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Sample records for cervarix human papillomavirus

  1. HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) Cervarix - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® Vaccine Information Statement: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-cervarix.html . CDC review information for HPV Cervarix® ...

  2. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Cervarix)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes or ringing in the ears. Like all vaccines, HPV vaccines will continue to be monitored for unusual ... gov/std/hpv and http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines HPV Vaccine (Cervarix) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health ...

  3. HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) Cervarix - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes or ringing in the ears. Like all vaccines, HPV vaccines will continue to be monitored for unusual ... Vaccine information statement: HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix ® VIS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site. www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ...

  4. Comparison of the Immunogenicity and Reactogenicity of Cervarix and Gardasil Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in HIV-Infected Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Toft; Storgaard, Merete; Müller, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of Cervarix(®) or Gardasil(®) Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in HIV-infected adults.Methods. A double-blind, controlled trial randomizing HIV-positive adults to receive three doses of Cervarix(®) or Gardasil(®) at 0, 1.5 and 6 months.......Results. Ninety-two participants were included in the study. Anti-HPV-18 antibody titers were higher in the Cervarix(®) group compared with the Gardasil(®) group at 7 and 12 months. No significant differences in anti-HPV-16 antibody titers were found among vaccine groups. Among Cervarix(®) vaccinees, women had.......Conclusions. Both vaccines were immunogenic and well tolerated. Compared with Gardasil(®), Cervarix(®) induced superior vaccine responses among HIV-infected women whereas in HIV-infected men the difference in immunogenicity was less pronounced....

  5. Clinical application of human papillomavirus vaccines Gardasil and Cervarix%预防性人乳头瘤病毒疫苗Gardasil和Cervarix的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙琦琦; 夏和霞; 张炜

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the main cause of cervical cancer and anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. A bivalent vaccine Cervarix and a quadrivalent vaccine Gardasil have been applying in vaccination programs around the world. Some highly immunogenic, safe, and effective vaccines are now available to control HPV-related diseases with proven efifcacy against diseases at many anatomical sites, including the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, and penis ones. The data from pre-licensure and post-licensure studies have showed that both Cervarix and Gardasil are vaccines with high safety. However, there are some barriers in the promotion and application of HPV vaccination.%人乳头瘤病毒(human papillomavirus, HPV)感染可能导致宫颈癌、肛门生殖器癌和口咽癌。目前,已得到世界范围内应用的HPV疫苗主要有二价疫苗Cervarix和四价疫苗Gardasil。高免疫原性、安全、有效的HPV疫苗可预防和控制多个部位,包括宫颈、外阴、阴道、肛门和阴茎等的HPV感染相关疾病。上市前、后的研究都显示, Cervarix和Gardasil具有很高的安全性。但其推广应用也面临一些问题。

  6. A randomized, observer-blinded immunogenicity trial of Cervarix(® and Gardasil(® Human Papillomavirus vaccines in 12-15 year old girls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Draper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The current generation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccines, Cervarix® and Gardasil®, exhibit a high degree of efficacy in clinical trials against the two high-risk (HR genotypes represented in the vaccines (HPV16 and HPV18. High levels of neutralizing antibodies are elicited against the vaccine types, consistent with preclinical data showing that neutralizing antibodies can mediate type-specific protection in the absence of other immune effectors. The vaccines also confer protection against some closely related non-vaccine HR HPV types, although the vaccines appear to differ in their degree of cross-protection. The mechanism of vaccine-induced cross-protection is unknown. This study sought to compare the breadth and magnitudes of neutralizing antibodies against non-vaccine types elicited by both vaccines and establish whether such antibodies could be detected in the genital secretions of vaccinated individuals. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Serum and genital samples were collected from 12-15 year old girls following vaccination with either Cervarix® (n = 96 or Gardasil® (n = 102 HPV vaccine. Serum-neutralizing antibody responses against non-vaccine HPV types were broader and of higher magnitude in the Cervarix®, compared to the Gardasil®, vaccinated individuals. Levels of neutralizing and binding antibodies in genital secretions were closely associated with those found in the serum (r = 0.869, with Cervarix® having a median 2.5 (inter-quartile range, 1.7-3.5 fold higher geometric mean HPV-specific IgG ratio in serum and genital samples than Gardasil® (p = 0.0047. There was a strong positive association between cross-neutralizing antibody seropositivity and available HPV vaccine trial efficacy data against non-vaccine types. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate for the first time that cross-neutralizing antibodies can be detected at the genital site of infection and support the possibility that cross-neutralizing antibodies play a

  7. Comparison of the immunogenicity of Cervarix® and Gardasil® human papillomavirus vaccines for oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Toft; Tolstrup, Martin; Müller, Martin;

    2014-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have excess risk of developing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease. A substantial fraction of HPV-associated cancers is caused by HPV serotypes not included in the currently available vaccines. Among healthy women, both Cervarix......(®) (HPV-16/18, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, GSK) and Gardasil(®) (HPV-6/11/16/18, Merck) have demonstrated partial cross-protection against certain oncogenic non-vaccine HPV-types. Currently, there are no available data on vaccine-induced cross-protection in men and little is known about cross......-reactive immunity after HPV-vaccination of HIV-infected individuals. In an investigator-initiated trial, we randomized 91 HIV-positive men and women to receive vaccination with Cervarix(®) or Gardasil(®). The HPV-DNA status of the participants was determined with pcr before and after immunization. Cross...

  8. Cross-neutralizing antibodies elicited by the Cervarix® human papillomavirus vaccine display a range of Alpha-9 inter-type specificities ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Bissett, Sara L; Draper, Eve; Myers, Richard E.; Godi, Anna; Beddows, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The highly efficacious human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLP) representing genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, which together account for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases. Vaccine-type protection is thought to be mediated by high titer, type-specific neutralizing antibodies. The vaccines also confer a degree of cross-protection against some genetically-related types from the Alpha-9 (HPV16-like: HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58) and Alpha-7 (HPV18-like: HPV39...

  9. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Page Content Article Body According to ... Control and Prevention, there is an epidemic of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the United States. HPV is ...

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Overview–for health professionals Research Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines On This Page What are human papillomaviruses? Which cancers are caused by HPV? Who gets HPV infections? Can HPV infections be ...

  11. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You Human Papillomavirus Vaccine HPV Information in Other Languages Women ...

  12. DNA vaccines targeting human papillomavirus-associated diseases: progresses in animal and clinical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Kyusun Torque; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer and its precancerous diseases. Cervical cancer is the second deadliest cancer killer among women worldwide. Moreover, HPV is also known to be a causative agent of oral, pharyngeal, anal and genital cancer. Recent application of HPV structural protein (L1)-targeted prophylactic vaccines (Gardasil® and Cervarix®) is expected to reduce the incidence of HPV infection and cervical cancer, and possibly other HPV-associated can...

  13. Human papillomaviruses and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small oncogenic DNA viruses of which more than 200 types have been identified to date. A small subset of these is etiologically linked to the development of anogenital malignancies such as cervical cancer. In addition, recent studies established a causative relationship between these high-risk HPV types and tonsillar and oropharyngeal cancer. Clinical management of cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is largely standardized and involves surgical removal of the tumor tissue as well as adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Notably, the response to therapeutic intervention of HPV-positive HNSCCs has been found to be better as compared to HPV-negative tumors. Although the existing HPV vaccine is solely licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, it might also have prophylactic potential for the development of high-risk HPV-associated HNSCCs. Another group of viruses, which belongs to the beta-HPV subgroup, has been implicated in nonmelanoma skin cancer, however, the etiology remains to be established. Treatment of HPV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is based on local excision. However, topically applied immune-modulating substances represent non-surgical alternatives for the management of smaller cutaneous tumors. In this review we present the current knowledge of the role of HPV in cancer development and discuss clinical management options as well as targets for the development of future intervention therapies

  14. Human papillomavirus gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the role of tissue differentiation on expression of each of the papillomavirus mRNA species identified by electron microscopy, the authors prepared exon-specific RNA probes that could distinguish the alternatively spliced mRNA species. Radioactively labeled single-stranded RNA probes were generated from a dual promoter vector system and individually hybridized to adjacent serial sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies of condylomata. Autoradiography showed that each of the message species had a characteristic tissue distribution and relative abundance. The authors have characterized a portion of the regulatory network of the HPVs by showing that the E2 ORF encodes a trans-acting enhancer-stimulating protein, as it does in BPV-1 (Spalholz et al. 1985). The HPV-11 enhancer was mapped to a 150-bp tract near the 3' end of the URR. Portions of this region are duplicated in some aggressive strains of HPV-6 (Boshart and zur Hausen 1986; Rando et al. 1986). To test the possible biological relevance of these duplications, they cloned tandem arrays of the enhancer and demonstrated, using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assay, that they led to dramatically increased transcription proportional to copy number. Using the CAT assays, the authors found that the E2 proteins of several papillomavirus types can cross-stimulate the enhancers of most other types. This suggests that prior infection of a tissue with one papillomavirus type may provide a helper effect for superinfection and might account fo the HPV-6/HPV-16 coinfections in condylomata that they have observed

  15. Human papillomavirus and genital cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rapose Alwyn

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections world-wide. Low-risk HPV-types are associated with genital warts. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV-types is associated with genital cancers. Smoking and HIV infection have consistently been associated with longer duration of HPV infection and risk for genital cancer. There is an increasing incidence of anal cancers, and a close association with HPV infection has been demonstrated. Receptive anal sex an...

  16. Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    D. Jenkins(University of York, UK)

    2003-01-01

    Of the many types of human papillomavirus (HPV), more than 30 infect the genital tract. The association between certain oncogenic (high-risk) strains of HPV and cervical cancer is well established. Although HPV is essential to the transformation of cervical epithelial cells, it is not sufficient, and a variety of cofactors and molecular events influence whether cervical cancer will develop. Early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions can prevent progression to cervical cancer. Ident...

  17. Human Papillomavirus, Condylomata Acuminata, and Anal Neoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, George J.; Welton, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is an increasingly common sexually transmitted disease. This virus causes condylomata acuminata and is associated with anal neoplasia. Management options are discussed.

  18. [Human papillomavirus infection and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam Soto, Selene; de la Peña y Carranza, Alejandro Ortiz; Plascencia, Josefina Lira

    2011-04-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus has increased dramatically in recent years. The highest prevalence rates are among adolescents and young women, reflecting changes in sexual behavior associated with biological factors in adolescent development. Adolescents who begin sexual activity early are at greater risk of precursor lesions and cervical cancer. There are adolescents with special circumstances, where no early decision should be delayed cervical cytology and in whom it is important to initiate consultations and periodic reviews with a preventive approach. Cervical cancer can be avoided when the diagnosis and treatment of precursor lesions is early. Despite efforts at sex education based on "safe sex" with the correct use of condoms has not been able to reduce the incidence of infections with human papillomavirus in adolescents. While better than nothing, condom use is not 100% reliable. Studies show that consistent and correct use provides protection against the human papillomavirus only 70%. In Mexico, reported an overall ratio of actual use of condoms from 24.6%. It is clear that the physician who provides care for adolescents plays a fundamental role in sex education. The key to future prevention of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions could be the vaccination. PMID:21966809

  19. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: State of the Art and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rizzitelli, Emanuela; Tramalloni, Daniela; Valle, Ivana; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a widely distributed and common virus, that causes benign lesions (such as warts and papillomas) but, if not cleared, can lead to malignant lesions as well, such as intraepithelial lesions and neoplasia. An extensive body of researches has demonstrated that E1 and E2 are involved in viral transcription and replication, E5, E6, and E7 act as oncoproteins, whilst L1 and L2 contribute to the formation of the capsid. However, this view has been recently challenged, since also E2 could play a role in HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Therefore, a complex picture is emerging, opening new ways and perspectives. The present article provides an overview of the biology of HPV, paying particular attention to its structural details and molecular mechanisms. The article also shows how this knowledge has been exploited for developing effective vaccines, both prophilactic/preventive and therapeutic ones. L1-based prophylactic vaccines, like Gardasil, Cervarix, and Gardasil 9, have been already licensed, whilst L2-based second generation preventive vaccines are still under clinical trials. New, highly immunogenic and effective vaccines can be further developed thanks to computer-aided design and bioinformatics/computational biology. The optimization of combinational therapies is another promising opportunity. PMID:26572981

  20. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, Aranka; Boşca, Bianca; Miclăuş, Viorel; Rus, Vasile; Băbţan, Anida Maria; Mesaros, Anca; Crişan, Bogdan; Câmpian, Radu Septimiu

    2016-02-01

    Oral human papillomavirus infection is rare in children, but the presence of a villous lesion with slow but continuous growth concerns parents, who need information and therapeutic solutions from the physician. All these aspects are discussed based on a case report of a 9-year-old child with an oral human papillomavirus infection. PMID:26588443

  1. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Gardasil-9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccinated?Gardasil-9 prevents many cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, including:cervical cancer in females ... 9) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National ...

  2. Epigenetics of human papillomaviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human papilllomaviruses (HPVs) are common human pathogens that infect cutaneous or mucosal epithelia in which they cause warts, self-contained benign lesions that commonly regress. The HPV life cycle is intricately tied to the differentiation of the host epithelium it infects. Mucosotropic HPVs are the most common sexually transmitted pathogen known to mankind. A subset of the mucosotropic HPVs, so-called high risk HPVs, is etiologically associated with numerous cancers of the anogenital tract, most notably the cervix, as well as a growing fraction of head and neck cancers. In these cancers, the HPV genome, which normally exists an a double stranded, circular, nuclear plasmid, is commonly found integrated into the host genome and expresses two viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, that are implicated in the development and maintainance of the cancers caused by these high risk HPVs. Numerous studies, primarily on the high risk HPV16, have documented that the methylation status of the viral genome changes not only in the context of the viral life cycle but also in the context of the progressive neoplastic disease that culminates in cancer. In this article, we summarize the knowledge gained from those studies. We also provide the first analysis of available ChIP-seq data on the occupancy of both epigentically modified histones as well as transcription factors on the high risk HPV18 genome in the context of HeLa cells, a cervical cancer-derived cell line that has been the subject of extensive analyses using this technique. - Highlights: • Methylation status of HPV genomes is dynamic. • Changes are seen in both the viral life cycle and neoplasia. • Histone modification status at LCR is predictive of transcription factor occupancy. • Novel transcription factor binding noted by ChIP-seq

  3. Epigenetics of human papillomaviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannsen, Eric [Department of Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lambert, Paul F., E-mail: plambert@wisc.edu [Department of Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Human papilllomaviruses (HPVs) are common human pathogens that infect cutaneous or mucosal epithelia in which they cause warts, self-contained benign lesions that commonly regress. The HPV life cycle is intricately tied to the differentiation of the host epithelium it infects. Mucosotropic HPVs are the most common sexually transmitted pathogen known to mankind. A subset of the mucosotropic HPVs, so-called high risk HPVs, is etiologically associated with numerous cancers of the anogenital tract, most notably the cervix, as well as a growing fraction of head and neck cancers. In these cancers, the HPV genome, which normally exists an a double stranded, circular, nuclear plasmid, is commonly found integrated into the host genome and expresses two viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, that are implicated in the development and maintainance of the cancers caused by these high risk HPVs. Numerous studies, primarily on the high risk HPV16, have documented that the methylation status of the viral genome changes not only in the context of the viral life cycle but also in the context of the progressive neoplastic disease that culminates in cancer. In this article, we summarize the knowledge gained from those studies. We also provide the first analysis of available ChIP-seq data on the occupancy of both epigentically modified histones as well as transcription factors on the high risk HPV18 genome in the context of HeLa cells, a cervical cancer-derived cell line that has been the subject of extensive analyses using this technique. - Highlights: • Methylation status of HPV genomes is dynamic. • Changes are seen in both the viral life cycle and neoplasia. • Histone modification status at LCR is predictive of transcription factor occupancy. • Novel transcription factor binding noted by ChIP-seq.

  4. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte Møller;

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four...... assays. Positive agreement between the assays was measured as the conditional probability that the results of all compared assays were positive given that at least one assay returned a positive result. Of all 5,064 samples, 1,679 (33.2%) tested positive on at least one of the assays. Among these, 41......-65 years (n = 2,881), 23% tested positive on at least one assay, and 42 to 58% of these showed positive agreement on any compared pair of the assays. While 4% of primary screening samples showed abnormal cytology, 6 to 10% were discordant on any pair of assays. A literature review corroborated our findings...

  5. Human papillomavirus and genital cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapose Alwyn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections world-wide. Low-risk HPV-types are associated with genital warts. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV-types is associated with genital cancers. Smoking and HIV infection have consistently been associated with longer duration of HPV infection and risk for genital cancer. There is an increasing incidence of anal cancers, and a close association with HPV infection has been demonstrated. Receptive anal sex and HIV-positive status are associated with a high risk for anal cancer. Two HPV vaccines are now available and offer protection from infection by the HPV-types included in the vaccine. This benefit is maximally seen in young women who were uninfected prior to vaccination.

  6. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  7. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  8. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  9. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV We provide this video in a variety of ... not possible without a visit to your doctor. Immunizations stop disease from spreading. Check with your family ...

  10. The epidemiology of genital human papillomavirus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Trottier, Helen; Franco, Eduardo L.

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: cancer epidemiology;complications;Canada;epidemiology;Evaluation;Female;Genital Diseases,Female;Humans;Incidence;lifestyle modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Papillomaviridae;Papillomavirus Infections;Risk Factors;Uterine Cervical Neoplasms;virology.

  11. Post-licensure safety surveillance for human papillomavirus-16/18-AS04-adjuvanted vaccine: more than 4 years of experience

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo, Maria-Genalin; Zima, Julia; Tavares Da Silva, Fernanda; Baril, Laurence; Arellano, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To summarise post-licensure safety surveillance over more than 4 years of routine use of the human papillomavirus-16/18-AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (HPV-16/18 vaccine: Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium). Methods We describe global post-licensure passive surveillance data based on routine pharmacovigilance from 18 May 2007 until 17 November 2011 and enhanced surveillance implemented during the 2-year national immunisation programme in the UK (school years 2008–2010). Results Spontaneous ...

  12. A Novel Pre-Clinical Murine Model to Study the Life Cycle and Progression of Cervical and Anal Papillomavirus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R.; Balogh, Karla K.; Timothy K Cooper; Jiafen Hu; Christensen, Neil D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Papillomavirus disease and associated cancers remain a significant health burden in much of the world. The current protective vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, are expensive and not readily available to the underprivileged. In addition, the vaccines have not gained wide acceptance in the United States nor do they provide therapeutic value. Papillomaviruses are strictly species specific and thus human viruses cannot be studied in an animal host. An appropriate model for mucosal disea...

  13. Human papillomavirus in amniotic fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swan David C

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence to suggest that human papillomavirus (HPV can cross the placenta resulting in in-utero transmission. The goal of this study was to determine if HPV can be detected in amniotic fluid from women with intact amniotic membranes. Methods Residual amniotic fluid and cultured cell pellets from amniocentesis performed for prenatal diagnosis were used. PGMY09/11 L1 consensus primers and GP5+/GP6+ primers were used in a nested polymerase chain reaction assay for HPV. Results There were 146 paired samples from 142 women representing 139 singleton pregnancies, 2 twin pregnancies, and 1 triplet pregnancy. The women were 78% Caucasian, 5% African American, 14% Asian, and 2% Hispanic. The average age was 35.2 years with a range of 23–55 years. All samples were β-globin positive. HPV was not detected in any of the paired samples. Conclusion Given the age range, race, and ethnicity of the study population, one would anticipate some evidence of HPV if it could easily cross the placenta, but there was none.

  14. Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Amrita

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Papillomavirus vaccines are widely hailed as a sweeping pharmaceutical innovation for the universal benefit of all women. The implementation of the vaccines, however, is far from universal or equitable. Socio-economically marginalized women in emerging and developing, and many advanced economies alike, suffer a disproportionately large burden of cervical cancer. Despite the marketing of Human Papillomavirus vaccines as the solution to cervical cancer, the market authorization (licensing of the vaccines has not translated into universal equitable access. Vaccine implementation for vulnerable girls and women faces multiple barriers that include high vaccine costs, inadequate delivery infrastructure, and lack of community engagement to generate awareness about cervical cancer and early screening tools. For Human Papillomavirus vaccines to work as a public health solution, the quality-assured delivery of cheaper vaccines must be integrated with strengthened capacity for community-based health education and screening.

  15. Subclinical human papillomavirus infection of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective study to investigate a group of Iraqi woman with proved genital vulval warts, to seek evidence of human papillomavirus infection in apparently normal looking cervixes and to investigate the natural history of infection. From December 1997 to August 1998, 20 women with vulval warts were enrolled along with 20 aged-matched control cases without warts. Their ages ranged between 19-48 years with a mean of 30.4 years, (+/- standard deviation = 2.3) for patients and 18-48 years with a mean of 29.7 (+/- standard deviation = 2.7) for the control group. General and gynecological examinations were carried out. Cervical swabs for associated genital infection, papilloma smears, speculoscopy and directed punch biopsies were carried out to detect subclinical human papillomavirus infections of the cervix and associated intraepithelial neoplasm. Cytology results showed that 11 (55%) of patients had evidence of cervical infection by human papillomavirus, 6 (30%) showed mild dysplastic changes, 3 (15%) showed moderate dysplastic changes, whilst 2 (10%) showed no dysplastic changes. Speculoscopy and acetowhitening was positive in 11 (55%) and collated histological results showed evidence of human papillomavirus infection in 9 patients (45%). As for the control group one case (5%) had evidence of human papillomavirus infection. Subclinical human papillomavirus infection is more common than was previously thought among Iraqi women. It may appear alone or in association with vulval or exophytic cervical warts, or both, and may be more common than the clinically obvious disease. Speculoscopy as an adjunctive method to colposcopy was found to be a simple and an easy to perform technique. Its combination with cytology gave relatively good results when it was used as a triage instrument, and may have a more promising performance in the future. (author)

  16. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Svahn, Malene Frøsig; Faber, Mette Tuxen; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Junge, Jette; Norrild, Bodil; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2014-01-01

    HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer.......HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer....

  17. Human Papillomavirus and Ano-genital Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Pellino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Papillomaviruses (HPV are responsible of a widespectrum of diseases, from warts to carcinoma. The incidence ofHPV infection is increasing during time. We are used to considerthe disease as a “female matter”; however, once the burdenof disease is carefully observed in men, a few considerationsconcerning screening and prophylactic approaches to male subjectsmay be wise.

  18. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  19. Screening for human papillomavirus: is urine useful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Hauwers, K.W.M.; Tjalma, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk Human papillomavirus (hr-HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, and 45) is the main risk factor for developing malignant genital lesions. Screening methods and follow-up schedules for cervical cancer are well known. A golden standard to screen and monitor men does not exist yet, bec

  20. Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosa Garbuglia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is currently considered to be a major etiologic factor, in addition to tobacco and alcohol, for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC development. HPV positive OPCs are epidemiologically distinct from HPV negative ones, and are characterized by younger age at onset, male predominance, and strong association with sexual behaviors. HPV16 is the most prevalent types in oral cavity cancer (OCC, moreover the prevalence of beta, and gamma HPV types is higher than that of alpha HPV in oral cavity.

  1. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Jong; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien Fu

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:27329199

  2. [Infection therapeutic modalities in human papillomavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Pacheco, Adia; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino; Hernández Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genital it can infect any mucous of the body and to cause cancer of the uterine cervix. Until recently specific treatments did not exist on this infection, for what had to destroy or to remove the injured tissue by diverse procedures, what could have obstetric repercussions in young women. Recently some surgical modalities and topical drugs have arisen, as well as of systemic employment that allow to arrive to the lesions difficult to approach, and have demonstrated good effectiveness to cure the infection for HPV, for what an analysis of the medical treatment of this infection type is made. PMID:23427640

  3. Human papillomavirus testing in cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Philip E; Cremer, Miriam

    2013-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is more reliable and sensitive but less specific than Papanicolaou (Pap) testing/cervical cytology for the detection of cervical precancer and cancer. HPV-negative women are at lower risk of cervical cancer than Pap-negative women. In high-resource settings, HPV testing can be used to make cervical cancer prevention programs more efficient by focusing clinical attention on women who have HPV. In lower-resource settings, where Pap testing has not been sustained or widespread, new, lower-cost HPV tests may make cervical cancer screening feasible. PMID:23732037

  4. Vaccines and immunization against human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Neil D; Budgeon, Lynn R

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic immunization strategies are an effective method to control human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated diseases and cancers. Current protective virus-like particle and capsid-based vaccines are highly protective against vaccine-matched HPV types, and continued improvements in second-generation vaccines will lead to broader protection and cross-protection against the cancer-associated types. Increasing the effectiveness of broadly cross-protective L2-based immunogens will require adjuvants that activate innate immunity to thus enhance adaptive immunity. Therapeutic immunization strategies are needed to control and cure clinical disease and HPV-associated cancers. Significant advances in strategies to improve induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV early (and capsid) proteins have been pretested in preclinical animal papillomavirus models. Several of these effective protocols have translated into successful therapeutic immune-mediated clearance of clinical lesions. Nevertheless, there are significant challenges in activating immunity to cancer-associated lesions due to various immune downregulatory events that are triggered by persistent HPV infections. A better understanding of immune responses to HPV lesions in situ is needed to optimize immune effector T cells that efficiently locate to sites of infection and which should lead to an effective immunotherapeutic management of this important human viral pathogen. The most effective immunization strategy may well require combination antiviral and immunotherapeutic treatments to achieve complete clearance of HPV infections and associated cancers. PMID:24643192

  5. Focal Cortical Dysplasia Type IIB and Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA tested the hypothesis that human papillomavirus type 16 oncoprotein E6 (HPV16 E6 is present in human focal cortical dysplasia type IIB (FCDIIB specimens.

  6. Knowledge of human papillomavirus and the human papillomavirus vaccine in European adolescents: a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, H; Jeve, YB; Sherman, SM; Moss, EL

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is recommended for adolescent girls in many European countries, however there is huge variation in vaccine uptake. METHODS: A mixed methods systematic review to ascertain the level of HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge that exists among European adolescents. Two electronic databases, Ovid Medline and PsychInfo, were searched from origin to September 2014. Meta-analysis was performed for the two primary outcome measures ('have you heard of HPV?' an...

  7. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuovo, G.J. (Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (USA)); Pedemonte, B.M. (Harlem Hospital Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  8. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion

  9. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil Vaccine - What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine - Gardasil® Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-gardasil.html . CDC review information for HPV Gardasil® ...

  10. Reduced dose human papillomavirus vaccination: an update of the current state-of-the-art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Zheng Quan; Licciardi, Paul V; Fong, James; Garland, Suzanne M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Russell, Fiona M; Mulholland, Edward K

    2015-09-22

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the primary cause of genital warts, some oropharyngeal cancers and anogenital cancers, including cervical, vagina, vulvar, anal and penile cancers. Primary prevention of cervical cancer requires the prevention of high-risk HPV infections, particularly HPV genotypes 16 and 18. Both Gardasil® and Cervarix® vaccines when administered by a three-dose schedule have been demonstrated to be effective against cervical, vulva, and vaginal cancer precursors from vaccine genotypes in phase III clinical trials, and post-marketing studies; Gardasil® vaccine also offers additional protection against anal cancer precursors. However, high costs of HPV vaccines and the logistics of delivering a three-dose schedule over 6 months are challenging in countries with limited resources. Several studies have demonstrated non-inferiority in antibody response between adolescents (9-15 years old) who received two doses (6 months apart) and women (>15 years old) who received the standard three-dose schedule. These studies provided evidence for the World Health Organization and European Medical Association to revise its recommendation to give two instead of three doses of HPV vaccine to adolescents below 15 years of age, provided the 2nd dose is given 6 months apart. Although reduced dose schedules can alleviate costs and logistics associated with HPV vaccination, especially in resource-poor countries, there are still gaps in this area of research, particularly regarding long-term protection. This review discusses the findings on antibody response and clinical outcomes in studies evaluating reduced dose HPV schedules, and highlights the important considerations of its implementation. In addition, other important immunological biomarkers that may be associated with long-term protection are highlighted and discussed. PMID:26271829

  11. Searching for antiviral drugs for human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, M R; Shewchuk, L M; Hassell, A M; Phelps, W C

    2000-12-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are ubiquitous human pathogens that cause a wide variety of benign and pre-malignant epithelial tumours. Of the almost 100 different types of HPV that have been characterized to date, approximately two dozen specifically infect genital and oral mucosa. Mucosal HPVs are most frequently sexually transmitted and, with an incidence roughly twice that of herpes simplex virus infection, are considered one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases throughout the world. A subset of genital HPVs, termed 'high-risk' HPVs, is highly associated with the development of genital cancers including cervical carcinoma. The absence of a simple monolayer cell culture system for analysis and propagation of the virus has substantially retarded progress in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for HPV infection. In spite of these difficulties, great progress has been made in the elucidation of the molecular controls of virus gene expression, replication and pathogenesis. With this knowledge and some important new tools, there is great potential for the development of improved diagnostic and prognostic tests, prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, and traditional antiviral medicines. PMID:11142617

  12. Role and uptake of human papillomavirus vaccine in adolescent health in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudenga SL

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Staci L Sudenga, Kathryn E Royse, Sadeep ShresthaDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Both the prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines, Gardasil® and Cervarix®, are licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer in females, and Gardasil is also licensed for the prevention of genital warts and anal cancer in both males and females. This review focuses on the uptake of these vaccines in adolescent males and females in the USA and the barriers associated with vaccine initiation and completion. In the USA in 2009, approximately 44.3% of adolescent females aged 13–17 years had received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine, but only 26.7% had received all three doses. In general, the Northeast and Midwest regions of the USA have the highest rates of HPV vaccine initiation in adolescent females, while the Southeast has the lowest rates of vaccine initiation. Uptake of the first dose of the HPV vaccine in adolescent females did not vary by race/ethnicity; however, completion of all three doses is lower among African Americans (23.1% and Latinos (23.4% compared with Caucasians (29.3%. At present, vaccination rates among adolescent females are lower than expected, and thus vaccine models suggest that it is more cost-effective to vaccinate both adolescent males and females. Current guidelines for HPV vaccination in adolescent males is recommended only for “permissive use,” which leaves this population out of routine vaccination for HPV. The uptake of the vaccine is challenged by the high cost, feasibility, and logistics of three-dose deliveries. The biggest impact on acceptability of the vaccine is by adolescents, physicians, parents, and the community. Future efforts need to focus on HPV vaccine education among adolescents and decreasing the barriers associated with poor vaccine uptake and completion in adolescents before their sexual debut, but Papanicolau

  13. An update on oral human papillomavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit H Bharti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV constitutes the majority of newly acquired sexually transmitted infections (STIs in United States as per the centers for disease control factsheet 2013. Genital HPV is the most common STI with incidence of about 5.5 million world-wide, nearly 75% of sexually active men and women have been exposed to HPV at some point in their lives. Oral Sexual behavior is an important contributor to infection of HPV in the oral mucosa especially in cases known to practice high risk behavior and initiating the same at an early age. HPV infection of the oral mucosa currents is believed to affect 1-50% of the general population, depending on the method used for diagnosis. The immune system clears most HPV naturally within 2 years (about 90%, but the ones that persist can cause serious diseases. HPV is an essential carcinogen being implicated increasingly in association with cancers occurring at numerous sites in the body. Though there does not occur any specific treatment for the HPV infection, the diseases it causes are treatable such as genital warts, cervical and other cancers.

  14. Human Papillomavirus Laboratory Testing: the Changing Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Eileen M

    2016-04-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause essentially all cervical cancers, most anal and oropharyngeal cancers, and some vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of infection and the availability of newer tests are changing the approach to screening and diagnosis. Molecular tests to detect DNA from the most common high-risk HPVs are FDA approved for use in conjunction with cytology in cervical cancer screening programs. More-specific tests that detect RNA from high-risk HPV types are now also available. The use of molecular tests as the primary screening tests is being adopted in some areas. Genotyping to identify HPV16 and -18 has a recommended role in triaging patients for colposcopy who are high-risk HPV positive but have normal cytology. There are currently no recommended screening methods for anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile, or oropharyngeal HPV infections. HPV testing has limited utility in patients at high risk for anal cancer, but p16 immunohistochemistry is recommended to clarify lesions in tissue biopsy specimens that show moderate dysplasia or precancer mimics. HPV testing is recommended for oropharyngeal squamous cell tumors as a prognostic indicator. Ongoing research will help to improve the content of future guidelines for screening and diagnostic testing. PMID:26912568

  15. Progress in prophylactic vaccines for human papillomavirus%预防性人乳头瘤病毒疫苗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴浩飞; 周红星

    2014-01-01

    Part of the high risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are transmitted by sexual contact and lead to cervical,anal and other cancers.Two HPV vaccines,Gardasil quadrivalent vaccine and Cervarix bivalent vaccine,have been approved by FDA.Both vaccines have been widely used,but have not yet entered China.Researchers are committed to developing low-cost and broad-spectrum protective second-generation vaccines.This review focuses on current progress in development of the next generation prophylactic HPV vaccines.%部分高危型人乳头瘤病毒(human papillomavirus,HPV)经性接触传播,可导致宫颈及肛门等部位的恶性肿瘤.默克公司的Gardasil四价疫苗和葛兰素史克公司的Cervarix二价疫苗已被美国FDA批准上市,在世界范围内广泛应用,但尚未在中国上市.目前研究者正致力于开发保护覆盖面广、价格低廉的第二代疫苗.此文重点介绍国内外第二代预防性疫苗的研究进展.

  16. Human papillomavirus and HPV vaccines: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FT Cutts

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer, the most common cancer affecting women in developing countries, is caused by persistent infection with "high-risk" genotypes of human papillomaviruses (HPV. The most common oncogenic HPV genotypes are 16 and 18, causing approximately 70% of all cervical cancers. Types 6 and 11 do not contribute to the incidence of high-grade dysplasias (precancerous lesions or cervical cancer, but do cause laryngeal papillomas and most genital warts. HPV is highly transmissible, with peak incidence soon after the onset of sexual activity. A quadrivalent (types 6, 11, 16 and 18 HPV vaccine has recently been licensed in several countries following the determination that it has an acceptable benefit/risk profile. In large phase III trials, the vaccine prevented 100% of moderate and severe precancerous cervical lesions associated with types 16 or 18 among women with no previous infection with these types. A bivalent (types 16 and 18 vaccine has also undergone extensive evaluation and been licensed in at least one country. Both vaccines are prepared from non-infectious, DNA-free virus-like particles produced by recombinant technology and combined with an adjuvant. With three doses administered, they induce high levels of serum antibodies in virtually all vaccinated individuals. In women who have no evidence of past or current infection with the HPV genotypes in the vaccine, both vaccines show > 90% protection against persistent HPV infection for up to 5 years after vaccination, which is the longest reported follow-up so far. Vaccinating at an age before females are exposed to HPV would have the greatest impact. Since HPV vaccines do not eliminate the risk of cervical cancer, cervical screening will still be required to minimize cancer incidence. Tiered pricing for HPV vaccines, innovative financing mechanisms and multidisciplinary partnerships will be essential in order for the vaccines to reach populations in greatest need.

  17. Screening for human papillomavirus: Is urine useful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D′Hauwers K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with high-risk Human papillomavirus (hr-HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 is the main risk factor for developing malignant genital lesions. Screening methods and follow-up schedules for cervical cancer are well known. A golden standard to screen and monitor men does not exist yet, because HPV-related, life threatening malignancies in men are rare. The importance of male HPV screening lies mainly in HPV vaccination. Young females are the target group for HPV, but men are considered to be the reservoir for HPV and to have a role in the perpetuation of the infection in the general population. We looked at the usefulness of urine as a tool for HPV screening. Pubmed was searched with the words ′′HPV′′, ′′Urine,′′ and ′′HPV-DNA′′. The chance of finding HPV-DNA in urine is higher in men with lesions in the urethra than outside the urethra, and in women with abnormal cervical cytology. In general, the results of testing urine for HPV-DNA are better for women than for men, probably because of the anatomical position of the urethra to the vagina, vulva, and cervix. In both genders, urine HPV prevalence is higher in HIV pos patients and in high-risk populations. Urine, to screen asymptomatic low-risk-profile (women seems less useful because their urine samples are often inadequate. If urine proves to be the best medium to screen, a low-risk population remains controversial.

  18. Prevalence of Genital Human Papillomavirus among Men in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebnes, Julie B; Olesen, Tina B; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the commonest sexually transmitted infection worldwide and causes substantial morbidity in both sexes. Most European countries offer HPV vaccination for girls, but vaccine recommendations for boys are warranted. AIMS: The aims of this study were to...... contribute knowledge that may be useful as a baseline measure before the introduction of HPV vaccination for boys in Europe, and add to understanding of the epidemiology of HPV infection in men. Hebnes JB, Olesen TB, Duun-Henriksen AK, Munk C, Norrild B, and Kjaer SK. Prevalence of genital human...... papillomavirus among men in Europe: Systematic review and meta-analysis. J Sex Med **;**:**-**....

  19. Life Cycle Heterogeneity in Animal Models of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Peh, Woei Ling; Middleton, Kate; Christensen, Neil; Nicholls, Philip; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Sotlar, Karl; Brandsma, Janet; Percival, Alan; Lewis, Jon; Liu, Wen Jun; Doorbar, John

    2002-01-01

    Animal papillomaviruses are widely used as models to study papillomavirus infection in humans despite differences in genome organization and tissue tropism. Here, we have investigated the extent to which animal models of papillomavirus infection resemble human disease by comparing the life cycles of 10 different papillomavirus types. Three phases in the life cycles of all viruses were apparent using antibodies that distinguish between early events, the onset of viral genome amplification, and...

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of human papillomavirus-16/18AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in healthy Chinese females aged 15 to 45 years: a phase I trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-Cai Zhu; Chang-Gui Li; Hong-Xing Pan; Yi-Ju Zhang; Dan Bi; Hai-Wen Tang; Sanjoy Datta

    2011-01-01

    Globally,about 70% of cervical cancers are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 or HPV-18 infection. A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies in China showed that HPV was present in 98% of cervical cancer samples. The HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine Cervarix(R)* has shown a high level of protection against HPV-16/18 infections and associated cervical lesions. This phase I trial (NCT00549900)assessed the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of the vaccine in Chinese. Thirty healthy Chinese females, aged 15 to 45 years with a median age of 29.5 years, received three doses of Cervarix(R) in Months 0, 1, and 6. Safety was assessed via recording solicited local and systemic symptoms within 7days and unsolicited symptoms within 30 days after each vaccination. Serious adverse events, new onset of chronic diseases, and other medically significant conditions were recorded throughout this trial. As an exploratory objective, HPV-16/18 antibody titers were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum samples collected in Months 0 and 7. Pain at the injection site was the most frequently reported local symptom. Two subjects reported medically significant adverse events. Both cases were assessed as unrelated to vaccination by the investigator. In Month 7, 100% seroconversion was observed for both anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18 with high geometric mean antibody titers. HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine,evaluated for the first time in Chinese females, was generally well tolerated and immunogenic, as previously shown in global studies.

  1. Model systems of human papillomavirus-associated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorbar, John

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a range of serious diseases, including the vast majority of cervical cancers, most anal cancers and around half of head and neck cancers. They are also responsible for troublesome benign epithelial lesions, including genital warts and laryngeal papillomas, and in some individuals HPVs lead to recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and other difficult-to-manage diseases. As a result, there is a great need for model systems that accurately mimic papillomavirus infections in humans. This is complicated by the diverse variety of HPVs, which now number over 200 types, and the different strategies they have evolved to persist in the population. The most well-developed models involve the culture of HPV-containing keratinocytes in organotypic raft culture, an approach which appears to accurately mimic the life cycle of several of the high-risk cancer-associated HPV types. Included amongst these are HPV16 and 18, which cause the majority of cervical cancers. The low-risk HPV types persist less well in tissue-culture models, and our ability to study the productive life cycle of these viruses is more limited. Although ongoing research is likely to improve this situation, animal models of papillomavirus disease can provide considerable basic information as to how lesions form, regress and can be controlled by the immune system. The best studied are cottontail rabbit papillomavirus, rabbit oral papillomavirus and, more recently, mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV), the last of which is providing exciting new insights into viral tropisms and immune control. In addition, transgenic models of disease have helped us to understand the consequences of persistent viral gene expression and the importance of co-factors such as hormones and UV irradiation in the development of neoplasia and cancer. It is hoped that such disease models will eventually lead us to better understanding and better treatments for human disease. PMID:26456009

  2. Human papillomavirus testing and genotyping in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bonde, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Mass vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 16 and 18 will, in the long term, reduce the incidence of cervical cancer, but screening will remain an important cancer control measure in both vaccinated and unvaccinated women. Since the 1960s, cytology screening has helped to reduce...

  3. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intent and Uptake among Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Divya A.; Zochowski, Melissa; Peterman, Stephanie; Dempsey, Amanda F.; Ernst, Susan; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine intent and the effect of an educational intervention on vaccine uptake among female college students. Participants: Females aged 18 to 26 attending a university health service gynecology clinic (n = 256). Methods: Participants were randomized to receive either HPV-specific education with a…

  4. An Overview of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vichnin, Michelle; Bonanni, Paolo; Klein, Nicola P;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) type 6/11/16/18 vaccine (GARDASIL/SILGARD®) has been licensed in many countries around the world for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers and precancers, as well as external genital warts causally related to HPV types...

  5. The prevalence of human papillomavirus in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Louise; Thomsen, Louise T; Olesen, Tina Bech;

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal cancer has been widely studied with conflicting results. We performed a systematic review and a meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in colorectal adenocarcinomas and adenomas, and test the potential association....

  6. Human papillomavirus-associated cancers: A growing global problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Anshuma; Singh, Mini P; Rai, Bhavana

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is linked with several cancers such as cancer cervix, vagina, vulva, head and neck, anal, and penile carcinomas. Although there is a proven association of HPV with these cancers, questions regarding HPV testing, vaccination, and treatment of HPV-related cancers continue to remain unanswered. The present article provides an overview of the HPV-associated cancers. PMID:27127735

  7. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil Vaccine - What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes or ringing in the ears. Like all vaccines, HPV vaccines will continue to be monitored for unusual ... Vaccine information statement: HPV (human papillomavirus) Gardasil® VIS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site. www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ...

  8. Human papillomavirus prevalence among men in sub-Saharan Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Munk, Christian; Christensen, Jane;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarise the available data on the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) among men in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: PubMed and Embase were searched up to 10 March 2014. Random effects meta-analyses were used to calculate a poole...

  9. Tenacity of Exogenous Human Papillomavirus DNA in Sperm Washing

    OpenAIRE

    Brossfield, Jeralyn E.; Chan, Philip J.; Patton, William C.; King, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:Sperm cells have been shown to take up exogenous DNA readily. The hypothesis was that sperm washing would remove exogenous viral DNA infecting sperm cells. The objective was to compare three types of sperm washing procedures for their capacity to remove exogenous human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from infected sperm.

  10. Identification and validation of human papillomavirus encoded microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Qian

    Full Text Available We report here identification and validation of the first papillomavirus encoded microRNAs expressed in human cervical lesions and cell lines. We established small RNA libraries from ten human papillomavirus associated cervical lesions including cancer and two human papillomavirus harboring cell lines. These libraries were sequenced using SOLiD 4 technology. We used the sequencing data to predict putative viral microRNAs and discovered nine putative papillomavirus encoded microRNAs. Validation was performed for five candidates, four of which were successfully validated by qPCR from cervical tissue samples and cell lines: two were encoded by HPV 16, one by HPV 38 and one by HPV 68. The expression of HPV 16 microRNAs was further confirmed by in situ hybridization, and colocalization with p16INK4A was established. Prediction of cellular target genes of HPV 16 encoded microRNAs suggests that they may play a role in cell cycle, immune functions, cell adhesion and migration, development, and cancer. Two putative viral target sites for the two validated HPV 16 miRNAs were mapped to the E5 gene, one in the E1 gene, two in the L1 gene and one in the LCR region. This is the first report to show that papillomaviruses encode their own microRNA species. Importantly, microRNAs were found in libraries established from human cervical disease and carcinoma cell lines, and their expression was confirmed in additional tissue samples. To our knowledge, this is also the first paper to use in situ hybridization to show the expression of a viral microRNA in human tissue.

  11. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  12. Estado actual de la vacuna recombinante contra el virus del papiloma humano State of the art on human papillomavirus vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Chan Acón

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La infección por el virus del papiloma humano (VPH es una enfermedad de transmisión sexual común. Alrededor del mundo millones de personas están infectadas y el resto de la población en general tiene un riesgo de contraer la infección superior al 50%. El virus se asocia aproximadamente a un 100% de los casos de cáncer cervical; a un 100% de las neoplasias cervicales intraepiteliales grados 1, 2, 3; a un 40% de los casos de cáncer de vulva, vagina y pene, 100% de las verrugas genitales; a un 100% de las papilomatosis respiratorias recurrentes; a un 90% del cáncer anal y a un 12% del cáncer de cabeza y cuello, predominantemente en orofaringe y amígdala. Actualmente, el uso de dos vacunas está aprobado en diversos países: Gardasil® y Cervarix®. Ambas están compuestas por proteínas L1 de VPH, en forma de partículas no infecciosas similares al virus (VLPs producidas por tecnología de ADN recombinante, adsorbidas en adyuvantes que contienen aluminio. La eficacia hallada en diversos estudios en sujetos no expuestos previamente al virus se encuentran en el rango del 98.8% al 100.0% para la prevención de neoplasias cervicales, vulvares y vaginales intraepiteliales, grados 2 y 3, relacionados con el VPH-16/18, además de los adenocarcinomas in situ y verrugas genitales causadas por VPH- 16/18/6/11 en el caso de Gardasil® y una eficacia del 100% en el caso de Cervarix® para la prevención de neoplasias cervicales grado 2 y 3 relacionados con el VPH-16/18. La eficacia de ambas se mantiene alrededor de los 5 años. Hasta el momento no se le ha atribuido a la vacuna ningún efecto terapéutico, solo se administra con fines profilácticos, sin embargo, esta no debe ser considerada como un sustituto de las pruebas de tamizaje para la prevención del cáncer cervical.Genital human papillomavirus (HPV is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Millions of persons are now infected and the lifetime risk of HPV

  13. The etiologic role of human papillomavirus in penile cancers: a study in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Do, H T T; Koriyama, C; Khan, N. A.; Higashi, M; Kato, T; Le, N T; Matsushita, S; Kanekura, T; Akiba, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: We investigated the aetiologic role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in 120 penile squamous cell carcinomas (PSCCs) from Vietnam. Methods: Human papillomavirus DNA was detected by PCR using SPF10 primers and a primer set targeting HPV-16 E6. The INNO-LiPA HPV genotyping kit was used to determine genotype. Human papillomavirus-16 viral load and physical status were determined by real-time PCR. P16INK4A protein expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Human papillo...

