal cord injury in the cervical spine of a young soccer player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshihiko; Koga, Michiaki; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2010-05-12

    A 17-year-old male soccer player presented with numbness in the upper- and lower-left extremities of 6 months' duration. He had no apparent history of trauma but experienced neck pain during heading of the ball 5 years prior. A high-signal intensity area was seen on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine. No muscle weakness was observed. Hypoesthesia was observed in bilateral forearms, hands, and extremities below the inguinal region. Plain radiographs in the neutral position showed local kyphosis at C3/4. A small protrusion of the C3/4 disk was observed on T1-weighted MRI. A high-signal area in the spinal cord at the C3/4 level was observed on T2-weighted MRI, but this was not enhanced by gadolinium. Multiple sclerosis, intramedullary spinal cord tumor, sarcoidosis and malignant lymphoma, and spinal cord injury were all considered in the differential diagnosis. However, in view of the clinical, laboratory, and radiological investigations, we concluded that repeated impacts to the neck caused by heading of the ball during soccer induced a chronic, minor spinal cord injury. This contributed to the high-signal intensity change of the spinal cord in T2-weighted MRI. The present case demonstrates that repeated impact may cause chronic spinal cord injury. Soccer, American football, or rugby players presenting with neck or extremity symptoms should not be overlooked for the possibility of latent spinal cord injury, as this could present later development of more severe or unrecoverable spinal cord injuries. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Interneuronal systems of the cervical spinal cord assessed with BOLD imaging at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stracke, C.P.; Schoth, F.; Moeller-Hartmann, W.; Krings, T.; Pettersson, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if functional activity with spinal cord somatosensory stimulation can be visualized using BOLD fMRI. We investigated nine healthy volunteers using a somatosensory stimulus generator. The stimuli were applied in three different runs at the first, third, and fifth finger tip of the right hand, respectively, corresponding to dermatomes c6, c7, and c8. The stimuli gave an increase of BOLD signal (activation) in three different locations of the spinal cord and brain stem. First, activations could be seen in the spinal segment corresponding to the stimulated dermatome in seven out of nine volunteers for c6 stimulation, two out of eight for c7, and three out of eight for c8. These activations were located close to the posterior margin of the spinal cord, presumably reflecting synaptic transmission to dorsal horn interneurons. Second, activation in the medulla oblongata was evident in four subjects, most likely corresponding to the location of the nucleus cuneatus. The third location of activation, which was the strongest and most reliable observed was inside the spinal cord in the c3 and c4 segments. Activation at these spinal levels was almost invariably observed independently of the dermatome stimulated (9/9 for c6, 8/8 for c7, and 7/8 for c8 stimulation). These activations may pertain to an interneuronal system at this spinal level. The results are discussed in relation to neurophysiological studies on cervical spinal interneuronal pathways in animals and humans. (orig.)

  8. Motor cortex and spinal cord neuromodulation promote corticospinal tract axonal outgrowth and motor recovery after cervical contusion spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareen, N; Shinozaki, M; Ryan, D; Alexander, H; Amer, A; Truong, D Q; Khadka, N; Sarkar, A; Naeem, S; Bikson, M; Martin, J H

    2017-11-01

    Cervical injuries are the most common form of SCI. In this study, we used a neuromodulatory approach to promote skilled movement recovery and repair of the corticospinal tract (CST) after a moderately severe C4 midline contusion in adult rats. We used bilateral epidural intermittent theta burst (iTBS) electrical stimulation of motor cortex to promote CST axonal sprouting and cathodal trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) to enhance spinal cord activation to motor cortex stimulation after injury. We used Finite Element Method (FEM) modeling to direct tsDCS to the cervical enlargement. Combined iTBS-tsDCS was delivered for 30min daily for 10days. We compared the effect of stimulation on performance in the horizontal ladder and the Irvine Beattie and Bresnahan forepaw manipulation tasks and CST axonal sprouting in injury-only and injury+stimulation animals. The contusion eliminated the dorsal CST in all animals. tsDCS significantly enhanced motor cortex evoked responses after C4 injury. Using this combined spinal-M1 neuromodulatory approach, we found significant recovery of skilled locomotion and forepaw manipulation skills compared with injury-only controls. The spared CST axons caudal to the lesion in both animal groups derived mostly from lateral CST axons that populated the contralateral intermediate zone. Stimulation enhanced injury-dependent CST axonal outgrowth below and above the level of the injury. This dual neuromodulatory approach produced partial recovery of skilled motor behaviors that normally require integration of posture, upper limb sensory information, and intent for performance. We propose that the motor systems use these new CST projections to control movements better after injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. White matter organization in cervical spinal cord relates differently to age and control of grip force in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Påvel G; Feydy, Antoine; Maier, Marc A

    2010-03-17

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can be used to elucidate relations between CNS structure and function. We hypothesized that the degree of spinal white matter organization relates to the accuracy of control of grip force. Healthy subjects of different age were studied using DTI and visuomotor tracking of precision grip force. The latter is a prime component of manual dexterity. A regional analysis of spinal white matter [fractional anisotropy (FA)] across multiple cervical levels (C2-C3, C4-C5, and C6-C7) and in different regions of interest (left and right lateral or medial spinal cord) was performed. FA was highest at the C2-C3 level, higher on the right than the left side, and higher in the lateral than in the medial spinal cord (p level in the lateral spinal cord, in which the corticospinal tract innervates spinal circuitry controlling hand and digit muscles. FA of the medial spinal cord correlated consistently with age across all cervical levels, whereas FA of the lateral spinal cord did not. The results suggest (1) a functionally relevant specialization of lateral spinal cord white matter and (2) an increased sensitivity to age-related decline in medial spinal cord white matter in healthy subjects.

  10. Dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord after proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijl, Hendrik P.; Vuijk, Peter van; Coppes, Rob P.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord with protons. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with a single fraction of unmodulated protons (150-190 MeV) using the shoot through method, which employs the plateau of the depth-dose profile rather than the Bragg peak. Four different lengths of the spinal cord (2, 4, 8, and 20 mm) were irradiated with variable doses. The endpoint for estimating dose-volume effects was paralysis of fore or hind limbs. Results: The results obtained with a high-precision proton beam showed a marginal increase of ED 50 when decreasing the irradiated cord length from 20 mm (ED 50 = 20.4 Gy) to 8 mm (ED 50 = 24.9 Gy), but a steep increase in ED 50 when further decreasing the length to 4 mm (ED 50 = 53.7 Gy) and 2 mm (ED 50 = 87.8 Gy). These results generally confirm data obtained previously in a limited series with 4-6-MV photons, and for the first time it was possible to construct complete dose-response curves down to lengths of 2 mm. At higher ED 50 values and shorter lengths irradiated, the latent period to paralysis decreased from 125 to 60 days. Conclusions: Irradiation of variable lengths of rat cervical spinal cord with protons showed steeply increasing ED 50 values for lengths of less than 8 mm. These results suggest the presence of a critical migration distance of 2-3 mm for cells involved in regeneration processes

  11. The correlation between evoked spinal cord potentials and magnetic resonance imaging before Surgery in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Kosuke; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Kato, Yoshihiko; Imajo, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the correlation between electrophysiological examination and MRI diagnosis. Twenty-four patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and evoked spinal cord potentials (ESCPs) before surgery. In all the patients, only the intervertebral level was symptomatic, as shown by ESCPs. ESCPs following median nerve stimulation (MN-ESCPs), transcranial electric stimulation (TCE-ESCPs), and spinal cord stimulation (Spinal-ECSPs) were recorded. The patients were grouped into two groups as follows: group A, all ESCPs were abnormal; group B, normal spinal cord stimulation. Spinal cord transverse area and compression ratio (central and 1/4-lateral anteroposterior diameter divided by transverse diameter) were measured on T1-weighted axial imaging, with abnormal ESCPs as indicators of spinal cord morphology. Central and 1/4-lateral compression ratio was significantly lower in group A. Spinal cord morphology of magnetic resonance imaging is useful for functional diagnosis. (author)

  12. Increased sorbitol levels in the hypertrophic ligamentum flavum of diabetic patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiaquan; Huang, Lu; Chen, Zhuo; Zeng, Zhaoxun; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Zhongzu; Pan, Zhimin; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Hikata, Tomohiro; Iwanami, Akio; Tsuji, Takashi; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Cao, Kai

    2017-05-01

    The pathomechanism of the ligamentum flavum (LF) hypertrophy in diabetic patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) remains unclear. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism of LF hypertrophy in these patients. Twenty-four diabetic and 20 normoglycemic patients with LSCS were enrolled in the study. The structure of the LF in the study subjects was evaluated using histological and immunohistochemical methods, and the levels of sorbitol, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the fibrogenic factor, TGF-β1, in the LF were analyzed. In vitro experiments were performed using NIH3T3 fibroblasts to evaluate the effect of high-glucose conditions and an aldose reductase inhibitor on the cellular production of sorbitol, pro-inflammatory factors, and TGF-β1. We found that the LF of diabetic patients exhibited significantly higher levels of sorbitol and pro-inflammatory cytokines, TGF-β1 and of CD68-positive staining than that of the normoglycemic subjects. The diabetic LF was significantly thicker than that of the controls, and showed evidence of degeneration. The high glucose-cultured fibroblasts exhibited significantly higher levels of sorbitol, pro-inflammatory factors, and TGF-β1 compared to the low glucose-cultured cells, and these levels were dose-dependently reduced by treatment with the aldose reductase inhibitor. Taken together, our data suggests that increased sorbitol levels in the LF of diabetic patients results in increased production of pro-inflammatory and fibrogenic factor, which contribute to LF hypertrophy, and could increase the susceptibility of diabetic patients to LSCS. Furthermore, aldose reductase inhibition effectively reduced the levels of sorbitol and sorbitol-induced pro-inflammatory factor expression in high glucose-cultured fibroblasts. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1058-1066, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Does cervical lordosis change after spinal manipulation for non-specific neck pain? A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilton, Michael; Branney, Jonathan; de Vries, Bas Penning; Breen, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    The association between cervical lordosis (sagittal alignment) and neck pain is controversial. Further, it is unclear whether spinal manipulative therapy can change cervical lordosis. This study aimed to determine whether cervical lordosis changes after a course of spinal manipulation for non-specific neck pain. Posterior tangents of C2 and C6 were drawn on the lateral cervical fluoroscopic images of 29 patients with subacute/chronic non-specific neck pain and 30 healthy volunteers matched for age and gender, recruited August 2011 to April 2013. The resultant angle was measured using 'Image J' digital geometric software. The intra-observer repeatability (measurement error and reliability) and intra-subject repeatability (minimum detectable change (MDC) over 4 weeks) were determined in healthy volunteers. A comparison of cervical lordosis was made between patients and healthy volunteers at baseline. Change in lordosis between baseline and 4-week follow-up was determined in patients receiving spinal manipulation. Intra-observer measurement error for cervical lordosis was acceptable (SEM 3.6°) and reliability was substantial ICC 0.98, 95 % CI 0.962-0991). The intra-subject MDC however, was large (13.5°). There was no significant difference between lordotic angles in patients and healthy volunteers (p = 0.16). The mean cervical lordotic increase over 4 weeks in patients was 2.1° (9.2) which was not significant (p = 0.12). This study found no difference in cervical lordosis (sagittal alignment) between patients with mild non-specific neck pain and matched healthy volunteers. Furthermore, there was no significant change in cervical lordosis in patients after 4 weeks of cervical spinal manipulation.

  14. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with extension of the central canal of the spinal cord according to magnetic resonance imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Mendelevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an atypical case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS concurrent with extension of the central canal – hydromyelia.Diagnostic difficulty is due to the presence of symptoms which are atypical for ALS, such as early age of onset, slow progression with long-term involvement of one leg, as well as extension of the central canal of the spinal cord at the level of TIII-IX bodies, as evidenced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The paper presents a clinical case, a review of current literature on the clinical and MRI signs of ALS and on the differential diagnosis of motor neuron disease.

  15. Vertebral stabilization using positively threaded profile pins and polymethylmethacrylate, with or without laminectomy, for spinal canal stenosis and vertebral instability caused by congenital thoracic vertebral anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Takeshi; Kanazono, Shinichi; Yoshigae, Yuki; Sharp, Nicholas J H; Muñana, Karen R

    2007-07-01

    To describe diagnostic findings, surgical technique, and outcome in dogs with thoracic spinal canal stenosis and vertebral instability secondary to congenital vertebral anomalies. Retrospective clinical study. Dogs (n=9) with thoracic spinal canal stenosis. Medical records (1995-1996; 2000-2006) of 9 dogs with a myelographic diagnosis of spinal canal stenosis and/or vertebral instability secondary to congenital vertebral anomaly that were surgically managed by vertebral stabilization with or without laminectomy were reviewed. Data on pre- and postoperative neurologic status, diagnostic findings, surgical techniques, and outcomes were retrieved. Follow-up evaluations were performed at 1, 2, and 6 months. Long-term outcome was assessed by means of clinical examination or owner telephone interviews. Spinal cord compression was confirmed by myelography, and in 2 dogs, dynamic compression by stress myelography. Eight dogs regained the ability to ambulate postoperatively. One dog with a partial recovery regained voluntary movement but did not become ambulatory. Spinal cord injury secondary to congenital vertebral anomaly may have a good outcome when treated by vertebral stabilization with or without laminectomy. Adequate stabilization of the vertebrae and improved neurologic outcome were achieved in most dogs. Vertebral stabilization using positively threaded profile pins and polymethylmethacrylate with or without laminectomy is an effective treatment for spinal canal stenosis and vertebral instability secondary to congenital thoracic vertebral anomalies.

  16. Serotonin(2) receptors mediate respiratory recovery after cervical spinal cord hemisection in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S Y; Basura, G J; Goshgarian, H G

    2001-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to specifically investigate the involvement of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT(2))] receptors in 5-HT-mediated respiratory recovery after cervical hemisection. Experiments were conducted on C(2) spinal cord-hemisected, anesthetized (chloral hydrate, 400 mg/kg ip), vagotomized, pancuronium- paralyzed, and artificially ventilated female Sprague-Dawley rats in which CO(2) levels were monitored and maintained. Twenty-four hours after spinal hemisection, the ipsilateral phrenic nerve displayed no respiratory-related activity indicative of a functionally complete hemisection. Intravenous administration of the 5-HT(2A/2C)-receptor agonist (+/-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI) induced respiratory-related activity in the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to hemisection under conditions in which CO(2) was maintained at constant levels and augmented the activity induced under conditions of hypercapnia. The effects of DOI were found to be dose dependent, and the recovery of activity could be maintained for up to 2 h after a single injection. DOI-induced recovery was attenuated by the 5-HT(2)-receptor antagonist ketanserin but not with the 5-HT(2C)-receptor antagonist RS-102221, suggesting that 5-HT(2A) and not necessarily 5-HT(2C) receptors may be involved in the induction of respiratory recovery after cervical spinal cord injury.

  17. Factors associated with upper extremity contractures after cervical spinal cord injury: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Dustin; Bryden, Anne; Kubec, Gina; Kilgore, Kevin

    2018-05-01

    To examine the prevalence of joint contractures in the upper limb and association with voluntary strength, innervation status, functional status, and demographics in a convenience sample of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury to inform future prospective studies. Cross-sectional convenience sampled pilot study. Department of Veterans Affairs Research Laboratory. Thirty-eight participants with cervical level spinal cord injury. Not applicable. Contractures were measured with goniometric passive range of motion. Every joint in the upper extremity was evaluated bilaterally. Muscle strength was measured with manual muscle testing. Innervation status was determined clinically with surface electrical stimulation. Functional independence was measured with the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM-III). Every participant tested had multiple joints with contractures and, on average, participants were unable to achieve the normative values of passive movement in 52% of the joints tested. Contractures were most common in the shoulder and hand. There was a weak negative relationship between percentage of contractures and time post-injury and a moderate positive relationship between percentage of contractures and age. There was a strong negative correlation between SCIM-III score and percentage of contractures. Joint contractures were noted in over half of the joints tested. These joint contractures were associated with decreased functional ability as measured by the SCIM-III. This highlights the need the need for detailed evaluation of the arm and hand early after injury as well as continued monitoring of joint characteristics throughout the life course of the individual with tetraplegia.

  18. Severe cervical spinal cord injuries related to rugby union and league football in New South Wales, 1984-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, T R; Lawson, J S; Wilson, S F; Engel, S; Rutkowski, S B; Aisbett, C W

    1998-04-20

    To determine the frequency and circumstances of serious cervical cord injuries associated with rugby union and league football in New South Wales. Retrospective review of patients with rugby football-related cervical spinal cord injuries. The two central spinal units in NSW, from January 1984 to July 1996. Admission to spinal units; injury resulting in permanent tetraplegia. During the review period, 115 rugby football players (56 union and 59 league) were admitted to the spinal units because of cervical spinal cord injuries. 49 patients had resultant permanent neurological deficits (complete tetraplegia [quadriplegia])--26 associated with rugby union and 23 with rugby league. Two patients died of injury sequelae within two weeks of admission. There was no significant change in the rate of football-related admissions to spinal units for either code. There was a small decline in the number (from 15 in 1984 to 1987 to 7 in 1992 to 1996) and incidence (from 1.2 to 0.5 per 10,000 participants) of patients with tetraplegia associated with rugby union. When this decline was tested as a trend over the years, it was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.06). No significant trend was found in the tetraplegia data associated with rugby league. Cervical spinal cord injuries leading to complete tetraplegia were most commonly associated with scrum-like plays in union and with tackles in league. Serious cervical spinal injuries associated with both codes of rugby continue to occur in NSW. Rugby football in its various forms is still an inherently dangerous game.

  19. A deformable-model approach to semi-automatic segmentation of CT images demonstrated by application to the spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, Stuart S.C.; Starkschall, George; Stevens, Craig W.; Liao Zhongxing

    2004-01-01

    Because of the importance of accurately defining the target in radiation treatment planning, we have developed a deformable-template algorithm for the semi-automatic delineation of normal tissue structures on computed tomography (CT) images. We illustrate the method by applying it to the spinal canal. Segmentation is performed in three steps: (a) partial delineation of the anatomic structure is obtained by wavelet-based edge detection; (b) a deformable-model template is fitted to the edge set by chamfer matching; and (c) the template is relaxed away from its original shape into its final position. Appropriately chosen ranges for the model parameters limit the deformations of the template, accounting for interpatient variability. Our approach differs from those used in other deformable models in that it does not inherently require the modeling of forces. Instead, the spinal canal was modeled using Fourier descriptors derived from four sets of manually drawn contours. Segmentation was carried out, without manual intervention, on five CT data sets and the algorithm's performance was judged subjectively by two radiation oncologists. Two assessments were considered: in the first, segmentation on a random selection of 100 axial CT images was compared with the corresponding contours drawn manually by one of six dosimetrists, also chosen randomly; in the second assessment, the segmentation of each image in the five evaluable CT sets (a total of 557 axial images) was rated as either successful, unsuccessful, or requiring further editing. Contours generated by the algorithm were more likely than manually drawn contours to be considered acceptable by the oncologists. The mean proportions of acceptable contours were 93% (automatic) and 69% (manual). Automatic delineation of the spinal canal was deemed to be successful on 91% of the images, unsuccessful on 2% of the images, and requiring further editing on 7% of the images. Our deformable template algorithm thus gives a robust

  20. CT and MR imaging of high cervical intradural lipomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Joo Hyeong; Choi, Woo Suk; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon; Leem, Woon; Kim, Gook Ki; Rhee, Bong Arm [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-04-15

    Intradural spinal lipoma occurs in less than 1% of all spinal cord tumors. It has been described at every level of the spinal canal, although its most common location is the cervicothoracic and thoracic region. However, lipoma located in the high cervical region is very unusual. We described two cases, a teenager and an adult, with progressive neurologic deficit from such a lipomatous tumor, which were evaluated by CT scanning and MR imaging.

  1. Posterior-only spinal fusion without rib head resection for treating type I neurofibromatosis with intra-canal rib head dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Patients with Type I neurofibromatosis scoliosis with intra-canal rib head protrusion are extremely rare. Current knowledge regarding the diagnosis and treatment for this situation are insufficient. The purpose of this study is to share our experience in the diagnosis and surgical treatments for such unique deformities. METHODS: Six patients with Type I neurofibromatosis scoliosis with rib head dislocation into the spinal canal were diagnosed at our institution. Posterior instrumentation and spinal fusion without intra-canal rib head resection via a posterior-only approach was performed for deformity correction and rib head extraction. The efficacy and outcomes of the surgery were evaluated by measurements before, immediately and 24 months after the surgery using the following parameters: coronal spinal Cobb angle, apex rotation and kyphosis of the spine and the intra-canal rib head position. Post-operative complications, surgery time and blood loss were also evaluated. RESULTS: Patients were followed up for at least 24 months post-operatively. The three dimensional spinal deformity was significantly improved and the intra-canal rib head was significantly extracted from the canal immediately after the surgery. At follow-up 24 months after surgery, solid fusions were achieved along the fusion segments, and the deformity corrections and rib head positions were well maintained. There were no surgery-related complications any time after the surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Systematic examinations are needed to identify patients with Type I neurofibromatosis scoliosis with rib head dislocation into the canal who can be treated by posterior-only spinal fusion without rib head resection.

  2. Functional recovery after cervical spinal cord injury: Role of neurotrophin and glutamatergic signaling in phrenic motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Luther C; Gransee, Heather M; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2016-06-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) interrupts descending neural drive to phrenic motoneurons causing diaphragm muscle (DIAm) paralysis. Recent studies using a well-established model of SCI, unilateral spinal hemisection of the C2 segment of the cervical spinal cord (SH), provide novel information regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of functional recovery after SCI. Over time post-SH, gradual recovery of rhythmic ipsilateral DIAm activity occurs. Recovery of ipsilateral DIAm electromyogram (EMG) activity following SH is enhanced by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the region of the phrenic motoneuron pool. Delivery of exogenous BDNF either via intrathecal infusion or via mesenchymal stem cells engineered to release BDNF similarly enhance recovery. Conversely, recovery after SH is blunted by quenching endogenous BDNF with the fusion-protein TrkB-Fc in the region of the phrenic motoneuron pool or by selective inhibition of TrkB kinase activity using a chemical-genetic approach in TrkB(F616A) mice. Furthermore, the importance of BDNF signaling via TrkB receptors at phrenic motoneurons is highlighted by the blunting of recovery by siRNA-mediated downregulation of TrkB receptor expression in phrenic motoneurons and by the enhancement of recovery evident following virally-induced increases in TrkB expression specifically in phrenic motoneurons. BDNF/TrkB signaling regulates synaptic plasticity in various neuronal systems, including glutamatergic pathways. Glutamatergic neurotransmission constitutes the main inspiratory-related, excitatory drive to motoneurons, and following SH, spontaneous neuroplasticity is associated with increased expression of ionotropic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in phrenic motoneurons. Evidence for the role of BDNF/TrkB and glutamatergic signaling in recovery of DIAm activity following cervical SCI is reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathogenesis of spinal cord involvement induced by lower cervical instability in rheumatoid spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Hironobu; Kuwabara, Shigeru; Fukuda, Kenji; Kuroki, Tatsuji; Tajima, Naoya (Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan))

    1994-07-01

    To examine prognostic factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), plain radiography findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were compared with histopathological findings in 129 RA patients who had local or neurologic symptoms due to the cervical spine. All patients underwent plain radiography, and subdislocation more than 2 mm towards the anterior and posterior directions on plain radiographs was defined as instability. In predicting induction of instability of the inferior cervical spine and risk for spinal compression, erosion of the vertebral rim, as seen on plain X-rays, and irregular findings of the end-plate of the vertebral body and Gd-enhanced nodules around the intervertebral disk, as seen on MRI, seemed to be important. (N.K.).

  4. Computerized axial tomography in traumatic cervical lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1982-01-01

    Although plain computerized axial tomography cannot routinely demonstrate the spinal cord, it does provide excellent visualization of the bony outline of the spinal canal and vertebral column. So it should be reasonable to use this technique in cases of cervical traumatic disorders. In this paper we presented 10 cases of cervical traumatic lesions; 3 atlanto-axial dislocation, 2 cervical canal stenosis, 3 OPLL, 1 intramedullary hematoma and 1 C 2 -neurinoma. In some patients neurologic deficits were induced by cervical trauma. Bony lesions appeared more adequately deliniated than intraspinal lesions, however, in some cases intramedullary changes could also be demonstrated. The use of metrizamide with high resolution CT-scanner could improve the usefullness of this technique. (author)

  5. Cervical spinal epidural abscess following acupuncture and wet-cupping therapy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yindan; Hong, Wenke; Chen, Huimin; Guan, Qiongfeng; Yu, Hu; Chang, Xianchao; Yu, Yaoping; Xu, Shanhu; Fan, Weinv

    2016-02-01

    Report of an uncommon complication of acupuncture and wet cupping. A 54-year-old man presented with neck pain and fever. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed an epidural abscess at C4 to T2. The symptoms related to epidural abscess resolved partially after treatment with antibiotics. Acupuncture and wet-cupping therapy should be taken into consideration as a cause of spinal epidural abscesses in patients who present with neck pain and fever. Furthermore, acupuncture and wet-cupping practitioners should pay attention to hygienic measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MRI signal intensity as a maker of impairment in incomplete cervical spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Hidefumi; Aoki, Haruhito; Hamabe, Masaki; Sasao, Yutaka; Miura, Takehiko

    1998-01-01

    Incomplete cervical spinal cord injuries such as central cord syndrome may result in prolonged spasticity of the limbs, especially disabilities of the upper extremities, even if the patient is able to walk. In this study, relationship between cord impairment and clinical outcome was investigated using MRI. Results showed that small foci of low signal intensity in T 1 -weighted imaging combined with foci of high signal intensity in T 2 -weighted imaging in follow-up MRI are closely related to the severity of sequelae. Small foci of low signal intensity in T 1 -weighted imaging are considered in the literature to indicate myelomalacia or cyst formation with gliosis. (author)

  7. The relationship between electrodiagnosis using spinal cord evoked potential after spinal cord stimulation and MRI evaluation for cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Shiba, Keiichiro; Ueta, Takayoshi; Ohta, Hideki; Mori, Eiji; Kaji, Kozo; Yuge, Itaru; Kawano, Osamu

    2006-01-01

    We studied the correlation between the site of high intensity spinal cord signals on preoperative sagittal T2 MRIs (T2-high signal) and that of intrdaperative electrophysiological abnormalities for 200 cervical myelopathy cases. We recorded the Sp(E)-SCEPs during posterior cervical laminoplasty operations. In the cases with a T2-high signal at single levels, conduction abnormality matched the site of T2-high signal in 50%, and no conduction abnormalities were detected in 44%. In the cases with a T2-high signal at two levels, conduction abnormality matched the site of T2-high signal in only 11%, and no conduction abnormalities were disclosed in 59%. In the cases with a T2-high signal at three or more levels, conduction abnormalities matched the site of T2-high signal in 8% and no conduction abnormalities were disclosed in 72%. Our study showed a higher correspondence between the MRI finding and conduction abnormalities in the cases with T2-high signal at single levels, although our Sp(E)-SCEP study could not disclose conduction abnormalities in nearly half the cases. False negative findings of Sp(E)-SCEPs may result from the simplified recording technique. (author)

  8. Restoring tactile awareness through the rubber hand illusion in cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenggenhager, Bigna; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Pazzaglia, Mariella

    2013-10-01

    Bodily sensations are an important component of corporeal awareness. Spinal cord injury can leave affected body parts insentient and unmoving, leading to specific disturbances in the mental representation of one's own body and the sense of self. Here, we explored how illusions induced by multisensory stimulation influence immediate sensory signals and tactile awareness in patients with spinal cord injuries. The rubber hand illusion paradigm was applied to 2 patients with chronic and complete spinal cord injury of the sixth cervical spine, with severe somatosensory impairments in 2 of 5 fingers. Both patients experienced a strong illusion of ownership of the rubber hand during synchronous, but not asynchronous, stroking. They also, spontaneously reported basic tactile sensations in their previously numb fingers. Tactile awareness from seeing the rubber hand was enhanced by progressively increasing the stimulation duration. Multisensory illusions directly and specifically modulate the reemergence of sensory memories and enhance tactile sensation, despite (or as a result of) prior deafferentation. When sensory inputs are lost, and are later illusorily regained, the brain updates a coherent body image even several years after the body has become permanently unable to feel. This particular example of neural plasticity represents a significant opportunity to strengthen the sense of the self and the feelings of embodiment in patients with spinal cord injury.

  9. Hypoxia triggers short term potentiation of phrenic motoneuron discharge after chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Sandhu, Milapjit S.; Dougherty, Brendan J.; Reier, Paul J.; Fuller, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated exposure to hypoxia can induce spinal neuroplasticity as well as respiratory and somatic motor recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of the present study was to define the capacity for a single bout of hypoxia to trigger short-term plasticity in phrenic output after cervical SCI, and to determine the phrenic motoneuron (PhrMN) bursting and recruitment patterns underlying the response. Hypoxia-induced short term potentiation (STP) of phrenic motor output was quantified in anesthetized rats 11 wks following lateral spinal hemisection at C2 (C2Hx). A 3-min hypoxic episode (12–14% O2) always triggered STP of inspiratory burst amplitude, the magnitude of which was greater in phrenic bursting ipsilateral vs. contralateral to C2Hx. We next determined if STP could be evoked in recruited (silent) PhrMNs ipsilateral to C2Hx. Individual PhrMN action potentials were recorded during and following hypoxia using a “single fiber” approach. STP of bursting activity did not occur in cells initiating bursting at inspiratory onset, but was robust in recruited PhrMNs as well as previously active cells initiating bursting later in the inspiratory effort. We conclude that following chronic C2Hx, a single bout of hypoxia triggers recruitment of PhrMNs in the ipsilateral spinal cord with bursting that persists beyond the hypoxic exposure. The results provide further support for the use of short bouts of hypoxia as a neurorehabilitative training modality following SCI. PMID:25448009

  10. [Clinical study on spinal cord decompression combined with traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Tan, Ming-Sheng; Yi, Ping; Tang, Xiang-Sheng; Hao, Qing-Ying; Qi, Ying-Na

    2018-01-25

    the governor's vessel stasis syndrome in simple operation group were 8.31±3.15, 29.91±4.52, 6.58±1.31 before operation, and 10.21±2.58, 18.67±4.31, 8.24±1.18 one week after operation, and 11.38±2.85, 16.11±3.18, 8.91±2.11 one month after operation, and 12.21±3.12, 14.61±3.28, 9.12±1.56 at final follow-up, respectively; and in operation combined with traditional Chinese medicine group were 8.29±3.47, 30.83±4.14, 6.38±1.81before operation, and 10.48±2.39, 17.59±5.14, 8.33±1.57 one week after operation, and 12.14±3.12, 13.14±3.21, 9.55±2.49 one month after operation, and 13.85±3.34, 12.11±2.51, 10.33±1.95 at final follow-up, respectively. Postoperative JOA , NDI, and the governor vessel stasis syndrome score of two groups were significantly higher than preoperativee( P 0.05). The above items in operation combined with traditional Chinese medicine group was better than that of simple operation group one month and final follow-up after operation ( P traditional Chinese medicine group was (66.88±12.15)%, there was no significant difference between two groups( P >0.05). There were no complications such as internal fixation failure or re-dislocation of atlas by postoperative CT, MRI and X-rays examination. Spinal card decompression for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy can extend the spinal canal, relieve the compression of nerve, achieve the deoppilation of governor vessel, the regulation of qi and blood, the restore of Yangqi, combined with traditional Chinese medicine of activating blood removing stasis, warming yang and activating meridians, reinforcing liver benefiting kidney, which may obtain better clinical effect. Copyright© 2018 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  11. Comparison of MRI pulse sequences for investigation of lesions of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campi, A.; Pontesilli, S.; Gerevini, S.; Scotti, G.

    2000-01-01

    Small spinal cord lesions, even if clinically significant, can be due to the low sensitivity of some pulse sequences. We compared T2-weighted fast (FSE), and conventional (CSE) spin-echo and short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR)-FSE overlooked on MRI sequences to evaluate their sensitivity to and specificity for lesions of different types. We compared the three sequences in MRI of 57 patients with cervical spinal symptoms. The image sets were assessed by two of us individually for final diagnosis, lesion detectability and image quality. Both readers arrived at the same final diagnoses with all sequences, differentiating four groups of patients. Group 1 (30 patients, 53 %), with a final diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Demyelinating lesions were better seen on STIR-FSE images, on which the number of lesions was significantly higher than on FSE, while the FSE and CSE images showed approximately equal numbers of lesions; additional lesions were found in 9 patients. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 17 demyelinating lesions was significantly higher on STIR-FSE images than with the other sequences. Group 2, 19 patients (33 %) with cervical pain, 15 of whom had disc protrusion or herniation: herniated discs were equally well delineated with all sequences, with better myelographic effect on FSE. In five patients with intrinsic spinal cord abnormalities, the conspicuity and demarcation of the lesions were similar with STIR-FSE and FSE. Group 3, 4 patients (7 %) with acute myelopathy of unknown aetiology. In two patients, STIR-FSE gave better demarcation of lesions and in one a questionable additional lesions. Group 4, 4 patients (7 %) with miscellaneous final diagnoses. STIR-FSE had high sensitivity to demyelinating lesions, can be considered quite specific and should be included in spinal MRI for assessment of suspected demyelinating disease. (orig.)