  14. Biology and pathological associations of the human papillomaviruses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, P L; Looi, L M

    1998-06-01

    Historical cottontail rabbit papillomavirus studies raised early indications of a mammalian DNA oncogenic virus. Today, molecular cloning recognises numerous animal and human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and the development of in vitro transformation assays has escalated oncological research in HPVs. Currently, their detection and typing in tissues is usually by Southern blotting, in-situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction methods. The complete papillomavirus virion constitutes a protein coat (capsid) surrounding a circular, double-stranded DNA organised into coding and non-coding regions. 8 early (E1-E8) open reading frames (ORFs) and 2 late (L1, L2) ORFs have been identified in the coding region of all papillomaviruses. The early ORFs encode proteins which interact with the host genome to produce new viral DNA while late ORFs are activated only after viral DNA replication and encode for viral capsid proteins. All papillomaviruses are obligatory intranuclear organisms with specific tropism for keratinocytes. Three possible courses of events can follow papillomaviruses entry into cells: (1) viral DNA are maintained as intranuclear, extrachromosomal, circular DNA episomes, which replicates synchronously with the host cell, establishing a latent infection; (2) conversion from latent into productive infection with assembly of complete infective virions; (3) integration of viral DNA into host cellular genome, a phenomenon seen in HPV infections associated with malignant transformation. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) essentially induce skin and mucosal epithelial lesions. Various skin warts are well known to be HPV-associated (HPVs 1, 2, 3, 7 and 10). Besides HPVs 3 and 10, HPVs 5, 8, 17 and 20 have been recovered from Epidermodysplasia verruciformis lesions. Anogenital condyloma acuminatum, strongly linked with HPVs 6 and 11 are probably sexually transmitted. The same HPVs, demonstrable in recurrent juvenile laryngeal papillomas, are probably transmitted by passage

  15. Human Papillomavirus Infection Requires Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Giroglou, Tzenan; Florin, Luise; Schäfer, Frank; Streeck, Rolf E.; Sapp, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Using pseudoinfection of cell lines, we demonstrate that cell surface heparan sulfate is required for infection by human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-33 pseudovirions. Pseudoinfection was inhibited by heparin but not dermatan or chondroitin sulfate, reduced by reducing the level of surface sulfation, and abolished by heparinase treatment. Carboxy-terminally deleted HPV-33 virus-like particles still bound efficiently to heparin. The kinetics of postattachment neutralization by antis...

  16. Introduction of human papillomavirus vaccination in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Bente Braad; Rebolj, Matejka; Valentiner-Branth, Palle;

    2012-01-01

    Cervical screening has helped decrease the incidence of cervical cancer, but the disease remains a burden for women. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is now a promising tool for control of cervical cancer. Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) are...... relatively wealthy with predominantly publicly paid health care systems. The aim of this paper was to provide an update of the current status of introduction of HPV vaccine into the childhood vaccination programs in this region....

  17. RNA Binding Proteins that Control Human Papillomavirus Gene Expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Naoko Kajitani; Stefan Schwartz

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle is strictly linked to the differentiation program of the infected mucosal epithelial cell. In the basal and lower levels of the epithelium, early genes coding for pro-mitotic proteins and viral replication factors are expressed, while terminal cell differentiation is required for activation of late gene expression and production of viral particles at the very top of the epithelium. Such productive infections are normally cleared within 18–24 months. I...

  18. Human papillomaviruses and DNA ploidy in anal condylomata acuminata

    OpenAIRE

    Rihet, S.; Bellaich, P.; Lorenzato, M; Bouttens, D.; Bernard, P.; Birembaut, P.; Clavel, C.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have emphasized the usefulness of DNA ploidy measurement and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) detection as pronostic markers in low grade cervical lesions. We addressed the eventual relationship between HPV type, DNA profile, and p53 tumor suppressor protein expression in anal condylomata acuminata to eventually determine parameters which may be considered as predictive risk factors for the development of cancer. DNA ploidy was assessed by image ...

  19. Detection of Multiple Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Anal Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ramamoorthy, Sonia; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Luo, Linda; Miyai, Katsumi; Lu, Qing; John M. Carethers

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for development of anal squamous cell carcinoma. Despite over 100 genotypes of the virus, HPV 16 and 18 are considered pathogenic as they are seen in the majority of cervical and anal cancers. We have employed a custom microarray to examine DNA for several HPV genotypes. We aimed to determine the accuracy of our microarray in anal cancer DNA for HPV genotypes compared to the DNA sequencing gold standard. Method...

  20. Detection of Multiple Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Anal Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Luo Linda; Liu Yu-Tsueng; Ramamoorthy Sonia; Miyai Katsumi; Lu Qing; Carethers John M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for development of anal squamous cell carcinoma. Despite over 100 genotypes of the virus, HPV 16 and 18 are considered pathogenic as they are seen in the majority of cervical and anal cancers. We have employed a custom microarray to examine DNA for several HPV genotypes. We aimed to determine the accuracy of our microarray in anal cancer DNA for HPV genotypes compared to the DNA sequencing gold standard. Methods We util...

  1. Predictivity of human papillomavirus positivity in advanced oral cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, S.; V M Patil; V Noronha; Joshi, A.; S Dhumal; Cruz, A D; Bhattacharjee, A; K Prabhash

    2015-01-01

    Background And Objective: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a known prognostic factor world over in patients of carcinoma oropharynx. The role of HPV in oral cancers has not been investigated adequately. We tried to identify standard clinicopathological features in oral cancer, which would predict HPV-positivity. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of 124 cases of T4 oral cancer patients at our center. HPV-positive was defined in accordance with positive p16 immunohistochemistry done on pr...

  2. Adolescent Premature Ovarian Insufficiency Following Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Little, Deirdre Therese; Ward, Harvey Rodrick Grenville

    2014-01-01

    Three young women who developed premature ovarian insufficiency following quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination presented to a general practitioner in rural New South Wales, Australia. The unrelated girls were aged 16, 16, and 18 years at diagnosis. Each had received HPV vaccinations prior to the onset of ovarian decline. Vaccinations had been administered in different regions of the state of New South Wales and the 3 girls lived in different towns in that state. Each had been p...

  3. Human papillomavirus (HPV) information needs: a theoretical framework

    OpenAIRE

    Marlow, L A V; Wardle, J; Grant, N.; J. Waller

    2009-01-01

    Background With the introduction of human papillomavirus (HPV) testing and vaccination in the UK, health professionals will start to receive questions about the virus from their patients. This study aimed to identify the key questions about HPV that British women will ask when considering having an HPV test or vaccination. Methods Face-to-face interviews were carried out with 21 women to discover what they wanted to know about HPV. A thematic framework approach was used to analyse the data an...

  4. False-positive Human Papillomavirus DNA tests in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Pribac, Igor; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2011-01-01

    Based on data from randomised controlled trials (RCT) on primary cervical screening, it has been reported that the problem of more frequent false-positive tests in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA screening compared to cytology could be overcome. However, these reports predominantly operated with a...... narrow definition of a (false-)positive test. The aim of this paper was to illustrate how the narrow definition affected the measured adverse effects of HPV DNA screening compared with cytology screening....

  5. Immunogenicity of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine in Organ Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, D.; Unger, E R; Panicker, G.; Medvedev, P.; Wilson, L.; Humar, A

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients are at risk of morbidity from human papillomavirus (HPV)-related diseases. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine is recommended for posttransplant patients but there are no data on vaccine immunogenicity. We determined the immunogenicity of HPV vaccine in a cohort of young adult transplant patients. Patients were immunized with three doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine containing viral types 6, 11, 16 and 18. Immunogenicity was determined by type-specific viral-like protein...

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Human Papillomavirus-Induced Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lehoux, Michaël; D’Abramo, Claudia M.; Archambault, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 20% of all cancers are associated with infectious agents. Among them, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are very common and are now recognized as the etiological agent of cervical cancer, the second most common cancer in women worldwide, and they are increasingly linked with other forms of dysplasia. Carcinogenesis is a complex and multistep process requiring the acquisition of several genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. HPV-induced neoplasia, however, is in part mediated by the ...

  7. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination at a Time of Changing Sexual Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Baussano, Iacopo; Lazzarato, Fulvio; Brisson, Marc; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence varies widely worldwide. We used a transmission model to show links between age-specific sexual patterns and HPV vaccination effectiveness. We considered rural India and the United States as examples of 2 heterosexual populations with traditional age-specific sexual behavior and gender-similar age-specific sexual behavior, respectively. We simulated these populations by using age-specific rates of sexual activity and age differences between sexual partner...

  8. Cost-effectiveness of different human papillomavirus vaccines in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Vernon J; Tay, Sun Kuie; Teoh, Yee Leong; Tok, Mei Yin

    2011-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are widely available and there have been studies exploring their potential clinical impact and cost-effectiveness. However, few studies have compared the cost-effectiveness among the 2 main vaccines available - a bivalent vaccine against HPV 16/18, and a quadrivalent vaccine against 6/11/16/18. We explore the cost-effectiveness of these two HPV vaccines in tropical Singapore. Methods We developed a Markov state-transition model to represent the n...

  9. Factors Influencing Familial Decision-Making Regarding Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Gamble, Heather L.; Klosky, James L; Parra, Gilbert R.; Randolph, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review is to summarize the research regarding Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination uptake among families with adolescent/preadolescent daughters. Methods Literature searches (utilizing PubMed and PsychInfo databases) were conducted and research examining psychological and environmental factors which relate to HPV vaccine uptake and intentions was reviewed. Results Factors such as physician recommendations, perceptions of the beliefs of peers and significant oth...

  10. Cost-effectiveness of different human papillomavirus vaccines in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Tay Sun; Lee Vernon J; Teoh Yee; Tok Mei

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are widely available and there have been studies exploring their potential clinical impact and cost-effectiveness. However, few studies have compared the cost-effectiveness among the 2 main vaccines available - a bivalent vaccine against HPV 16/18, and a quadrivalent vaccine against 6/11/16/18. We explore the cost-effectiveness of these two HPV vaccines in tropical Singapore. Methods We developed a Markov state-transition model to repres...

  11. Human papillomavirus and breast cancer in Iran: a meta- analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Mousavi, Tahoora; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Afshari, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study aims to investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and breast cancer using meta- analysis. Materials and Methods: Relevant studies were identified reviewing the national and international databases. We also increased the search sensitivity by investigating the references as well as interview with research centers and experts. Finally, quality assessment and implementation of inclusion/exclusion criteria determined the eligible articles for meta-an...

  12. Enhanced transcriptional activation by E2 proteins from the oncogenic human papillomaviruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Kovelman, R; Bilter, G K; Glezer, E; Tsou, A Y; Barbosa, M S

    1996-01-01

    A systematic comparison of transcriptional activation by papillomavirus E2 proteins revealed that the E2 proteins from high-risk human papillomaviruses (human papillomavirus type 16 [HPV-16] and HPV-18) are much more active than are the E2 proteins from low-risk HPVs (HPV-6b and HPV-11). Despite the tropism of HPVs for particular epithelial cell types, this difference in transcriptional activation was observed in a number of different epithelial and nonepithelial cells. The enhanced activitie...

  13. [How did I contract human Papillomavirus (HPV)?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavillon, N; Vervaet, H; Derniaux, E; Terrosi, P; Graesslin, O; Quereux, C

    2010-03-01

    More than 120 genotypes have been identified among the Papillomavirus (HPV) family. These viruses are ubiquitary with skin or mucous membrane tropism and cause various pathologies from wart to neoplasia. HPV family is classified according to their tropism. Genital HPV infection is considered as the most frequent sexually transmitted disease in the world. Seventy-five percent of women will be in contact with HPV at least one time in their life. HPV is usually transmitted through direct skin-to-skin contact, more often during penetrative genital contact. Other types of genital contact in the absence of penetration can lead to HPV infection, but those routes of transmission are much less common than sexual intercourse. However, virgins (young children can present HPV infection, suggesting other routes of transmission than sexual intercourse. HPV infection could occur during delivery; vaginal deliveries appear to promote this transmission in comparison with cesarean section. But cesarean section do not completely protect against contamination risk. In utero, vertical transmission has been suggested by different studies but with lack of evidence. HPV infection can be detected on inanimate objects, such as clothing or environmental surfaces. However, transmission is not known to occur by this route. More detailed knowledges of the transmission route of HPV infection will enable to get prevention more effective. PMID:20189438

  14. PREVALENSI DAN KARAKTERISTIK PELAYANAN VAKSINASI CERVARIX SEBAGAI PREVENSI PRIMER KANKER SERVIKS DI SMP NEGERI 1 DENPASAR PERIODE OKTOBER 2011 - APRIL 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrikus Gede Surya Adhi Putra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaksin Human Papillomavirus (HPV saat ini menjadi metode pencegahan yang paling diperhitungkan terhadap infeksi HPV yang merupakan etiologi kanker cervix. Peningkatan efektifitas vaksin HPV terjadi pada pemberian dalam rentang usia prapubertas dan remaja. Pemberian vaksin yang menargetkan usia tersebut dapat menjaring wanita yang masih belum aktif secara seksual, sehingga probabilitas terpapar HPV masih rendah. Disamping itu, respon imunitas yang dihasilkan juga lebih besar dibandingkan pemberian pasca pubertas. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui prevalensi vaksinasi cervarix sebagai upaya prevensi primer kanker serviks di SMP Negeri 1 Denpasar. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode deskriptif retrospektif dan dilaksanakan di SMP Negeri 1 Denpasar pada tanggal 8 November 2012. Dengan sampel yakni siswi yang mengikuti program vaksinasi HPV cervarix di SMP Negeri 1 Denpasar pada 15 Oktober 2011, 12 November 2011, dan 14 April 2012. Dari penelitian ini diperoleh yang mengikuti program vaksinasi sebanyak 46 siswi dari 420 siswi atau 10,95%. Hasil distribusi yang tertinggi, menurut umur usia 14 tahun (43,48%, kelas IX (17,95%, asal daerah Denpasar (50%, mempunyai 3 saudara kandung (39,13%, pendidikan orang tua sarjana (82,61%, pekerjaan orang tua sebagai PNS (32,61%, penghasilan orang tua diatas 3 juta (45,65%. Berdasarkan  hasil  penelitian  ini,  dapat  disimpulkan  bahwa  kesadaran siswi SMP Negeri 1 Denpasar mengenai vaksin HPV berada dalam kategori rendah. Oleh karena itu, diperlukan sosialisasi yang berkesinambungan untuk memberikan pemahaman dan kesadaran mengenai pentingnya upaya pencegahan primer kanker serviks, yaitu melalui vaksinasi.

  15. PREVALENSI DAN KARAKTERISTIK PELAYANAN VAKSINASI CERVARIX SEBAGAI PREVENSI PRIMER KANKER SERVIKS DI SMP NEGERI 1 DENPASAR PERIODE OKTOBER 2011 - APRIL 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrikus Gede Surya Adhi Putra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vaksin Human Papillomavirus (HPV saat ini menjadi metode pencegahan yang paling diperhitungkan terhadap infeksi HPV yang merupakan etiologi kanker cervix. Peningkatan efektifitas vaksin HPV terjadi pada pemberian dalam rentang usia prapubertas dan remaja. Pemberian vaksin yang menargetkan usia tersebut dapat menjaring wanita yang masih belum aktif secara seksual, sehingga probabilitas terpapar HPV masih rendah. Disamping itu, respon imunitas yang dihasilkan juga lebih besar dibandingkan pemberian pasca pubertas. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui prevalensi vaksinasi cervarix sebagai upaya prevensi primer kanker serviks di SMP Negeri 1 Denpasar. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode deskriptif retrospektif dan dilaksanakan di SMP Negeri 1 Denpasar pada tanggal 8 November 2012. Dengan sampel yakni siswi yang mengikuti program vaksinasi HPV cervarix di SMP Negeri 1 Denpasar pada 15 Oktober 2011, 12 November 2011, dan 14 April 2012. Dari penelitian ini diperoleh yang mengikuti program vaksinasi sebanyak 46 siswi dari 420 siswi atau 10,95%. Hasil distribusi yang tertinggi, menurut umur usia 14 tahun (43,48%, kelas IX (17,95%, asal daerah Denpasar (50%, mempunyai 3 saudara kandung (39,13%, pendidikan orang tua sarjana (82,61%, pekerjaan orang tua sebagai PNS (32,61%, penghasilan orang tua diatas 3 juta (45,65%.Berdasarkan  hasil  penelitian  ini,  dapat  disimpulkan  bahwa  kesadaran siswi SMP Negeri 1 Denpasar mengenai vaksin HPV berada dalam kategori rendah. Oleh karena itu, diperlukan sosialisasi yang berkesinambungan untuk memberikan pemahaman dan kesadaran mengenai pentingnya upaya pencegahan primer kanker serviks, yaitu melalui vaksinasi.

  16. 人乳头瘤病毒疫苗带来的伦理问题%Current Controversies of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵卫红; 王洪奇; 郝敏

    2013-01-01

    人乳头瘤病毒疫苗的问世使宫颈癌的预防进入崭新的时代,自其问世以来便饱受伦理争议.通过分析目前全球医学文献中比较重视和争议的伦理问题,如Gardasil与Cervarix哪种更为有效,能否在发展中国家顺利推广,应当“强制接种”还是“自愿接种”,男性是否应常规接种等.基于伦理学的基本原则,提出正确的宣教是解决的经由之路.%The advent of human papillomavirus vaccine made the prevention of cervical cancer enter into a new era and suffered a lot ethical controversy.This paper analyses the ethical issues on the global medical literature,such as Gardasil and Cervarix,which one is more effective? Would vaccination be feasible in the developing countries? Should be "compulsory vaccination" or "voluntary vaccination"? Whether men should be routine vaccination? Based on the basic principals of ethics,the right education is put forward to solve these ethical issues.

  17. Human papillomavirus 52 positive squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Olivia Salceanu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV infection is strongly associated with several human cancers; the most known genotypes involved being HPV 16 and HPV 18. We report the detection of HPV 52 in a sample taken from a 47-year-old patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva of the left eye. The method used for the detection of HPV was real time polymerase chain reaction. The evolution was favorable after surgical removal of the tumor and the patient was explained that long-term follow-up is essential to avoid recurrence.

  18. Human papillomavirus in anogenital cancer, with special reference to the viral capsid

    OpenAIRE

    Heino, Pirkko

    1996-01-01

    HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS IN ANOGENITAL CANCER, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE VIRAL CAPSID b y Pirkko HeinoInfection with the oncogenic types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV), particularlyHPV type 16, is the major cause of anogenital dysplasias, which are precursorlesions of anogenital cancers. Studies of the HPV capsid are of interest, since HPVcapsids are attractive...

  19. Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus by cobas 4800 HPV test in urban Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Iwasaki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular tests allow the detection of high-risk human papillomavirus in cervical samples, playing an important role in the prevention of cervical cancer. Objectives: We performed a study to determine the prevalence of HPV 16, HPV 18 and other high-risk human papillomavirus (pool 12 genotypes in Peruvian females from diverse urban areas using the cobas 4800 HPV test. Methods: Routine cervical samples collected in our laboratory were analyzed by cobas 4800 HPV test. Results: A total of 2247 samples from female patients aged 17–79 years were tested. high-risk human papillomavirus was positive in 775 (34.49% samples. Of these, 641 (82.71% were single infections and 134 (17.29% were multiple infections. The positivity rates for HPV 16, HPV 18, and other high-risk human papillomavirus were 10.77%, 2.0%, and 28.08%, respectively. In multiple high-risk human papillomavirus infections, the concomitance of HPV 16 and other high-risk human papillomavirus was more prevalent (13.42%. Conclusion: Our study showed high prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus in urban Peru, mainly among young women. In both single and multiple infections other high-risk human papillomavirus were more prevalent than HPV 16 and HPV 18, which might influence vaccine impact in our country. Furthermore, the cobas 4800 HPV test may be considered a useful tool for HPV molecular diagnosis.

  20. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Genital Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page. Skip Navigation U.S. Department of Health and Human Services • National Institutes of Health Temas de Salud ... RELATED GOVERNMENT SITES U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health USA.gov

  1. [Melanoma and Human Papillomaviruses: Is There an Outlook for Study?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgareva, G M; Mikhaylova, I N; Golovina, D A

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive human malignant tumors. Its incidence and mortality are growing steadily. Ultraviolet irradiation is the main risk factor for melanoma involved in melanomagenesis. The probability of viral etiology of melanoma has been discussed. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been mentioned among candidates for its etiologic agents because some HPV types are the powerful carcinogens causing cervical cancer and other cancers. The review analyses the literature data on the association of melanoma with HPV Several groupsfound HPVin skin melanomas as well as in mucosa; viruses of high oncogenic risk were detected in some cases. For some organs the etiological role of high-risk HPV as inducers of invasive carcinomas is confirmed. These organs require special mention: cervix uteri, vulva, vagina, penis, anal region, and oral cavity. However in the majority of the studies in which viral DNA-positive melanomas were found, testing for viral genome expression was not done while this is the fact of primary importance. HPVare found in normal skin and mucous membranes thus creating justifiable threat of tumor specimen contamination with viral DNA in vivo. There are limited data on aggravation of the disease prognosis in papillomavirus-positive melanomas. However, any systematic observation of a sizeable patient group distinguished by that tumor type has not been performed yet. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk papillomaviruses were shown to be able to transform normal human melanocytes in vitro experiments. Thus, we can assume the presence of the association of melanoma with oncogenic HPV. The clinical significance of this problem is indisputable under the conditions of the steady increase in melanoma incidence and mortality rates in Russia and abroad. The problem requires further study. PMID:27522713

  2. Immune therapy for human papillomaviruses-related cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Rosales, Ricardo; Rosales, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a large family of double strand DNA viruses comprising more than 180 types. Infection with HPV is very common and it is associated with benign and malignant proliferation of skin and squamous mucosae. Many HPVs, considered low-risk such as HPV 6 and 11, produce warts; while high-risk viruses, such as HPVs 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, and 58, induce tumors. About 5% of all cancers in men and women are associated with HPV infection. Because there are...

  3. Comparison of the AdvanSure Human Papillomavirus Screening Real-Time PCR, the Abbott RealTime High Risk Human Papillomavirus Test, and the Hybrid Capture Human Papillomavirus DNA Test for the Detection of Human Papillomavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Yusun; Lee, Miae

    2012-01-01

    Background We evaluated the performance of various commercial assays for the molecular detection of human papillomavirus (HPV); the recently developed AdvanSure HPV Screening real-time PCR assay (AdvanSure PCR) and the Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV PCR assay (Abbott PCR) were compared with the Hybrid Capture 2 HPV DNA Test (HC2). Methods All 3 tests were performed on 177 samples, and any sample that showed a discrepancy in any of the 3 tests was genotyped using INNO-LiPA HPV genotyping and/or...

  4. Porokeratoma: A Possible Association with Human Papillomavirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Caseiro Silverio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Porokeratoma is a rare, relatively newly described and still unclear entity. Here, we describe the case of a 52-year-old male patient who presented with four well-defined, verrucous and hyperkeratotic lesions. Microscopically, one of the lesions showed acanthopapillomatosis overlying compact orthokeratosis. Prominent broad and confluent cornoid lamellae were present, with no granular layer and some dyskeratotic keratinocytes. PCR sequencing and in situ hybridization revealed the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 in the lesion. The association of porokeratoma and HPV infection has not previously been reported.

  5. Cutaneous human papillomavirus 88: Remarkable differences in viral load

    OpenAIRE

    Kullander, Johanna; Handisurya, Alessandra; Forslund, Ola; Geusau, Alexandra; Kirnbauer, Reinhard; Dillner, Joakim

    2008-01-01

    A human papillomavirus (HPV) was cloned from a patient with multiple squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and identified as HPV88, recently categorized into a new species within the genus Gamma. The HPV88 viral load in an SCC of the index patient exceeded 1 million copies/cell. By contrast, a survey of 447 skin lesions (79 actinic keratoses, 73 seborrhoeic keratoses, 169 basal cell carcinomas and 126 SCCs) and 362 healthy skin biopsies found detectable HPV88 DNA in only 7 specimens. All these had ...

  6. High risk human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in human breast milk

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn Wendy K; Whitaker Noel J; Lawson James S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multiple viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and mouse mammary tumour virus have been identified in human milk. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences have been identified in breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if viral sequences are present in human milk from normal lactating women. Findings Standard (liquid) and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were used to identify HPV and EBV in human milk...

  7. Capsomer Vaccines Protect Mice from Vaginal Challenge with Human Papillomavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Wai-Hong; Gersch, Elizabeth; Kwak, Kihyuck; Jagu, Subhashini; Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Huh, Warner K.; Garcea, Robert L.; Roden, Richard B. S.

    2011-01-01

    Capsomers were produced in bacteria as glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins with human papillomavirus type 16 L1 lacking the first nine and final 29 residues (GST-HPV16L1Δ) alone or linked with residues 13–47 of HPV18, HPV31 and HPV45 L2 in tandem (GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3). Subcutaneous immunization of mice with GST-HPV16L1Δ or GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 in alum and monophosphoryl lipid A induced similarly high titers of HPV16 neutralizing antibodies. GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 also elicited moderate L2-s...

  8. Progress and prospects for L2-based human papillomavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rosie T; Schellenbacher, Christina; Chackerian, Bryce; Roden, Richard B S

    2016-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a worldwide public health problem, particularly in resource-limited countries. Fifteen high-risk genital HPV types are sexually transmitted and cause 5% of all cancers worldwide, primarily cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Skin HPV types are generally associated with benign disease, but a subset is linked to non-melanoma skin cancer. Licensed HPV vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from L1 major capsid antigen of key high risk HPVs are effective at preventing these infections but do not cover cutaneous types and are not therapeutic. Vaccines targeting L2 minor capsid antigen, some using capsid display, adjuvant and fusions with early HPV antigens or Toll-like receptor agonists, are in development to fill these gaps. Progress and challenges with L2-based vaccines are summarized. PMID:26901354

  9. Long-term Study of a Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferris, Daron; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Block, Stan L;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present a long-term safety, immunogenicity, and effectiveness study of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccine. METHODS: Sexually naive boys and girls aged 9 to 15 years (N = 1781) were assigned (2:1) to receive HPV4 vaccine or saline placebo at day 1 and months 2 and 6....... At month 30, the placebo group (n = 482) received HPV4 vaccine following the same regimen and both cohorts were followed through month 96. Subjects ≥16 years were eligible for effectiveness evaluations. The primary objective was to evaluate the long-term anti-HPV6/11/16/18 serological levels. The...... secondary objective was to estimate vaccine effectiveness against HPV6/11/16/18-related persistent infection or disease. RESULTS: For each of the HPV4 vaccine types, vaccination-induced anti-HPV response persisted through month 96. Among 429 subjects who received HPV4 vaccine at a mean age of 12, none...

  10. Determinants in the uptake of the human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Casadevante, Victoria Fernández; Cuesta, Julita Gil; Cantarero Arevalo, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer affecting women worldwide. Since 2006, two human papillomavirus vaccines (HPVV) have been licensed to protect women against the virus that causes cervical cancer. However, worldwide coverage remains unequal. Studies from the USA found...... refers to either initiation and/or completion of the three dose vaccination program. Results: Out of the 23 eligible studies, 14 were retrospective reviews of data, six were cross-sectional surveys, and three were prospective cohort studies. Higher HPVV uptake was associated with ethnic majority...... populations, higher socio-economic status, regular cervical screening participation by the mother, and having received previous childhood vaccinations. Conclusion: Since the vaccine is offered for free in most of the European countries, the findings suggest that ethno-cultural and educational factors play an...

  11. Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead Delany-Moretlwe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence of a significant burden of human papillomavirus (HPV infection and associated disease in men. High rates of HPV infection have been observed in men from sub-Saharan Africa where HIV prevalence is high. HIV infection increases HPV prevalence, incidence and persistence and is strongly associated with the development of anogenital warts and anal, penile and head and neck cancers in men. Despite increasing access to antiretroviral therapy, there appears to be little benefit in preventing the development of these cancers in HIV-positive men, making prevention of infection a priority. New prevention options that are being introduced in many African countries include male circumcision and HPV vaccination. However, more data are needed on the burden of HPV disease in men before boys are included in HPV vaccination programmes.

  12. Human papillomavirus as a target for management, prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Emma J; Kitchener, Henry C

    2012-01-01

    The discovery that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the necessary causal factor in cervical carcinogenesis has made it a target for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, as well as a diagnostic tool in cervical screening. Whilst prophylactic vaccination has proven very effective in terms of preventing cervical cancer precursor lesions, therapeutic strategies have presented far greater challenges. HPV testing has shown itself to be extremely valuable in the triage of low grade cytological abnormalities, test of cure following treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and will, over the next 10 years, gradually replace cytology as the mainstay of primary cervical screening. In this review, the latest evidence supporting HPV as both a biomarker of risk for cervical cancer and a target for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination is presented. PMID:22690976

  13. An overview of human papillomaviruses and current vaccine strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnanamony M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide, particularly in developing countries. The viral origin of cervical cancer has been proven beyond any reasonable doubt. Persistent infection with certain subsets of human papillomaviruses is recognized as a necessary cause for the development of cervical cancer. Persistence of oncogenic HPVs, immunodeficiency, high HPV viral load and cofactors like smoking, multiple sex partners and poor nutrition predispose to cervical cancer. Prophylactic vaccines using HPV virus-like particles containing capsid protein L1 have shown protection against disease in animals and are currently undergoing clinical trials. Therapeutic vaccines using HPV E6 and E7 proteins are also being investigated for their ability to remove residual infection.

  14. Human papillomavirus vaccination in the prevention of cervical neoplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Astbury, Katharine

    2012-02-01

    Cervical cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality for women worldwide. Although the introduction of comprehensive screening programs has reduced the disease incidence in developed countries, it remains a major problem in the developing world. The recent licensing of 2 vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and HPV-18, the viruses responsible for 70% of cervical cancer cases, offers the hope of disease prevention. In this article, we review the role of HPV in the etiology of cervical cancer and the evidence to support the introduction of vaccination programs in young women and discuss the potential obstacles to widespread vaccination. In addition, we discuss the issues that remain to be elucidated, including the potential need for booster doses of the vaccine and the role of concomitant vaccination in men.

  15. Human papillomavirus: cause of epithelial lacrimal sac neoplasia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjö, Nicolai Christian; von Buchwald, Christian; Cassonnet, Patricia;

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epithelial tumours of the lacrimal sac are rare but important entities that may carry grave prognoses. In this study the prevalence and possible role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in epithelial tumours of the lacrimal sac were evaluated. METHODS: Five papillomas and six...... types 6 or 11 were identified in all four lacrimal sac papillomas suitable for PCR analysis and in situ hybridization. Four of six lacrimal sac carcinomas harboured HPV. One carcinoma was positive for HPV 11 only, two carcinomas had concomitant infection with HPV 6 or 11 and high-risk HPV 16, and the...... remaining carcinoma was positive for HPV 16. All specimens of dacryocystitis were betaglobin-positive and HPV-negative. Using DNA ISH, two papillomas and a single carcinoma showed evidence for vegetative HPV 11 DNA replication, whereas no HPV 16 DNA replication was found in the five carcinomas tested. HPV...

  16. Sexual and non-sexual transmission of human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeglédy, J

    2001-01-01

    Benign tumors and lesions of the anogenital tract are caused by human papillomaviruses (HPVs). They are also major risk factors for cervical cancer. Introduction of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed that HPV infections are much more common among young asymptomatic women than it had been previously suspected. The side-specificity of genital HPVs led to the assumption that HPVs were primarily transmitted by sexual contact. However, since HPVs have been detected in virgins, infants/children and juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis was shown to be caused by these viruses, it became acknowledged that HPVs may be transmitted by other--non-sexual--routes as well. The evidence for sexual and different non-sexual routes of transmission of HPVs will be reviewed here. PMID:11791348

  17. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. A meta-analysis of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svahn, Malene F; Faber, Mette Tuxen; Christensen, Jane;

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue....

  18. Home-Based or Clinic-Based Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Atypical Squamous Cell of Undetermined Significance; Cervical Carcinoma; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2/3; Health Status Unknown; Human Papillomavirus Infection; Low Grade Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Neoplasia; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer

  19. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine - what you need to know [Gardasil®-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil-9 Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-gardasil-9.html . CDC review information for HPV ...

  20. Human Papillomavirus Infection and Bladder Cancer Risk: A Meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ni; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Ping; Zheng, Tongzhang; Dai, Min

    2011-01-01

    Background. Despite an increase in the number of molecular epidemiological studies conducted in recent years to evaluate the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and risk of bladder cancer, the studies remain inconclusive.

  1. Health awareness among young women vaccinated against human papillomavirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Bąk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Genital human papillomavirus (HPV infections are essentials factors in the development of cervical cancer. Human papillomavirus vaccines can contribute to reducing the high incidence of this disease, provided that this form of prophylaxis is commonly accepted. Participation in vaccinations is restricted by the belief that their implementation and consequent feeling of safety will reduce women’s participation in other forms of cervical carcinoma prophylaxis and will encourage them to be sexually promiscuous. Aim of the research study : To determine the awareness of cervical carcinoma prophylaxis among young women vaccinated against HPV by comparing them with a group of unvaccinated women. Material and methods: The survey covered a group of 210 young women in the age range 18 to 20 years, who were vaccinated against HPV. Within the framework of comparison, the survey covered a group of 255 young HPV-unvaccinated women, adequately selected in respect of age and education. Results: The HPVvaccinated women declared participation in medical check-ups and cytological tests no less frequently than the unvaccinated women. In both groups, the usage of condoms, sexual partners hygiene, monogamy and smoking abstinence were determined as behaviours limiting the occurrence of cervical carcinoma. Conclusions: Awareness of the application of supplementary prophylaxis of cervical carcinoma was high among the HPV vaccinated woman and did not differ from the unvaccinated woman’s awareness. Young women did not show a tendency for promiscuous behaviours, and were more likely touse condoms in the prevention of cervical carcinoma than were the unvaccinated woman.

  2. Factors associated with clinical and sub-clinical anal human papillomavirus infection in homosexual men.

    OpenAIRE

    Law, C L; Qassim, M; Thompson, C. H.; Rose, B R; Grace, J.; Morris, B.J.; Cossart, Y E

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--(I) to determine the relative sensitivities of clinical examination, cytology and HPV DNA hybridisation for the detection of anal human papillomavirus infection; and (ii) to examine various factors which may influence presentation of anal human papillomavirus infection in homosexual men. METHODS AND RESULTS--112 unselected homosexual men attending a Sydney STD clinic for routine screening underwent a complete anogenital and physical examination, during which blood samples (for hae...

  3. Human papillomaviruses in anogenital warts in children: typing by in situ hybridisation.

    OpenAIRE

    Padel, A F; Venning, V A; Evans, M. F.; Quantrill, A M; Fleming, K A

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To identify the types of human papillomaviruses found in anogenital warts in children and to relate these to clinical and social information. DESIGN--In situ hybridisation using biotin labelled DNA probes to 11 types of human papillomavirus was performed on biopsy specimens from 17 children with anogenital warts. SETTING--Nuffield department of pathology and the department of dermatology, Oxford. PATIENTS--Children in one group were referred by general practitioners or paediatricia...

  4. Psychological responses to information about human papillomavirus and cervical cancer: methods of evaluating print materials

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, G.

    2012-01-01

    Learning about human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as a possible source of negative affect in women, but the extent and nature of these emotions is unclear, along with whether they are associated with negative attitudes and behaviours (particularly with respect to HPV vaccination). The goal of this thesis is to examine the psychological impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) information using measures of knowledge, behavioural intentions, mood, attitudes and implicit a...

  5. Safety of human papillomavirus 6, 11, 16 and 18 (recombinant): systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Luiz Spinelli Coelho; Gustavo Lacerda da Silva Calestini; Fernando Salgueiro Alvo; Jefferson Michel de Moura Freitas; Paula Marcela Vilela Castro; Tulio Konstantyner

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify and quantify the adverse effects associated with the recombinant human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16 and 18) vaccine in adolescents. Data source: Systematic review of randomized clinical trials from PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases. Articles investigating the safety of the vaccine in subjects under 18 years and comparing the recombinant human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine with a control group were included. Meta-analyses were performed for the outc...

  6. Human herpesvirus 6 infects cervical epithelial cells and transactivates human papillomavirus gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, M.; Popescu, N; Woodworth, C; Berneman, Z; M. Corbellino; Lusso, P.; Ablashi, D V; Dipaolo, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    To examine whether human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is capable of infecting human cervical epithelial cells and altering expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) genes, HPV-immortalized or -transformed carcinoma cell lines were infected with HHV-6 variant A. No cytopathic effect was observed in infected cervical cells. However, immunofluorescence indicated that infected cells expressed early-late proteins of HHV-6 by day 3 postinfection. HHV-6 DNA was also detected by Southern blot hybridization a...

  7. Laboratory production in vivo of infectious human papillomavirus type 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) induce among patients natural lesions which produce small amounts of virus. Infection of human cell cultures does not lead to the multiplication of virus, which also does not replicate in experimental animals. The authors have developed a unique system for the laboratory production of HPV type 11 (HPV-11). Fragments of human neonatal foreskin were infected with an extract of naturally occurring human vulvar condylomata and grafted beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. Later (3 to 5 months), condylomatous cysts developed from those grafts. Nuclei of koilocytotic cells contained large amounts of capsid antigen and intranuclear virions. The experimentally induced condylomata were homogenized, and the virions were extracted and used to infect another generation of human foreskin grafts in athymic mice. The HPV-11 DNA content and infectivity of the natural and experimental condylomata were similar. Extracts of experimental condylomata were subjected to differential ultracentrifugation and sedimentation in CsCl density gradients. A single, opalescent band was visible at a density of 1.34 g/ml. It contained HPV virions with HPV-11 DNA. This report is the first demonstration of the laboratory production of an HPV

  8. Human papillomavirus and tumours of the eye region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjö, Nicolai Christian

    2005-01-01

    ophthalmology, lacrimal sac, tear sac, papilloma, carcinoma, papillomavirus, HPV, polymerase chain reaction, PCR, RNA, DNA, in situ hybridisation, aetiology, conjunctiva, dysplasia, sex, age, distribution......ophthalmology, lacrimal sac, tear sac, papilloma, carcinoma, papillomavirus, HPV, polymerase chain reaction, PCR, RNA, DNA, in situ hybridisation, aetiology, conjunctiva, dysplasia, sex, age, distribution...

  9. Use of human papillomavirus vaccine in HIV-infected men for the prevention of anal dysplasia and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachay, Edward R; Mathews, Wm Christopher

    2014-01-01

    There are two commercially available vaccines licensed worldwide for the prevention of cervical cancer and other human papillomavirus-associated cancers such as anal cancer. However, only two countries have implemented healthcare programs that include human papillomavirus vaccination for boys and men. Although most of the human papillomavirus-related cancers in the world are attributable to cervical cancer, in developed countries anal cancer accounts for a larger proportion of human papillomavirus-related cancers. Most cases of anal cancer occur in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. In this review, we discuss the burden of human papillomavirus-related cancers in men, the most plausible immune mechanism associated with the high efficacy of the human papillomavirus vaccine, and address key issues of vaccination for HIV-infected men. Finally, we review cost-effectiveness considerations for the use of the vaccine in boys and recent guidelines for vaccination in boys, with attention to HIV-infected men. PMID:24818632

  10. The recognition of local DNA conformation by the human papillomavirus type 6 E2 protein

    OpenAIRE

    Hooley, Elizabeth; Fairweather, Victoria; Clarke, Anthony R.; Gaston, Kevin; Leo Brady, R.

    2006-01-01

    The E2 proteins are transcription/replication factors from papillomaviruses. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can be broadly divided in two groups; low-risk HPV subtypes cause benign warts while high-risk HPVs give rise to cervical cancer. Although a range of crystal structures of E2 DNA-binding domains (DBD) from both high- and low-risk HPV subtypes have been reported previously, structures of E2 DBD:DNA complexes have only been available for high-risk HPV18 and bovine papillomavirus (BPV1). In...

  11. Deep sequencing extends the diversity of human papillomaviruses in human skin.

    OpenAIRE

    Bzhalava, Davit; Mühr, Laila Sara Arroyo; Lagheden, Camilla; Ekström, Johanna; Forslund, Ola; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most viruses in human skin are known to be human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Previous sequencing of skin samples has identified 273 different cutaneous HPV types, including 47 previously unknown types. In the present study, we wished to extend prior studies using deeper sequencing. This deeper sequencing without prior PCR of a pool of 142 whole genome amplified skin lesions identified 23 known HPV types, 3 novel putative HPV types and 4 non-HPV viruses. The complete sequence was obtained for one...

  12. Genome-wide analysis of high risk human papillomavirus E2 proteins in human primary keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Sunthamala, Nuchsupha; Pang, Chai Ling; Thierry, Francoise; Teissier, Sebastien; Pientong, Chamsai; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2014-01-01

    The E2 protein is expressed in the early stage of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection that is associated with cervical lesions. This protein plays important roles in regulation of viral replication and transcription. To characterize the role of E2 protein in modulation of cellular gene expression in HPV infected cells, genome-wide expression profiling of human primary keratinocytes (HPK) harboring HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2 was investigated using microarray. The Principle Components Analysis (PCA...

  13. p53 represses human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication via the viral E2 protein

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan Iain M; Taylor Ewan R; Kowalczyk Anna M; Brown Craig; Gaston Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA replication can be inhibited by the cellular tumour suppressor protein p53. However, the mechanism through which p53 inhibits viral replication and the role that this might play in the HPV life cycle are not known. The papillomavirus E2 protein is required for efficient HPV DNA replication and also regulates viral gene expression. E2 represses transcription of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes and can thereby modulate indirectly host cell prolifera...

  14. The Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier Bosch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer has been recognized as a rare outcome of a common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI. The etiologic association is restricted to a limited number of viral types of the family of the Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs. The association is causal in nature and under optimal testing systems, HPV DNA can be identified in all specimens of invasive cervical cancer. As a consequence, it has been claimed that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The evidence is consistent worldwide and implies both the Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC, the adenocarcinomas and the vast majority (i.e. > 95% of the immediate precursors, namely High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (HSIL/Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 (CIN3/Carcinoma in situ. Co-factors that modify the risk among HPV DNA positive women include the use of oral contraceptives (OC for five or more years, smoking, high parity (five or more full term pregnancies and previous exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases such as Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT and Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2. Women exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV are at high risk for HPV infection, HPV DNA persistency and progression of HPV lesions to cervical cancer.

  15. Association between human papillomavirus infection and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Kamal

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using two methods: PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay (PCR/DEIA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for detection of HPV in specimens of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and to correlate the presence of HPV with the epidemiological and clinicopathological features of recurrence and survival. HPV DNA was amplified from 93 paraffin-embedded laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma tissue specimens by the short PCR fragment (SPF 10) primer set using PCR/DNA method. HPV detection using monoclonal anti-human papilloma virus antibodies Clone K1H8 for IHC reaction was performed on 130 specimens. HPV was identified in 35.5% of patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using PCR/DEIA and 27.7% using IHC. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of HPV and the epidemiological and clinicopathological features and recurrence. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of HPV and overall survival nor disease specific survival. Statistically significant correlation between HPV detection using PCR/DEIA technique and IHC technique was found. The presence of HPV infection in 27.7% and 38.9% of the patients suggests a possible role in the etiology of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The SPF(10) PCR/DEIA technique is the most accurate method for detection of HPV in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:20419817

  16. The DNA Binding Domain of a Papillomavirus E2 Protein Programs a Chimeric Nuclease To Cleave Integrated Human Papillomavirus DNA in HeLa Cervical Carcinoma Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Horner, Stacy M.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Viral DNA binding proteins that direct nucleases or other protein domains to viral DNA in lytically or latently infected cells may provide a novel approach to modulate viral gene expression or replication. Cervical carcinogenesis is initiated by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and viral DNA persists in the cancer cells. To test whether a DNA binding domain of a papillomavirus protein can direct a nuclease domain to cleave HPV DNA in cervical cancer cells, we fused the DNA bind...

  17. 宫颈癌防治用人乳头瘤病毒疫苗的研究进展%Research progress of human papillomavirus vaccine in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏和霞; 张炜

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is closely related to the development of cervical cancer. The role of HPV vaccine in the prevention and treatment of cervical diseases caused by HPV infection is gradually taken into account. This review summarizes the recent research progress of preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer. Quadrivalent HPV (HPV6/11/16/18) vaccine Gardasil, bivalent HPV (HPV16/18) vaccine Cervarix, and a new nine-valent HPV (HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccine Gardasil 9 have been listed and applied in clinic among the preventive vaccines. However, therapeutic HPV vaccines are still in the research stage and more experiments are needed to improve the immunogenicity and safety for clinical trials in humankind.%高危型人乳头瘤病毒(human papillomavirus, HPV)感染与宫颈癌的发生、发展关系密切。HPV疫苗在HPV感染所致宫颈疾病防治中的作用逐渐受到重视。本文介绍宫颈癌防治用预防性和治疗性HPV疫苗的研究进展。预防性HPV疫苗中的四价HPV(HPV6/11/16/18)疫苗Gardasil、二价HPV(HPV16/18)疫苗Cervarix和九价HPV (HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58)疫苗Gardasil 9已获准上市并用于临床。治疗性HPV疫苗均尚处于研究阶段,且免疫原性与安全性仍有待提高。

  18. Sexual transmission of oral human papillomavirus infection among men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Kristina R; Burchell, Ann N; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Rodrigues, Allita; Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Hanley, James; Coutlée, François; Franco, Eduardo L

    2014-12-01

    We estimated the prevalence of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) and assessed risk factors among young heterosexual men participating in the HPV Infection and Transmission among Couples through Heterosexual Activity (HITCH) study. Oral and genital HPV samples were collected from 222 men and their female partners who were participating in the HITCH study, a longitudinal cohort on HPV transmission among heterosexual couples. Demographic and behavioral data were collected through self-administered computer questionnaires and biologic samples were tested with the Linear Array for HPV. Outcome measures were overall and type-specific prevalence of oral HPV. The prevalence of oral HPV among men was 7.2% and was higher among men who were ever smokers (12.2%), in nonmonogamous relationships (17.9%), or had a partner with oral (28.6%) and/or genital (11.5%) HPV infection. Moreover, prevalence increased with frequency of oral sex among men whose partner who had a genital infection with the same HPV type. Our results provide further evidence that oral HPV may be transmitted through either oral-oral or oral-genital routes. PMID:25392180

  19. CLINICAL OBSERVATION ON VERTICAL TRANSMISSION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐倏燊; 刘兰青; 吕绳敏; 任舒月

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To observe the possibility of maternal-fetal vertical transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV)via amniotic fluid. Subjects and methods. Specimens of cervical secretions from 30 pregnant women were obtained during the third trimester before rupture of membrane, and specimens of pharyngeal secretsions of their neonates weee obtained 12-48 h after birth. Amniotic fluids were collected in 13 pregnant women during cesarean section. The presence of HPV types 6,11,16,18,31,33,35,38 deoxyribonucleic acid were detected by consensus polymerase chain reaction. Remits. HPV deoxyribonucleic acid was found in 18 cervical secretions, 14 pharyngeal secretions and in 8 amniotic fluids, the positive rate was 53. 3%, 46.7%, 23. 1% respectively. The pharyngeal secretion was also HPV positive in one of the three neonates from the amnlotic fluid positive mothers. Conclusion. The results indic.am that HPV can be transmitted in utezo through amniotic fluid and cesarean section can not protect the neonates against vertical transmission completely.