  12. Diseases of the spine, spinal cord, and extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper covers the following topics: acupuncture needle in the spinal canal of the neck; thoracic tuberculous spondylitis: cold abscess; comminuted fracture of the fifth cervical vertebra; lumbar spondylolysis; lumbar spondylosis; ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament; disk herniation of the cervical spine: narrowing of the root tunnel; ankylosing spondylitis: narrowing of the root tunnel; ossification of the ligamentum flavum; narrow spinal canal syndrome; syringomyelia; epidural neurinoma of the cervical spine; neurofibromatosis; spinal arteriovenous malformation; atrophy of the thoracic spinal cord; osteomyelitis tuberculosa of the rib; osteomyelitis tuberculosa of the left femur; chronic osteomyelitis of the left humerus; malignant giant cell tumor of the left femur; rheumatoid arthritis of the left hip joint; arthrosis deformans of the left hip joint; and enchondroma of the left index finger: Proximal Phalanx

  13. Sensory Loss Mimicking Cauda Equina Syndrome due to Cervical Spinal Lesion in a Patient with Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Vinceti, Giulia; Zini, Andrea; Nichelli, Paolo; Mandrioli, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a 39-year-old woman with signs and symptoms suggesting cauda equina syndrome. Lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated no lesion at this level, while cervical MRI showed a T2-hyperintense lesion in the middle-right anterolateral region of the cervical spinal cord, which may explain the symptoms by involving the anterior spinothalamic tract. We suggest that in cases with cauda equina syndrome presentation and normal lumbosacral MRI, a cervicodorsal lesi...

  14. Fixed cord in spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; Wang, H.; Francomano, C.; Hurko, O.; Carson, B.; Heffez, D.S.; DiChiro, G.; Bryan, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates patients with cervical spinal canal compromise due to congenital anomalies (achondroplasia, Chiari malformation) and degenerative diseases using MR cord motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow studies. Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the cervical cord was determined by means of cardiac-gated velocity phase contrast methods, including cine. Pathology included dwarfism (n = 15), Chiari malformation (n = 10), spondylosis (n = 10), and acute cord compression (n = 9). Symptomatic cases of congenital cervical stenosis had decreased cord motion, although CSF flow was not always significantly compromised. Postoperative cases demonstrated good cord and CSF motion, unless compression or obstruction was present

  15. Widening of the spinal canal and dural ectasia in Marfan's syndrome: assessment by CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeirs, G.M.; Verstraete, K.L.; Kunnen, M.F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Tongerloo, A.J. van; Paepe, A.M. de [Dept. of Medical Genetics, Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium)

    1999-11-01

    We describe a method for diagnosing dural ectasia (DE) and spinal canal widening (SCW) using CT. We examined 23 patients with Marfan's syndrome (MFS), 17 with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and 29 normal subjects, using six axial slices at the level of the L1-S1 pedicles. Transverse diameters of the vertebral bodies, spinal canal and dural sac were measured and indices were defined to differentiate patients with DE and SCW from normal. Statistical significance was assessed using Student's t -test, {chi} {sup 2}-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. DE and SCW occurred in 69.6 % and 60.9 % of cases of MFS and in 23.5 % and 35.3 % of EDS respectively. In MFS, prevalence was significantly higher than in the control group. DE was significantly more frequent in MFS than in EDS. A strong correlation existed between DE and SCW in MFS and the control group, but not in EDS. Our system enables quantitative assessment of SCW and DE. The latter is particularly important in subjects suspected of having MFS, in whom it is a common and characteristic sign. (orig.)

  16. Functional MRI of the cervical spinal cord on 1.5 T with fingertapping: to what extent is it feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govers, N.; Beghin, J.; Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Vandervliet, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Michiels, J.

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, was mainly used to study brain physiology. The activation signal measured with fMRI is based upon the changes in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin that arise from an increase in blood flow in the vicinity of neuronal firing. Technical limitations have impeded such research in the human cervical spinal cord. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether a reliable fMRI signal can be elicited from the cervical spinal cord during fingertapping, a complex motor activity. Furthermore, we wanted to determine whether the fMRI signal could be spatially localized to the particular neuroanatomical location specific for this task. A group of 12 right-handed healthy volunteers performed the complex motor task of fingertapping with their right hand. T2*-weighted gradient-echo echo-planar imaging on a 1.5-T clinical unit was used to image the cervical spinal cord. Motion correction was applied. Cord activation was measured in the transverse imaging plane, between the spinal cord levels C5 and T1. In all subjects spinal cord responses were found, and in most of them on the left and the right side. The distribution of the activation response showed important variations between the subjects. While regions of activation were distributed throughout the spinal cord, concentrated activity was found at the anatomical location of expected motor innervation, namely nerve root C8, in 6 of the 12 subjects. fMRI of the human cervical spinal cord on an 1.5-T unit detects neuronal activity related to a complex motor task. The location of the neuronal activation (spinal cord segment C5 through T1 with a peak on C8) corresponds to the craniocaudal anatomical location of the neurons that activate the muscles in use. (orig.)

  17. The anal canal as a risk organ in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunsoo; Baek, Jong Geun; Jo, Sunmi

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients with cervical cancer undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. However, patients with hemorrhoids may be troubled with low radiation dose. We tried to analyze the dose-volume statistics of the anal canal in patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. The records of 31 patients with cervical cancer who received definite or postoperative radiotherapy at one institution were reviewed. Acute anal symptoms, such as anal pain and bleeding, were evaluated from radiotherapy start to 1 month after radiotherapy completion. Various clinical and dosimetric factors were analyzed to characterize relations with acute anal complications. The anal verge was located an average of 1.2 cm (range -0.6~3.9) below the lower border of the ischial tuberosity and an average of 2.7 cm (range -0.6~5.7) behind the sacral promontory level. The presence of hemorrhoids before radiotherapy was found to be significantly associated with acute radiation-induced anal symptoms (p = 0.001), and the mean induction dose for anal symptoms was 36.9 Gy. No patient without hemorrhoids developed an anal symptom during radiotherapy. Dosimetric analyses of V30 and V40 showed marginal correlations with anal symptoms (p = 0.07). The present study suggests a relation between acute anal symptoms following radiotherapy and acute hemorrhoid aggravation. Furthermore, the location of the anal verge was found to be variable, and consequently doses administered to the anal canal also varied substantially. Our results caution careful radiation treatment planning for whole pelvic radiotherapy, and that proper clinical management be afforded patients with hemorrhoids during radiotherapy.

  18. Design of COSMIC: a randomized, multi-centre controlled trial comparing conservative or early surgical management of incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Meent, H.; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Vos, P.E.; Slooff, W.B.; Öner, F.C.; Coppes, M.H.; Peul, W.C.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability is a very devastating event for the patient and the family. It is estimated that up to 25 % of all traumatic spinal cord lesions belong to this category. The treatment for this type of spinal cord lesion is still subject of

  19. Design of COSMIC: a randomized, multi-centre controlled trial comparing conservative or early surgical management of incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Meent, H. van de; Hofmeijer, J.; Vos, P.E.; Slooff, W.B.; Oner, F.C.; Coppes, M.H.; Peul, W.C.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability is a very devastating event for the patient and the family. It is estimated that up to 25% of all traumatic spinal cord lesions belong to this category. The treatment for this type of spinal cord lesion is still

  20. The morphometric analysis of the intervertebral foramen and the spinal nerve root in the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the onset of cervical myelopathy and cervical spondylotic radiculopathy as well as what influence the anatomy of the cervical spine and cervical nerves have on their onset and occurrence of various types of disease state. We conducted imaging and morphological measurements on specimens of cervical spine of Japanese people, focusing attention on the running of intervertebral foramen and dorsal nerve rootlets of the cervical spine. The subjects were cervical spine specimens from 12 cadavers (7 males and 5 females, age at the time of death ranged from 48 to 93 years with a mean of 71 years) obtained at Showa University School of Dentistry in 2005 and 2006. Specimens were prepared by removing the atlas through the 1st thoracic vertebra from the cadavers, then resecting the soft tissue such as muscles to expose the cervical spine in whole circumference. The removed cervical spine specimens, from 1st to 7th cervical spines, were imaged by volume scan of radiographic helical CT at 0.6 mm spatial resolution, and their images were stored as Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data. Image measurement on the vertebral body, vertebral foramen, and intervertebral foramen was conducted based on DICOM data. Furthermore, macroscopic observation and measurement were conducted on the dorsal nerve rootlets of cervical spine specimens. The image measurement of cervical spine specimens showed that the intervertebral foramen at C5/6 was the narrowest, followed by C3/4, C4/5, C6/7, and C2/3, respecting. With regard to angles in the frontal section and horizontal section of the groove for the spinal nerve, there was no significant difference in the angle between the right and the left. In the frontal section, the angle was about 63deg at C3, about 57deg at C4, about 52deg at C5, and about 55deg at C6, showing a significantly acute angle at C5, while in the horizontal section, it was about 54deg at C3, about 59deg at C4, about 63

  1. Pedicle distraction increases intervertebral and spinal canal area in a cadaver and bone model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Discussion: For each increase in pedicle distraction the area of the spinal and vertebral foramen increases. Pedicle distraction could potentially be used to alleviate spinal stenosis and root impingement. A potential osteotomy plane could be at the midpoint of the pedicle with minimal risk to nerve roots and soft tissue restrictions to prevent distraction.

  2. Comparison of the effects of TripleGates and Gates-Glidden burs on cervical dentin thickness and root canal area by using cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kássio SOUSA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The search for new instruments to promote an appropriate cervical preparation has led to the development of new rotary instruments such as TripleGates. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, there is no study evaluating TripleGates effect on the “risk zone” of mandibular molars. Objectives : The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a crown-down sequence of Gates-Glidden and TripleGates burs on the remaining cervical dentin thickness and the total amount of dentin removed from the root canals during the instrumentation by using cone beam computed tomography. The number of separated instruments was also evaluated. Material and Methods : Mesial roots of 40 mandibular first molars were divided into 2 equal groups: crown-down sequence of Gates-Glidden (#3, #2, #1 and TripleGates burs. Cervical dentin thickness and canal area were measured before and after instrumentation by using cone beam computed tomography and image analysis software. Student’s t-test was used to determine significant differences at p0.05 were observed between the instruments, regarding the root canal area and dentin wall thickness. Conclusion : Both tested instruments used for cervical preparation were safe to be used in the mesial root canal of mandibular molars.

  3. MRI Prognostication Factors in the Setting of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Secondary to Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Rafael; Cepeda, Santiago; Paredes, Igor; Alen, Jose F; Lagares, Alfonso

    2017-05-01

    Several studies have looked for an association between radiologic findings and neurologic outcome after cervical trauma. In the current literature, there is a paucity of evidence proving the prognostic role of soft tissue damage or bony integrity. Our objective is to determine radiologic findings related to neurologic prognosis in patients after incomplete acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury, regardless of initial neurologic examination results. We retrospectively reviewed patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury who had a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within the first 96 hours. Clinical and epidemiologic data were recorded from the medical records along with several radiologic findings from the initial computed tomographic scan and MRI. Data were analyzed using a non-parametric test. Significant prognostic factors were analyzed through a stepwise multivariable logistic regression, adjusted by neurologic status at baseline. The receiver-operating characteristic curve was used to test the discriminative capacity of the model. Eighty-six patients (68 males and 18 females) were included for the analysis. Mean age was 49 years. Ligamentum flavum injury, intramedullary edema larger than 36 mm, and facet dislocation were demonstrated to be associated with a lack of neurologic improvement at follow-up. Multivariable analysis showed that edema larger than 36 mm and facet dislocation were strong predictors of clinical outcome, regardless of the initial neurologic examination result. Early MRI has an intrinsic prognostic value. Ligamentous injury and larger edema are strong predicting factors of a bad neurologic outcome at long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel Sensor Technology To Assess Independence and Limb-Use Laterality in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogioli, Michael; Popp, Werner L; Albisser, Urs; Brust, Anne K; Frotzler, Angela; Gassert, Roger; Curt, Armin; Starkey, Michelle L

    2016-11-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), levels of independence are commonly assessed with standardized clinical assessments. However, such tests do not provide information about the actual extent of upper limb activities or the impact on independence of bi- versus unilateral usage throughout daily life following cervical SCI. The objective of this study was to correlate activity intensity and laterality of upper extremity activity measured by body-fixed inertial measurement units (IMUs) with clinical assessment scores of independence. Limb-use intensity and laterality of activities performed by the upper extremities was measured in 12 subjects with cervical SCI using four IMUs (positioned on both wrists, on the chest, and on one wheel of the wheelchair). Algorithms capable of reliably detecting self-propulsion and arm activity in a clinical environment were applied to rate functional outcome levels, and were related to clinical independence measures during inpatient rehabilitation. Measures of intensity of upper extremity activity during self-propulsion positively correlated (p laterality were positively correlated (p laterality as measured by IMUs during "daily life," and increased laterality was negatively correlated (p laterality in human cervical SCI. Continuous and objective movement data of distinct daily activities (i.e., mobility and day-to-day activities) can be related to levels of independence. Therefore, IMU sensor technology is suitable not only for monitoring activity levels during rehabilitation (including during clinical trials) but could also be used to assess levels of participation after discharge.

  5. Modulation of hand aperture during reaching in persons with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Victoria A; Hayes, Heather B; Buetefisch, Cathrin M; Wolf, Steven L; Trumbower, Randy D

    2015-03-01

    The intact neuromotor system prepares for object grasp by first opening the hand to an aperture that is scaled according to object size and then closing the hand around the object. After cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), hand function is significantly impaired, but the degree to which object-specific hand aperture scaling is affected remains unknown. Here, we hypothesized that persons with incomplete cervical SCI have a reduced maximum hand opening capacity but exhibit novel neuromuscular coordination strategies that permit object-specific hand aperture scaling during reaching. To test this hypothesis, we measured hand kinematics and surface electromyography from seven muscles of the hand and wrist during attempts at maximum hand opening as well as reaching for four balls of different diameters. Our results showed that persons with SCI exhibited significantly reduced maximum hand aperture compared to able-bodied (AB) controls. However, persons with SCI preserved the ability to scale peak hand aperture with ball size during reaching. Persons with SCI also used distinct muscle coordination patterns that included increased co-activity of flexors and extensors at the wrist and hand compared to AB controls. These results suggest that motor planning for aperture modulation is preserved even though execution is limited by constraints on hand opening capacity and altered muscle co-activity. Thus, persons with incomplete cervical SCI may benefit from rehabilitation aimed at increasing hand opening capacity and reducing flexor-extensor co-activity at the wrist and hand.

  6. Distribution of collateral fibers in the monkey cervical spinal cord detected with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Ptito, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    techniques. We calculate the diffusion tensor and the persistent angular structure (PAS), a multi-fiber reconstruction technique, from high quality post mortem data of a perfusion-fixed vervet monkey cervical spinal cord sample and simulated crossing fiber data. Our results show that (i) cylindrical geometry...

  7. Alpha particle excited x-ray fluorescence analysis for trace elements in cervical spinal cords of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Iwata, Shiro; Sasajima, Kazuhisa; Yase, Yoshio; Yoshida, Shohei.

    1980-01-01

    The mean contents of trace elements in anterior gray horn section of cervical spinal cords of six amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases were relatively determined against those of six control cases by α-particle excited X-ray fluorescence analysis. The anterior gray horn section of cervical spinal cord samples were excited by 1.6 MeV α-particle beam of 2 mm diameter accelerated with a Van de Graaff accelerator, and characteristic X-ray spectra were measured with a Si(Li) detector. From the peak areas on the X-ray spectra, the relative mean contents of the trace elements in cervical spinal cords of ALS and control cases were determined. As a result, the X-ray peaks of Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn were detected. The contents of Al, Si, P, Ca, Ti, V, Mn and Fe in ALS cases were higher than those in control cases. The contents of S, Cl, K, Cu and Zn in ALS and in control cases were equal to each other within standard deviation. The precipitation mechanisms of Al, Si, P, Ca, Ti, V, Mn and Fe into cervical spinal cord of ALS cases are discussed on the basis of the previous studies. (author)

  8. Degeneration of Phrenic Motor Neurons Induces Long-Term Diaphragm Deficits following Mid-Cervical Spinal Contusion in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaise, Charles; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Hala, Tamara J.; Regan, Kathleen A.; Frank, David M.; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Leroy, Karelle; Pochet, Roland; Wright, Megan C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A primary cause of morbidity and mortality following cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is respiratory compromise, regardless of the level of trauma. In particular, SCI at mid-cervical regions targets degeneration of both descending bulbospinal respiratory axons and cell bodies of phrenic motor neurons, resulting in deficits in the function of the diaphragm, the primary muscle of inspiration. Contusion-type trauma to the cervical spinal cord is one of the most common forms of human SCI; however, few studies have evaluated mid-cervical contusion in animal models or characterized consequent histopathological and functional effects of degeneration of phrenic motor neuron–diaphragm circuitry. We have generated a mouse model of cervical contusion SCI that unilaterally targets both C4 and C5 levels, the location of the phrenic motor neuron pool, and have examined histological and functional outcomes for up to 6 weeks post-injury. We report that phrenic motor neuron loss in cervical spinal cord, phrenic nerve axonal degeneration, and denervation at diaphragm neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) resulted in compromised ipsilateral diaphragm function, as demonstrated by persistent reduction in diaphragm compound muscle action potential amplitudes following phrenic nerve stimulation and abnormalities in spontaneous diaphragm electromyography (EMG) recordings. This injury paradigm is reproducible, does not require ventilatory assistance, and provides proof-of-principle that generation of unilateral cervical contusion is a feasible strategy for modeling diaphragmatic/respiratory deficits in mice. This study and its accompanying analyses pave the way for using transgenic mouse technology to explore the function of specific genes in the pathophysiology of phrenic motor neuron degeneration and respiratory dysfunction following cervical SCI. PMID:23176637

  9. Organization of hyperactive microglial cells in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis and upper cervical spinal cord associated with orofacial neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuta, Kazuo; Suzuki, Ikuko; Shinoda, Masamichi; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Kuniya; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Sessle, Barry J; Iwata, Koichi

    2012-04-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate spatial organization of hyperactive microglial cells in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) and upper cervical spinal cord (C1), and to clarify the involvement in mechanisms underlying orofacial secondary hyperalgesia following infraorbital nerve injury. We found that the head-withdrawal threshold to non-noxious mechanical stimulation of the maxillary whisker pad skin was significantly reduced in chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (ION-CCI) rats from day 1 to day 14 after ION-CCI. On day 3 after ION-CCI, mechanical allodynia was obvious in the orofacial skin areas innervated by the 1st and 3rd branches of the trigeminal nerve as well as the 2nd branch area. Hyperactive microglial cells in Vc and C1 were observed on days 3 and 7 after ION-CCI. On day 3 after ION-CCI, a large number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK)-immunoreactive (IR) cells were observed in Vc and C1. Many hyperactive microglial cells were also distributed over a wide area of Vc and C1 innervated by the trigeminal nerve. The intraperitoneal administration of minocycline significantly reduced the activation of microglial cells and the number of pERK-IR cells in Vc and C1, and also significantly attenuated the development of mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, enhanced background activity and mechanical evoked responses of Vc wide dynamic range neurons in ION-CCI rats were significantly reversed following minocycline administration. These findings suggest that activation of microglial cells over a wide area of Vc and C1 is involved in the enhancement of Vc and C1 neuronal excitability in the early period after ION-CCI, resulting in the neuropathic pain in orofacial areas innervated by the injured as well as uninjured nerves. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cervical Spine Injuries: A Whole-Body Musculoskeletal Model for the Analysis of Spinal Loading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Cazzola

    Full Text Available Cervical spine trauma from sport or traffic collisions can have devastating consequences for individuals and a high societal cost. The precise mechanisms of such injuries are still unknown as investigation is hampered by the difficulty in experimentally replicating the conditions under which these injuries occur. We harness the benefits of computer simulation to report on the creation and validation of i a generic musculoskeletal model (MASI for the analyses of cervical spine loading in healthy subjects, and ii a population-specific version of the model (Rugby Model, for investigating cervical spine injury mechanisms during rugby activities. The musculoskeletal models were created in OpenSim, and validated against in vivo data of a healthy subject and a rugby player performing neck and upper limb movements. The novel aspects of the Rugby Model comprise i population-specific inertial properties and muscle parameters representing rugby forward players, and ii a custom scapula-clavicular joint that allows the application of multiple external loads. We confirm the utility of the developed generic and population-specific models via verification steps and validation of kinematics, joint moments and neuromuscular activations during rugby scrummaging and neck functional movements, which achieve results comparable with in vivo and in vitro data. The Rugby Model was validated and used for the first time to provide insight into anatomical loading and cervical spine injury mechanisms related to rugby, whilst the MASI introduces a new computational tool to allow investigation of spinal injuries arising from other sporting activities, transport, and ergonomic applications. The models used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and allow to integrate in silico analyses with experimental approaches in injury prevention.

  11. Multimodal decoding and congruent sensory information enhance reaching performance in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Anna Corbett

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI paralyzes muscles of the hand and arm, making it difficult to perform activities of daily living. Restoring the ability to reach can dramatically improve quality of life for people with cervical SCI. Any reaching system requires a user interface to decode parameters of an intended reach, such as trajectory and target. A challenge in developing such decoders is that often few physiological signals related to the intended reach remain under voluntary control, especially in patients with high cervical injuries. Furthermore, the decoding problem changes when the user is controlling the motion of their limb, as opposed to an external device. The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefits of combining disparate signal sources to control reach in people with a range of impairments, and to consider the effect of two feedback approaches. Subjects with cervical SCI performed robot-assisted reaching, controlling trajectories with either shoulder electromyograms (EMGs or EMGs combined with gaze. We then evaluated how reaching performance was influenced by task-related sensory feedback, testing the EMG-only decoder in two conditions. The first involved moving the arm with the robot, providing congruent sensory feedback through their remaining sense of proprioception. In the second, the subjects moved the robot without the arm attached, as in applications that control external devices. We found that the multimodal decoding algorithm worked well for all subjects, enabling them to perform straight, accurate reaches. The inclusion of gaze information, used to estimate target location, was especially important for the most impaired subjects. In the absence of gaze information, congruent sensory feedback improved performance. These results highlight the importance of proprioceptive feedback, and suggest that multi-modal decoders are likely to be most beneficial for highly impaired subjects and in tasks where such

  12. Anthropometry, spinal canal width, and flexibility of the spine and hamstring muscles in 45-55-year-old men with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, G; Saraste, H; Ohlsen, H

    1992-09-01

    One hundred fifty 45-55-year-old men were divided into three groups: those with healthy backs, recurrent low back pain (LBP), and chronic LBP. These groups were studied with respect to anthropometry, spinal canal width, spinal sagittal configuration and flexibility, and the flexibility of the hamstrings musculature with straight leg raising (SLR). There were no differences between the groups with respect to anthropometry. The group with healthy backs had significantly greater lordosis and sagittal flexibility than the other groups. The width of the spinal canal was correlated to body height. The SLR test showed significantly higher values in the group with healthy backs and in the recurrent pain group than in the chronic pain group. The possible role of restoring normal range of motion to minimize the risk of LBP recurrence is discussed.

  13. Congenital midline cleft of the posterior arch of atlas: a rare cause of symptomatic cervical canal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Chandler, C.; Robinson, S.; Jarosz, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Developmental symptomatic C1 canal stenosis is very rare. We describe the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances in a 8-year-old child who presented with progressive upper and lower limb neurological symptoms and in whom imaging revealed the medial posterior hemiarches of a bifid C1 to be inturned and compressing the cervical cord. This particular configuration of the posterior arch of atlas is frequently associated with other craniocervical bony anomalies and presents with neurological symptoms early in life. Early CT or MRI examination of patients with symptomatic posterior arch of C1 defects is necessary, in order to detect such an appearance, since surgical treatment may prevent neurological deterioration. (orig.)

  14. Biomechanics of coupled motion in the cervical spine during simulated whiplash in patients with pre-existing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Nightingale, R. W.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Loss of motion following spine segment fusion results in increased strain in the adjacent motion segments. However, to date, studies on the biomechanics of the cervical spine have not assessed the role of coupled motions in the lumbar spine. Accordingly, we investigated the biomechanics of the cervical spine following cervical fusion and lumbar fusion during simulated whiplash using a whole-human finite element (FE) model to simulate coupled motions of the spine. Methods A previously validated FE model of the human body in the driver-occupant position was used to investigate cervical hyperextension injury. The cervical spine was subjected to simulated whiplash exposure in accordance with Euro NCAP (the European New Car Assessment Programme) testing using the whole human FE model. The coupled motions between the cervical spine and lumbar spine were assessed by evaluating the biomechanical effects of simulated cervical fusion and lumbar fusion. Results Peak anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) strain ranged from 0.106 to 0.382 in a normal spine, and from 0.116 to 0.399 in a fused cervical spine. Strain increased from cranial to caudal levels. The mean strain increase in the motion segment immediately adjacent to the site of fusion from C2-C3 through C5-C6 was 26.1% and 50.8% following single- and two-level cervical fusion, respectively (p = 0.03, unpaired two-way t-test). Peak cervical strains following various lumbar-fusion procedures were 1.0% less than those seen in a healthy spine (p = 0.61, two-way ANOVA). Conclusion Cervical arthrodesis increases peak ALL strain in the adjacent motion segments. C3-4 experiences greater changes in strain than C6-7. Lumbar fusion did not have a significant effect on cervical spine strain. Cite this article: H. Huang, R. W. Nightingale, A. B. C. Dang. Biomechanics of coupled motion in the cervical spine during simulated whiplash in patients with pre-existing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion: A Finite Element Study. Bone

  15. Biomechanics of coupled motion in the cervical spine during simulated whiplash in patients with pre-existing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion: A Finite Element Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H; Nightingale, R W; Dang, A B C

    2018-01-01

    Loss of motion following spine segment fusion results in increased strain in the adjacent motion segments. However, to date, studies on the biomechanics of the cervical spine have not assessed the role of coupled motions in the lumbar spine. Accordingly, we investigated the biomechanics of the cervical spine following cervical fusion and lumbar fusion during simulated whiplash using a whole-human finite element (FE) model to simulate coupled motions of the spine. A previously validated FE model of the human body in the driver-occupant position was used to investigate cervical hyperextension injury. The cervical spine was subjected to simulated whiplash exposure in accordance with Euro NCAP (the European New Car Assessment Programme) testing using the whole human FE model. The coupled motions between the cervical spine and lumbar spine were assessed by evaluating the biomechanical effects of simulated cervical fusion and lumbar fusion. Peak anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) strain ranged from 0.106 to 0.382 in a normal spine, and from 0.116 to 0.399 in a fused cervical spine. Strain increased from cranial to caudal levels. The mean strain increase in the motion segment immediately adjacent to the site of fusion from C2-C3 through C5-C6 was 26.1% and 50.8% following single- and two-level cervical fusion, respectively (p = 0.03, unpaired two-way t -test). Peak cervical strains following various lumbar-fusion procedures were 1.0% less than those seen in a healthy spine (p = 0.61, two-way ANOVA). Cervical arthrodesis increases peak ALL strain in the adjacent motion segments. C3-4 experiences greater changes in strain than C6-7. Lumbar fusion did not have a significant effect on cervical spine strain. Cite this article : H. Huang, R. W. Nightingale, A. B. C. Dang. Biomechanics of coupled motion in the cervical spine during simulated whiplash in patients with pre-existing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion: A Finite Element Study. Bone Joint Res 2018;7:28-35. DOI: 10

  16. The effect of the X-Stop implantation on intervertebral foramen, segmental spinal canal length and disc space in elderly patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zongmiao; Wang, Shaobai; Kozanek, Michal; Xia, Qun; Mansfield, Frederick L; Lü, Guohua; Wood, Kirkham B; Li, Guoan

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical effect of the X-Stop device on the intervertebral foramen (IVF) and segmental spinal canal length (SSCL), as well as the intervertebral disc space at the implanted and the adjacent segments in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Eight elderly patients with LSS, scheduled for X-stop implantation, were CT or MRI scanned to construct 3D vertebral models (L2-S1). Before and after the surgery, each patient was also imaged using a dual-fluoroscopic image system during weight-bearing standing and maximum extension-flexion. The positions of the vertebrae were then determined using an established 2D-3D model matching method. The data revealed that the postoperative IVF area was significantly increased by 32.9% (or 32 mm2) (pspace of the implanted level was significantly decreased from 8.0 to 6.6 mm during standing. The X-Stop implantation efficiently enlarged the IVF area in the elderly patients with LSS at the operated level with little biomechanical effect immediately on the superior and inferior adjacent levels. However, it reduced the anterior disc space at the implanted level.

  17. [Biomechanical behaviors of cervical spinal cord injury related to various bone fragment impact velocities: a finite element study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, S; Zhu, Z Q; Wang, K F; Liu, C J; Xu, S; Xia, W W; Liu, H Y

    2018-03-20

    Objective: To establish a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of the whole cervical spinal cord (WSCS) and explore the biomechanical behaviors of cervical spinal cord injury related to different bone fragment impact velocities by FE analysis. Methods: A 3D FE model of WCSC was established based on the morphologic data of each segment of the human cervical cord. The reconstruction structures, which included the dura mater, the cerebrospinal fluid, the gray and white matter in the C(2) to C(7) cervical vertebrae, were validated.On the validated WCSC model, three kinds of pellets with same mass (7 g) but different impact areas (314, 157 and 78.5 mm(2)) were created to represent the bone fragments.These were positioned in the middle of the spinal cord to impact at various initial velocities.The maximum of von Mises stress and the reduction of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the spinal cord were measured from each impact. Results: The compression of WCSC (percentage) and the time to reach maximum compression were similar with the results reported in literatures, indicating the validity of the model.Regardless of the impact areas of the pellet, the maximum of von Mises stress and the reduction of CSA of the spinal cord increased with the increased velocity.The maximum of von Mises stress was 5.0-7.0 kPa at a pellet velocity of 1.5 m/s, and the reduction of CSA was 9.3%-12.3%.At a velocity of 3.5 m/s, the maximum of von Mises stress was 42-54 kPa and the reduction of CSA was over 30%.The stress of the spinal cord significantly increased when pellet velocity exceeded 3.5 m/s, and the fastest increase was recorded at 4.5 m/s.The von Mises stress of the spinal cord ranged between 240 and 320 kPa at a velocity of 6.0 m/s, and CSA decreased by more than 50%. Conclusion: The 3D FE model of WSCS could provide more insights on the biomechanical mechanisms of spinal cord injury through various bone fragment impacts in burst fracture.When the impact velocity of the

  18. [Post-traumatic reconnection of the cervical spinal cord with skeletal striated muscles. Study in adult rats and marmosets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, J C; Affane-Boulaid, F; Baillet-Derbin, C; Davarpanah, Y; Destombes, J; Duchossoy, Y; Emery, E; Kassar-Duchossoy, L; Mira, J C; Moissonnier, P; Pécot-Dechavassine, M; Reviron, T; Rhrich-Haddout, F; Tadié, M; Ye, J H

    1997-01-01

    In an attempt at repairing the injured spinal cord of adult mammals (rat, dog and marmoset) and its damaged muscular connections, we are currently using: 1) peripheral nerve autografts (PNG), containing Schwann cells, to trigger and direct axonal regrowth from host and/or transplanted motoneurons towards denervated muscular targets; 2) foetal spinal cord transplants to replace lost neurons. In adult rats and marmosets, a PNG bridge was used to joint the injured cervical spinal cord to a denervated skeletal muscle (longissimus atlantis [rat] or biceps brachii [rat and marmoset]). The spinal lesion was obtained by the implantation procedure of the PNG. After a post-operative delay ranging from 2 to 22 months, the animals were checked electrophysiologically for functional muscular reconnection and processed for a morphological study including retrograde axonal tracing (HRP, Fast Blue, True Blue), histochemistry (AChE, ATPase), immunocytochemistry (ChAT) and EM. It was thus demonstrated that host motoneurons of the cervical enlargement could extend axons all the way through the PNG bridge as: a) in anaesthetized animals, contraction of the reconnected muscle could be obtained by electrical stimulation of the grafted nerve; b) the retrograde axonal tracing studies indicated that a great number of host cervical neurons extended axons into the PNG bridge up to the muscle; c) many of them were assumed to be motoneurons (double labelling with True Blue and an antibody against ChAT); and even alpha-motoneurons (type C axosomatic synapses in HRP labelled neurons seen in EM in the rat); d) numerous ectopic endplates were seen around the intramuscular tip of the PNG. In larger (cavitation) spinal lesions (rat), foetal motoneurons contained in E14 spinal cord transplants could similarly grow axons through PNG bridges up to the reconnected muscle. Taking all these data into account, it can be concluded that neural transplants are interesting tools for evaluating both the

  19. Spinal cord injury after blunt cervical spine trauma: correlation of soft-tissue damage and extension of lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Cepeda, S; Ramos, A; Castaño-León, A M; García-Fuentes, C; Lobato, R D; Gómez, P A; Lagares, A

    2014-05-01

    In patients with spinal cord injury after blunt trauma, several studies have observed a correlation between neurologic impairment and radiologic findings. Few studies have been performed to correlate spinal cord injury with ligamentous injury. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate whether ligamentous injury or disk disruption after spinal cord injury correlates with lesion length. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients diagnosed with traumatic spinal cord injury after cervical trauma between 1990-2011. Plain films, CT, and MR imaging were performed on patients and then reviewed for this study. MR imaging was performed within 96 hours after cervical trauma for all patients. Data regarding ligamentous injury, disk injury, and the extent of the spinal cord injury were collected from an adequate number of MR images. We evaluated anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and the ligamentum flavum. Length of lesion, disk disruption, and ligamentous injury association, as well as the extent of the spinal cord injury were statistically assessed by means of univariate analysis, with the use of nonparametric tests and multivariate analysis along with linear regression. There were significant differences in lesion length on T2-weighted images for anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and ligamentum flavum in the univariate analysis; however, when this was adjusted by age, level of injury, sex, and disruption of the soft tissue evaluated (disk, anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and ligamentum flavum) in a multivariable analysis, only ligamentum flavum showed a statistically significant association with lesion length. Furthermore, the number of ligaments affected had a positive correlation with the extension of the lesion. In cervical spine trauma, a specific pattern of ligamentous injury correlates with the length of the spinal cord lesion in MR imaging studies

  20. Enhancing neural activity to drive respiratory plasticity following cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormigo, Kristiina M.; Zholudeva, Lyandysha V.; Spruance, Victoria M.; Marchenko, Vitaliy; Cote, Marie-Pascale; Vinit, Stephane; Giszter, Simon; Bezdudnaya, Tatiana; Lane, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) results in permanent life-altering sensorimotor deficits, among which impaired breathing is one of the most devastating and life-threatening. While clinical and experimental research has revealed that some spontaneous respiratory improvement (functional plasticity) can occur post-SCI, the extent of the recovery is limited and significant deficits persist. Thus, increasing effort is being made to develop therapies that harness and enhance this neuroplastic potential to optimize long-term recovery of breathing in injured individuals. One strategy with demonstrated therapeutic potential is the use of treatments that increase neural and muscular activity (e.g. locomotor training, neural and muscular stimulation) and promote plasticity. With a focus on respiratory function post-SCI, this review will discuss advances in the use of neural interfacing strategies and activity-based treatments, and highlights some recent results from our own research. PMID:27582085

  1. Dorsal border periaqueductal gray neurons project to the area directly adjacent to the central canal ependyma of the C4-T8 spinal cord in the cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouton, LJ; Kerstens, L; VanderWant, J; Holstege, G

    In a previous study horseradish peroxidase (HRP) injections in the upper thoracic and cervical spinal cord revealed some faintly labeled small neurons at the dorsal border of the periaqueductal gray (PAG). The present light microscopic and electronmicroscopic tracing study describes the precise

  2. Risk factors of neurological lesions in low cervical spine fractures and dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COELHO DANILO GONÇALVES

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighty-nine patients with lower cervical spine fractures or dislocations were evaluated for risk factors of neurological lesion. The age, sex, level and pattern of fracture and sagittal diameter of the spinal canal were analysed. There were no significant differences on the age, gender, level and Torg's ratio between intact patients and those with nerve root injury, incomplete or complete spinal cord injuries. Bilateral facet dislocations and burst fractures are a significant risk factor of spinal cord injury.

  3. Mechanism of Restoration of Forelimb Motor Function after Cervical Spinal Cord Hemisection in Rats: Electrophysiological Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Takeuchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to electrophysiologically assess the corticospinal tracts of adult rats and the recovery of motor function of their forelimbs after cervical cord hemisection. Of 39 adult rats used, compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs of the forelimbs of 15 rats were evaluated, before they received left C5 segmental hemisection of the spinal cord, by stimulating the pyramid of the medulla oblongata on one side using an exciting microelectrode. All 15 rats exhibited contralateral electrical activity, but their CMAPs disappeared after hemisection. The remaining 24 rats received hemisection first, and CMAPs of 12 rats were assessed over time to study their recovery time. All of them exhibited electrical activity of the forelimbs in 4 weeks after surgery. The remaining 12 rats received additional right C2 segmental hemisection, and variation of CMAPs between before and after surgery was examined. The right side of the 12 rats that received the additional hemisection exhibited no electrical activity in response to the stimulation of the pyramids on both sides. These results suggest that changes in path between the resected and healthy sides, activation of the ventral corticospinal tracts, and propriospinal neurons were involved in the recovery of motor function after cervical cord injury.

  4. Chronological observation in early radiation myelopathy of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Saeko; Yoshida, Shoji; Soejima, Toshinori

    1993-01-01

    Gd-enhanced MR images of two patients with clinically and histopathologically diagnosed chronic progressive radiation myelitis (CPRM) were observed chronologically. One of them had had nasopharyngeal cancer and received radiotherapy at a dose of 100 Gy to the C1-2 level of the spinal cord. She developed CPRM 25 months after the termination of radiotherapy. The other had had malignant lymphoma originating from the tonsil and received chemoradiotherapy. The dose delivered to her cervical spinal cord was 40 Gy, and she developed CPRM 30 months later. Gd-enhanced MRI in the early phase revealed a small crescent-shaped nidus with or without a very small central nonenhanced area in both cases. Enhancement was not great. At that time, patients noticed only the inability to perceive pain and temperature or paresthesia in the opposite side. In a few months, MRI revealed a much more strongly enhanced and larger nidus with enlargement of a central nonenhanced area accompanied by long segmental cord enlargement. The patients' neurological symptoms had also progressed, with hemiparesis developing, for example. (author)

  5. Spinal Cord Infarction after Cervical Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection: Case Report and Literature Review

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    Jangsup Moon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI is a widely used nonsurgical procedure in the treatment of patients with radiculopathy. It is efficacious in relieving pain, but a number of complications are being reported. Recently, increasing frequency of major complications, such as spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction, has been reported with the use of a particulate steroid within fluoroscopic-guided procedures. Methods: We report a 49-year-old man with a history of chronic cervical radiculopathy, who experienced a devastating complication after TFESI. Results: After 2 min of regular TFESI, the patient abruptly experienced muscle weakness in both upper extremities and within 5 min the patient became quadriplegic. Despite active rehabilitation, the patient remained bed-ridden 4 years after the catastrophic event. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spinal cord infarction that occurred after TFESI in Korea. Conclusion: Considering the risk of dreadful complications, which appear in an unpredictable manner, TFESI with fluoroscopic guidance should be done only with a nonparticulate steroid.

  6. Effects of hyperthermia applied to previously irradiated cervical spinal cord in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sminia, P.; Haveman, J.; Koedoder, C.

    1991-01-01

    Rat cervical spinal cord was X-ray irradiated at doses of 15, 18, 20 and 26 Gy. Approximately the same part of the spinal cord was heated by means of a 434 MHz microwave applicator 90 days later. After treatment, animals were observed for 18 months, for expression of neurological complications. These could either be result of the heat or of the radiation treatment. The time course showed 3 distinct peaks in the incidence of neurological symptoms. The 1st peak was due to the acute response to hyperthermia. The ED 50 value for neurological complications one day after treatment at 42.3±0.4 o C was 74 ±2 min. Previous X-ray irradiation of spinal cord with 18, 20 and 26 Gy reduced ED 50 to 57±7,65±4 and 55±5 min (12-26% of control), resp. Recovery from heat-induced neurological complications was diminished in previously irradiated animals. The 2nd peak (150-300 days after X-rays) concerned expression of 'early-delayed' radiation damage. Hyperthermia given in 90 days after irradiation did not influence either the percentage of animals with paralysis or the latent period. Neurological symptoms developing after day 300 were due to the late delayed radiation response. Significant difference was not observed in data on paralysis induced by radiation alone or radiation followed by heat. The late radiation-induced minor neurological symptoms, were however, influenced by retreatment with heat. (author). 30 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Phrenic motoneuron expression of serotonergic and glutamatergic receptors following upper cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Carlos B.; Bailey, Jeffrey P.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C.

    2012-01-01

    Following cervical spinal cord injury at C2 (SH hemisection model) there is progressive recovery of phrenic activity. Neuroplasticity in the postsynaptic expression of neurotransmitter receptors may contribute to functional recovery. Phrenic motoneurons express multiple serotonergic (5-HTR) and glutamatergic (GluR) receptors, but the timing and possible role of these different neurotransmitter receptor subtypes in the neuroplasticity following SH are not clear. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that there is an increased expression of serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmitter receptors within phrenic motoneurons after SH. In adult male rats, phrenic motoneurons were labeled retrogradely by intrapleural injection of Alexa 488-conjugated cholera toxin B. In thin (10 μm) frozen sections of the spinal cord, fluorescently-labeled phrenic motoneurons were visualized for laser capture microdissection (LCM). Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR in LCM samples, the time course of changes in 5-HTR and GluR mRNA expression was determined in phrenic motoneurons up to 21 days post-SH. Expression of 5-HTR subtypes 1b, 2a and 2c and GluR subtypes AMPA, NMDA, mGluR1 and mGluR5 was evident in phrenic motoneurons from control and SH rats. Phrenic motoneuron expression of 5-HTR2a increased ~8-fold (relative to control) at 14 days post-SH, whereas NMDA expression increased ~16-fold by 21-days post-SH. There were no other significant changes in receptor expression at any time post-SH. This is the first study to systematically document changes in motoneuron expression of multiple neurotransmitter receptors involved in regulation of motoneuron excitability. By providing information on the neuroplasticity of receptors expressed in a motoneuron pool that is inactivated by a higher-level spinal cord injury, appropriate pharmacological targets can be identified to alter motoneuron excitability. PMID:22227062

  8. Transplantation of Neural Precursor Cells Attenuates Chronic Immune Environment in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Riemann

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI is non-resolving and thus still present in chronic injury stages. It plays a key role in the pathophysiology of SCI and has been associated with further neurodegeneration and development of neuropathic pain. Neural precursor cells (NPCs have been shown to reduce the acute and sub-acute inflammatory response after SCI. In the present study, we examined effects of NPC transplantation on the immune environment in chronic stages of SCI. SCI was induced in rats by clip-compression of the cervical spinal cord at the level C6-C7. NPCs were transplanted 10 days post-injury. The functional outcome was assessed weekly for 8 weeks using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scale, the CatWalk system, and the grid walk test. Afterwards, the rats were sacrificed, and spinal cord sections were examined for M1/M2 macrophages, T lymphocytes, astrogliosis, and apoptosis using immunofluorescence staining. Rats treated with NPCs had compared to the control group significantly fewer pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and reduced immunodensity for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, their marker enzyme. Anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages were rarely present 8 weeks after the SCI. In this model, the sub-acute transplantation of NPCs did not support survival and proliferation of M2 macrophages. Post-traumatic apoptosis, however, was significantly reduced in the NPC group, which might be explained by the altered microenvironment following NPC transplantation. Corresponding to these findings, reactive astrogliosis was significantly reduced in NPC-transplanted animals. Furthermore, we could observe a trend toward smaller cavity sizes and functional improvement following NPC transplantation. Our data suggest that transplantation of NPCs following SCI might attenuate inflammation even in chronic injury stages. This might prevent further neurodegeneration and could also set a stage for improved neuroregeneration after SCI.

  9. Cervical shaping in curved root canals: comparison of the efficiency of two endodontic instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Busquim Sandra Soares Kühne; Santos Marcelo dos

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the removal of dentin produced by number 25 (0.08) Flare files (Quantec Flare Series, Analytic Endodontics, Glendora, California, USA) and number 1 e 2 Gates-Glidden burs (Dentsply - Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), in the mesio-buccal and mesio-lingual root canals, respectively, of extracted human permanent inferior molars, by means of measuring the width of dentinal walls prior and after instrumentation. The obtained values were compared. Due to th...

  10. Phrenic nerve neurotization utilizing the spinal accessory nerve: technical note with potential application in patients with high cervical quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Pearson, Blake; Loukas, Marios; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oakes, W Jerry

    2008-11-01

    High cervical quadriplegia is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Artificial respiration in these patients carries significant long-term risks such as infection, atelectasis, and respiratory failure. As phrenic nerve pacing has been proven to free many of these patients from ventilatory dependency, we hypothesized that neurotization of the phrenic nerve with the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) may offer one potential alternative to phrenic nerve stimulation via pacing and may be more efficacious and longer lasting without the complications of an implantable device. Ten cadavers (20 sides) underwent exposure of the cervical phrenic nerve and the SAN in the posterior cervical triangle. The SAN was split into anterior and posterior halves and the anterior half transposed to the ipsilateral phrenic nerve as it crossed the anterior scalene muscle. The mean distance between the cervical phrenic nerve and the SAN in the posterior cervical triangle was 2.5 cm proximally, 4 cm at a midpoint, and 6 cm distally. The range for these measurements was 2 to 4 cm, 3.5 to 5 cm, and 4 to 8.5 cm, respectively. The mean excess length of SAN available after transposition to the more anteromedially placed phrenic nerve was 5 cm (range 4 to 6.5 cm). The mean diameter of these regional parts of the spinal accessory and phrenic nerves was 2 and 2.5 mm, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found for measurements between sides. To our knowledge, using the SAN for neurotization to the phrenic nerve for potential use in patients with spinal cord injury has not been previously explored. Following clinical trials, these data may provide a mechanism for self stimulation of the diaphragm and obviate phrenic nerve pacing in patients with high cervical quadriplegia. Our study found that such a maneuver is technically feasible in the cadaver.

  11. Early versus delayed decompression in acute subaxial cervical spinal cord injury: A prospective outcome study at a Level I trauma center from India

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Vaghani, Gaurang; Siddiqui, Saquib; Sawhney, Chhavi; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Atin; Kale, S. S.; Sharma, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study was done with the aim to compare the clinical outcome and patients’ quality of life between early versus delayed surgically treated patients of acute subaxial cervical spinal cord injury. The current study was based on the hypothesis that early surgical decompression and fixations in acute subaxial cervical spinal cord trauma is safe and is associated with improved outcome as compared to delayed surgical decompression. Materials and Methods: A total of 69 patients were recrui...

  12. Phrenic motor outputs in response to bronchopulmonary C‐fibre activation following chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Key points Activation of bronchopulmonary C‐fibres, the main chemosensitive afferents in the lung, can induce pulmonary chemoreflexes to modulate respiratory activity.Following chronic cervical spinal cord injury, bronchopulmonary C‐fibre activation‐induced inhibition of phrenic activity was exaggerated.Supersensitivity of phrenic motor outputs to the inhibitory effect of bronchopulmonary C‐fibre activation is due to a shift of phrenic motoneuron types and slow recovery of phrenic motoneuron discharge in cervical spinal cord‐injured animals.These data suggest that activation of bronchopulmonary C‐fibres may retard phrenic output recovery following cervical spinal cord injury.The alteration of phenotype and discharge pattern of phrenic motoneuron enables us to understand the impact of spinal cord injury on spinal respiratory activity. Abstract Cervical spinal injury interrupts bulbospinal pathways and results in cessation of phrenic bursting ipsilateral to the lesion. The ipsilateral phrenic activity can partially recover over weeks to months following injury due to the activation of latent crossed spinal pathways and exhibits a greater capacity to increase activity during respiratory challenges than the contralateral phrenic nerve. However, whether the bilateral phrenic nerves demonstrate differential responses to respiratory inhibitory inputs is unclear. Accordingly, the present study examined bilateral phrenic bursting in response to capsaicin‐induced pulmonary chemoreflexes, a robust respiratory inhibitory stimulus. Bilateral phrenic nerve activity was recorded in anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated adult rats at 8–9 weeks after C2 hemisection (C2Hx) or C2 laminectomy. Intra‐jugular capsaicin (1.5 μg kg−1) injection was performed to activate the bronchopulmonary C‐fibres to evoke pulmonary chemoreflexes. The present results indicate that capsaicin‐induced prolongation of expiratory duration was significantly attenuated in C2Hx

  13. Phrenic motor outputs in response to bronchopulmonary C-fibre activation following chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze

    2016-10-15

    Activation of bronchopulmonary C-fibres, the main chemosensitive afferents in the lung, can induce pulmonary chemoreflexes to modulate respiratory activity. Following chronic cervical spinal cord injury, bronchopulmonary C-fibre activation-induced inhibition of phrenic activity was exaggerated. Supersensitivity of phrenic motor outputs to the inhibitory effect of bronchopulmonary C-fibre activation is due to a shift of phrenic motoneuron types and slow recovery of phrenic motoneuron discharge in cervical spinal cord-injured animals. These data suggest that activation of bronchopulmonary C-fibres may retard phrenic output recovery following cervical spinal cord injury. The alteration of phenotype and discharge pattern of phrenic motoneuron enables us to understand the impact of spinal cord injury on spinal respiratory activity. Cervical spinal injury interrupts bulbospinal pathways and results in cessation of phrenic bursting ipsilateral to the lesion. The ipsilateral phrenic activity can partially recover over weeks to months following injury due to the activation of latent crossed spinal pathways and exhibits a greater capacity to increase activity during respiratory challenges than the contralateral phrenic nerve. However, whether the bilateral phrenic nerves demonstrate differential responses to respiratory inhibitory inputs is unclear. Accordingly, the present study examined bilateral phrenic bursting in response to capsaicin-induced pulmonary chemoreflexes, a robust respiratory inhibitory stimulus. Bilateral phrenic nerve activity was recorded in anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated adult rats at 8-9 weeks after C2 hemisection (C2Hx) or C2 laminectomy. Intra-jugular capsaicin (1.5 μg kg -1 ) injection was performed to activate the bronchopulmonary C-fibres to evoke pulmonary chemoreflexes. The present results indicate that capsaicin-induced prolongation of expiratory duration was significantly attenuated in C2Hx animals. However, ipsilateral phrenic

  14. Favourable outcome of posterior decompression and stabilization in lordosis for cervical spondylotic myelopathy: the spinal cord "back shift" concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaro, Vincenzo; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Berton, Alessandra; Salvatore, Giuseppe; Denaro, Luca

    2015-11-01

    Surgical management of patients with multilevel CSM aims to decompress the spinal cord and restore the normal sagittal alignment. The literature lacks of high level evidences about the best surgical approach. Posterior decompression and stabilization in lordosis allows spinal cord back shift, leading to indirect decompression of the anterior spinal cord. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of posterior decompression and stabilization in lordosis for multilevel CSM. 36 out of 40 patients were clinically assessed at a mean follow-up of 5, 7 years. Outcome measures included EMS, mJOA Score, NDI and SF-12. Patients were asked whether surgery met their expectations and if they would undergo the same surgery again. Bone graft fusion, instrumental failure and cervical curvature were evaluated. Spinal cord back shift was measured and correlation with EMS and mJOA score recovery rate was analyzed. All scores showed a significative improvement (p 0.05). Ninety percent of patients would undergo the same surgery again. There was no deterioration of the cervical alignment, posterior grafted bones had completely fused and there were no instrument failures. The mean spinal cord back shift was 3.9 mm (range 2.5-4.5 mm). EMS and mJOA recovery rates were significantly correlated with the postoperative posterior cord migration (P lordosis is a valuable procedure for patients affected by multilevel CSM, leading to significant clinical improvement thanks to the spinal cord back shift. Postoperative lordotic alignment of the cervical spine is a key factor for successful treatment.

  15. A Study of Risk Factors for Tracheostomy in Patients With a Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Jun; Yugue, Itaru; Shiba, Keiichiro; Maeyama, Akira; Naito, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective, consecutive case series. To determine the risk factors for a tracheostomy in patients with a cervical spinal cord injury. Respiratory status cannot be stabilized in patients with a cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) for various reasons, so a number of these patients require long-term respiratory care and a tracheostomy. Various studies have described risk factors for a tracheostomy, but none have indicated a relationship between imaging assessment and the need for a tracheostomy. The current study used imaging assessment and other approaches to assess and examine the risk factors for a tracheostomy in patients with a CSCI. Subjects were 199 patients who were treated at the Spinal Injuries Center within 72 hours of a CSCI over 8-year period. Risk factors for a tracheostomy were retrospectively studied. Patients were assessed in terms of 10 items: age, sex, the presence of a vertebral fracture or dislocation, ASIA Impairment Scale, the neurological level of injury (NLI), PaO2, PaCO2, the level of injury on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the presence of hematoma-like changes (a hypointense core surrounded by a hyperintense rim in T2-weighted images) on MRI, and the Injury Severity Score.Items were analyzed multivariate logistic regression, and P tracheostomy, accounting for 11.6% of patients with a CSCI. Univariate analyses of the risk factors for tracheostomy revealed significant differences for six items: age, Injury Severity Score, presence of fracture or dislocation, ASIA Impairment Scale A, NLI C4 or above, and MRI scans revealing hematoma-like changes. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed significant differences in terms of two items: NLI C4 or above and MRI scans revealing hematoma-like changes. Thirty patients had both an NLI C4 or above and MRI scans revealing hematoma-like changes. Of these, 17 (56.7%) required a tracheostomy. Patients with an NLI C4 or above and MRI scans revealing hematoma-like changes were likely to

  16. Complex neurological investigations of space-occupying lesions in the spinal canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, H; Besel, R; Schumann, E; Usbeck, W

    1981-03-01

    Problems of early diagnosis of space-occupying intraspinal lesions are discussed in relation to 335 patients on whom surgery had been carried out. Advances in neuroradiological methods are considered. The development of new contrast media has resulted in a reduction of the risk of invasive procedures and this should lead to diagnosis of space-occupying spinal lesions at a very early stage. It is now possible to diagnose small tumours before they cause compression of the cord or of nerve roots.

  17. Delayed post-traumatic spinal cord infarction in an adult after minor head and neck trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartanusz Viktor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Delayed post-traumatic spinal cord infarction is a devastating complication described in children. In adults, spinal cord ischemia after cardiovascular interventions, scoliosis correction, or profound hypotension has been reported in the literature. However, delayed spinal cord infarction after minor head trauma has not been described yet. Case presentation We report the case of a 45-year-old Hispanic man who had a minor head trauma. He was admitted to our hospital because of paresthesias in his hands and neck pain. A radiological workup showed cervical spinal canal stenosis and chronic cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Twelve hours after admission, our patient became unresponsive and, despite full resuscitation efforts, died. The autopsy revealed spinal cord necrosis involving the entire cervical spinal cord and upper thoracic region. Conclusions This case illustrates the extreme fragility of spinal cord hemodynamics in patients with chronic cervical spinal canal stenosis, in which any further perturbations, such as cervical hyperflexion related to a minor head injury, can have catastrophic consequences. Furthermore, the delayed onset of spinal cord infarction in this case shows that meticulous maintenance of blood pressure in the acute post-traumatic period is of paramount importance, even in patients with minimal post-traumatic symptoms.

  18. Dynamic function MR of the cervical vertebral column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naegele, M.; Woell, B.; Reiser, M.; Koch, W.; Kaden, B.

    1992-01-01

    To obtain functional studies of the cervical spine, a device has been developed which allows MRI examinations to be carried out in five different degrees of flexion. T 1 and T 2 * weighted FFE sequences were used. Dynamic functional MRI was performed on 5 normals and 31 patients (5 disc herniation, 4 whiplash injuries, 6 spinal canal stenoses, 14 laminectomies and spinal fusions, 2 rheumatoid arthritis). The relationship of the spinal cord to the bony and ligamentous components in different degrees of flexion was particularly well shown in whiplash injury, spinal stenosis and postoperative situations. (orig.) [de

  19. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winklhofer, S. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Schoth, F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Krings, T. [Toronto Western Hospital, ON (Canada). Div. of Neuroradiology; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Stracke, C.P. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2014-11-15

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  20. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winklhofer, S.; University Hospital Zurich; Schoth, F.; Stolzmann, P.; Krings, T.; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Stracke, C.P.; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen

    2014-01-01

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  1. Diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) metrics in the cervical spinal cord in asymptomatic HIV-positive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Mang, Christina; Mang, Thomas; Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia; Weber, Michael; Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Law, Meng [University of Southern California, Los Angeles County Hospital and USC Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    This study was conducted to compare diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) metrics of the cervical spinal cord in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with those measured in healthy volunteers, and to assess whether DTI is a valuable diagnostic tool in the early detection of HIV-associated myelopathy (HIVM). MR imaging of the cervical spinal cord was performed in 20 asymptomatic HIV-positive patients and in 20 healthy volunteers on a 3-T MR scanner. Average fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and major (E1) and minor (E2, E3) eigenvalues were calculated within regions of interest (ROIs) at the C2/3 level (central and bilateral anterior, lateral and posterior white matter). Statistical analysis showed significant differences with regard to mean E3 values between patients and controls (p = 0.045; mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) test). Mean FA was lower, and mean MD, mean E1, and mean E2 were higher in each measured ROI in patients compared to controls, but these differences were not statistically significant. Asymptomatic HIV-positive patients demonstrate only subtle changes in DTI metrics measured in the cervical spinal cord compared to healthy volunteers that currently do not support using DTI as a diagnostic tool for the early detection of HIVM. (orig.)

  2. "Do Not Follow the Tail": A Practical Approach to Remove a Sheared Lumbar Catheter Fragment Avoiding Its Migration into the Spinal Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshino, Satoru; Kishima, Haruhiko; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Saitoh, Youichi

    2016-03-01

    Catheter shearing is one of the most common complications of various neurosurgical modalities that use an intrathecal lumbar catheter. The sheared catheter fragment often can spontaneously migrate into the spinal canal; however, in some cases, the end of the fragment will remain outside the spinal canal. In this situation, the consulting neurosurgeons may try to retrieve the catheter fragment by approaching it directly through the catheter tract. This simple maneuver, however, can cause the fragment to slip into the spinal canal before it is secured, as we experienced recently in 2 cases. Because the fragment of the sheared catheter slipped while manipulating it within the catheter tract, we suggest that surgeons not approach the fragment along the tract to prevent it from migrating downward. Using the operative findings of an illustrative case, we describe how to avoid downward migration of the catheter fragment when retrieving a sheared lumbar catheter. We found that the sheared catheter of a lumbar-peritoneal shunt was slowly slipping along with the pulsatile movement of cerebrospinal fluid within the catheter tract. We successfully retrieved the fragment by approaching it from outside the catheter tract. We propose that surgeons approach the fragment from outside of the catheter tract. One should keep in mind a simple phrase, 'Do not follow the tail', when retrieving the sheared lumbar catheter fragment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 in the ligamentum flavum from lumbar spinal canal stenosis patients with and without diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Guanyu; Watanabe, Kota; Miyauchi, Yoshiteru

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) is one of the most common spinal disorders in the elderly, and ligamentum flavum (LF) hypertrophy is an important cause of LSCS. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) can degrade fibrillar collagens and elastic microfibrils, and is involved in inflammation and fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to compare the expression of MMP13 in the LF from LSCS patients with diabetes mellitus [DM (+)] with that in the LF from patients without DM [DM (-)] and to analyze the relationship among DM, MMP13 expression, and LF hypertrophy. LFs from 11 DM (+) and 24 DM (-) LSCS patients were analyzed in this study. Histology analysis using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome stain was performed for each LF. The expression of MMP13 was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The thickness of LF was measured by CT. In the LF from DM (+) LSCS patients, the elastic fibers were more disorganized and had lower volumes than in the LF from DM (-) LSCS patients, while more fibrotic tissue was observed in the LF from DM (+) than from DM (-) LSCS patients. MMP13 expression was significantly higher in the LF from DM (+) LSCS patients (0.46±0.61 vs. 0.05±0.09, P=0.002). The LF from the DM (+) LSCS patients was significantly thicker than that from the DM (-) LSCS patients (5.0±0.9 vs. 3.1±0.8 mm, P<0.01), and the thickness was correlated with the expression of MMP13 (correlation coefficient=0.43, P=0.01, Pearson's correlation test). DM-related MMP13 expression can be one of the factors contributing to fibrosis and hypertrophy of the LF. Further research on the mechanism of this process may lead to new therapies for LF hypertrophy. (author)

  4. Functional restoration of the paralyzed diaphragm in high cervical quadriplegia via phrenic nerve neurotization utilizing the functional spinal accessory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-liang; Li, Jian-jun; Zhang, Shao-cheng; Du, Liang-jie; Gao, Feng; Li, Jun; Wang, Yu-ming; Gong, Hui-ming; Cheng, Liang

    2011-08-01

    The authors report a case of functional improvement of the paralyzed diaphragm in high cervical quadriplegia via phrenic nerve neurotization using a functional spinal accessory nerve. Complete spinal cord injury at the C-2 level was diagnosed in a 44-year-old man. Left diaphragm activity was decreased, and the right diaphragm was completely paralyzed. When the level of metabolism or activity (for example, fever, sitting, or speech) slightly increased, dyspnea occurred. The patient underwent neurotization of the right phrenic nerve with the trapezius branch of the right spinal accessory nerve at 11 months postinjury. Four weeks after surgery, training of the synchronous activities of the trapezius muscle and inspiration was conducted. Six months after surgery, motion was observed in the previously paralyzed right diaphragm. The lung function evaluation indicated improvements in vital capacity and tidal volume. This patient was able to sit in a wheelchair and conduct outdoor activities without assisted ventilation 12 months after surgery.

  5. The Use of Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Extremity Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K; Novak, Christine B; Krauss, Emily M; Hoben, Gwendolyn M; Zaidman, Craig; Ruvinskaya, Rimma; Juknis, Neringa; Winter, Anke C; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2018-03-15

    Nerve transfer surgery to restore upper extremity function in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is novel and may transform treatment. Determining candidacy even years post-SCI is ill defined and deserves investigation. To develop a diagnostic algorithm, focusing on electrodiagnostic (EDX) studies, to determine eligibility for nerve transfer surgery. Retrospective descriptive case series. Tertiary university-based institution. Individuals with cervical SCI (n = 45). The electronic medical records of people referred to the Plastic Surgery Multidisciplinary Upper Extremity Surgery unit in the SCI clinic from 2010-2015 were reviewed. People were considered for nerve transfers to restore elbow extension or finger flexion and/or extension. Data including demographic, clinical evaluation, EDX results, surgery, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. EDX data, including nerve conduction studies and electromyography, for bilateral upper extremities of each patient examined was used to assess for the presence of lower motor neuron injury, which would preclude late nerve transfer. Based on our criteria and the results of EDX testing, a substantial number of patients presenting even years post-SCI were candidates for nerve transfers. Clinical outcome results are heterogeneous but promising and suggest that further refinement of eligibility, long-term follow-up, and standardized assessment will improve our understanding of the role of nerve transfer surgery to restore function in people with midcervical SCI. Many patients living with SCI are candidates for nerve transfer surgery to restore upper extremity function. Although the ultimate efficacy of these surgeries is not yet determined, this study attempts to report the criteria we are using and may ultimately determine the timing for intervention and which transfers are most useful for this heterogeneous population. IV. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Occipital neuralgia associates with high cervical spinal cord lesions in idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoon, Narayan R; Watson, James C; Boes, Christopher J; Kantarci, Orhun H

    2018-01-01

    Background The association of trigeminal neuralgia with pontine lesions has been well documented in multiple sclerosis, and we tested the hypothesis that occipital neuralgia in multiple sclerosis is associated with high cervical spinal cord lesions. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 29 patients diagnosed with both occipital neuralgia and demyelinating disease by a neurologist from January 2001 to December 2014. We collected data on demographics, clinical findings, presence of C2-3 demyelinating lesions, and treatment responses. Results The patients with both occipital neuralgia and multiple sclerosis were typically female (76%) and had a later onset (age > 40) of occipital neuralgia (72%). Eighteen patients (64%) had the presence of C2-3 lesions and the majority had unilateral symptoms (83%) or episodic pain (78%). All patients with documented sensory loss (3/3) had C2-3 lesions. Most patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (6/8) had C2-3 lesions. Of the eight patients with C2-3 lesions and imaging at onset of occipital neuralgia, five (62.5%) had evidence of active demyelination. None of the patients with progressive multiple sclerosis (3/3) responded to occipital nerve blocks or high dose intravenous steroids, whereas all of the other phenotypes with long term follow-up (eight patients) had good responses. Conclusions A cervical spine MRI should be considered in all patients presenting with occipital neuralgia. In patients with multiple sclerosis, clinical features in occipital neuralgia that were predictive of the presence of a C2-3 lesion were unilateral episodic symptoms, sensory loss, later onset of occipital neuralgia, and progressive multiple sclerosis phenotype. Clinical phenotype predicted response to treatment.