  20. Therapeutic vaccines against human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are linked to infection by a subset of so-called "highrisk" human papillomavirus types, which are estimated to infect nearly four hundred million women worldwide. Two prophylactic vaccines have been commercialized recently targeting HPV16 and 18, the most prevalent viral types found in cervical cancer, which operate through induction of capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, in patients with persistent infection these vaccines have not been found to protect against progression to neoplasia. Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines targeting nonstructural early viral proteins. Among these, E6 and E7 are the preferred targets, since they are essential for induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and are constitutively expressed by the transformed epithelial cells. Here are reviewed the most relevant potential vaccines based on HPV early antigens that have shown efficacy in preclinical models and that are being tested in clinical studies, which should determine their therapeutic capacity for eradicating HPV-induced premalignant and malignant lesions and cure cervical cancer. PMID:19915722

  1. [Cervical infection epidemiology of human papillomavirus in Ushuaia, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijvarger, C C; González, J V; Prieto, A; Messmer, A G; Mallimaci, M C; Alonio, V L; Teyssié, A R; Picconi, M A

    2006-01-01

    Genital infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is decisive in the causation of cervical cancer. In order to evaluate the epidemiology of HPV infection in Ushuaia, Province of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, 132 endocervical cytobrushes from preneoplastic and neoplastic cases and controls were studied. Detection and typing of the viral genome was performed by polymerase chain reaction, combined with a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay or hybridization. The overall prevalence of HPV infection was 41% in the population examined, with a frequency of 26% in the controls and 71% in the cases under study. The 14-24 age group showed the highest HPV prevalence. The most common viral types in the infected population were HPV 16 (23%), HPV 18 (11%), HPV 33 (8%) and HPV 35 (8%), while high risk viral types were detected in 30% of the samples, 16% of the controls and 60% of the cases. This study provides the first data on the predominant viral types in Ushuaia. Our results show lower levels of infection than in regions with a high incidence of cervical cancer, HPV 16 being the most prevalent viral type. This research may be useful for selecting a specific vaccine targeting the population examined. PMID:16784128

  2. Human Papillomavirus 16E6 Oncogene Mutation in Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Sun; Xiao-qin Ha; Tong-de Lv; Chuan-ping Xing; Bin Liu; Xiao-zhe Cao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, after breast cancer. High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are considered to be the major causes of cervical cancer. HPV16 is the most common type of HR-HPVs and HPV16 E6 gene is one of the major oncogenes. Specific mutations are considered as dangerous factors causing CC. This study was designed to find mutations of HPV16 E6 and the relationship between the mutations and the happening of CC.Methods: The tissue DNA was extracted from 15 biopsies of CC. Part of HPV16 E6 gene (nucleotide 201-523) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the CC tissue DNA. The PCR fragments were sequenced and analyzed.Results: The result of PCR showed that the positive rate of HPV16 E6 was 93.33% (14/15). After sequencing and analyzing, in the 13 out of 14 PCR fragments, 4 maintained prototype (30.77%), 8 had a same 350G mutation (61.54%), and 1 had a 249G mutation (7.69%).Conclusion: This study suggest that there is a high infection rate of HPV in cervical cancer and most of the HPV16 E6 gene has mutations. Those mutations may have an association with the development of cervical cancer.

  3. Human Papillomavirus Infection, Infertility, and Assisted Reproductive Outcomes

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    Nigel Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV is a sexually transmitted infection common among men and women across all geographic and socioeconomic subgroups worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that HPV infection may affect fertility and alter the efficacy of assisted reproductive technologies. In men, HPV infection can affect sperm parameters, specifically motility. HPV-infected sperm can transmit viral DNA to oocytes, which may be expressed in the developing blastocyst. HPV can increase trophoblastic apoptosis and reduce the endometrial implantation of trophoblastic cells, thus increasing the theoretical risk of miscarriage. Vertical transmission of HPV during pregnancy may be involved in the pathophysiology of preterm rupture of membranes and spontaneous preterm birth. In patients undergoing intrauterine insemination for idiopathic infertility, HPV infection confers a lower pregnancy rate. In contrast, the evidence regarding any detrimental impact of HPV infection on IVF outcomes is inconclusive. It has been suggested that vaccination could potentially counter HPV-related sperm impairment, trophoblastic apoptosis, and spontaneous miscarriages; however, these conclusions are based on in vitro studies rather than large-scale epidemiological studies. Improvement in the understanding of HPV sperm infection mechanisms and HPV transmission into the oocyte and developing blastocyst may help explain idiopathic causes of infertility and miscarriage.

  4. Identification of human papillomavirus in esophageal squamous papillomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in esophageal squamous papilloma (ESP) and determine p16, p53 and Ki67 expression in a Mexican cohort.METHODS: Nineteen cases diagnosed as ESP, corresponding to 18 patients were reviewed; nineteen cases of normal esophageal mucosa were used as negative controls. HPV detection was performed by ,amplified chromogenic in situ hybridization (ACISH) using a wide spectrum-cocktail probe and PCR. RESULTS: The average age at presentation was 46.3 years (range 28-72 years). Patients included four (22.22%) males and 14 (77.77%) females. The most frequent location was upper third (11 cases), followed by middle third (3 cases) and unknown site (5 cases). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed basal and focal p53 expression in 17 cases (89%); p16 was expressed in eight cases (42.10%) and the Ki67 index ranged from 10% to 30%. HPV was detected in 14 out of 16 cases (87.5%) by ACISH: Twelve showed diffuse nuclear patterns and two showed granular patterns. HPV DNA was identified by PCR in 12 out of 14 cases (85.7%). Low-risk HPV types were detected in the most of the cases. CONCLUSION: This study provides identification of HPV infection in almost 80% of ESP using either ACISH or PCR; overall, all of these lesions show low expression of cell-cycle markers. We suggest ACISH as an alternative diagnostic tool for HPV detection in ESP.

  5. Human papillomavirus genotypes in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with anal pathology in Madrid, Spain

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    García-Espinosa, Benjamín; Moro-Rodríguez, Ernesto; Álvarez-Fernández, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied anal specimens to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and co-infection occurrence. This information will contribute to the knowledge of HPV genotype distributions and provide an estimate of the prevalence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes found in patients in Madrid (Spain). Methods We studied a total of 82 anal biopsies from the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón of Madrid. These included 4 specimens with benign lesions, 52...

  6. Adenocarcinoma in situ and associated human papillomavirus type distribution observed in two clinical trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ault, Kevin A; Joura, Elmar A; Kjaer, Susanne K;

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this report is to describe the detection of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and associated human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution that was observed in the context of two phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine. In this intention-to-treat analysis......, we include all women who had at least one follow-up visit postenrollment. Healthy women (17,622) aged 15-26 with no history of HPV disease and a lifetime number of less than five sex partners (average follow-up of 3.6 years) were randomized (1:1) to receive vaccine or placebo at day 1, months 2, and...... 6. Women underwent colposcopy and biopsy according to a Papanicolaou triage algorithm. All tissue specimens were tested for 14 HPV types and were adjudicated by a pathology panel. During the trials, 22 women were diagnosed with AIS (six vaccine and 16 placebo). There were 25 AIS lesions in total...

  7. Adenocarcinoma in situ and associated human papillomavirus type distribution observed in two clinical trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ault, Kevin A; Joura, Elmar A; Kjaer, Susanne K;

    2011-01-01

    , we include all women who had at least one follow-up visit postenrollment. Healthy women (17,622) aged 15-26 with no history of HPV disease and a lifetime number of less than five sex partners (average follow-up of 3.6 years) were randomized (1:1) to receive vaccine or placebo at day 1, months 2, and......The primary objective of this report is to describe the detection of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and associated human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution that was observed in the context of two phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine. In this intention-to-treat analysis...... 6. Women underwent colposcopy and biopsy according to a Papanicolaou triage algorithm. All tissue specimens were tested for 14 HPV types and were adjudicated by a pathology panel. During the trials, 22 women were diagnosed with AIS (six vaccine and 16 placebo). There were 25 AIS lesions in total...

  8. Multicenter Study of Human Papillomavirus and the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Knowledge and Attitudes among People of African Descent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Blackman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare knowledge and attitudes of human papillomavirus (HPV and the vaccine between different cultures of African descent. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of 555 African-Americans and Afro-Caribbeans residing in the US and the Bahamas (BHM was conducted. Results. General knowledge about HPV and the HPV vaccine differed between the two countries significantly. Bahamian respondents were less likely to have higher numbers of correct knowledge answers when compared to Americans (Adjusted Odds Ratio [Adj. OR] 0.47, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.30–0.75. Older age, regardless of location, was also associated with answering fewer questions correctly (Adj. OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40–0.92. Attitudes related to HPV vaccination were similar between the US and BHM, but nearly 80% of BHM respondents felt that children should not be able to receive the vaccine without parental consent compared to 57% of American respondents. Conclusions. Grave lack of knowledge, safety and cost concerns, and influence of parental restrictions may negatively impact vaccine uptake among African-American and Afro-Caribbean persons. Interventions to increase the vaccine uptake in the Caribbean must include medical provider and parental involvement. Effective strategies for education and increasing vaccine uptake in BHM are crucial for decreasing cervical cancer burden in the Caribbean.

  9. Knowledge, attitudes and practices about human papillomavirus in educated adolescents

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    Castro Reyes Elkin Mauricio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: cervical cancer (CC is the second most frequent cancer in women in theworld, South America and Colombia. It represents the fourth cause of death by cancerin the world, the third cause in South America and the first cause in Colombia. The interesanprincipalrisk factor is the persistent infection with the Human Papillomavirus (HPV. TheCC can be prevented and the patient can be treated if it is detected early.Objective: to establish the knowledge, attitudes and practices about HumanPapillomavirus (HPV in adolescent students of secondary.Methods: an analytical, observational and cross sectional study was performed withthe application of a survey of knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP, to studentsof secondary of two schools of the city of Cartagena, Colombia, between July andDecember of 2011.Results: 10.8% of the polled adolescents replied that they knew the condilomatosis,infectious disease of sexual transmission caused by HPV and 20,1% have knowledgeabout the connection between cervical cancer and HPV infection.Conclusion: there is low knowledge about HPV infection and its association with CC,just like good attitudes with respect to the use of prevention methods of HPV infectionand early detection methods of CC and inadequate practices, mainly in the vaccinationprogramming against HPV. Rev.cienc.biomed. 2012;3(2:275-281RESUMEN:frecuente en mujeres en el mundo, América Latina y Colombia. Representa la cuartacausa de muerte por cáncer en el mundo, la tercera en America del Sur y la primera enColombia. El factor de riesgo principal es la infección persistente con el Virus del PapilomaHumano (VPH. El CACU puede prevenirse y curarse si se detecta tempranamente.Objetivo: establecer conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas acerca del VPH enadolescentes estudiantes de secundaria.Metodología: estudio observacional analítico de corte transversal realizado con laaplicación de una encuesta de conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas (CAP, a

  10. Characterization of a novel human papillomavirus DNA in the cervical carcinoma cell line ME180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, S; Delius, H; Kahn, T; Hofmann, B; zur Hausen, H; Schwarz, E

    1991-01-01

    The human cervical carcinoma cell line ME180 was examined for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA and RNA. The integrated DNA of a presumably new HPV type showing a relationship closer to HPV39 than to HPV18 was cloned and sequenced. HPV sequences from the E6-E7-E1 region are expressed as poly(A)+ RNAs. Images PMID:1716694

  11. Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cancers - United States, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viens, Laura J; Henley, S Jane; Watson, Meg; Markowitz, Lauri E; Thomas, Cheryll C; Thompson, Trevor D; Razzaghi, Hilda; Saraiya, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a known cause of cervical cancers, as well as some vulvar, vaginal, penile, oropharyngeal, anal, and rectal cancers (1,2). Although most HPV infections are asymptomatic and clear spontaneously, persistent infections with one of 13 oncogenic HPV types can progress to precancer or cancer. To assess the incidence of HPV-associated cancers, CDC analyzed 2008-2012 high-quality data from the CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. During 2008-2012, an average of 38,793 HPV-associated cancers were diagnosed annually, including 23,000 (59%) among females and 15,793 (41%) among males. By multiplying these counts by the percentages attributable to HPV (3), CDC estimated that approximately 30,700 new cancers were attributable to HPV, including 19,200 among females and 11,600 among males. Cervical precancers can be detected through screening, and treatment can prevent progression to cancer; HPV vaccination can prevent infection with HPV types that cause cancer at cervical and other sites (3). Vaccines are available for HPV types 16 and 18, which cause 63% of all HPV-associated cancers in the United States, and for HPV types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58, which cause an additional 10% (3). Among the oncogenic HPV types, HPV 16 is the most likely to both persist and to progress to cancer (3). The impact of these primary and secondary prevention interventions can be monitored using surveillance data from population-based cancer registries. PMID:27387669

  12. Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in Invasive Cervical Cancer in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Asif; Serrano, Beatriz; Rasheed, Farah; Tous, Sara; Hassan, Mariam; Clavero, Omar; Raza, Muhammad; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F Xavier; Alemany, Laia

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Pakistan. We aim to provide specific information on HPV-type distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in the country. A total of 280 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were consecutively selected from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (Lahore, Pakistan). HPV-DNA was detected by SPF10 broad-spectrum PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by LiPA25. HPV-DNA prevalence was 87.5% (95%CI: 83.0-91.1), with 96.1% of cases histologically classified as squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the HPV-DNA positive cases presented single infections (95.9%). HPV16 was the most common type followed by HPV18 and 45. Among HPV-DNA positive, a significantly higher contribution of HPV16/18 was detected in Pakistan (78.4%; 72.7-83.3), compared to Asia (71.6%; 69.9-73.4) and worldwide (70.8%; 69.9-71.8) and a lower contribution of HPVs31/33/45/52/58 (11.1%; 7.9-15.7 vs. 19.8%; 18.3-21.3 and 18.5%; 17.7-19.3). HPV18 or HPV45 positive ICC cases were significantly younger than cases infected by HPV16 (mean age: 43.3, 44.4, 50.5 years, respectively). A routine cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination program does not yet exist in Pakistan; however, the country could benefit from national integrated efforts for cervical cancer prevention and control. Calculated estimations based on our results show that current HPV vaccine could potentially prevent new ICC cases. PMID:27483322

  13. Human Papillomavirus and Tonsillar and Base of Tongue Cancer

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    Torbjörn Ramqvist

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 was recognized as a risk factor by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, where tonsillar and base of tongue cancer (TSCC and BOTSCC dominate. Furthermore, patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC, had a much better clinical outcome than those with corresponding HPV-negative cancer and other head and neck cancer. More specifically, survival was around 80% for HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC vs. 40% five-year disease free survival, for the corresponding HPV-negative tumors with conventional radiotherapy and surgery, while this could not be observed for HPV-positive OSCC at other sites. In addition, the past 20–40 years in many Western Countries, the incidence of HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC has risen, and >70% are men. This has resulted in a relative increase of patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC that may not need the intensified chemo-radiotherapy (with many more severe debilitating side effects often given today to patients with head and neck cancer. However, before tapering therapy, one needs to enable selection of patients for such treatment, by identifying clinical and molecular markers that together with HPV-positive status will better predict patient prognosis and response to therapy. To conclude, there is a new increasing group of patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC with good clinical outcome, where options for better-tailored therapy are needed. For prevention, it would be of benefit to vaccinate both girls and boys against HPV16 infection. For potential future screening the ways to do so need optimizing.

  14. Nucleic acid tests for the detection of alpha human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Iftner, Thomas; Dillner, Joakim; Arbyn, Marc

    2012-11-20

    Testing for high-risk types of alpha human papillomaviruses (HPV) is an invaluable part of clinical guidelines for cervical carcinoma screening, management and treatment. In this comprehensive inventory of commercial tests for detection of alpha-HPV, we identified at least 125 distinct HPV tests and at least 84 variants of the original tests. However, only a small subset of HPV tests has documented clinical performance for any of the standard HPV testing indications. For more than 75% of HPV tests currently on the market, no single publication in peer-reviewed literature can be identified. HPV tests that have not been validated and lack proof of reliability, reproducibility and accuracy should not be used in clinical management. Once incorporated in the lab, it is essential that the whole procedure of HPV testing is subject to continuous and rigorous quality assurance to avoid sub-optimal, potentially harmful practices. Manufacturers of HPV tests are urged to put more effort into evaluating their current and future products analytically, using international standards, and for clinical applications, using clinically validated endpoints. To assist with analytical validation, the World Health Organization is developing international standards for HPV types other than HPV16 and HPV18 and is planning development of external quality control panels specifically designed to be used for performance evaluation of current and future HPV tests. There is a need for more competitively priced HPV tests, especially for resource-poor countries, and uniform test validation criteria based on international standards should enable issuing more competitive and fair tender notices for purchasing. Automation systems allowing large-scale testing, as well as further increases in clinical performance, are the main needs in the further improvement of HPV tests. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine

  15. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research. PMID:26132923

  16. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tormi Reinson

    Full Text Available Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  17. Commercially available molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV): 2015 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Oštrbenk, Anja; Seme, Katja

    2016-03-01

    Commercial molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV) are invaluable diagnostic tools in cervical carcinoma screening and management of women with cervical precancerous lesions as well as important research tools for epidemiological studies, vaccine development, and implementation and monitoring of vaccination programs. In this third inventory of commercial HPV tests, we identified 193 distinct commercial HPV tests and at least 127 test variants available on the market in 2015, which represents a 54% and 79% increase in the number of distinct HPV tests and variants, respectively, in comparison to our last inventory performed in 2012. Identified HPV tests were provisionally divided into eight main groups and several subgroups. Among the 193 commercial HPV tests, all but two target alpha-HPV types only. Although the number of commercial HPV tests with at least one published study in peer-reviewed literature has increased significantly in the last three years, several published performance evaluations are still not in line with agreed-upon standards in the HPV community. Manufacturers should invest greater effort into evaluating their products and publishing validation/evaluation results in peer-reviewed journals. To achieve this, more clinically oriented external quality-control panels and initiatives are required. For evaluating the analytical performance of the entire range of HPV tests currently on the market, more diverse and reliable external quality-control programs based on international standards for all important HPV types are indispensable. The performance of a wider range of HPV tests must be promptly evaluated on a variety of alternative clinical specimens. In addition, more complete HPV assays containing validated sample-extraction protocols and appropriate internal controls are urgently needed. Provision of a broader range of automated systems allowing large-scale HPV testing as well as the development of reliable, rapid, and affordable molecular

  18. Detection of Multiple Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Anal Carcinoma

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    Luo Linda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV is a major risk factor for development of anal squamous cell carcinoma. Despite over 100 genotypes of the virus, HPV 16 and 18 are considered pathogenic as they are seen in the majority of cervical and anal cancers. We have employed a custom microarray to examine DNA for several HPV genotypes. We aimed to determine the accuracy of our microarray in anal cancer DNA for HPV genotypes compared to the DNA sequencing gold standard. Methods We utilized a sensitive microarray platform to classify 37 types of mucosal HPVs including 14 known high-risk and 23 low-risk types based on cervical cancer data. We utilized DNA from pathologically confirmed cases of anal squamous cell carcinoma. All samples underwent microarray HPV genotyping and PCR analysis. Results HPV was detected in 18/20 (90% anal cancers. HPV genotypes 16 and 18 were present in the majority of specimens, with HPV 16 being the most common. Eighty percent of anal cancers had at least two HPV types. Ten percent of cases (2/20 tested negative using our microarray; DNA sequencing confirmed the lack of presence of HPV DNA in these samples. Conclusions Microarray technology is an accurate way to screen for various genotypes of HPV in anal cancer, with 100% correlation with genomic DNA detection of HPV. The majority of anal cancers in our study associated with pathogenic HPV 16 and/or 18. Other HPV genotypes are present simultaneously with HPV 16 and 18, and might contribute to its pathogenesis.

  19. Molecular testing of human papillomavirus in cervical specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to improve the diagnosis of cervical neoplasia by early detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) in uterine cervix, by adding molecular testing of HPV using hybrid capture 2 (HC2) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests to Papanicoalou (Pap) test. One hundred women were enrolled in this study. The mean age (mean+-SD) was 41.97+- 8.76 years and range was 27-65 years. All women had undergone cervical cytological screening with cervical cytology, HPV DNA testing by HC2 and PCR, during the period from January to December 2006, at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital (KAAUH) and King Fahd research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The results were obtained by HC2 for detection of HPV were 5(5%) high-risk HPV, one low-risk HPV (1%) and 94(94%) negative cases. The PCR detected only 4(4%) cases. Using the HC2 test as a reference, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive, negative predictive values and accuracy of base line Pap were 50, 85, 17.7, 96.4 and 83%; of final Pap smear were 100, 96.8, 66.7, 100, and 97% and for PCR were 66.7, 100, 100, 97.9 and 98%. The Pap test was repeated within a year for patients with abnormal Pap test with positive HPV DNA. Combined screening by cytology and HPV testing using both HC2 and PCR sensitively detects women with existing disease. The absence of HPV DNA provides reassurance that patients are unlikely to develop cancer for several years. We suggest using Pap with HC2 and PCR in screening programs to ensure that women with the double negative result at baseline might safely be screened at longer intervals. (author)

  20. Barriers to human papillomavirus vaccine acceptability in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A; Laniado, Hila; Shoval, Hila; Hakim, Marwan; Bornstein, Jacob

    2013-11-22

    Barriers to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptability in Israel include Israel's relatively low incidence of cervical cancer; the religiously-based 80% circumcision rate in Israel, which is regarded as contributing to the lower incidence of HPV infection in the country; the fact that HPV vaccine provides immunity against only few virus types; the vaccine's high cost; and the perception that HPV transmission is associated with unacceptable sexual relations. A recent survey has demonstrated that, following media two campaigns, Israeli's level of awareness of the vaccine increased but the actual vaccination rate remained low, at approximately 10%. Survey findings also indicated that an enduring barrier to HPV vaccination is the vaccine's high cost. Recent research on a convenience sample of Israeli undergraduate women 21 to 24 years of age showed that intentions to receive HPV vaccination in the coming year were a function of women's attitudes towards getting vaccinated and their perceptions of social support for doing so. Undergraduate women who intended to be vaccinated perceived the prevention of cervical cancer, avoidance of personal health threat, and avoidance of HPV infection per se to be the advantages of undergoing HPV vaccination. Disadvantages of getting vaccinated included fear of vaccine side effects, cost of the vaccine, and newness of the vaccine, doubts about vaccines, time required to undergo multiple vaccinations, and dislike of injections. Friends', mothers' and physicians' recommendations influenced women's intentions to be vaccinated in the coming year as well. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in Israel" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 8, 2013. Updates of the progress in the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:24229720

  1. High risk human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in human breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wendy K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein Barr virus (EBV and mouse mammary tumour virus have been identified in human milk. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV sequences have been identified in breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if viral sequences are present in human milk from normal lactating women. Findings Standard (liquid and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques were used to identify HPV and EBV in human milk samples from normal lactating Australian women who had no history of breast cancer. High risk human papillomavirus was identified in milk samples of 6 of 40 (15% from normal lactating women - sequencing on four samples showed three were HPV 16 and one was HPV 18. Epstein Barr virus was identified in fourteen samples (33%. Conclusion The presence of high risk HPV and EBV in human milk suggests the possibility of milk transmission of these viruses. However, given the rarity of viral associated malignancies in young people, it is possible but unlikely, that such transmission is associated with breast or other cancers.

  2. Increased alpha-9 human papillomavirus species viral load in human immunodeficiency virus positive women

    OpenAIRE

    Mbulawa, Zizipho Z. A.; Johnson, Leigh F.; Marais, Dianne J.; Gustavsson, Inger; Moodley, Jennifer R; Coetzee, David; Gyllensten, Ulf; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Background: Persistent high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and increased HR-HPV viral load are associated with the development of cancer. This study investigated the effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection, HIV viral load and CD4 count on the HR-HPV viral load; and also investigated the predictors of cervical abnormalities. Methods: Participants were 292 HIV-negative and 258 HIV-positive women. HR-HPV viral loads in cervical cells were determined by the real-...

  3. Monitoring human papillomavirus prevalence in urine samples: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enerly E

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Espen Enerly, Cecilia Olofsson, Mari NygårdDepartment of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer, and many countries now offer vaccination against HPV to girls by way of government-funded national immunization programs. Monitoring HPV prevalence in adolescents could offer a near-term biological measure of vaccine impact, and urine sampling may be an attractive large-scale method that could be used for this purpose. Our objective was to provide an overview of the literature on HPV DNA detection in urine samples, with an emphasis on adolescents. We searched the PubMed database using the terms “HPV” and “urine” and identified 21 female and 14 male study populations in which HPV prevalence in urine samples was reported, four of which included only asymptomatic female adolescents. We provide herein an overview of the recruitment setting, age, urine sampling procedure, lesion type, HPV assay, and HPV prevalence in urine samples and other urogenital samples for the studies included in this review. In female study populations, concordance for any HPV type and type-specific concordance in paired urine and cervical samples are provided in addition to sensitivity and specificity. We concluded that few studies on HPV prevalence in urine samples have been performed in asymptomatic female adolescent populations but that urine samples may be a useful alternative to cervical samples to monitor changes in HPV prevalence in females in the post-HPV vaccination era. However, care should be taken when extrapolating HPV findings from urine samples to the cervix. In males, urine samples do not seem to be optimal for monitoring HPV prevalence due to a low human genomic DNA content and HPV DNA detection rate compared to other urogenital sites. In each situation the costs and benefits of HPV DNA detection in urine compared to alternative monitoring options should be carefully

  4. Human papillomaviruses associated with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. II. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of human papillomavirus 3a, 8, 10, and 12 genomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kremsdorf, D; Jablonska, S; Favre, M; Orth, G

    1983-01-01

    The DNAs of four human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that were found in the benign lesions of three patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis have been characterized. The flat wart-like lesions and the macular lesions of patient 1 contained two viruses, HPV-3a and HPV-8, respectively, whose genomes had previously been only partially characterized. The flat wart-like lesions of patient 2 and the macular lesions of patient 3 each contained a virus previously considered as belonging to t...

  5. A novel pre-clinical murine model to study the life cycle and progression of cervical and anal papillomavirus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy M Cladel

    Full Text Available Papillomavirus disease and associated cancers remain a significant health burden in much of the world. The current protective vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, are expensive and not readily available to the underprivileged. In addition, the vaccines have not gained wide acceptance in the United States nor do they provide therapeutic value. Papillomaviruses are strictly species specific and thus human viruses cannot be studied in an animal host. An appropriate model for mucosal disease has long been sought. We chose to investigate whether the newly discovered mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1, could infect mucosal tissues in Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu mice.The vaginal and anal canals of Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu mice were gently abraded using Nonoxynol-9 and "Doctor's BrushPicks" and MmuPV1 was delivered into the vaginal tract or the anal canal.Productive vaginal, cervical and anal infections developed in all mice. Vaginal/cervical infections could be monitored by vaginal lavage. Dysplasias were evident in all animals.Anogenital tissues of a common laboratory mouse can be infected with a papillomavirus unique to that animal. This observation will pave the way for fundamental virological and immunological studies that have been challenging to carry out heretofore due to lack of a suitable model system.

  6. Conserved interaction of the papillomavirus E2 transcriptional activator proteins with human and yeast TFIIB proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, J D; Lawande, R; Howley, P M

    1997-01-01

    Papillomavirus early gene expression is regulated by the virus gene-encoded E2 proteins. The best-characterized E2 protein, encoded by bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1), has been shown to interact with basal transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) and the TATA binding protein basal transcription factor (N. M. Rank and P. F. Lambert, J. Virol. 69:6323-6334, 1995). We demonstrate that the potent E2 transcriptional activator protein encoded by a gene of human PV type 16 also interacts with TFIIB in ...

  7. Human papillomavirus infection, vaccination, and cervical cancer communication: the protection dilemma faced by women in southern Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Sadie P; Dorgan, Kelly A; Duvall, Kathryn L; Garrett, Linda H

    2011-11-30

    Human papillomavirus is the most frequently occurring sexually transmitted infection and has been recognized as the necessary cause of cervical cancer. Understanding the shift in public awareness caused by recent changes to cervical prevention is critical to addressing cervical cancer disparities in Appalachia. Since the human papillomavirus vaccine was approved for prevention, little data have been collected regarding human papillomavirus risk assessment and vaccine perceptions among Appalachian women. The purpose of the authors in this study was to investigate communication and cultural issues via a social scripting framework that could influence human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among southern Appalachian women; and explore participants' perceptions of human papillomavirus, cervical cancer, and the vaccine. A qualitative, descriptive design was employed to examine these issues in eight counties in northeast Tennessee and southwest Virginia. Thirty-nine women aged 18-49 years participated in a single individual interview or focus group session from October 2007 through August 2008. Interview and focus group data were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Two major themes emerged from the data: the human papillomavirus vaccine protection dilemma and spheres of silence surrounding the human papillomavirus vaccine protection dilemma. Study findings suggested areas for future research and may assist healthcare professionals in approaching southern Appalachian women as they make decisions regarding cervical cancer prevention. PMID:22185292

  8. The Acceptability of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination among Women with Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chia-Feng; Chen, Si-Fan; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Chang, Mao-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims to explore awareness and acceptability of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and to identify factors influencing HPV acceptability among women with physical disabilities in Taiwan. The study participants were 438 adult women with physical disabilities, aged 18-69 years. The participants were all officially registered as…

  9. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Stages of Change among Male and Female University Students: Ready or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Divya A.; Grunzweig, Katherine A.; Zochowski, Melissa K.; Dempsey, Amanda F.; Carlos, Ruth C.; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender differences in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine stages of change following the recommendations for permissive use of HPV vaccine in males. Participants: Students aged 18-26 attending a large, public, Midwest university in April 2010. Methods: Participants completed a self-administered, online questionnaire. HPV…

  10. Print News Coverage of School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Mandates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Dana M.; Smith, Katherine C.; Andon, Lindsay; Vernick, Jon; Tsui, Amy; Klassen, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2007, legislation was proposed in 24 states and the District of Columbia for school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine mandates, and mandates were enacted in Texas, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Media coverage of these events was extensive, and media messages both reflected and contributed to controversy surrounding…

  11. Investigating Stakeholder Attitudes and Opinions on School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodulman, Jessica A.; Starling, Randall; Kong, Alberta S.; Buller, David B.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Woodall, W. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Background: In several countries worldwide, school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs have been successful; however, little research has explored US stakeholders' acceptance toward school-based HPV vaccination programs. Methods: A total of 13 focus groups and 12 key informant interviews (N?=?117; 85% females; 66% racial/ethnic…

  12. Receipt of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine among Female College Students in the United States, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Lisa L.; Elkind, Julia S.; Landi, Suzanne N.; Brandt, Heather M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine receipt of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among female college students by demographic/descriptive characteristics and sexual behaviors. Methods: A secondary analysis of the Spring 2009 National College Health Assessment-II was conducted with 40,610 female college students (aged 18 to 24 years) attending 4-year…

  13. Opportunities for Increasing Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Provision in School Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jennifer L.; Feld, Ashley L.; O'Malley, Brittany; Entzel, Pamela; Smith, Jennifer S.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine remains low among adolescents in the United States. We sought to assess barriers to HPV vaccine provision in school health centers to inform subsequent interventions. Methods: We conducted structured interviews in the fall of 2010 with staff from all 33 school health centers in North…

  14. Human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal cancer in Greenland in 1994-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avnstorp, Magnus Balslev; Jensen, Ramon Gordon; Garnæs, Emilie;

    2013-01-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is associated with the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), smoking and alcohol. In Greenland, a high rate of HPV-induced cervical cancer and venereal diseases are found, which exposes the population for high risk of HPV infection. In...... Greenland, only girls are included in the mandatory HPV vaccination program....

  15. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intention among College Men: What's Oral Sex Got to Do with It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Richard A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Salazar, Laura F.; Nash, Rachel; Younge, Sinead; Head, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify associations between engaging in oral sex and perceived risk of oral cancer among college men. Also, to identify associations, and their moderating factors, between oral sex and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance. Methods: Young men were recruited from 2 university campuses in the South (N = 150). Men completed an…

  16. Beliefs and Knowledge about the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine among Undergraduate Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Theresa; Weinstein, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess male undergraduate students' human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge and intentions to receive the HPV vaccination. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: A sample of 116 male undergraduate students from a university in the Midwestern USA completed a survey questionnaire assessing various aspects…

  17. Evolution and classification of oncogenic human papillomavirus types and variants associated with cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zigui; de Freitas, Luciana Bueno; Burk, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The nomenclature of human papillomavirus (HPV) is established by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Virus (ICTV). However, the ICTV does not set standards for HPV below species levels. This chapter describes detailed genotyping methods for determining and classifying HPV variants. PMID:25348294

  18. Natural History of Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection in Heterosexual Women and Risks Associated With Persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Ma, Yifei; Farhat, Sepideh; Jay, Julie; Hanson, Evelyn; Benningfield, Susanna; Jonte, Janet; Godwin-Medina, Cheryl; Wilson, Robert; Shiboski, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infections were more likely to persist than other high-risk HPV types, and sexual behaviors were strongly associated with its persistence. As HPV-16 is responsible for 90% of anal cancers, prevention should include education around sexual practices.

  19. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Anal and Oral Sites Among Patients with Genital Warts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Sand, Carsten; Forslund, Ola;

    2014-01-01

    Genital warts are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a leading cause of anogenital malignancies and a role of HPV in the aetiology of oro-pharyngeal cancers has been demonstrated. The frequency of oral HPV infection in patients with genital warts and the association between concomitant...

  20. Activities of E7 promoters in the human papillomavirus type 16 genome during cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Nielsen, Lone; Norrild, Bodil

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, one of the most common cancer forms diagnosed in women is cervical cancer induced by infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) with HPV type 16 (HPV-16) being the most frequently identified. The oncogenicity is caused mainly by expression of the oncogenes E6 and E7 leading...

  1. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 modulates the expression of host microRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greco, Dario; Kivi, Niina; Qian, Kui;

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a prerequisite of developing cervical cancer, approximately half of which are associated with HPV type 16. HPV 16 encodes three oncogenes, E5, E6, and E7, of which E5 is the least studied so far. Its roles in regulating replication and pathogenesis of HPV a...

  2. Knowledge, Beliefs, and Behaviors: Examining Human Papillomavirus-Related Gender Differences among African American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Shalanda A.; Brandt, Heather M.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Annang, Lucy; Tanner, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Given recent approval for administration of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to men, it is important to assess the HPV-related perspectives of men and women. The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in HPV knowledge, beliefs, and vaccine acceptance among college students attending 3 historically black…

  3. No evidence for active human papillomavirus (HPV) in fields surrounding HPV-positive oropharyngeal tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Rietbergen; B.J.M. Braakhuis; N. Moukhtari; E. Bloemena; A. Brink; D. Sie; B. Ylstra; R.J. Baatenburg de Jong; P.J.F. Snijders; R.H. Brakenhoff; C.R. Leemans

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs) have a better prognosis than patients with HPV-negative OPSCCs. Important factors contributing to this better prognosis are relatively low numbers of local/regional recurrences (LRRs) and sec

  4. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Informational Behaviors of College Students in Regard to the Human Papillomavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandfort, Jessica R.; Pleasant, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess students' human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Participants/ Methods: Students (N = 1,282) at a large, public university in the Northeast United States completed a questionnaire during February 2008 assessing HPV knowledge, prevalence, transmission, cervical cancer risk and stigma; sexual behavior,…

  5. Human papillomavirus, anal cancer, and screening considerations among HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachay, Edward R; Mathews, William Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Invasive anal cancer has become an important cause of non AIDS-related cancer among HIV-infected individuals. Human papillomavirus is the main etiological agent. This review explains the pathophysiologic role of human papillomavirus in the development of invasive anal cancer, summarizes recent epidemiological trends of invasive anal cancer, and reviews the evidence to address common clinical questions posed when screening for anal cancer in HIV-infected patients. The effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy on human papillomavirus oncogenesis is still unclear, but given the increased clinical burden of invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected patients, many clinics have implemented screening programs for anal cancer and its precursors. Despite the availability of several modalities for treatment of precursors of anal cancer, evidence that current treatment modalities favorably alter the natural history of human papillomavirus oncogenesis in the anal and perianal regions is still inconclusive. However, there is sufficient evidence to state that the accuracy of anal cancer screening procedures (cytology and high-resolution anoscopy directed biopsy) is comparable to the accuracy of those used in screening for cervical cancer precursors. Studies that systematically assess the efficacy of these anal cancer screening programs in reducing the incidence of and morbidity and mortality from invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected patients are needed. PMID:23681437

  6. Global burden of human papillomavirus and related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, David; de Martel, Catherine; Lacey, Charles J; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Lortet-Tieulent, Joannie; Bruni, Laia; Vignat, Jerome; Ferlay, Jacques; Bray, Freddie; Plummer, Martyn; Franceschi, Silvia

    2012-11-20

    The worldwide prevalence of infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) in women without cervical abnormalities is 11-12% with higher rates in sub-Saharan Africa (24%), Eastern Europe (21%) and Latin America (16%). The two most prevalent types are HPV16 (3.2%) and HPV18 (1.4%). Prevalence increases in women with cervical pathology in proportion to the severity of the lesion reaching around 90% in women with grade 3 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cancer. HPV infection has been identified as a definite human carcinogen for six types of cancer: cervix, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including the base of the tongue and tonsils). Estimates of the incidence of these cancers for 2008 due to HPV infection have been calculated globally. Of the estimated 12.7 million cancers occurring in 2008, 610,000 (Population Attributable Fraction [PAF]=4.8%) could be attributed to HPV infection. The PAF varies substantially by geographic region and level of development, increasing to 6.9% in less developed regions of the world, 14.2% in sub-Saharan Africa and 15.5% in India, compared with 2.1% in more developed regions, 1.6% in Northern America and 1.2% in Australia/New Zealand. Cervical cancer, for which the PAF is estimated to be 100%, accounted for 530,000 (86.9%) of the HPV attributable cases with the other five cancer types accounting for the residual 80,000 cancers. Cervical cancer is the third most common female malignancy and shows a strong association with level of development, rates being at least four-fold higher in countries defined within the low ranking of the Human Development Index (HDI) compared with those in the very high category. Similar disparities are evident for 5-year survival-less than 20% in low HDI countries and more than 65% in very high countries. There are five-fold or greater differences in incidence between world regions. In those countries for which reliable temporal data are available, incidence rates appear to be

  7. Competitive binding of viral E2 protein and mammalian core-binding factor to transcriptional control sequences of human papillomavirus type 8 and bovine papillomavirus type 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, H. M.; Steger, G; Pfister, H

    1997-01-01

    The promoter P7535 of human papillomavirus type 8 and the promoter P7185 of bovine papillomavirus type 1 are negatively regulated by viral E2 proteins via the promoter proximal binding sites P2 and BS1, respectively. Mutations of these E2 binding sites can reduce basal promoter activity. This suggests binding of a transcription-stimulating factor and may indicate that repression by E2 is due to competitive binding of viral and cellular proteins. A computer search revealed putative binding sit...

  8. Delineation of interfaces on human alpha-defensins critical for human adenovirus and human papillomavirus inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria R Tenge

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human α-defensins are potent anti-microbial peptides with the ability to neutralize bacterial and viral targets. Single alanine mutagenesis has been used to identify determinants of anti-bacterial activity and binding to bacterial proteins such as anthrax lethal factor. Similar analyses of α-defensin interactions with non-enveloped viruses are limited. We used a comprehensive set of human α-defensin 5 (HD5 and human neutrophil peptide 1 (HNP1 alanine scan mutants in a combination of binding and neutralization assays with human adenovirus (AdV and human papillomavirus (HPV. We have identified a core of critical hydrophobic residues that are common determinants for all of the virus-defensin interactions that were analyzed, while specificity in viral recognition is conferred by specific surface-exposed charged residues. The hydrophobic residues serve multiple roles in maintaining the tertiary and quaternary structure of the defensins as well as forming an interface for virus binding. Many of the important solvent-exposed residues of HD5 group together to form a critical surface. However, a single discrete binding face was not identified for HNP1. In lieu of whole AdV, we used a recombinant capsid subunit comprised of penton base and fiber in quantitative binding studies and determined that the anti-viral potency of HD5 was a function of stoichiometry rather than affinity. Our studies support a mechanism in which α-defensins depend on hydrophobic and charge-charge interactions to bind at high copy number to these non-enveloped viruses to neutralize infection and provide insight into properties that guide α-defensin anti-viral activity.

  9. Doelmatigheid van Humaan papillomavirus-vaccinatie--schattingen op basis van Nederlandse kosteneffectiviteitanalyses. [Efficiency of human papillomavirus vaccination--estimates based on Dutch cost effectiveness analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, T.A.; Daemen, T.; Postma, M.J.; Wilschut, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Up to now the turnout for the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme implemented this year in the Netherlands has been lower than expected. This may be the result of negative publicity and doubts about the efficacy of the vaccination programme. To provide some clarity about the efficacy, t

  10. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-07-01

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted. PMID:26193301

  11. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagayasu Egawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted.

  12. Specific chromosomal imbalances in human papillomavirus-transfected cells during progression toward immortality

    OpenAIRE

    Solinas-Toldo, Sabina; Dürst, Matthias; Lichter, Peter

    1997-01-01

    High risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) known to be closely associated with cervical cancer, such as HPV16 and HPV18, have the potential to immortalize human epithelial cells in culture. Four lines of HPV-transfected keratinocytes were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization at different time points after transfection. A number of chromosomal imbalances was found to be highly characteristic for the cultures progressing toward immortality. Whereas several of these were new and previously...

  13. State-of-the-art of infections produced by human papillomavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Julio César Reina; Nubia Muñoz; Gloria Inés Sánchez

    2009-01-01

    Anogenital human papillomavirus infection is the most frequent sexually transmitted disease. Around one hundred genotypes have been identified in humans, and 40 infect the genitalia and anal regions. Fifteen genotypes, classified as high-risk HPVs, are the necessary cause of cervical cancer and have been involved as carcinogenic agents for cancer of the vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharyngeal cavity. Low-risk HPVs are the causative agents of genital warts, and recurrent respiratory papi...

  14. Cancer, Warts, or Asymptomatic Infections: Clinical Presentation Matches Codon Usage Preferences in Human Papillomaviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Bedhomme, Stéphanie; González-Bravo, Maria Isabel; Kamp, Christel; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rely completely on the hosts’ machinery for translation of viral transcripts. However, for most viruses infecting humans, codon usage preferences (CUPrefs) do not match those of the host. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a showcase to tackle this paradox: they present a large genotypic diversity and a broad range of phenotypic presentations, from asymptomatic infections to productive lesions and cancer. By applying phylogenetic inference and dimensionality reduction methods, we demon...

  15. The Nasal Mucosa Contains a Large Spectrum of Human Papillomavirus Types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus Genera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslund, Ola; Johansson, Hanna; Madsen, Klaus Gregaard;

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus genera are common at cutaneous sites. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of these HPV types in oral and nasal samples....... Human papillomavirus (HPV) types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus genera are common at cutaneous sites. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of these HPV types in oral and nasal samples....

  16. CpG methylation directly inhibits binding of the human papillomavirus type 16 E2 protein to specific DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Thain, A.; Jenkins, O; Clarke, A R; Gaston, K

    1996-01-01

    CpG methylation of the human papillomavirus upstream regulatory region has previously been shown to reduce virus promoter activity. Here, we demonstrate that methylation of the CpG dinucleotides contained within the binding site of the human papillomavirus type 16 E2 protein has a direct effect on the interaction of this protein with DNA. Methylation of both CpG dinucleotides within the E2 site abolishes the binding of E2.

  17. Chlamydia trachomatis and risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse in women with persistent human papillomavirus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kirsten E; Thomsen, Louise T; Schmiedel, Sven; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Norrild, Bodil; van den Brule, Adriaan; Iftner, Thomas; Kjær, Susanne K

    Some studies suggest that Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) enhances cervical carcinogenesis; however, a possible confounding effect of persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection was not addressed. We examined the potential role of CT infection in the development of subsequent cervical intraepithel......Some studies suggest that Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) enhances cervical carcinogenesis; however, a possible confounding effect of persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection was not addressed. We examined the potential role of CT infection in the development of subsequent cervical...

  18. Knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers on vaccination against human papillomavirus infection: a cross-sectional study among primary care physicians in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C S Wong

    Full Text Available This study explored the knowledge, attitude, practice and barriers to prescribe human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines among private primary care physicians in Hong Kong. A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted by sending letters to doctors who had joined a vaccination program for school girls. From 720 surveys sent, 444 (61.7% completed questionnaires were returned and analyzed. For knowledge, few responded to questions accurately on the prevalence of cervical HPV (27.9% and genital wart infection (13.1% among sexually active young women in Hong Kong, and only 44.4% correctly answered the percentage of cervical cancers caused by HPV. For attitude, most agreed that HPV vaccination should be fully paid by the Government (68.3% as an important public health strategy. Vaccination against HPV was perceived as more important than those for genital herpes (52.2% and Chlamydia (50.1% for adolescent health, and the majority selected adolescents aged 12-14 years as the ideal group for vaccination. Gardasil(® (30.9% and Cervarix(® (28.0% were almost equally preferred. For practice, the factors influencing the choice of vaccine included strength of vaccine protection (61.1%, long-lasting immunity (56.8% and good antibody response (55.6%. The most significant barriers to prescribe HPV vaccines consisted of parental refusal due to safety concerns (48.2%, and their practice of advising vaccination was mostly affected by local Governmental recommendations (78.7%. A substantial proportion of physicians had recommended HPV vaccines for their female clients/patients aged 18-26 years for protection of cervical cancer (83.8% or both cervical cancer and genital warts (85.5%. The knowledge on HPV infection was low among physicians in Hong Kong. Prescription of HPV vaccine was hindered by the perceived parental concerns and was mostly relied on Governmental recommendations. Educational initiatives should be targeted towards both physicians and parents

  19. Characterization of the human papillomavirus E2 protein: evidence of trans-activation and trans-repression in cervical keratinocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bouvard, V.; A Storey; Pim, D; Banks, L.

    1994-01-01

    The major regulator of papillomavirus transcription is encoded by the viral E2 gene. The E2 gene has been well characterized in bovine papillomavirus (BPV) where it encodes at least three different polypeptides which differentially affect viral gene expression. In human papillomaviruses (HPVs) the E2 gene product is much less well characterized. In this study we have analysed the mechanism of action of the HPV-16, HPV-18 and BPV-1 E2 proteins in cervical keratinocytes. We show that the full l...

  20. The role of NH4Cl and cysteine proteases in Human Papillomavirus type 16 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Meneses Patricio I; Dabydeen Sarah A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The infectious pathway of the non-enveloped Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV16) includes binding to the cell surface, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and penetration into an endosome. HPV16 infection was shown to decrease in the presence of the lysosomotrophic neutralizing agent ammonium chloride (NH4Cl). NH4Cl neutralizes acidic endo-lysosome compartments, thus suggesting that pH was responsible for PV capsid conformational changes leading endosome escape. Results However...

  1. Conserved Methylation Patterns of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 DNA in Asymptomatic Infection and Cervical Neoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Kalantari, Mina; Calleja-Macias, Itzel E.; Tewari, Devansu; Hagmar, Bjørn; Lie, Kathrine; Barrera-Saldana, Hugo A.; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    DNA methylation contributes to the chromatin conformation that represses transcription of human papillomavirus type16 (HPV-16), which is prevalent in the etiology of cervical carcinoma. In an effort to clarify the role of this phenomenon in the regulation and carcinogenicity of HPV-16, 115 clinical samples were studied to establish the methylation patterns of the 19 CpG dinucleotides within the long control region and part of the L1 gene by bisulfite modification, PCR amplification, DNA cloni...