  7. Schwann cell transplantation improves reticulospinal axon growth and forelimb strength after severe cervical spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, S M; Kitay, B M; Cho, K S; Lo, T P; Barakat, D J; Marcillo, A E; Sanchez, A R; Andrade, C M; Pearse, D D

    2007-01-01

    Schwann cell (SC) implantation alone has been shown to promote the growth of propriospinal and sensory axons, but not long-tract descending axons, after thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI). In the current study, we examined if an axotomy close to the cell body of origin (so as to enhance the intrinsic growth response) could permit supraspinal axons to grow onto SC grafts. Adult female Fischer rats received a severe (C5) cervical contusion (1.1 mm displacement, 3 KDyn). At 1 week postinjury, 2 million SCs ex vivo transduced with lentiviral vector encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were implanted within media into the injury epicenter; injury-only animals served as controls. Animals were tested weekly using the BBB score for 7 weeks postimplantation and received at end point tests for upper body strength: self-supported forelimb hanging, forearm grip force, and the incline plane. Following behavioral assessment, animals were anterogradely traced bilaterally from the reticular formation using BDA-Texas Red. Stereological quantification revealed a twofold increase in the numbers of preserved NeuN+ neurons rostral and caudal to the injury/graft site in SC implanted animals, corroborating previous reports of their neuroprotective efficacy. Examination of labeled reticulospinal axon growth revealed that while rarely an axon was present within the lesion site of injury-only controls, numerous reticulospinal axons had penetrated the SC implant/lesion milieu. This has not been observed following implantation of SCs alone into the injured thoracic spinal cord. Significant behavioral improvements over injury-only controls in upper limb strength, including an enhanced grip strength (a 296% increase) and an increased self-supported forelimb hanging, accompanied SC-mediated neuroprotection and reticulospinal axon growth. The current study further supports the neuroprotective efficacy of SC implants after SCI and demonstrates that SCs alone are capable of supporting

  8. Locomotor Training Restores Walking in a Nonambulatory Child With Chronic, Severe, Incomplete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrman, Andrea L; Nair, Preeti M; Bowden, Mark G; Dauser, Robert C; Herget, Benjamin R; Martin, Jennifer B; Phadke, Chetan P; Reier, Paul J; Senesac, Claudia R; Thompson, Floyd J; Howland, Dena R

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Locomotor training (LT) enhances walking in adult experimental animals and humans with mild-to-moderate spinal cord injuries (SCIs). The animal literature suggests that the effects of LT may be greater on an immature nervous system than on a mature nervous system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of LT in a child with chronic, incomplete SCI. Subject: The subject was a nonambulatory 4½-year-old boy with an American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) C Lower Extremity Motor Score (LEMS) of 4/50 who was deemed permanently wheelchair-dependent and was enrolled in an LT program 16 months after a severe cervical SCI. Methods: A pretest-posttest design was used in the study. Over 16 weeks, the child received 76 LT sessions using both treadmill and over-ground settings in which graded sensory cues were provided. The outcome measures were ASIA Impairment Scale score, gait speed, walking independence, and number of steps. Result: One month into LT, voluntary stepping began, and the child progressed from having no ability to use his legs to community ambulation with a rolling walker. By the end of LT, his walking independence score had increased from 0 to 13/20, despite no change in LEMS. The child's final self-selected gait speed was 0.29 m/s, with an average of 2,488 community-based steps per day and a maximum speed of 0.48 m/s. He then attended kindergarten using a walker full-time. Discussion and Conclusion: A simple, context-dependent stepping pattern sufficient for community ambulation was recovered in the absence of substantial voluntary isolated lower-extremity movement in a child with chronic, severe SCI. These novel data suggest that some children with severe, incomplete SCI may recover community ambulation after undergoing LT and that the LEMS cannot identify this subpopulation. PMID:18326054

  9. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a patient with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury and multimorbidity: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Robert D; Gosselin, Donna M; Thurmond, Jeb; Case, Kimberlee; Bruch, Frederick R

    2017-08-01

    This report describes interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a 51-year-old male recovering from incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) and multiple comorbidities following an automobile accident. The patient was admitted to a rehabilitation specialty hospital approximately 2 months post SCI and 2 separate surgical fusion procedures (C3-C6). Clinical presentation at the rehabilitation hospital included moderate to severe motor strength loss in both upper and lower extremities, a percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube (PEG), dysphagia, bowel/bladder incontinence, dependence on a mechanical lift and tilting wheelchair due to severe orthostatic hypotension, and pre-existing shoulder pain from bilateral joint degeneration. The interdisciplinary team formally coordinated rehabilitative care from multiple disciplines. Internal medicine managed medications, determined PEG removal, monitored co-morbid conditions, and overall progress. Chiropractic care focused on alleviating shoulder and thoracic pain and improving spinal and extremity mobility. Physical therapy addressed upright tolerance, transfer, gait, and strength training. Occupational therapy focused on hand coordination and feeding/dressing activities. Psychology assisted with coping strategies. Nursing ensured medication adherence, nutrient intake, wound prevention, and incontinence management, whereas physiatry addressed abnormal muscle tone. Eleven months post-admission the patient's progress allowed discharge to a long-term care facility. At this time he was without dysphagia or need for a PEG. Orthostatic hypotension and bilateral shoulder pain symptoms were also resolved while bowel/bladder incontinence and upper and lower extremity motor strength loss remained. He was largely independent in transferring from bed to wheelchair and in upper body dressing. Lower body dressing/bathing required maximal assistance. Gait with a 2-wheeled walker was possible up to 150 feet with verbal cues and occasional

  10. Thoracic spinal cord and cervical vagosympathetic neuromodulation obtund nodose sensory transduction of myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavatian, Siamak; Beaumont, Eric; Gibbons, David; Hammer, Matthew; Hoover, Donald B; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2017-12-01

    Autonomic regulation therapy involving either vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) or spinal cord stimulation (SCS) represents emerging bioelectronic therapies for heart disease. The objective of this study was to determine if VNS and/or SCS modulate primary cardiac afferent sensory transduction of the ischemic myocardium. Using extracellular recordings in 19 anesthetized canines, of 88 neurons evaluated, 36 ventricular-related nodose ganglia sensory neurons were identified by their functional activity responses to epicardial touch, chemical activation of their sensory neurites (epicardial veratridine) and great vessel (descending aorta or inferior vena cava) occlusion. Neural responses to 1min left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion (CAO) were then evaluated. These interventions were then studied following either: i) SCS [T1-T3 spinal level; 50Hz, 90% motor threshold] or ii) cervical VNS [15-20Hz; 1.2× threshold]. LAD occlusion activated 66% of identified nodose ventricular sensory neurons (0.33±0.08-0.79±0.20Hz; baseline to CAO; p<0.002). Basal activity of cardiac-related nodose neurons was differentially reduced by VNS (0.31±0.11 to 0.05±0.02Hz; p<0.05) as compared to SCS (0.36±0.12 to 0.28±0.14, p=0.59), with their activity response to transient LAD CAO being suppressed by either SCS (0.85±0.39-0.11±0.04Hz; p<0.03) or VNS (0.75±0.27-0.12±0.05Hz; p<0.04). VNS did not alter evoked neural responses of cardiac-related nodose neurons to great vessel occlusion. Both VNS and SCS obtund ventricular ischemia induced enhancement of nodose afferent neuronal inputs to the medulla. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a patient with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury and multimorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Robert D.; Gosselin, Donna M.; Thurmond, Jeb; Case, Kimberlee; Bruch, Frederick R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: This report describes interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a 51-year-old male recovering from incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) and multiple comorbidities following an automobile accident. Patient concerns: The patient was admitted to a rehabilitation specialty hospital approximately 2 months post SCI and 2 separate surgical fusion procedures (C3–C6). Diagnoses: Clinical presentation at the rehabilitation hospital included moderate to severe motor strength loss in both upper and lower extremities, a percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube (PEG), dysphagia, bowel/bladder incontinence, dependence on a mechanical lift and tilting wheelchair due to severe orthostatic hypotension, and pre-existing shoulder pain from bilateral joint degeneration. Interventions: The interdisciplinary team formally coordinated rehabilitative care from multiple disciplines. Internal medicine managed medications, determined PEG removal, monitored co-morbid conditions, and overall progress. Chiropractic care focused on alleviating shoulder and thoracic pain and improving spinal and extremity mobility. Physical therapy addressed upright tolerance, transfer, gait, and strength training. Occupational therapy focused on hand coordination and feeding/dressing activities. Psychology assisted with coping strategies. Nursing ensured medication adherence, nutrient intake, wound prevention, and incontinence management, whereas physiatry addressed abnormal muscle tone. Outcomes: Eleven months post-admission the patient's progress allowed discharge to a long-term care facility. At this time he was without dysphagia or need for a PEG. Orthostatic hypotension and bilateral shoulder pain symptoms were also resolved while bowel/bladder incontinence and upper and lower extremity motor strength loss remained. He was largely independent in transferring from bed to wheelchair and in upper body dressing. Lower body dressing/bathing required maximal assistance. Gait with a 2

  12. Allograft versus autograft in cervical and lumbar spinal fusions: an examination of operative time, length of stay, surgical site infection, and blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Grauberger, Jennifer; Shepherd, Daniel; Maloney, Patrick R; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Nassr, Ahmad; Bydon, Mohamad

    2016-11-23

    Autograft harvesting for spine arthrodesis has been associated with longer operative times and increased blood loss. Allograft compared to autograft in spinal fusions has not been studied in a multicenter cohort. Patients enrolled in the ACS-NSQIP registry between 2012 and 2013 who underwent cervical or lumbar spinal fusion with either allograft or autograft through a separate incision were included for analysis. The primary outcomes of interest were operative time, length of stay, blood transfusion, and surgical site infection (SSI). A total of 6,790 and 6,718 patients received a cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, respectively. On unadjusted analysis in both cervical and lumbar cohorts, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion (cervical: 2.9% vs 1.0%, poperative time (cervical: 167 vs 128 minutes, poperative times (cervical: 27.8 minutes, 95% CI 20.7-35.0; and lumbar: 25.4 minutes, 95% CI 17.7-33.1) relative to allograft. Autograft was not associated with either length of stay or SSI. In a multicenter cohort of patients undergoing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion and increased operative time relative to allograft.

  13. Analysis of cervical kyphosis and spinal balance in young idiopathic scoliosis patients classified by the apex of thoracic kyphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenyu; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Tsushima, Mikito; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Sagittal balance has recently been the focus of studies aimed at understanding the correction force required for both coronal and sagittal malalignment. However, the correlation between cervical kyphosis and sagittal balance in AIS patients has yet to be thoroughly investigated. This study aimed to clarify the correlation between cervical alignment and spinal balance in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Here, we hypothesized that cervical kyphosis patients can be classified into groups by the apex of thoracic kyphosis. This study included 92 AIS patients (84 females, 8 males; mean age, 15.1 years). Patients were divided into the cervical lordosis (CL), cervical sigmoid (CS), or cervical kyphosis (CK) groups and further classified according to the apex of thoracic kyphosis into High (above T3), Middle (T4-T9), and Low (below T10) groups. There were 17 (18.5 %), 22 (23.9 %), and 53 (57.6 %) patients with CL, CS, and CK, respectively. In the CK group, 13 had CK-High, 35 had CK-Middle, and 5 had CK-Low. The C7 sagittal vertical axis (C7SVA) measurements were most backward in CK-High and most forward in CK-Low. The T5-12 kyphosis (TK) measurement was significantly lower in CK-High. Most AIS patients had kyphotic cervical alignment. Patients with CK can be classified as having CK-High, CK-Middle, or CK-Low according to the apex of thoracic kyphosis. CK-High is due to thoracic hypokyphosis with a backward balanced C7SVA. CK-Middle is well-balanced cervical kyphosis. CK-Low has forward-bent global kyphosis of the cervicothoracic spine that positioned the C7SVA forward.

  14. Endogenous neural stem cells in central canal of adult rats acquired limited ability to differentiate into neurons following mild spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Tan, Botao; Wang, Li; Long, Zaiyun; Li, Yingyu; Liao, Weihong; Wu, Yamin

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem cells in central canal of adult mammalian spinal cord exhibit stem cell properties following injury. In the present study, the endogenous neural stem cells were labeled with Dil to track the differentiation of cells after mild spinal cord injury (SCI). Compared with 1 and 14 days post mild injury, the number of endogenous neural stem cells significantly increased at the injured site of spinal cord on 3 and 7 days post-injury. Dil-labeled βIII-tublin and GFAP expressing cells could be detected on 7 days post-injury, which indicated that the endogenous neural stem cells in central canal of spinal cord differentiated into different type of neural cells, but there were more differentiated astrocytes than the neurons after injury. Furthermore, after injury the expression of inhibitory Notch1 and Hes1 mRNA began to increase at 6 hours and was evident at 12 and 24 hours, which maintained high levels up to 7 days post-injury. These results indicated that a mild SCI in rat is sufficient to induce endogenous neural stem cells proliferation and differentiation. However, the ability to differentiate into neurons is limited, which may be, at least in part, due to high expression of inhibitory Notch1 and Hes1 genes after injury. PMID:26097566

  15. An optimized framework for quantitative magnetization transfer imaging of the cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Marco; Grussu, Francesco; Ianus, Andrada; Schneider, Torben; Prados, Ferran; Fairney, James; Ourselin, Sebastien; Alexander, Daniel C; Cercignani, Mara; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Samson, Rebecca S

    2018-05-01

    To develop a framework to fully characterize quantitative magnetization transfer indices in the human cervical cord in vivo within a clinically feasible time. A dedicated spinal cord imaging protocol for quantitative magnetization transfer was developed using a reduced field-of-view approach with echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. Sequence parameters were optimized based in the Cramer-Rao-lower bound. Quantitative model parameters (i.e., bound pool fraction, free and bound pool transverse relaxation times [ T2F, T2B], and forward exchange rate [k FB ]) were estimated implementing a numerical model capable of dealing with the novelties of the sequence adopted. The framework was tested on five healthy subjects. Cramer-Rao-lower bound minimization produces optimal sampling schemes without requiring the establishment of a steady-state MT effect. The proposed framework allows quantitative voxel-wise estimation of model parameters at the resolution typically used for spinal cord imaging (i.e. 0.75 × 0.75 × 5 mm 3 ), with a protocol duration of ∼35 min. Quantitative magnetization transfer parametric maps agree with literature values. Whole-cord mean values are: bound pool fraction = 0.11(±0.01), T2F = 46.5(±1.6) ms, T2B = 11.0(±0.2) µs, and k FB  = 1.95(±0.06) Hz. Protocol optimization has a beneficial effect on reproducibility, especially for T2B and k FB . The framework developed enables robust characterization of spinal cord microstructure in vivo using qMT. Magn Reson Med 79:2576-2588, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  16. Organization of projections from the spinal trigeminal subnucleus oralis to the spinal cord in the rat: a neuroanatomical substrate for reciprocal orofacial-cervical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoize, Laurent; Doméjean, Sophie; Melin, Céline; Raboisson, Patrick; Artola, Alain; Dallel, Radhouane

    2010-07-09

    The organization of efferent projections from the spinal trigeminal nucleus oralis (Sp5O) to the spinal cord in the rat was studied using the anterograde tracer Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin. Sp5O projections to the spinal cord are restricted to the cervical cord. No labeled terminal can be detected in the thoracic and lumbar cord. The organization of these projections happens to critically depend on the dorso-ventral location of the injection site. On the one hand, the dorsal part of the Sp5O projects to the medial part of the dorsal horn (laminae III-V) at the C1 level, on the ipsilateral side, and to the ventral horn, on both sides but mainly on the ipsilateral one. Ipsilateral labeled terminals are distributed throughout laminae VII to IX but tend to cluster around the dorso-medial motor nuclei, especially at C3-C5 levels. Within the contralateral ventral horn, label terminals are found particularly in the region of the ventro-medial motor nucleus. This projection extends as far caudally as C3 or C4 level. On the other hand, the ventral part of the Sp5O projects to the lateral part of the dorsal horn (laminae III-V) at the C1 level, on the ipsilateral side, and to the ventral horn, on both sides but mainly on the contralateral one. Contralateral labeled terminals are distributed within the region of the dorso- and ventro-medial motor nuclei at C1-C4 levels whereas they are restricted to the dorso-medial motor nucleus at C5-C8 levels. These findings suggest that Sp5O is involved in the coordination of neck movements and in the modulation of incoming sensory information at the cervical spinal cord. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute intermittent hypoxia and rehabilitative training following cervical spinal injury alters neuronal hypoxia- and plasticity-associated protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Atiq; Arnold, Breanna M; Caine, Sally; Toosi, Behzad M; Verge, Valerie M K; Muir, Gillian D

    2018-01-01

    One of the most promising approaches to improve recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the augmentation of spontaneously occurring plasticity in uninjured neural pathways. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH, brief exposures to reduced O2 levels alternating with normal O2 levels) initiates plasticity in respiratory systems and has been shown to improve recovery in respiratory and non-respiratory spinal systems after SCI in experimental animals and humans. Although the mechanism by which AIH elicits its effects after SCI are not well understood, AIH is known to alter protein expression in spinal neurons in uninjured animals. Here, we examine hypoxia- and plasticity-related protein expression using immunofluorescence in spinal neurons in SCI rats that were treated with AIH combined with motor training, a protocol which has been demonstrated to improve recovery of forelimb function in this lesion model. Specifically, we assessed protein expression in spinal neurons from animals with incomplete cervical SCI which were exposed to AIH treatment + motor training either for 1 or 7 days. AIH treatment consisted of 10 episodes of AIH: (5 min 11% O2: 5 min 21% O2) for 7 days beginning at 4 weeks post-SCI. Both 1 or 7 days of AIH treatment + motor training resulted in significantly increased expression of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) relative to normoxia-treated controls, in neurons both proximal (cervical) and remote (lumbar) to the SCI. All other markers examined were significantly elevated in the 7 day AIH + motor training group only, at both cervical and lumbar levels. These markers included vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated forms of the BDNF receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB). In summary, AIH induces plasticity at the cellular level after SCI by altering the expression of major plasticity- and hypoxia-related proteins at spinal regions

  18. Cervical shaping in curved root canals: comparison of the efficiency of two endodontic instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busquim Sandra Soares Kühne

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the removal of dentin produced by number 25 (0.08 Flare files (Quantec Flare Series, Analytic Endodontics, Glendora, California, USA and number 1 e 2 Gates-Glidden burs (Dentsply - Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland, in the mesio-buccal and mesio-lingual root canals, respectively, of extracted human permanent inferior molars, by means of measuring the width of dentinal walls prior and after instrumentation. The obtained values were compared. Due to the multiple analyses of data, a nonparametric test was used, and the Kruskal-Wallis test was chosen. There was no significant difference between the instruments as to the removal of dentin in the 1st and 2nd millimeters. However, when comparing the performances of the instruments in the 3rd millimeter, Flare files promoted a greater removal than Gates-Glidden drills (p > 0.05. The analysis revealed no significant differences as to mesial wear, which demonstrates the similar behavior of both instruments. Gates-Glidden drills produced an expressive mesial detour in the 2nd and 3rd millimeters, which was detected trough a statistically significant difference in the wear of this region (p > 0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between mesial and lateral wear when Flare instruments were employed.

  19. Cervical shaping in curved root canals: comparison of the efficiency of two endodontic instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquim, Sandra Soares Kühne; dos Santos, Marcelo

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the removal of dentin produced by number 25 (0.08) Flare files (Quantec Flare Series, Analytic Endodontics, Glendora, California, USA) and number 1 e 2 Gates-Glidden burs (Dentsply - Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), in the mesio-buccal and mesio-lingual root canals, respectively, of extracted human permanent inferior molars, by means of measuring the width of dentinal walls prior and after instrumentation. The obtained values were compared. Due to the multiple analyses of data, a nonparametric test was used, and the Kruskal-Wallis test was chosen. There was no significant difference between the instruments as to the removal of dentin in the 1st and 2nd millimeters. However, when comparing the performances of the instruments in the 3rd millimeter, Flare files promoted a greater removal than Gates-Glidden drills (p > 0.05). The analysis revealed no significant differences as to mesial wear, which demonstrates the similar behavior of both instruments. Gates-Glidden drills produced an expressive mesial detour in the 2nd and 3rd millimeters, which was detected trough a statistically significant difference in the wear of this region (p > 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between mesial and lateral wear when Flare instruments were employed.

  20. Influence of the Number of Predicted Words on Text Input Speed in Participants With Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouplin, Samuel; Roche, Nicolas; Vaugier, Isabelle; Jacob, Antoine; Figere, Marjorie; Pottier, Sandra; Antoine, Jean-Yves; Bensmail, Djamel

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the number of words displayed in the word prediction software (WPS) list affects text input speed (TIS) in people with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), and whether any influence is dependent on the level of the lesion. A cross-sectional trial. A rehabilitation center. Persons with cervical SCI (N=45). Lesion level was high (C4 and C5, American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] grade A or B) for 15 participants (high-lesion group) and low (between C6 and C8, ASIA grade A or B) for 30 participants (low-lesion group). TIS was evaluated during four 10-minute copying tasks: (1) without WPS (Without); (2) with a display of 3 predicted words (3Words); (3) with a display of 6 predicted words (6Words); and (4) with a display of 8 predicted words (8Words). During the 4 copying tasks, TIS was measured objectively (characters per minute, number of errors) and subjectively through subject report (fatigue, perception of speed, cognitive load, satisfaction). For participants with low-cervical SCI, TIS without WPS was faster than with WPS, regardless of the number of words displayed (Pwords displayed in a word prediction list on TIS; however, perception of TIS differed according to lesion level. For persons with low-cervical SCI, a small number of words should be displayed, or WPS should not be used at all. For persons with high-cervical SCI, a larger number of words displayed increases the comfort of use of WPS. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of lung volumes, vital capacity and respiratory muscle strength after cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcio Aparecido; Vidotto, Milena Carlos; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Almeida, Renato; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Jardim, José Roberto; Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that physiopathological changes to the respiratory system can occur following thoracic and abdominal surgery. Laminectomy is considered to be a peripheral surgical procedure, but it is possible that thoracic spinal surgery exerts a greater influence on lung function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary volumes and maximum respiratory pressures of patients undergoing cervical, thoracic or lumbar spinal surgery. Prospective study in a tertiary-level university hospital. Sixty-three patients undergoing laminectomy due to diagnoses of tumors or herniated discs were evaluated. Vital capacity, tidal volume, minute ventilation and maximum respiratory pressures were evaluated preoperatively and on the first and second postoperative days. Possible associations between the respiratory variables and the duration of the operation, surgical diagnosis and smoking status were investigated. Vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure presented reductions on the first postoperative day (20.9% and 91.6%, respectively) for thoracic surgery (P = 0.01), and maximum expiratory pressure showed reductions on the first postoperative day in cervical surgery patients (15.3%; P = 0.004). The incidence of pulmonary complications was 3.6%. There were reductions in vital capacity and maximum respiratory pressures during the postoperative period in patients undergoing laminectomy. Surgery in the thoracic region was associated with greater reductions in vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure, compared with cervical and lumbar surgery. Thus, surgical manipulation of the thoracic region appears to have more influence on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle action.

  2. Preliminary results after upper cervical chiropractic care in patients with chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolesi, Sandro; Marceca, Giuseppe; Moser, Jon; Niglio, Tarcisio; d'Alessandro, Aldo; Ciccone, Matteo Marco; Zito, Annapaola; Mandolesi, Dimitri; d'Alessandro, Alessandro; Fedele, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical and X-ray results of the Upper Cervical Chiropractic care through the specific adjustments (corrections) of C1-C2 on patients with chronic venous cerebral-spinal insufficiency (CCSVI) and multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied a sample of 77 patients before and after the Upper Cervical Chiropractic care, and we analyzed: A) The change of the X-ray parameters; B) The clinical results using a new set of questions. The protocol of the C1- C2 upper Cervical Chiropractic treatment, specific for these patients, lasts four months. From a haemodynamic point of view we divided the patients in 3 types: Type 1 - purely vascular with intravenous alterations; Type 2 - "mechanical" with of external venous compressions; Type 3 - mixed. We found an improvement in all kinds of subluxations after the treatment with respect to the pre-treatment X-ray evaluation, with a significant statistical difference. The differences between the clinical symptoms before and after the specific treatment of C1-C2 are statistically significant with pcerebro-spinal fluid.

  3. The possible meaning of fractional anisotropy measurement of the cervical spinal cord in correct diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budrewicz, Slawomir; Szewczyk, Pawel; Bladowska, Joanna; Podemski, Ryszard; Koziorowska-Gawron, Ewa; Ejma, Maria; Słotwiński, Krzysztof; Koszewicz, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is based on clinical criteria and electrophysiological tests (electromyography, and transcranial magnetic stimulation). In the search for ALS biomarkers, the role of imaging procedures is currently emphasized, especially modern MR techniques. MR procedures were performed on 15 ALS patients and a sex- and age-matched control group. The MR examinations were performed with a 1.5-T MR unit, and the protocol consisted of sagittal T1-weighed images, sagittal and axial T2-weighed images, and sagittal T2-weighed FAT SAT images followed by an axial diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequence of the cervical spinal cord. FA values in individual segments of the cervical spinal cord were decreased in the ALS group in comparison with the control group. After comparing FA values for anterior, posterior, and lateral corticospinal columns, the greatest difference was observed between the C2 and C5 segments. Spinal cord assessment with the use of FA measurements allows for confirmation of the motor pathways lesion in ALS patients. The method, together with clinical criteria, could be helpful in ALS diagnosis, assessment of clinical course, or even the effects of new drugs. The results also confirmed the theory of the generalized character of ALS.

  4. Analysis of a self-propelling sheet with heat transfer through non-isothermal fluid in an inclined human cervical canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walait, Ahsan; Siddiqui, A M; Rana, M A

    2018-02-13

    The present theoretical analysis deals with biomechanics of the self-propulsion of a swimming sheet with heat transfer through non-isothermal fluid filling an inclined human cervical canal. Partial differential equations arising from the mathematical modeling of the proposed model are solved analytically. Flow variables like pressure gradient, propulsive velocity, fluid velocity, time mean flow rate, fluid temperature, and heat-transfer coefficients are analyzed for the pertinent parameters. Striking features of the pumping characteristics are explored. Propulsive velocity of the swimming sheet becomes faster for lower Froude number, higher Reynolds number, and for a vertical channel. Temperature and peak value of the heat-transfer coefficients below the swimming sheet showed an increase by the increment of Brinkmann number, inclination, pressure difference over wavelength, and Reynolds number whereas these quantities decrease with increasing Froude number. Aforesaid parameters have shown opposite effects on the peak value of the heat-transfer coefficients below and above the swimming sheet. Relevance of the current results to the spermatozoa transport with heat transfer through non-isothermal cervical mucus filling an inclined human cervical canal is also explored.

  5. Cervicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that does not go away: discharge may be gray, white or yellow in color Painful sexual intercourse ... Names Cervical inflammation; Inflammation - cervix Images Female reproductive anatomy Cervicitis Uterus References Eckert LO, Lentz GM. Infections ...

  6. Impact of sagittal spinopelvic alignment on clinical outcomes after decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis without coronal imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikata, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Kota; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Iwanami, Akio; Hosogane, Naobumi; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2015-10-01

    The object of this study was to investigate correlations between sagittal spinopelvic alignment and improvements in clinical and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes after lumbar decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LCS) without coronal imbalance. The authors retrospectively reviewed data from consecutive patients treated for LCS with decompression surgery in the period from 2009 through 2011. They examined correlations between preoperative or postoperative sagittal vertical axis (SVA) and radiological parameters, clinical outcomes, and health-related (HR)QOL scores in patients divided according to SVA. Clinical outcomes were assessed according to Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores. Health-related QOL was evaluated using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and the JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ). One hundred nine patients were eligible for inclusion in the study. Compared to patients with normal sagittal alignment prior to surgery (Group A: SVA imbalance (Group B: SVA ≥ 50 mm) had significantly smaller lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis angles and larger pelvic tilt. In Group B, there was a significant decrease in postoperative SVA compared with the preoperative SVA (76.3 ± 29.7 mm vs. 54.3 ± 39.8 mm, p = 0.004). The patients in Group B with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual sagittal imbalance after surgery (82.8 ± 41.6 mm). There were no significant differences in clinical and HRQOL outcomes between Groups A and B. Compared to patients with normal postoperative SVA (Group C: SVA imbalance. Decompression surgery improved the SVA value in patients with preoperative sagittal imbalance; however, the patients with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual imbalance after decompression surgery. Both clinical and HRQOL outcomes were negatively affected by postoperative residual sagittal imbalance.

  7. Acute effects of glossopharyngeal insufflation in people with cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren-Bonnier, Malin; Schiffer, Tomas A; Lindholm, Peter

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate acute effects of glossopharyngeal insufflation (GI) on lung function, airway pressure (P aw ), blood pressure and heart rate (HR) in people with cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Case-control design. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Ten participants with CSCI suffering from lesions between C4 and C8, and ASIA classification of A or B were recruited. Ten healthy particpants familiar with GI were recruited as a reference group. Spirometry, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), P aw, and HR were measured in a sitting and a supine position before, during, and after GI. GI in the study group in a sitting position increased total lung capacity (TLC) by 712 ml: P < 0.001, vital capacity (VC) by 587 ml: P < 0.0001, P aw by 13 cm H 2 O: P < 0.01, and HR by 10 beats/min: P < 0.001. MAP decreased by 25 mmHg, P < 0.0001. Significant differences were observed between groups comparing baseline with GI. The reference group had a higher increase in; TLC (P < 0.01), VC (P < 0.001), P aw (P < 0.001) and HR (P < 0.05) and a higher decrease in MAP (P < 0.001). With GI in a sitting compared to a supine position, TLC, MAP, HR, P aw remained unchanged in the study group, while residual volume decreased in the supine position (P < 0.01). There was a difference between the groups in the increase in TLC; VC; P aw, HR and in the decrease in MAP with GI, however MAP, HR and P aw responded in similar way in both groups in a sitting as well as a supine position. If performed correctly, the risks of GI resulting in clinically significant hemodynamic changes is low, although syncope may still occur.

  8. Cervical spinal cord injury associated with near-drowning does not increase pneumonia risk or mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas; Shin, Susanna; Collins, Jay; Britt, Rebecca C; Reed, Scott F; Weireter, Leonard J; Britt, L D

    2011-04-01

    Body surfing accidents (BSA) can cause cervical spinal cord injuries (CSCIs) that are associated with near-drowning (ND). The submersion injury from a ND can result in aspiration and predispose to pulmonary complications. We predicted a worse outcome (particularly the development of pneumonia) in patients with CSCIs associated with ND. A retrospective review was performed of patients who were treated at Eastern Virginia Medical School for a CSCI resulting from a blunt mechanism. Data collected included basic demographic data, data regarding injury and in-hospital outcomes, and discharge data, including discharge disposition. Statistics were performed using χ(2) and Student t test. In 2003 to 2008, 141 patients were treated for CSCIs with inclusion criteria. Thirty patients (21%) had an associated ND (BSA) and 111 patients (79%) did not (BLT). The cohorts were similar in mean age (BSA, 45 years; BLT, 50 years; P = 0.16) and male gender distribution (BSA, 93%; BLT, 79%; P = 0.13). The cohorts were similar in injury severity using Injury Severity Score (BSA, 22; BLT, 24; P = 0.65). The cohorts were similar in rates of developing pneumonia (BSA, 3%; BLT, 12%; P = 0.31). The rate of infection was significantly higher in the cohort without an associated near-drowning (BSA, 10%; BLT, 32%; P = 0.033). The mean intensive care unit stay (BSA, 3.5 days; BLT, 11.3 days; P = 0.057) and the rate of mortality were similar (BSA, 10%; BLT, 10% P = 0.99). Those patients with an associated ND had a shorter hospital stay (BSA, 5.7 days; BLT, 22.2 days; P = 0.007) and a better chance of being discharged home (BSA, 57%; BLT, 27%; P = 0.004). CSCIs after a BSA do better than their counterparts without an associated ND. CSCIs associated with ND appear to be isolated injuries with minimal pulmonary involvement despite submersion injuries.

  9. Radiation response of the rat cervical spinal cord after irradiation at different ages: Tolerance, latency and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruifrok, A.C.C.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.; Stephens, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    Investigation of the age dependent single-dose radiation tolerance, latency to radiation myelopathy, and the histopathological changes after irradiation of the rat cervical spinal cord is presented. Rats were irradiated with graded single doses of 4 MV photons to the cervical spinal cord. When the rats showed definite signs of paresis of the forelegs, they were killed and processed for histological examination. The radiation dose resulting in paresis due to white matter damage in 50% of the animals (ED 50 ) after single dose irradiation was about 21.5 Gy at all ages ≥ 2 weeks. Only the Ed 50 at 1 week was significantly lower. The latency to the development of paresis clearly changed with the age at irradiation, from about 2 weeks after irradiation at 1 week to 6-8 months after irradiation at age ≥ 8 weeks. The white matter damage was similar in all symptomatic animals studied. The most prominent were areas with diffuse demyelination and swollen axons, often with focal necrosis, accompanied by glial reaction. This was observed in all symptomatic animals, irrespective of the age at irradiation. Expression of vascular damage appeared to depend on the age at irradiation. Although the latency to myelopathy is clearly age dependent, single dose tolerance is not age dependent at age ≥ 2 weeks in the rat cervical spinal cord. The white matter damage is similar in all symptomatic animals studied, but the vasculopathies appear to be influenced by the age at irradiation. It is concluded that white matter damage and vascular damage are separate phenomena contributing to the development of radiation myelopathy, expression of which may depend on the radiation dose applied and the age at irradiation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary.

  11. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary

  12. Alternative technique of cervical spinal stabilization employing lateral mass plate and screw and intra-articular spacer fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Goel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The author discusses an alternative technique of segmental cervical spinal fixation. Material and Methods: The subtleties of the technique are discussed on the basis of experience with 3 cases with a follow-up of between 30 and 36 months. Technique: The technique involves debridement of facetal articular cartilage, distraction of facets, jamming of ′Goel spacer′ into the articular cavity and fortification of the fixation by lateral mass plate and screw fixation. The ′double-insurance′ method of fixation is safe for vertebral artery, nerve roots and spinal neural structures and the fixation is strong. Conclusions: The discussed technique is safe and provides a strong fixation and a ground for ultimate arthrodesis.

  13. Electroversion in treatment of arrhythmia in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and cervical spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEN Peng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】We report electroversion in treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF and atrioventricular nodal reentry ta-chycardia (AVNRT in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and cervical spinal cord injury. At first, the pa-tient sustained respiratory failure and weak cough reflex, thereafter repeated bronchoscopy was used to aspirate the sputum as well as control the pneumonia, which resulted in arrhythmia (AF and AVNRT. Two doses of intravenous amiodarone failed to correct the arrhythmia. After restora-tion of sinus rhythm by electroversion, he was successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation and discharged from the intensive care unit without recurrent arrhythmia. Key words: Arrhythmia, cardiac; Atrial fibrillation; Electric countershock; Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome; Spinal cord injuries

  14. A rare cause of spinal cord compression: imaging appearances of gout of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmadhikari, R.; Hide, I.G.; Dildey, P.

    2006-01-01

    Gout is a metabolic disorder typically affecting the peripheral joints, more commonly in males. Spinal involvement is uncommon and is usually associated with hyperuricemia. We present the imaging findings of a case of spinal gout in a female patient with no previous history of hyperuricaemia, involving multiple spinal segments. (orig.)

  15. A rare cause of spinal cord compression: imaging appearances of gout of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmadhikari, R.; Hide, I.G. [Freeman Hospital, Department of Radiology, High Heaton, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (United Kingdom); Dildey, P. [Freeman Hospital, Department of Pathology, High Heaton, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    Gout is a metabolic disorder typically affecting the peripheral joints, more commonly in males. Spinal involvement is uncommon and is usually associated with hyperuricemia. We present the imaging findings of a case of spinal gout in a female patient with no previous history of hyperuricaemia, involving multiple spinal segments. (orig.)

  16. The cervical spinal cord in neuromyelitis optica patients: A comparative study with multiple sclerosis using diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessôa, Fernanda Miraldi Clemente, E-mail: fernandamiraldi@hotmail.com [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Medical Student, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Fernanda Cristina Rueda, E-mail: frueda81@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, João Victor Altamiro, E-mail: victoraltamiro@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Leon, Soniza Vieira Alves, E-mail: sonizavleon@globo.com [Department of Neurology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Domingues, Romeu Côrtes, E-mail: romeu@CDPi.com.br [CDPI – Clínica de Diagnóstico Por Imagem, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro, E-mail: egasparetto@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); CDPI – Clínica de Diagnóstico Por Imagem, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    Introduction: This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), using diffusion tensor MR imaging, comparing to controls and patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and methods: We studied 8 patients with NMO and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Also, 32 MS patients were selected. Fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results: At C2, the FA value was decreased in NMO patients compared to MS and controls in the anterior column. Also in this column, RD value showed increase in NMO compared to MS and to controls. The FA value of the posterior column was decreased in NMO in comparison to controls. At C7, AD value was higher in NMO than in MS in the right column. At the same column, MD values were increased in NMO compared to MS and to controls. Conclusions: There is extensive NASC damage in NMO patients, including peripheral areas of the cervical spinal cord, affecting the white matter, mainly caused by demyelination. This suggests a new spinal cord lesion pattern in NMO in comparison to MS.

  17. The cervical spinal cord in neuromyelitis optica patients: A comparative study with multiple sclerosis using diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessôa, Fernanda Miraldi Clemente; Lopes, Fernanda Cristina Rueda; Costa, João Victor Altamiro; Leon, Soniza Vieira Alves; Domingues, Romeu Côrtes; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), using diffusion tensor MR imaging, comparing to controls and patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and methods: We studied 8 patients with NMO and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Also, 32 MS patients were selected. Fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results: At C2, the FA value was decreased in NMO patients compared to MS and controls in the anterior column. Also in this column, RD value showed increase in NMO compared to MS and to controls. The FA value of the posterior column was decreased in NMO in comparison to controls. At C7, AD value was higher in NMO than in MS in the right column. At the same column, MD values were increased in NMO compared to MS and to controls. Conclusions: There is extensive NASC damage in NMO patients, including peripheral areas of the cervical spinal cord, affecting the white matter, mainly caused by demyelination. This suggests a new spinal cord lesion pattern in NMO in comparison to MS

  18. The radiation response of the cervical spinal cord of the pig: Effects of changing the irradiated volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Aardweg, G.J.M.J.; Hopewell, J.W.; Whitehouse, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the field size effect for the cervical spinal cord of the pig after single doses of γ-rays. In this study, clinically relevant volumes of the spinal cord were irradiated. The effects of the local irradiation of different lengths of the spinal cord (2.5 cm, 5.0 cm, and 10.0 cm) have been evaluated in mature pigs (37-43 weeks). Single doses of 25-31 Gy were given using a 60 Co γ-source, at a dose rate of 0.21-0.30 Gy/min. The incidence of radiation-induced paralysis was used as the endpoint. The data were analyzed using probit analysis and a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP)-model. Twenty-five animals out of a total of 53 developed paralysis, with histological evidence of parenchymal and vascular changes in their white matter. The slope of the dose-response curves decreased with the decrease in field size; however, there was no significant difference at the radiation dose associated with a 50% incidence of paralysis (ED 50 ) irrespective of the method of analysis. The ED 50 values ± standard errors (± SE) were 27.02 ± 0.36 Gy, 27.68 ± 0.57 Gy, and 28.28 ± 0.78 Gy for field lengths of 10, 5, and 2.5 cm, respectively. Analysis of the data with a normal tissue complication probability (NCTP) model gave similar results. The latent period of paralysis was 7.5-16.5 weeks with no significant differences between dose and field size. No significant field size-related differences in response were detectable in the cervical spinal cord of mature pigs after single dose irradiations, specifically at a clinically relevant level of effect ( 10 ). 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. The radiation response of the cervical spinal cord of the pig: effects of changing the irradiated volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aardweg, Gerard J.M.J. van den; Hopewell, John W.; Whitehouse, Elizabeth M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: An investigation of the field size effect for the cervical spinal cord of the pig after single doses of γ-rays. In this study, clinically relevant volumes of the spinal cord were irradiated. Methods and Materials: The effects of the local irradiation of different lengths of the spinal cord (2.5 cm, 5.0 cm, and 10.0 cm) have been evaluated in mature pigs (37-43 weeks). Single doses of 25-31 Gy were given using a 60 Co γ-source, at a dose rate of 0.21-0.30 Gy/min. The incidence of radiation-induced paralysis was used as the endpoint. The data were analyzed using probit analysis and a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP)-model. Results: Twenty-five animals out of a total of 53 developed paralysis, with histological evidence of parenchymal and vascular changes in their white matter. The slope of the dose-response curves decreased with the decrease in field size; however, there was no significant difference at the radiation dose associated with a 50% incidence of paralysis (ED 50 ) irrespective of the method of analysis. The ED 50 values ± standard errors (± SE) were 27.02 ± 0.36 Gy, 27.68 ± 0.57 Gy, and 28.28 ± 0.78 Gy for field lengths of 10, 5, and 2.5 cm, respectively. Analysis of the data with a normal tissue complication probability (NCTP) model gave similar results. The latent period for paralysis was 7.5-16.5 weeks with no significant differences between dose and field size. Conclusion: No significant field size-related differences in response were detectable in the cervical spinal cord of mature pigs after single dose irradiations, specifically at a clinically relevant level of effect ( 10 )

  20. Cervical spinal cord, root, and bony spine injuries: a closed claims analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bradley J; Palecek, John P; Posner, Karen L; Traynelis, Vincent C; Lee, Lorri A; Sawin, Paul D; Tredway, Trent L; Todd, Michael M; Domino, Karen B

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize cervical cord, root, and bony spine claims in the American Society of Anesthesiologists Closed Claims database to formulate hypotheses regarding mechanisms of injury. All general anesthesia claims (1970-2007) in the Closed Claims database were searched to identify cervical injuries. Three independent teams, each consisting of an anesthesiologist and neurosurgeon, used a standardized review form to extract data from claim summaries and judge probable contributors to injury. Cervical injury claims (n = 48; mean ± SD age 47 ± 15 yr; 73% male) comprised less than 1% of all general anesthesia claims. When compared with other general anesthesia claims (19%), cervical injury claims were more often permanent and disabling (69%; P cervical stenosis) were often present, cord injuries usually occurred in the absence of traumatic injury (81%) or cervical spine instability (76%). Cord injury occurred with cervical spine (65%) and noncervical spine (35%) procedures. Twenty-four percent of cord injuries were associated with the sitting position. Probable contributors to cord injury included anatomic abnormalities (81%), direct surgical complications (24% [38%, cervical spine procedures]), preprocedural symptomatic cord injury (19%), intraoperative head/neck position (19%), and airway management (11%). Most cervical cord injuries occurred in the absence of traumatic injury, instability, and airway difficulties. Cervical spine procedures and/or sitting procedures appear to predominate. In the absence of instability, cervical spondylosis was the most common factor associated with cord injury.

  1. An analysis of cervical myelopathy due to cervical spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament by CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Keiju; Yonenobe, Sakuo; Ebara, Sohei; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ono, Keiro

    1988-01-01

    CT-myelographic (CTM) findings of 20 patients with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) and 24 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) were reviewed for the evaluation of (1) contributing factors to preoperative neurologic symptoms and therapeutic prognosis in OPLL, and (2) differences in pathology between OPLL and CSM. In OPLL, the severity of preoperative neurologic symptoms was not related to the degree of deformed spinal cord - as expressed by the transverse area of the spinal cord and the rate of flatness - nor the degree of ossification - as expressed by the rate of stricture, and the transverse areas of the effective spinal canal and ossification. The transverse areas of the spinal cord and effective spinal canal were correlated with both postoperative scores for neurologic symptoms and the recovery rate. Osseous compression to the spinal cord was severer in OPLL than OSM. Regarding other factors, such as size and shape of the spinal cord and therapeutic prognosis, there was no difference between the two diseases. This implied the association of dynamic compression to the spinal cord that resulted from the unstable cervical spine in the case of CSM. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Laminoplasty Techniques for the Treatment of Multilevel Cervical Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance K. Mitsunaga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminoplasty is one surgical option for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. It was developed to avoid the significant risk of complications associated with alternative surgical options such as anterior decompression and fusion and laminectomy with or without posterior fusion. Various laminoplasty techniques have been described. All of these variations are designed to reposition the laminae and expand the spinal canal while retaining the dorsal elements to protect the dura from scar formation and to preserve postoperative cervical stability and alignment. With the right surgical indications, reliable results can be expected with laminoplasty in treating patients with multilevel cervical myelopathy.

  3. [Case report: Iatrogenic shoulder pain syndrome following spinal accessory nerve injury during lateral cervical neck dissection for tongue cancer: the role of rehabilitation and ethical-deontological issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Spagnolo, Antonio Gioacchino; Ferriero, Giorgio; Giovannini, Silvia; Amabile, Eugenia; Maccauro, Giulio; Ferrara, Paola Emilia

    2017-01-01

    The shoulder pain syndrome is the most frequent complication of lateral cervical neck dissection and may be caused by iatrogenic injury to the spinal accessory nerve, causing pain and functional limitation of the upper limb and of the cervical spine. Interdisciplinary collaboration and early rehabilitation can reduce the consequences of disability and the possible issues that can arise due to inadequate management of the problem.

  4. Trauma related changes in cervical spine and spinal cord in myelography and MRI; Zmiany pourazowe kregoslupa i rdzenia w odcinku szyjnym, w mielografii i w obrazie NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozniak, E.; Bronarski, J.; Kiwerski, J.; Krasuski, M. [Akademia Medyczna, Warsaw (Poland)]|[Stoleczny Zespol Rehabilitacji, Konstancin (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Myelographic and MRI results in 14 patients treated in 1992 because of cervical spine injury with neurological complications have been presented. Myelography proves to be useful in posttraumatic spine diagnostics but in some cases does not render sufficient information, especially if the trauma superimposes previously existing pathological changes. MRI is exceptionally valuable diagnostic modality in cervical spine injuries offering an advantage of both early and late evaluation of the post-traumatic spinal cord changes. (author). 12 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs.

  5. SPINAL CORD- A CADAVERIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamma K. N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal cord is situated within the vertebral canal extending from the lower end of the medulla oblongata at the upper border of first cervical vertebra. In early foetal life, it extends throughout the length of the vertebral canal, and at the time of birth, it reaches the level of third lumbar vertebra. In adult, it ends at the lower border of first lumbar vertebra and thereafter continued as filum terminale, which gets attached to tip of coccyx. Spinal cord is covered by three protective membranes called spinal meninges, diameter, arachnoid and pia mater. The diameter and arachnoid mater extent up to second sacral vertebra and the pia mater forms filum terminale and extend at the tip of coccyx. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty spinal cord cadaveric specimen were studied by dissection method after exposing the vertebral canal. The roots of spinal nerve were sectioned on both sides and the cord is released along with its coverings. The dura and arachnoid mater were incised longitudinally and the subarachnoid space, blood vessels, nerve roots, ligament denticulata, cervical and lumbar enlargements were observed. The blood vessels including radicular arteries were also studied photographed. RESULTS The spinal cord is a highly vascular structure situated within the vertebral canal, covered by diameter, arachnoid mater and pia mater. Spinal dura is thicker anteriorly than posteriorly. The pia mater forms linea splendens, which extend along the whole length of the cord in front of the anterior median fissure. The average length of the cord is 38 cm. The length and breadth of cervical enlargement was more compared to lumbar enlargement. The number of rootlets in both dorsal and ventral roots accounts more in cervical compared to other regions of the cord. The ligament denticulata is a thin transparent bands of pia mater attached on either sides of the cord between the dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The tooth like extensions are well

  6. Cervical porcupine quill foreign body involving the spinal cord of a dog: A description of various imaging modality findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle le Roux

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although porcupine quill injuries are common in dogs, the detailed appearance of the quill on diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging has not been sufficiently described. A 4-year-old, intact, female Jack Russel terrier presented with severe neck pain and ataxia after an altercation with a porcupine 2 weeks earlier. Radiology, diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were all utilised to identify a quill imbedded in the cervical vertebral canal and cervical musculature and were compared to each other. Surgical removal of the quill, guided by imaging findings, led to the resolution of the clinical signs in the patient. Previous ultrasound imaging reports have just stated that the quill consists of paralell hyperechoic lines, and do not mention the finer hyperechoic lines inbetween and do not try to provide a reason for the appearance. Previous computed tomography (CT reports just mention identifying the quill on CT images (whether or not CT could identify the fragments, but do not go into detail about the attenuating appearance of the quill nor try to relate this to the composition of the quill. This is to the authors’ knowledge the first report with detailed imaging descriptions of a case of cranial cervical vertebral canal porcupine quill foreign body in a dog. This is also the first report to allude to a possible difference in imaging findings related to quill structure because of keratin orientation and melanin content. The ideal imaging modality to use remains elusive, but ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could all identify the quill.

  7. The impact of spine stability on cervical spinal cord injury with respect to demographics, management, and outcome: a prospective cohort from a national spinal cord injury registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Jérôme; Rivers, Carly S; Kurban, Dilnur; Finkelstein, Joel; Tee, Jin W; Noonan, Vanessa K; Kwon, Brian K; Hurlbert, R John; Christie, Sean; Tsai, Eve C; Ahn, Henry; Drew, Brian; Bailey, Christopher S; Fourney, Daryl R; Attabib, Najmedden; Johnson, Michael G; Fehlings, Michael G; Parent, Stefan; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2018-01-01

    Emergent surgery for patients with a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is seen as the gold standard in acute management. However, optimal treatment for those with the clinical diagnosis of central cord syndrome (CCS) is less clear, and classic definitions of CCS do not identify a unique population of patients. The study aimed to test the authors' hypothesis that spine stability can identify a unique group of patients with regard to demographics, management, and outcomes, which classic CCS definitions do not. This is a prospective observational study. The sample included participants with cervical SCI included in a prospective Canadian registry. The outcome measures were initial hospitalization length of stay, change in total motor score from admission to discharge, and in-hospital mortality. Patients with cervical SCI from a prospective Canadian SCI registry were grouped into stable and unstable spine cohorts. Bivariate analyses were used to identify differences in demographic, injury, management, and outcomes. Multivariate analysis was used to better understand the impact of spine stability on motor score improvement. No conflicts of interest were identified. Compared with those with an unstable spine, patients with cervical SCI and a stable spine were older (58.8 vs. 44.1 years, p<.0001), more likely male (86.4% vs. 76.1%, p=.0059), and have more medical comorbidities. Patients with stable spine cervical SCI were more likely to have sustained their injury by a fall (67.4% vs. 34.9%, p<.0001), and have high cervical (C1-C4; 58.5% vs. 43.3%, p=.0009) and less severe neurologic injuries (ASIA Impairment Scale C or D; 81.3% vs. 47.5%, p<.0001). Those with stable spine injuries were less likely to have surgery (67.6% vs. 92.6%, p<.0001), had shorter in-hospital lengths of stay (median 84.0 vs. 100.5 days, p=.0062), and higher total motor score change (20.7 vs. 19.4 points, p=.0014). Multivariate modeling revealed that neurologic severity of injury and spine stability

  8. Paired motor cortex and cervical epidural electrical stimulation timed to converge in the spinal cord promotes lasting increases in motor responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Asht M; Pal, Ajay; Gupta, Disha; Carmel, Jason B

    2017-11-15

    Pairing motor cortex stimulation and spinal cord epidural stimulation produced large augmentation in motor cortex evoked potentials if they were timed to converge in the spinal cord. The modulation of cortical evoked potentials by spinal cord stimulation was largest when the spinal electrodes were placed over the dorsal root entry zone. Repeated pairing of motor cortex and spinal cord stimulation caused lasting increases in evoked potentials from both sites, but only if the time between the stimuli was optimal. Both immediate and lasting effects of paired stimulation are likely mediated by convergence of descending motor circuits and large diameter afferents onto common interneurons in the cervical spinal cord. Convergent activity in neural circuits can generate changes at their intersection. The rules of paired electrical stimulation are best understood for protocols that stimulate input circuits and their targets. We took a different approach by targeting the interaction of descending motor pathways and large diameter afferents in the spinal cord. We hypothesized that pairing stimulation of motor cortex and cervical spinal cord would strengthen motor responses through their convergence. We placed epidural electrodes over motor cortex and the dorsal cervical spinal cord in rats; motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured from biceps. MEPs evoked from motor cortex were robustly augmented with spinal epidural stimulation delivered at an intensity below the threshold for provoking an MEP. Augmentation was critically dependent on the timing and position of spinal stimulation. When the spinal stimulation was timed to coincide with the descending volley from motor cortex stimulation, MEPs were more than doubled. We then tested the effect of repeated pairing of motor cortex and spinal stimulation. Repetitive pairing caused strong augmentation of cortical MEPs and spinal excitability that lasted up to an hour after just 5 min of pairing. Additional physiology

  9. Dynamic function MR of the cervical vertebral column. Dynamische Funktions-MRT der Halswirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegele, M.; Woell, B.; Reiser, M. (Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany)); Koch, W. (Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany)); Kaden, B. (Neurochirurgische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany))

    1992-09-01

    To obtain functional studies of the cervical spine, a device has been developed which allows MRI examinations to be carried out in five different degrees of flexion. T[sub 1] and T[sub 2][sup *] weighted FFE sequences were used. Dynamic functional MRI was performed on 5 normals and 31 patients (5 disc herniation, 4 whiplash injuries, 6 spinal canal stenoses, 14 laminectomies and spinal fusions, 2 rheumatoid arthritis). The relationship of the spinal cord to the bony and ligamentous components in different degrees of flexion was particularly well shown in whiplash injury, spinal stenosis and postoperative situations. (orig.).

  10. Nerve Transfers for Improved Hand Function Following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    the cervical spine resulting in diminished or complete loss of arm and/or hand function. Cervical SCI patients consistently rank hand function as the...most desired function above bowel and bladder function, sexual function, standing, and pain control. The overall goal of the proposed study is to...evaluate the efficacy of nerve transfers to treat patients with cervical SCIs. Over the last decade, nerve transfers have been used with increasing

  11. The effects of gender on clinical and neurological outcomes after acute cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Julio C; Krassioukov, Andrei V; Fehlings, Michael G

    2005-03-01

    The potential clinical relevance of gender on clinical and neurological outcome after spinal cord injury (SCI) has received little attention. In order to address this issue, we examined all consecutive cases of acute traumatic cervical SCI admitted to our institution from 1998 to 2000. There were 38 males (ages 17-89 years, mean of 51.6) and 17 females (ages 18-84 years, mean of 63.2). Both groups were comparable regarding level (C1 to C7) and severity of SCI (ASIA A to D) at admission. Age differences between the groups approached significance (p = 0.057), and thus this factor was treated as a covariate in the analysis. Co-morbidities were as frequent in men (86.8%) as in women (76.5%). The therapeutic approaches, length-of-stay in the acute care unit, mortality, and discharge disposition were similar in men and women. During hospitalization, 44.7% of men and 52.9% of women developed post-SCI secondary complications without any significant gender-related differences. Both groups showed a similar incidence of infections, cardiovascular complications, thromboembolism, and pressure sores. Univariate analysis revealed a trend for higher incidence of psychiatric complications (p = 0.054) and deep venous thrombosis (p = 0.092) in women, which was confirmed by multivariate analysis. Neurological outcome was not correlated with gender. A similar number of males and females (42.1%, 47.1%) showed evidence of neurological recovery as revealed by an improvement in ASIA scores. Moreover, 18.4% of males and 29.4% of females recovered to ASIA E status. Our data suggest a shift in the demographics of acute SCI with an increasing incidence in elderly women. Although neurological outcomes were not significantly related to gender, we observed a trend for higher rates of reactive depression and deep venous thrombosis in women. These issues may be of key clinical importance in developing improved management protocols for SCI so as to maximize functional recovery and quality-of-life.

  12. Age-related changes of the diffusion tensor imaging parameters of the normal cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kun, E-mail: medsciwangkun@126.com [Orthopedics Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Song, Qingxin; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Zhi; Hou, Canglong; Tang, Yixing [Orthopedics Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Shiyue [Radiology Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Hao, Qiang, E-mail: haoqiang@189.cn [Radiology Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Shen, Hongxing, E-mail: shenhxgk@126.com [Orthopedics Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • It is essential to determine the DTI parameters in the whole CSC. • To analyze DTI parameters in all intervertebral space levels of the CSC. • To study the impact of age on these parameters in healthy Chinese subjects. • Provide better insights in factors that could bias the diagnosis of CSC pathologies. - Abstract: Background: The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of the cervical spinal cord (CSC) changes with age. However, previous studies only examined specific CSC areas. Objectives: To analyze the DTI parameters in all intervertebral space levels of the whole normal CSC and to study the impact of age on these parameters in a Chinese population. Methods: Thirty-six healthy subjects aged 20–77 years were recruited. DTI parameters were calculated for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) funiculi in all the CSC intervertebral spaces (C1/2-C6/7). Age-related changes of DTI parameters were analyzed for the GM and WM funiculi. Results: Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were lower in GM than in WM. MD and FA values were lower in the WM in the lower CSC compared with the upper CSC (all P < 0.05), but no difference was observed in GM. In ventral funiculi, MD increased with age, while FA decreased (all P < 0.001). In lateral and dorsal funiculi, MD and FA decreased with age (all P < 0.001). In GM, MD and FA decreased with age (all P < 0.001). Significant age-related changes were observed in FA and MD from GM and WM funiculi. FA was correlated with age in all funiculi (ventral: r = −0.733; lateral: r = −0.468; dorsal: r = −0.607; GM: r = −0.724; all P < 0.01). Conclusion: Important changes in MD and FA were observed with advancing age at all levels of CSC in Chinese patients. DTI parameters may be useful to assess CSC pathology, but the influence of age and segments need to be taken into account in diagnosis.

  13. Age-related changes of the diffusion tensor imaging parameters of the normal cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kun; Song, Qingxin; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Zhi; Hou, Canglong; Tang, Yixing; Chen, Shiyue; Hao, Qiang; Shen, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • It is essential to determine the DTI parameters in the whole CSC. • To analyze DTI parameters in all intervertebral space levels of the CSC. • To study the impact of age on these parameters in healthy Chinese subjects. • Provide better insights in factors that could bias the diagnosis of CSC pathologies. - Abstract: Background: The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of the cervical spinal cord (CSC) changes with age. However, previous studies only examined specific CSC areas. Objectives: To analyze the DTI parameters in all intervertebral space levels of the whole normal CSC and to study the impact of age on these parameters in a Chinese population. Methods: Thirty-six healthy subjects aged 20–77 years were recruited. DTI parameters were calculated for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) funiculi in all the CSC intervertebral spaces (C1/2-C6/7). Age-related changes of DTI parameters were analyzed for the GM and WM funiculi. Results: Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were lower in GM than in WM. MD and FA values were lower in the WM in the lower CSC compared with the upper CSC (all P < 0.05), but no difference was observed in GM. In ventral funiculi, MD increased with age, while FA decreased (all P < 0.001). In lateral and dorsal funiculi, MD and FA decreased with age (all P < 0.001). In GM, MD and FA decreased with age (all P < 0.001). Significant age-related changes were observed in FA and MD from GM and WM funiculi. FA was correlated with age in all funiculi (ventral: r = −0.733; lateral: r = −0.468; dorsal: r = −0.607; GM: r = −0.724; all P < 0.01). Conclusion: Important changes in MD and FA were observed with advancing age at all levels of CSC in Chinese patients. DTI parameters may be useful to assess CSC pathology, but the influence of age and segments need to be taken into account in diagnosis

  14. Spinal cord injuries related to cervical spine fractures in elderly patients: factors affecting mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Parham; Roffey, Darren M; Brikeet, Yasser A; Tsai, Eve C; Bailey, Chris S; Wai, Eugene K

    2013-08-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) related to cervical spine (C-spine) fractures can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Aggressive treatment often required to manage instability associated with C-spine fractures is complicated and hazardous in the elderly population. To determine the mortality rate of elderly patients with SCIs related to C-spine fractures and identify factors that contribute toward a higher risk for negative outcomes. Retrospective cohort study at two Level 1 trauma centers. Thirty-seven consecutive patients aged 60 years and older who had SCIs related to C-spine fractures. Level of injury, injury severity, preinjury medical comorbidities, treatment (operative vs. nonoperative), and cause of death. Hospital medical records were reviewed independently. Baseline radiographs and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans were examined to permit categorization according to the mechanistic classification by Allen and Ferguson of subaxial C-spine injuries. Univariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors related to in-hospital mortality and ambulation at discharge. There were no funding sources or potential conflicts of interest to disclose. The in-hospital mortality rate was 38%. Respiratory failure was the leading cause of death. Preinjury medical comorbidities, age, and operative versus nonoperative treatment did not affect mortality. Injury level at or above C4 was associated with a 7.1 times higher risk of mortality compared with injuries below C4 (p=.01). Complete SCI was associated with a 5.1 times higher risk of mortality compared with incomplete SCI (p=.03). Neurological recovery was uncommon. Apart from severity of initial SCI, no other factor was related to ambulatory disposition at discharge. In this elderly population, neurological recovery was poor and the in-hospital mortality rate was high. The strongest risk factors for mortality were injury level and severity of SCI. Although each case of SCI

  15. Application of Piezosurgery in Anterior Cervical Corpectomy and Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sheng-Fa; Sun, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) is frequently used to decompress the cervical spine; however, this procedure is risky when dealing with a hard disc or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). Piezosurgery offers a useful tool for performing this procedure. In this article, we present a 50 years old man who had cervical spondylotic myelopathy with OPLL at the C 6 level and segmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal. When removing the posterior wall of his C 6 vertebral body and OPLL, piezosurgery was used to selectively cut hard structures piece by piece without injuring delicate soft tissues like the nerve roots and spinal cord. Because there is no bleeding from the bone surface with piezosurgery, it provides a clean operative field. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Theophylline-induced respiratory recovery following cervical spinal cord hemisection is augmented by serotonin 2 receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Nantwi, Kwaku D; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2002-11-22

    Cervical spinal cord hemisection leads to a disruption of bulbospinal innervation of phrenic motoneurons resulting in paralysis of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm. We have previously demonstrated separate therapeutic roles for theophylline, and more recently serotonin (5-HT) as modulators to phrenic nerve motor recovery; mechanisms that likely occur via adenosine A1 and 5-HT2 receptors, respectively. The present study was designed to specifically determine if concurrent stimulation of 5-HT2 receptors may enhance motor recovery induced by theophylline alone. Adult female rats (250-350 g; n=7 per group) received a left cervical (C2) hemisection that resulted in paralysis of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm. Twenty-four hours later rats were given systemic theophylline (15 mg/kg, i.v.), resulting in burst recovery in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve. Theophylline-induced recovery was enhanced with the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist, (+/-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI; 1.0 mg/kg). DOI-evoked augmentation of theophylline-induced recovery was attenuated following subsequent injection of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin (2.0 mg/kg). In a separate group, rats were pretreated with ketanserin, which did not prevent subsequent theophylline-induced respiratory recovery. However, pretreatment with ketanserin did prevent DOI-induced augmentation of the theophylline-evoked phrenic nerve burst recovery. Lastly, using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time a positive co-localization of adenosine A1 receptor mRNA and immunoreactivity with phrenic motoneurons of the cervical ventral horns. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that theophylline may induce motor recovery likely at adenosine A1 receptors located at the level of the spinal cord, and the concurrent stimulation of converging 5-HT2 receptors may augment the response.

  17. Cervical disc herniation manifesting as a Brown-Sequard syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Yokoyama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Sequard syndrome is commonly seen in the setting of spinal trauma or an extramedullary spinal neoplasm. The clinical picture reflects hemisection of the spinal cord. We report a rare case of Brown-Sequard syndrome caused by a large cervical herniated disc. A 63-year-old man presented with progressive right hemiparesis and disruption of pain and temperature sensation on the left side of the body. Magnetic resonance imaging showed large C3-C4 disc herniation compressing the spinal cord at that level, with severe canal stenosis from C4 through C7. Decompressive cervical laminoplasty was performed. After surgery, complete sensory function was restored and a marked improvement in motor power was obtained.

  18. Occipital Condyle Fracture with Accompanying Meningeal Spinal Cysts as a result of Cervical Spine Injury in 15-Year-Old Girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Wiktor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The occipital condyle fracture is rare injury of the craniocervical junction. Meningeal spinal cysts are rare tumors of the spinal cord. Depending on location, these lesions may be classified as extradural and subdural, but extradural spinal cysts are more common. We present the case of a 15-year-old girl who suffered from avulsion occipital condyle fracture treated with use of “halo-vest” system. We established that clinical effect after completed treatment is very good. Control MRI evaluation was performed 12 months after removal of “halo-vest” traction, and clinically silent extradural meningeal spinal cysts were detected at the ventral side of the spinal cord in the cervical segment of the spine. Due to clinically silent course of the disease, we decided to use the conservative treatment. The patient remains under control of our department.

  19. Intraspinal cell transplantation for targeting cervical ventral horn in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Angelo C

    2011-09-18

    Respiratory compromise due to phrenic motor neuron loss is a debilitating consequence of a large proportion of human traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) cases (1) and is the ultimate cause of death in patients with the motor neuron disorder, amyotrophic laterals sclerosis (ALS) (2). ALS is a devastating neurological disorder that is characterized by relatively rapid degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Patients ultimately succumb to the disease on average 2-5 years following diagnosis because of respiratory paralysis due to loss of phrenic motor neuron innnervation of the diaphragm (3). The vast majority of cases are sporadic, while 10% are of the familial form. Approximately twenty percent of familial cases are linked to various point mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene on chromosome 21 (4). Transgenic mice (4,5) and rats (6) carrying mutant human SOD1 genes ((G93A, G37R, G86R, G85R)) have been generated, and, despite the existence of other animal models of motor neuron loss, are currently the most highly used models of the disease. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a heterogeneous set of conditions resulting from physical trauma to the spinal cord, with functional outcome varying according to the type, location and severity of the injury (7). Nevertheless, approximately half of human SCI cases affect cervical regions, resulting in debilitating respiratory dysfunction due to phrenic motor neuron loss and injury to descending bulbospinal respiratory axons (1). A number of animal models of SCI have been developed, with the most commonly used and clinically-relevant being the contusion (8). Transplantation of various classes of neural precursor cells (NPCs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of traumatic CNS injuries and neurodegeneration, including ALS and SCI, because of the ability to replace lost or dysfunctional CNS cell types, provide neuroprotection, and deliver gene factors of interest (9). Animal models of both ALS and

  20. Influence of gravity compensation on kinematics and muscle activation patterns during reach and retrieval in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury An explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, Marieke G. M.; Snoek, Govert J.; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Nene, Anand V.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many interventions in upper-limb rehabilitation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) use arm support (gravity compensation), however, its specific effects on kinematics and muscle activation characteristics in subjects with a CSCI are largely unknown We conducted a cross-sectional explorative

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging susceptibility artifacts in the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord related to monocortical screw-polymethylmethacrylate implants in canine cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian G; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Green, Eric M; Habing, Amy M; Hettlich, Bianca F

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize and compare MRI susceptibility artifacts related to titanium and stainless steel monocortical screws in the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord of canine cadavers. SAMPLE 12 canine cadavers. PROCEDURES Cervical vertebrae (C4 and C5) were surgically stabilized with titanium or stainless steel monocortical screws and polymethylmethacrylate. Routine T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and short tau inversion recovery sequences were performed at 3.0 T. Magnetic susceptibility artifacts in 20 regions of interest (ROIs) across 4 contiguous vertebrae (C3 through C6) were scored by use of an established scoring system. RESULTS Artifact scores for stainless steel screws were significantly greater than scores for titanium screws at 18 of 20 ROIs. Artifact scores for titanium screws were significantly higher for spinal cord ROIs within the implanted vertebrae. Artifact scores for stainless steel screws at C3 were significantly less than at the other 3 cervical vertebrae. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Evaluation of routine MRI sequences obtained at 3.0 T revealed that susceptibility artifacts related to titanium monocortical screws were considered mild and should not hinder the overall clinical assessment of the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord. However, mild focal artifacts may obscure small portions of the spinal cord or intervertebral discs immediately adjacent to titanium screws. Severe artifacts related to stainless steel screws were more likely to result in routine MRI sequences being nondiagnostic; however, artifacts may be mitigated by implant positioning.

  2. Skull traction for cervical spinal injury in Enugu: A 5‑year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-05

    Nov 5, 2015 ... Background: Treatment of cervical spine injury is the most challenging of all the injuries of the spine, and there is yet no agreement on the best method of care. Objective: We studied the complications and outcome of two skull traction devices used to treat cases of cervical spine injury in three centers in ...

  3. Tuina treatment in cervical spondylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Mihai Hinoveanu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylosis is a common, chronic degenerative condition of the cervical spine that affects the vertebral bodies and intervertebral disks of the neck as well as the contents of the spinal canal. Common clinical syndromes associated with cervical spondylosis include cervical pain, cervical radiculopathy and/or mielopathy. This study show the main principles, indication and side effects of tuina in cervical spondylosis´ treatment; tuina is one of the external methods based on the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM, especially suitable for use on the elderly population and on infants. While performing Tuina, the therapist concentrates his mind, regulates his breathing, and actuates the Qi and power of his entire body towards his hands. For a better result is recommended to try to combine acupuncture with tuina treatment. Tuina can help relieve the pain associated with spondylosis. After this kind of treatment, the symptomes produced by irritated nerves and sore muscles can find some relief. Tuina helps patients with cervical spondylosis regain muscle control, nerve function and flexibility, all through the restoration of the life force flow.

  4. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self Care Working With Your Doctor Drugs, Procedures & Devices Over-the- ...