  2. Awareness and acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccine: an application of the instrumental variables bivariate probit model

    OpenAIRE

    Do Young Kyung; Wong Ker Yi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Although lower uptake rates of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations have been documented, less is known about the relationships between awareness and acceptability, and other factors affecting HPV vaccine uptake. The current study aimed to estimate the potential effectiveness of increased HPV vaccine awareness on the acceptability of HPV vaccination in a nationally representative sample of women, using a methodology that ...

  3. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in women attending a gynecology/oncology clinic in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Thani, Asma A J; Abu-Rub, Aesha I; Al-Ansari, Afaf; Abushama, Mandy; Al-Khanji, Moza; Al-Lawati, Sabah

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Human papillomavirus (HPV) detection is very important for the evaluation of prevention strategies in cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of high-risk HPV infection in a cohort of Qatari residents, and correlate this with cytology and potential risk factors. Method: The study utilized cervical cytology and HPV DNA testing methods, high-risk screen real-time PCR, to detect high-risk HPV genotype infections in a sample...

  4. Evaluation of Linear Array Human Papillomavirus Genotyping Using Automatic Optical Imaging Software▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jeronimo, J; Wentzensen, N; R. Long; Schiffman, M; Dunn, S. T.; Allen, R A; Walker, J L; Gold, M.A.; Zuna, R. E.; Sherman, M E; Wacholder, S.; Wang, S S

    2008-01-01

    Variations in biological behavior suggest that each carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) type should be considered individually in etiologic studies. HPV genotyping assays might have clinical applications if they are approved for use by the FDA. A widely used genotyping assay is the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping test (LA). We used LA to genotype the HPV isolates from cervical specimens from women with the full spectrum of cervical disease: cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neop...

  5. Genital human papillomavirus lesions of the male sexual partners: the diagnostic accuracy of peniscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hippeläinen, M; Yliskoski, M; Saarikoski, S.; Syrjänen, S; Syrjänen, K

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate the accuracy of peniscopy for identifying human papillomavirus (HPV) lesions in male sexual partners of women with HPV infection. The predictive value of the medical history for HPV infection was also evaluated. DESIGN--Examination of voluntary male partners of the women with HPV infection using colposcopy (peniscopy after acetic acid), cytology and surgical biopsy, the latter being analysed by light microscopy, in situ hybridisation (ISH) and polymerase chain reaction...

  6. Human papillomavirus-related squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal with papillary features

    OpenAIRE

    Leon, Marino E.; Shamekh, Rania; Coppola, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) related squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) involving the anal canal is a well-known carcinoma associated with high-risk types of HPV. HPV-related SCC with papillary morphology (papillary SCC) has been described in the oropharynx. We describe, for the first time, a case of anal HPV-related squamous carcinoma with papillary morphology. The tumor arose from the anal mucosa. The biopsies revealed a superficially invasive SCC with prominent papillary features and associated i...

  7. Impact of human papillomavirus vaccination on anal cancer incidence in French women.

    OpenAIRE

    Ribassin-Majed, Laureen; Lounes, Rachid; Clémençon, Stéphan

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 are found to be involved in 80% of anal cancers. Two vaccines against HPV infections are currently available, and vaccination policies aim to decrease mainly, incidence of cervical cancers. Moreover, an impact of HPV vaccination on the incidence of anal cancer can also be expected. Our aim was to assess the potential benefits of HPV vaccination on the occurrence of female anal cancer in France. We developed a dynamic model for the heterosexual transmission...

  8. The biology and significance of human papillomavirus infections in the genital tract.

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, R; Campion, M J

    1988-01-01

    A variety of human papillomavirus (HPV) types infect the anogenital mucosa, giving rise to lesions that differ in clinical appearance, histology, and risk of malignant progression. Certain high-risk types (HPVs 16, 18, 31, 33, 35 and 39) have a strong association with high-grade epithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinomas of the anogenital tract. Cancer appears to have a multifactorial etiology, and HPV infection alone is probably insufficient for malignant transformation. The consistent ass...

  9. Sequencing-Based Genotyping of Mixed Human Papillomavirus Infections by Use of RipSeq Software

    OpenAIRE

    Tardif, Keith D.; Simmon, Keith E.; Kommedal, Øyvind; Pyne, Michael T.; Schlaberg, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Sequencing-based pathogen identification directly from clinical specimens requires time-consuming interpretation, especially with mixed chromatograms when multiple microorganisms are detected. We assessed RipSeq Mixed software for human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping by comparison to the linear array HPV genotyping assay. RipSeq Mixed provided rapid, sequencing-based HPV typing for single-type infections and coinfections with 2 types.

  10. Human papillomavirus in anal squamous cell carcinoma: an angel rather than a devil?

    OpenAIRE

    Ravenda, Paola Simona; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Nicola; Barberis, Massimo; Bottiglieri, Luca; Chiocca, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancer is a rare disease with an increasing incidence worldwide but, unfortunately, even today the scientific community still has a limited knowledge and limited options of treatment. More than 50% of patients with anal cancer presenting at diagnosis with locoregional disease have good chances of cure with chemoradiotherapy (CT–RT). However, once patients develop metastatic spread, the prognosis is very poor. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is present in more than 80% of anal cancers and whil...

  11. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 perturbs DREAM to promote cellular proliferation and mitotic gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    DeCaprio, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Study of the small DNA tumor viruses continues to provide valuable new insights into oncogenesis and fundamental biological processes. While much has already been revealed about how the human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can transform cells and contribute to cervical and oropharyngeal cancer, there clearly is much more to learn. In this issue of Oncogene, Pang et al. demonstrate that the high-risk HPV16 E7 oncogene can promote cellular proliferation by interacting with the DREAM (DP, RB-like, E2F ...

  12. Cytological Analysis for Human Papillomavirus DNAs in Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia by In situ Hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Nobutaka; Takehara, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Takahiro; Ohama, Koso

    1994-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and 18 DNAs are reported to be associated with uterine cervical cancer. In order to investigate the relationship between the presence of HPV DNA and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), we attempted the cytological detection of HPV DNAs in uterine cervical smear samples. The samples included those of severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ (CIS). They were analysed by DNA-DNA in situ hybridization using biotinylated HPV DNA probes.  The results of in sit...

  13. Cytological Analysis for Human Papillomavirus DNAs in Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia by In situ Hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Nobutaka; Takehara, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Takahiro; Ohama, Koso

    1994-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and 18 DNAs are reported to be associated with uterine cervical cancer. In order to investigate the relationship between the presence of HPV DNA and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), we attempted the cytological detection of HPV DNAs in uterine cervical smear samples. The samples included those of severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ (CIS). They were analysed by DNA-DNA in situ hybridization using biotinylated HPV DNA probes.   The results of i...

  14. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Commercial Sex Workers in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Fujihiko Suzuki; Kazuhisa Ishi; Takeyoshi Kubota; Akira Saito

    2000-01-01

    Objective: We used the hybrid capture assays to investigate the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV), Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae among commercial sex workers in Tokyo.Methods: Five hundred forty-six consecutive commercial sex workers (CSW) who visited an STD clinic for STD checkup in 1998 and 1999 were studied. A control group consisted of 233 consecutive women who visited a general gynecological clinic for annual checkup. A cervical sample was obtained for hybrid cap...

  15. The human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein is stabilised in S phase

    OpenAIRE

    C. Johansson; Graham, S.V.; Dornan, E S; Morgan, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    The human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein regulates transcription from, and replication of, the viral genome and is also required for segregation of the viral genome via interaction with mitotic bodies. To regulate DNA replication E2 interacts with sequences around the origin of replication and recruits the viral helicase E1 via a protein-protein interaction, which then initiates viral genome replication. The replication role of E2 must originally function in a host cell S phase. In this report,...

  16. Identification of the human papillomavirus E2 protein in genital tract tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, C. C.; Gilden, R. V.; Showalter, S D; Shah, K V

    1988-01-01

    A 27-kilodalton protein representing approximately 60% of the E2 open reading frame of human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV-6) was synthesized in a bacterial expression system. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibody to this protein detected the probable E2 gene product as a 50-kilodalton protein in most condylomas by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The E2-positive condylomas were associated with HPV-6, HPV-11, HPV-16, or unidentified HPVs.

  17. Oral Immunogenicity of Human Papillomavirus-Like Particles Expressed in Potato

    OpenAIRE

    Warzecha, Heribert; Mason, Hugh S.; Lane, Christopher; Tryggvesson, Anders; Rybicki, Edward; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Clements, John D.; Rose, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    Human papillomavirus-like particles (HPV VLPs) have shown considerable promise as a parenteral vaccine for the prevention of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions. Parenteral vaccines are expensive to produce and deliver, however, and therefore are not optimal for use in resource-poor settings, where most cervical HPV disease occurs. Transgenic plants expressing recombinant vaccine immunogens offer an attractive and potentially inexpensive alternative to vaccination by injection. For exam...

  18. Production of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Virus-Like Particles in Transgenic Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Biemelt, Sophia; Sonnewald, Uwe; Galmbacher, Petra; Willmitzer, Lothar; Müller, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Cervical cancer is linked to infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV) and is the third most common cancer among women worldwide. There is a strong demand for the development of an HPV preventive vaccine. Transgenic plants expressing the HPV major capsid protein L1 could be a system to produce virus-like particles for prophylactic vaccination or could even be used as edible vaccines to induce an L1-specific prophylactic immune response. Here, we describe the generation of transgenic tobacco...

  19. Knowledge about human papillomavirus and the HPV vaccine – a survey of the general population

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background The United States (US) Food & Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine with the purpose of reducing the risk of cervical cancers caused by HPV 16 and HPV 18. It is important that the general population be educated about HPV and the HPV vaccine in order to make the appropriate decision whether or not to vaccinate against this virus. Participants from the adult US general population of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA and Hampton, Virginia, USA (1...

  20. Distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in genital warts from males in Slovenia:

    OpenAIRE

    Kocjan, Boštjan; Poljak, Mario; Potočnik, Marko; Seme, Katja

    2007-01-01

    Background: Genital warts (GWs) are the most frequent benign tumors in the anogenital region of both males and females. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are etiologically associated with the development of virtually all GWs. HPV-6 and HPV-11 are the most commonly detected HPV genotypes, but at least 20 other alpha-HPV genotypes have occasionally been found in GW tissue specimens. Objective: There is limited knowledge of GWs in Slovenia. Thus in this study we tested 55 GW tissue specimens collecte...

  1. Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccination: an international comparison.

    OpenAIRE

    Marlow, L. A.; Zimet, G. D.; McCaffery, K. J.; Ostini, R; Waller, J

    2012-01-01

    Since vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) became available, awareness of HPV has dramatically increased. Implementation of a vaccine program varies internationally yet no studies have explored the influence this has on the public's knowledge of HPV. The present study aimed to explore differences in awareness of HPV and HPV knowledge across three countries: The US, UK and Australia. Participants (n=2409) completed a validated measure of HPV knowledge as part of an online survey. The...

  2. Human Papillomavirus Carcinogenesis: an Identity Crisis in the Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Munger, Karl; Jones, D. Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites and need to reprogram host cells to establish long-term persistent infection and/or to produce viral progeny. Cellular changes initiated by the virus trigger cellular defense responses to cripple viral replication, and viruses have evolved countermeasures to neutralize them. Established models have suggested that human papillomaviruses target the retinoblastoma (RB1) and TP53 tumor suppressor networks to usurp cellular replication, which drives car...

  3. Human Papillomavirus-16 and 18 in Penile Carcinomas: DNA Methylation, Chromosomal Recombination, and Genomic Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Kalantari, Mina; Villa, Luisa L.; Calleja-Macias, Itzel E.; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Penile carcinomas are frequently associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types. Since little is known about the molecular biology of this association, we investigated three properties of HPV genomes in penile carcinomas from Brazilian patients: (i) HPV DNA methylation, (ii) junctions between HPV and cellular DNA, and (iii) genomic variation. In cervical carcinogenesis, recombination between HPV and chromosomal DNA is frequent and likely necessary for progression, and DNA hypermet...

  4. Chronic estrogen-induced cervical and vaginal squamous carcinogenesis in human papillomavirus type 16 transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Arbeit, J M; Howley, P M; Hanahan, D

    1996-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), including type 16, have been identified as factors in cervical carcinogenesis. However, the presence and expression of the virus per se appear to be insufficient for carcinogenesis. Rather, cofactors most likely are necessary in addition to viral gene expression to initiate neoplasia. One candidate cofactor is prolonged exposure to sex hormones. To examine the possible effects of estrogen on HPV-associated neoplasia, we treated transgenic mice expressi...

  5. Triage of high-risk human papillomavirus-positive women by methylated POU4F3

    OpenAIRE

    Pun, Par Bahadur; Liao, Yu-Ping; Su, Po-Hsuan; Wang, Hui-Chen; Chen, Yu-Chih; Hsu, Yaw-Wen; Huang, Rui-Lan; Chang, Cheng-Chang; Lai, Hung-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Insufficient specificity of the high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) assay in primary cervical cancer screening results in unnecessary referral. Additional assays to triage hrHPV-positive women are needed to improve molecular cervical cancer screening. DNA methylation is a promising biomarker in cervical cancer. We evaluated the clinical performance of potentially methylated genes as a triage assay for hrHPV-positive women. Results We conducted a retrospective hospital-based case...

  6. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 66 from an invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    OpenAIRE

    Tawheed, A R; Beaudenon, S; Favre, M; Orth, G

    1991-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences coexisting with HPV16 and HPV45 were cloned from an invasive cervical carcinoma. The cloned HPV was shown to be a novel type, named HPV66, and is related to HPV56 (an HPV detected in cervical cancer). After screening 160 anogenital biopsies, four specimens exhibited histological features of intraepithelial neoplasia and contained HPV66 sequences. Of these, three were found to be associated with another HPV type.

  7. Changes in type-specific human papillomavirus load predict progression to cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Depuydt, Christophe E.; Criel, Arnold M; Benoy, Ina H; Arbyn, Marc; Vereecken, Annie J; Bogers, Johannes J

    2012-01-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is strongly associated with the development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cancer (CIN3+). However, HPV infection is common and usually transient. Viral load measured at a single time-point is a poor predictor of the natural history of HPV infection. The profile of viral load evolution over time could distinguish HPV infections with carcinogenic potential from infections that regress. A case-cohort natural history ...

  8. Human papillomavirus infection in Rwanda at the moment of implementation of a national HPV vaccination programme

    OpenAIRE

    Ngabo, Fidele; Franceschi, Silvia; Baussano, Iacopo; Umulisa, M. Chantal; Snijders, Peter J F; Uyterlinde, Anne M.; Lazzarato, Fulvio; Tenet, Vanessa; Gatera, Maurice; Binagwaho, Agnes; Clifford, Gary M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the most common female cancer in Rwanda that, in 2011, became the first African country to implement a national vaccination programme against human papillomavirus (HPV). Methods: To provide a robust baseline for future evaluations of vaccine effectiveness, cervical cell specimens were obtained from 2508 women aged 18–69 years from the general population in Kigali, Rwanda, during 2013/14. 20 % of women were HIV-positive. Samples were used for liquid-based cytolog...

  9. A case–control study of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine-associated autoimmune adverse events

    OpenAIRE

    Geier, David A.; Geier, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    GARDASIL (Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA) is a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccine. An epidemiological study was undertaken to evaluate concerns about the potential for HPV4 vaccination to induce serious autoimmune adverse events (SAAEs). The vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS) database was examined for adverse event reports associated with vaccines administered from January 2006 through December 2012 to recipients between 18 and 39 years old with a lis...

  10. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in the cervical epithelium of Mexican women: meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Peralta-Rodríguez Raúl; Romero-Morelos Pablo; Villegas-Ruíz Vanessa; Mendoza-Rodríguez Mónica; Taniguchi-Ponciano Keiko; González-Yebra Beatriz; Marrero-Rodríguez Daniel; Salcedo Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical epithelium has been identified as the main etiological factor in the developing of Cervical Cancer (CC), which has recently become a public health problem in Mexico. This finding has allowed for the development of vaccines that help prevent this infection. In the present study, we aimed to determine the prevalence and HPV type-distribution in Mexican women with CC, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), low-grade squamous ...

  11. Correlates for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination of Adolescent Girls and Young Women in a Managed Care Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Chun; Velicer, Christine; Slezak, Jeff M; Jacobsen, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors studied the characteristics of those who initiated the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine versus those who did not. Female members of Kaiser Permanente Southern California aged 9–26 years were identified and assessed for HPV vaccination between October 2006 and March 2008. Multivariable log-binomial regression was used to examine the association of the following factors with vaccine initiation: 1) demographics, 2) provider characteristics, 3) health care utilization, 4) women's he...

  12. Role of human papillomavirus in determining the HLA associated risk of cervical carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mehal, W Z; Lo, Y M; Herrington, C. S.; Evans, M. F.; Papadopoulos, M.C.; Odunis, K; Ganesan, T. S.; McGee, J O; Bell, J. I.; Fleming, K A

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the association between HLA DQw3 and squamous cell cancer of the cervix (SCCC). METHODS--Tissue from 194 cervical samples, ranging from normal, through cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, to SCCC, were typed for HPV by amplification of the L1 gene using degenerate consensus primers, followed by oligonucleotide probing. HLA DQw3 typing was undertaken in the same samples using a new PCR amplification system using primers common to a...

  13. Detection of human papillomavirus types in balanitis xerotica obliterans and other penile conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, P W; Cook, N.; Andrews, H.; Bracka, A; Myint, S H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16 and 18 in foreskin biopsies from patients with balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO) and other penile conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS--Foreskin biopsy specimens from 24 patients with penile lesions and 5 control patients were analysed by type-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS--HPV6 or HPV16 were not detected in patients with BXO. HPV6 was detected in 2 controls. CONCLUSIONS--Genital papilloma...

  14. Oral sex and oral cancer in the context of human papillomavirus infection: lay public understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Mario A. Brondani; Mario A. Cruz-Cabrera; Cheryle Colombe

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a risk factor for ano-genital and cervical cancers and has been associated with head and neck malignancies in the context of oral sex for the transmission of the virus. However, the level of knowledge that lay people have in terms of HPV transmission through oral sex and oral cancer development remains unknown. A pilot sample of 150 questionnaires was distributed at specific non-profit health organizations in Vancouver, Canada. Questions included perceived risks ...

  15. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with uterine cervical human papillomavirus infection: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    De Sutter Philippe; Bosire Carolyne; Verstraelen Hans; Meys Joris FA; Gillet Evy; Temmerman Marleen; Broeck Davy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV), an alteration of vaginal flora involving a decrease in Lactobacilli and predominance of anaerobic bacteria, is among the most common cause of vaginal complaints for women of childbearing age. It is well known that BV has an influence in acquisition of certain genital infections. However, association between BV and cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been inconsistent among studies. The objective of this meta-analysis of published stu...

  16. Human Papillomavirus Research on the Prevention, Diagnosis, and Prognosis of Cervical Cancer in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Chyong-Huey Lai; Angel Chao; Huei-Jean Huang

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is third in incidence and fourth in mortality among cancers of women worldwide. Epidemiological studies have shown that human papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary, if not sufficient, to cause nearly 100% of cervical cancers. HPV testing is useful in primary screening for cervical neoplasms. The value of HPV detection or genotyping is potentially useful in triage of borderline or low-grade abnormal cervical cytology, follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia,...

  17. Distribution patterns of infection with multiple types of human papillomaviruses and their association with risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Soto-De Leon; Milena Camargo; Ricardo Sanchez; Marina Munoz; Antonio Perez-Prados; Antonio Purroy; Manuel Elkin Patarroyo; Manuel Alfonso Patarroyo

    2011-01-01

    Background: Infection with multiple types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the main risk factors associated with the development of cervical lesions. In this study, cervical samples collected from 1, 810 women with diverse sociocultural backgrounds, who attended to their cervical screening program in different geographical regions of Colombia, were examined for the presence of cervical lesions and HPV by Papanicolau testing and DNA PCR detection, respectively. Principal Findings: T...

  18. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M;

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  19. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA-induced malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biological function for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) DNA was demonstrated by transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. HPV 16 DNA has been found frequently in genital cancer and has been classified as a papillomavirus on the basis of DNA homology. A recombinant HPV 16 DNA (pSHPV16d), which contains a head-to-tail dimer of the full-length HPV 16 genome, induced morphologic transformation; the transformed cells were tumorigenic in nude mice. Expression of transforming activity was unique because of the long latency period (more than 4 weeks) required for induction of morphologic transformation and because the transfected DNA existed primarily in a multimeric form with some rearrangement. Furthermore, virus-specific RNAs were expressed in the transformants. The transformation of NIH 3T3 cells provides a model for analyzing the functions of HPV 16, which is associated with cervical carcinomas

  20. Loss of p53 protein in human papillomavirus type 16 E6-immortalized human mammary epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Band, V; De Caprio, J A; Delmolino, L; Kulesa, V; Sager, R

    1991-01-01

    We have shown previously that introduction of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) or HPV18 genome into human mammary epithelial cells induces their immortalization. These immortalized cells have reduced growth factor requirements. We report here that transfection with a single HPV16 gene E6 is sufficient to immortalize these cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. The RB protein is normal in these cells, but the p53 protein is sharply reduced, as shown by immunoprecipitation w...

  1. Integration of human papillomavirus type 16 into the human genome correlates with a selective growth advantage of cells.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Jeon; Allen-Hoffmann, B L; Lambert, P F

    1995-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) DNA into a host chromosome has been hypothesized to result in altered expression of two viral transforming genes, E6 and E7, in cervical cancers. In order to investigate the role that changes in viral genomic state and gene expression play in cervical carcinogenesis, we have derived clonal populations of human cervical epithelial cells which harbor multiple copies of either extrachromosomal or integrated viral DNA. The clonal populations ha...

  2. Skin human papillomavirus type 38 alters p53 functions by accumulation of ΔNp73

    OpenAIRE

    Accardi, Rosita; Dong, Wen; Smet, Anouk; Cui, Rutao; Hautefeuille, Agnes; Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Sylla, Bakary S.; Gissmann, Lutz; Hainaut, Pierre; Tommasino, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    The E6 and E7 of the cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) type 38 immortalize primary human keratinocytes, an event normally associated with the inactivation of pathways controlled by the tumour suppressor p53. Here, we show for the first time that HPV38 alters p53 functions. Expression of HPV38 E6 and E7 in human keratinocytes or in the skin of transgenic mice induces stabilization of wild-type p53. This selectively activates the transcription of ΔNp73, an isoform of the p53-related protein ...

  3. Human papillomavirus detection in cervical scrapes from women attended in the Family Health Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Faccini Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to survey the prevalence of human papillomavirus, associated risk factors and genotype distribution in women who were referred to cervical cancer screening when attended in a Family Health Program. METHOD: we conducted a cross-sectional survey, investigating 351 women. Polymerase chain reaction for DNA amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were used to detect and typify the papillomavirus. RESULTS: virus infection was detected in 8.8% of the samples. Among the 21 different genotypes identified in this study, 14 were high risk for cervical cancer, and the type 16 was the most prevalent type. The infection was associated with women who had non-stable sexual partners. Low risk types were associated with younger women, while the high risk group was linked to altered cytology. CONCLUSION: in this sample attended a Family Health Program, we found a low rate of papillomavirus infection. Virus frequency was associated to sexual behavior. However, the broad range of genotypes detected deserves attention regarding the vaccine coverage, which includes only HPV prevalent types.

  4. NF-kB signalling is attenuated by the E7 protein from cutaneous human papillomaviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byg, Luise M; Stensson, Jessica; Vasiljevic, Natasa;

    2012-01-01

    The high-risk Alpha-types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are the causative agent of cervical cancer, which is the second major cause of death among women worldwide. Recent investigations have shown that E7 from the Alpha-papillomavirus HPV-16 interacts with IKKa and IKKß of the IKK complex in the NF-¿B...... pathway leading to an attenuation of the activity. There is a possible link between development of non melanoma skin cancer and cutaneous Beta-papillomavirus but if these HPV types attenuate the NF-¿B pathway is unclear. Seven different E7 proteins, representing four out of the five different species of...... the Beta genus (HPV-20, -37, -38, -92, -93 and -96) and one from the Gamma genus (HPV-4), were investigated for potential modulation of the NF-¿B pathway in U2OS cells. Our results demonstrate that E7 from all the cutaneous HPV types were capable of inhibiting the NF-¿B activity as well as E7 from HPV...

  5. NF-κB signalling is attenuated by the E7 protein from cutaneous human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byg, Luise M; Vidlund, Jessica; Vasiljevic, Natasa; Clausen, Dorte; Forslund, Ola; Norrild, Bodil

    2012-10-01

    The high-risk Alpha-types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are the causative agent of cervical cancer, which is the second major cause of death among women worldwide. Recent investigations have shown that E7 from the Alpha-papillomavirus HPV-16 interacts with IKKα and IKKβ of the IKK complex in the NF-κB pathway leading to an attenuation of the activity. There is a possible link between development of non-melanoma skin cancer and cutaneous Beta-papillomavirus but if these HPV types attenuate the NF-κB pathway is unclear. Seven different E7 proteins, representing four out of the five different species of the Beta genus (HPV-20, -37, -38, -92, -93 and -96) and one from the Gamma genus (HPV-4) were investigated for potential modulation of the NF-κB pathway in U2OS cells. Our results demonstrate that E7 from all the cutaneous HPV types were capable of inhibiting the NF-κB activity as well as E7 from HPV-16. In addition, E7 proteins from the cutaneous HPV types demonstrated interaction with IKKα but not with IKKβ. The deregulation of the NF-κB pathway by cutaneous HPVs might contribute to the pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancers and its precursors. PMID:22776252

  6. Inhibition of p53 DNA binding by human papillomavirus E6 proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Lechner, M S; Laimins, L A

    1994-01-01

    Transformation by the human papillomavirus (HPV) early gene products, E6 and E7, involves their interaction with cellular proteins p53 and Rb. Using glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins, we found that HPV E6 bound human p53 and that the relative efficiency of binding varied such that the GST-HPV type 16 E6 (16E6) protein bound p53 with highest affinity, followed by GST-31E6, GST-18E6, and GST-11E6. The GST-E6 fusion proteins were sufficient for binding p53 purified from a baculovir...

  7. Value of human papillomavirus typing for detection of anal cytological abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Livia Bravo Maia; Larissa Cardoso Marinho; Tânia Wanderley Paes Barbosa; Lara Franciele Ribeiro Velasco; Patrícia Godoy Garcia Costa; Fabiana Pirani Carneiro; Paulo Gonçalves de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate anal cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) typing in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Materials and Methods: Anal samples were collected from 61 patients (44 men and 17 women) and analyzed by PapilloCheck test and conventional cytology. Results: Of all anal samples, 37.7% had cytological abnormalities, 47.54% were negative and 14.75% were unsatisfactory. High-risk HPV, multiple high-risk HPV and HPV 16 infection was d...

  8. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M;

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata).......To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  9. Genome-wide analysis of high risk human papillomavirus E2 proteins in human primary keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunthamala, Nuchsupha; Pang, Chai Ling; Thierry, Francoise; Teissier, Sebastien; Pientong, Chamsai; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2014-12-01

    The E2 protein is expressed in the early stage of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection that is associated with cervical lesions. This protein plays important roles in regulation of viral replication and transcription. To characterize the role of E2 protein in modulation of cellular gene expression in HPV infected cells, genome-wide expression profiling of human primary keratinocytes (HPK) harboring HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2 was investigated using microarray. The Principle Components Analysis (PCA) revealed that the expression data of HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2-transduced HPKs were rather closely clustered. The Venn diagram of modulated genes showed an overlap of 10 common genes in HPV16 E2 expressing HPK and HPV18 E2 expressing HPK. These genes were expressed with significant difference by comparison with control cells. In addition, the distinct sets of modulated genes were detected 14 and 34 genes in HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2 expressing HPKs, respectively. PMID:26484085

  10. Regulation of human genome expression and RNA splicing by human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauson, Elaine J; Windle, Brad; Donaldson, Mary M; Caffarel, Maria M; Dornan, Edward S; Coleman, Nicholas; Herzyk, Pawel; Henderson, Scott C; Wang, Xu; Morgan, Iain M

    2014-11-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is causative in human cancer. The E2 protein regulates transcription from and replication of the viral genome; the role of E2 in regulating the host genome has been less well studied. We have expressed HPV16 E2 (E2) stably in U2OS cells; these cells tolerate E2 expression well and gene expression analysis identified 74 genes showing differential expression specific to E2. Analysis of published gene expression data sets during cervical cancer progression identified 20 of the genes as being altered in a similar direction as the E2 specific genes. In addition, E2 altered the splicing of many genes implicated in cancer and cell motility. The E2 expressing cells showed no alteration in cell growth but were altered in cell motility, consistent with the E2 induced altered splicing predicted to affect this cellular function. The results present a model system for investigating E2 regulation of the host genome. PMID:25129434

  11. Genome-wide analysis of high risk human papillomavirus E2 proteins in human primary keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuchsupha Sunthamala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The E2 protein is expressed in the early stage of human papillomavirus (HPV infection that is associated with cervical lesions. This protein plays important roles in regulation of viral replication and transcription. To characterize the role of E2 protein in modulation of cellular gene expression in HPV infected cells, genome-wide expression profiling of human primary keratinocytes (HPK harboring HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2 was investigated using microarray. The Principle Components Analysis (PCA revealed that the expression data of HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2-transduced HPKs were rather closely clustered. The Venn diagram of modulated genes showed an overlap of 10 common genes in HPV16 E2 expressing HPK and HPV18 E2 expressing HPK. These genes were expressed with significant difference by comparison with control cells. In addition, the distinct sets of modulated genes were detected 14 and 34 genes in HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2 expressing HPKs, respectively.

  12. Cyclin A1 promoter hypermethylation in human papillomavirus-associated cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate epigenetic status of cyclin A1 in human papillomavirus-associated cervical cancer. Y. Tokumaru et al., Cancer Res 64, 5982-7 (Sep 1, 2004)demonstrated in head and neck squamous-cell cancer an inverse correlation between cyclin A1 promoter hypermethylation and TP53 mutation. Human papillomavirus-associated cervical cancer, however, is deprived of TP53 function by a different mechanism. Therefore, it was of interest to investigate the epigenetic alterations during multistep cervical cancer development. In this study, we performed duplex methylation-specific PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR on several cervical cancer cell lines and microdissected cervical cancers. Furthermore, the incidence of cyclin A1 methylation was studied in 43 samples of white blood cells, 25 normal cervices, and 24, 5 and 30 human papillomavirus-associated premalignant, microinvasive and invasive cervical lesions, respectively. We demonstrated cyclin A1 methylation to be commonly found in cervical cancer, both in vitro and in vivo, with its physiological role being to decrease gene expression. More important, this study demonstrated that not only is cyclin A1 promoter hypermethylation strikingly common in cervical cancer, but is also specific to the invasive phenotype in comparison with other histopathological stages during multistep carcinogenesis. None of the normal cells and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions exhibited methylation. In contrast, 36.6%, 60% and 93.3% of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, microinvasive and invasive cancers, respectively, showed methylation. This methylation study indicated that cyclin A1 is a potential tumor marker for early diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer

  13. Classification of weakly carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: addressing the limits of epidemiology at the borderline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro Franco M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by persistent infections with a restricted set of human papillomaviruses (HPV. Some HPV types, like HPV16 and HPV18, are clear and powerful carcinogens. However, the categorization of the most weakly carcinogenic HPV types is extremely challenging. The decisions are important for screening test and vaccine development. This article describes for open discussion an approach recently taken by a World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC Monographs Working Group to re-assess the carcinogenicity of different HPV types.

  14. The diagnosis and treatment of human papillomavirus-mediated genital lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodell, Lindsey Ann; Mercurio, Mary Gail; Brodell, Robert T

    2007-04-01

    Genital warts (condyloma acuminatum, venereal warts) are common highly contagious benign epithelial lesions occurring on the genitals, perianal area, and inguinal folds, and are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Diagnosis is based largely on the clinical appearance of lesions. New home-based treatments, including podofilox and imiquimod, have revolutionized the therapeutic management of genital warts, empowering patients to participate in their own treatment with products that primarily have local side effects. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment (office based and home based) of genital warts. PMID:17508490

  15. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in anal cancers from six different countries.

    OpenAIRE

    Scholefield, J. H.; Kerr, I B; Shepherd, N A; Miller, K J; Bloomfield, R.; Northover, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    An association between anal squamous cell carcinoma and human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA has been documented in the UK. If HPV type 16 is an important aetiological factor in the development of this tumour it would be expected to occur in anal cancer tissues from other parts of the world. In this study a series of 173 anal squamous cell carcinoma tissue samples from five centres around the world have been examined by DNA hybridisation for HPV type 16 DNA sequences. HPV type 16 DNA was fo...

  16. Human Papillomavirus-Related Disease in Men: Not Just a Women’s Issue

    OpenAIRE

    Palefsky, Joel M.

    2010-01-01

    The most common cause of mortality related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is cervical cancer. However, male HPV infection is also an important concern, both for the disease burden in men and for the risk of transmission to women. HPV is associated with a variety of cancers in men, including anal cancer and a subset of penile and oral cancers. The incidence of anal and oral cancers related to HPV is increasing in the general population and is growing even faster among individuals who ...

  17. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Anal and Oral Sites Among Patients with Genital Warts

    OpenAIRE

    Kofoed, Kristian; Sand, Carsten; Forslund, Ola; Madsen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Genital warts are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a leading cause of anogenital malignancies and a role of HPV in the aetiology of oro-pharyngeal cancers has been demonstrated. The frequency of oral HPV infection in patients with genital warts and the association between concomitant genital, anal and oral infection is unclear. A total of 201 men and women with genital wart-like lesions were recruited. Swab samples were obtained from the genital warts and the anal canal and an ora...

  18. Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men Who Have Sex with Men in Lima, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, Roswell; Salvatierra, Javier; Solari, Vicky; Calderon, Martha; Ton, Thanh G.N.; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) is the primary risk factor for anal cancer. Of 105 Peruvian MSM examined, 77.1% were infected with HPV; of these 79.0% were coinfected with two or more types and 47.3% were infected by a carcinogenic type. HPV types 53, 6, 16, and 58 were the most frequent HPV infections detected. High-risk HPV type infection was associated with sex work, HIV status, and having rectal chlamydial or gonorrheal infection. These findings ...

  19. Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection in a Street Based Sample of Drug Using HIV-Positive Men

    OpenAIRE

    Cranston, Ross D.; Murphy, Ryan; Weiss, Robert E.; Costa, Maria Da; Palefsky, Joel; Shoptaw, Steven; Gorbach, Pamina M.

    2012-01-01

    HIV facilitates an increase in human papillomavirus (HPV) associated conditions. HIV-positive men living in a substance use context in Los Angeles were recruited using Respondent Driven Sampling, completed a questionnaire and had biological samples including an anal HPV swab taken. 316 evaluable men were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of all HPV, high-risk (HR) infection, and multiple type infection was highest for men who have sex with men (MSM) (93.9%, 64.6%, 29.7% respectively). Whe...

  20. Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection in Women and Its Relationship with Cervical Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Brenda Y.; McDuffie, Katharine; Zhu, Xuemei; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Killeen, Jeffrey; Kessel, Bruce; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Bertram, Cathy C.; Easa, David; Ning, Lily; Boyd, Jamie; Sunoo, Christian; Kamemoto, Lori; Goodman, Marc T.

    2005-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), the primary cause of cervical cancer, is also associated with the development of anal cancer. Relatively little is known about the epidemiology of anal HPV infection among healthy females and its relationship to cervical infection. We sought to characterize anal HPV infection in a cohort of adult women in Hawaii. Overall, 27% (372 of 1,378) of women were positive for anal HPV DNA at baseline compared with 29% (692 of 2,372) with cervical HPV DNA. Among women with p...

  1. Cervical and Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection in Adult Women in American Samoa

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Ka’opua, Lana S.; Scanlan, Luana; Ah Ching, John; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Zhu, Xuemei; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Tofaeono, Jennifer; Williams, Victor Tofaeono

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of cervical and anal human papillomavirus (HPV) and risk factors associated with infections were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of 211 adult women in American Samoa. Overall, 53% of women reported ever having a Pap smear. Cervical and anal HPV was detected in 10% and 16% of women, respectively; 4% of women had concurrent cervical and anal HPV. The most common cervical genotypes were HPV 6, HPV 16, and HPV 53. Cutaneous HPV types were detected in 40% of anal infections. Ce...

  2. Production and characterisation of a monoclonal antibody to human papillomavirus type 16 using recombinant vaccinia virus.

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, C S; Churcher, M J; Meinke, J.; Smith, G.L.; Higgins, G; Stanley, M.; Minson, A C

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody was raised against the major capsid protein L1 of human papillomavirus type 16, using a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses the L1 protein, as a target for screening. This antibody, designated CAMVIR-1, reacted with a 56 kilodalton protein in cells infected with L1-vaccinia virus, and the protein was present in a predominantly nuclear location. The antibody also detects the HPV-16 L1 antigen in formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded biopsy specimens and on routine c...

  3. Correlation between human papillomavirus and p16 overexpression in oropharyngeal tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj Larsen, C; Gyldenløve, M; Jensen, D H; Therkildsen, M H; Kiss, Katalin; Norrild, B; Konge, L; von Buchwald, C

    2014-01-01

    A significant proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx (OP-SCC) are related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and p16 overexpression. This subgroup proves better prognosis and survival but no evidence exists on the correlation between HPV and p16 overexpression based on diag...... diagnostic measures and definition of p16 overexpression. We evaluated means of p16 and HPV diagnostics, and quantified overexpression of p16 in HPV-positive and -negative OP-SCCs by mode of immunohistochemical staining of carcinoma cells....

  4. Human Papillomavirus-Related Cancers Among People Living With AIDS in Puerto Rico

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Ana Patricia; Pérez-Irizarry, Javier; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Suárez, Erick; Pérez, Naydi; Cruz, Maritza; Palefsky, Joel; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; de Miranda, Sandra; Colón-López, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV)–related cancers and the risk of death (by cancer status) among people living with AIDS (PLWA) in Puerto Rico. We used data from the Puerto Rico AIDS Surveillance Program and Central Cancer Registry (1985–2005). Cancers with highest incidence were cervix (299.6/100,000) for women and oral cavity/oropharynx for men (150.0/100,000); the greatest excess of cancer incidence for men (standardized inci...

  5. Selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription in non-tumorigenic cells by 5-azacytidine.

    OpenAIRE

    Rösl, F; Dürst, M; zur Hausen, H

    1988-01-01

    The transcription of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV 18) is selectively suppressed in non-tumorigenic HeLa x fibroblast or HeLa x keratinocyte cell hybrids by 5-azacytidine. In contrast, viral gene expression is not influenced by 5-azacytidine in both tumorigenic hybrid segregants and in the parental HeLa cells. The suppression mechanism seems to operate at the level of initiation of transcription since nuclear run-on experiments show the absence of elongated nascent viral RNA, whereas the ...

  6. Health Disparities in the Immunoprevention of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Associated Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Bakir, Amira H.; Skarzynski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes roughly 1.6% of the plus 1.6 million cases of cancer that are diagnosed in the United States each year. Despite the proven safety and efficacy of available vaccines, HPV remains the most common sexually transmitted infection. Underlying the high prevalence of HPV infection is the poor adherence to the Centers for Disease Control recommendation to vaccinate all 11- to 12-year-old males and females. In fact, only about 38 and 14% of eligible females and males, ...

  7. The human papillomavirus and cancer: a multiphase study investigating preventative behaviours in young males

    OpenAIRE

    FitzGerald, Serena Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the world’s most common sexually transmitted infections, and a causative factor of oropharyngeal, anal and penile cancers in males. Worldwide, an estimated 39,000 HPV-associated cancers occur each year in men. The highest rates of HPV infection are found in adults aged 18 to 28 years. Clinical evidence indicates that use of a condom in addition to obtaining the HPV vaccine provides the greatest protection from HPV infections. Aim: To explor...

  8. Insights into the mechanism of human papillomavirus E2-induced procaspase-8 activation and cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Nitu Singh; Sanjib Senapati; Kakoli Bose

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) E2 protein, the master regulator of viral life cycle, induces apoptosis of host cell that is independent of its virus-associated regulatory functions. E2 protein of HR-HPV18 has been found to be involved in novel FADD-independent activation of caspase-8, however, the molecular basis of this unique non-death-fold E2-mediated apoptosis is poorly understood. Here, with an interdisciplinary approach that involves in silico, mutational, biochemical and bioph...

  9. Replication and transcription of human papillomavirus type 58 genome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To establish a convenient system for the study of human papillomavirus (HPV, we inserted a Saccharomyces cerevisiae selectable marker, Ura, into HPV58 genome and transformed it into yeast. Results HPV58 genome could replicate extrachromosomally in yeast, with transcription of its early and late genes. However, with mutation of the viral E2 gene, HPV58 genome lost its mitotic stability, and the transcription levels of E6 and E7 genes were upregulated. Conclusions E2 protein could participate in viral genome maintenance, replication and transcription regulation. This yeast model could be used for the study of certain aspects of HPV life cycle.

  10. NRIP, a Novel Calmodulin Binding Protein, Activates Calcineurin To Dephosphorylate Human Papillomavirus E2 Protein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Szu-Wei; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Lin, Chia-Yi; Chen, Show-Li

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we found a gene named nuclear receptor interaction protein (NRIP) (or DCAF6 or IQWD1). We demonstrate that NRIP is a novel binding protein for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) E2 protein. HPV-16 E2 and NRIP can directly associate into a complex in vivo and in vitro, and the N-terminal domain of NRIP interacts with the transactivation domain of HPV-16 E2. Only full-length NRIP can stabilize E2 protein and induce HPV gene expression, and NRIP silenced by two designed small interferi...

  11. Longer-term efficacy of a prophylactic monovalent human papillomavirus type 16 vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Mao, Constance; Hughes, James P.; Alvarez, Frances B.; Bryan, Janine T; Stephen E., Hawes; Weiss, Noel S.; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted an extended follow-up study (March 2006 – May 2008) to assess the longer-term efficacy of a prophylactic monovalent human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 L1 virus-like particle vaccine in women (n = 290) who had enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of this vaccine during October 1998 – November 1999 in Seattle and remained HPV-16 DNA negative during the course of that trial. During the extended follow-up period, none of the vaccine recipients was found to be infected with HPV-1...

  12. The Cigarette Smoke Carcinogen Benzo[a]pyrene Enhances Human Papillomavirus Synthesis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Samina; Conway, Michael J; Chen, Horng-Shen; Meyers, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that cigarette smoke carcinogens are cofactors which synergize with human papillomavirus (HPV) to increase the risk of cervical cancer progression. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a major carcinogen in cigarette smoke, is detected in the cervical mucus and may interact with HPV. Exposure of cervical cells to high concentrations of BaP resulted in a 10-fold increase in HPV type 31 (HPV31) viral titers, whereas treatment with low concentrations of BaP resulted in an increa...

  13. Human papillomavirus-16 is integrated in lung carcinomas: a study in Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Aguayo, F; Castillo, A.; Koriyama, C; Higashi, M; Itoh, T.; Capetillo, M; Shuyama, K; Corvalan, A; Eizuru, Y; Akiba, S

    2007-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) was detected in 20 (29%) out of 69 lung carcinomas (LCs) in Chile, by PCR and Southern blot, and was more frequently detected in squamous cell carcinoma (SQC) than in adenocarcinomas (46 vs 9%, P=0.001). HPV-16, positive in 11 cases, was the most frequently detected HPV genotype determined by DNA sequencing. HPV-16 E2/E6 ratio, estimated from real-time PCR analysis, was much lower than the unity, suggesting that at least a partial HPV-16 genome was integrated in...

  14. Specificity of the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test for detecting human papillomavirus genotype 52 (HPV-52):

    OpenAIRE

    Kocjan, Boštjan; Poljak, Mario; Oštrbenk, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: HPV-52 is one of the most frequent human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes causing significant cervical pathology. The most widely used HPV genotyping assay, the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Linear Array), is unable to identify HPV- 52 status in samples containing HPV-33, HPV-35, and/or HPV-58. Methods: Linear Array HPV-52 analytical specificity was established by testing 100 specimens reactive with the Linear Array HPV- 33/35/52/58 cross-reactive probe, but not with the...

  15. Human papillomavirus vaccine initiation among 9–13-year-olds in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Donahue, Kelly L.; Hendrix, Kristin S.; Lynne A. Sturm; Zimet, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The quadrivalent and 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are licensed for administration among 9–26-year-old males and females, with routine vaccination recommended for 11–12-year-olds. Despite the availability of the vaccine at younger ages, few studies have explored vaccine uptake prior to age 13, and national HPV vaccination surveillance data is limited to 13–17-year-olds. Our objective was to examine rates and predictors of HPV vaccine initiation among 9–13-year-olds in the Unite...

  16. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type distribution among women attending routine gynecological examinations in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    AlObaid, Abdulaziz; Al-Badawi, Ismail A.; Al-Kadri, Hanan; Gopala, Kusuma; Kandeil, Walid; Quint, Wim; Al-Aker, Murad; DeAntonio, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by persistent infection with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) types. In Saudi Arabia which has a population of 6.5 million women over the age of 15 years, approximately 152 new cases of CC are diagnosed and 55 women die from the disease annually. Nevertheless current epidemiological data for HPV in this population are limited. This study evaluated the prevalence and type distribution of HPV and documented the awareness of HPV infection and he...

  17. Vacinas contra o Papilomavirus humano Vaccines against human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Roberto Nadal

    2006-09-01

    outras doenças anogenitais associadas à infecção pelo HPV.Papillomavirus infection is more common in young sexually active people. It is so prevalent that from 75% to 80% of this population will be infected in their lifetime. Most lesions will be eradicated spontaneously at the point of not being detected even with the most sensible methods. Persistent infections with oncogenic HPV increase intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer risks. Two ways of prevention may be proposed: screening for precursor lesions and immunization against HPV, to avoid them. Although anogenital cancer incidence is decreasing with screening methods, costs are high and emotional disturbance may be caused by an abnormal result. So, vaccines to prevent diseases associated to HPV must be available. In the last decade, clinical tests began with several vaccines targeting the most frequent HPV types. The goal of prophylactic vaccines is to prevent primary or persistent HPV infections, and thus prevent cervical cancer and/or genital warts and the aim of the therapeutic types is to prevent progression of HPV infection, induce regression of intraepithelial neoplasia or condylomata, or eradicate residual cervical cancer. Prophylactic HPV vaccines in late stages of clinical testing are composed of HPV L1 capsid protein that self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs when expressed in recombinant systems, resulting in strong adaptive immune responses that are capable of neutralizing subsequent natural infections. Some studies observed 100% efficacy in preventing clinical disease for specific HPV types at least 5 years after immunization. Vaccines that target E6 and E7 proteins also represent an important strategy to control HPV-associated lesions and are in test in animal models. HPV vaccines seem to be more effective when administered prior to initiation of sexual activity, and vaccination campaigns should target preadolescent and adolescent populations. It is expected that with good coverage of the

  18. Human papillomavirus detection from human immunodeficiency virus-infected Colombian women's paired urine and cervical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Munoz

    Full Text Available Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204 were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R. HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58 and two low-risk (LR-HPV (HPV-6/11 types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine followed by HPV-31(47.2% in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7% in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance.