  6. Large armored bridging over fractured vertebra with intraspinal tumor mimicking bony mass caused by migrated fragments of burst cervical vertebra presenting with severe cervical myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyarthee Guru Dutta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral body may get displaced anterior or posteror with elements of rotation. However, burst cervical spine vertebral fracture may migrate anteriorly and posteriorly simultaneously. However anterior displaced fragment forming armor like mass is very rare. Similarly, the posteriorly propelled fragments migrating caudally and posterolaterally producing a large osseous mass inside spinal canal mimicking bony tumour causing severe cervical canal stenosis and presenting with marked myelopathy is extremely rare. To the best knowledge of authors, association of such traumatic dual pathology represents first of its kind in western literature, who was neglected early medical advice and presenting with marked compressive cervical myelopathy. She underwent successful surgical decompression with gradual recovery of spastic limb weakness and recovery of sensation. Authors also highlights the importance of early resuscitation and adequate maintainace of mean arterial pressure following acute spinal cord injury. Pertinent literature is briefly reviewed.

  7. Cervical peridural calcification in dialysed patients. Report of seven cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Yasuhiro; Komura, Masayoshi; Fukuda, Minoru; Yamanaka, Mariko; Inose, Kazuto; Honda, Masanori; Shiraishi, Tateru

    2007-01-01

    Though a variety of bone joint complications are widely recognized in long-term dialysis patients, myelopathy caused by ectopic calcification surrounding the cervical spinal dura has not been reported. We encountered seven patients with the cervical peridural calcification (CPC) and performed surgery on four. The present study investigated the clinical features of this condition. All seven had a dialysis history over 20 years, and the Ca X P product was high. Plain cervical CT scan was the most useful diagnostic tool for CPC, though was quite difficult to establish the diagnosis by plain X-ray, MRI or myelography. Clinical symptoms of CPC resembled those of spinal canal stenosis caused by thickening or ossification of the ligament. The spinal cord in the area of CPC was comppressed with calcified fibrous membrane surrounding the cervical dura mater, swelling and pulsation of spinal cord was obtained after not only excising the vertebral arch but also opening and removing the calcified membrane from the dura. Clinical improvement was obtained only in two patients with a short symptomatic period. Based on these findings, CPC should be recognized as an important complication in dialysed patients. Patients demonstrating any sign of numbness and/or muscle weakness in upper and/or lower limbs should be examined by plain cervical CT scan. If calcification around the spinal dura is identified, surgery should be considered in the early stage. (author)

  8. Operation of a P300-based brain-computer interface by individuals with cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Shiro; Takano, Kouji; Saeki, Naokatsu; Kansaku, Kenji

    2011-05-01

    This study evaluates the efficacy of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) with green/blue flicker matrices for individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Ten individuals with cervical SCI (age 26-53, all male) and 10 age- and sex-matched able-bodied controls (age 27-52, all male) with no prior BCI experience were asked to input hiragana (Japanese alphabet) characters using the P300 BCI with two distinct types of visual stimuli, white/gray and green/blue, in an 8×10 flicker matrix. Both online and offline performance were evaluated. The mean online accuracy of the SCI subjects was 88.0% for the white/gray and 90.7% for the green/blue flicker matrices. The accuracy of the control subjects was 77.3% and 86.0% for the white/gray and green/blue, respectively. There was a significant difference in online accuracy between the two types of flicker matrix. SCI subjects performed with greater accuracy than controls, but the main effect was not significant. Individuals with cervical SCI successfully controlled the P300 BCI, and the green/blue flicker matrices were associated with significantly higher accuracy than the white/gray matrices. The P300 BCI with the green/blue flicker matrices is effective for use not only in able-bodied subjects, but also in individuals with cervical SCI. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Spinal Manipulation of Upper Cervical Vertebrae on Blood Pressure: Results of a Pilot Sham-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Christine M; Salsbury, Stacie A; Vining, Robert D; Long, Cynthia R; Pohlman, Katherine A; Weeks, William B; Lamas, Gervasio A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this pilot sham-controlled clinical trial was to estimate the treatment effect and safety of toggle recoil spinal manipulation for blood pressure management. Fifty-one participants with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension (systolic blood pressure ranging from 135 to 159 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure ranging from 85 to 99 mm Hg) were allocated by an adaptive design to 2 treatments: toggle recoil spinal manipulation or a sham procedure. Participants were seen by a doctor of chiropractic twice weekly for 6 weeks and remained on their antihypertensive medications, as prescribed, throughout the trial. Blood pressure was assessed at baseline and after study visits 1, 6 (week 3), and 12 (week 6), with the primary end point at week 6. Analysis of covariance was used to compare mean blood pressure changes from baseline between groups at each end point, controlling for sex, age, body mass index, and baseline blood pressure. Adjusted mean change from baseline to week 6 was greater in the sham group (systolic, -4.2 mm Hg; diastolic, -1.6 mm Hg) than in the spinal manipulation group (systolic, 0.6 mm Hg; diastolic, 0.7 mm Hg), but the difference was not statistically significant. No serious and few adverse events were noted. Six weeks of toggle recoil spinal manipulation did not lower systolic or diastolic blood pressure when compared with a sham procedure. No serious adverse events from either treatment were reported. Our results do not support a larger clinical trial. Further research to understand the potential mechanisms of action involving upper cervical manipulation on blood pressure is warranted before additional clinical investigations are conducted. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Alterations in Cortical Sensorimotor Connectivity following Complete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Prospective Resting-State fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinwunmi Oni-Orisan

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies have demonstrated alterations during task-induced brain activation in spinal cord injury (SCI patients. The interruption to structural integrity of the spinal cord and the resultant disrupted flow of bidirectional communication between the brain and the spinal cord might contribute to the observed dynamic reorganization (neural plasticity. However, the effect of SCI on brain resting-state connectivity patterns remains unclear. We undertook a prospective resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI study to explore changes to cortical activation patterns following SCI. With institutional review board approval, rs-fMRI data was obtained in eleven patients with complete cervical SCI (>2 years post injury and nine age-matched controls. The data was processed using the Analysis of Functional Neuroimages software. Region of interest (ROI based analysis was performed to study changes in the sensorimotor network using pre- and post-central gyri as seed regions. Two-sampled t-test was carried out to check for significant differences between the two groups. SCI patients showed decreased functional connectivity in motor and sensory cortical regions when compared to controls. The decrease was noted in ipsilateral, contralateral, and interhemispheric regions for left and right precentral ROIs. Additionally, the left postcentral ROI demonstrated increased connectivity with the thalamus bilaterally in SCI patients. Our results suggest that cortical activation patterns in the sensorimotor network undergo dynamic reorganization following SCI. The presence of these changes in chronic spinal cord injury patients is suggestive of the inherent neural plasticity within the central nervous system.

  11. Cervicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of a woman getting HIV from an infected sexual partner. Prevention To reduce your risk of cervicitis from sexually transmitted infections, use condoms consistently and correctly each time you have sex. ...

  12. The evaluation of cervical spinal angle in patients with acute and chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşkin, Ayhan; Bayram, Korhan Barış; Demirdal, Ümit Seçil; Atar, Emel; Arifoğlu Karaman, Çiğdem; Güvendi, Ece; Tosun, Aliye

    2017-06-12

    Clinicians associate the changes in cervical lordosis with neck pain, but there is no clear consensus on this. We aimed to investigate the relationships of cervical angles, neck pain, disability, and the psychological status of the patients with acute and chronic neck pain. A total of 110 patients with neck pain were included in this study. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients were recorded. The lordosis angle was determined by the posterior tangent method. A visual analog scale (VAS), the Neck Disability Index (NDI), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale were administered to all patients. The mean cervical lordosis angle was 23.10 ± 8.07 degrees. A statistically negative correlation was detected between cervical angle and duration of disease (P cervical angle of the acute neck pain group was higher than that of the chronic pain group (P pain groups with respect to VAS, NDI, and HAD scores (P > 0.05). We found that the cervical angle was significantly lower in chronic neck pain patients when compared to acute patients, and patients with higher pain scores had more severe disability and that disability increased with the duration of disease.

  13. Spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the spine that was present from birth Narrow spinal canal that the person was born with Herniated or slipped disk, which ... when you sit down or lean forward. Most people with spinal stenosis cannot walk for a long ... During a physical exam, your health care provider will try to ...

  14. Elevated levels of plasminogen activators in the pathogenesis of delayed radiation damage in rat cervical spinal cord in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawaya, R.; Rayford, A.; Kono, S.; Rao, J.S.; Ang, K.K.; Feng, Y.; Stephens, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    The pathophysiology of the cellular basis of radiation-induced demyelination and white-matter necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is poorly understood. Preliminary data suggest that tissue damage is partly mediated through changes in the proteolytic enzymes. In this study, we irradiated rat cervical spinal cords with single doses of 24 Gy of 18 MV photons or 20 MeV electrons and measured the levels of plasminogen activators at days 2, 7, 30, 60, 90, 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation, using appropriate controls at each time. Fibrin zymography revealed fibrinolytic bands representing molecular weights of 68,000 and 48,000 in controls and irradiated samples; these bands increased significantly at days 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation. Inhibition of these enzymatic bands with specific antibodies against tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and amiloride, an inhibitor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), confirmed that these bands were tPA and uPA. Enzymatic levels quantified by densitometry showed a twofold elevation in the levels of tPA and more than a tenfold increase in uPA after 120 days' irradiation. Activity of uPA was increased threefold by day 2 and increased steadily with time compared to nonirradiated control samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also showed a threefold increase in the tPA content in the extracts of irradiated rat cervical spinal cords at days 120, 130 and 145. This study adds additional information to the proposed role of plasminogen activators in the pathogenic pathways of radiation damage in the CNS. 38 refs., 6 figs

  15. Elevated levels of plasminogen activators in the pathogenesis of delayed radiation damage in rat cervical spinal cord in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawaya, R.; Rayford, A.; Kono, S.; Rao, J.S.; Ang, K.K.; Feng, Y.; Stephens, L.C. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The pathophysiology of the cellular basis of radiation-induced demyelination and white-matter necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is poorly understood. Preliminary data suggest that tissue damage is partly mediated through changes in the proteolytic enzymes. In this study, we irradiated rat cervical spinal cords with single doses of 24 Gy of 18 MV photons or 20 MeV electrons and measured the levels of plasminogen activators at days 2, 7, 30, 60, 90, 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation, using appropriate controls at each time. Fibrin zymography revealed fibrinolytic bands representing molecular weights of 68,000 and 48,000 in controls and irradiated samples; these bands increased significantly at days 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation. Inhibition of these enzymatic bands with specific antibodies against tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and amiloride, an inhibitor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), confirmed that these bands were tPA and uPA. Enzymatic levels quantified by densitometry showed a twofold elevation in the levels of tPA and more than a tenfold increase in uPA after 120 days` irradiation. Activity of uPA was increased threefold by day 2 and increased steadily with time compared to nonirradiated control samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also showed a threefold increase in the tPA content in the extracts of irradiated rat cervical spinal cords at days 120, 130 and 145. This study adds additional information to the proposed role of plasminogen activators in the pathogenic pathways of radiation damage in the CNS. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Morphology of Donor and Recipient Nerves Utilised in Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Limb Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Messina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Loss of hand function after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI impacts heavily on independence. Multiple nerve transfer surgery has been applied successfully after cervical SCI to restore critical arm and hand functions, and the outcome depends on nerve integrity. Nerve integrity is assessed indirectly using muscle strength testing and intramuscular electromyography, but these measures cannot show the manifestation that SCI has on the peripheral nerves. We directly assessed the morphology of nerves biopsied at the time of surgery, from three patients within 18 months post injury. Our objective was to document their morphologic features. Donor nerves included teres minor, posterior axillary, brachialis, extensor carpi radialis brevis and supinator. Recipient nerves included triceps, posterior interosseus (PIN and anterior interosseus nerves (AIN. They were fixed in glutaraldehyde, processed and embedded in Araldite Epon for light microscopy. Eighty percent of nerves showed abnormalities. Most common were myelin thickening and folding, demyelination, inflammation and a reduction of large myelinated axon density. Others were a thickened perineurium, oedematous endoneurium and Renaut bodies. Significantly, very thinly myelinated axons and groups of unmyelinated axons were observed indicating regenerative efforts. Abnormalities exist in both donor and recipient nerves and they differ in appearance and aetiology. The abnormalities observed may be preventable or reversible.

  17. Reliability of cervical lordosis and global sagittal spinal balance measurements in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Christophe; Ilharreborde, Brice; Azoulay, Robin; Sebag, Guy; Mazda, Keyvan

    2013-06-01

    Radiological reproducibility study. To assess intra and interobserver reliability of radiographic measurements for global sagittal balance parameters and sagittal spine curves, including cervical spine. Sagittal spine balance in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a main issue and many studies have been reported, showing that coronal and sagittal deformities often involve sagittal cervical unbalance. Global sagittal balance aims to obtain a horizontal gaze and gravity line at top of hips when subject is in a static position, involving adjustment of each spine curvature in the sagittal plane. To our knowledge, no study did use a methodologically validated imaging analysis tool able to appreciate sagittal spine contours and distances in AIS and especially in the cervical region. Lateral full-spine low-dose EOS radiographs were performed in 75 patients divided in three groups (control subjects, AIS, operated AIS). Three observers digitally analyzed twice each radiograph and 11 sagittal measures were collected for each image. Reliability was assessed calculating intraobserver Pearson's r correlation coefficient, interobserver intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) completed with a two-by-two Bland-Altman plot analysis. This measurement method has shown excellent intra and interobserver reliability in all parameters, sagittal curvatures, pelvic parameters and global sagittal balance. This study validated a simple and efficient tool in AIS sagittal contour analysis. It defined new relevant landmarks allowing to characterize cervical segmental curvatures and cervical involvement in global balance.

  18. Chronological observation in early radiation myelopathy of the cervical spinal cord; Gadolinium-enhanced MRI findings in two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Saeko; Yoshida, Shoji; Soejima, Toshinori (Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan)) (and others)

    Gd-enhanced MR images of two patients with clinically and histopathologically diagnosed chronic progressive radiation myelitis (CPRM) were observed chronologically. One of them had had nasopharyngeal cancer and received radiotherapy at a dose of 100 Gy to the C1-2 level of the spinal cord. She developed CPRM 25 months after the termination of radiotherapy. The other had had malignant lymphoma originating from the tonsil and received chemoradiotherapy. The dose delivered to her cervical spinal cord was 40 Gy, and she developed CPRM 30 months later. Gd-enhanced MRI in the early phase revealed a small crescent-shaped nidus with or without a very small central nonenhanced area in both cases. Enhancement was not great. At that time, patients noticed only the inability to perceive pain and temperature or paresthesia in the opposite side. In a few months, MRI revealed a much more strongly enhanced and larger nidus with enlargement of a central nonenhanced area accompanied by long segmental cord enlargement. The patients' neurological symptoms had also progressed, with hemiparesis developing, for example. (author).

  19. Analysis of the diffusion tensor imaging parameters of a normal cervical spinal cord in a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liang-Feng; Wang, Shou-Sen; Zheng, Zhao-Cong; Tian, Jun; Xue, Liang

    2017-05-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) shows great advantage in the diagnosis of brain diseases, including cervical spinal cord (CSC) disease. This study aims to obtain the normal values of the DTI parameters for a healthy population and to establish a baseline for CSC disease diagnosis using DTI. A total of 36 healthy adults were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the entire CSC using the Siemens 3.0 T MR System. Sagittal DTI acquisition was carried out with a single-shot spin-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence along 12 non-collinear directions. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were determined at different cervical levels using a region of interest (ROI) method, following which they were correlated with parameters, like age and sex. Further, diffusion tensor tracking (DTT) was carried out to reconstruct the white matter fiber bundles of the CSC. The full and complete fiber bundle structure of a normal CSC was confirmed in both the T2-weighted and DTI images. The FA and ADC values were significantly negatively correlated with each other and showed strongly negative and positive correlations with age, respectively, but not with sex. Additionally, there was no significant difference between the FA and the ADC values at different cervical levels. The DTI technique can act as an important supplement to the conventional MRI technique for CSC observation. Moreover, the FA and ADC values can be used as sensitive parameters in the DTI study on the CSC by taking the effects of age into consideration.

  20. Reevaluation of the Pavlov ratio in patients with cervical myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Ki-Tack; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jin-Young

    2009-03-01

    This study was designed to reevaluate the effectiveness of the Pavlov ratio in patients with cervical myelopathy. We studied 107 patients who underwent open door laminoplasty for the treatment of cervical myelopathy between the C3 to C7 levels. We determined the Pavlov ratio on preoperative and postoperative cervical spine lateral radiographs, the vertebral body-to-canal ratio on sagittal reconstruction CT scans, and the vertebral body-to-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) column ratio on T2-weighted sagittal MR images from C3 to C6. The severity of myelopathy was determined using the JOA score on both preoperative and postoperative images. The recovery rate was also calculated. The Pavlov ratio in plain radiographs from patients with myelopathy was compared with the ratio of the vertebral body to the spinal canal on CT and MRI. The average Pavlov ratio between C3 and C6 ranged from 0.71 to 0.76. On CT scan, the average vertebral body-to-canal ratio between C3 and C6 ranged from 0.62 to 0.66. On MRI, the vertebral body-to-CSF column ratio between C3 and C6 ranged between 0.53 and 0.57. A positive correlation was noted between the Pavlov ratio and the vertebral body-to-canal ratio on sagittal-reconstruction CT (correlation coefficient = 0.497-0.627, p = 0.000) and between the Pavlov ratio and the vertebral body-to-CSF column ratio on MRI (correlation coefficient = 0.511-0.649, p = 0.000). We demonstrated a good correlation between the Pavlov ratio and both the vertebral body-to-canal ratio on CT and the vertebral body-to-CSF column ratio on MRI. Therefore, the Pavlov ratio can be relied upon to predict narrowing of the cervical spinal canal in the sagittal plane.

  1. The value of MR and other methods in evaluation of cervical spondylosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopka, M.; Rejniak, I.; Kluczewska, E.; Baron, J.; Collie, D.

    1995-01-01

    38 patients with clinical symptoms of myelopathy, radiculopathy and neck pain have undergone X-ray and MR examinations in order to estimate spinal canal and degenerative changes of cervical vertebral column. The correlation between degree of degenerative changes and myelopathy or radiculopathy or neck pain was established on MR. In patients with myelopathy advanced degeneration changes (2. and 3. degree) were observed more often than in radiculopathy and neck pain. Disorders of mobility and cervical spine instability were found in 50%. Focal changes with high signal on T2 images in cervical cord were found in 2 cases. (author)

  2. Epicritic Sensation in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Diagnostic Gains Beyond Testing Light Touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velstra, Inge-Marie; Bolliger, Marc; Baumberger, Michael; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Curt, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Applied as a bedside test of gross dorsal column function, the testing of light touch (LT) sensation is of high clinical value in the diagnosis of human spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the assessment of overall dorsal column deficit by testing only LT may be limited, because the dorsal column

  3. Cervical Retrograde Spinal Cord Stimulation Lead Placement to Treat Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A Case Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmond, N. van; Kardaszewski, C.N.; Chapman, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation is an effective treatment modality for refractory neuropathic pain conditions, but the placement of leads can be challenging due to unforeseen anatomical variations. We used a retrograde C7-T1 approach to place a lead at the bottom of T8 in a patient suffering from failed

  4. Skull traction for cervical spinal injury in Enugu: A 5‑year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty‑one had the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Grade A whereas 64 had incomplete cord injury of ASIA Grades B–E. Forty‑eight had Crutchfield traction whereas 57 had Gardner‑Wells traction. At the end of treatment, no patient improved among those with ASIA Grades A and B. All the 12 cases of mortality ...

  5. Long descending cervical propriospinal neurons differ from thoracic propriospinal neurons in response to low thoracic spinal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propriospinal neurons, with axonal projections intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than supraspinal neurons after axotomy due to spinal cord injury (SCI. Our previous work focused on the response of axotomized short thoracic propriospinal (TPS neurons following a low thoracic SCI (T9 spinal transection or moderate spinal contusion injury in the rat. The present investigation analyzes the intrinsic response of cervical propriospinal neurons having long descending axons which project into the lumbosacral enlargement, long descending propriospinal tract (LDPT axons. These neurons also were axotomized by T9 spinal injury in the same animals used in our previous study. Results Utilizing laser microdissection (LMD, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we studied LDPT neurons (located in the C5-C6 spinal segments between 3-days, and 1-month following a low thoracic (T9 spinal cord injury. We examined the response of 89 genes related to growth factors, cell surface receptors, apoptosis, axonal regeneration, and neuroprotection/cell survival. We found a strong and significant down-regulation of ~25% of the genes analyzed early after injury (3-days post-injury with a sustained down-regulation in most instances. In the few genes that were up-regulated (Actb, Atf3, Frs2, Hspb1, Nrap, Stat1 post-axotomy, the expression for all but one was down-regulated by 2-weeks post-injury. We also compared the uninjured TPS control neurons to the uninjured LDPT neurons used in this experiment for phenotypic differences between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons. We found significant differences in expression in 37 of the 84 genes examined between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons with LDPT neurons exhibiting a significantly higher base line expression for all but 3 of these genes compared to TPS neurons. Conclusions Taken collectively these data indicate a broad overall down

  6. Computed tomography in the foramen magnum and high cervical cord lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isu, T.; Ito, T.; Iwasaki, Y.; Tsuru, M. (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine); Kitaoka, K.

    1981-10-01

    The value of computed tomography in the spine and spinal cord disease recently has been well documented. However, little attention is made to the role of computed tomography in foramen magnum and high cervical cord lesion. We report 16 cases of the foramen magnum and high cervical cord lesion. Method: Either EMI Head Scanner, CT 1010 (slice thickness 10 mm) or EMI Whole Body Scanner, CT 5005 (slice thickness 13 mm) was used. In 9 cases enhanced CT with intravenous injection of contrast medium was performed. Eleven cases received intrathecal injection of metrizamide. Materials: 1) control group without cervical pathology 70 cases, 2) spinal cord tumor 6 cases, 3) atlanto-axial dislocation 6 cases, 4) Chiari malformation (type 1) 3 cases, 5) spinal foreign body (acupuncture needle) 1 case. Results: 1. plain CT. 1) In control group without cervical pathology the cervical cord at C/sub 1/ level was seen as area surrounded by ring of subarachnoid space. 2) In 14 cases except for 1 case of atlanto-axial dislocation and 1 case of spinal foreign body identification of the cervical cord at C/sub 1/ level was impossible. 3) CT was of diagnostic value in detecting altanto-axial dislocation and spinal foreign body. 2. enhanded CT. Meningioma and neurinoma showed positive contrast enhancement. However, astrocytoma and herniated cerebellar tonsils were not detectable. 3. CT metrizamide myelography visualized the subarachnoid space and made it possible to localize the lesion in the spinal canal in relation to the spinal cord. Conclusion: Attention should be given to plain CT finding at C/sub 1/ level in diagnosis of foramen magnum and high cervical cord lesion. If identification of cervical cord at C/sub 1/ level is impossible, it is suspected that subarachnoid space is blocked by the lesion, and enhanced CT and CT metrizamide myelography must be performed.

  7. Computed tomography in the foramen magnum and high cervical cord lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isu, Toyohiko; Ito, Terufumi; Iwasaki, Yoshnobu; Tsuru, Mitsuo; Kitaoka, Kenichi.

    1981-01-01

    The value of computed tomography in the spine and spinal cord disease recently has been well documented. However, little attention is made to the role of computed tomography in foramen magnum and high cervical cord lesion. We report 16 cases of the foramen magnum and high cervical cord lesion. Method: Either EMI Head Scanner, CT 1010 (slice thickness 10 mm) or EMI Whole Body Scanner, CT 5005 (slice thickness 13 mm) was used. In 9 cases enhanced CT with intravenous injection of contrast medium was performed. Eleven cases received intrathecal injection of metrizamide. Materials: 1) control group without cervical pathology 70 cases, 2) spinal cord tumor 6 cases, 3) atlanto-axial dislocation 6 cases, 4) Chiari malformation (type 1) 3 cases, 5) spinal foreign body (acupuncture needle) 1 case. Results: 1. plain CT. 1) In control group without cervical pathology the cervical cord at C 1 level was seen as area surrounded by ring of subarachnoid space. 2) In 14 cases except for 1 case of atlanto-axial dislocation and 1 case of spinal foreign body identification of the cervical cord at C 1 level was impossible. 3) CT was of diagnostic value in detecting altanto-axial dislocation and spinal foreign body. 2. enhanded CT. Meningioma and neurinoma showed positive contrast enhancement. However, astrocytoma and herniated cerebellar tonsils were not detectable. 3. CT metrizamide myelography visualized the subarachnoid space and made it possible to localize the lesion in the spinal canal in relation to the spinal cord. Conclusion: Attention should be given to plain CT finding at C 1 level in diagnosis of foramen magnum and high cervical cord lesion. If identification of cervical cord at C 1 level is impossible, it is suspected that subarachnoid space is blocked by the lesion, and enhanced CT and CT metrizamide myelography must be performed. (author)

  8. Spinal Surgeon Variation in Single-Level Cervical Fusion Procedures: A Cost and Hospital Resource Utilization Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijji, Fady Y; Massel, Dustin H; Mayo, Benjamin C; Narain, Ankur S; Long, William W; Modi, Krishna D; Burke, Rory M; Canar, Jeff; Singh, Kern

    2017-07-01

    Retrospective analysis. To compare perioperative costs and outcomes of patients undergoing single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusions (ACDF) at both a service (orthopedic vs. neurosurgical) and individual surgeon level. Hospital systems are experiencing significant pressure to increase value of care by reducing costs while maintaining or improving patient-centered outcomes. Few studies have examined the cost-effectiveness cervical arthrodesis at a service level. A retrospective review of patients who underwent a primary 1-level ACDF by eight surgeons (four orthopedic and four neurosurgical) at a single academic institution between 2013 and 2015 was performed. Patients were identified by Diagnosis-Related Group and procedural codes. Patients with the ninth revision of the International Classification of Diseases coding for degenerative cervical pathology were included. Patients were excluded if they exhibited preoperative diagnoses or postoperative social work issues affecting their length of stay. Comparisons of preoperative demographics were performed using Student t tests and chi-squared analysis. Perioperative outcomes and costs for hospital services were compared using multivariate regression adjusted for preoperative characteristics. A total of 137 patients diagnosed with cervical degeneration underwent single-level ACDF; 44 and 93 were performed by orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons, respectively. There was no difference in patient demographics. ACDF procedures performed by orthopedic surgeons demonstrated shorter operative times (89.1 ± 25.5 vs. 96.0 ± 25.5 min; P = 0.002) and higher laboratory costs (Δ+$6.53 ± $5.52 USD; P = 0.041). There were significant differences in operative time (P = 0.014) and labor costs (P = 0.034) between individual surgeons. There was no difference in total costs between specialties or individual surgeons. Surgical subspecialty training does not significantly affect total costs of

  9. Association of myelopathy scores with cervical sagittal balance and normalized spinal cord volume: analysis of 56 preoperative cases from the AOSpine North America Myelopathy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin S; Lafage, Virginie; Ryan, Devon J; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank J; Patel, Alpesh A; Brodke, Darrel S; Arnold, Paul M; Riew, K Daniel; Traynelis, Vincent C; Radcliff, Kris; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Fehlings, Michael G; Ames, Christopher P

    2013-10-15

    Post hoc analysis of prospectively collected data. Development of methods to determine in vivo spinal cord dimensions and application to correlate preoperative alignment, myelopathy, and health-related quality-of-life scores in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). CSM is the leading cause of spinal cord dysfunction. The association between cervical alignment, sagittal balance, and myelopathy has not been well characterized. This was a post hoc analysis of the prospective, multicenter AOSpine North America CSM study. Inclusion criteria for this study required preoperative cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neutral sagittal cervical radiography. Techniques for MRI assessment of spinal cord dimensions were developed. Correlations between imaging and health-related quality-of-life scores were assessed. Fifty-six patients met inclusion criteria (mean age = 55.4 yr). The modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (mJOA) scores correlated with C2-C7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA) (r = -0.282, P = 0.035). Spinal cord volume correlated with cord length (r = 0.472, P balance (C2-C7 SVA) to myelopathy severity. We found a moderate negative correlation in kyphotic patients of cord volume and cross-sectional area to mJOA scores. The opposite (positive correlation) was found for lordotic patients, suggesting a relationship of cord volume to myelopathy that differs on the basis of sagittal alignment. It is interesting to note that sagittal balance but not kyphosis is tied to myelopathy score. Future work will correlate alignment changes to cord morphology changes and myelopathy outcomes. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: This is the first study to correlate sagittal balance (C2-C7 SVA) to myelopathy severity. We found a moderate negative correlation in kyphotic patients of cord volume and cross-sectional area to mJOA scores. The opposite (positive correlation) was found for lordotic patients, suggesting a relationship of cord volume to myelopathy that differs on the

  10. GLT1 overexpression reverses established neuropathic pain-related behavior and attenuates chronic dorsal horn neuron activation following cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falnikar, Aditi; Hala, Tamara J; Poulsen, David J; Lepore, Angelo C

    2016-03-01

    Development of neuropathic pain occurs in a major portion of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, resulting in debilitating and often long-term physical and psychological burdens. Following SCI, chronic dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis has been shown to play a key role in persistent central hyperexcitability of superficial dorsal horn neurons that mediate pain neurotransmission, leading to various forms of neuropathic pain. Astrocytes express the major CNS glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of functional glutamate uptake, particularly in the spinal cord. In our unilateral cervical contusion model of mouse SCI that is associated with ipsilateral forepaw heat hypersensitivity (a form of chronic at-level neuropathic pain-related behavior), we previously reported significant and long-lasting reductions in GLT1 expression and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake in cervical spinal cord dorsal horn. To therapeutically address GLT1 dysfunction following cervical contusion SCI, we injected an adeno-associated virus type 8 (AAV8)-Gfa2 vector into the superficial dorsal horn to increase GLT1 expression selectively in astrocytes. Compared to both contusion-only animals and injured mice that received AAV8-eGFP control injection, AAV8-GLT1 delivery increased GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes of the injured cervical spinal cord dorsal horn, resulting in a significant and persistent reversal of already-established heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, AAV8-GLT1 injection significantly reduced expression of the transcription factor and marker of persistently increased neuronal activation, ΔFosB, in superficial dorsal horn neurons. These results demonstrate that focal restoration of GLT1 expression in the superficial dorsal horn is a promising target for treating chronic neuropathic pain following SCI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Influence of gravity compensation on kinematics and muscle activation patterns during reach and retrieval in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury: An explorative study

    OpenAIRE

    Marieke G . M. Kloosterman, PT, MSc; Govert J. Snoek, MD, PhD; Mirjam Kouwenhoven, MD; Anand V. Nene, MD, PhD; Michiel J. A. Jannink, PhD

    2010-01-01

    Many interventions in upper-limb rehabilitation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) use arm support (gravity compensation); however, its specific effects on kinematics and muscle activation characteristics in subjects with a CSCI are largely unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional explorative study to study these effects. Nine subjects with a CSCI performed two goal-directed arm movements (maximal reach, reach and retrieval) with and without gravity compensation. Angles at elbow and shou...

  12. Distribution of serotonin 2A and 2C receptor mRNA expression in the cervical ventral horn and phrenic motoneurons following spinal cord hemisection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, G J; Zhou, S Y; Walker, P D; Goshgarian, H G

    2001-06-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury leads to a disruption of bulbospinal innervation from medullary respiratory centers to phrenic motoneurons. Animal models utilizing cervical hemisection result in inhibition of ipsilateral phrenic nerve activity, leading to paralysis of the hemidiaphragm. We have previously demonstrated a role for serotonin (5-HT) as one potential modulator of respiratory recovery following cervical hemisection, a mechanism that likely occurs via 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2C receptors. The present study was designed to specifically examine if 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2C receptors are colocalized with phrenic motoneurons in both intact and spinal-hemisected rats. Adult female rats (250-350 g; n = 6 per group) received a left cervical (C2) hemisection and were injected with the fluorescent retrograde neuronal tracer Fluorogold into the left hemidiaphragm. Twenty-four hours later, animals were killed and spinal cords processed for in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Using (35)S-labeled cRNA probes, cervical spinal cords were probed for 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA expression and double-labeled using an antibody to Fluorogold to detect phrenic motoneurons. Expression of both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA was detected in motoneurons of the cervical ventral horn. Despite positive expression of both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNA-hybridization signal over phrenic motoneurons, only 5-HT2A silver grains achieved a signal-to-noise ratio representative of colocalization. 5-HT2A mRNA levels in identified phrenic motoneurons were not significantly altered following cervical hemisection compared to sham-operated controls. Selective colocalization of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA with phrenic motoneurons may have implications for recently observed 5-HT2A receptor-mediated regulation of respiratory activity and/or recovery in both intact and injury-compromised states. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Quantitative study of the cervical spinal cord damage in patients with multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica using diffusion tensor imaging

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    Hou Huanxin; Li Yongmei; Lu Fajin; Luo Tianyou; Ouyang Yu; Zeng Chun; Zhang Zhiwei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of the cervical spinal cord in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and relapsing neuromyelitis optica (RNMO) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and to analyze its correlations with clinical disability scores. Methods: Thirty patients with MS (MS group),28 patients with NMO (NMO group) and 20 healthy volunteers were imaged using DTI on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. DTI indices of cervical spinal cord from all participants were measured, including mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA), and the correlations between the DTI metrics and the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores were assessed. One-way ANOVA, Dunnett-t test and Spearman correlation analysis were used for statistics. Results: (1) The values of MD among three groups were different at C3 level for left lateral and dorsal columns, C4 level for the central gray substance and dorsal columns, and C5-C6 level for all structures. There were significant differences among them (F=4.006-36.814, P<0.05). The values of FA were significantly different at all levels (F=5.561-98.128, P<0.05). (2) Compared with the control group, the values of MD were increased and FA were decreased for both MS and NMO groups, there were significant differences among them (t=-0.320-3.138, P<0.05). In MS and NMO groups, there were no significant differences of MD (t=-1.183-0.069, P>0.05), while the FA at C4-C6 levels (including the central gray substance, dorsal columns,right lateral columns and left lateral columns) for NMO group were 0.57 ± 0.09, 0.56 ± 0.11, 0.54 ±0.10, 0.57±0.09, 0.55 ±0.11, 0.52 ±0.13, 0.55 ±0.11, 0.54 ±0.13, 0.54±0.10, 0.54±0.11, 0.53 ±0.13, 0.52 ±0.11; and for MS group were 0.67 ±0.10, 0.68 ±0.10, 0.68 ±0.10, 0.70 ±0.12, 0.68 ±0.11, 0.69±0.10, 0.68 ±0.11, 0.69 ±0.12, 0.67 ±0.14, 0.68 ±0.15, 0.69 ±0.14, 0.69 ±0.16, and there were significant differences between two groups (t=-0.011-0.169, P<0.05). (3) Univariate

  14. Age related diffusion and tractography changes in typically developing pediatric cervical and thoracic spinal cord

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    Mahdi Alizadeh

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT are two techniques that can measure white matter integrity of the spinal cord. Recently, DTI indices have been shown to change with age. The purpose of this study is (a to evaluate the maturational states of the entire pediatric spinal cord using DTI and DTT indices including fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD, mean length of white matter fiber tracts and tract density and (b to analyze the DTI and DTT parameters along the entire spinal cord as a function of spinal cord levels and age. Method: A total of 23 typically developing (TD pediatric subjects ranging in age from 6 to 16 years old (11.94 ± 3.26 (mean ± standard deviation, 13 females and 10 males were recruited, and scanned using 3.0 T MR scanner. Reduced FOV diffusion tensor images were acquired axially in the same anatomical location prescribed for the T2-weighted images to cover the entire spinal cord (C1-mid L1 levels. To mitigate motion induced artifacts, diffusion directional images were aligned with the reference image (b0 using a rigid body registration algorithm performed by in-house software developed in Matlab (MathWorks, Natick, Massachusetts. Diffusion tensor maps (FA and MD and streamline deterministic tractography were then generated from the motion corrected DTI dataset. DTI and DTT parameters were calculated by using ROIs drawn to encapsulate the whole cord along the entire spinal cord by an independent board certified neuroradiologist. These indices then were compared between two age groups (age group A = 6–11 years (n = 11 and age group B = 12–16 years (n = 12 based on similar standards and age definitions used for reporting spinal cord injury in the pediatric population. Standard least squared linear regression based on a restricted maximum likelihood (REML method was used to evaluate the relationship between age and DTI and

  15. High-frequency epidural stimulation across the respiratory cycle evokes phrenic short-term potentiation after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

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    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Streeter, Kristi A; Hanna, Marie H; Stamas, Anna C; Reier, Paul J; Baekey, David M; Fuller, David D

    2017-10-01

    C2 spinal hemilesion (C2Hx) paralyzes the ipsilateral diaphragm, but recovery is possible through activation of "crossed spinal" synaptic inputs to ipsilateral phrenic motoneurons. We tested the hypothesis that high-frequency epidural stimulation (HF-ES) would potentiate ipsilateral phrenic output after subacute and chronic C2Hx. HF-ES (300 Hz) was applied to the ventrolateral C4 or T2 spinal cord ipsilateral to C2Hx in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated adult rats. Stimulus duration was 60 s, and currents ranged from 100 to 1,000 µA. Bilateral phrenic nerve activity and ipsilateral hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity were recorded before and after HF-ES. Higher T2 stimulus currents potentiated ipsilateral phasic inspiratory activity at both 2 and 12 wk post-C2Hx, whereas higher stimulus currents delivered at C4 potentiated ipsilateral phasic phrenic activity only at 12 wk ( P = 0.028). Meanwhile, tonic output in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve reached 500% of baseline values at the high currents with no difference between 2 and 12 wk. HF-ES did not trigger inspiratory burst-frequency changes. Similar responses occurred following T2 HF-ES. Increases in contralateral phrenic and XII nerve output were induced by C4 and T2 HF-ES at higher currents, but the relative magnitude of these changes was small compared with the ipsilateral phrenic response. We conclude that following incomplete cervical spinal cord injury, HF-ES of the ventrolateral midcervical or thoracic spinal cord can potentiate efferent phrenic motor output with little impact on inspiratory burst frequency. However, the substantial increases in tonic output indicate that the uninterrupted 60-s stimulation paradigm used is unlikely to be useful for respiratory muscle activation after spinal injury. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Previous studies reported that high-frequency epidural stimulation (HF-ES) activates the diaphragm following acute spinal transection. This study examined HF-ES and phrenic motor output

  16. A rare case of spinal cord compression due to cervical spine metastases from paraganglioma of the jugular foramen-how should it be treated?

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    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Chourmouzi, Danai; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Katsaridis, Vasileios; Eleftheriadis, Eleftherios; Givissis, Panagiotis

    2018-02-01

    Paragangliomas are benign neoplasms that arise from the autonomic nervous system and the associated paraganglia. Although benign, they have been shown to possess metastatic potential. Involvement of the spine is rare. Even rarer is considered the involvement of the cervical spine. We report a case of a patient with a history of an extra-adrenal non-functional paraganglioma of the jugular foramen which was initially treated with intra-arterial embolization. After a 3-year disease-free follow-up, the patient was presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression due to spinal metastases in C2 and C3 vertebrae. The patient was then treated with surgical decompression and external beam radiation. Therapeutic management with additional treatment options is now under discussion by a multidisciplinary team. Paraganglioma of the jugular foramen with spinal metastasis is an uncommon presentation where increased physician awareness and long-term follow-up are mandatory for all patients with history of paraganglioma.

  17. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging may show abnormalities in the normal-appearing cervical spinal cord from patients with multiple sclerosis

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    Fernanda Miraldi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord (NASC in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS compared to controls, using diffusion tensor MR imaging. Methods We studied 32 patients with MS and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD and mean diffusivity (MD were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results At C2, FA value was decreased in MS patients. Besides, RD value was higher in MS than in controls. At C7, MD values were increased in MS. Conclusion The NASC in the right column of the cervical spinal cord showed abnormal FA, RD and MD values, which is possibly related to demyelination, since the FA abnormality was related to the RD and not to the AD.

  18. A comparison of cervical cancer screening rates among women with traumatic spinal cord injury and the general population.

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    Guilcher, Sara J T; Newman, Alice; Jaglal, Susan B

    2010-01-01

    Previous qualitative and survey studies have suggested women with spinal cord injury (SCI) are screened less often for cervical cancer compared with the general population. We investigated whether cervical cancer screening rates differ between population-based women with and without traumatic SCI, matched for age and geography. A double cohort design was used, comparing women with SCI to the general population (1:4) using administrative data for Ontario, Canada. Women with SCI, identified using the Discharge Abstract Database for the fiscal years 1995-1996 to 2001-2002, were female residents of Ontario between the ages of 25 and 66, admitted to an acute care facility with a traumatic SCI (ICD-9 CM code 806 or 952). Women in the general Ontario population were randomly matched by age and geography. Screening rates were calculated from fee codes related to Papanicolaou (Pap) smear tests for a 3-year period preinjury and postinjury. There were 339 women with SCI matched to 1506 women in the general Ontario population. Screening rates pre-SCI were 55% for women with SCI and 57% during this same time period for matched women in the general population; post-SCI rates were 58% for both the two groups. Factors predicting the likelihood of receiving a Pap test for SCI cases included younger age and higher socioeconomic status. Utilization data suggest that there are no significant differences in screening rates for women with SCI compared with the general population. However, screening rates for women with SCI were significantly influenced by age as well as income.

  19. Morphometric changes in the spinal cord during prenatal life: a stereological study in sheep.

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    Sadeghinezhad, Javad; Zadsar, Narges; Hasanzadeh, Beal

    2018-03-01

    This study describes the volumetric changes in the spinal cord during prenatal life in sheep using quantitative stereological methods. Twenty healthy sheep fetuses were included in the present study, divided into four groups representing 9-11, 12-14, 15-17, and 18-20 weeks of gestation. In each group, the spinal cord was dissected out and sampled according to the unbiased systematic random sampling method then used for stereological estimations. The total volume of spinal cord, volume of gray matter (GM), volume of white matter (WM), ratio of GM volume to WM volume, and volume of central canal (CC) were estimated in the whole spinal cord and its various regions using Cavalieri's principle. The total volume of the spinal cord increased 8 times from week 9 to week 20. The cervical region showed the greatest (9.7 times) and the sacral region the least (6.3 times) volumetric change. The CC volume of the whole spinal cord increased 5.8 times from week 9 to week 20. The cervical region developed faster (8.2 times) and the thoracic region slower (4.4 times) than the total spinal cord. During development, the volume ratio of GM to WM decreased from lower toward upper regions. The greatest volume changes occurred mostly in weeks 9-11 and 12-14. The cervical region showed the greatest volume changes in comparison with other regions of the spinal cord.

  20. Reliable volumetry of the cervical spinal cord in MS patient follow-up data with cord image analyzer (Cordial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Michael; Pezold, Simon; Naegelin, Yvonne; Fundana, Ketut; Andělová, Michaela; Weier, Katrin; Stippich, Christoph; Kappos, Ludwig; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Cattin, Philippe; Sprenger, Till

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord (SC) atrophy is an important contributor to the development of disability in many neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). To assess the spinal cord atrophy in clinical trials and clinical practice, largely automated methods are needed due to the sheer amount of data. Moreover, using these methods in longitudinal trials requires them to deliver highly reliable measurements, enabling comparisons of multiple data sets of the same subject over time. We present a method for SC volumetry using 3D MRI data providing volume measurements for SC sections of fixed length and location. The segmentation combines a continuous max flow approach with SC surface reconstruction that locates the SC boundary based on image voxel intensities. Two cutting planes perpendicular to the SC centerline are determined based on predefined distances to an anatomical landmark, and the cervical SC volume (CSCV) is then calculated in-between these boundaries. The development of the method focused on its application in MRI follow-up studies; the method provides a high scan-rescan reliability, which was tested on healthy subject data. Scan-rescan reliability coefficients of variation (COV) were below 1 %, intra- and interrater COV were even lower (0.1-0.2 %). To show the applicability in longitudinal trials, 3-year follow-up data of 48 patients with a progressive course of MS were assessed. In this cohort, CSCV loss was the only significant predictor of disability progression (p = 0.02). We are, therefore, confident that our method provides a reliable tool for SC volumetry in longitudinal clinical trials.

  1. Clinical and radiological profile of Hirayama disease: A flexion myelopathy due to tight cervical dural canal amenable to collar therapy

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    K M Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hirayama disease (HD is benign focal amyotrophy of the distal upper limbs, often misdiagnosed as motor neuron disease. Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often reported normal. Objective: To study the clinicoradiological profile of hand wasting in young males. Materials and Methods: Patients presenting with insidious-onset hand wasting from March 2008 to May 2011 were evaluated electrophysiologically. Cervical MRI in neutral position was done in 11 patients and flexion contrast imaging was done in 10 patients. Results: All patients were males less than 25 years of age, with median age 23 years, except one patient who was 50 years old. Duration of illness was 3 months to 3 years. All (100% had oblique amyotrophy, four (36% cold paresis, 10 (91% minipolymyoclonus and three (27% had fasciculations. Regional reflexes were variably absent. Two patients (18% had brisk reflexes of lower limbs with flexor plantars. Electromyography (EMG showed chronic denervation in the C7-T1 myotomes. Neutral position MRI showed loss of cervical lordosis in 10/11 (91%, localized lower cervical cord atrophy in 9/11 (82%, asymmetric cord flattening in 11/11 (100% and intramedullary hyperintensity in 2/11 (18%; flexion study showed loss of dural attachment, anterior displacement of dorsal dura, epidural flow voids in 9/10 (90% and enhancing epidural crescent in 10/10 (100%. Clinical profile, imaging and electrophysiological findings of the patient aged 50 years will be described in detail as presentation at this age is exceptional. Collar therapy slowed progression in most cases. Conclusion: Clinical features of HD corroborated well with electrophysiological diagnosis of anterior horn cell disease of lower cervical cord. While dynamic contrast MRI is characteristic, routine studies have a high predictive value for diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis is important to institute early collar therapy.

  2. Dimensions of the spinal canal in individuals symptomatic and non-symptomatic for sciatica: A CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmink, J.T.; Korte, J.H.; Penning, L.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements obtained in 50 spinal CT studies of patients referred for suspected lumbosacral nerve root compression, were compared to those of a group of 30 individuals asymptomatic in this respect, who had been referred for abdominal pathology. Transverse ligamentous interfacet and transverse dural dimensions were significantly reduced in the sciatica group, with usually normal interpedicular and sagittal dimensions ruling out idiopathic developmental stenosis. The borderline value for ligamentous interfacet distance (ILD) at L4-5 appeared to be 11 mm. (orig.)

  3. Dimensions of the spinal canal in individuals symptomatic and non-symptomatic for sciatica: A CT study

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    Wilmink, J.T.; Korte, J.H.; Penning, L.

    1988-12-01

    Measurements obtained in 50 spinal CT studies of patients referred for suspected lumbosacral nerve root compression, were compared to those of a group of 30 individuals asymptomatic in this respect, who had been referred for abdominal pathology. Transverse ligamentous interfacet and transverse dural dimensions were significantly reduced in the sciatica group, with usually normal interpedicular and sagittal dimensions ruling out idiopathic developmental stenosis. The borderline value for ligamentous interfacet distance (ILD) at L4-5 appeared to be 11 mm.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging of the cervical spinal cord in healthy adult population: normative values and measurement reproducibility at 3T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brander, Antti; Koskinen, Eerika; Luoto, Teemu M; Hakulinen, Ullamari; Helminen, Mika; Savilahti, Sirpa; Ryymin, Pertti; Dastidar, Prasun; Ohman, Juha

    2014-05-01

    Compared to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the brain, there is a paucity of reports addressing the applicability of DTI in the evaluation of the spinal cord. Most normative data of cervical spinal cord DTI consist of relatively small and arbitrarily collected populations. Comprehensive normative data are necessary for clinical decision-making. To establish normal values for cervical spinal cord DTI metrics with region of interest (ROI)- and fiber tractography (FT)-based measurements and to assess the reproducibility of both measurement methods. Forty healthy adults underwent cervical spinal cord 3T MRI. Sagittal and axial conventional T2 sequences and DTI in the axial plane were performed. Whole cord fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were determined at different cervical levels from C2 to C7 using the ROI method. DTI metrics (FA, axial, and radial diffusivities based on eigenvalues λ1, λ2, and λ3, and ADC) of the lateral and posterior funicles were measured at C3 level. FA and ADC of the whole cord and the lateral and posterior funicles were also measured using quantitative tractography. Intra- and inter-observer variation of the measurement methods were assessed. Whole cord FA values decreased and ADC values increased in the rostral to caudal direction from C2 to C7. Between the individual white matter funicles no statistically significant difference for FA or ADC values was found. Both axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity of both lateral funicles differed significantly from those of the posterior funicle. Neither gender nor age correlated with any of the DTI metrics. Intra-observer variation of the measurements for whole cord FA and ADC showed almost perfect agreement with both ROI and tractography-based measurements. There was more variation in measurements of individual columns. Inter-observer agreement varied from moderate to strong for whole cord FA and ADC. Both ROI- and FT-based measurements are applicable

  5. Cervical Spinal Cord and Dorsal Nerve Root Stimulation for Neuropathic Upper Limb Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Adrian B; Parrent, Andrew G; MacDougall, Keith W

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a well-established treatment for chronic neuropathic pain in the lower limbs. Upper limb pain comprises a significant proportion of neuropathic pain patients, but is often difficult to target specifically and consistently with paresthesias. We hypothesized that the use of dorsal nerve root stimulation (DNRS), as an option along with SCS, would help us better relieve pain in these patients. All 35 patients trialed with spinal stimulation for upper limb pain between July 1, 2011, and October 31, 2013, were included. We performed permanent implantation in 23/35 patients based on a visual analogue scale pain score decrease of ≥50% during trial stimulation. Both the SCS and DNRS groups had significant improvements in average visual analogue scale pain scores at 12 months compared with baseline, and the majority of patients in both groups obtained ≥50% pain relief. The majority of patients in both groups were able to reduce their opioid use, and on average had improvements in Short Form-36 quality of life scores. Complication rates did not differ significantly between the two groups. Treatment with SCS or DNRS provides meaningful long-term relief of chronic neuropathic pain in the upper limbs.

  6. Cervical spinal erythropoietin induces phrenic motor facilitation via ERK and Akt signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Erica A.; Satriotomo, Irawan; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is typically known for its role in erythropoiesis, but is also a potent neurotrophic/neuroprotective factor for spinal motor neurons. Another trophic factor regulated by Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), signals via ERK and Akt activation to elicit long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation (pMF). Since EPO also signals via ERK and Akt activation, we tested the hypothesis that EPO elicits similar pMF. Using retrograde labeling and immunohistochemical techniques, we demonstrate in adult, male, Sprague-Dawley rats that EPO and its receptor, EPO-R, are expressed in identified phrenic motor neurons. Intrathecal EPO at C4 elicits long-lasting pMF; integrated phrenic nerve burst amplitude increased >90 min post-injection (63±12% baseline 90 min post-injection; pphrenic motor neurons; EPO also increased pAkt (1.6 fold vs controls; pphrenic motor neurons (p<0.05), indicating a complex interaction between these kinases. We conclude that EPO elicits spinal plasticity in respiratory motor control. Since EPO expression is hypoxia-sensitive, it may play a role in respiratory plasticity in conditions of prolonged or recurrent low oxygen. PMID:22539857

  7. Cervical spinal demyelination with ethidium bromide impairs respiratory (phrenic) activity and forelimb motor behavior in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Punzo, Antonio M.; Duncan, Ian D.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Johnson, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Although respiratory complications are a major cause of morbidity/mortality in many neural injuries or diseases, little is known concerning mechanisms whereby deficient myelin impairs breathing, or how patients compensate for such changes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that respiratory and forelimb motor function are impaired in a rat model of focal dorsolateral spinal demyelination (ethidium bromide, EB). Ventilation, phrenic nerve activity and horizontal ladder walking were performed 7-14 days post-C2 injection of EB or vehicle (SHAM). EB caused dorsolateral demyelination at C2-C3 followed by signficant spontaneous remyelination at 14 days post-EB. Although ventilation did not differ between groups, ipsilateral integrated phrenic nerve burst amplitude was significantly reduced versus SHAM during chemoreceptor activation at 7 days post-EB but recovered by 14 days. The ratio of ipsi- to contralateral phrenic nerve amplitude correlated with cross-sectional lesion area. This ratio was significantly reduced 7 days post-EB versus SHAM during baseline conditions, and versus SHAM and 14 day groups during chemoreceptor activation. Limb function ipsilateral to EB was impaired 7 days post-EB and partially recovered by 14 days post-EB. EB provides a reversible model of focal, spinal demyelination, and may be a useful model to study mechanisms of functional impairment and recovery via motor plasticity, or the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions to reduce severity or duration of disease. PMID:23159317

  8. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodman, Alexa; Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-05-23

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient's history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection.

  9. The tibial nerve compression test for the diagnosis of lumbar spinal canal stenosis-A simple and reliable physical examination for use by primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shu; Nakano, Atsushi; Kin, Akihiro; Baba, Ichiro; Kurokawa, Yoshitaka; Neo, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and suitability of the 'Tibial Nerve Compression Test (TNCT)' as a screening tool for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS). A total of 108 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital for surgical treatment or diagnosis of LSS were included in this study. Fifty healthy volunteers were examined as a control group. The severity of tenderness was scored (tenderness score) and measured on a visual analogue scale (P-VAS score). These scores were compared between the LSS and control groups. Moreover, they were compared before and after the operation among operated patients. The positive tenderness rate was significantly higher (92.6% [100/108]) in the LSS group than in the control group (30% [15/50]). The sensitivity and specificity of TNCT (95% confidence interval) were 0.93 (0.88-0.96) and 0.70 (0.61-0.77), respectively. Positive tenderness rates and P-VAS scores were significantly higher in the LSS group (p Test is a useful screening tool for LSS diagnosis in a primary care setting. Level II, diagnostic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of stenosis ratio as a predictor of surgical satisfaction in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis: a receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hassanreza R; Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate independent factors that predict surgical satisfaction in lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) patients. Patients who underwent surgery were grouped based on the age, gender, duration of symptoms, walking distance, Neurogenic Claudication Outcome Score (NCOS) and the stenosis ratio (SR) described by Lurencin. We recorded on 2-year patient satisfaction using standardized measure. The optimal cut-off points in SR, NCOS and walking distance for predicting surgical satisfaction were estimated from sensitivity and specificity calculations and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. One hundred fifty consecutive patients (51 male, 99 female, mean age 62.4±10.9 years) were followed up for 34±13 months (range 24-49). One, two, three and four level stenosis was observed in 10.7%, 39.3%, 36.0 % and 14.0% of patients, respectively. Post-surgical satisfaction was 78.5% at the 2 years follow up. In ROC curve analysis, the asymptotic significance is less than 0.05 in SR and the optimal cut-off value of SR to predict worsening surgical satisfaction was measured as more than 0.52, with 85.4% sensitivity and 77.4% specificity (AUC 0.798, 95% CI 0.73-0.90; Ppatients with degenerative lumbar stenosis considered for surgical treatment. Using a ROC curve analysis, a radiological feature, the SR, demonstrated superiority in predicting patient satisfaction, compared to functional and clinical characteristics such as walking distance and NCOS.

  11. Acute Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship of Cord Compression to Neurological Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeers, Peta; Battistuzzo, Camila R; Clark, Jillian M; Bernard, Stephen; Freeman, Brian J C; Batchelor, Peter E

    2018-02-21

    Spinal cord injury in the cervical spine is commonly accompanied by cord compression and urgent surgical decompression may improve neurological recovery. However, the extent of spinal cord compression and its relationship to neurological recovery following traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury is unclear. The purpose of this study was to quantify maximum cord compression following thoracolumbar spinal cord injury and to assess the relationship among cord compression, cord swelling, and eventual clinical outcome. The medical records of patients who were 15 to 70 years of age, were admitted with a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury (T1 to L1), and underwent a spinal surgical procedure were examined. Patients with penetrating injuries and multitrauma were excluded. Maximal osseous canal compromise and maximal spinal cord compression were measured on preoperative mid-sagittal computed tomography (CT) scans and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by observers blinded to patient outcome. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades from acute hospital admission (≤24 hours of injury) and rehabilitation discharge were used to measure clinical outcome. Relationships among spinal cord compression, canal compromise, and initial and final AIS grades were assessed via univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-three patients with thoracolumbar spinal cord injury were included in this study. The overall mean maximal spinal cord compression (and standard deviation) was 40% ± 21%. There was a significant relationship between median spinal cord compression and final AIS grade, with grade-A patients (complete injury) exhibiting greater compression than grade-C and D patients (incomplete injury) (p compression as independently influencing the likelihood of complete spinal cord injury (p compression. Greater cord compression is associated with an increased likelihood of severe neurological deficits (complete injury) following

  12. Thoracolumbar spinal neurenteric cyst with tethered cord syndrome and extreme cervical lordosis in a child: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Zhi Gang; Richard, Seidu A; Lei, Chuanfen; Huang, Siqing

    2018-04-01

    Neurenteric cysts, are rare benign tumors of the central nervous system that are mostly located in the spinal cord and predominantly seen in male children although adult form of the disorder also occurs. The etiology and treatment of this disorder is still a matter of debate. Our case further throws more light on the pathogenesis and treatment of this disorder. A 4-year-old boy presented with 5-month history of cervical lordosis and bilateral lower extremity pain that progressed to his abdomen and upper body. The pain was general, recurrent, non-persistent and progressive in nature with no paralysis. The pain was aggravated by trunk stretching and relieved when he assumed opisthotonos position so he preferred sleeping in this position at night. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cystic lesion at the thoracolumbar spine with tethering of spinal cord and cervical lordosis. He was operated on successfully and the cervical lordosis and pain resolved. The child recovered well with no tumor recurrence and massive improvement of his life. The gold standard treatment for this disorder is surgery although the precise surgical approach is still a matter of debate. We are of the view that surgical approach should be individualized and aim at total excision of the cyst.

  13. Clinical Trial of Human Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cell Transplantation in Patients with Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Cheol Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a phase I/IIa open-label and nonrandomized controlled clinical trial, we sought to assess the safety and neurological effects of human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSPCs transplanted into the injured cord after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI. Of 19 treated subjects, 17 were sensorimotor complete and 2 were motor complete and sensory incomplete. hNSPCs derived from the fetal telencephalon were grown as neurospheres and transplanted into the cord. In the control group, who did not receive cell implantation but were otherwise closely matched with the transplantation group, 15 patients with traumatic cervical SCI were included. At 1 year after cell transplantation, there was no evidence of cord damage, syrinx or tumor formation, neurological deterioration, and exacerbating neuropathic pain or spasticity. The American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS grade improved in 5 of 19 transplanted patients, 2 (A → C, 1 (A → B, and 2 (B → D, whereas only one patient in the control group showed improvement (A → B. Improvements included increased motor scores, recovery of motor levels, and responses to electrophysiological studies in the transplantation group. Therefore, the transplantation of hNSPCs into cervical SCI is safe and well-tolerated and is of modest neurological benefit up to 1 year after transplants. This trial is registered with Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS, Registration Number: KCT0000879.

  14. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord: incidence and dose-volume relationship of symptomatic and asymptomatic late effects following high dose irradiation of paraspinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mitchell C.C.; Munzenrider, John E.; Finkelstein, Dianne; Liebsch, Norbert; Adams, Judy; Hug, Eugen B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Low grade chordomas and chondrosarcomas require high radiation doses for effective, lasting tumor control. Fractionated, 3-D planned, conformal proton radiation therapy has been used for lesions along the base of skull and spine to deliver high target doses, while respecting constraints of critical, normal tissues. In this study, we sought to determine the incidence of myelopathy after high dose radiotherapy to the cervical spine and investigated the influence of various treatment parameters, including dose-volume relationship. Methods and Materials: Between December 1980 and March 1996, 78 patients were treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory for primary or recurrent chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the cervical spine using combined proton and photon radiation therapy. In general, the tumor dose given was between 64.5 to 79.2 CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent). The guidelines for maximum permissible doses to spinal cord were: ≤ 64 CGE to the spinal cord surface and ≤ 53 CGE to the spinal cord center. Dose volume histograms of the spinal cord were analyzed to investigate a possible dose and volume relationship. Results: With a mean follow-up period of 46.6 months (range: 3 - 157 months), 4 of 78 patients (5.1%) developed high-grade (RTOG Grade 3 and 4) late toxicity: 3 patients (3.8%) experienced sensory deficits without motor deficits, none had any limitations of daily activities. One patient (1.2%) developed motor deficit with loss of motor function of one upper extremity. The only patient, who developed permanent motor damage had received additional prior radiation treatment and therefore received a cumulative spinal cord dose higher than the treatment guidelines. No patient treated within the guidelines experienced any motor impairment. Six patients (7.7%) experienced transient Lhermitt's syndrome and 1 patient (1.2%) developed asymptomatic radiographic MR findings only. Time to onset of symptoms of radiographic

  15. Effect of cervical vs. thoracic spinal manipulation on peripheral neural features and grip strength in subjects with chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Aguirre, Francisco; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Ángel; Heredia-Rizo, Alberto M; Boscá-Gandía, Juan J; Ricard, François; Rodriguez-Blanco, Cleofás

    2017-06-01

    Cervical and thoracic spinal manipulative therapy has shown positive impact for relief of pain and improve function in non-specific mechanical neck pain. Several attempts have been made to compare their effectiveness although previous studies lacked a control group, assessed acute neck pain or combined thrust and non-thrust techniques. To compare the immediate effects of cervical and thoracic spinal thrust manipulations on mechanosensitivity of upper limb nerve trunks and grip strength in patients with chronic non-specific mechanical neck pain. Randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial. Private physiotherapy clinical consultancy. Eighty-eight subjects (32.09±6.05 years; 72.7% females) suffering neck pain (grades I or II) of at least 12 weeks of duration. Participants were distributed into three groups: 1) cervical group (N.=28); 2) thoracic group (N.=30); and 3) control group (N.=30). One treatment session consisting of applying a high-velocity low-amplitude spinal thrust technique over the lower cervical spine (C7) or the upper thoracic spine (T3) was performed, while the control group received a sham-manual contact. Measurements were taken at baseline and after intervention of the pressure pain threshold over the median, ulnar and radial nerves. Secondary measures included assessing free-pain grip strength with a hydraulic dynamometer. No statistically significant differences were observed when comparing between-groups in any of the outcome measures (P>0.05). Those who received thrust techniques, regardless of the manipulated area, reported an immediate increase in mechanosensitivity over the radial (both sides) and left ulnar nerve trunks (Ppain perception over the radial nerve also improved (P≤0.025). Low-cervical and upper-thoracic thrust manipulation is no more effective than placebo to induce immediate changes on mechanosensitivity of upper limb nerve trunks and grip strength in patients with chronic non-specific mechanical neck pain. A single

  16. Short-scan-time multi-slice diffusion MRI of the mouse cervical spinal cord using echo planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callot, Virginie; Duhamel, Guillaume; Cozzone, Patrick J; Kober, Frank

    2008-10-01

    Mouse spinal cord (SC) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides important information on tissue morphology and structural changes that may occur during pathologies such as multiple sclerosis or SC injury. The acquisition scheme of the commonly used DWI techniques is based on conventional spin-echo encoding, which is time-consuming. The purpose of this work was to investigate whether the use of echo planar imaging (EPI) would provide good-quality diffusion MR images of mouse SC, as well as accurate measurements of diffusion-derived metrics, and thus enable diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and highly resolved DWI within reasonable scan times. A four-shot diffusion-weighted spin-echo EPI (SE-EPI) sequence was evaluated at 11.75 T on a group of healthy mice (n = 10). SE-EPI-derived apparent diffusion coefficients of gray and white matter were compared with those obtained using a conventional spin-echo sequence (c-SE) to validate the accuracy of the method. To take advantage of the reduction in acquisition time offered by the EPI sequence, multi-slice DTI acquisitions were performed covering the cervical segments (six slices, six diffusion-encoding directions, three b values) within 30 min (vs 2 h for c-SE). From these measurements, fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivities were calculated, and fiber tracking along the C1 to C6 cervical segments was performed. In addition, high-resolution images (74 x 94 microm(2)) were acquired within 5 min per direction. Clear delineation of gray and white matter and identical apparent diffusion coefficient values were obtained, with a threefold reduction in acquisition time compared with c-SE. While overcoming the difficulties associated with high spatially and temporally resolved DTI measurements, the present SE-EPI approach permitted identification of reliable quantitative parameters with a reproducibility compatible with the detection of pathologies. The SE-EPI method may be particularly valuable when multiple sets of images

  17. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 contributes to inflammatory tongue pain via extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis and upper cervical spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ming-Gang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the orofacial region, limited information is available concerning pathological tongue pain, such as inflammatory pain or neuropathic pain occurring in the tongue. Here, we tried for the first time to establish a novel animal model of inflammatory tongue pain in rats and to investigate the roles of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling in this process. Methods Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA was submucosally injected into the tongue to induce the inflammatory pain phenotype that was confirmed by behavioral testing. Expression of phosphorylated ERK (pERK and mGluR5 in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc and upper cervical spinal cord (C1-C2 were detected with immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. pERK inhibitor, a selective mGluR5 antagonist or agonist was continuously administered for 7 days via an intrathecal (i.t. route. Local inflammatory responses were verified by tongue histology. Results Submucosal injection of CFA into the tongue produced a long-lasting mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia at the inflamed site, concomitant with an increase in the pERK immunoreactivity in the Vc and C1-C2. The distribution of pERK-IR cells was laminar specific, ipsilaterally dominant, somatotopically relevant, and rostrocaudally restricted. Western blot analysis also showed an enhanced activation of ERK in the Vc and C1-C2 following CFA injection. Continuous i.t. administration of the pERK inhibitor and a selective mGluR5 antagonist significantly depressed the mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in the CFA-injected tongue. In addition, the number of pERK-IR cells in ipsilateral Vc and C1-C2 was also decreased by both drugs. Moreover, continuous i.t. administration of a selective mGluR5 agonist induced mechanical allodynia in naive rats. Conclusions The present study constructed a new animal model of inflammatory tongue pain in rodents, and

  18. Neurotization of the phrenic nerve with accessory nerve for high cervical spinal cord injury with respiratory distress: an anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ce; Zhang, Ying; Nicholas, Tsai; Wu, Guoxin; Shi, Sheng; Bo, Yin; Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Xuhui; Yuan, Wen

    2014-01-01

    High cervical spinal cord injury is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Traditional treatments carry various complications such as infection, pacemaker failure and undesirable movement. Thus, a secure surgical strategy with fewer complications analogous to physiological ventilation is still required. We hope to offer one potential method to decrease the complications and improve survival qualities of patients from the aspect of anatomy. The purpose of the study is to provide anatomic details on the accessory nerve and phrenic nerve for neurotization in patients with high spinal cord injuries. 38 cadavers (76 accessory and 76 phrenic nerves) were dissected in the study. The width, length and thickness of each accessory nerve and phrenic nerve above clavicle were measured. The distances from several landmarks on accessory nerve to the origin and the end of the phrenic nerve above clavicle were measured too. Then, the number of motor nerve fibers on different sections of the nerves was calculated using the technique of immunohistochemistry. The accessory nerves distal to its sternocleidomastoid muscular branches were 1.52 ± 0.32 mm ~1.54 ± 0.29 mm in width, 0.52 ± 0.18 mm ~ 0.56 ± 0.20mm in thickness and 9.52 ± 0.98 cm in length. And the phrenic nerves above clavicle were 1.44 ± 0.23 mm ~ 1.45 ± 0.24 mm in width, 0.47 ± 0.15 mm ~ 0.56 ± 0.25 mm in thickness and 6.48 ± 0.78 cm in length. The distance between the starting point of accessory nerve and phrenic nerve were 3.24 ± 1.17 cm, and the distance between the starting point of accessory nerve and the end of the phrenic nerve above clavicle were 8.72 ± 0.84 cm. The numbers of motor nerve fibers in accessory nerve were 1,038 ± 320~1,102 ± 216, before giving out the sternocleidomastoid muscular branches. The number of motor nerve fibers in the phrenic nerve was 911 ± 321~1,338 ± 467. The accessory nerve and the phrenic were similar in width, thickness and the number of motor nerve fibers. And