  19. Identification of a Novel Human Papillomavirus, Type HPV199, Isolated from a Nasopharynx and Anal Canal, and Complete Genomic Characterization of Papillomavirus Species Gamma-12

    OpenAIRE

    Oštrbenk, Anja; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Hošnjak, Lea; Li, Jingjing; Deng, Qiuju; Šterbenc, Anja; Poljak, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The novel human papillomavirus type 199 (HPV199) was initially identified in a nasopharyngeal swab sample obtained from a 25 year-old immunocompetent male. The complete genome of HPV199 is 7,184 bp in length with a GC content of 36.5%. Comparative genomic characterization of HPV199 and its closest relatives showed the classical genomic organization of Gammapapillomaviruses (Gamma-PVs). HPV199 has seven major open reading frames (ORFs), encoding five early (E1, E2, E4, E6, and E7) and two late...

  20. Selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription in non-tumorigenic cells by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösl, F; Dürst, M; zur Hausen, H

    1988-01-01

    The transcription of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV 18) is selectively suppressed in non-tumorigenic HeLa x fibroblast or HeLa x keratinocyte cell hybrids by 5-azacytidine. In contrast, viral gene expression is not influenced by 5-azacytidine in both tumorigenic hybrid segregants and in the parental HeLa cells. The suppression mechanism seems to operate at the level of initiation of transcription since nuclear run-on experiments show the absence of elongated nascent viral RNA, whereas the transcription of cellular reference genes remains unaffected. Down-regulation of HPV 18 mRNA correlates directly with cessation of cellular growth and can be abolished using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore human keratinocytes immortalized by HPV 16 but still retaining the non-tumorigenic phenotype reveal the same inhibitory effect on viral transcription after treatment with 5-azacytidine. These results support a model of a postulated intracellular control mechanism, directed against papillomavirus transcription, which can be induced by 5-azacytidine and appears to correlate with the presence of specific chromosomes in non-tumorigenic cells. Images PMID:2457495

  1. Molecular Characterization of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Women in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Marie Angèle Traore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV is found in over 99% of cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in a population of women in Bobo-Dioulasso and to identify the high-risk types present in these women. From May to June, 2015, 181 women who came for consultation at the Souro Sanou University Hospital of Bobo-Dioulasso have been included in this study. Uterine endocervical swabs have been taken in these women. DNA obtained by extraction from the samples thus collected was used to determine the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes through real-time PCR. The age of the women ranged from 20 to 56 years with a mean of 35.3±8.1 years. The prevalence of infection by high-risk HPV types was 25.4% (46/181. The most common high-risk HPV genotypes were HPV 39 (18.5%, HPV 52 (16.7%, HPV 18 (14.8%, and HPV 35 (13.0%. HPV 16 which is included in the HPV vaccines was not found in the population studied. This type of study which is the first one in Bobo-Dioulasso has showed a high prevalence of genotypes HPV 39, HPV 52, and HPV 35 which are not yet covered by a vaccine.

  2. Molecular Characterization of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Women in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traore, Ina Marie Angèle; Dembele, Adama; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Traore, Germain; Bambara, Moussa; Ouedraogo, Charlemagne; Traore, Yves

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in over 99% of cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in a population of women in Bobo-Dioulasso and to identify the high-risk types present in these women. From May to June, 2015, 181 women who came for consultation at the Souro Sanou University Hospital of Bobo-Dioulasso have been included in this study. Uterine endocervical swabs have been taken in these women. DNA obtained by extraction from the samples thus collected was used to determine the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes through real-time PCR. The age of the women ranged from 20 to 56 years with a mean of 35.3 ± 8.1 years. The prevalence of infection by high-risk HPV types was 25.4% (46/181). The most common high-risk HPV genotypes were HPV 39 (18.5%), HPV 52 (16.7%), HPV 18 (14.8%), and HPV 35 (13.0%). HPV 16 which is included in the HPV vaccines was not found in the population studied. This type of study which is the first one in Bobo-Dioulasso has showed a high prevalence of genotypes HPV 39, HPV 52, and HPV 35 which are not yet covered by a vaccine. PMID:27525275

  3. Human papillomavirus knowledge, vaccine acceptance, and vaccine series completion among female entertainment and sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia: the Young Women's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhera, Priya; Evans, Jennifer L; Stein, Ellen; Gandhi, Monica; Couture, Marie-Claude; Sansothy, Neth; Sichan, Keo; Maher, Lisa; Kaldor, John; Page, Kimberly; Kien

    2015-10-01

    Human papillomavirus is a common sexually transmitted infection and the causative agent for cervical cancer, a frequently occurring malignant disease among women in developing countries. We assessed human papillomavirus awareness prior to the delivery of a brief information and education intervention, and human papillomavirus vaccine provision to female entertainment and sex workers (N = 220). At baseline, only 23.6% of women had heard of human papillomavirus. Following the educational intervention, 90% answered all the human papillomavirus knowledge questions correctly. Of 192 participants attending the first quarterly cohort visit where vaccine was offered, 149 (78%) were eligible for vaccination; HIV-positive (n = 32) and pregnant (n = 11) women were excluded. Acceptance of vaccine among eligible women was universal, and 79.2% completed the three-dose vaccination series. Women who reported use of amphetamine-type stimulants had significantly and independently lower odds of vaccine completion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08, 0.69). New pregnancies also had an impact on vaccine completion: 5.4% (8/149 5.4%) who started the series had to stop due to new pregnancy. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a simple education intervention designed to increase human papillomavirus knowledge and the feasibility of successful human papillomavirus vaccine in a population that is often difficult to engage in preventive health care. PMID:25505042

  4. Serology for human papillomavirus Serología para el virus del papiloma humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Coursaget

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Difficulties with serology for papillomavirus are associated with the large number of human papillomavirus, cross-reactions between papillomavirus, and to the diversity of lesions and target sites for infection. In addition, the expression of the papillomavirus in the superficial layers of the epithelium gives rise to the weak presentation to immunocompetent cells of viral antigens, which in turn gives rise to a weak serological response. Distinct efforts have been made in previous decades to develop more specific and sensitive serological assays. These former studies use fusion proteins and synthetic peptides, although they remain on the whole uninteresting, due to their lack of sensitivity and specificity. Only in the last few years, and principally due to the advent of various virus-like particles (VLP, have more sensitive and specific assays become available.Las limitaciones para la utilización de la serología para el estudio del virus del papiloma humano con fines clínicos están asociadas con la gran variedad de subtipos humanos, con las reacciones cruzadas que existen entre diversos genotipos, la diversidad de lesiones precursoras de cáncer y con los sitios blancos de infección. Asimismo, la expresión del virus del papiloma humano en las capas superficiales del epitelio dan origen a una débil presentación de células inmunocompetentes de antígenos virales, lo cual origina una elevación de la respuesta serológica. Distintos esfuerzos se han realizado en décadas previas para desarrollar ensayos serológicos más específicos y sensibles. En muchas investigaciones se ha utilizado una fusión de proteínas y péptidos sintéticos que tienen como principal limitación su escasa sensibilidad y especificidad. Sólo en los últimos años, y principalmente debido al arribo de partículas parecidas a este virus, tenemos disponibles ensayos más sensibles y específicos, ampliamente descritos en este artículo.

  5. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the -Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species 5 (HPV51), 6 (HPV56), 7 (H...

  6. Identification of a novel human papillomavirus by metagenomic analysis of samples from patients with febrile respiratory illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokili, J.L.; Dutilh, B.E.; Lim, Y.W.; Schneider, B.S.; Taylor, T.; Haynes, M.R.; Metzgar, D.; Myers, C.A.; Blair, P.J.; Nosrat, B.; Wolfe, N.D.; Rohwer, F.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a virus discovery investigation using a metagenomic approach, a highly divergent novel Human papillomavirus type was identified in pooled convenience nasal/oropharyngeal swab samples collected from patients with febrile respiratory illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome and th

  7. Production of human papillomavirus type16 E7 oncoprotein fused with ß-glucuronidase in transgenic tomato and potato

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bříza, Jindřich; Pavingerová, Daniela; Vlasák, Josef; Ludvíková, V.; Niedermeierová, Hana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2007), s. 268-276. ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/05/2092 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : transgenic plants * human papillomavirus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.259, year: 2007

  8. The Uptake of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine among Adolescent Females in the United States: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jacqueline A.; Peterson, Jane Anthony

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive review of literature was conducted to identify the barriers and facilitators, from the parents'/guardians' and primary care providers' (PCPs) perspective, that are associated with the uptake of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among adolescent females. Findings from 14 peer-reviewed articles indicate that 37% of adolescent…

  9. Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus and Perceived Barriers to Vaccination in a Sample of US Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, James Price; Spear, Margaret E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) and perceived barriers to being vaccinated against the virus. Participants: Three hundred ninety-six undergraduate women enrolled at Penn State University in Fall 2008. Methods: A random sample of students were invited to participate in a Web-based survey. Results: Awareness of HPV and…

  10. Disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Literacy and Vaccine Completion among Asian American Pacific Islander Undergraduates: Implications for Cancer Health Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa; Vang, Suzanne; DeWolfe, Jessica; Kim, Nam Keol; Lee, Do Kyung; Yeung, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Low rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among young Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women need to be addressed, particularly given the high incidence of cervical cancer in this population. The current study aims to investigate predictors of HPV vaccination in young AAPI and non-Latina white (NLW) women. Methods: A…

  11. Does Mother Know Best? An Actor-Partner Model of College-Age Women's Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Janice L.; Kam, Jennifer A.; Katz, Mira L.; Roberto, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the associations of perceived threat, perceived efficacy, and parent-child communication with the extent to which college-age women received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Daughters and their mothers completed a survey about the HPV vaccine (N = 182 dyads). The results showed that mothers' perceived self-efficacy to…

  12. A Randomized Intervention Study to Evaluate Whether Electronic Messaging Can Increase Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Completion and Knowledge among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Alice R.; Maddy, LaDonna; Torres, Essie; Goldberg, Ellen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate an intervention aimed at increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine completion of the 3-dose series and knowledge. Participants: Two hundred sixty-four male and female US college students 18-26 years old who were receiving HPV vaccine dose 1. Methods: Students were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group.…

  13. Predicting Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intentions of College-Aged Males: An Examination of Parents' and Son's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Mira L.; Kam, Jennifer A.; Krieger, Janice L.; Roberto, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine male students' and their parents' human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine communication in relation to males' willingness to discuss the vaccine with their health care provider and the likelihood of being vaccinated. Participants: Dyads (n = 111) of students and parents. Methods: Participants completed a HPV vaccine survey based…

  14. Relative Persuasiveness of Gain- versus Loss-Framed Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Messages for the Present- and Future-Minded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    This research examines how young adults' attitudes toward human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and their intentions to get the vaccine are influenced by the framing of health messages (gain vs. loss) and time orientation (i.e., the extent to which people value immediate vs. distant consequences of their decisions). Results of an experiment…

  15. Correlates to Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Status and Willingness to Vaccinate in Low-Income Philadelphia High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Sarah B.; Leader, Amy; Shwarz, Michelle; Greener, Judith; Patterson, Freda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination or willingness to be vaccinated in urban, minority adolescents. Methods: Using responses to the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey in Philadelphia, a random sample of high schools provided weighted data representing 20,941 9th to 12th graders. Stratified by…

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF PROPHYLACTIC VACCINATION AGAINST HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION USING A DYNAMIC-MODELLING APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, T.; Nijman, H.; Wilschut, J.; Daemen, T.; Postma, M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Since 2008, teenage girls are being vaccinated against Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in Europe. The vaccine coverage did not reach high uptake. The aim of this study is to design a dynamic transmission framework to model HPVtransmission in the population in order to predict epidemiologic an

  17. Targeting Human Papillomavirus to Reduce the Burden of Cervical, Vulvar and Vaginal Cancer and Pre-Invasive Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygard, Mari; Hansen, Bo Terning; Dillner, Joakim;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally related to cervical, vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasias and cancers. Highly effective vaccines against HPV types 16/18 have been available since 2006, and are currently used in many countries in combination with c...

  18. A novel strategy for human papillomavirus detection and genotyping with SybrGreen and molecular beacon polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szuhai, K; Sandhaus, E; Kolkman-Uljee, SM; Lemaitre, M; Truffert, JC; Dirks, RW; Tanke, HJ; Fleuren, GJ; Schuuring, E; Raap, AK

    2001-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. For identification of the large number of different HPV types found in (pre)malignant lesions, a robust methodology is needed that combines general HPV detection with HPV genotyping. We have developed for fo

  19. Human papillomavirus type influences the extent of chromosomal lag during mitosis in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, MPM; VanLeeuwen, AM; Hollema, H; Quint, WGV; Pieters, WJLM

    1997-01-01

    The level of risk for carcinoma in the uterine cervix depends on the type of human papillomavirus (HPV) present. We examined whether the HPV type influences the proliferation rate and occurrence of mitotic figures with lagging chromosomes in the precursor of cervical carcinoma. The study group compr

  20. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Risk Factors, Vaccination Patterns, and Vaccine Perceptions among a Sample of Male College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B.; Collins Fantasia, Heidi; Charyk, Anna; Sutherland, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates, including initiation and completion of the vaccine series, and barriers to vaccination in a sample of male college students. Participants: Male students between the ages of 18 and 25 who reported being currently or previously sexually active (N = 735). Methods: A cross-sectional…

  1. A Patient-Centered Approach to Counseling Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Human Papillomavirus Testing: A Clinician's Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Amy; Genden, Eric; Posner, Marshall; Sikora, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 is an independent risk factor for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). This article is intended to be a reference for physicians to effectively manage psychosocial outcomes and ensure optimum health promotion when diagnosing patients with HPV-associated OPC.

  2. Biophysical characterization of the complex between human papillomavirus E6 protein and synapse-associated protein 97

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine Ngang; Bach, Anders; Engström, Åke;

    2011-01-01

    The E6 protein of human papillomavirus exhibits complex interaction patterns with several host proteins and their roles in HPV mediated oncogenesis have proved challenging to study. Here we use several biophysical techniques to explore the binding of E6 to the three PDZ domains of the tumor suppr...

  3. NucliSENS EasyQ HPV v1 test - Testing for oncogenic activity of human papillomaviruses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeantet, D.; Schwarzmann, F.; Tromp, J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Wurff, A.A. van der; Oosterlaken, T.; Jacobs, M.; Troesch, A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analytical sensitivity of DNA-based assays to detect infection with human papillomaviruses is very high, but clinical specificity for cervical cancer strongly depends on the age of the patient and case classification. To solve the dilemma between sensitivity and specificity, a new genera

  4. The epidemiology of human papillomavirus in HIV-negative and HIV-infected men who have sex with men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.H. Mooij

    2015-01-01

    This thesis studied the epidemiology and seroepidemiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) among HIV-negative and HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Anal, penile, and oral HPV prevalence and incidence were high, in particular among HIV-infected MSM. Clearance of

  5. Deconstructing Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Knowledge: Objective and Perceived Knowledge in Males' Intentions to Receive the HPV Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Stephenson, Ellen; Perez, Samara; Lau, Elsa; Rosberger, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recently approved for men. To effectively tailor HPV education efforts toward men, it is important to understand what men know about HPV and how this knowledge relates to their decision to receive the vaccine. This study examines how objective HPV knowledge, objective HPV vaccine knowledge,…

  6. HIV acquisition is associated with prior high-risk human papillomavirus infection among high-risk women in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Veldhuijzen; J. Vyankandondera; J.H. van de Wijgert

    2010-01-01

    As part of a prospective cohort study to assess HIV incidence among high-risk women in Kigali, Rwanda, we evaluated the association between high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and subsequent HIV acquisition. Women who seroconverted for HIV between the first and second HPV measurement visi

  7. High-Risk and Low-Risk Human Papillomavirus and the Absolute Risk of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia or Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louise T; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Munk, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the absolute risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 or cervical cancer (CIN 3 or worse) after detection of low-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) and after a negative high-risk HPV test. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, consecutive liquid-based cer...

  8. Prevalence and Type Distribution of Human Papillomavirus Among 1813 Men in Tanzania and the Relationship to HIV Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Iftner, Thomas; Mwaiselage, Julius; Kahesa, Crispin; Rasch, Vibeke; Ngoma, Twalib; Munk, Christian; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger

    2013-01-01

    Infection with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with penile cancer in men, cervical cancer in women, and anal cancer and certain types of head and neck cancers in both sexes. Few studies have assessed the prevalence and type distribution of HPV among men in sub-Saharan Africa...

  9. The interferon-related developmental regulator 1 is used by human papillomavirus to suppress NFκB activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Tummers (Bart); R. Goedemans (Renske); L.P.L. Pelascini (Laetitia P. L.); E.S. Jordanova (Ekaterina S.); E.M.G. Van Esch (Edith M. G.); C. Meyers (Craig); C.J. Melief (Cornelius); J.M. Boer (Judith); S.H. van der Burg (Sjoerd)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractHigh-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPVs) infect keratinocytes and successfully evade host immunity despite the fact that keratinocytes are well equipped to respond to innate and adaptive immune signals. Using non-infected and freshly established or persistent hrHPV-infected keratinocyte

  10. p53 represses human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication via the viral E2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Iain M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV DNA replication can be inhibited by the cellular tumour suppressor protein p53. However, the mechanism through which p53 inhibits viral replication and the role that this might play in the HPV life cycle are not known. The papillomavirus E2 protein is required for efficient HPV DNA replication and also regulates viral gene expression. E2 represses transcription of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes and can thereby modulate indirectly host cell proliferation and survival. In addition, the E2 protein from HPV 16 has been shown to bind p53 and to be capable of inducing apoptosis independently of E6 and E7. Results Here we use a panel of E2 mutants to confirm that mutations which block the induction of apoptosis via this E6/E7-independent pathway, have little or no effect on the induction of apoptosis by the E6/E7-dependent pathway. Although these mutations in E2 do not affect the ability of the protein to mediate HPV DNA replication, they do abrogate the repressive effects of p53 on the transcriptional activity of E2 and prevent the inhibition of E2-dependent HPV DNA replication by p53. Conclusion These data suggest that p53 down-regulates HPV 16 DNA replication via the E2 protein.

  11. Seroprevalence of 34 human papillomavirus types in the German general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M Michael

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of infections with many human papillomavirus (HPV types is poorly understood. Here, we describe for the first time the age- and sex-dependent antibody prevalence for 29 cutaneous and five mucosal HPV types from 15 species within five phylogenetic genera (alpha, beta, gamma, mu, nu in a general population. Sera from 1,797 German adults and children (758 males and 1,039 females between 1 and 82 years (median 37 years were analysed for antibodies to the major capsid protein L1 by Luminex-based multiplex serology. The first substantial HPV antibody reactions observed already in children and young adults are those to cutaneous types of the genera nu (HPV 41 and mu (HPV 1, 63. The antibody prevalence to mucosal high-risk types, most prominently HPV 16, was elevated after puberty in women but not in men and peaked between 25 and 34 years. Antibodies to beta and gamma papillomaviruses (PV were rare in children and increased homogeneously with age, with prevalence peaks at 40 and 60 years in women and 50 and 70 years in men. Antibodies to cutaneous alpha PV showed a heterogeneous age distribution. In summary, these data suggest three major seroprevalence patterns for HPV of phylogenetically distinct genera: antibodies to mu and nu skin PV appear early in life, those to mucosal alpha PV in women after puberty, and antibodies to beta as well as to gamma skin PV accumulate later in life.

  12. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichero, Laura, E-mail: lsichero@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Simao Sobrinho, Joao [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Lina Villa, Luisa [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  13. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  14. Human papillomavirus promotes Epstein-Barr virus maintenance and lytic reactivation in immortalized oral keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makielski, Kathleen R; Lee, Denis; Lorenz, Laurel D; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Kenney, Shannon C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomaviruses are human tumor viruses that infect and replicate in upper aerodigestive tract epithelia and cause head and neck cancers. The productive phases of both viruses are tied to stratified epithelia highlighting the possibility that these viruses may affect each other's life cycles. Our lab has established an in vitro model system to test the effects of EBV and HPV co-infection in stratified squamous oral epithelial cells. Our results indicate that HPV increases maintenance of the EBV genome in the co-infected cells and promotes lytic reactivation of EBV in upper layers of stratified epithelium. Expression of the HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 were found to be necessary and sufficient to account for HPV-mediated lytic reactivation of EBV. Our findings indicate that HPV increases the capacity of epithelial cells to support the EBV life cycle, which could in turn increase EBV-mediated pathogenesis in the oral cavity. PMID:27179345

  15. Human papillomavirus and p53 protein immunoreactivity in condylomata acuminatum and squamous cell carcinoma of penis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Hua ZHANG; Gui-Qin SUN; Yu YANG; Tai-He ZHANG

    2001-01-01

    To determine the immunoreactive pattem of human papillomavirus (HPV) antigen and p53 protein in condylomata acuminatum (CA) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of penis. Methods: Immunohistochemistry for HPV and p53 were performed in 40 specimens of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissues using a polyclonal (rabbit) antibody against HPV and a monoclonal (mouse) antibody against human p53 protein. Twenty one cases of CA and nineteen cases of SCC were examined. Results: HPV antigen was detected in all 21 CA and 2 penile SCC. p53 protein overexpression was observed in 12 of 19 (63%) SCC in which 6 cases were strong positive. Five of 21 CA (24%)showed low-grade p53 protein overexpression. Conclusion: CA is related to HPV infection and some cases show p53 protein low-grade overexpression. In contrast, p53 protein overexpression is common in penile SCC, which is seldom related to HPV infection.

  16. Testing of human papillomavirus in lung cancer and non-tumor lung tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk factors for lung cancer, such as cigarette smoking, environmental pollution, asbestos, and genetic determinants, are well-known, whereas involvement of the human papillomavirus (HPV) is still unclear. We examined a series of 100 lung cancer patients from Italy and the UK for the presence of HPV DNA in both lung tumor specimens and adjacent non-tumoral specimens from the same patients. Thirty-five of the most clinically relevant HPV types were assayed using PCR amplification of the highly conserved L1 region of the viral genome followed by hybridization with specific probes. No HPV was detected in tumor specimens nor in normal lung tissue of any patient. These data indicate that, in this Western series, HPV is not associated with the risk of lung cancer. Our findings will help refine estimates of lung cancer risk in patients affected by a common viral infection involved in other types of human cancer

  17. The 3' region of Human Papillomavirus type 16 early mRNAs decrease expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, J.; Rosenstierne, M.W.; Kristiansen, Karen; Norrild, B.

    2005-01-01

    Background: High risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infects mucosal surfaces and HR-HPV infection is required for development of cervical cancer. Accordingly, enforced expression of the early HR-HPV proteins can induce immortalisation of human cells. In most cervical cancers and cervical cancer...... cell lines the HR-HPV double stranded DNA genome has been integrated into the host cell genome. Methods: We have used a retroviral GUS reporter system to generate pools of stably transfected HaCaT and SiHa cells. The HPV-16 early sequences that are deleted upon integration of the HPV-16 genome was...... inserted into the 3' UTR of the reporter mRNA. Pools containing thousands of independent integrations were tested for the steady state levels of the reporter mRNA by Real Time PCR and reporter protein by a GUS enzymatic activity assays. In addition, we tested the cellular distribution and half lives of the...

  18. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Genotyping: Automation and Application in Routine Laboratory Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M; Fraile, L; Echevarria, JM; Hernandez Novoa, B; Ortiz, M

    2012-01-01

    A large number of assays designed for genotyping human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been developed in the last years. They perform within a wide range of analytical sensitivity and specificity values for the different viral types, and are used either for diagnosis, epidemiological studies, evaluation of vaccines and implementing and monitoring of vaccination programs. Methods for specific genotyping of HPV-16 and HPV-18 are also useful for the prevention of cervical cancer in screening programs. Some commercial tests are, in addition, fully or partially automated. Automation of HPV genotyping presents advantages such as the simplicity of the testing procedure for the operator, the ability to process a large number of samples in a short time, and the reduction of human errors from manual operations, allowing a better quality assurance and a reduction of cost. The present review collects information about the current HPV genotyping tests, with special attention to practical aspects influencing their use in clinical laboratories. PMID:23248734

  19. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Genotyping: Automation and Application in Routine Laboratory Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M; Fraile, L; Echevarria, Jm; Hernandez Novoa, B; Ortiz, M

    2012-01-01

    A large number of assays designed for genotyping human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been developed in the last years. They perform within a wide range of analytical sensitivity and specificity values for the different viral types, and are used either for diagnosis, epidemiological studies, evaluation of vaccines and implementing and monitoring of vaccination programs. Methods for specific genotyping of HPV-16 and HPV-18 are also useful for the prevention of cervical cancer in screening programs. Some commercial tests are, in addition, fully or partially automated. Automation of HPV genotyping presents advantages such as the simplicity of the testing procedure for the operator, the ability to process a large number of samples in a short time, and the reduction of human errors from manual operations, allowing a better quality assurance and a reduction of cost. The present review collects information about the current HPV genotyping tests, with special attention to practical aspects influencing their use in clinical laboratories. PMID:23248734

  20. Human papillomavirus and its influence on head and neck cancer predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H. Nelke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is a virus often infecting humans. It is often present on skin or mucousmembranes. These diverse DNA viruses are often linked to many various benign and malignant neoplasticlesions. Over 40 types of HPV are transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital regionwhich might be secondly transmitted to the oral mucous. Over 150 HPV viruses are defined according tothe invaded site. Oral papillomas are marked with numbers 6, 7, 11, 16 and 32. Squamous cell papillomais often found in laryngeal epithelial tumor associated with HPV-6 and HPV-11 and also HPV-16 in oralsquamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. In the last 15 years OSCC has become more common in children andyoung adults. The role of HPV virus causing oral squamous cell carcinomas is more often realized, butpeople’s lack of knowledge and risky sexual behavior is still the main factor in growing HPV infections.

  1. State-of-the-art of infections produced by human papillomavirus.

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    Julio César Reina

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Anogenital human papillomavirus infection is the most frequent sexually transmitted disease. Around one hundred genotypes have been identified in humans, and 40 infect the genitalia and anal regions. Fifteen genotypes, classified as high-risk HPVs, are the necessary cause of cervical cancer and have been involved as carcinogenic agents for cancer of the vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharyngeal cavity. Low-risk HPVs are the causative agents of genital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis in both men and women. The number of women harboring HPV-DNA worldwide is estimated to be 300 million. The recently introduced prophylactic HPV vaccines represent a hopeful strategy to prevent HPV infection and HPV-related diseases.

  2. Detection of human papillomavirus in laryngeal lesions by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Fessler, J N; Warhol, M J

    1994-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with human neoplasms of squamous epithelium. Squamous papillomas and verrucous carcinomas are two types of squamous neoplasms of the larynx that present difficult problems in differential diagnosis. Using in situ hybridization with biotinylated DNA probes......, we examined benign squamous papillomas and verrucous squamous carcinomas of the larynx for the presence of HPV. Forty-two biopsy specimens from 18 patients with laryngeal papillomas and 11 biopsy specimens from seven patients with verrucous carcinomas were obtained from the files of Pennsylvania...... Hospital, Philadelphia, PA. Tissue sections were hybridized with an HPV DNA cocktail. The HPV-positive cases then were subtyped further with DNA probes specific for HPV subtypes 6/11, 16/18, and 31/33/35. All benign squamous papillomas (42 of 42) were positive for HPV subtype 6/11. None of the verrucous...

  3. Human papillomavirus infection in HIV-seropositive men who have sex with men in both the United States and India: prevalence, incidence, and risk factors for infection

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Alexandra Lydia

    2011-01-01

    AbstractHuman papillomavirus infection in HIV-seropositive men who have sex with men in both the United States and India: Prevalence, incidence, and risk factors for infectionbyAlexandra Lydia HernandezDoctor of Philosophy in EpidemiologyUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Arthur Reingold, ChairHuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of anal cancer compared with the general population. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particul...

  4. Patterns of human papillomavirus types in multiple infections: an analysis in women and men of the high throughput human papillomavirus monitoring study.

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    Salvatore Vaccarella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the pattern of co-infection of human papillomavirus (HPV types in both sexes in Sweden. METHODS: Cell samples from genital swabs, first-void urine, and genital swabs immersed in first-void urine were collected in the present cross-sectional High Throughput HPV Monitoring study. Overall, 31,717 samples from women and 9,949 from men (mean age 25 were tested for 16 HPV types using mass spectrometry. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate the expected number of multiple infections with specific HPV types, adjusted for age, type of sample, and accounting for correlations between HPV types due to unobserved risk factors using sample-level random effects. Bonferroni correction was used to allow for multiple comparisons (120. RESULTS: Observed-to-expected ratio for any multiple infections was slightly above unity in both sexes, but, for most 2-type combinations, there was no evidence of significant departure from expected numbers. HPV6/18 was found more often and HPV51/68 and 6/68 less often than expected. However, HPV68 tended to be generally underrepresented in co-infections, suggesting a sub-optimal performance of our testing method for this HPV type. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence for positive or negative clustering between HPV types included in the current prophylactic vaccines and other untargeted oncogenic types, in either sex.

  5. EUROGIN 2014 roadmap: differences in human papillomavirus infection natural history, transmission and human papillomavirus-related cancer incidence by gender and anatomic site of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Anna R; Nyitray, Alan G; Kreimer, Aimée R; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Goodman, Marc T; Sudenga, Staci L; Monsonego, Joseph; Franceschi, Silvia

    2015-06-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause cancer at multiple anatomic sites in men and women, including cervical, oropharyngeal, anal, vulvar and vaginal cancers in women and oropharyngeal, anal and penile cancers in men. In this EUROGIN 2014 roadmap, differences in HPV-related cancer and infection burden by gender and anatomic site are reviewed. The proportion of cancers attributable to HPV varies by anatomic site, with nearly 100% of cervical, 88% of anal and cancers attributable to HPV, depending on world region and prevalence of tobacco use. Often, mirroring cancer incidence rates, HPV prevalence and infection natural history varies by gender and anatomic site of infection. Oral HPV infection is rare and significantly differs by gender; yet, HPV-related cancer incidence at this site is several-fold higher than at either the anal canal or the penile epithelium. HPV seroprevalence is significantly higher among women compared to men, likely explaining the differences in age-specific HPV prevalence and incidence patterns observed by gender. Correspondingly, among heterosexual partners, HPV transmission appears higher from women to men. More research is needed to characterize HPV natural history at each anatomic site where HPV causes cancer in men and women, information that is critical to inform the basic science of HPV natural history and the development of future infection and cancer prevention efforts. PMID:25043222

  6. Identification of a novel human papillomavirus by metagenomic analysis of samples from patients with febrile respiratory illness.

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    John L Mokili

    Full Text Available As part of a virus discovery investigation using a metagenomic approach, a highly divergent novel Human papillomavirus type was identified in pooled convenience nasal/oropharyngeal swab samples collected from patients with febrile respiratory illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome and the L1 gene reveals that the new HPV identified in this study clusters with previously described gamma papillomaviruses, sharing only 61.1% (whole genome and 63.1% (L1 sequence identity with its closest relative in the Papillomavirus episteme (PAVE database. This new virus was named HPV_SD2 pending official classification. The complete genome of HPV-SD2 is 7,299 bp long (36.3% G/C and contains 7 open reading frames (L2, L1, E6, E7, E1, E2 and E4 and a non-coding long control region (LCR between L1 and E6. The metagenomic procedures, coupled with the bioinformatic methods described herein are well suited to detect small circular genomes such as those of human papillomaviruses.

  7. Primary human cervical carcinoma cells require human papillomavirus E6 and E7 expression for ongoing proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in established cervical carcinoma cell lines causes senescence due to reactivation of cellular tumor suppressor pathways. Here, we determined whether ongoing expression of HPV16 or HPV18 oncogenes is required for the proliferation of primary human cervical carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions at low passage number after isolation from patients. We used an SV40 viral vector expressing the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein to repress E6 and E7 in these cells. To enable efficient SV40 infection and E2 gene delivery, we first incubated the primary cervical cancer cells with the ganglioside GM1, a cell-surface receptor for SV40 that is limiting in these cells. Repression of HPV in primary cervical carcinoma cells caused them to undergo senescence, but the E2 protein had little effect on HPV-negative primary cells. These data suggest that E6 and E7 dependence is an inherent property of human cervical cancer cells.

  8. Primary human cervical carcinoma cells require human papillomavirus E6 and E7 expression for ongoing proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Almstead, Laura L. [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States); Bellone, Stefania [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208063, New Haven, CT 06520-8063 (United States); Prevatt, Edward G. [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States); Santin, Alessandro D. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208063, New Haven, CT 06520-8063 (United States); Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, P.O. Box 208028, New Haven, CT 06520-8028 (United States); DiMaio, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.dimaio@yale.edu [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208040, New Haven, CT 06520-8040 (United States); Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208024 (United States); Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, P.O. Box 208028, New Haven, CT 06520-8028 (United States)

    2012-01-05

    Repression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in established cervical carcinoma cell lines causes senescence due to reactivation of cellular tumor suppressor pathways. Here, we determined whether ongoing expression of HPV16 or HPV18 oncogenes is required for the proliferation of primary human cervical carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions at low passage number after isolation from patients. We used an SV40 viral vector expressing the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein to repress E6 and E7 in these cells. To enable efficient SV40 infection and E2 gene delivery, we first incubated the primary cervical cancer cells with the ganglioside GM1, a cell-surface receptor for SV40 that is limiting in these cells. Repression of HPV in primary cervical carcinoma cells caused them to undergo senescence, but the E2 protein had little effect on HPV-negative primary cells. These data suggest that E6 and E7 dependence is an inherent property of human cervical cancer cells.

  9. Attribution of 12 High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Genotypes to Infection and Cervical Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joura, Elmar A.; Ault, Kevin A.; Bosch, F. Xavier;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We estimated the prevalence and incidence of 14 human papillomavirus (HPV) types (6/11/16/18/31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59) in cervicovaginal swabs, and the attribution of these HPV types in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), using predefined...... algorithms that adjusted for multiple-type infected lesions. METHODS: A total of 10,656 women ages 15 to 26 years and 1,858 women ages 24 to 45 years were enrolled in the placebo arms of one of three clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV vaccine. We estimated the cumulative incidence of persistent infection...... and the proportion of CIN/AIS attributable to individual carcinogenic HPV genotypes, as well as the proportion of CIN/AIS lesions potentially preventable by a prophylactic 9-valent HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of persistent infection with ≥1 of the seven high...

  10. Population-level impact and herd effects following human papillomavirus vaccination programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drolet, Mélanie; Bénard, Élodie; Boily, Marie-Claude;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programmes were first implemented in several countries worldwide in 2007. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the population-level consequences and herd effects after female HPV vaccination programmes, to verify whether or not...... the high efficacy reported in randomised controlled clinical trials are materialising in real-world situations. METHODS: We searched the Medline and Embase databases (between Jan 1, 2007 and Feb 28, 2014) and conference abstracts for time-trend studies that analysed changes, between the pre-vaccination...... and post-vaccination periods, in the incidence or prevalence of at least one HPV-related endpoint: HPV infection, anogenital warts, and high-grade cervical lesions. We used random-effects models to derive pooled relative risk (RR) estimates. We stratified all analyses by age and sex. We did subgroup...

  11. Dose-Related Differences in Effectiveness of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Against Genital Warts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Maria; Dehlendorff, Christian; Sand, Carsten;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reducing the number of doses in the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination regimen from 3 to 2 could increase coverage rates. In this cohort study, we assessed the risk of genital warts (GWs) according to timing and number of doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine. METHODS: From population......-based registries, we identified all girls in Denmark born during 1985-1999, for whom information on HPV vaccinations was retrieved. The cohort was followed for GW occurrence during 2006-2012. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated by Poisson regression to determine differences in GW rates by number of...... vaccine doses. RESULTS: Of the 550,690 girls in the cohort, 361 734 had been vaccinated. Of these, 25.9% had been vaccinated twice and 58.8% 3 times. The risk of GWs decreased significantly with each additional dose of vaccine. For girls who received 2 doses, extension of the interval between doses...

  12. Identification of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Cancer Tissue by Targeted Next-generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Nathan D; Parker, Joel S; Eberhard, David A; Patel, Nirali M; Weck, Karen E; Sharpless, Norman E; Hu, Zhiyuan; Hayes, David Neil; Gulley, Margaret L

    2016-08-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are oncogenic DNA viruses implicated in squamous cell carcinomas of several anatomic sites, as well as endocervical adenocarcinomas. Identification of HPV is an actionable finding in some carcinomas, potentially influencing tumor classification, prognosis, and management. We incorporated capture probes for oncogenic HPV strains 16 and 18 into a broader next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel designed to identify actionable mutations in solid malignancies. A total of 21 head and neck, genitourinary, and gynecologic squamous cell carcinomas and endocervical adenocarcinomas were sequenced as part of the UNCSeq project. Using p16 immunohistochemical results as the gold standard, we set a cutoff for proportion of aligned HPV reads that maximized performance of our NGS assay (92% sensitive, 100% specific for HPV). These results suggest that sequencing of oncogenic pathogens can be incorporated into targeted NGS panels, extending the clinical utility of genomic assays. PMID:26371432

  13. Human Papillomavirus prevalence, viral load and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levi José E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-infected women from São Paulo city were enrolled in a cross-sectional study on Human Papillomavirus (HPV and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN prevalence and their association with laboratory markers of AIDS, namely HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts. A cervical specimen was collected and submitted to Hybrid Capture, a test for HPV viral load determination. HPV-DNA was detected in 173 of 265 women (64.5%. Twenty (7.5% women were infected by one or more low-risk viruses, 89 (33% by one or more high-risk viruses, and 64 (24% harbored at least one HPV type from each risk group. Abnormal smears were observed in 19% of the patients, though there were no invasive carcinomas. Severely immunosuppressed patients (CD4/µL <100 were at the greatest risk of having a cytological abnormality and a high high-risk HPV viral load.

  14. Oral squamous papilloma and condyloma acuminatum as manifestations of buccal-genital infection by human papillomavirus

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    dos Reis Helena Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Genital infection by human papillomavirus (HPV, a sexually transmitted disease (STD, has increased considerably due to the changes in sexual behaviour and an increase in the practice of oral sex. HPV, in a parallel manner, has been closely studied due to its oncogenic potential. We present the case of a 27-year-old patient, with a multi-partner sexual history and frequent practice of oral sex, who suffered from warts lesions on the genitalia and tongue. Squamous papilloma was diagnosed from a tongue biopsy. The treatment of the oral lesion was by way of surgery, without relapse in the first two years. Our discussion in this report is regarding the HPV infection in the oral cavity.

  15. Transcriptional differences of the human papillomavirus type 16 genome between precancerous lesions and invasive carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) genome DNA and its transcripts in biopsied cervical neoplasias were analyzed by simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from one biopsied sample. Southern blot analysis revealed that 5 of 20 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) contained HPV16 DNAs existing primarily as episomes and two of seven invasive carcinomas harbored HPV16 genome sequences integrated into the host DNA. Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed that the HPV16 genome sequences were transcriptionally active in the five CINs, as well as in the two invasive carcinomas. The pattern of HPV16-specific transcripts in the CINs was uniform, and the major transcripts were 4.2, 2.2, 1.6, and 1.4 kilobases in size. However, the pattern of HPV16-specific transcripts in the invasive carcinomas was variable and different from that in CINs, suggesting that the alteration of transcriptional pattern might play a key role in the development of malignancy

  16. Epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections: new options for cervical cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch F. Xavier

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, the cervical cancer puzzle has become a coherent description that includes the identification of human papillomavirus (HPV as the sexually transmitted etiologic agent and the characterization of the major determinants of HPV acquisition. Triage studies have consistently shown that HPV testing is more sensitive that repeated cytology in identifying underlying high-grade lesions in women with atypical scamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS. Studies that reflect primary screening conditions have shown that the sensitivity of HPV tests is higher than standard cytology in detecting high-grade lesions whereas the specificity is similar only in women aged 30-35 and above. HPV vaccines have an intrinsic attraction as a preventive strategy in populations with limited resources. However, vaccines designed to widespread use are still in development and testing phases. Time is ripe for exploring in depth the clinical implications of current achievements and to devise novel strategies for the prevention of cervical cancer.

  17. Canadian oncogenic human papillomavirus cervical infection prevalence: Systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Pham Ba'

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV infection prevalence is required to determine optimal vaccination strategies. We systematically reviewed the prevalence of oncogenic cervical HPV infection among Canadian females prior to immunization. Methods We included studies reporting DNA-confirmed oncogenic HPV prevalence estimates among Canadian females identified through searching electronic databases (e.g., MEDLINE and public health websites. Two independent reviewers screened literature results, abstracted data and appraised study quality. Prevalence estimates were meta-analyzed among routine screening populations, HPV-positive, and by cytology/histology results. Results Thirty studies plus 21 companion reports were included after screening 837 citations and 120 full-text articles. Many of the studies did not address non-response bias (74% or use a representative sampling strategy (53%. Age-specific prevalence was highest among females aged Conclusion Our results support vaccinating females

  18. Optimized Formulation of a Thermostable Spray-Dried Virus-Like Particle Vaccine against Human Papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboo, Sugandha; Tumban, Ebenezer; Peabody, Julianne; Wafula, Denis; Peabody, David S; Chackerian, Bryce; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-05-01

    Existing vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) require continuous cold-chain storage. Previously, we developed a bacteriophage virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccine for HPV infection, which elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies against diverse HPV types. Here, we formulated these VLPs into a thermostable dry powder using a multicomponent excipient system and by optimizing the spray-drying parameters using a half-factorial design approach. Dry-powder VLPs were stable after spray drying and after long-term storage at elevated temperatures. Immunization of mice with a single dose of reconstituted dry-powder VLPs that were stored at 37 °C for more than a year elicited high anti-L2 IgG antibody titers. Spray-dried thermostable, broadly protective L2 bacteriophage VLPs vaccine could be accessible to remote regions of the world (where ∼84% of cervical cancer patients reside) by eliminating the cold-chain requirement during transportation and storage. PMID:27019231

  19. Human papillomavirus: prevalence and factors associated in women prisoners population from the Eastern Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Sylvia Regina Vasconcellos; Villanova, Fabiola Elizabeth; Martins, Luisa Carício; dos Santos, Milena Silva; Maciel, Juliana de Paula; Falcão, Luiz Fábio Magno; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and the associated factors among female prisoners in Ananindeua City, State of Pará, Brazil. In 2010, 190 cervical samples were obtained, and Pap smear and polymerase chain reaction (GE Health Care™, Uppsala, Sweden) were performed. Additionally, a questionnaire was used. The prevalence of HPV was 10.5%, and the presence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade I (n = 33, 17.5%; P < 0.1) was associated with HPV infection. The presence of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions was greater in women with HPV than in those without HPV infection, indicating that HPV infection is a risk factor for such injuries and that viral screening and prevention are extremely important in public health among female prisoners in Amazon. PMID:24838771

  20. The invisible enemy - how human papillomaviruses avoid recognition and clearance by the host immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Agnieszka K; Riemer, Angelika B

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) needs to persist in squamous epithelia for a certain amount of time to complete its reproductive cycle. Therefore, the virus has evolved multiple immune evasion strategies. The interplay of these immune evasion mechanisms with the host immune system decides whether a HPV infection is cleared or becomes persistent. Clearance of HPV-induced lesions is mediated by a cellular immune response, consisting of both cytotoxic T lymphocyte and T helper cell responses. Persistent HPV infection, on the other hand, is the single most important risk factor for the development of HPV-associated premalignant lesions and HPV-driven cancers. This article reviews the immune evasion mechanisms employed by high-risk HPVs to escape host immune recognition and attack. PMID:23341860

  1. [News items on human papillomavirus and its vaccine in the Valencian press (2006-2011)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuells, José; Duro Torrijos, José Luis; Chilet Rosell, Elisa; Pastor Villalba, Eliseo; Portero Alonso, Antonio; Navarro Ortiz, Carmen; Galiana de la Villa, Eva María

    2013-01-01

    The process of introducing the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine aimed at teenage girls has not been entirely without controversy in Spain. This vaccine was originally hyped as a preventive measure in the fight against cervical cancer but the resulting euphoria was tempered by a message calling for evidence. During administration of the second dose of the vaccine in February 2009, an unexpected turn of events attracted vast media coverage when two teenagers experienced adverse effects after immunization in Valencia (Spain). This study analyzes the scope and content of news items on HPV, immunization and cervical cancer published between 2006 and 2011 in two widely disseminated regional newspapers in Valencia. We also discuss the extent to which the messages transmitted may have influenced acceptability of the vaccine. PMID:23416026

  2. Prevalence of human papillomavirus type 16 variants in the Federal District, Central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio R Cruz

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the prevalence of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16 variants in women with cervical lesions from the Federal District, Central Brazil. We analyzed 34 HPV-16 samples, identifying the sequence variations of E6 and L1 genes and correlating variant frequency with disease status. The most prevalent HPV-16 variant was the European (50%, followed by Asian-American (41.2%, African-1 (5.9%, and African-2 (2.9%. European and non-European variants appeared in equal frequencies among the cytological types of lesions - atypical squamous or glandular cells of undetermined significance, cytological alterations suggesting HPV infection, cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, squamous cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma.

  3. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution in cervical glandular neoplasias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holl, Katsiaryna; Nowakowski, Andrzej M; Powell, Ned;

    2015-01-01

    Cervical glandular neoplasias (CGN) present a challenge for cervical cancer prevention due to their complex histopathology and difficulties in detecting preinvasive stages with current screening practices. Reports of human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type-distribution in CGN vary, providing......: 0%). The most common HPV types were restricted to HPV16/18/45, accounting for 98.3% of all HPV-positive ADC. There were variations in HPV prevalence and ADC type-distribution by country. Age at diagnosis differed by ADC subtype, with usual-type diagnosed in younger women (median: 43 years) compared...... uncertain evidence to support prophylactic vaccination and HPV screening. This study [108288/108290] assessed HPV prevalence and type-distribution in women diagnosed with cervical adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS, N = 49), adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC, N = 104), and various adenocarcinoma subtypes (ADC, N = 461...

  4. Human papillomavirus infection in couples with female low-grade intraepithelial cervical lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Philippe; Roumeguere, Thierry; Christophe Noël, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) are frequently found during cervical cancer screening. Usually they are associated with a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Does the high-transmission rate of HPV infection to the male partner represent a clinical risk for him? Are preventive measures to be taken to prevent the occurrence of male diseases? More than 80% of all LSIL are associated with HPV infections. The prevalence of HPV infection in males can range up to 40%, with 60% of the male partners of LSIL female patients presenting with penile flat lesions. The spontaneous cure rate for male infections is very high (90% at 5 years) but negative consequences in females (cervical high-grade lesion and cervical cancer) are frequent. Their male counterparts are far rarer but in some patients can require deleterious treatment. Transmission prevention by the use of condoms and circumcision is discussed. The effectiveness of HPV vaccination in this situation has not been validated. PMID:20646823

  5. Restriction of human papillomavirus DNA testing in primary cervical screening to women above age 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Njor, Sisse H; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2012-01-01

    Cervical screening with human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is less specific for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (=CIN3) than cytology. The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether a restriction of HPV testing to women aged at least 30 years would eliminate the problem....... On the basis of the data from randomized controlled trials, we calculated the relative detection of CIN1 and CIN2, and the relative risks of false-positive tests (positive tests without subsequent =CIN3) per age group and trial for HPV testing versus cytology. For women aged at least 30 years in...... trials with a low cytology abnormality rate, detection of CIN1 increased significantly by 50-90% in the two trials with reported data; detection of CIN2 was doubled in three trials; the risks of false-positive HPV tests were also doubled. In trials with a high cytology abnormality rate, these risks were...

  6. The problem of false-positive human papillomavirus DNA tests in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Pribac, Igor; Frederiksen, Maria Eiholm;

    2013-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) testing has been extensively studied in randomized controlled trials of primary cervical screening. Based on encouraging results concerning its high detection rates and a high negative predictive value for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), HPV testing...... will probably replace cytology in future primary cervical screening. However, HPV testing is associated with more frequent false-positive tests compared to cytology. False-positive tests are defined as positive screening tests which are not subsequently confirmed with high-grade CIN. Several authors...... have claimed that the frequency of false-positive HPV tests could be reduced if an additional test was used to decide on referral for colposcopy of HPV-positive women. Data from the trials, however, do not support this claim. In fact, when compared to standard cytology screening and triage procedures...

  7. Awareness of human papillomavirus in 23 000 Danish men from the general male population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ann; Munk, Christian; Liaw, Kai-Li;

    2009-01-01

    . In this study, we assessed awareness of HPV in Danish men. A random sample of men aged 18-45 years from the general male population was invited to participate in the study. The participants filled in a self-administered questionnaire with questions concerning awareness of HPV, lifestyle, and sexual......%). Higher educational level and history of self-reported genital warts were the strongest predictors of having heard of HPV. Furthermore, condom use and excellent self-rated health were significantly correlated with awareness of HPV. In contrast, no correlations were found with age, lifetime number of......Men play an important role in transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV). Both in men and in women HPV causes great morbidity, such as cervical cancer, penile and anal cancer, and genital warts. The awareness of HPV and its consequences is essential to a successful vaccination program against HPV...

  8. Human papillomavirus-related cancers among people living with AIDS in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ana Patricia; Pérez-Irizarry, Javier; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Suárez, Erick; Pérez, Naydi; Cruz, Maritza; Palefsky, Joel; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Miranda, Sandra; Colón-López, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers and the risk of death (by cancer status) among people living with AIDS (PLWA) in Puerto Rico. We used data from the Puerto Rico AIDS Surveillance Program and Central Cancer Registry (1985-2005). Cancers with highest incidence were cervix (299.6/100,000) for women and oral cavity/oropharynx for men (150.0/100,000); the greatest excess of cancer incidence for men (standardized incidence ratio, 86.8) and women (standardized incidence ratio, 52.8) was for anal cancer. PLWA who developed a cancer had decreased survival and increased risk of death compared with those who did not have cancer. Cancer control strategies for PLWA will be essential for improving their disease survival. PMID:24831284

  9. Knowledge of human papillomavirus among high school students can be increased by an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottvall, M; Tydén, T; Höglund, A T; Larsson, M

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an educational intervention concerning human papillomavirus (HPV) directed at Swedish first year high school students. The intervention consisted of a class room lesson, a website and a folder. Outcome variables were knowledge of HPV and attitudes to preventive methods such as HPV vaccination, condom use and Pap smear testing. An intervention group (n = 92) was matched with two comparison groups (n = 184). At baseline, the median score for HPV knowledge was one out of 10 in both groups. At follow-up, the median knowledge score had increased to six in the intervention group, but was still one in the comparison group (P Pap smear testing remained the same (P > 0.05). In conclusion, a short school-based intervention can greatly increase the students' knowledge about HPV, but attitudes and behaviours are less easy to influence. PMID:20975088

  10. Journey of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in a Developing Country over 5 Years (2010 - 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial, M; Sivasangari, S; Arulappen, Al; Ong, Lm

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a prevalent sexually transmitted infection with serious medical, sexual, and relationship consequences. HPV vaccine protection is available globally but unfortunately vaccine uptake is inconsistent everywhere. From this study, it was observed that the awareness of cervical cancer, HPV virus and HPV vaccination in Malaysia is high, at 83.1%, 73.9% and 73.3% of respondents, respectively. However, a considerably low percentage had undergone HPV vaccination (8.6%) compared to those who had experienced a Pap smear (32.9%). Awareness between cervical cancer and HPV virus and vaccination was low. Health care providers and the governing bodies have to play a vital role in disseminating holistic information on the vaccine and the importance of getting vaccinated to the public more vigorously in Malaysia. PMID:27039773

  11. Cumulative Impact of HIV and Multiple Concurrent Human Papillomavirus Infections on the Risk of Cervical Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, David H; Wallace, Melissa; Bennie, Thola; Abar, Beau; Meiring, Tracy L; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV is known to increase the risk of cervical cancer. In addition, evidence suggests that concurrent infection with multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes increases the risk of cervical dysplasia more than infection with a single HPV genotype. However, the impact of the combination of HIV coinfection and presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections on the risk of cervical dysplasia is uncertain. We compared the results of HPV testing and Pap smears between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected young women to assess the cumulative impact of these two conditions. We found that both HIV and the presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections are associated with increased risk of associated Pap smear abnormality and that the impact of these two risk factors may be additive. PMID:26997954

  12. Modulation of Apoptotic Pathways by Human Papillomaviruses (HPV: Mechanisms and Implications for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsiang Yuan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the host to trigger apoptosis in infected cells is perhaps the most powerful tool by which viruses can be cleared from the host organism. To avoid elimination by this mechanism, human papillomaviruses (HPV have developed several mechanisms that enable the cells they infect to elude both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis. In this manuscript, we review the current literature regarding how HPV-infected cells avoid apoptosis and the molecular mechanisms involved in these events. In particular, we will discuss the modifications in intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways caused by proteins encoded by HPV early genes. Many of the current efforts regarding anti-cancer drug development are focused on directing tumor cells to undergo apoptosis. However, the ability of HPV-infected cells to resist apoptotic signals renders such therapies ineffective. Possible mechanisms for overcoming the resistance of HPV-infected tumor cells to anticancer drugs will be discussed.

  13. [Research progress in roles of high-risk human papillomavirus E2 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, En-Qi; Tang, Yuan-Yu

    2014-03-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is the principal cause of various cancers including cervical cancer, anal cancer, vulvar cancer, and some head and neck cancers. In the viral life cycle, by interacting with both viral and host DNA and proteins, the HPV E2 protein plays a pivotal role in viral transcriptional regulation and DNA replication, and it is also associated with modification of various cellular processes, including host gene transcription, RNA processing, apoptosis, ubiquitination, and intracellular trafficking, to create a convenient environment for a replicative cycle of the virus and contribute to the HPV pathogenesis. Elucidating the roles of E2 protein throughout the viral life cycle will improve our understanding of the viral life cycle and pathogenesis and help us identify novel antiviral agents with therapeutic potential. This article reviews the research progress in the structure, roles, and activity of high-risk HPV E2 protein, particularly that of HPV-16. PMID:24923176

  14. Asymptomatic Genital Infection of Human Papillomavirus in Pregnant Women and the Vertical Transmission Route

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Dongrui; WEN Liangzhen; CHEN Wen; LING Xiazhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: To further investigate the vertical transmission route of human papillomavirus (HPV) and the indication for the choice of mode of delivery, the infective status of 152 asymptomatic pregnant wemen and the maternal-fetal transmission were studied. By using general primers in polymerase chain reaction (GP-PCR) combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, HPV DNA positive rate in cervical secretions and venous blood in asymptomatic pregnant women was 36.21 % and 52.78 %, respectively, and the identified genotypes were mainly HPV16 and 18. The maternal-fetal transmission rate of HPV via genital tract as well as blood was 40.91 % and 57.89 %, respectively. It was concluded that besides the transmission route of genital tract and amniotic fluid, there was also transplacental transmission of HPV in utero. Therefore,in our opinion, it is not an absolut indication to perform a cesarean delivery for the pregnant women with HPV asymtomatic genital infection.

  15. 阴茎癌与HPV感染%Penile cancer and human papillomavirus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟建坡; 王建伟

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the major risk factors for penile cancer. This article presents an overview on the biological characteristics of HPVs, HPV infection in penile cancer, possible carcinogenic mechanisms of HPV, prognostic value of HPV in penile cancer, and HPV vaccine.%HPV感染是阴茎癌重要的致病因素之一.本文对HPVs的生物学特性,HPV在阴茎癌中的感染情况,HPV可能的致癌机制,HPV与阴茎癌预后的关系以及HPV疫苗的应用前景等方面进行了综述.

  16. Lack of detection of human papillomavirus infection by hybridization test in prostatic biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the possibility of finding human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the prostate tissue of a cohort of Saudi men presenting with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or prostate cancer. A cohort study on prospectively collected tissue samples was conducted at King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH), Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from March 2007 to December 2008 on a total of 56 male patients, age range 50-93 years (average 68), diagnosed as having BPH or prostate cancer. The HPV DNA hybridization by hybrid capture 2 technology was performed on prostate biopsies of these patients to detect 18 types of HPV infection, and differentiate between 2 HPV DNA groups, the low-risk types, and the high/intermediate risk types.The tissues of all the prostatic biopsies were negative for HPV DNA. Our results, using the hybridization test, indicate that it is unlikely that HPV-16 or HPV-18, or the other tested subtypes, enhance the risk of prostate cancer. (author)

  17. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and subsequent sexual behaviour: Evidence from a large survey of Nordic women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bo T.; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Arnheim-Dahlstrom, Lisen;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether recipients and non-recipients of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine subsequently differ in terms of sexual risk taking behaviour. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. Sequential analyses constructed from self-reported age at vaccination, age at first intercourse and age....... Among vaccinees, 1539 received the HPV vaccine before or at the same age as sexual debut, of which 476 and 1063 were eligible for organized catch-up and opportunistic vaccination, respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported sexual behaviour, compared by hazard ratios and odds ratios for women who...... received the HPV vaccine before or at the same age as sexual debut versus women who did not receive the HPV vaccine. RESULTS: HPV vaccination did not result in younger age at first intercourse. Women who received the HPV vaccine before or at the same age as sexual debut did not have more sexual partners...

  18. A human papillomavirus public vaccination program in Taiwan: the Kinmen County experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin-Chih; Chen, Tien-Shun; Wu, Tsung-Zu; Huang, Li-Min

    2012-12-01

    In Taiwan, cervical cancer is ranked sixth among all causes of death in women. With the goal of reducing the incidence of cervical cancer, the Kinmen County Health Bureau planned to implement a pilot human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program in 2007. The Bureau established a committee to promote public awareness, coordinate with the schools, arrange for the administration of the vaccine, establish a vaccination registry, and develop a plan for follow-up and assessment. Vaccination for female residents aged 16-18 began through a school-based program in 2008. A total of 1633 girls completed the vaccination protocol within 3 years, and vaccine uptake rates of over 90% were achieved by 2010. No serious adverse events were reported among those who were vaccinated. The experience gained from the Kinmen County HPV vaccination program has helped and will continue to help establish an operational model for similar programs throughout the country. PMID:23265746

  19. Environmental Scanning as a Public Health Tool: Kentucky's Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, Amanda; Vanderpool, Robin C; Knight, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    Borrowing from business, quality improvement programs, and strategic planning principles, environmental scanning is gaining popularity in public health practice and research and is advocated as an assessment and data collection tool by federal funding agencies and other health-related organizations. Applicable to a range of current and emerging health topics, environmental scans - through various methods - assess multiple facets of an issue by engaging stakeholders who can ask or answer research questions, exploring related policy, critiquing published and gray literature, collecting and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data in both primary and secondary forms, disseminating findings to internal and external stakeholders, and informing subsequent planning and decision making. To illustrate the environmental scanning process in a public health setting and showcase its value to practitioners in the field, we describe a federally funded environmental scan for a human papillomavirus vaccination project in Kentucky. PMID:27536901

  20. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV and its relation with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrees Muhammad

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Papillomavirus (HPV is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, teenage pregnancies, smoking, use of oral contraceptives, having multiple sex partners, hormone replacement therapies and various other unknown factors lead to the onset of the disease. Awareness for various diagnostic procedures such as Pap smears screening prove to be an effective way in eradicating the oncogenic potential of HPV.

  1. American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Howard H; Chuang, Linus T; duPont, Nefertiti C; Eng, Cathy; Foxhall, Lewis E; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Blanke, Charles D

    2016-05-20

    American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the leading medical professional oncology society, is committed to lessening the burden of cancer and as such will promote underused interventions that have the potential to save millions of lives through cancer prevention. As the main providers of cancer care worldwide, our patients, their families, and our communities look to us for guidance regarding all things cancer related, including cancer prevention. Through this statement and accompanying recommendations, ASCO hopes to increase awareness of the tremendous global impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) -caused cancers, refocus the discussion of HPV vaccination on its likely ability to prevent millions of cancer deaths, and increase HPV vaccination uptake via greater involvement of oncology professionals in ensuring accurate public discourse about HPV vaccination and calling for the implementation of concrete strategies to address barriers to vaccine access and acceptance. PMID:27069078

  2. Anal human papillomavirus infection: prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of related lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolo, Maria; Donà, Maria Gabriella; Ravenda, Paola Simona; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is mostly asymptomatic, but may also have many diverse clinical signs encompassing benign ano-genital lesions, and carcinomas. Recently, interest has also particularly focused on anal cancer since, over the last decades, its incidence has been greatly increasing in developed countries, both in women and men and is drastically higher in specific risk groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV-1 infected individuals. Approximately 88% of anal cancer cases worldwide are associated with HPV infection. This review summarizes our current understanding of anal HPV infection, discussing its epidemiology and risk factors in various populations, and the state of the art in the detection of anal HPV infection and its related lesions through both cytology and histology. Finally, we discuss the clinical management and therapy for these lesions. PMID:27050294

  3. Human papillomavirus-associated cancers as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome defining illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Shahabi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Centers for Disease Control currently report cervical, vulvar, vaginal, anal and some head and neck cancers as human papillomavirus (HPV-associated cancers. Only cervical cancer is listed amongst acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS defining illnesses. All of these cancers may represent progression of the immunocompromised state with the inability to eradicate viral infection. This study reports the case of a 27-year old HIV positive female presenting with a persistent right vulvar exophytic lesion. High-risk HPV analysis and immunostaining for P16 were both positive. A biopsy of the lesion revealed invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent neoadjuvant radiation and chemotherapy followed by a radical vulvectomy. During treatment, her CD4 T-lymphocyte count decreased to 120 advancing her condition from HIV to AIDS. This case suggests that all HPV-associated cancers should be included as AIDS defining illnesses.

  4. Enhanced immunization after intranasal coadministration of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit and human papillomavirus 16-L1 DNA vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; ZHAO Chang-an; WANG Kai; ZHENG Jin; WANG Yi-li; SI Lü-sheng

    2006-01-01

    @@ Human papillomavirus (HPV), mainly types 16 and 18, are the most important initiating agents of cervical cancer.1 Prevention of high-risk HPV infections is a potentially effective approach to control HPV associated cervical cancer.

  5. Human papillomavirus type 29 (HPV-29), an HPV type cross-hybridizing with HPV-2 and with HPV-3-related types.

    OpenAIRE

    Favre, M; Croissant, O; Orth, G

    1989-01-01

    The cloning and partial characterization of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 29 is presented. By hybridization analyses, this virus appears to be related to HPV types associated with common warts and HPV types associated with flat warts.

  6. Analysis of the Effect of DNA Purification on Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Oral Rinse Samples by PCR

    OpenAIRE

    D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Sugar, Elizabeth; Ruby, William; Gravitt, Patti; Gillison, Maura

    2005-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has recently been associated with oral cancers. To prepare for a study of the natural history of oral HPV infection, the effect of the DNA purification method on HPV genomic DNA detection in Scope mouthwash oral rinse samples and the reproducibility of HPV detection in rinse samples collected 7 days apart were investigated. The study was conducted with a population at high risk for oral HPV infection: human immunodeficiency virus-infected men with CD4-cell counts

  7. E2 represses the late gene promoter of human papillomavirus type 8 at high concentrations by interfering with cellular factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Stubenrauch, F.; Leigh, I M; Pfister, H

    1996-01-01

    The late gene promoter P7535 of the epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus type 8 (HPV8) is regulated by the viral E2 protein. Transfection experiments performed with the human skin keratinocyte cell line RTS3b and P7535 reporter plasmids revealed transactivation at low amounts and a repression of basal promoter activity at high amounts of E2 expression vector. This repression was promoter specific and correlated with the amount of transiently expressed E2 protein. Mu...

  8. Human papillomaviruses-related cancers: Presence and prevention strategies in the Middle East and North African Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin; Al-Awadhi, Rana; Missaoui, Nabiha; Adam, Ishag; Durusoy, Raika; Ghabreau, Lina; Akil, Nizar; Ahmed, Hussain Gadelkarim; Yasmeen, Amber; Alsbeih, Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are estimated to be the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Meanwhile, it is well established that infection by high-risk HPVs is considered the major cause of cervical cancer since more than 96% of these cancers are positive for high-risk HPVs, especially types 16 and 18. Moreover, during the last 2 decades, numerous studies pointed-out the possible involvement of high-risk HPV in several human carcinomas including head and neck, color...

  9. In vivo expression of immunosuppressive cytokines in human papillomavirus-transformed cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcocer-González, Juan Manuel; Berumen, Jaime; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes; Bermúdez-Morales, Víctor; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Moreno, José; Gariglio, Patricio; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    Genital human Papillomavirus infection is common and only a minor fraction of infected subjects develop progressing cervical epithelial lesions or cancer. Bypassing local immune responses is important for the development of cervical cancer. In this work we determined the cytokine pattern in samples from patients with cervical cancer. Thus, we examined the local mRNA expression profile of helper T cell type 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th3 cytokines in HPV-positive cervical cancer biopsies by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our data indicate that 80% of the tumors expressed low levels of CD4 mRNA, with all of them expressing higher CD8 mRNA levels. Most tumors expressed interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 mRNAs and, most importantly, all of them expressed transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 and interferon gamma mRNA. None of the tumors studied expressed IL-12, IL-6, or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA. Immunohistochemical analysis identified IL-10 only in tumor cells and koilocytic cells, but not in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, suggesting that IL-10-producing cells are those transformed by HPV. We found a correlation between immunostaining for IL-10 protein and the level of IL-10 mRNA expression. Moreover, supernatants from HPV-transformed cell cultures contained IL-10 and TGF- beta1. Our findings indicate a predominant expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, which might help downregulate tumor-specific immune responses in the microenvironment of the tumor. This information may be useful for cervical cancer immunotherapies or for therapeutic vaccine design against Human Papillomavirus. PMID:16987066

  10. Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16 E5 protein and HLA class I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Haghshenas

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus type 16 E5 protein (HPV16 E5 is expressed early in papillomavirus infection in the deep layers of the infected epithelium, and is localised primarily in the cell Golgi apparatus (GA and endoplasmic reticulum (ER. We have shown that E5 prevents transport of the major histocompatibility class I (MHC I to the cell surface and retains the complex in the GA. Here we show that these effects are due, at least in part, to the interaction between E5 and many types of MHC I heavy chain (Hc. In addition, we have further investigated the domain necessary to down-regulate surface MHC I and to interact with Hc, by using deletion mutants of E5, including either helical domain 1, 2 or 3. We show that the down-regulation of surface MHC I (HLA I in humans, and interaction with Hc are mediated by the first helical domain of E5. Although E5 down-regulates classical HLA selectively as it does not down-regulate non-classical HLA (ref. 4, the interaction with the Hc of classical HLA I is not specific for a particular type of HLA I, suggesting that E5 can interfere with antigen presentation by most, if not all, of classical HLA I types. The down-regulation of HLA I can potentially have serious consequences for the host immune response to viral infection, as the ability of infected cells to present antigenic peptides to effector T cells would be compromised.

  11. The probability of involvement of human papillomavirus in the carcinogenesis of bladder small cell carcinoma, prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and penile squamous cell carcinoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Soichiro; Yasui, Takahiro; Taguchi, Kazumi; Umemoto, Yukihiro; Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus is associated with urogenital carcinogenesis such as penile and uterine cervix cancer. On the other hand, association between human papillomavirus infection and risk of bladder and prostatic cancer remains controversial. Case presentation We report a rare case of a 67-year-old Japanese man with synchronous triple urogenital cancer including bladder small cell carcinoma, prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and penile squamous cell carcinoma, who presented with a hi...

  12. Modeling the impact of the difference in cross-protection data between a human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and a human papillomavirus (HPV)-6/11/16/18 vaccine in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Kohli Michele; Lawrence Donna; Haig Jennifer; Anonychuk Andrea; Demarteau Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Background In Canada, two vaccines that have demonstrated high efficacy against infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types −16 and −18 are available. The HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine provides protection against genital warts (GW) while the HPV-16/18 vaccine may provide better protection against other oncogenic HPV types. In this analysis, the estimated clinical and economic benefit of each of these vaccines was compared in the Canadian setting. Methods A Markov model of the natural history of ...

  13. Skin human papillomavirus type 38 alters p53 functions by accumulation of ΔNp73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, Rosita; Dong, Wen; Smet, Anouk; Cui, Rutao; Hautefeuille, Agnes; Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Sylla, Bakary S; Gissmann, Lutz; Hainaut, Pierre; Tommasino, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    The E6 and E7 of the cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) type 38 immortalize primary human keratinocytes, an event normally associated with the inactivation of pathways controlled by the tumour suppressor p53. Here, we show for the first time that HPV38 alters p53 functions. Expression of HPV38 E6 and E7 in human keratinocytes or in the skin of transgenic mice induces stabilization of wild-type p53. This selectively activates the transcription of ΔNp73, an isoform of the p53-related protein p73, which in turn inhibits the capacity of p53 to induce the transcription of genes involved in growth suppression and apoptosis. ΔNp73 downregulation by an antisense oligonucleotide leads to transcriptional re-activation of p53-regulated genes and apoptosis. Our findings illustrate a novel mechanism of the alteration of p53 function that is mediated by a cutaneous HPV type and support the role of HPV38 and ΔNp73 in human carcinogenesis. PMID:16397624

  14. Skin human papillomavirus type 38 alters p53 functions by accumulation of deltaNp73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, Rosita; Dong, Wen; Smet, Anouk; Cui, Rutao; Hautefeuille, Agnes; Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Sylla, Bakary S; Gissmann, Lutz; Hainaut, Pierre; Tommasino, Massimo

    2006-03-01

    The E6 and E7 of the cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) type 38 immortalize primary human keratinocytes, an event normally associated with the inactivation of pathways controlled by the tumour suppressor p53. Here, we show for the first time that HPV38 alters p53 functions. Expression of HPV38 E6 and E7 in human keratinocytes or in the skin of transgenic mice induces stabilization of wild-type p53. This selectively activates the transcription of deltaNp73, an isoform of the p53-related protein p73, which in turn inhibits the capacity of p53 to induce the transcription of genes involved in growth suppression and apoptosis. DeltaNp73 downregulation by an antisense oligonucleotide leads to transcriptional re-activation of p53-regulated genes and apoptosis. Our findings illustrate a novel mechanism of the alteration of p53 function that is mediated by a cutaneous HPV type and support the role of HPV38 and deltaNp73 in human carcinogenesis. PMID:16397624

  15. Targeting hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus induced carcinogenesis: novel patented therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, Rupinder K; Singh, Neha; Gurudevan, Sneha; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2011-05-01

    Viral infections leading to carcinogenesis tops the risk factors list for the development of human cancer. The decades of research has provided ample scientific evidence that directly links 10-15% of the worldwide incidence of human cancers to the infections with seven human viruses. Moreover, the insights gained into the molecular pathogenetic and immune mechanisms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) viral transmission to tumour progression, and the identification of their viral surface antigens as well as oncoproteins have provided the scientific community with opportunities to target these virus infections through the development of prophylactic vaccines and antiviral therapeutics. The preventive vaccination programmes targeting HBV and high risk HPV infections, linked to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cervical cancer respectively have been recently reported to alter age-old cancer patterns on an international scale. In this review, with an emphasis on HBV and HPV mediated carcinogenesis because of the similarities and differences in their global incidence patterns, viral transmission, mortality, molecular pathogenesis and prevention, we focus on the development of recently identified HBV and HPV targeting innovative strategies resulting in several patents and patent applications. PMID:21517743

  16. Immortalization of human foreskin keratinocytes by various human papillomavirus DNAs corresponds to their association with cervical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodworth, C.D.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Normal human foreskin keratinocytes cotransfected with the neomycin resistance gene and recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs (types 16, 18, 31, and 33) that have a high or moderate association with cervical malignancy acquired immortality and contained integrated and transcriptionally active viral genomes. Only transcripts from the intact E6 and E7 genes were detected in at least one cell line, suggesting that one or both of these genes are responsible for immortalization. Recombinant HPV DNAs with low or no oncogenic potential for cervical cancer (HPV1a, -5, -6b, and -11) induced small G418-resistant colonies that senesced as did the nontransfected cells. These colonies contained only episomal virus DNA; therefore, integration of HPV sequences is important for immortalization of keratinocytes. This study suggests that the virus-encoded immortalization function contributes to the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma.

  17. Immortalization of human foreskin keratinocytes by various human papillomavirus DNAs corresponds to their association with cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal human foreskin keratinocytes cotransfected with the neomycin resistance gene and recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs (types 16, 18, 31, and 33) that have a high or moderate association with cervical malignancy acquired immortality and contained integrated and transcriptionally active viral genomes. Only transcripts from the intact E6 and E7 genes were detected in at least one cell line, suggesting that one or both of these genes are responsible for immortalization. Recombinant HPV DNAs with low or no oncogenic potential for cervical cancer (HPV1a, -5, -6b, and -11) induced small G418-resistant colonies that senesced as did the nontransfected cells. These colonies contained only episomal virus DNA; therefore, integration of HPV sequences is important for immortalization of keratinocytes. This study suggests that the virus-encoded immortalization function contributes to the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma

  18. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Unselected SurePath Samples Using the APTIMA HPV mRNA Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte M;

    2013-01-01

    The APTIMA Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Assay detects E6/E7 mRNA from 14 human papillomavirus genotypes. Horizon was a population-based split-sample study among well-screened women, with an aim to compare APTIMA, Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), and liquid-based cytology (LBC) using SurePath samples. APTIMA...... agreement between APTIMA and HC2. This is the first APTIMA study using SurePath samples on the PANTHER platform. The trends in positivity rates on SurePath samples for APTIMA, HC2, and LBC were consistent with studies based on PreservCyt samples, and the agreement between the two HPV assays was substantial....... The high proportions of women testing positive suggest that in countries with a high HPV prevalence, caution will be needed if HPV tests, including mRNA-based tests, are to replace LBC....

  19. trans activation by the full-length E2 proteins of human papillomavirus type 16 and bovine papillomavirus type 1 in vitro and in vivo: cooperation with activation domains of cellular transcription factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Ushikai, M; Lace, M J; Yamakawa, Y.; Kono, M; Anson, J; Ishiji, T; Parkkinen, S; Wicker, N.; Valentine, M E; Davidson, I

    1994-01-01

    Papillomaviral E2 genes encode proteins that regulate viral transcription. While the full-length bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) E2 peptide is a strong trans activator, the homologous full-length E2 product of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) appeared to vary in function in previous studies. Here we show that when expressed from comparable constructs, the full-length E2 products of HPV-16 and BPV-1 trans activate a simple E2- and Sp1-dependent promoter up to approximately 100-fold i...

  20. Prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus among women older than 18 years in Egypt: a multicenter, observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Fadel Shaltout; Sallam, Hassan N.; Maged AbouSeeda; Fady Moiety; Hossam Hemeda; Ahmed Ibrahim; Moutaz E.L. Sherbini; Helmy Rady; Kusuma Gopala; Rodrigo DeAntonio

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Persistent infection with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with premalignant lesions and cervical cancer, the third most common cancer amongst women globally and the second most frequent in Egypt. We studied the prevalence and type distribution of HPV and documented HPV infection awareness and health-related behaviours for HPV infection. Methods: This was a multicenter, hospital-based observational study of women ≥18 years of age who attended for a gynaec...

  1. Potato virus X displaying the E7 peptide derived from human papillomavirus type 16: a novel position for epitope presentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaculík, Petr; Plchová, Helena; Moravec, Tomáš; Hoffmeisterová, Hana; Čeřovská, Noemi; Šmahel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 2 (2015), s. 671-680. ISSN 0167-6857 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/1761 Grant ostatní: European Regional Development Fund(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24014 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Potato virus X * Human papillomavirus * Nicotiana benthamiana Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.125, year: 2014

  2. Evaluation of fotonovela to increase human papillomavirus vaccine knowledge, attitudes, and intentions in a low-income Hispanic community

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Alvin; Brown, Brandon; Sepulveda, Enedina; Teran-Clayton, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Background It has nearly been a decade since the introduction of the vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV), yet vaccination rates in the United States have remained suboptimal, particularly among Hispanics. Culturally and linguistically relevant health education tools targeting Hispanics are needed to increase the current rate of HPV vaccination. This article evaluates a theory-informed, evidence-guided fotonovela (photographic short story) intervention to improve HPV vaccination knowled...

  3. Human Papillomavirus and Head and Neck Cancer: Psychosocial Impact in Patients and Knowledge of the Link - A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, R. H.; Waller, J; Marlow, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) currently affects approximately 11 200 people in the UK, with an increasing proportion known to be caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). We undertook a systematic review of studies measuring the psychosocial impact of HPV-related HNC and also studies measuring knowledge about the link between HPV and HNC among different populations. Searches were conducted on MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL Plus and Web of Science, with reference and forward citation searches ...

  4. Assessing knowledge of human papillomavirus and collecting data on sexual behavior: computer assisted telephone versus face to face interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Garland Suzanne; Ryall Richard; Croy Samantha; Pitts Marian; Lyons Anthony; Smith Anthony; Wong Mee; Tay Eng

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Education campaigns seeking to raise awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) and promoting HPV vaccination depend on accurate surveys of public awareness and knowledge of HPV and related sexual behavior. However, the most recent population-based studies have relied largely on computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATI) as opposed to face to face interviews (FTFI). It is currently unknown how these survey modes differ, and in particular whether they attract similar demogr...

  5. The epidemiology of human papillomavirus in HIV-negative and HIV-infected men who have sex with men

    OpenAIRE

    Coutinho, R A; Schim van der Loeff, M.F.; Mooij, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis studied the epidemiology and seroepidemiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) among HIV-negative and HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Anal, penile, and oral HPV prevalence and incidence were high, in particular among HIV-infected MSM. Clearance of anal HPV infection was lower among HIV-infected compared to HIV-negative MSM. HIV infection was strongly associated with HPV infection, independent of sexual behavior and other possible confounder...

  6. Prevalence of Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection and Risk Factors among HIV-positive Patients in Tokyo, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Nishijima, Takeshi; Tadokoro, Kenichi; Watanabe, Koji; Shimbo, Takuro; Niikura, Ryota; Sekine, Katsunori; Akiyama, Junichi; Teruya, Katsuji; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Uemura, Naomi; Oka, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly multiple HPV types, is recognized as a necessary cause of anal cancer. However, a limited number of studies have reported the prevalence of anal HPV infection in Asia. We determined the prevalence, genotypes, and risk factors for anal HPV infection in Japanese HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), heterosexual men, and women. Methods This cross-sectional study included 421 HIV-positive patients. At enrollment, we ...

  7. Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and HPV type distribution in cervical, vulvar, and anal cancers in central and eastern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Kocjan, Boštjan; Seme, Katja; Poljak, Mario; Maver Vodičar, Polona; Škamperle, Mateja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) play the leading etiological role in the development of cervical, anal, and vaginal cancers and a substantial proportion of penile, vulvar, and oropharyngeal (tonsillar) cancers. Methods: The article summarizes the results of the most important studies that examined tissue specimens of cervical, anal, and vulvar carcinoma from 16 central and eastern European countries for the presence of HPV DNA. Results: Twenty-eight eligible studies were ...

  8. Anal human papillomavirus infection among HIV-infected and uninfected men who have sex with men in Beijing, China

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yifei; Qian, Han-Zhu; Sun, Jiangping; Gao, Lei; Yin, Lu; Li, Xiangwei; Xiao, Dong; Li, Dongliang; Sun, Xiaoyun; Ruan, Yuhua; Milam, Douglas F.; Pan, Stephen W.; Shao, Yiming; Vermund, Sten H.

    2013-01-01

    To determine prevalence, genotypes and predictors of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) among HIV-infected and uninfected men who have sex with men (MSM) in Beijing, China. In 2010–2011, we recruited MSM (age range 18–61; median 28 years) through peer volunteers, and collected demographic/behavioral information via interviewer-administrated questionnaires. Trained health workers collected anal swabs for HPV genotyping by PCR and blood samples for HIV/syphilis serologies . We obtained anal specim...

  9. Plasma Micronutrients and the Acquisition and Clearance of Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection: the Hawaii HPV Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Franke, Adrian A.; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T.

    2010-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is common among women and the cause of most anal malignancies. The incidence of anal cancer has been increasing among U.S. women; yet few co-factors for the natural history of anal HPV infection have been identified. We examined the hypothesis that plasma carotenoid, retinol, and tocopherol concentrations are associated with the acquisition and clearance of anal HPV infection in a cohort of 279 Hawaiian residents followed at 4-month intervals for a me...

  10. Comparison of Hybribio GenoArray and Roche Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Linear Array for HPV Genotyping in Anal Swab Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Low, Huey Chi; Silver, Michelle I.; Brown, Brandon J.; Leng, Chan Yoon; Blas, Magaly M; GRAVITT, Patti E; Woo, Yin Ling

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with anal cancer, as HPV DNA is detected in up to 90% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias and anal cancers. With the gradual increase of anal cancer rates, there is a growing need to establish reliable and clinically relevant methods to detect anal cancer precursors. In resource-limited settings, HPV DNA detection is a potentially relevant tool for anal cancer screening. Here, we evaluated the performance of the Hybribio GenoArray (GA) for geno...

  11. Comparison of hybribio genoarray and roche human papillomavirus (HPV) linear array for HPV genotyping in anal swab samples

    OpenAIRE

    Low, HC; Silver, MI; Brown, BJ; Leng, CY; Blas, MM; Gravitt, PE; Woo, YL

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with anal cancer, as HPV DNA is detected in up to 90% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias and anal cancers. With the gradual increase of anal cancer rates, there is a growing need to establish reliable and clinically relevant methods to detect anal cancer precursors. In resource-limited settings, HPV DNA detection is a potentially relevant tool for anal cancer screening. Here, we e...

  12. Predicting Pediatricians’ Communication With Parents About the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine: An Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto, Anthony J.; Krieger, Janice L.; Katz, Mira L.; Goei, Ryan; Jain, Parul

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the ability of the theory of reasoned action (TRA) and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to predict whether or not pediatricians encourage parents to get their adolescent daughters vaccinated against the human papillomavirus (HPV). Four-hundred and six pediatricians completed a mail survey measuring attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, intentions, and behavior. Results indicate that pediatricians have positive attitudes, subjective norms, and perce...

  13. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPES 16, 18 AND 31 SEROSTATUS AND PROSTATE CANCER RISK IN THE PROSTATE CANCER PREVENTION TRIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hoque, Ashraful M.; Hsing, Ann W.; Thompson, Ian M; Zenilman, Jonathan M; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Since human papillomavirus (HPV) infection was first identified as a risk factor for cervical cancer, several seroepidemiologic and tissue-based studies have investigated HPV in relation to prostate cancer, another common genitourinary malignancy, with mixed results. To further inform this potential association, we conducted a large, prospective investigation of HPV types 16, 18, and 31 in relation to risk of prostate cancer in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT). Cases were a sample ...

  14. Characterization of a new type of human papillomavirus found in a lesion of Bowen's disease of the skin.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Kawashima; Jablonska, S.; Favre, M.; Obalek, S; Croissant, O; Orth, G.

    1986-01-01

    The genome of a human papillomavirus (HPV) found in a patient with Bowen's disease of the skin was molecularly cloned. Blot hybridization experiments, performed under stringent conditions, revealed no cross-hybridization between this HPV DNA and the other known HPV DNAs, showing that this HPV represents a new type, tentatively named HPV34. In relaxed hybridization conditions, the highest cross-hybridization was observed with HPV16 DNA. The physical map of HPV34 DNA was aligned with the geneti...

  15. Human Papillomavirus Up-Regulates MMP-2 and MMP-9 Expression and Activity by Inducing Interleukin-8 in Lung Adenocarcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Fan, Li-Ching; Yang, Shun-Chun; Tsao, Chang-Hui; Lee, Huei; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Lai, Li-Chuan; Chang, Yih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with non-smoking female lung cancer. Our previous report demonstrated that HPV 16 promotes lung tumor cell progression by up-regulating interleukin-17 (IL-17). IL-17 and its downstream signaling mediator, interleukin-8 (IL-8), have been implicated to modulate a variety of pro-angiogenic factors and play important roles in tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Accordingly, we hypothesized that HPV infection may potentiate tumorigenic and metastat...

  16. Amino acid sequence diversity of the major human papillomavirus capsid protein: Implications for current and next generation vaccines ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Amina I.; Bissett, Sara L; Beddows, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fidelity of host cell polymerases, the human papillomavirus (HPV) displays a degree of genomic polymorphism resulting in distinct genotypes and intra-type variants. The current HPV vaccines target the most prevalent genotypes associated with cervical cancer (HPV16/18) and genital warts (HPV6/11). Although these vaccines confer some measure of cross-protection, a multivalent HPV vaccine is in the pipeline that aims to broaden vaccine protection against other cervical cancer-associa...

  17. Comparison of human papillomavirus detection between freshly frozen tissue and paraffin embedded tissue of invasive cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lloveras Belen; Alemany Laia; Quiros Beatriz; Sandin Sven; de Sanjose Silvia; Odida Michael; Quint Wim; Kleter Bernhard; Alejo Maria; van Doorn Leen-Jan; Weiderpass Elisabete

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) detection results comparing paraffin embedded cervical tissue and other cervical specimens have been done with varying degrees of agreement. However, studies comparing freshly frozen specimens and paraffin embedded specimens of invasive cervical carcinomas are lacking. The aim of the study was to compare HPV detection using SPF10 broad-spectrum primers PCR followed by DEIA and genotyping by LiPA25 (version 1) between freshly frozen cervical tissu...

  18. Human Papillomavirus Infection and Anxiety: Analyses in Women with Low-Grade Cervical Cytological Abnormalities Unaware of Their Infection Status

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Candice Y; Sharp, Linda; Cotton, Seonaidh C; Harris, Cheryl A.; Gray, Nicola M; Little, Julian; ,

    2011-01-01

    Background Women testing positive for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection experience increased levels of anxiety that have been attributed to fears of stigmatization and developing cervical cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between HPV infection and anxiety in women who were unaware they had been tested specifically for HPV, to determine if any anxiety experienced by HPV-positive women could be due to causes other than learning of test results. Methods Th...

  19. Persistent human papillomavirus infection in the etiology of cervical carcinoma: The role of immunological, genetic, viral and cellular factors

    OpenAIRE

    Živadinović Radomir; Petrić Aleksandra; Lilić Goran; Lilić Vekoslav; Đorđević Biljana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to present the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical carcinogenesis from several aspects. By explaining the HPV virus lifecycle and structure, its effect on cervical cell cycle and subversion of immune response can be better understood. Early E region of the viral genome encodes proteins that are directly involved in carcinogenesis. The E6 protein binds to p53 protein (product of tumor-suppressor gene) blocking and degradi...

  20. Differences in Oral Sexual Behaviors by Gender, Age, and Race Explain Observed Differences in Prevalence of Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Gypsyamber D'Souza; Kevin Cullen; Janice Bowie; Roland Thorpe; Carole Fakhry

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study explores whether gender, age and race differences in oral sexual behavior account for the demographic distribution of oral human papillomavirus infection (HPV) and HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer (HPV-OSCC). METHODS: This analysis included 2,116 men and 2,140 women from NHANES (2009-10) who answered a behavioral questionnaire and provided an oral-rinse sample for HPV detection. Weighted prevalence estimates and prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated for sexual behaviors ...

  1. Human papillomavirus and other genital infections in indigenous women from Paraguay: a cross-sectional analytical study

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza, Laura; Mongelos, Pamela; Paez, Malvina; Castro, Amalia; Rodriguez-Riveros, Isabel; Gimenez, Graciela; Araujo, Patricia; Echagüe, Gloria; Diaz, Valentina; Laspina, Florentina; Castro, Wilberto; Jimenez, Rosa; Marecos, Ramón; Ever, Santiago; Deluca, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of cervical cancer in Paraguay is among the highest in the world, with the human papillomavirus (HPV) being a necessary factor for cervical cancer. Knowledge about HPV infection among indigenous women is limited. This cross-sectional study analyzed the frequency of HPV and other genital infections in indigenous Paraguayan women of the Department of Presidente Hayes. Methods This study included 181 sexually active women without cervical lesions. They belonged to the fo...

  2. Knowledge of human papillomavirus infection and its prevention among adolescents and parents in the greater Milan area, Northern Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Consolo Silvia; Picciolli Irene; Sabatini Caterina; Semino Margherita; Galeone Carlotta; Esposito Susanna; Pelucchi Claudio; Milani Gregorio; Principi Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In order to be widely accepted by users, the implementation of a new health intervention requires them to be adequately informed about its clinical importance, benefits and risks. The aim of this study was to provide data on the knowledge of Italian adolescents and parents concerning human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and its prevention in order to allow the development of adequate training programmes. Methods Between 2 May and 15 June 2008, we made a cross-sectional sur...

  3. Two novel genital human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, related to the potentially oncogenic HPV39.

    OpenAIRE

    Longuet, M; Beaudenon, S; Orth, G

    1996-01-01

    The genomes of two novel human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, were cloned from a low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and a vulvar papilloma, respectively, and partially sequenced. Both types are related to HPV39, a potentially oncogenic virus. HPV68 and HPV70 were also detected in genital intraepithelial neoplasia from three patients and one patient, respectively. Comparison with sequence data in the literature indicates that the subgenomic ME180-HPV DNA fragment, clone...

  4. Epstein-Barr Virus, Human Papillomavirus and Mouse Mammary Tumour Virus as Multiple Viruses in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn, Wendy K; Heng, Benjamin; Delprado, Warick; Iacopetta, Barry; Whitaker, Noel J.; Lawson, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV), high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV) co-exist in some breast cancers. Materials and Methods All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 l...

  5. Prevention of cervical, vaginal, and vulval cancers: role of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (6, 11, 16, 18) recombinant vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Lina Diaz

    2010-01-01

    Maria Lina DiazSection of Ambulatory Gynecology Cleveland Clinic Florida Weston, Florida, USAAbstract: The relationship between the human papillomavirus (HPV) and malignancies of the uterine cervix, vagina, and vulva has been established. The development of a quadrivalent HPV recombinant prophylactic vaccine represents the first time in history that primary prevention of these cancers is offered to girls and women. The prevalence of oncogenic HPV subtypes in cervical cancers has been the most...

  6. Feasibility and Implementation of a Literature Information Management System for Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancers with Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dee H; Matthiesen, Chance L; Alleman, Anthony M; Fournier, Aaron L; Gunter, Tyler C

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the feasibility and implementation of information service-orientated architecture (ISOA) on an emergent literature domain of human papillomavirus, head and neck cancer, and imaging. From this work, we examine the impact of cancer informatics and generate a full set of summarizing clinical pearls. Additionally, we describe how such an ISOA creates potential benefits in informatics education, enhancing utility for creating enduring digital content in this clinical domain. PMID:25392683

  7. Estimation of Geographic Variation in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Uptake in Men and Women: An Online Survey Using Facebook Recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Erik J; Hughes, John; Oakes, J. Michael; Pankow, James S.; Kulasingam, Shalini L

    2014-01-01

    Background Federally funded surveys of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake are important for pinpointing geographically based health disparities. Although national and state level data are available, local (ie, county and postal code level) data are not due to small sample sizes, confidentiality concerns, and cost. Local level HPV vaccine uptake data may be feasible to obtain by targeting specific geographic areas through social media advertising and recruitment strategies, in combinati...

  8. Individual- and Regional-level determinants of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine refusal: the Ontario Grade 8 HPV vaccine cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Remes, Olivia; Smith, Leah M.; Alvarado-Llano, Beatriz E; Colley, Lindsey; Lévesque, Linda E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies on the determinants of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine use have generally focused on individual-level characteristics, despite the potentially important influence of regional-level characteristics. Therefore, we undertook a population-based, retrospective cohort study to identify individual- and regional-level determinants of HPV vaccine refusal (non-receipt) in Ontario’s (Canada) Grade 8 HPV Immunization Program. Methods Ontario’s administrative health and immunization ...

  9. The DNA load of six high-risk human papillomavirus types and its association with cervical lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Río Ospina, Luisa del; Soto de León, Sara; Camargo, Milena; Moreno Pérez, Darwin Andrés; Sánchez, Ricardo; Pérez Prados, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Background: Analysing human papillomavirus (HPV) viral load is important in determining the risk of developing cervical cancer (CC); most knowledge to date regarding HPV viral load and cervical lesions has been related to HPV-16. This study evaluated the association between the viral load of the six most prevalent high-risk viral types in Colombia and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) frequency. Methods: 114 women without CIN and 59 women having CIN confirmed by colposcopy, all of them...

  10. Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses Down-regulate AKT1, whereas AKT2 Up-regulation and Activation Associates with Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Akgũl, Baki; Storey, Alan; Pfister, Herbert; Harwood, Catherine A; Byrne, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial tumorigenesis has been linked to AKT up-regulation. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause anogenital cancers and anogenital HPV infection up-regulates AKT activity. Mounting evidence points to a role for cutaneous HPVs as etiologic factors in skin tumorigenesis. High-risk cutaneous β HPVs have been linked to carcinogenesis in immunosuppressed patients, and high-risk cutaneous HPV8 genes enhance tumorigenesis in transgenic mice. We find that, in contrast to anogenital HPVs, cutaneous H...

  11. Cancer, Warts, or Asymptomatic Infections: Clinical Presentation Matches Codon Usage Preferences in Human Papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Bedhomme, Stéphanie; González-Bravo, Maria Isabel; Kamp, Christel; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2015-08-01

    Viruses rely completely on the hosts' machinery for translation of viral transcripts. However, for most viruses infecting humans, codon usage preferences (CUPrefs) do not match those of the host. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a showcase to tackle this paradox: they present a large genotypic diversity and a broad range of phenotypic presentations, from asymptomatic infections to productive lesions and cancer. By applying phylogenetic inference and dimensionality reduction methods, we demonstrate first that genes in HPVs are poorly adapted to the average human CUPrefs, the only exception being capsid genes in viruses causing productive lesions. Phylogenetic relationships between HPVs explained only a small proportion of CUPrefs variation. Instead, the most important explanatory factor for viral CUPrefs was infection phenotype, as orthologous genes in viruses with similar clinical presentation displayed similar CUPrefs. Moreover, viral genes with similar spatiotemporal expression patterns also showed similar CUPrefs. Our results suggest that CUPrefs in HPVs reflect either variations in the mutation bias or differential selection pressures depending on the clinical presentation and expression timing. We propose that poor viral CUPrefs may be central to a trade-off between strong viral gene expression and the potential for eliciting protective immune response. PMID:26139833

  12. Neutralization of non-vaccine human papillomavirus pseudoviruses from the A7 and A9 species groups by bivalent HPV vaccine sera

    OpenAIRE

    Draper, Eve; Bissett, Sara L; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Edwards, Debbie; Munslow, Graham; Soldan, Kate; Beddows, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The majority of cervical cancers are associated with infection by one or more Human Papillomavirus (HPV) types from just two distinct Alpha-Papillomavirus species groups, A7 and A9. The extent to which the current HPV16/18 vaccines will protect against other genetically related HPV types is of interest to inform vaccine implementation, cervical disease surveillance and the development of second generation HPV vaccines. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and titer of neutrali...

  13. Construction of a recombinant adenovirus Vector of human papillomavirus type 16 L1_E7c

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses are closely associated with human cervical cancer, especially HPV types 16 and 18. At present, HPV can not be produced in large quantity; it also has tumorgenicity and these properties of HPV have seriously hampered the development of HPV vaccine. HPV type 16 L1 proteins can assembled into virus-like particles (VLP), which are morphologically identical to the nature virion. In order to develop the recombinant adenovirus vectors of HPV, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus shuttle plasmid pCA14 L1-E7c. Methods: Human papillomavirus type 16 L1 open reading frame without terminator codon (TAA) (5559- 7152) and E7c (682- 855) were amplified using PCR. The L1 and E7c fragments were inserted into pGEM-T easy vectors by T- A strategy, named pTAL1 and pTAE7c. pTAL1 was cut with Hind III and BglII, the pTAE7c with BamHI and ClaI. The L1 DNA fragment, E7c and pBluesscript SK were ligated together using T4 DNA ligase. pBSL1-E7c and pBSL1-E7c was digested with Hind III and Xhol. The L1-E7c fragment was inserted into adenovirus shuttle plasmids pCAl4, named pCAl4L1-E7c. DNA sequence results indicated that The L1-E7c DNA fragment can encode the HPV16L1-E7 fusion protein correctly. Results: The L1 and E7c DNA fragments were amplified by PCR and recombinant plasmid pTAL1, pTAE7c, pBSL1-E7c and pCA14L1-E7c were constructed correctly. The pCAl4L1-E7c can be used in the further research work, cotransfected the 293 cell with the parent adenovirus pBHG10. Conclusion: Our results indicated that we have constructed a HPV16L1-E7 fusion DNA fragments and the adenovirus shuttle plasmids pCALl-E7c for the further research.

  14. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis

  15. Primary prevention of human papillomavirus-dependent neoplasia: no condom, no sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard J

    2005-11-01

    Cervix cancer is one of several neoplastic disorders that arise following transfer of human papillomavirus (HPV) during unprotected sexual intercourse, and like most other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), is largely preventable by consistent condom use. This primary prevention strategy has received little support, however, when compared with massive secondary prevention initiatives involving cervical screening. The reasons for this anomalous situation are complex, and include: (i) the asymptomatic nature of most primary HPV infections; (ii) widespread ignorance concerning the venereal aetiology of HPV-related cancers; (iii) the common but incorrect belief that condom use does not reduce HPV transmission; (iv) the perceived irrelevance of safe sex campaigns based on reducing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in high-HPV but low-HIV countries such as the Philippines; (v) the promotion of oral contraception by the medical and pharmaceutical sectors as the sexual prophylaxis of choice; and (vi) the assumption that HPV vaccines will solve the problem. Here it is proposed that the high prevalence of non-HIV STDs, including distressing disorders such as genital warts and herpes simplex, can be exploited with greater efficacy as a public health deterrent to unsafe sex and HPV transmission. Targeting a "mutually assured infection" campaign at vulnerable subgroups such as teenagers and oral contraceptive users could help reverse the global expansion of HPV-related cancers. PMID:16223580

  16. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses activate the tumor-associated lens epithelial-derived growth factor (LEDGF gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Leitz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic.

  17. Papillomavirus genomes in human cervical carcinoma: Analysis of their integration and transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighty-four biopsies derived from cervical tissues were analyzed for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA types 6, 16 and 18 using Southern blot hybridization. HPV 6 was found in none of the cervical biopsies, and HPV types 16 and 18 were found in 44% of them. The rate of HPV 16/18 positive samples increased proportionally to the severity of the lesion. In normal tissue there were no positive samples, in mild and moderate dysplasia HPV 16/18 was present in 20% and in severe dysplasia and invasive carcinomas in 37 and 50%, respectively. In biopsies from 13 cases with squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix and CIN III lesions HPV 16 was integrated within the host genome. It was concluded that the virus could be integrated at variable, presumably randomly selected chromosomal loci and with different number of copies. Transcription of HPV 16 and 18 was detected in one cervical cancer in HeLa cells, respectively. These results imply that HPV types 16 and 18 play an etiological role in the carcinogenesis of human cervical epithelial cells. (author)

  18. DEFB1 polymorphisms are involved in susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection in Brazilian gynaecological patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovica Segat

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The human beta defensin 1 (hBD-1 antimicrobial peptide is a member of the innate immune system known to act in the first line of defence against microorganisms, including viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV. In this study, five functional polymorphisms (namely g-52G>A, g-44C>G and g-20G>A in the 5’UTR and c.*5G>A and c.*87A>G in the 3’UTR in the DEFB1 gene encoding for hBD-1 were analysed to investigate the possible involvement of these genetic variants in susceptibility to HPV infection and in the development of HPV-associated lesions in a population of Brazilian women. The DEFB1 g-52G>A and c.*5G>A single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and the GCAAA haplotype showed associations with HPV-negative status; in particular, the c.*5G>A SNP was significantly associated after multiple test corrections. These findings suggest a possible role for the constitutively expressed beta defensin-1 peptide as a natural defence against HPV in the genital tract mucosa.

  19. Human papillomaviruses and cervical cancer in Bangkok. III. The role of husbands and commercial sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D B; Ray, R M; Kuypers, J; Kiviat, N; Koetsawang, A; Ashley, R L; Qin, Q; Koetsawang, S

    2001-04-15

    Between September 1991 and September 1993, husbands of women with and without cervical neoplasia and commercial sex workers in one brothel and one massage parlor in Bangkok, Thailand, were interviewed; serologic tests for sexually transmitted infections were performed; and cervical and penile scrapings were tested for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. The risks of cervical carcinoma in monogamous women and of oncogenic HPV in their husbands were associated with the men's having unprotected intercourse with prostitutes. The prevalence of oncogenic HPV was higher in commercial sex workers than in women attending gynecologic and family planning clinics. Oncogenic HPV prevalence declined with age in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative, but not in healthy HIV-positive, commercial sex workers and was weakly associated with hepatitis B antigenemia, suggesting that persistence of HPV infection is due to subtle changes in immunity. Associations of HPV with recent pregnancy and oral contraceptive use suggest that hormonal factors may increase the risk of cervical neoplasia by enhancing persistence of HPV infection. The prevalence of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions was strongly related to oncogenic HPV types and weakly to HIV infection only in their presence. Commercial sex workers in Bangkok are reservoirs of oncogenic HPV, and cervical cancer in monogamous Thai women develops in part as a result of transmission of these viruses to them by their husbands from prostitutes. PMID:11296145

  20. Antibody detection in tear samples as a surrogate to monitor host immunity against papillomavirus infections in vaccinated and naturally infected hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendle, Sarah; Balogh, Karla; Bywaters, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring serum antibodies against natural infections or after immunizations has been a standard clinical diagnostic procedure. However, collecting blood samples requires trained personnel, and may cause discomfort and increase the risk of complications. In this study, we investigated whether tear samples could serve as a surrogate for serum samples to measure specific antibodies. A widely used preclinical cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)/rabbit model has been a surrogate model for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. New Zealand white rabbits, either naturally infected with CRPV or immunized with two clinically available HPV vaccines (Gardasil and Cervarix), were examined for antibody generation in both tear and serum samples. We demonstrated that antibodies were detectable in tears from both naturally infected as well as vaccinated animals. Overall, the antibody levels in tears were ~10-fold lower than those from the corresponding serum samples, but background noise was lower in tear samples. The isotypes of antibodies in tears were predominantly IgA and IgG. These findings showed clearly that tears could be a surrogate for serum samples for monitoring antibody responses. As collecting tears causes no discomfort and poses no risk to patients, it represents a novel and promising method for monitoring future HPV epidemiological studies as well as for use in clinical practice. PMID:24903329

  1. Evaluating human papillomavirus vaccination programs in Canada: should provincial healthcare pay for voluntary adult vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith? Robert J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, provincial health programs in Canada and elsewhere have begun rolling out vaccination against human papillomavirus for girls aged 9–13. While vaccination is voluntary, the cost of vaccination is waived, to encourage parents to have their daughters vaccinated. Adult women who are eligible for the vaccine may still receive it, but at a cost of approximately CAN$400. Given the high efficacy and immunogenicity of the vaccine, the possibility of eradicating targeted types of the virus may be feasible, assuming the vaccination programs are undertaken strategically. Methods We develop a mathematical model to describe the epidemiology of vaccination against human papillomavirus, accounting for a widespread childhood vaccination program that may be supplemented by voluntary adult vaccination. A stability analysis is performed to determine the stability of the disease-free equilibrium. The critical vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity thresholds are derived, and the minimum level of adult vaccination required for eradication of targeted types is determined. Results We demonstrate that eradication of targeted types is indeed feasible, although the burden of coverage for a childhood-only vaccination program may be high. However, if a small, but non-negligible, proportion of eligible adults can be vaccinated, then the possibility of eradication of targeted types becomes much more favourable. We provide a threshold for eradication in general communities and illustrate the results with numerical simulations. We also investigate the effects of suboptimal efficacy and immunogenicity and show that there is a critical efficacy below which eradication of targeted types is not possible. If eradication is possible, then there is a critical immunogenicity such that even 100% childhood vaccination will not eradicate the targeted types of the virus and must be supplemented with voluntary adult vaccination. However, the level of adult

  2. Integration of human papillomavirus 18 DNA in esophageal carcinoma 109 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Zhang; Jin-Tao Li; Shu-Ying Li; Li-Hua Zhu; Ling Zhou; Yi Zeng

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in esophageal carcinoma (EC) 109 cells and investigate the relationship between HPV and EC. METHODS: Genomic DNA and total RNA from EC109 cells were isolated. HPV DNA was detected by poly-merase chain reaction (PCR) with the general primer sets of MyO9/ll and GP5 +/6 + for the HPV LI gene and type-specific primer sets for HPV18 E6 and HPV18 E6-E7. Reverse transcription (RT) of mRNA isolated from EC109 cells was performed to produce a cDNA. And then a PCR-based protocol for the amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts was used to analyze HPV18 DNA and integrated transcripts of HPV18 in the chromosomes of EC109 cells. The final nested PCR products were cloned into a pMD-18T vector and se-quenced to analyze the chromosomal location of HPV integration. RESULTS: HPV18 DNA was detected in EC109 cells by PCR using the general primer sets of MyO9/ll and GP5 +/6 + for HPV LI and the type-specific primer sets for HPV18 E6 and E6-E7 to generate products of 450 bp, 150 bp, 335 bp and 944 bp, respectively. Approximately 600 bp of integrated HPV18-specific transcript was identified. The final nested PCR product of integrated HPV18 DNA was cloned into a pMD-18T vector and sequenced to analyze the chromosomal location of HPV integration. Sequence alignment showed that the HPV18 sequence from EC109 cells was identical to that of the encoded early protein E7-E1 of the standard HPV18 strain X05015, and another partial gene sequence was identical to a partial sequence of human chromosome 8. CONCLUSION: Integration of the HPV genome into the host cell chromosome suggests that persistent HPV infection is vital for malignant cell transformation and carcinogenesis.

  3. Prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus infection in women from North Sardinia, Italy

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    Marras Vincenzo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV has been associated with several disorders of the genital tract, skin and oropharynx. The aims of our study were to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection in women between 15 and 54 years of age in North Sardinia, Italy, to identify the prevalence of High Risk - Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV genotypes and to establish a correlation between molecular and cytological results. Methods From 2007 to 2009 we consecutively enrolled women aged 15-54 years admitted to public and private outpatient settings. All the participants filled in a questionnaire about the socio-cultural state, sexual activity and awareness about HPV. 323 cervical specimens were tested for HPV-DNA and HPV genotypes with INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping CE Amp kit. Samples showing positivity to some HPV genotypes were re-tested using "in house" quantitative Real-Time PCR assays. Results Overall HPV-DNA positivity was detected in 35.9% of the women. The prevalence of HR-HPV infection among HPV positive samples was 93.1% with a specific prevalence of HPV 16, 51, 31, 53 and 18 of 54.3%, 37.9%, 10.3%, 6.9% and 5.2%, respectively. Co-infection with any HPV, HR-HPV, LR-HPV and HR/LR-HPV type was 18.3%, 14.9%, 0.9% and 2.5%, respectively; HPV 16/51 co-infection was detected in 64.6% of the HR-HPV co-infection group. The most frequent HPV-genotypes detected were 16 (32.5% and 51 (22.7%. Among the 57 patients harboring mono-infection the most prevalent HPV genotypes were 16 (38.6% and 31(10.5%. A multivariate analysis identified a statistical significant association between HPV infection and age and between HPV infection and previous sexual transmitted diseases. A statistically significant association between cytological cervical lesions and generic HPV exposure was identified. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first survey evaluating the prevalence of HPV infection in Northern Sardinia and drawing attention to the unusual high proportion of

  4. Replicative Intermediates of Human Papillomavirus Type 11 in Laryngeal Papillomas: Site of Replication Initiation and Direction of Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auborn, K. J.; Little, R. D.; Platt, T. H. K.; Vaccariello, M. A.; Schildkraut, C. L.

    1994-07-01

    We have examined the structures of replication intermediates from the human papillomavirus type 11 genome in DNA extracted from papilloma lesions (laryngeal papillomas). The sites of replication initiation and termination utilized in vivo were mapped by using neutral/neutral and neutral/alkaline two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis methods. Initiation of replication was detected in or very close to the upstream regulatory region (URR; the noncoding, regulatory sequences upstream of the open reading frames in the papillomavirus genome). We also show that replication forks proceed bidirectionally from the origin and converge 180circ opposite the URR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of analysis of replication of viral genomes directly from infected tissue.

  5. Encapsidating artificial human papillomavirus-16 mE7 protein in human papillomavirus-6b L1/L2 virus like particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yu-fei; WANG Qing-yong; ZHANG Hong-tao; HAN Ye-hua; SONG Guo-xing; XU Xue-mei

    2007-01-01

    Background Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can infect squamous or mucosal epithelia and cause cervical cancer or genital warts. Coinfection with multiple HPV types is a common finding of many epidemiological studies. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a vaccine, which can eradicate established HPV infections and prevent other HPV infections. In this study, we generated chimeric virus like particles (cVLPs) composed of HPV-6b L1, HPV-6b L2 and one artificial HPV-16 mE7 proteins.Methods The artificial HPV-16 mE7 gene was designed by codon modification, point mutation and gene shuffling then chemically synthesized and subcloned behind HPV-6b L2. HPV-6b L1 and L2-mE7 were expressed in insect cells by using Bac-to-Bac system. The generated cVLPs were purified by CsCl gradient ultracentrifuge and analyzed by immunoblot, electron microscope and haemagglutination assay.Results The HPV-6b L1 and L2-mE7 proteins were well expressed in insect cells and could selfassemble into cVLPs,whose diameter was about 55 nm and similar to that of HPV-6b L1/L2 VLPs. Intact cVLPs could be recognized by H6.M48 neutralizing monoclonal antibody and HPV-6b L2 polyclonal antibody, while the denatured cVLPs, but not the intact cVLPs, were reactive to HPV-16 E7 polyclonal antibody. HPV-6b L1/L2-mE7 cVLPs haemagglutinated mouse erythrocytes as efficiently as HPV-6b L1/L2 VLPs did.Conclusions The insertion of the 158 amino acid HPV-16 mE7 protein behind L2 did not disrupt the correct assembling of cVLPs. The morphological characteristics and haemagglutinating activity of cVLPs were similar to those of HPV-6b L1/L2 VLPs. The cVLPs retained conformational B cell epitopes of HPV-6 VLPs and HPV-16 mE7 protein had an internal location in the cVLPs. Therefore, large modified E7 protein with higher immunogenicity could be incorporated into cVLPs by fusing to the C-terminus of L2, which would help to improve the therapeutic effects of L1/L2-E7 cVLPs.

  6. Human papillomavirus types 6 and 11 DNA sequences in genital and laryngeal papillomas and in some cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissmann, L; Wolnik, L; Ikenberg, H; Koldovsky, U; Schnürch, H G; zur Hausen, H

    1983-01-01

    Human genital tumors as well as recurrent laryngeal papillomas were analyzed for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and HPV 11 sequences. HPV 11 DNA was found in 7 of 14 laryngeal papillomas; in the 7 other tumors no HPV DNA was demonstrated. HPV 11 DNA was also found in all five atypical condylomata of the cervix included in this study. Condylomata acuminata mainly contained HPV 6 DNA. From 63 biopsy specimens, 41 clearly harbored HPV 6 DNA and 13 harbored HPV 11 DNA. In three tumors accurate typing was impossible, and in six additional ones neither HPV 6 nor HPV 11 DNA could be demonstrated. The data support a genital origin of laryngeal papillomavirus infections. In 4 of 24 malignant tumors, HPV 11 DNA or related sequences were demonstrated; 2 of the 4 were biopsy specimens from invasive cancer, and the other 2 originated from carcinomata in situ. A possible role of this or related papillomavirus types in the induction of malignant genital tumors remains to be elucidated. Images PMID:6300854

  7. Phosphorylation Regulates Binding of the Human Papillomavirus Type 8 E2 Protein to Host Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Sekhar, Vandana; Alison A McBride

    2012-01-01

    The papillomavirus E2 proteins are indispensable for the viral life cycle, and their functions are subject to tight regulation. The E2 proteins undergo posttranslational modifications that regulate their properties and roles in viral transcription, replication, and genome maintenance. During persistent infection, the E2 proteins from many papillomaviruses act as molecular bridges that tether the viral genomes to host chromosomes to retain them within the host nucleus and to partition them to ...

  8. Characterization of neutralizing epitopes within the major capsid protein of human papillomavirus type 33

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    Sapp Martin

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections with papillomaviruses induce type-specific immune responses, mainly directed against the major capsid protein, L1. Based on the propensity of the L1 protein to self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs, type-specific vaccines have already been developed. In order to generate vaccines that target a broader spectrum of HPV types, extended knowledge of neutralizing epitopes is required. Despite the association of human papillomavirus type 33 (HPV33 with cervical carcinomas, fine mapping of neutralizing conformational epitopes on HPV33 has not been reported yet. By loop swapping between HPV33 and HPV16 capsid proteins, we have identified amino acid sequences critical for the binding of conformation-dependent type-specific neutralizing antibodies to surface-exposed hyper variable loops of HPV33 capsid protein L1. Results Reactivities of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs H33.B6, H33.E12, H33.J3 and H16.56E with HPV16:33 and HPV33:16 hybrid L1 VLPs revealed the complex structures of their conformational epitopes as well as the major residues contributing to their binding sites. Whereas the epitope of mAb H33.J3 was determined by amino acids (aa 51–58 in the BC loop of HPV33 L1, sequences of at least two hyper variable loops, DE (aa 132–140 and FGb (aa 282–291, were found to be essential for binding of H33.B6. The epitope of H33.E12 was even more complex, requiring sequences of the FGa loop (aa 260–270, in addition to loops DE and FGb. Conclusion These data demonstrate that neutralizing epitopes in HPV33 L1 are mainly located on the tip of the capsomere and that several hyper variable loops contribute to form these conformational epitopes. Knowledge of the antigenic structure of HPV is crucial for designing hybrid particles as a basis for intertypic HPV vaccines.

  9. Physical and functional interactions of human papillomavirus E2 protein with nuclear receptor coactivators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced immortalization of epithelial cells, which usually requires integration of the viral DNA into the host cell genome, steroid hormone-activated nuclear receptors (NRs) are thought to bind to specific DNA sequences within transcriptional regulatory regions on the long control region to either increase or suppress transcription of dependent genes. In this study, our data suggest that the NR coactivator function of HPV E2 proteins might be mediated through physical and functional interactions with not only NRs but also the NR coactivators GRIP1 (glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1) and Zac1 (zinc-finger protein which regulates apoptosis and cell cycle arrest 1), reciprocally regulating their transactivation activities. GRIP1 and Zac1 both were able to act synergistically with HPV E2 proteins on the E2-, androgen receptor-, and estrogen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation systems. GRIP1 and Zac1 might selectively function with HPV E2 proteins on thyroid receptor- and p53-dependent transcriptional activation, respectively. Hence, the transcriptional function of E2 might be mediated through NRs and NR coactivators to regulate E2-, NR-, and p53-dependent transcriptional activations

  10. Electrochemical chip-based genomagnetic assay for detection of high-risk human papillomavirus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosik, Martin; Durikova, Helena; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Anton, Milan; Jandakova, Eva; Hrstka, Roman

    2016-09-15

    Cervical cancer, being the fourth leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide, predominantly originates from a persistent infection with a high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Detection of DNA sequences from these high-risk strains, mostly HPV-16 and HPV-18, represents promising strategy for early screening, which would help to identify women with higher risk of cervical cancer. In developing countries, inadequate screening options lead to disproportionately high mortality rates, making a fast and inexpensive detection schemes highly important. Electrochemical sensors and assays offer an alternative to current methods of detection. We developed an electrochemical-chip based assay, in which target HPV DNA is captured via magnetic bead-modified DNA probes, followed by an antidigoxigenin-peroxidase detection system at screen-printed carbon electrode chips, enabling parallel measurements of eight samples simultaneously. We show sensitive detection in attomoles of HPV DNA, selective discrimination between HPV-16 and HPV-18 and good reproducibility. Most importantly, we show application of the assay into both cancer cell lines and cervical smears from patients. The electrochemical results correlated well with standard methods, making this assay potentially applicable in clinical practice. PMID:27132004

  11. Heterologous production of human papillomavirus type-16 L1 protein by a lactic acid bacterium

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    Bermúdez-Humarán Luis G

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of vaccine antigens in lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a safe and cost-effective alternative to traditional expression systems. In this study, we investigated i the expression of Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16 L1 major capsid protein in the model LAB Lactococcus lactis and ii the ability of the resulting recombinant strain to produce either capsomer-or virus-like particles (VLPs. Results and conclusion HPV-16 L1 gene was cloned into two vectors, pCYT and pSEC, designed for controlled intra- or extracellular heterologous expression in L. lactis, respectively. The capacity of L. lactis harboring either pCYT:L1 or pSEC:L1 plasmid to accumulate L1 in the cytoplasm and supernatant samples was confirmed by Western blot assays. Electron microscopy analysis suggests that, L1 protein produced by recombinant lactococci can self-assemble into structures morphologically similar to VLPs intracellularly. The presence of conformational epitopes on the L. lactis-derived VLPs was confirmed by ELISA using an anti-HPV16 L1 capsid antigen antibody. Our results support the feasibility of using recombinant food-grade LAB, such as L. lactis, for the production of L1-based VLPs and open the possibility for the development of a new safe mucosal vector for HPV-16 prophylactic vaccination.

  12. Immunophenotype and human papillomavirus status of serous adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togami, Shinichi; Sasajima, Yuko; Kasamatsu, Takahiro; Oda-Otomo, Rie; Okada, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Mitsuya; Ikeda, Shun-ichi; Kato, Tomoyasu; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    Serous adenocarcinoma of the cervix (SACC) is a very rare tumor. Our study aimed to characterize the immune profile and human papillomavirus (HPV) status of SACC, in comparison with other serous adenocarcinomas arising in the female genital tract. The pathological specimens obtained from 81 patients with serous carcinoma of the uterine cervix (n = 12), 29 endometrium, 20 ovary and 20 patients with mucinous carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reviewed. We assessed the expression of WT-1, p53, p16, HER2, CEA, and CA125 by immunohistochemistry and HPV DNA by PCR in 12 SACC samples. Their immune profile was compared with that of uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC), ovarian serous adenocarcinoma (OSA), and mucinous endocervical adenocarcinoma (MEA). WT-1 and HER2 were expressed in very few SACC samples (0 and 0%, respectively), but p16, CA125, CEA and p53 were present in 100, 92, 58 and 50%, respectively. The difference in WT-1 expression between SACC and UPSC, MEA is not significant, but SACC differ significantly from OSA (p UPSC, whereas the frequency of expression of WT-1 was significantly lower in SACC than OSA. It appeared that p53 expression was associated with worse clinical outcome in patients with SACC, and that HPV infection was related to its occurrence. PMID:25370301

  13. Numerical simulation of a two-sex human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani, I.; Adi-Kusumo, F.

    2014-02-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, precancerous lesions, cancer and other disease. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Although HPV virus primarily affects woman but it can also affects man because it cause of cancer of the anus, vulva, vagina, penis and some other cancers. HPV vaccines now used to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts because the vaccine protect against four types of HPV that most commonly cause disease are types 6, 11, 16, and 18. This paper is sequel work of Elbasha (2008). Difference with Elbasha (2008) are give alternative proof global stability, numerical simulation and interpretation. Global stability of the equilibrium on the model of a two-sex HPV vaccination were explored by using Lyapunov. Although we use the same lyapunov function, we use the largest invariant set to proof the global stability. The result show that the global stability of the equilibrium depends on the effective reproduction number (R). If R 1 then endemic equilibrium have globally asymptotically stable properties. Then equilibrium proceed with the interpretation of numerical simulation.

  14. The potential impact of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccination on oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Theresa; Eisele, David W; Fakhry, Carole

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is significantly increasing in the United States. Given that these epidemiologic trends are driven by human papillomavirus (HPV), the potential impact of prophylactic HPV vaccines on the prevention of OPC is of interest. The primary evidence supporting the approval of current prophylactic HPV vaccines is from large phase 3 clinical trials focused on the prevention of genital disease (cervical and anal cancer, as well as genital warts). These trials reported vaccine efficacy rates of 89% to 98% for the prevention of both premalignant lesions and persistent genital infections. However, these trials were designed before the etiologic relationship between HPV and OPC was established. There are differences in the epidemiology of oral and genital HPV infection, such as differences in age and sex distributions, which suggest that the vaccine efficacy observed in genital cancers may not be directly translatable to the cancers of the oropharynx. Evaluation of vaccine efficacy is challenging in the oropharynx because no premalignant lesion analogous to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in cervical cancer has yet been identified. To truly investigate the efficacy of these vaccines in the oropharynx, additional clinical trials with feasible endpoints are needed. Cancer 2016;122:2313-2323. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27152637

  15. Taking stock and looking ahead: Behavioural science lessons for implementing the nonavalent human papillomavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Alice S; Waller, Jo

    2016-07-01

    The development and licensing of a nonavalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality from HPV-related cancers beyond that of first generation HPV vaccines. However, this benefit can only be realised if the offer of vaccination is accepted. Uptake of first generation HPV vaccines is not complete and shows huge global variation. In addition to practical and financial challenges to optimising coverage, behavioural issues explain a large proportion of the variance in vaccine receipt. This commentary draws on the findings of over a decade of behavioural science research seeking to understand uptake of first generation HPV vaccines, in order to anticipate challenges to implement the nonavalent HPV vaccine. Challenges include distrust of combination vaccines, uncertainty about long-term efficacy, distrust of a new and (perceived to be) untested vaccine, cost and uncertainty regarding interchanging doses of first generation and nonavalent vaccines and the appropriateness of revaccination. We use behavioural science theory and existing evaluations of interventions to increase uptake of vaccines to identify evidence-based approaches that can be implemented by vaccine stakeholders to address parents' concerns and maximise uptake of the nonavalent HPV vaccine. PMID:27235782

  16. Easy and fast detection and genotyping of high-risk human papillomavirus by dedicated DNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Valérie; Chevallier, Anne; Magnone, Virginie; Barbry, Pascal; Vandenbos, Fanny; Bongain, André; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2006-11-01

    Persistent cervical high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is correlated with an increased risk of developing a high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesion. A two-step method was developed for detection and genotyping of high-risk HPV. DNA was firstly amplified by asymmetrical PCR in the presence of Cy3-labelled primers and dUTP. Labelled DNA was then genotyped using DNA microarray hybridization. The current study evaluated the technical efficacy of laboratory-designed HPV DNA microarrays for high-risk HPV genotyping on 57 malignant and non-malignant cervical smears. The approach was evaluated for a broad range of cytological samples: high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and atypical squamous cells of high-grade (ASC-H). High-risk HPV was also detected in six atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) samples; among them only one cervical specimen was found uninfected, associated with no histological lesion. The HPV oligonucleotide DNA microarray genotyping detected 36 infections with a single high-risk HPV type and 5 multiple infections with several high-risk types. Taken together, these results demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the HPV DNA microarray approach. This approach could improve clinical management of patients with cervical cytological abnormalities. PMID:16879879

  17. Awareness and acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccine: an application of the instrumental variables bivariate probit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Young Kyung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although lower uptake rates of the human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations have been documented, less is known about the relationships between awareness and acceptability, and other factors affecting HPV vaccine uptake. The current study aimed to estimate the potential effectiveness of increased HPV vaccine awareness on the acceptability of HPV vaccination in a nationally representative sample of women, using a methodology that controlled for potential non-random selection. Methods This study used a population-based sample from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey, a cross-sectional study of the US population aged 18 years or older, and focused on the subsample of 742 women who have any female children under the age of 18 years in the household. An instrumental variables bivariate probit model was used to jointly estimate HPV vaccine awareness and acceptability. Results The proportion of HPV vaccine acceptability among the previously aware and non-aware groups was 58% and 47%, respectively. Results from the instrumental variables bivariate probit model showed that the estimated marginal effect of awareness on acceptability was 46 percentage points, an effect that was even greater than observed. Conclusions Among populations who are not currently aware of the HPV vaccine, the potential impact of raising awareness on acceptability of HPV vaccination is substantial. This finding provides additional support to strengthening public health programs that increase awareness and policy efforts that address barriers to HPV vaccination.

  18. The sero-epidemiology of human papillomavirus among Caucasian transplant recipients in the UK

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    Newton Robert

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive study of high-risk mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV, little is known of the epidemiology of cutaneous HPV. As part of a study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and HPV among organ transplant recipients (OTR from London and Oxford, we investigated the seroprevalence and risk factors for 34 HPV types (detected using Luminex technology among 425 Caucasian OTR without skin cancer. Results Overall, 86% of participants were seropositive to at least one HPV: 41% to mucosal alpha types, 33% to cutaneous alpha types, 57% to alpha types, 56% to beta, 47% to gamma types and 45% to other types (nu, mu, HPV101 and 103. In both centres, the most common types were HPV6 (33% and 26% for London and Oxford respectively, HPV8 (24% and 18%, HPV15 (26% and 29%, HPV17 (25% and 21%, HPV38 (23% and 21%, HPV49 (19% and 21%, HPV4 (27% and 23%, HPV65 (30% and 25%, HPV95 (22% and 20%, HPV1 (33% and 24% and HPV63 (28% and 17%. The seroprevalence of 8 HPV types differed significantly (P Conclusion Findings for mucosal HPV types were in line with results from previous studies. We observed differences in HPV seroprevalence between organ transplant recipients from two geographically close centres but no clear risk factor was found associated with cutaneous HPV seropositivity among organ transplant recipients. These findings have implications for interpretation of future seroepidemiology studies addressing the association between HPV and cutaneous SCC in OTR populations.

  19. The Prevalence and Genotype Distribution of Human Papillomavirus in the Genital Tract of Males in Iran

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    Salehi-Vaziri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Human papillomavirus (HPV is the most common viral sexually-transmitted infection. Despite HPV infection is associated with several malignant disorders including penile and anal cancers, little is known about the epidemiology of HPV infection in males, particularly in developing countries. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV infection and its genotype distribution among Iranian males. Patients and Methods Between March 2009 and April 2014, a total number of 483 males, referred to Iran University of Medical Sciences-affiliated sexually transmitted infections (STI clinics, were enrolled in this study. Following DNA extraction, HPV detection and genotyping were performed using INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay. To analyze the association of HPV infection and age, the logistic regression was employed. Results No statistical association between HPV infection and age was observed (P = 0.469. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant correlation between HR HPV infection and age (P = 0.330. Conclusions In this investigation, the prevalence of HPV infection was relatively substantial. Totally, 17 different HPV genotypes were detected and the most frequently detected genotypes were HPV6, HPV11, HPV16, HPV18 and HPV52, respectively. The data from this study is essential for planning future public health strategies including HPV vaccination programs.

  20. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Coverage Among Female Adolescents in Managed Care Plans - United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Judy; Ye, Faye; Roth, Lindsey; Sobel, Katherine; Byron, Sepheen; Barton, Mary; Lindley, Megan; Stokley, Shannon

    2015-10-30

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, with a reported 79 million persons aged 15–59 years in the United States currently infected with HPV, and approximately 14 million new cases diagnosed each year. Although most HPV infections are asymptomatic, transient, and do not cause disease, persistent HPV infection can lead to cervical, vulvar, vaginal, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancer. In the United States, approximately 27,000 HPV-attributable cancers occur each year. HPV vaccination is an effective primary prevention strategy that can reduce many of the HPV infections that lead to cancer, and is routinely recommended for adolescents aged 11–12 years. To determine whether the recommended HPV vaccination series is currently being administered to adolescents with health insurance, CDC and the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) assessed 2013 data from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS). The HEDIS HPV Vaccine for Female Adolescents performance measure evaluates the proportion of female adolescent members in commercial and Medicaid health plans who receive the recommended 3-dose HPV vaccination series by age 13 years. In 2013, in the United States, the median HPV vaccination coverage levels for female adolescents among commercial and Medicaid plans were 12% and 19%, respectively (ranges = 0%–34% for commercial plans; 5%–52% for Medicaid plans). Improving HPV vaccination coverage and understanding of what health plans might do to support HPV vaccination are needed, including understanding the barriers to, and facilitators for, vaccination coverage. PMID:26513219

  1. Human papillomavirus research on the prevention, diagnosis, and prognosis of cervical cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Angel; Huang, Huei-Jean; Lai, Chyong-Huey

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is third in incidence and fourth in mortality among cancers of women worldwide. Epidemiological studies have shown that human papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary, if not sufficient, to cause nearly 100% of cervical cancers. HPV testing is useful in primary screening for cervical neoplasms. The value of HPV detection or genotyping is potentially useful in triage of borderline or low-grade abnormal cervical cytology, follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, assessment of prognosis and treatment planning for invasive cervical cancer. Studies from Chang Gung Memorial Hospital have defined the genotype distribution of cervical cancer in Taiwan and confirmed the independent prognostic value of the HPV genotype in cervical cancer. The cost-effectiveness of using HPV testing in prevention and management of cervical neoplasms depends on the medical and public health infrastructure of the individual country. The population-based HPV prevalence and genotype distribution as well as longitudinal follow-up studies have established strong support for incorporating HPV testing with cervical cytology and for future comparisons of HPV epidemiology before and after implementation of HPV prophylactic vaccines in Taiwan. Future directions in HPV research are discussed. PMID:22913856

  2. Immunogenic Human Papillomavirus Pseudovirus-Mediated Suicide-Gene Therapy for Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rim Hojeij

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the second most common urological malignancy in the world. In 70% of cases it is initially diagnosed as non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC and it is amenable to local treatments, with intravesical (IVES Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin (BCG immunotherapy being routinely used after transurethral resection of the lesion. However, this treatment is associated with significant side-effects and treatment failures, highlighting the necessity of novel strategies. One potent approach is the suicide-gene mediated therapy/prodrug combination, provided tumor-specificity can be ensured and anti-tumor immune responses induced. Using the mouse syngeneic orthotopic MB49-bladder tumor model, here we show that IVES human papillomavirus non-replicative pseudovirions (PsV can pseudoinfect tumors with a ten-fold higher efficacy than normal bladders. In addition, PsV carrying the suicide-gene herpes-simplex virus thymidine kinase (PsV-TK combined to Ganciclovir (GCV led to immunogenic cell-death of tumor cells in vitro and to MB49-specific CD8 T-cells in vivo. This was associated with reduction in bladder-tumor growth and increased mice survival. Altogether, our data show that IVES PsV-TK/GCV may be a promising alternative or combinatory treatment for NMIBC.

  3. Immunogenic Human Papillomavirus Pseudovirus-Mediated Suicide-Gene Therapy for Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojeij, Rim; Domingos-Pereira, Sonia; Nkosi, Marianne; Gharbi, Dalila; Derré, Laurent; Schiller, John T; Jichlinski, Patrice; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the second most common urological malignancy in the world. In 70% of cases it is initially diagnosed as non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and it is amenable to local treatments, with intravesical (IVES) Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunotherapy being routinely used after transurethral resection of the lesion. However, this treatment is associated with significant side-effects and treatment failures, highlighting the necessity of novel strategies. One potent approach is the suicide-gene mediated therapy/prodrug combination, provided tumor-specificity can be ensured and anti-tumor immune responses induced. Using the mouse syngeneic orthotopic MB49-bladder tumor model, here we show that IVES human papillomavirus non-replicative pseudovirions (PsV) can pseudoinfect tumors with a ten-fold higher efficacy than normal bladders. In addition, PsV carrying the suicide-gene herpes-simplex virus thymidine kinase (PsV-TK) combined to Ganciclovir (GCV) led to immunogenic cell-death of tumor cells in vitro and to MB49-specific CD8 T-cells in vivo. This was associated with reduction in bladder-tumor growth and increased mice survival. Altogether, our data show that IVES PsV-TK/GCV may be a promising alternative or combinatory treatment for NMIBC. PMID:27428950

  4. Enhanced human papillomavirus type 8 oncogene expression levels are crucial for skin tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in skin cancer development in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. Transgenic mice expressing HPV8 early genes (HPV8-CER) developed papillomas, dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas. UVA/B-irradiation and mechanical wounding of HPV8-CER mouse skin led to prompt papilloma induction in about 3 weeks. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinetics and level of transgene expression in response to skin irritations. Transgene expression was already enhanced 1 to 2 days after UVA/B-irradiation or tape-stripping and maintained during papilloma development. The enhanced transgene expression could be assigned to UVB and not to UVA. Papilloma development was thus always paralleled by an increased transgene expression irrespective of the type of skin irritation. A knock-down of E6 mRNA by tattooing HPV8-E6-specific siRNA led to a delay and a lower incidence of papilloma development. This indicates that the early increase of viral oncogene expression is crucial for induction of papillomatosis.

  5. A Single Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Dose Improves B Cell Memory in Previously Infected Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Erin M; Smith, Robin A; Gallego, Daniel F; Carter, Joseph J; Wipf, Gregory C; Hoyos, Manuela; Stern, Michael; Thurston, Tate; Trinklein, Nathan D; Wald, Anna; Galloway, Denise A

    2016-08-01

    Although licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are most efficacious in persons never infected with HPV, they also reduce infection and disease in previously infected subjects, indicating natural immunity is not entirely protective against HPV re-infection. The aim of this exploratory study was to examine the B cell memory elicited by HPV infection and evaluate whether vaccination merely boosts antibody (Ab) levels in previously infected subjects or also improves the quality of B cell memory. Toward this end, the memory B cells (Bmem) of five unvaccinated, HPV-seropositive subjects were isolated and characterized, and subject recall responses to a single HPV vaccine dose were analyzed. Vaccination boosted Ab levels 24- to 930-fold (median 77-fold) and Bmem numbers 3- to 27-fold (median 6-fold). In addition, Abs cloned from naturally elicited Bmem were generally non-neutralizing, whereas all those isolated following vaccination were neutralizing. Moreover, Ab and plasmablast responses indicative of memory recall responses were only observed in two subjects. These results suggest HPV vaccination augments both the magnitude and quality of natural immunity and demonstrate that sexually active persons could also benefit from HPV vaccination. This study may have important public policy implications, especially for the older 'catch-up' group within the vaccine's target population. PMID:27423190

  6. Role of human papillomavirus and tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manvikar, Vardendra; Kulkarni, Rama; Koneru, Anila; Vanishree, M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases, but its components are not yet entirely clear. In accordance with the multi-step theory of carcinogenesis, the natural history of oral cancer seems to gradually evolve through transitional precursor lesions from normal epithelium to a full-blown metastatic phenotype. A number of genomic lesions accompany this transformation and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature and is being summarized here. Furthermore, several key genes have been implicated, especially well-known tumor suppressors such as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, TP53 and RB1 and oncogenes such as the cyclin family, epidermal growth factor receptor and RAS. Viral infections, particularly oncogenic human papillomavirus subtypes and Epstein-Barr virus, can have a tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia and their role is discussed, along with potential therapeutic interventions. A brief explanatory theoretical model of oral carcinogenesis is provided and potential avenues for further research are highlighted. PMID:27194871

  7. Ciliated Adenosquamous Carcinoma: Expanding the Phenotypic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radkay-Gonzalez, Lisa; Faquin, William; McHugh, Jonathan B; Lewis, James S; Tuluc, Madalina; Seethala, Raja R

    2016-06-01

    This study describes a unique subset of ciliated, human papillomavirus (HPV) related, adenosquamous carcinomas (AsqCA) of the head and neck that in contrast to most AsqCA, often show areas with lower grade cytonuclear features. They are comprised of largely non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma components with cystic change, gland formation, mucin production, and cilia in tumor cells. Seven cases of ciliated AsqCA were retrieved. Site distribution was as follows: palatine tonsil-3/7, base of tongue-1/7, and neck (unknown primary site)-3/7. Despite the occasional resemblance to mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), the tumors showed focal keratinizing morphology and atypia, and all tumors were negative for MAML2 rearrangements. Oropharyngeal and neck tumors were uniformly p16 positive and showed punctate staining by in situ hybridization for high risk HPV DNA. There were two distant metastases (lung), and one tumor related death. Thus, ciliated AsqCA are HPV-associated lesions that pose unique pitfalls, closely mimicking MEC and other salivary gland tumors. These tumors add to the list of those which defy the dogma that ciliated epithelium always equates to a benign process. PMID:26411881

  8. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective.

  9. Association of human papillomavirus and Chlamydia trachomatis with intraepithelial alterations in cervix samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlmeister, Denise; Vianna, Débora Renz Barreto; Helfer, Virgínia Etges; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes; Barcellos, Regina Bones; Rossetti, Maria Lucia; Calil, Luciane Noal; Buffon, Andréia; Pilger, Diogo André

    2016-01-01

    The influence of different infectious agents and their association with human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical carcinogenesis have not been completely elucidated. This study describes the association between cytological changes in cervical epithelium and the detection of the most relevant aetiological agents of sexually transmitted diseases. Samples collected from 169 patients were evaluated by conventional cytology followed by molecular analysis to detect HPV DNA, Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2,Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, andTreponema pallidum, besides genotyping for most common high-risk HPV. An association between cytological lesions and different behavioural habits such as smoking and sedentariness was observed. Intraepithelial lesions were also associated with HPV and C. trachomatis detection. An association was also found between both simple and multiple genotype infection and cytological changes. The investigation of HPV and C. trachomatisproved its importance and may be considered in the future for including in screening programs, since these factors are linked to the early diagnosis of patients with precursor lesions of cervical cancer. PMID:26841046

  10. Implications of the Virginia human papillomavirus vaccine mandate for parental vaccine acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Margaret Jane; Adams Tufts, Kimberly

    2013-05-01

    In 2009, Virginia became the first state in the United States to enact a school vaccine mandate for the human papillomavirus (HPV), putting it at the forefront of the national HPV vaccine mandate controversy. It is critical to explore the public response and sensemaking where the mandate has already been enacted. Thus, we conducted 8 focus group discussions among 33 Virginia parents to explore how they conceptualized the virus and vaccine and their responses to the mandate. Findings suggest that many parents are skeptical of and reluctant to follow a state-mandated vaccine requirement, choosing instead to opt out of the vaccine until they decide the time is right for their daughter and/or until they feel confident in their knowledge about the virus, vaccine, and the impetus for the mandate. Study results can inform future legislation among states considering HPV-related mandates and aid in the development of health-promotion materials within the context of a state mandate. PMID:23275459

  11. Prevalence of human papillomavirus types in cervical cancerous and precancerous lesions of Ecuadorian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Lorena; Muñoz, Diana; Trueba, Gabriel; Tinoco, Leopoldo; Zapata, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide and it is responsible for most cases of uterine cancer. In Ecuador there is limited information about HPV types (and variants) in cancerous lesions; however, identifying the type-specific HPV prevalence in cervical lesions of women living in Ecuador is important to better predict the impact of HPV prophylactic vaccination in this country. We studied the prevalence of HPV types in cervical cancerous or precancerous lesions from 164 Ecuadorian women and found that 86.0% were HPV positive. The most common types were HPV16 (41.8%) and HPV58 (30.5%). Interestingly, HPV18 was detected only in 2.8% of the HPV-positive samples. Fifteen DNA sequences (genes E6 and L1) from 16 samples positive for HPV16 belonged to the European lineage, considered one of the least carcinogenic lineages, and 1 (6.25%) to the Asian-American lineage. Similar analysis in 12 HPV58 positive samples showed that 10 (83.3%) sequences grouped in sublineage A2, which belongs to the oldest HPV58 lineage, 1 belonged to A3 and 1 to lineage C. This study suggests that the currently used HPV vaccines (bivalent and tetravalent) may have lower effectiveness in Ecuador than in other geographic locations where HPV18 is more prevalent. PMID:26113443

  12. Human papillomavirus genotyping by multiplex pyrosequencing in cervical cancer patients from India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cheryl M Travasso; Mona Anand Mansi; Mansi Samarth; Aditi Deshpande; Chandan Kumar-Sinha

    2008-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in India. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the causative agent of cervical cancer; and infection with the high-risk genotypes, predominantly HPV16 and 18, is the biggest risk factor. Vaccines targeting HPV16 and 18 have been found to confer protection in large-scale clinical trials. HPV genotyping has traditionally been carried out to screen the population “at risk” using indirect methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using consensus primers combined with various DNA hybridization techniques, and often followed by the sequencing of candidate products. Recently, a high-throughput and direct method based on DNA sequencing has been described for HPV genotyping using multiplex pyrosequencing. We present a pilot study on HPV genotyping of cervical cancer and non-malignant cervical samples using multiplex pyrosequencing. Using genomic DNA from cell lines, cervical biopsies, surgical tissues or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples, we could successfully resolve 6 different HPV types out of the 7 tested, with their prevalence found to be in agreement with earlier reports. We also resolved coinfections with two different HPV types in several samples. An HPV16 genotype with a specific and recurrent sequence variation was observed in 8 cancer samples and one non-malignant sample. We find this technique eminently suited for high-throughput applications, which can be easily extended to large sample cohorts to determine a robust benchmark for HPV genotypes prevalent in India.

  13. A comprehensive review on host genetic susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection and progression to cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Chattopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. This is caused by oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Although large numbers of young sexually active women get HPV-infected, only a small fraction develop cervical cancer. This points to different co-factors for regression of HPV infection or progression to cervical cancer. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases such as cervical cancer and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. The aim of this review is to compile the advances in the field of host genetics of cervical cancer. MEDLINE database was searched using the terms, ′HPV′, ′cervical′, ′CIN′, ′polymorphism(s′, ′cervical′ + FNx01the name of the geneFNx01 and ′HPV′ + FNx01the name of the geneFNx01. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to cervical cancer in HPV infected individuals.

  14. Determination of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Genotypes in Anogenital Cancers in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu Mu Shwe; Hlaing Myat Thu; Khin Saw Aye; Aye Aye Myint; Mya Thida; Khin Shwe Mar; Khin Khin Oo; Khin Sandar Aye; Okada, Shigeru; Kyaw Zin Thant

    2016-04-01

    Molecular and epidemiologic investigations suggest a causal role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in anogenital cancers. This study identified oncogenic HPV genotypes in anogenital cancers among men and women in a 2013 cross-sectional descriptive study in Myanmar. In total, 100 biopsy tissues of histologically confirmed anogenital cancers collected in 2008-2012 were studied, including 30 penile and 9 anal cancers from Yangon General Hospital and 61 vulvar cancers from Central Women's Hospital, Yangon. HPV-DNA testing and genotyping were performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Overall, 34% of anogenital cancers were HPV-positive. HPV was found in 44.4% of anal (4/9), 36.1% of vulvar (22/61), and 26.7% of penile (8/30) cancers. The most frequent genotypes in anal cancers were HPV 16 (75% ) and 18 (25% ). In vulvar cancers, HPV 33 was most common (40.9% ), followed by 16 (31.8% ), 31 (22.7% ), and 18 (4.6% ). In penile cancers, HPV 16 (62.5% ) was most common, followed by 33 (25% ) and 18 (12.5% ). This is the first report of evidencebased oncogenic HPV genotypes in anogenital cancers among men and women in Myanmar. This research provides valuable information for understanding the burden of HPV-associated cancers of the anus, penis, and vulva and considering the effectiveness of prophylactic HPV vaccination. PMID:27094835

  15. Human papillomavirus infection in a population-based sample of women in Algiers, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammouda, Doudja; Clifford, Gary M; Pallardy, Sophie; Ayyach, Ghassan; Chékiri, Asma; Boudrich, Arab; Snijders, Peter J F; van Kemenade, Folkert J; Meijer, Chris J L M; Bouhadef, Anissa; Zitouni, Zahia; Habib, Djamila; Ikezaren, Nadia; Franceschi, Silvia

    2011-05-01

    No data exist on the population prevalence of, nor risk factors for, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the predominantly Muslim countries of Northern Africa. Cervical specimens were obtained from 759 married women aged 15-65 years from the general population of Algiers, Algeria. Liquid-based cytology and HPV DNA detection, using a GP5+/6+-based polymerase chain reaction assay that detects 44 HPV types, were performed according to the standardized protocol of the International Agency for Research on Cancer HPV Prevalence Surveys. HPV prevalence in the general population was 6.3% (4.0% of high-risk types), with no significant variation by age. The prevalence of cervical abnormalities was 3.6%. HPV positivity was significantly higher among divorced women, women in polygamous marriages and those reporting husband's extramarital sexual relationships. HPV16/18 accounted for only 15% of HPV-positive women in the general population, compared with 77% of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed in the same city. In conclusion, we report that HPV infection among married women in Algeria is much lower than in sub-Saharan Africa and also lower than in the majority of high-resource countries. PMID:20607828

  16. The CD63-Syntenin-1 Complex Controls Post-Endocytic Trafficking of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräßel, Linda; Fast, Laura Aline; Scheffer, Konstanze D; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Spoden, Gilles A; Tenzer, Stefan; Boller, Klaus; Bago, Ruzica; Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Berditchevski, Fedor; Florin, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses enter host cells via a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway involving tetraspanin proteins. However, post-endocytic trafficking required for virus capsid disassembly remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the early trafficking pathway of internalised HPV particles involves tetraspanin CD63, syntenin-1 and ESCRT-associated adaptor protein ALIX. Following internalisation, viral particles are found in CD63-positive endosomes recruiting syntenin-1, a CD63-interacting adaptor protein. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence experiments indicate that the CD63-syntenin-1 complex controls delivery of internalised viral particles to multivesicular endosomes. Accordingly, infectivity of high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 31 as well as disassembly and post-uncoating processing of viral particles was markedly suppressed in CD63 or syntenin-1 depleted cells. Our analyses also present the syntenin-1 interacting protein ALIX as critical for HPV infection and CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex formation as a prerequisite for intracellular transport enabling viral capsid disassembly. Thus, our results identify the CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex as a key regulatory component in post-endocytic HPV trafficking. PMID:27578500

  17. Biological Features of Human Papillomavirus-related Head and Neck Cancers Contributing to Improved Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, C; Leeman, J E; Higginson, D S; Katabi, N; Sherman, E; Morris, L; McBride, S; Lee, N; Riaz, N

    2016-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are the sixth most common malignancy globally, and an increasing proportion of oropharyngeal HNSCCs are associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Patients with HPV-associated tumours have markedly improved overall and disease-specific survival compared with their HPV-negative counterparts when treated with chemoradiation. Although the difference in outcomes between these two groups is clearly established, the mechanism underlying these differences remains an area of investigation. Data from preclinical, clinical and genomics studies have started to suggest that an increase in radio-sensitivity of HPV-positive HNSCC may be responsible for improved outcomes, the putative mechanisms of which we will review here. The Cancer Genome Atlas and others have recently documented a multitude of molecular differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumours. Preclinical investigations by multiple groups have explored possible mechanisms of increased sensitivity to therapy, including examining differences in DNA repair, hypoxia and the immune response. In addition to differences in the response to therapy, some groups have started to investigate phenotypic differences between the two diseases, such as tumour invasiveness. Finally, we will conclude with a brief review of ongoing clinical trials that are attempting to de-escalate treatment to minimise long-term toxicity while maintaining cure rates. New insights from preclinical and genomic studies may eventually lead to personalised treatment paradigms for HPV-positive patients. PMID:27052795

  18. Treatment of anal human papillomavirus-associated disease: a long term outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, M; Hickey, N; Mayuranathan, L; Vowler, S L; Singh, N

    2008-07-01

    Treatment for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal canal disease has been unsatisfactory. The objective of our study was to determine the treatment outcome in our cohort with anal HPV disease. Overall, 181 patients were evaluated over a median period of 19.1 months (range = 2.8-125.5). Eighty-eight patients (48.6%) with high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and 82 patients (45.3%) with low-grade AIN underwent treatment. One hundred and forty-one patients (77.9%) received laser ablative treatment as an outpatient procedure. The treatment yielded cure, defined as a disease-free state at 12 months after treatment, in 63.0% (114/181). Median time to cure for the cohort was 31.5 months (95% confidence interval: 23.0-40.0). Treatment outcome showed no evidence of being affected by age, sexual preference, history of smoking or presence of high-grade disease. Median time to cure was significantly affected by a positive HIV status (P = 0.02) and the extent (volume) of the disease (P = 0.01). Contrary to the current view that treatment of HPV-related anal disease is difficult, unrewarding due to recurrences and may lead to substantial morbidity, we demonstrate that effective treatment is possible for both low- and high-grade AIN. These findings should help with the general desire to introduce screening for AIN for at-risk groups. PMID:18574114

  19. Human papillomavirus in anal squamous cell carcinoma: an angel rather than a devil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenda, Paola Simona; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Nicola; Barberis, Massimo; Bottiglieri, Luca; Chiocca, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancer is a rare disease with an increasing incidence worldwide but, unfortunately, even today the scientific community still has a limited knowledge and limited options of treatment. More than 50% of patients with anal cancer presenting at diagnosis with locoregional disease have good chances of cure with chemoradiotherapy (CT-RT). However, once patients develop metastatic spread, the prognosis is very poor. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is present in more than 80% of anal cancers and while multiple etiologic connections between HPV infection and anal cancer have already been well elucidated, its prognostic and/or predictive role is currently under investigation, especially among immunocompetent patients affected by this disease. In a single-institutional set, we have retrospectively analysed clinical data of 50 consecutive cases homogeneously treated with CT-RT for stage I-III anal squamous cell carcinoma. We found that HPV-positive anal cancers had a statistically significant improved five-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to HPV-negative group. These findings could be explained by an increased chemo/radiosensitivity of HPV-positive tumours. Further efforts should be directed towards a better understanding of HPV-related oncogenesis and towards designing novel tailored strategies for the management of this disease both in terms of prevention and treatment. PMID:25987898

  20. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 perturbs DREAM to promote cellular proliferation and mitotic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCaprio, J A

    2014-07-31

    The study of the small DNA tumor viruses continues to provide valuable new insights into oncogenesis and fundamental biological processes. Although much has already been revealed about how the human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can transform cells and contribute to cervical and oropharyngeal cancer, there clearly is much more to learn. In this issue of Oncogene, Pang et al., doi:10.1038/onc.2013.426, demonstrate that the high-risk HPV16 E7 oncogene can promote cellular proliferation by interacting with the DREAM (DP, RB-like, E2F and MuvB) complex at two distinct phases of the cell cycle. Consistent with earlier work, HPV16 E7 can bind to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) family member p130 (RBL2) protein and promote its proteasome-mediated destruction thereby disrupting the DREAM complex and can prevent exit from the cell cycle into quiescence. In addition, they demonstrate that HPV16 E7 can bind to MuvB core complex in association with BMYB and FOXM1 and activate gene expression during the G2 and M phase of the cell cycle. Thus, HPV16 E7 acts to prevent exit from the cell cycle entry and promotes mitotic proliferation and may account for the high levels of FOXM1 often observed in poor-risk cervical cancers. PMID:24166507

  1. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 perturbs DREAM to promote cellular proliferation and mitotic gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCaprio, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Study of the small DNA tumor viruses continues to provide valuable new insights into oncogenesis and fundamental biological processes. While much has already been revealed about how the human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can transform cells and contribute to cervical and oropharyngeal cancer, there clearly is much more to learn. In this issue of Oncogene, Pang et al. demonstrate that the high-risk HPV16 E7 oncogene can promote cellular proliferation by interacting with the DREAM (DP, RB-like, E2F and MuvB) complex at two distinct phases of the cell cycle (1). Consistent with earlier work, HPV16 E7 can bind to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) family member p130 (RBL2) protein and promote its proteasome-mediated destruction thereby disrupting the DREAM complex and prevent exit from the cell cycle into quiescence. In addition, they demonstrate that HPV16 E7 can bind to MuvB core complex in association with BMYB and FOXM1 and activate gene expression during the G2 and M phase of the cell cycle. Thus, HPV16 E7 acts to prevent exit from the cell cycle entry and promotes mitotic proliferation and may account for the high levels of FOXM1 often observed in poor risk cervical cancers. PMID:24166507

  2. Association of human papillomavirus and Chlamydia trachomatis with intraepithelial alterations in cervix samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Wohlmeister

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different infectious agents and their association with human papillomavirus (HPV in cervical carcinogenesis have not been completely elucidated. This study describes the association between cytological changes in cervical epithelium and the detection of the most relevant aetiological agents of sexually transmitted diseases. Samples collected from 169 patients were evaluated by conventional cytology followed by molecular analysis to detect HPV DNA, Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2,Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, andTreponema pallidum, besides genotyping for most common high-risk HPV. An association between cytological lesions and different behavioural habits such as smoking and sedentariness was observed. Intraepithelial lesions were also associated with HPV and C. trachomatis detection. An association was also found between both simple and multiple genotype infection and cytological changes. The investigation of HPV and C. trachomatisproved its importance and may be considered in the future for including in screening programs, since these factors are linked to the early diagnosis of patients with precursor lesions of cervical cancer.

  3. Association of human papillomavirus and Chlamydia trachomatis with intraepithelial alterations in cervix samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlmeister, Denise; Vianna, Débora Renz Barreto; Helfer, Virgínia Etges; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes; Barcellos, Regina Bones; Rossetti, Maria Lucia; Calil, Luciane Noal; Buffon, Andréia; Pilger, Diogo André

    2016-02-01

    The influence of different infectious agents and their association with human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical carcinogenesis have not been completely elucidated. This study describes the association between cytological changes in cervical epithelium and the detection of the most relevant aetiological agents of sexually transmitted diseases. Samples collected from 169 patients were evaluated by conventional cytology followed by molecular analysis to detect HPV DNA, Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2,Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, andTreponema pallidum, besides genotyping for most common high-risk HPV. An association between cytological lesions and different behavioural habits such as smoking and sedentariness was observed. Intraepithelial lesions were also associated with HPV and C. trachomatis detection. An association was also found between both simple and multiple genotype infection and cytological changes. The investigation of HPV and C. trachomatisproved its importance and may be considered in the future for including in screening programs, since these factors are linked to the early diagnosis of patients with precursor lesions of cervical cancer. PMID:26841046

  4. The Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus between the Neonates and Their Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczyński, Mariusz; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna; Kwaśniewska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection on pregnancy is a major problem of medicine. The transmission of the virus from mother to fetus is a process yet unresolved. The immune response and changed hormonal status of pregnant women might facilitate infection. A research on the prevalence of HPV infection was conducted at the Clinic of Obstetrics, Medical University of Lublin (Poland). The studied group included 152 randomly selected women. The material was tested for the presence of HPV DNA by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The aim of the research was to assess the relation between HPV infections detected in the buccal smears of the neonates and the incidence of such infections in the cervical/buccal smears of their mothers. In the group of 152 infants HPV was found in 16 (10.53%). Among the cervical/buccal smears, HPV was isolated, respectively, in 24 (15.79%) and in 19 (12.5%) pregnant women. Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of HPV swabs from the newborns and the cervical/buccal smears of their mothers were found (p < 0.001). The identification of mothers in whose buccal smears HPV was detected can help develop a group of children who run a relatively significant risk of being infected. PMID:26713313

  5. Human papillomavirus-16 presence and physical status in lung carcinomas from Asia

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    Morewaya Jacob

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although human papillomavirus (HPV genome has been detected in lung cancer, its prevalence is highly variable around the world. Higher frequencies have been reported in far-east Asian countries, when compared with European countries. The present study analysed the HPV-16 presence in 60 lung carcinomas from the Asian countries China, Pakistan and Papua New Guinea. Results HPV-16 was present in 8/59 (13% samples. According to histological type, HPV-16 was detected in 8/18 (44% squamous cell carcinomas (SQCs, which were mainly from Pakistan; 0/38 (0% adenocarcinomas (ACs, which were mainly from China; and in 0/4 (0% small cell carcinomas (SCLCs. The observed histological difference was statistically significant (p Conclusion These results support the notion that HPV-16 infection is highly associated with SQCs in Pakistan. Our results show a frequent HPV-16 integration in SQCs, although the low viral load casts doubt respect a direct etiological role of HPV in lung carcinomas from Asia. Additional HPV-16 characterization is necessary to establish a direct or indirect etiological role of HPV in this malignancy.

  6. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study

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    Bernabe-Dones, Raul D.; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Villar-Prados, Alejandro; Lacourt-Ventura, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Arroyo, Heriberto; Fonseca-Williams, Sharon; Velazquez, Francisco E.; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Lopez-Diaz, Sofia M.; Rodríguez, Nayra; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45) and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36) was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2%) CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males) and in 1 of 36 (2.8%) controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males) with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49). HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted. PMID:26904111

  7. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study

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    Raul D. Bernabe-Dones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC. In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45 and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36 was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2% CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males and in 1 of 36 (2.8% controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49. HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted.

  8. CONSTRUCTION AND IMMUNOGENICITY OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE 6B L1 RECOMBINANT PLASMID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Liu; Jia-bi Wang; Ya-gang Zuo; Yue-hua Liu; Dong-lai Ma

    2004-01-01

    Objective To construct a DNA vaccine as a prophylactic model to prevent condyloma acuminatum and detect its immunogenicity in mice.Methods The major capsid protein (L1) gene of human papillomavirus (HPV) 6b was inserted into an eukaryotic expression plasmid (pcDNA3.1). The recombinant plasmid was transfected into COS-7 cells. Western blot were performed to detect whether L1 protein can be expressed in eukaryotic cells. Eighteen female BALB/c mice were tested for immunogenicity study.Results The recombinant plasmid (pcDNA3.1-HPV6bL1) was verified as HPV6b L1 gene by sequencing. Western blot showed specific strip. Anti-L1 protein antibodies could be detected in the mice's sera inoculated with pcDNA3.1-HPV6bL1.Similarly, IL-4, IL-2, and IFN-γ were increased in the same mice.Conclusion HPV6b L1 recombinant plasmid was constructed successfully which had immunogenicity for BALB/c mice. It provided experimental evidence for the research of DNA vaccine of condyloma acuminata.

  9. The efficacy and safety of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus 6/11/16/18 vaccine gardasil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Richard M; Sings, Heather L

    2011-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection causes cervical cancer, a significant portion of anal, genital, and oropharyngeal cancers, genital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. In June 2006, a quadrivalent HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (Gardasil/Silgard) was licensed in the United States, and subsequently in the European Union (September 2006). It has since been approved in 121 countries, with >74 million doses distributed globally as of March 2011. As the incidence of HPV infection peaks 5-10 years after the onset of sexual activity, preadolescents and adolescents represent an appropriate target group to implement HPV vaccination programs so as to achieve the maximal public health benefit. In this article, we provide an overview of the prophylactic efficacy of the vaccine in young women who were found to be negative to at least one of the four vaccine HPV types, thus approximating sexually naive adolescents. Because adolescents are also at high risk for other infections which are preventable by currently available vaccines, the development of concurrent immunization strategies may lead to better compliance, thereby contributing to the overall goal of protection against preventable diseases. We also summarize concomitant administration studies with meningococcal, diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines, which were conducted in adolescents aged 9-15 years. Prophylactic efficacy in other populations (males aged 16-26 years) is also summarized along with long-term safety and efficacy studies. PMID:22018560

  10. Knowledge and acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in Karnataka, India.

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    Montgomery, Martha P; Dune, Tanaka; Shetty, Prasanna K; Shetty, Avinash K

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in India; however, participation in prevention and screening is low and the reasons for this are not well understood. In a cross-sectional survey in August 2008, 202 healthy women in Karnataka, India completed a questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Factors associated with vaccination and Papanicolau (Pap) smear screening acceptance were explored. Thirty-six percent of women had heard of HPV while 15% had heard of cervical cancer. Five percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, and 4% of women felt at risk of HPV infection. Forty-six percent of women were accepting of vaccination, but fewer (21%) were willing to have a Pap smear. Overall, knowledge related to HPV and cervical cancer topics was low. Women with negative attitudes toward HPV infection were 5.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-10) times more likely to accept vaccination but were not significantly more likely to accept Pap smear (odds ratio 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.0). Cost and a low level of perceived risk were the most frequent factors cited as potential barriers. Improving awareness of HPV and cervical cancer through health care providers in addition to increasing access to vaccination and screening through government-sponsored programs may be feasible and effective methods to reduce cervical cancer burden in India. PMID:25355525

  11. The human papillomavirus vaccine: A powerful tool for the primary prevention of cervical cancer.

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    Nubia Muñoz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine is the most promissory public health tool for primary prevention of cervical cancer. Immunization of females before the acquisition of HPV infection has the greatest impact in preventing pre-neoplasic lesions and cervical cancer. Current HPV vaccines do not eliminate cervical cancer risk, therefore, screening should continue covering vaccinated as well as women that do not get the vaccine. The strategies that include combination of high-coverage vaccination of HPV-unexposed adolescents with screening using methods with higher sensitivity than cytology as HPV test may be more cost-effective than the strategies currently used. The cytology-based screening programs of Latin America countries including Colombia are very ineffective. The evidence in favor of the cost-effectiveness of other screening strategies such as HPV tests and visual inspection followed by immediate treatment for women with difficult access to health care services in developing countries warrants the immediate revision of the current strategies.

  12. Insights into the mechanism of human papillomavirus E2-induced procaspase-8 activation and cell death.

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    Singh, Nitu; Senapati, Sanjib; Bose, Kakoli

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) E2 protein, the master regulator of viral life cycle, induces apoptosis of host cell that is independent of its virus-associated regulatory functions. E2 protein of HR-HPV18 has been found to be involved in novel FADD-independent activation of caspase-8, however, the molecular basis of this unique non-death-fold E2-mediated apoptosis is poorly understood. Here, with an interdisciplinary approach that involves in silico, mutational, biochemical and biophysical probes, we dissected and characterized the E2-procasapse-8 binding interface. Our data demonstrate direct non-homotypic interaction of HPV18 E2 transactivation domain (TAD) with α2/α5 helices of procaspase-8 death effector domain-B (DED-B). The observed interaction mimics the homotypic DED-DED complexes, wherein the conserved hydrophobic motif of procaspase-8 DED-B (F122/L123) occupies a groove between α2/α3 helices of E2 TAD. This interaction possibly drives DED oligomerization leading to caspase-8 activation and subsequent cell death. Furthermore, our data establish a model for E2-induced apoptosis in HR-HPV types and provide important clues for designing E2 analogs that might modulate procaspase-8 activation and hence apoptosis. PMID:26906543

  13. Hypermutation in the E2 gene of human papillomavirus type 16 in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

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    Kukimoto, Iwao; Mori, Seiichiro; Aoyama, Satoru; Wakae, Kousho; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Kondo, Kazunari

    2015-10-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer. However, viral genetic changes during cervical carcinogenesis are not fully understood. Recent studies have revealed the presence of adenine/thymine-clustered hypermutation in the long control region of the HPV16 genome in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesions, and suggested that apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC) proteins, which play a key role in innate immunity against retroviral infection, potentially introduce such hypermutation. This study reports for the first time the detection of adenine/thymine-clustered hypermutation in the E2 gene of HPV16 isolated from clinical specimens with low- and high-grade CIN lesions (CIN1/3). Differential DNA denaturation PCR, which utilizes lower denaturation temperatures to selectively amplify adenine/thymine-rich DNA, identified clusters of adenine/thymine mutations in the E2 gene in 4 of 11 CIN1 (36.4%), and 6 of 27 CIN3 (22.2%) samples. Interestingly, the number of mutations per sample was higher in CIN3 than in CIN1. Although the relevance of E2 hypermutation in cervical carcinogenesis remains unclear, the observed hypermutation patterns strongly imply involvement of APOBEC3 proteins in editing the HPV16 genome during natural viral infection. PMID:25914233

  14. Manipulation of cellular DNA damage repair machinery facilitates propagation of human papillomaviruses.

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    Wallace, Nicholas A; Galloway, Denise A

    2014-06-01

    In general, the interplay among viruses and DNA damage repair (DDR) pathways can be divided based on whether the interaction promotes or inhibits the viral lifecycle. The propagation of human papillomaviruses is both promoted and inhibited by DDR proteins. As a result, HPV proteins both activate repair pathways, such as the ATM and ATR pathways, and inhibit other pathways, most notably the p53 signaling pathway. Indeed, the role of HPV proteins, with regard to the DDR pathways, can be divided into two broad categories. The first set of viral proteins, HPV E1 and E2 activate a DNA damage response and recruit repair proteins to viral replication centers, where these proteins are likely usurped to replicate the viral genome. Because the activation of the DDR response typically elicits a cell cycle arrest that would impeded the viral lifecycle, the second set of HPV proteins, HPV E6 and E7, prevents the DDR response from pausing cell cycle progression or inducing apoptosis. This review provides a detailed account of the interactions among HPV proteins and DDR proteins that facilitate HPV propagation. PMID:24412279

  15. Genetic variations of human papillomavirus type 16: implications for cervical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukimoto, Iwao; Muramatsu, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agent of cervical cancer, and among approximately 15 high-risk genotypes, HPV16 accounts for more than half the cases of cervical cancer worldwide. Recent progress in determining HPV genomic sequences from clinical samples has revealed a wide variety in HPV16 genome sequences, and has allowed for comprehensive classification of intratype HPV16 variants. These consist of four variant lineages containing nucleotide variations in 1.0%-10.0% of the complete viral genome sequence. Epidemiological data suggest that the non-European-Asian lineages of HPV16 entail a higher risk of progression to invasive cervical cancer than the European-Asian lineage. Deep sequencing analysis has recently demonstrated that HPV16 genome sequences are highly homogeneous in individual clinical specimens compared with those of RNA viruses. However, an extremely sensitive PCR method, differential DNA denaturation PCR, has detected hypermutations from C to T or G to A in the E2 gene and the long control region of the HPV16 genome, which suggests the involvement of cellular apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC) proteins in this hypermutation. The quasispecies status of the HPV16 genome in the infected cervix may affect the development of cervical cancer and warrants further investigation. PMID:25766614

  16. NRIP, a novel calmodulin binding protein, activates calcineurin to dephosphorylate human papillomavirus E2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Szu-Wei; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Lin, Chia-Yi; Chen, Show-Li

    2011-07-01

    Previously, we found a gene named nuclear receptor interaction protein (NRIP) (or DCAF6 or IQWD1). We demonstrate that NRIP is a novel binding protein for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) E2 protein. HPV-16 E2 and NRIP can directly associate into a complex in vivo and in vitro, and the N-terminal domain of NRIP interacts with the transactivation domain of HPV-16 E2. Only full-length NRIP can stabilize E2 protein and induce HPV gene expression, and NRIP silenced by two designed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) decreases E2 protein levels and E2-driven gene expression. We found that NRIP can directly bind with calmodulin in the presence of calcium through its IQ domain, resulting in decreased E2 ubiquitination and increased E2 protein stability. Complex formation between NRIP and calcium/calmodulin activates the phosphatase calcineurin to dephosphorylate E2 and increase E2 protein stability. We present evidences for E2 phosphorylation in vivo and show that NRIP acts as a scaffold to recruit E2 and calcium/calmodulin to prevent polyubiquitination and degradation of E2, enhancing E2 stability and E2-driven gene expression. PMID:21543494

  17. Additive Hazard Regression Models: An Application to the Natural History of Human Papillomavirus

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    Xianhong Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several statistical methods for time-to-event analysis, among which is the Cox proportional hazards model that is most commonly used. However, when the absolute change in risk, instead of the risk ratio, is of primary interest or when the proportional hazard assumption for the Cox proportional hazards model is violated, an additive hazard regression model may be more appropriate. In this paper, we give an overview of this approach and then apply a semiparametric as well as a nonparametric additive model to a data set from a study of the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV in HIV-positive and HIV-negative women. The results from the semiparametric model indicated on average an additional 14 oncogenic HPV infections per 100 woman-years related to CD4 count < 200 relative to HIV-negative women, and those from the nonparametric additive model showed an additional 40 oncogenic HPV infections per 100 women over 5 years of followup, while the estimated hazard ratio in the Cox model was 3.82. Although the Cox model can provide a better understanding of the exposure disease association, the additive model is often more useful for public health planning and intervention.

  18. PIK3CA, HRAS and PTEN in human papillomavirus positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent genomic evidence suggests frequent phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activation in human papillomavirus (HPV) positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Mutations/amplification of the gene encoding p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PIK3CA), loss of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and HRAS mutations are known to activate PI3K pathway. PIK3CA mutations were identified by Sanger sequencing in 23 of 75 (31%) HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas, including exon 9 (p.E545K [n = 10] and p.E542K [n = 5]) or exon 20 (p.H1047Y, n = 2) mutations. Five rare and one novel (p.R537Q) PIK3CA mutations were identified. HRAS mutation (p.Q61L) was detected in 1 of 62 tested cases. PIK3CA amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was identified in 4 cases (4/21, 20%), while PTEN loss was seen in 7 (7/21, 33%) cases (chromosome 10 monosomy [n = 4], homozygous deletion [n = 3]). Overall, genetic alterations that likely lead to PI3K pathway activation were identified in 34 of 75 cases (45%) and did not correlate with disease specific survival. These findings offer a molecular rationale for therapeutic targeting of PI3K pathway in patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma

  19. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed

  20. From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm

  1. Repression of the human papillomavirus type 18 enhancer by the cellular transcription factor Oct-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe-Seyler, F; Butz, K; zur Hausen, H

    1991-01-01

    The role of cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of the cancer-associated human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) is yet poorly understood. The presence of an Oct-1-binding site within the HPV18 upstream regulatory region led us to investigate the influence of Oct-1 on viral transcription. Cotransfection of Oct-1 expression plasmids together with luciferase reporter constructs containing HPV18 regulatory sequences indicated that Oct-1 can transcriptionally repress the HPV18 upstream regulatory region. In contrast, heterologous control regions were not affected by Oct-1. HPV18 cis elements that can be repressed by Oct-1 mapped to a 135-bp subregion of the viral constitutive enhancer. Analysis of an Oct-1 mutant defective in DNA binding suggested that HPV18 down-modulation does not require direct binding of Oct-1 to DNA. These results make Oct-1 a candidate factor involved in the intracellular surveillance of HPV18 transcription and support the notion of a host cell mechanism that can specifically repress HPV E6-E7 transforming gene expression. Images PMID:1654457

  2. Human papillomavirus genotype prevalence in invasive penile cancers from a registry-based United States population

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    BrendaYHernandez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human papillomavirus (HPV is estimated to play an etiologic role in 40%-50% of penile cancers worldwide. Estimates of HPV prevalence in U.S. penile cancer cases are limited. Methods. HPV DNA was evaluated in tumor tissue from 79 invasive penile cancer patients diagnosed in 1998-2005 within the catchment areas of 7 U.S. cancer registries. HPV was genotyped using PCR-based Linear Array and INNO-LiPA assays and compared by demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics and survival. Histological classification was also obtained by independent pathology review. Results. HPV DNA was present in 50 of 79 (63% of invasive penile cancer cases. Sixteen viral genotypes were detected. HPV 16, found in 46% (36/79 of all cases (72% of HPV-positive cases was the most prevalent genotype followed equally by HPV 18, 33, and 45, which each comprised 5% of all cases. Multiple genotypes were detected in 18% of viral positive cases. HPV prevalence did not significantly vary by age, race/ethnicity, population size of geographic region, cancer stage, histology, grade, penile subsite, or prior cancer history. Penile cases diagnosed in more recent years were more likely to be HPV positive. Overall survival did not significantly vary by HPV status. Conclusions. The relatively high prevalence of HPV in our study population provides limited evidence of a more prominent and, possibly, increasing role of infection in penile carcinogenesis in the U.S. compared to other parts of the world.

  3. From Human Papillomavirus (HPV Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice

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    Sin Hang Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm.

  4. Human Papillomavirus: Current and Future RNAi Therapeutic Strategies for Cervical Cancer

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    Hun Soon Jung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are small DNA viruses; some oncogenic ones can cause different types of cancer, in particular cervical cancer. HPV-associated carcinogenesis provides a classical model system for RNA interference (RNAi based cancer therapies, because the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 that cause cervical cancer are expressed only in cancerous cells. Previous studies on the development of therapeutic RNAi facilitated the advancement of therapeutic siRNAs and demonstrated its versatility by siRNA-mediated depletion of single or multiple cellular/viral targets. Sequence-specific gene silencing using RNAi shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of diseases that currently lack effective treatments. However, siRNA-based targeting requires further validation of its efficacy in vitro and in vivo, for its potential off-target effects, and of the design of conventional therapies to be used in combination with siRNAs and their drug delivery vehicles. In this review we discuss what is currently known about HPV-associated carcinogenesis and the potential for combining siRNA with other treatment strategies for the development of future therapies. Finally, we present our assessment of the most promising path to the development of RNAi therapeutic strategies for clinical settings.

  5. Association between human papillomavirus (HPV and the oral squamous cell carcinoma: a systematic review

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    Marcos Antonio Pereira de Lima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV is an epitheliotropic agent whose high-risk genotypes have a well-established link with the development of cervical cancer. Although the relation of HPV to the oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC has been studied since the beginning of the 1980s, its role in the oral carcinogenesis and the probable underlying molecular mechanisms are still not fully elucidated. We performed a systematic review of the worldwide scientific literature, published until the preparation of the present paper, concerning the association of HPV with OSCC, scrutinizing the samples, prevalence levels, the techniques utilized and relevant findings of the studies. The results showed that HPV is associated with approximately one quarter of OSCCs. Another interesting feature is the distinct pattern of infection in these oral tumors, including the participation of genotypes that are uncommon in cervical malignant lesions, such as HPV-38, 44, 53 and 70. Equally interesting is the possibility of carcinogenic action without the occurrence of viral integration, verified by the high expression of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA of E6 and E7 from high-risk genotypes in cases whose virus remain in the episomal form. These findings support the assumption of HPV involvement in the genesis of OSCC, whereas warn about the possibility of unexpected viral behaviors that sometimes are not perceived or understood due to the technological limitations of the time and to the shortage of studies with the adequate approaches.

  6. Prevalence of human papillomavirus cervical infection in an Italian asymptomatic population

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    Sirito Rodolfo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last decade many studies have definitely shown that human papillomaviruses (HPVs are the major cause of cervical carcinogenesis and, in the last few years, HPV testing has been proposed as a new and more powerful tool for cervical cancer screening. This issue is now receiving considerable attention in scientific and non scientific press and HPV testing could be considered the most important change in this field since the introduction of cervical cytology. This paper reports our prevalence data of HPV infection collected in the '90s, while a follow up of these patients is ongoing. Methods For this study we used polymerase chain reaction (PCR to search HPV DNA sequences in cervical cell scrapings obtained from 503 asymptomatic women attending regular cervical cancer screening program in the city of Genova, Italy. All patients were also submitted to a self-administered, standardized, questionnaire regarding their life style and sexual activity. On the basis of the presence of HPV DNA sequences women were separated into two groups: "infected" and "non infected" and a statistical analysis of the factors potentially associated with the infection group membership was carried out. Results The infection rate was 15.9% and the most frequent viral type was HPV 16. Conclusion Our HPV positivity rate (15.9% was consistent to that reported by other studies on European populations.

  7. Structural comparison of four different antibodies interacting with human papillomavirus 16 and mechanisms of neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was used to solve the structures of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) complexed with fragments of antibody (Fab) from three different neutralizing monoclonals (mAbs): H16.1A, H16.14J, and H263.A2. The structure-function analysis revealed predominantly monovalent binding of each Fab with capsid interactions that involved multiple loops from symmetry related copies of the major capsid protein. The residues identified in each Fab-virus interface map to a conformational groove on the surface of the capsomer. In addition to the known involvement of the FG and HI loops, the DE loop was also found to constitute the core of each epitope. Surprisingly, the epitope mapping also identified minor contributions by EF and BC loops. Complementary immunological assays included mAb and Fab neutralization. The specific binding characteristics of mAbs correlated with different neutralizing behaviors in pre- and post-attachment neutralization assays. - Highlights: • We present HPV16-Fab complexes from neutralizing mAbs: H16.1A, H16.14J, and H263.A2. • The structure-function analysis revealed predominantly monovalent binding of each mAb. • Capsid–Fab interactions involved multiple loops from symmetry related L1 proteins. • Besides the known FG and HI loops, epitope mapping also identified DE, EF, and BC loops. • Neutralizing assays complement the structures to show multiple neutralization mechanisms

  8. Epidemiology and Natural History of Human Papillomavirus Infections in the Female Genital Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is the most common newly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Although the majority of sexually active adults will be infected with HPV at least once in their lives, it is sexually active women less than 25 years of age who consistently have the highest rates of infection. Besides youth and gender, common risk factors for HPV infection and clinical sequelae of infection include high number of sexual partners and coinfection with Chlamydia trachomatis or herpes simplex virus. Most HPV infections are cleared by the immune system and do not result in clinical complications. Clinical sequelae in cases of low-risk HPV infection consist of genital warts, and clinical manifestations of high-risk HPV infection include abnormal Pap test results, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL, and cervical cancer. LSIL, HSIL, and cervical cancer carry significant morbidity and/or mortality; genital warts and abnormal Pap test results are often significant sources of psychosocial distress. Currently, there are neither effective means of preventing HPV transmission nor cures for clinical manifestations: infection can only be prevented via complete sexual abstinence, while treatment for clinical sequelae such as genital warts and cytologic abnormalities consists of removing the problematic cells and watching for recurrence; this method consumes significant health care resources and is costly. New prophylactic HPV vaccines promise to dramatically reduce the incidence of HPV infection, genital warts, and cytologic abnormalities.

  9. Human papillomavirus infection in male patients with STI-related symptoms in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hai Ha Long; Bi, Xiuqiong; Ishizaki, Azumi; Van Le, Hung; Nguyen, Trung Vu; Hosaka, Norimitsu; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the prevalence, genotypes, and risk factors for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Hanoi, Vietnam. The study included 192 males (mean age, 32.9 years) with symptoms related to sexually transmitted infections (STI). Urinary, penile, and urethral samples were collected in April and May, 2014. HPV DNA was detected with PCR, performed with modified and/or original GP5(+) /GP6(+) primers. HPV genotypes were determined with a gene array assay. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) DNA were detected with loop-mediated isothermal amplification. HPV DNA, NG, and CT were detected in 48 (25.0%), 23 (12.0%), and 41 (21.4%) patients, respectively. HPV DNA appeared in penile samples (21.0%, 39/186) more frequently than in urinary (3.1%, 6/191, P infections were determined in 33.3% and 64.6%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of HPV infection in urethra with younger sexual debut age. HPV52 was the most prevalent high-risk HPV genotype, whereas HPV16 was less common in the male Vietnamese patients with STI-related symptoms. Younger sexual-debut age was a risk factor for HPV infection in urethra. J. Med. Virol. 88:1059-1066, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26519942

  10. Structural comparison of four different antibodies interacting with human papillomavirus 16 and mechanisms of neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Jian [Department of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Bywaters, Stephanie M.; Brendle, Sarah A. [Department of Pathology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Lee, Hyunwook; Ashley, Robert E. [Department of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Makhov, Alexander M.; Conway, James F. [Department of Structural Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3501 5th Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Christensen, Neil D. [Department of Pathology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Hafenstein, Susan, E-mail: shafenstein@hmc.psu.edu [Department of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was used to solve the structures of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) complexed with fragments of antibody (Fab) from three different neutralizing monoclonals (mAbs): H16.1A, H16.14J, and H263.A2. The structure-function analysis revealed predominantly monovalent binding of each Fab with capsid interactions that involved multiple loops from symmetry related copies of the major capsid protein. The residues identified in each Fab-virus interface map to a conformational groove on the surface of the capsomer. In addition to the known involvement of the FG and HI loops, the DE loop was also found to constitute the core of each epitope. Surprisingly, the epitope mapping also identified minor contributions by EF and BC loops. Complementary immunological assays included mAb and Fab neutralization. The specific binding characteristics of mAbs correlated with different neutralizing behaviors in pre- and post-attachment neutralization assays. - Highlights: • We present HPV16-Fab complexes from neutralizing mAbs: H16.1A, H16.14J, and H263.A2. • The structure-function analysis revealed predominantly monovalent binding of each mAb. • Capsid–Fab interactions involved multiple loops from symmetry related L1 proteins. • Besides the known FG and HI loops, epitope mapping also identified DE, EF, and BC loops. • Neutralizing assays complement the structures to show multiple neutralization mechanisms.

  11. Structural comparison of four different antibodies interacting with human papillomavirus 16 and mechanisms of neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian; Bywaters, Stephanie M; Brendle, Sarah A; Lee, Hyunwook; Ashley, Robert E; Makhov, Alexander M; Conway, James F; Christensen, Neil D; Hafenstein, Susan

    2015-09-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was used to solve the structures of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) complexed with fragments of antibody (Fab) from three different neutralizing monoclonals (mAbs): H16.1A, H16.14J, and H263.A2. The structure-function analysis revealed predominantly monovalent binding of each Fab with capsid interactions that involved multiple loops from symmetry related copies of the major capsid protein. The residues identified in each Fab-virus interface map to a conformational groove on the surface of the capsomer. In addition to the known involvement of the FG and HI loops, the DE loop was also found to constitute the core of each epitope. Surprisingly, the epitope mapping also identified minor contributions by EF and BC loops. Complementary immunological assays included mAb and Fab neutralization. The specific binding characteristics of mAbs correlated with different neutralizing behaviors in pre- and post-attachment neutralization assays. PMID:25996608

  12. Development of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies for oncogenic human papillomavirus types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Martha J; Seitz, Hanna; Towne, Victoria; Müller, Martin; Finnefrock, Adam C

    2014-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the etiological agent for all cervical cancers, a significant number of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Two licensed vaccines offer protection against the most prevalent oncogenic types, 16 and 18, responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide and one of these also offers protection against types 6 and 11, responsible for 90% of genital warts. The vaccines are comprised of recombinantly expressed major capsid proteins that self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) and prevent infection by eliciting neutralizing antibodies. Adding the other frequently identified oncogenic types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 to a vaccine would increase the coverage against HPV-induced cancers to approximately 90%. We describe the generation and characterization of panels of monoclonal antibodies to these five additional oncogenic HPV types, and the selection of antibody pairs that were high affinity and type specific and recognized conformation-dependent neutralizing epitopes. Such characteristics make these antibodies useful tools for monitoring the production and potency of a prototype vaccine as well as monitoring vaccine-induced immune responses in the clinic. PMID:24574536

  13. Characterization of two novel cutaneous human papillomaviruses, HPV93 and HPV96

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Natasa; Hazard, Kristina; Eliasson, Linda;

    2007-01-01

    Two novel human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV93 and HPV96, with genomes of 7450 and 7438 bp, respectively, are described. The L1 open reading frame of HPV93 showed highest identity to HPV24 (79%) and that of HPV96 had highest identity to HPV92 (71%). Real-time PCR for HPV92, 93 and 96 on stripped...... biopsies from tumours and healthy skin from 269 immunocompetent patients found HPV DNA in 2.6% of tumours and in 0.4% of healthy skin samples. Double infections were observed in two tumours. HPV92 was detected in four, HPV93 in two and HPV96 in three tumours. The range of viral loads spanned from one copy...... per 45 cells to one copy per 10,000 cells. The E7 proteins of HPV92, 93 and 96 were found to bind the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). These results suggest a possible role for these HPV types in skin carcinogenesis that deserves further study....

  14. Human papillomavirus infection in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O.O Carvalho

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable data to support a central role for human papillomavirus (HPV in the etiology of cervical cancer. More than a 100 HPV types have been described, and 40 have been isolated from benign and malignant genital lesions. Consequently, there is strong motivation to evaluate HPV testing for cervical cancer screening. Few studies concerning the natural history of HPV infection have been conducted in the state of Rio de Janeiro. We determined the prevalence of HPV types in female genital lesions by using Hybrid Capture Assay (HCA and we retrospectively analyzed the course of HPV infection. Our sample included 788 women attended at Laboratórios Sérgio Franco. The average age of the participants was 29.6 years. HPV prevalence and cytological diagnosis were determined. The overall prevalence of HPV DNA in the study group was 50.1% (395/788, ranging from 25% (NORMAL to 100% in high-grade intraepithelial lesions (HSIL. High risk HPV was found in 12% inflammatory, 58.3% HPV, 63.2% LSIL and 100% HSIL. A retrospective analysis of 78 patients showed that 22 presented persistent lesions, 2 had progressive lesions, 4 had regressive lesions, 13 showed latent infections, 18 were transiently infected and 19 were submitted to curative treatment. No cases of cancer were registered in this population, which can afford private medical care and regular follow-up exams. We suggest that HCA be used in specific cases involving persistent and recurrent lesions.

  15. Prevalence of human papillomavirus DNA in female cervical lesions from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. B. Cavalcanti

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available A hundred-sixty paraffin-embedded specimens from female cervical lesions were examined for human papillomavirus (HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18 infections by non-isotopic in situ hybridization. The data were compared with histologic diagnosis. Eighty-eight (55 biopsies contained HPV DNA sequences. In low grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN I, HPV infection was detected in 78.7 of the cases, the benign HPV 6 was the most prevalent type. HPV DNA was detected in 58 of CIN II and CIN III cases and in 41.8 of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC. Histologically normal women presented 20 of HPV infection. Oncogenic HPV was found in 10 of these cases, what may indicate a higher risk of developing CINs and cancer. Twenty-five percent of the infected tissues contained mixed infections. HPV 16 was the most common type infecting the cervix and its prevalence raised significantly with the severity of the lesions, pointing its role in cancer pathogenesis. White women presented twice the cervical lesions of mulatto and African origin women, although HPV infection rates were nearly the same for the three groups (approximately 50. Our results showed that HPV typing by in situ hybridization is a useful tool for distinguishing between low and high risk cervical lesions. Further studies are required to elucidate risk factors associated with HPV infection and progression to malignancy in Brazilian population.

  16. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Allie K. [Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Wise-Draper, Trisha M. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Wells, Susanne I., E-mail: Susanne.Wells@cchmc.org [Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed.

  17. From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sin Hang, E-mail: shlee01@snet.net; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William [Department of Pathology, Milford Hospital, 300 Seaside Ave., Milford, CT 06460 (United States)

    2014-10-02

    The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm.

  18. Relationship between the Expression of Telomerase and Human Papillomavirus Infection in Invasive Uterine Cervical Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SIMA Ni; CAI Liping; ZHU Yuanfang; WANG Wei; WANG Shixuan; MA Ding

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase activity was examined in invasive cervical carcinoma to assess whether it is activated during cervical malignant transformation and to look for its possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Histologically confirmed invasive cervical carcinomas and benign cervices were assayed for telomerase activity by using a modified telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). The same cases were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of HPV by using consensus primers and type-specific (HPV types 16 and 18) primers. Telomerase activity was detected in 40 of 45 (88.9%) invasive cervical carcinomas and 2 (all chronic cervicitis) of 50 (4%) benign cervical lesions. HPV was detected in 36 (24 HPV-16 and 4 HPV-18 cases) of 45 (80%) invasive cervical carcinomas and 20 (11 HPV-16 and 1 HPV-18 cases) of 50 (40%) benign cervical changes. There was a significant correlation between the expression of telomerase with histological grade (φ=0.44, P<0.005), but no correlation was found between telomerase expression and HPV-18 (P>0.05). Although larger sample studies are needed, there seems to be a clear association between telomerase upregulation and HPV status, mainly HPV-16 infection.

  19. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soo-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective. PMID:27617239

  20. Infection, replication, and cytopathology of human papillomavirus type 31 in trophoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is preferentially found in spontaneous abortions, specifically residing in trophoblasts, and transfected HPV-16 DNA replicates and produces progeny in 3A trophoblasts in culture. In this study 3A trophoblasts were shown to display both HPV receptors and infection by HPV-31b and HPV-6 virus resulted in de novo (increasing) HPV DNA replication in these cells (inhibited by neutralizing anti-HPV31b antibodies). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that E1-circumflexE4, E6, and L1 were significantly expressed at days 5 (early) and 10 (late), respectively, and in situ immunocytochemistry verified L1 protein expression. Perhaps most important, HPV 31b virus infection caused both a decrease in 3A trophoblast cell numbers in a dose-dependent manner and a low trophoblast-endometrial cell adhesion (both inhibited by neutralizing anti-HPV-31 antibodies). These data further support the hypothesis that HPVs are fully active in trophoblasts and may cause some spontaneous abortions