  19. Preliminary study of cervical spinal cord in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using MR diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Ma Lin; Guo Xinggao; Li Dejun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether normal-appearing cervical spinal cord in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has abnormal changes based on the quantitative measurement in healthy volunteers. Methods: Conventional MRI and axial DTI were obtained in 16 patients with ALS (ALS group) and 16 age-matched control subjects (normal group). ADC, fractional anisotropy (FA)and relative anisotropy(RA) images were obtained on workstation (AW4.2). ROIs (5 mm x 5 mm) were placed in anterior funiculus, posterior funiculus, and bilateral lateral corticospinal tracts (LCTs), respectively, at the same slice (C3). Independent-sample t test was used for comparison of parameters between the two groups. Correlations between DTI parameters of ALS and ALS course, Norris score, and ALSFRS were carried out separately by Pearson correlation analysis. Results: FA and RA values of bilateral LCTs were decreased significantly. FA/RA values of left LCT were 0.762±0.089 and 0.762±0.107 in ALS group, while they were 0.863±0.098 and 0.890±0.105 in control group, respectively. FA/RA values of right LCT were 0.751±0.065 and 0.772±0.082 in ALS group, and they were 0.843±0.118 and 0.863±0.134 in control group, respectively, they were decreased significantly (t=2.575, 4.195, 2.246, 2.218, P 0.05) between ADC values of left and right CSTs in ALS group [(0.744±0.162) x 10 -3 , (0.767±0.141) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s] and control group [(0.640±0.149) x 10 -3 , (0.643±0.168) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s)]. FA, RA and ADC values of ALS patients in anterior funiculus were 0.637±0.113, 0.622±0.138, (0.950±0.354) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, in control group they were 0.670±0.117, 0.656±0.136, (0.865±0.238) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, there were no significant differences (t=0.854, -0.704, -1.155, P>0.05). FA, RA and ADC values of ALS patients in posterior funiculus were 0.886±0.073, 0.920±0.100, (0.613±0.137) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, in control group they were 0.906±0.078, 0.914±0.135, (0.636±0.224) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, there were

  20. Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormality (SCIWORA) – Clinical and Radiological Aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szwedowski, Dawid; Walecki, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    The acronym SCIWORA (Spinal Cord Injury Without Radiographic Abnormality) was first developed and introduced by Pang and Wilberger who used it to define “clinical symptoms of traumatic myelopathy with no radiographic or computed tomographic features of spinal fracture or instability”. SCIWORA is a clinical-radiological condition that mostly affects children. SCIWORA lesions are found mainly in the cervical spine but can also be seen, although much less frequently, in the thoracic or lumbar spine. Based on reports from different authors, SCIWORA is responsible for 6 to 19% and 9% to 14% of spinal injuries in children and adults, respectively. Underlying degenerative changes, including spondylosis or spinal canal stenosis, are typically present in adult patients. The level of spinal cord injury corresponds to the location of these changes. With recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, especially in magnetic resonance imaging, and with increasing availability of MRI as a diagnostic tool, the overall detection rate of SCIWORA has significantly improved

  1. Quantitative analysis of relationship between the deformity of spinal cord and symptom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Kazunori; Honma, Takao; Uchiyama, Seiji; Matsumoto, Mineo; Amami, Kenichi

    1986-01-01

    Metrizamide CT (M-CT) scans of the spinal cord and dural canal were obtained in 35 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and 7 control subjects. There was a significant correlation between the deformity of the spinal cord shown on M-CT and both the severity and bilateral difference of symptoms. The decrease in the compression ratio of the spinal cord was of great importance in the determination of the degree of symptoms. M-CT failed to evaluate individual neurologic symptoms and clinical stages, and to predict prognosis. It was suggested that the deformed spinal cord is responsible for the occurrence of CSM symptoms, and that the severity becomes worse with progressing clinical symptoms in association with the compression of the spinal cord. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Comparison of MRI sequences for evaluation of multiple sclerosis of the cervical spinal cord at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philpott, Cristina; Brotchie, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Debate remains regarding the utility of the traditional STIR (short inversion time recovery) sequence in aiding MRI diagnosis of spinal cord lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and this sequence is not included in the current imaging guidelines. A recent study proposed a T1 weighted STIR as a superior alternative to the traditional STIR and T2 fast spin echo (FSE). Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity of T2, standard STIR and T1 weighted STIR sequences in the evaluation of MS plaques on our 3 T system. Methods and materials: A retrospective analysis of patients with multiple sclerosis who presented to our institution over a period of 5 months and who had cervical cord lesions was undertaken. Patients had been examined with our institutional protocol which included T2 FSE, STIR and the recommended T1 STIR. Quantitative analysis of the lesions versus background cord using sample T-tests was performed for each sequence, and comparative analysis of the lesion contrast:background cord ratios of the 3 sequences (using two-way ANOVA tests) was performed. Results: The T2 sequence was not as sensitive in detecting lesions versus the traditional STIR and T1 weighted STIR, with 10% of lesions not detected using statistical analysis (p < 0.05). The traditional STIR also demonstrated greater contrast ratios than the T2 sequence (p < 0.05) suggesting increased sensitivity. However, the T1 STIR demonstrated even greater contrast ratios than both the traditional STIR and T2 sequences (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This study confirms earlier findings of the traditional STIRs increased sensitivity versus the T2 sequence. However, the new “T1 weighted STIR” appears to be even more sensitive than both these sequences showing potential promise as an alternative method to monitor demyelinating plaques of MS.

  3. Anatomical architecture and responses to acidosis of a novel respiratory neuron group in the high cervical spinal cord (HCRG) of the neonatal rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Y; Yokota, S; Shinozaki, Y; Aoyama, R; Yasui, Y; Ishiguro, M; Oku, Y

    2009-01-01

    It has been postulated that there exists a neuronal mechanism that generates respiratory rhythm and modulates respiratory output pattern in the high cervical spinal cord. Recently, we have found a novel respiratory neuron group in the ventral portion of the high cervical spinal cord, and named it the high cervical spinal cord respiratory group (HCRG). In the present study, we analyzed the detailed anatomical architecture of the HCRG region by double immunostaining of the region using a neuron-specific marker (NeuN) and a marker for motoneurons (ChAT) in the neonatal rat. We found a large number of small NeuN-positive cells without ChAT-immunoreactivity, which were considered interneurons. We also found two and three clusters of motoneurons in the ventral portion of the ventral horn at C1 and C2 levels, respectively. Next, we examined responses of HCRG neurons to respiratory and metabolic acidosis in vitro by voltage-imaging together with cross correlation techniques, i.e., by correlation coefficient imaging, in order to understand the functional role of HCRG neurons. Both respiratory and metabolic acidosis caused the same pattern of changes in their spatiotemporal activation profiles, and the respiratory-related area was enlarged in the HCRG region. After acidosis was introduced, preinspiratory phase-dominant activity was recruited in a number of pixels, and more remarkably inspiratory phase-dominant activity was recruited in a large number of pixels. We suggest that the HCRG composes a local respiratory neuronal network consisting of interneurons and motoneurons and plays an important role in respiratory augmentation in response to acidosis.

  4. A comprehensive review with potential significance during skull base and neck operations, Part II: glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves and cervical spinal nerves 1-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Chern, Joshua J; Rizk, Elias B; Loukas, Marios; Miller, Joseph H; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate on the skull base and upper neck regions in order to avoid inadvertent traction or transection. We review the literature regarding the anatomy, function, and clinical implications of the complex neural networks formed by interconnections between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves. A review of germane anatomic and clinical literature was performed. The review is organized into two parts. Part I discusses the anastomoses between the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves or their branches and other nerve trunks or branches in the vicinity. Part II deals with the anastomoses between the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and their branches or between these nerves and the first four cervical spinal nerves; the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to these neural plexuses is also briefly reviewed. Part II is presented in this article. Extensive and variable neural anastomoses exist between the lower cranial nerves and between the upper cervical nerves in such a way that these nerves with their extra-axial communications can be collectively considered a plexus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Neck-to-shoulder pain as an unusual presentation of pulmonary embolism in a patient with cervical spinal cord injury: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Gyu; Chang, Min Cheol

    2017-10-01

    Information on referred pain can be helpful for diagnosing diseases of the visceral organs. Here, the authors report a patient with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) who had referred pain at the right side from the neck to shoulder, as a presentation of pulmonary embolism (PE). A 55-year-old man with complete tetraplegia, due to cervical SCI after C5 and C6 vertebral body fracture, complained of right neck-to-shoulder pain (numerical scale rating: 6). Despite pain medication (meloxicam 15 mg, gabapentin 400 mg, and propacetamol HCl 1 g), the pain was not reduced. Along with right neck-to-shoulder pain, he presented mild fever (37.8°C) and mildly elevated respiratory rate (20 breaths/min). D-dimer level was also mildly elevated to 6.09 mg/mL (normal value: pain completely disappeared. This study shows that pain at the neck-to-shoulder area can occur following unexpected causes such as PE. Not limited to PE, the evaluation of diseases in the thoracic or abdominal organs is recommended if patients with cervical SCI present refractory pain in the dermatomes innervated by high cervical nerve roots.

  6. Cine phase-contrast MRI measurement of CSF flow in the cervical spine: a pilot study in patients with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, MJ; Shakeri, M.; McDowell, E.; Wells, J.; Vitaz, T.; Harkema, S.; Amini, A.

    2011-03-01

    MRI velocimetry (also known as phase-contrast MRI) is a powerful tool for quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in various regions of the brain and craniospinal junction and has been accepted as a diagnostic tool to assist with the diagnosis of certain conditions such as hydrocephalus and chiari malformations. Cerebrospinal fluid is continually produced in the ventricles of the brain, flows through the ventricular system and then out and around the brain and spinal cord and is reabsorbed over the convexity of the brain. Any disease process which either impedes the normal pattern of flow or restricts the area where flow occurs can change the pattern of these waveforms with the direction and velocity of flow being determined by the pressure transmitted from the pulsation of the heart and circulation of blood within the central nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that phase-contrast MRI could eventually be used as a diagnostic aid in determining the degree of spinal cord compression following injury to the cervical or thoracic spine. In this study, we examined CSF flow in 3 normal subjects and 2 subjects with non-acute injuries in the cervical spine using Cine phasecontrast MRI. CSF flow analysis was performed using an in-house developed software. The flow waveform was calculated in both normal subjects (n=3) as well as subjects with spinal cord injury in the cervical spine (n=2). The bulk flow at C2 was measured to be 0.30 +/- 0.05 cc, at 5 cm distal to C2, it was 0.19+/- 0.07 cc, and at 10 cm distal to C2, it was 0.17+/- 0.05 cc. These results were in good agreement with previously published results. In patients with spinal cord injury, at the site of injury in the cervical spine, bulk flow was found to be 0.08 +/- 0.12 cc, at 5 cm proximal to the site of injury it was found to be 0.18 +/- 0.07 cc, and at 5 cm distal to the site of injury, it was found to be 0.12 +/- 0.01 cc.

  7. Kinematic MRI of the cervical spine in patients with degenerative disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhle, C.; Wiskirchen, J.; Brinkmann, G.; Falliner, A.; Weinert, D.; Reuter, M.; Heller, M.

    1995-01-01

    Kinematic MRI of the cervical spine was done from 50 of inclination to 30 of reclination. Depending on the maximum inclination and reclination the range of motion was divided into 9 equal angle positions. At each angle position sagittal T 2 ' weighted gradient echo sequences were performed. In relation to the neutral position a physiological narrowing of the ventral epidural space was seen in healthy volunteers at inclination (50 ) in up to 50% and respectively widening at reclination (30 ) in up to 10%. An increase of spinal canal stenosis or even spinal cord compression was seen at inclination in 5 patients (22%) and in 15 patients (65%) at reclination. No change of spinal canal stenosis was found in three patients (13%). (orig./MG) [de

  8. The value of MR and other methods in evaluation of cervical spondylosis; Wartosc badania MR i innych metod obrazowania w ocenie stopnia zaawansowania spondylozy szyjnej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopka, M.; Rejniak, I.; Kluczewska, E.; Baron, J.; Collie, D. [Pracownia Rezonansu Magnetycznego, Instytut Pediatrii w Budowie, Katowice (Poland) and Zaklad Diagnostyki Obrazowej, Centrum Medyczne Ksztalcenia Podyplomowego, Centralny Szpital Kliniczny, Warsaw-Miedzylesie (Poland) and Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    38 patients with clinical symptoms of myelopathy, radiculopathy and neck pain have undergone X-ray and MR examinations in order to estimate spinal canal and degenerative changes of cervical vertebral column. The correlation between degree of degenerative changes and myelopathy or radiculopathy or neck pain was established on MR. In patients with myelopathy advanced degeneration changes (2. and 3. degree) were observed more often than in radiculopathy and neck pain. Disorders of mobility and cervical spine instability were found in 50%. Focal changes with high signal on T2 images in cervical cord were found in 2 cases. (author) 17 refs, 4 figs , 7 tabs

  9. Comparative review of computed tomography of the spinal column and conventional x-ray films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, H.; Yamaura, A.; Horie, T.; Makino, H. (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-04-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) of the cervical spinal column was carried out in 39 patients using a GE.CT/T or Toshiba TCT60A scanner. There were 22 cervical disk lesions, 4 spinal neoplasms, 5 narrow spinal canals with or without ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, 2 syringomyelias, 5 traumas, and one Arnold-Chiari malformation. In all the patients, tomography was done after conventional spinal X-ray studies. The correlation between the CT findings and conventional X-ray films revealed the excellent capability of the CT. The measurement of the midline sagittal diameter of the spinal canal in the patient with the narrowest canal in this series showed 7.4 mm when done by CT and 9.6 mm when done by the conventional plain film at the C/sub 5/ level. To ascertain the precise sagittal diameter of the cord itself, CT myelography is indispensable after the intrathecal injection of metrizamide A; metrizamide CT myelogram is useful in determining the nature of the disease, the risk of and best approach to surgery, and the evaluation after a surgical procedure. Although the range of motion of cervical joints and intervertebral foramen are visible with the conventional films, the size of the spinal tumors, the degree of bony change, and the tumor extension to the paraspinal connective tissue can be precisely demonstrated only by CT. A CT study of the spine is a simple procedure and is less likely to produce complication, even with a metrizamide CT myelogram, though there are certain limitations in the examination.

  10. Laron syndrome abnormalities: spinal stenosis, os odontoideum, degenerative changes of the atlanto-odontoid joint, and small oropharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornreich, Liora; Horev, Gadi; Schwarz, Michael; Karmazyn, Boaz; Laron, Zvi

    2002-04-01

    Patients with Laron syndrome have an inborn growth hormone resistance. We investigated abnormalities in the upper airways and cervical spine in patients with Laron syndrome. We prospectively examined 11 patients (one child aged 9 years and 10 adults aged 36-68 years), 10 of whom underwent MR imaging of the spine or head; nine, radiography of the cervical spine; and four, CT of C1-C2. The width of the spinal canal was evaluated visually and quantitatively and compared with reference values. The smallest diameter of the oropharynx and the thickness of the palate were measured and compared with reference values. Nine age-matched female patients referred for MR imaging for unrelated reasons served as control subjects. Cervical spinal stenosis was present in seven of the adult patients, within a confidence interval of 95%. Anomaly of the dens compatible with os odontoideum was present in three patients, causing focal myelomalacia in two. The atlanto-odontoid joint showed osteoarthritic changes in six of the adult patients. The mediolateral diameter of the oropharynx was significantly smaller in the patients with Laron syndrome than in the control subjects (P Laron syndrome develop significant narrowing of the cervical spinal canal and early degenerative changes of the atlanto-odontoid joint. Laron syndrome is associated with os odontoideum causing myelomalacia. The dimensions of the oropharynx are small. Patients may be prone to neurologic morbidity and sleep disturbances. Routine MR imaging of the cervical spine is recommended in these patients.

  11. A PET/CT approach to spinal cord metabolism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, Cecilia [CNR Institute of Bioimages and Molecular Physiology, Milan, Section of Genoa (Italy); University of Genoa, Nuclear Medicine, IRCCS San Martino IST, and Depth of Health Science, Genoa (Italy); IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, CNR Institute of Bioimages and Molecular Physiology, Section of Genoa, C/o Nuclear Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Cistaro, Angelina; Fania, Piercarlo [Positron Emission Tomography Centre IRMET, Affidea, Turin (Italy); Campi, Cristina; Perasso, Annalisa; Massone, Anna Maria [SPIN Institute, CNR, Genoa (Italy); Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Canosa, Antonio; Cammarosano, Stefania; Chio, Adriano [University of Turin, ALS Center, ' ' Rita Levi Montalcini' ' Department of Neuroscience, Turin (Italy); AUO Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Turin (Italy); Caponnetto, Claudia; Nobili, Flavio Mariano; Novi, Giovanni; Scialo, Carlo; Mancardi, Gianluigi [IRCCS San Martino IST, Department of Neuroscience, Genoa (Italy); DINOGMI University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Beltrametti, Mauro C. [University of Genoa, Department of Mathematics (DIMA), Genoa (Italy); Buschiazzo, Ambra; Pomposelli, Elena; Morbelli, Silvia; Sambuceti, Gianmario [University of Genoa, Nuclear Medicine, IRCCS San Martino IST, and Depth of Health Science, Genoa (Italy); Bagnara, Maria Claudia [IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Medical Physics unit, Genoa (Italy); Bruzzi, Paolo [IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Statistics and Epidemiology Unit, Genoa (Italy); Piana, Michele [SPIN Institute, CNR, Genoa (Italy); University of Genoa, Department of Mathematics (DIMA), Genoa (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, functional alterations within the brain have been intensively assessed, while progression of lower motor neuron damage has scarcely been defined. The aim of the present study was to develop a computational method to systematically evaluate spinal cord metabolism as a tool to monitor disease mechanisms. A new computational three-dimensional method to extract the spinal cord from {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images was evaluated in 30 patients with spinal onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 30 controls. The algorithm identified the skeleton on the CT images by using an extension of the Hough transform and then extracted the spinal canal and the spinal cord. In these regions, {sup 18}F-FDG standardized uptake values were measured to estimate the metabolic activity of the spinal canal and cord. Measurements were performed in the cervical and dorsal spine and normalized to the corresponding value in the liver. Uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the spinal cord was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p < 0.05). By contrast, no significant differences were observed in spinal cord and spinal canal volumes between the two groups. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was completely independent of age, gender, degree of functional impairment, disease duration and riluzole treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a higher mortality rate in patients with standardized uptake values above the fifth decile at the 3-year follow-up evaluation (log-rank test, p < 0.01). The independence of this value was confirmed by multivariate Cox analysis. Our computational three-dimensional method enabled the evaluation of spinal cord metabolism and volume and might represent a potential new window onto the pathophysiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (orig.)

  12. A PET/CT approach to spinal cord metabolism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, Cecilia; Cistaro, Angelina; Fania, Piercarlo; Campi, Cristina; Perasso, Annalisa; Massone, Anna Maria; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Canosa, Antonio; Cammarosano, Stefania; Chio, Adriano; Caponnetto, Claudia; Nobili, Flavio Mariano; Novi, Giovanni; Scialo, Carlo; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Beltrametti, Mauro C.; Buschiazzo, Ambra; Pomposelli, Elena; Morbelli, Silvia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Bagnara, Maria Claudia; Bruzzi, Paolo; Piana, Michele

    2016-01-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, functional alterations within the brain have been intensively assessed, while progression of lower motor neuron damage has scarcely been defined. The aim of the present study was to develop a computational method to systematically evaluate spinal cord metabolism as a tool to monitor disease mechanisms. A new computational three-dimensional method to extract the spinal cord from 18 F-FDG PET/CT images was evaluated in 30 patients with spinal onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 30 controls. The algorithm identified the skeleton on the CT images by using an extension of the Hough transform and then extracted the spinal canal and the spinal cord. In these regions, 18 F-FDG standardized uptake values were measured to estimate the metabolic activity of the spinal canal and cord. Measurements were performed in the cervical and dorsal spine and normalized to the corresponding value in the liver. Uptake of 18 F-FDG in the spinal cord was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p < 0.05). By contrast, no significant differences were observed in spinal cord and spinal canal volumes between the two groups. 18 F-FDG uptake was completely independent of age, gender, degree of functional impairment, disease duration and riluzole treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a higher mortality rate in patients with standardized uptake values above the fifth decile at the 3-year follow-up evaluation (log-rank test, p < 0.01). The independence of this value was confirmed by multivariate Cox analysis. Our computational three-dimensional method enabled the evaluation of spinal cord metabolism and volume and might represent a potential new window onto the pathophysiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (orig.)

  13. Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal Centre: Experience at Enugu, Nigeria. ... The thoracic spine{9(41%)}was most often involved. ... Five (23%) patients with injury at cervical level died from respiratory failure.

  14. The relationship between cervical lordosis and Nurick scores in patients undergoing circumferential vs. posterior alone cervical decompression, instrumentation and fusion for treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shalin; Glivar, Phillip; Asgarzadie, Farbod; Cheng, David Juma Wayne; Danisa, Olumide

    2017-11-01

    The loss of regional cervical sagittal alignment and the progressive development of cervical kyphosis is a factor in the advancement of myelopathy. Adequate decompression of the spinal canal along with reestablishment of cervical lordosis are desired objective with regard to the surgical treatment of patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. A retrospective chart review was conducted in which patients who underwent either a combined anterior/posterior instrumentation and decompression or a posterior alone instrumentation and decompression for the treatment of CSM at our institution were identified. Any patient undergoing operative intervention for trauma, infection or tumors were excluded. Similarly, patients undergoing posterior instrumentation with constructs extending beyond the level of C2-C7 were similarly excluded from this study. A total of 67 patients met the inclusion criteria for this study. A total of 32 patients underwent posterior alone surgery and the remaining 35 underwent combined anterior/posterior procedure. Radiographic evaluation of patient's preoperative and postoperative cervical lordosis as measured by the C2-C7 Cobb angle was performed. Each patient's preoperative and postoperative functional disability as enumerated by the Nurick score was also recorded. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine if there was a significant relationship between improvement in cervical lordosis and improvement in patient's clinical outcomes as enumerated by the Nurick Score in patients undergoing posterior alone versus combined anterior/posterior decompression, instrumentation and fusion of the cervical spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diaphragmatic reinnervation in ventilator-dependent patients with cervical spinal cord injury and concomitant phrenic nerve lesions using simultaneous nerve transfers and implantable neurostimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Matthew R; Elkwood, Andrew I; Aboharb, Farid; Cece, John; Brown, David; Rezzadeh, Kameron; Jarrahy, Reza

    2015-06-01

    Patients who are ventilator dependent as a result of combined cervical spinal cord injury and phrenic nerve lesions are generally considered to be unsuitable candidates for diaphragmatic pacing due to loss of phrenic nerve integrity and denervation of the diaphragm. There is limited data regarding efficacy of simultaneous nerve transfers and diaphragmatic pacemakers in the treatment of this patient population. A retrospective review was conducted of 14 consecutive patients with combined lesions of the cervical spinal cord and phrenic nerves, and with complete ventilator dependence, who were treated with simultaneous microsurgical nerve transfer and implantation of diaphragmatic pacemakers. Parameters of interest included time to recovery of diaphragm electromyographic activity, average time pacing without the ventilator, and percent reduction in ventilator dependence. Recovery of diaphragm electromyographic activity was demonstrated in 13 of 14 (93%) patients. Eight of these 13 (62%) patients achieved sustainable periods (> 1 h/d) of ventilator weaning (mean = 10 h/d [n = 8]). Two patients recovered voluntary control of diaphragmatic activity and regained the capacity for spontaneous respiration. The one patient who did not exhibit diaphragmatic reinnervation remains within 12 months of initial treatment. Surgical intervention resulted in a 25% reduction (p nerve transfers and pacemaker implantation can result in reinnervation of the diaphragm and lead to successful ventilator weaning. Our favorable outcomes support consideration of this surgical method for appropriate patients who would otherwise have no alternative therapy to achieve sustained periods of ventilator independence. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Design of COSMIC: a randomized, multi-centre controlled trial comparing conservative or early surgical management of incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Ronald H M A; Hosman, Allard J F; van de Meent, Henk; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Vos, Pieter E; Slooff, Willem Bart; Öner, F Cumhur; Coppes, Maarten H; Peul, Wilco C; Verbeek, André L M

    2013-01-31

    Incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability is a very devastating event for the patient and the family. It is estimated that up to 25% of all traumatic spinal cord lesions belong to this category. The treatment for this type of spinal cord lesion is still subject of discussion. From a biological point of view early surgery could prevent secondary damage due to ongoing compression of the already damaged spinal cord. Historically, however, conservative treatment was propagated with good clinical results. Proponents for early surgery as well those favoring conservative treatment are still in debate. The proposed trial will contribute to the discussion and hopefully also to a decrease in the variability of clinical practice. A randomized controlled trial is designed to compare the clinical outcome of early surgical strategy versus a conservative approach. The primary outcome is clinical outcome according to mJOA. This also measured by ASIA score, DASH score and SCIM III score. Other endpoints are duration of the stay at a high care department (medium care, intensive care), duration of the stay at the hospital, complication rate, mortality rate, sort of rehabilitation, and quality of life. A sample size of 36 patients per group was calculated to reach a power of 95%. The data will be analyzed as intention-to-treat at regular intervals, but the end evaluation will take place at two years post-injury. At the end of the study, clinical outcomes between treatments attitudes can be compared. Efficacy, but also efficiency can be determined. A goal of the study is to determine which treatment will result in the best quality of life for the patients. This study will certainly contribute to more uniformity of treatment offered to patients with a special sort of spinal cord injury. Gov: NCT01367405.

  17. Design of COSMIC: a randomized, multi-centre controlled trial comparing conservative or early surgical management of incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartels Ronald HMA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability is a very devastating event for the patient and the family. It is estimated that up to 25% of all traumatic spinal cord lesions belong to this category. The treatment for this type of spinal cord lesion is still subject of discussion. From a biological point of view early surgery could prevent secondary damage due to ongoing compression of the already damaged spinal cord. Historically, however, conservative treatment was propagated with good clinical results. Proponents for early surgery as well those favoring conservative treatment are still in debate. The proposed trial will contribute to the discussion and hopefully also to a decrease in the variability of clinical practice. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial is designed to compare the clinical outcome of early surgical strategy versus a conservative approach. The primary outcome is clinical outcome according to mJOA. This also measured by ASIA score, DASH score and SCIM III score. Other endpoints are duration of the stay at a high care department (medium care, intensive care, duration of the stay at the hospital, complication rate, mortality rate, sort of rehabilitation, and quality of life. A sample size of 36 patients per group was calculated to reach a power of 95%. The data will be analyzed as intention-to-treat at regular intervals, but the end evaluation will take place at two years post-injury. Discussion At the end of the study, clinical outcomes between treatments attitudes can be compared. Efficacy, but also efficiency can be determined. A goal of the study is to determine which treatment will result in the best quality of life for the patients. This study will certainly contribute to more uniformity of treatment offered to patients with a special sort of spinal cord injury. Trial Registration Gov: NCT01367405

  18. Cervical MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bones and cartilage in the neck ( cervical spondylosis ) Abnormal results may also be due to: Bone ... Park AL. Degenerative disorders of the thoracic and lumbar spine. In: Azar FM, Beaty JH, Canale ST, ...

  19. Cervical spine injuries in American football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihn, Jeffrey A; Anderson, David T; Lamb, Kathleen; Deluca, Peter F; Bata, Ahmed; Marchetto, Paul A; Neves, Nuno; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2009-01-01

    American football is a high-energy contact sport that places players at risk for cervical spine injuries with potential neurological deficits. Advances in tackling and blocking techniques, rules of the game and medical care of the athlete have been made throughout the past few decades to minimize the risk of cervical injury and improve the management of injuries that do occur. Nonetheless, cervical spine injuries remain a serious concern in the game of American football. Injuries have a wide spectrum of severity. The relatively common 'stinger' is a neuropraxia of a cervical nerve root(s) or brachial plexus and represents a reversible peripheral nerve injury. Less common and more serious an injury, cervical cord neuropraxia is the clinical manifestation of neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord due to hyperextension, hyperflexion or axial loading. Recent data on American football suggest that approximately 0.2 per 100,000 participants at the high school level and 2 per 100,000 participants at the collegiate level are diagnosed with cervical cord neuropraxia. Characterized by temporary pain, paraesthesias and/or motor weakness in more than one extremity, there is a rapid and complete resolution of symptoms and a normal physical examination within 10 minutes to 48 hours after the initial injury. Stenosis of the spinal canal, whether congenital or acquired, is thought to predispose the athlete to cervical cord neuropraxia. Although quite rare, catastrophic neurological injury is a devastating entity referring to permanent neurological injury or death. The mechanism is most often a forced hyperflexion injury, as occurs when 'spear tackling'. The mean incidence of catastrophic neurological injury over the past 30 years has been approximately 0.5 per 100,000 participants at high school level and 1.5 per 100,000 at the collegiate level. This incidence has decreased significantly when compared with the incidence in the early 1970s. This decrease in the incidence of

  20. Sensitivity and specificity of the 'knee-up test' for estimation of the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale in patients with acute motor incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yugué, Itaru; Okada, Seiji; Maeda, Takeshi; Ueta, Takayoshi; Shiba, Keiichiro

    2018-04-01

    A retrospective study. Precise classification of the neurological state of patients with acute cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) can be challenging. This study proposed a useful and simple clinical method to help classify patients with incomplete CSCI. Spinal Injuries Centre, Japan. The sensitivity and specificity of the 'knee-up test' were evaluated in patients with acute CSCI classified as American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) C or D. The result is positive if the patient can lift the knee in one or both legs to an upright position, whereas the result is negative if the patient is unable to lift the knee in either leg to an upright position. The AIS of these patients was classified according to a strict computerised algorithm designed by Walden et al., and the knee-up test was tested by non-expert examiners. Among the 200 patients, 95 and 105 were classified as AIS C and AIS D, respectively. Overall, 126 and 74 patients demonstrated positive and negative results, respectively, when evaluated using the knee-up test. A total of 104 patients with positive results and 73 patients with negative results were classified as AIS D and AIS C, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values of this test for all patients were 99.1, 76.8, 82.5 and 98.7, respectively. The knee-up test may allow easy and highly accurate estimation, without the need for special skills, of AIS classification for patients with incomplete CSCI.

  1. Design of Lamifuse: a randomised, multi-centre controlled trial comparing laminectomy without or with dorsal fusion for cervical myeloradiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grotenhuis J André

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background laminectomy is a valuable surgical treatment for some patients with a cervical radiculomyelopathy due to cervical spinal stenosis. More recently attention has been given to motion of the spinal cord over spondylotic spurs as a cause of myelopathic changes. Immobilisation by fusion could have a positive effect on the recovery of myelopathic signs or changes. This has never been investigated in a prospective, randomised trial. Lamifuse is an acronyme for laminectomy and fusion. Methods/Design Lamifuse is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial comparing laminectomy with and without fusion in patients with a symptomatic cervical canal stenosis. The study population will be enrolled from patients that are 60 years or older with myelopathic signs and/or symptoms due to a cervical canal stenosis. A kyphotis shape of the cervical spine is an exclusion criterium. Each treatment arm needs 30 patients. Discussion This study will contribute to the discussion whether additional fusion after a cervical laminectomy results in a better clinical outcome. ISRCT number ISRCTN72800446

  2. Anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis of the cervical spine in cervical spondylotic myelopathy in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Motohiro; Tani, Toshikazu; Ushida, Takahiro; Ishida, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis of the cervical spine has received insufficient attention in contrast to that of the lumbar spine. The authors analyzed the functional significance of anterior and posterior degenerative spondylolisthesis (anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis) of the cervical spine to elucidate its role in the development of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) in the elderly. A total of 79 patients aged 65 or older who eventually had surgical treatment for CSM were evaluated radiographically. Altogether, 24 patients (30%) had displacement of 3.5 mm or more (severe spondylolisthesis group), 31 had displacement of 2.0-3.4 mm (moderate spondylolisthesis group), and 24 had less than 2.0 mm displacement (mild spondylolisthesis group). The severe spondylolisthesis group consisted of 14 patients with anterolisthesis (anterolisthesis group) and 10 patients with retrolisthesis (retrolisthesis group). Patients with severe spondylolisthesis had a high incidence (93%) of degenerative spondylolisthesis at C3/4 or C4/5 and significantly greater cervical mobility than those with mild spondylolisthesis. The anterolisthesis group, but not the retrolisthesis group, had a significantly wider spinal canal than the mild spondylolisthesis group, although the degree of horizontal displacement and cervical mobility did not differ significantly between the anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis groups. Severe cord compression seen on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and high-intensity spinal cord signals seen on T2-weighted MRI scans corresponded significantly to the levels of the spondylolisthesis. Degenerative spondylolisthesis is not a rare radiographic finding in elderly patients with CSM, which tends to cause intense cord compression that is seen on MRI scans. Greater mobility of the upper cervical segments may be a compensatory reaction for advanced disc degeneration of the lower cervical segments, leading to the development of degenerative

  3. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (