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Sample records for cern low energy antiproton ring

  1. The CERN Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) project

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, P; Plass, G

    1980-01-01

    The idea to add to the CERN Antiproton Accumulator (AA) a facility for experiments with dense and pure beams of low energy antiprotons has received enthusiastic support from many members of the physics community. After conceptual studies done since 1977 the following scheme was authorized in May 1980: Small batches of cooled antiprotons will be skimmed off from the AA at regular intervals, decelerated in the CERN PS and transferred into a small storage ring (LEAR). In its first stage LEAR will work as a beam stretcher providing a high duty cycle spill of 10/sup 6/ p/s into an experimental area. Future options (not yet authorized) foresee internal jet targets together with cooling, co-rotating beams of p and H, proton antiproton colliding beams, fast extraction with slowing down of p's to rest. A storage ring to fulfil this variety of tasks has to combine some unusual machine features which are summarized in the present report. (6 refs).

  2. Low Energy Antiproton Ring experimental area

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    The experimental area at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) is seen. This set up was used to slow down antiprotons which had been produced by colliding a proton beam with a solid target. The experiments in the hall then took antiprotons from LEAR to perform antimatter studies. One such experiment, PS210, produced the world's first antihydrogen atoms.

  3. LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring), general view.

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    When the Antiproton Project was launched in the late 1970s, it was recognized that in addition to the primary purpose of high-energy proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS, there was interesting physics to be done with low-energy antiprotons. In 1982, LEAR was ready to receive antiprotons from the Antiproton Accumulator (AA), via the PS. A year later, delivery of antiprotons to the experiments began, at momenta as low as 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy 5.3 MeV), in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction" mode, dispensing some E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. For such an achievement, stochastic and electron cooling had to be brought to high levels of perfection.

  4. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) ring and its Transfer Lines: Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Alanzeau, C; Angoletta, M E; Baillie, J; Barna, D; Bartmann, W; Belochitskii, P; Borburgh, J; Breuker, H; Butin, F; Buzio, M; Capatina, O; Carli, C; Carlier, E; Cattin, M; Dobers, T; Chiggiato, P; Ducimetiere, L; Eriksson, T; Fedemann, S; Fowler, T; Froeschl, R; Gebel, R; Gilbert, N; Hancock, S; Harasimowicz, J; Hori, M; Jorgensen, L V; Kersevan, R; Kuchler, D; Lacroix, J M; LeGodec, G; Lelong, P; Lopez-Hernandez, L; Maury, S; Molendijk, J; Morand, B; Newborough, A; Nisbet, D; Nosych, A; Oelert, W; Paoluzzi, M; Pasinelli, S; Pedersen, F; Perini, D; Puccio, B; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Schoerling, D; Sermeus, L; Soby, L; Timmins, M; Tommasini, D; Tranquille, G; Vanbavinckhove, G; Vorozhtsov, A; Welsch, C; Zickler, T

    2014-01-01

    This Report gives a full description of the ELENA Ring to be built within the circumference of the Antiproton Decelarator (AD) Ring, in Building 193 at CERN. The ELENA ring will further decelerate the antiprotons coming from the AD at the momentum of 100 MeV/c down to 13.7 MeV/c, which corresponds to the kinetic energy of 100 keV before extracting to the physics experiments in the same building. The history of such an extra low energy antiproton ring at CERN goes a long way back, and even to the Decelerator’s previous incarnation, the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR), which came into operation in 1983. Already at that time, there were physics’ requests to further decelerate the antiprotons expected from LEAR by proposals for ELENA. Appendix I illustrates the cover pages of two such CERN documents from 1982.

  5. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    To produce dense antiproton beams at very low energies (110 keV), it has been proposed to install a small decelerator ring between the existing AD ring and the experimental area. Phase-space blowup during deceleration is compensated by electron cooling such that the final emittances are comparable to the 5MeV beam presently delivered by the AD. An immediate consequence is a significant increase in the number of trapped antiprotons at the experiments as outlined in the proposal CERN/SPSC-2009-026; SPCS-P-338. This report describes the machine parameters and layout of the proposal ELENA (Extra Low ENergy Antiproton)ring also gives an approximate estimate of cost and manpower needs. Since the initial estimate, published in 2007 (CERN-AB-2007-079), the ELENA design has evolved considerably. This is due to a new location in the AD hall to acommodate for the possibility of another experimental zone, as suggested by the SPCS, and also due to improvements in the ring optics and layout. The cost estimate that is prese...

  6. A Cryogenic Current Comparator for the Low Energy Antiproton Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Welsch, CP

    2014-01-01

    Several laboratories have shown the potential of using Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers together with superconductor magnetic shields to measure beam current intensities in the submicro-Ampere regime. CERN, in collaboration with GSI, Jena university and Helmholtz Institute Jena, is currently working on developing an improved version of such a current monitor for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, aiming for better current resolution and overall system availability. This contribution will present the current design, including theoretical estimation of the current resolution; stability limits of SQUID systems and adaptation of the coupling circuit to the AD beam parameters; the analysis of thermal and mechanical cryostat modes.

  7. Non-Gaussian beam dynamics in low energy antiproton storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    In low energy antiproton facilities, where electron cooling is fundamental, the cooling forces together with heating phenomena causing emittance blow-up, such as Intra Beam Scattering (IBS), result in highly non-Gaussian beam distributions. In these cases, a precise simulation of IBS effects is essential to realistically evaluate the long term beam evolution, taking into account the non-Gaussian characteristics of the beam. Here, we analyse the beam dynamics in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA), which is a new small synchrotron currently being constructed at CERN to decelerate antiprotons to energies as low as 100 keV. Simulations are performed using the code BETACOOL, comparing different models of IBS.

  8. Beam Dynamics Studies and Design Optimisation of New Low Energy Antiproton Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; Welsch, Carsten P

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons, stored and cooled at low energies in a storage ring or at rest in traps, are highly desirable for the investigation of a large number of basic questions on fundamental interactions. This includes the static structure of antiprotonic atomic systems and the time-dependent quantum dynamics of correlated systems. The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is currently the worlds only low energy antiproton factory dedicated to antimatter experiments. New antiproton facilities, such as the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) at CERN and the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) at FLAIR, will open unique possibilities. They will provide cooled, high quality beams of extra-low energy antiprotons at intensities exceeding those achieved presently at the AD by factors of ten to one hundred. These facilities, operating in the energy regime between 100 keV down to 20 keV, face several design and beam dynamics challenges, for example nonlinearities, space charge and scattering effects limiting beam life time....

  9. The CERN Antiproton Collider Programme Accelerators and Accumulation Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koziol, Heribert

    2004-01-01

    One of CERN's most daring and successful undertakings was the quest for the intermediate bosons, W and Z. In this paper, we describe the accelerator part of the venture which relied on a number of innovations: an extension of the budding method of stochastic cooling by many orders of magnitude; the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator, depending on several novel accelerator methods and technologies; major modifications to the 26 GeV PS Complex; and the radical conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which just had started up as an accelerator, to a protonâ€"antiproton collider. The SPS Collider had to master the beamâ€"beam effect far beyond limits reached ever before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the huge detectors UA1 and UA2.

  10. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  11. The low energy atmospheric antiproton albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J. B.; Ormes, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The flux of albedo antiprotons in the 100-1000 MeV kinetic energy range produced by the cosmic ray primaries in the atmosphere is calculated. It is shown that this is not a significant background to measurements of the low energy anti-proton cosmic ray flux.

  12. Cryogenic Current Comparator as Low Intensity Beam Current Monitor in the CERN Antiproton Decelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Soby, L; Welsch, CP

    2013-01-01

    In the low-energy Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and the future Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor any losses during the deceleration and cooling phases. However, existing DC current transformers can hardly reach the μA level, while at the AD and ELENA currents can be as low as 100 nA. A Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) based on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is currently being designed and shall be installed in the AD and ELENA machines. It should meet the following specifications: A current resolution smaller than 10 nA, a dynamic range covering currents between 100 nA and 1 mA, as well as a bandwidth from DC to 1 kHz. Different design options are being considered, including the use of low or high temperature superconductor materials, different CCC shapes and dimensions, different SQUID characteristics, as well as electromagnetic shielding requirements. In this contribution we present first results f...

  13. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) some months before the start of its particle physics programme

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    LEAR*)and its enclosure in the PS South Hall in Jan, 1983, 4 months before the start of its particle physics programme. Visible (in red) are the 90 degree bending magnets consisting of 6 blocks each. Separated from the magnets by short straight sections are the quadrupole doublets (blue with read end-plates). The 4 long straight sections house large equipment like septa for injection/ejection, RF-cavities and later (since 1986) electron cooling and an internal target and its associated detector (JETSET experiment). Two small copper tubes spanning across the ring are coaxial lines transmitting the stochastic cooling signals from pickup to kicker. (see also photos 8205747X, 8207133, 8207541X, 8309026) *)see e.g.: H.Koziol and D. Möhl, Phys. Rep. 403-404 (2004), p.271 and references therein

  14. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in its first year of operation

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    LEAR*) and its enclosure in the PS South Hall in 1983 shortly after the start of its particle physics programme. Visible (in red) are the 90 degree bending magnets consisting of 6 blocks each. Separated from the magnets by short straight sections are the quadrupole doublets (blue with read end-plates). The 4 long straight sections house large equipment like septa for injection/ejection, RF-cavities and later (since 1986) electron cooling and an internal target and its associated detector (JETSET experiment). Several small copper tubes spanning across the ring are coaxial lines transmitting the stochastic cooling signals from pickup to kicker. *)[see H.Koziol and D. Möhl, Phys. Rep. 403-404 (2004), p.271 and references therein

  15. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) some months before the start of its particle physics programme

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    LEAR [see e.g.: H.Koziol and D. Möhl, Phys. Rep. 403-404 (2004), p.271 and references therein] and its enclosure in the PS South Hall in Jan, 1983, 4 months before the start of its particle physics programme. Visible (in red) are the 90 degree bending magnets consisting of 6 blocks each. Separated from the magnets by short straight sections are the quadrupole doublets (blue with read end-plates). The 4 long straight sections house large equipment like septa for injection/ejection, RF-cavities and later (since 1986) electron cooling and an internal target and its associated detector (JETSET experiment). Two small copper tubes spanning across the ring are coaxial lines transmitting the stochastic cooling signals from pick up to kicker. (see also photos 8205747X, 8207133, 8207541X, 8301550X,8309026X)

  16. The Floor's the Limit (Antiproton energies to hit new low)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Celebrating the success of the RFQ in Aarhus. Left to right: Alessanda Lombardi (CERN), Iouri Bylinskii (CERN), Alex Csete (Aarhus), Ulrik Uggerhøj (Aarhus), Ryu Hayano (Tokyo, spokesman ASACUSA), Helge Knudsen (Aarhus), Werner Pirkl (CERN), Ryan Thompson (Aarhus), Søren P. Møller (Aarhus). Although in particle physics we are accustomed to strive for higher and higher energies, this is not always the most interesting thing to do with antiprotons. Indeed, as recent issues of the Bulletin have suggested, the signpost on the road to a closer look at the antiproton points towards ever-lower energies. The CERN Antiproton Decelerator decelerates antipro-tons emerging from a target placed in the path of a 26 GeV/c proton beam from 90 % of to about 10 % of the speed of light. However, even this is far too fast for many of the most interesting experiments on antiprotons planned by Danish and Japanese members of the ASACUSA collaboration. Tokyo University has therefore financed the con...

  17. Energy and centrality dependence of antiproton and proton production in relativistic Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Alt, C; Baatar, B.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Betev, L.; Bialkowska, H.; Blume, C.; Boimska, B.; Botje, M.; Bracinik, J.; Bramm, R.; Buncic, P.; Cerny, V.; Christakoglou, P.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J.G.; Csato, P.; Dinkelaker, P.; Eckardt, V.; Flierl, D.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Friese, V.; Gal, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Genchev, V.; Georgopoulos, G.; Gladysz, E.; Grebieszkow, K.; Hegyi, S.; Hohne, C.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kliemant, M.; Kniege, S.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kornas, E.; Korus, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kraus, I.; Kreps, M.; Laslo, A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Levai, P.; Litov, L.; Lungwitz, B.; Makariev, M.; Malakhov, A.I.; Mateev, M.; Melkumov, G.L.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M.; Molnar, J.; Mrowczynski, St.; Nicolic, V.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Panayotov, D.; Petridis, A.; Pikna, M.; Prindle, D.; Puhlhofer, F.; Renfordt, R.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rybczynski, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sandoval, A.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T.; Seyboth, P.; Sikler, F.; Sitar, B.; Skrzypczak, E.; Stefanek, G.; Stock, R.; Strabel, C.; Strobele, H.; Susa, T.; Szentpetery, I.; Sziklai, J.; Szymanski, P.; Trubnikov, V.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G.I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranic, D.; Wetzler, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Yoo, I.K.; Zimanyi, J.

    2005-01-01

    The transverse mass distributions for antiprotons are measured at midrapidity for minimum bias Pb+Pb collisions at 158A GeV and for central Pb+Pb collisions at 20, 30, 40 and 80 A GeV beam energies in the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS. The rapidity density, inverse slope parameter and mean transverse mass derived from the transverse mass distributions are studied as a function of the incident energy and the collision centrality and compared to the relevant proton data. The shapes of the m_T distributions of antiprotons and protons are very similar. The ratios of the particle yields, antiproton/proton and antilambda/antiproton, are also analysed. The antiproton/proton ratio exhibits an increase with diminishing centrality and a steep rise with increasing beam energy. The antilambda/antiproton ratio increases beyond unity with decreasing beam energy.

  18. Beam Measurement Systems for the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; Ludwig, M; Marqversen, O; Odier, P; Pedersen, F; Raich, U; Søby, L; Tranquille, G; Spickermann, T

    2001-01-01

    The new, low-energy antiproton physics facility at CERN has been successfully commissioned and has been delivering decelerated antiprotons at 100 MeV/c since July 2000. The AD consists of one ring where the 3.5 GeV/c antiprotons produced from a production target are injected, rf manipulated, stochastically cooled, decelerated (with further stages involving additional stochastic and electron cooling and rf manipulation) and extracted at 100 MeV/c. While proton test beams of sufficient intensity could be used for certain procedures in AD commissioning, this was not possible for setting-up and routine operation. Hence, special diagnostics systems had to be developed to obtain the beam and accelerator characteristics using the weak antiproton beams of a few 10E7 particles at all momenta from 3.5 GeV/c down to 100 MeV/c. These include systems for position measurement, intensity, beam size measurements using transverse aperture limiters and scintillators and Schottky-based tools. This paper gives an overall view of...

  19. OPENMED: A facility for biomedical experiments based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carli, Christian

    At present protons and carbon ions are in clinical use for hadron therapy at a growing number of treatment centers all over the world. Nevertheless, only limited direct clinical evidence of their superiority over other forms of radiotherapy is available [1]. Furthermore fundamental studies on biological effects of hadron beams have been carried out at different times (some a long time ago) in different laboratories and under different conditions. Despite an increased availability of ion beams for hadron therapy, beam time for preclinical studies is expected to remain insufficient as the priority for therapy centers is to treat the maximum number of patients. Most of the remaining beam time is expected to be required for setting up and measurements to guarantee appropriate good quality beams for treatments. The proposed facility for biomedical research [2] in support of hadron therapy centers would provide ion beams for interested research groups and allow them to carry out basic studies under well defined conditions. Typical studies would include radiobiological phenomena like relative biological effectiveness with different energies, ion species, and intensities. Furthermore possible studies include the development of advanced dosimetry in heterogeneous materials that resemble the human body, imaging techniques and, at a later stage, when the maximum energy with the LEIR magnets can be reached, fragmentation.

  20. Saturation of low-energy antiproton annihilation on nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, A.; Friedman, E.; Batty, C. J.

    2000-10-01

    Recent measurements of very low-energy (pL0, parallels the recent prediction, for /E<0, that the level widths of /p¯ atoms saturate and, hence, that /p¯ deeply bound atomic states are relatively narrow. Antiproton annihilation cross sections are calculated at pL=57 MeV//c across the periodic table, and their dependence on /Z and /A is classified and discussed with respect to the Coulomb focussing effect at very low energies.

  1. Professor Walter Oelert, leader of the team which created the first atoms of antihydrogen at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in January 1996

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1996-01-01

    Antiparticles were predicted in the work of Paul Dirac in the 1920's, since when physicists have identified all the necessary antiparticle constituents of an antiparticle atom - antielectrons (positrons), antiprotons and antineutrons. However, an antihydrogen atom wasn't produced until the PS210 experiment at CERN in 1995. PS210 used the LEAR accelerator, which was then nearing the end of its lifetime, so everything in the experiment had to work first time. After installing the equipment in spring 1995, the experiment took place in the autumn, in two hour periods over 4 weeks. The experiment team collided energetic antiprotons from LEAR with a heavy element, a challenge for them as well as the LEAR operators. Proving that antihydrogen atoms had been formed required several more weeks of data analysis, but the announcement that nine antihydrogen atoms had been produced came on 4 January 1996.

  2. A leading-edge hardware family for diagnostics applications and low-level RF in CERN's ELENA ring

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Jaussi, M; Leiononen, P; Levens, T E; Molendijk, J C; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Simonin, J

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) Ring is a new synchrotron that will be commissioned in 2016 to further decelerate the antiprotons transferred from the CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The requirements for the acquisition and treatment of signals for longitudinal diagnostics are very demanding, owing to the revolution frequency swing as well as to the digital signal processing required. The requirements for the Low-Level Radio-Frequency (LLRF) system are very demanding as well, especially in terms of revolution frequency swing, dynamic range and low noise required by the cavity voltage control and digital signal processing to be performed. Both sets of requirements will be satisfied by using a leading-edge hardware family, developed to cover the LLRF needs of all synchrotrons in the Meyrin site; it will be first deployed in 2014 in the CERN’s PSB and in the medical machine MedAustron. This paper gives an overview of the main building blocks of the hardware family and of th...

  3. Selected Papers on Low-Energy Antiprotons and Possible Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert [Fermilab

    1998-09-19

    The only realistic means by which to create a facility at Fermilab to produce large amounts of low energy antiprotons is to use resources which already exist. There is simply too little money and manpower at this point in time to generate new accelerators on a time scale before the turn of the century. Therefore, innovation is required to modify existing equipment to provide the services required by experimenters.

  4. Design and optimisation of low heat load liquid helium cryostat to house cryogenic current comparator in antiproton decelerator at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, A.; Koettig, T.; Fernandes, M.; Tan, J.

    2017-02-01

    The Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) is installed in the low-energy Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN to make an absolute measurement of the beam intensity. Operating below 4.2 K, it is based on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and employs a superconducting niobium shield to supress magnetic field components not linked to the beam current. The AD contains no permanent cryogenic infrastructure so the local continuous liquefaction of helium using a pulse-tube is required; limiting the available cooling power to 0.69 W at 4.2K. Due to the sensitivity of the SQUID to variations in magnetic fields, the CCC is highly sensitive to mechanical vibration which is limited to a minimum by the support systems of the cryostat. This article presents the cooling system of the cryostat and discusses the design challenges overcome to minimise the transmission of vibration to the CCC while operating within the cryogenic limits imposed by the cooling system.

  5. Physics at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2013-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen ($\\bar{\\rm H}$) and antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$). The first 12 years of operation saw cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons ($e^+$) and antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium atoms and $\\bar{p}$. Ground-state $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was later trapped for up to $\\sim 1000$ s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ atom, UV transitions were measured to a precision of (2.3-5) $\\times$ $10^{-9}$ by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as $M_{\\bar{p}}/m_e=$1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value. Microwave spectroscopy of $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ yielded a measurement o...

  6. Low-energy direct photon production in p p and alpha alpha collisions at the cern intersecting storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Young-il

    1986-01-01

    High transverse momentum (p(,T)) direct photons have given us some of our best evidence for low order perturbative QCD proces- ses in hadron collisions. It is also important to examine hadronic collisions with a weakly interacting probe in the low p(,T) region, where hadron interactions involve very complicated phenomena. A previous experiment at SQRT.(s) = 12 GeV has observed an excess of low p(,T) direct photons. The present experiment has studied direct soft photons in pp interactions at SQRT.(s) = 63 GeV and alpha-alpha interactions at SQRT.(s(,NN)) = 31.5 GeV at the CERN ISR. Comparisons of photon production with respect to track production in pp minimum bias events with that in pp events with high transverse energy (E(,T)) and with alpha-alpha minimum bias events are investigated. For alpha-alpha minimum bias data, within experimental errors there was no excess of photons with respect to tracks, compared with pp minimum bias data. But for pp high E(,T) data, we observed an interesting effect: as p(,T) i...

  7. Antineutron and antiproton nuclear interactions at very low energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2014-05-01

    Experimental annihilation cross sections of antineutrons and antiprotons at very low energies are compared. Features of Coulomb focusing are observed for pbar annihilation on protons. Direct comparisons for heavier targets are not straightforward due to lack of overlap between targets and energies of experimental results for pbar and nbar. Nevertheless, the annihilation cross sections for nbar on nuclei cannot be described by an optical potential that fits well all the available data on pbar interactions with nuclei. Comparisons made with the help of this potential reveal in the nbar data features similar to Coulomb focusing. Direct comparisons between nbar and pbar annihilations at very low energies would be possible when pbar cross sections are measured on the same targets and at the same energies as the available cross sections for nbar. Such measurements may be possible in the foreseeable future.

  8. Perspectives for low energy antiproton physics at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    The CRYRING accelerator, previously located at the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory of Stockholm University, has been chosen by the FLAIR collaboration as the central accelerator for the planned facility. It has been modified to allow for high-energy injection and extraction and is capable of providing fast and slow extracted beams of antiprotons and highly charged ions. It is currently being installed at the ESR of GSI Darmstadt where it can be used with highly charged ions. The future possibilities for its use with slow antiprotons will be discussed.

  9. View of the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and portrait of Prof. Tommy Eriksson, in charge of the AD machine.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is a storage ring at the CERN laboratory in Geneva. It started operation in 2000. It decelerates antiprotons before sending them to several experiments studying antimatter : ALPHA, ASACUSA, ATRAP and ACE.

  10. Antiproton charge radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D.; Heiss, M. W.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming operation of the extra low energy antiprotons ring at CERN, the upgrade of the antiproton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of 1 08 e+ /s will open the possibility for new experiments with antihydrogen (H ¯). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of H ¯. For four months of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of C P T and the first determination of the antiproton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  11. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...

  12. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons and protons with atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luehr, Armin

    2010-02-18

    Antiproton (anti p) collisions have evolved to a powerful tool for the testing of dynamic electron correlations in atoms and molecules. While advances in the understanding of anti p collisions with the simplest one- and two-electron atoms, H and He, have been achieved experiment and theory did not agree for low-energy anti p+He collisions (<40 keV), stimulating a vivid theoretical activity. On the other hand, only very few theoretical anti p studies can be found considering molecular as well as other atomic targets, in contrast to proton (p) collisions. This is in particular true for anti p impacts on H{sub 2} despite its fundamental role in representing the simplest two-electron molecule. The obtained results may be useful for the anti p experiments at CERN (e.g., antihydrogen production) and in particular for the facility design of low-energy anti p storage rings (e.g., at FLAIR) where a precise knowledge of the anti p interaction with the dominant residual-gas molecule H{sub 2} is needed. In this work a nonperturbative, time-dependent numerical approach is developed which describes ionization and excitation of atoms or molecules by either anti p or p impact based on the impact-parameter method. A spectral close-coupling method is employed for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the scattering wave function is expanded in (effective) one- or two-electron eigenstates of the target. This includes for the first time a full two-electron, two-center description of the H{sub 2} molecule in anti p collisions. The radial part of the one-electron eigenstates is expanded in B splines while the two-electron basis is obtained with a configurationinteraction approach. Calculations are performed for anti p collisions with H, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 2} as well as with He and alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb. Additionally, data are obtained for p collisions with H{sub 2}, Li, Na, and K. The developed method is tested and validated by detailed

  13. Physics using cold antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2004-10-01

    Recent progress of low-energy antiproton physics by atomic spectroscopy and collisions using slow antiprotons collaboration at CERN AD is presented. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium-a neutral three-body system overlinepe-He2+(=overlinepHe+) produced when antiprotons (overlinep) are stopped in various phases of helium-has tested 3-body QED theories as well as proton-vs-antiproton CPT to within ∼10-8. This was achieved by using a newly-developed radiofrequency quadrupole decelerator. Other ongoing and future experiments using low-energy antiprotons are discussed.

  14. Physics using cold antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayano, R.S. E-mail: hayano@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2004-10-11

    Recent progress of low-energy antiproton physics by atomic spectroscopy and collisions using slow antiprotons collaboration at CERN AD is presented. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium--a neutral three-body system pbare{sup -}He{sup 2+}(=pbarHe{sup +}) produced when antiprotons (pbar) are stopped in various phases of helium--has tested 3-body QED theories as well as proton-vs-antiproton CPT to within {approx}10{sup -8}. This was achieved by using a newly-developed radiofrequency quadrupole decelerator. Other ongoing and future experiments using low-energy antiprotons are discussed.

  15. An ultra low-noise AC beam transformer and digital signal processing system for CERN's ELENA ring

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Caspers, F; Federmann, S; Molendijk, J; Pedersen, F; Sanchez-Quesada, J

    2013-01-01

    CERN’s Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) ring is a new synchrotron that will be commissioned in 2016 to further decelerate the antiprotons coming from CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD). Essential longitudinal diagnostics required for commissioning and operation include the intensity measurement for bunched and debunched beams and the measurement of p/p for debunched beams to assess the electron cooling performance. The beam phase information is also needed by the Low-Level RF (LLRF) system. The baseline system for providing the required beam parameters and signals is based upon two ultra-low-noise AC beam transformers and associated digital signal processing. The AC beam transformers cover different frequency regions and are an adaptation to the ELENA layout of those used in the AD. Two AC beam transformers will also be installed in the extraction lines to provide beam intensity measurements. The digital signal processing will be carried out with the leadingedge hardware family used for ELENA’s L...

  16. Annihilation of Antiprotons in Light Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. A. Rana; E. U. Khan; M. I. Shahzad; I. E. Qureshi; F. Malik; G. Sher; S. Manzoor; H. A. Khan

    2006-01-01

    @@ CR-39 detectors have been exposed to a 5.9-MeV antiproton beam using the low energy antiproton ring (LEAR) facility at CERN. At this energy, tracks of antiprotons appear in a CR-39 detector after 135 min of etching in 6 M NaOH at 70℃ . Fluence of the antiproton beam has been determined using track density. We have also found tracks in the etched CR-39 detector at different depths (250-500μm). These tracks have resulted from the annihilation of antiprotons with the constituents (H, C and O) of the CR-39 detector. The goal of the experiment is to develop a simple and low-cost method to study properties of antiparticles and those formed after annihilation of these particles with the target matter.

  17. The anti-proton charge radius

    CERN Document Server

    Crivelli, P; Heiss, M W

    2016-01-01

    The upcoming operation of the Extra Low ENergy Antiprotons (ELENA) ring at CERN, the upgrade of the anti-proton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of $10^{8}$ e$^+$/s will open the possibility for new experiments with anti-hydrogen ($\\bar{\\text{H}}$). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of $\\bar{\\text{H}}$. For a month of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of CPT and the first determination of the anti-proton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  18. Antiprotonic atom formation and spectroscopy-ASACUSA experiment at CERN-AD

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E

    1999-01-01

    This talk describes the experiments on atomic spectroscopy and atomic collisions as proposed by the ASACUSA collaboration for the forthcoming AD facility at CERN. They consist of high-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms, the study of anti-protonic atom formation processes, and stopping power and ionization measurements in low-pressure gases. (18 refs).

  19. Negative particle production at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin, A; Cristallini, A; D'Agostino-Bruno, M; Ellis, R J; Giacomelli, G; Maroni, C; Mercatali, F; Rossi, A M; Vannini, G

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary results on the production of negative particles in inclusive reactions at intermediate angles (80-200 mrad) at the CERN ISR are reported. Pion production, is still the dominant process; within experimental errors, scaling holds for negative pions or alternatively a limiting distribution is reached at relatively low energies. However the antiproton production cross-sections are apparently larger than smaller energies. (14 refs).

  20. GAPS - Dark matter search with low-energy cosmic-ray antideuterons and antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    von Doetinchem, P; Boggs, S; Fuke, H; Hailey, C J; Mognet, S I; Ong, R A; Perez, K; Zweerink, J

    2015-01-01

    The GAPS experiment is foreseen to carry out a dark matter search by measuring low-energy cosmic-ray antideuterons and antiprotons with a novel detection approach. It will provide a new avenue to access a wide range of different dark matter models and masses from about 10GeV to 1TeV. The theoretically predicted antideuteron flux resulting from secondary interactions of primary cosmic rays is very low. Well-motivated theories beyond the Standard Model contain viable dark matter candidates, which could lead to a significant enhancement of the antideuteron flux due to annihilation or decay of dark matter particles. This flux contribution is believed to be especially large at low energies, which leads to a high discovery potential for GAPS. The GAPS low-energy antiproton search will provide some of the most stringent constraints on ~30GeV dark matter, will provide the best limits on primordial black hole evaporation on galactic length scales, and explore new discovery space in cosmic-ray physics. GAPS is designed...

  1. Antiproton stopping at low energies: confirmation of velocity-proportional stopping power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, S P; Csete, A; Ichioka, T; Knudsen, H; Uggerhøj, U I; Andersen, H H

    2002-05-13

    The stopping power for antiprotons in various solid targets has been measured in the low-energy range of 1-100 keV. In agreement with most models, in particular free-electron gas models, the stopping power is found to be proportional to the projectile velocity below the stopping-power maximum. Although a stopping power proportional to velocity has also been observed for protons, the interpretation of such measurements is difficult due to the presence of charge exchange processes. Hence, the present measurements constitute the first unambiguous support for a velocity-proportional stopping power due to target excitations by a pointlike projectile.

  2. Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1980-01-01

    The AA in its final stage of construction, before it disappeared from view under concrete shielding. Antiprotons were first injected, stochastically cooled and accumulated in July 1980. From 1981 on, the AA provided antiprotons for collisions with protons, first in the ISR, then in the SPS Collider. From 1983 on, it also sent antiprotons, via the PS, to the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). The AA was dismantled in 1997 and shipped to Japan.

  3. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by the well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons and light fragments etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  4. Nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons within a microscopic transport approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular-dynamics transport model, the nuclear fragmentation induced by low-energy antiprotons has been investigated thoroughly. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing the primary fragments in phase space. The secondary decay process of the fragments is described by a well-known statistical code. It is found that the localized energy released in antibaryon-baryon annihilation is deposited in a nucleus mainly via pion-nucleon collisions, which leads to the emissions of pre-equilibrium particles, fission, evaporation of nucleons, light fragments, etc. The strangeness exchange reactions dominate the hyperon production. The averaged mass loss increases with the mass number of target nucleus. A bump structure in the domain of intermediate mass for heavy targets appears owing to the contribution of fission fragments.

  5. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons with molecular hydrogen: ionization, excitation and stopping power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    A time-dependent coupled-channel approach was used to calculate ionization, excitation, and energy-loss cross sections as well as energy spectra for antiproton and proton collisions with molecular hydrogen for impact energies 8 < E < 4000 keV....

  6. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E

    2001-01-01

    We present first results of laser and microwave spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium performed at the new Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Extending a series of previous measurements done at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN, several laser- induced transitions of the antiproton in the exotic three-body system He/sup 2+/-e/sup -/-p could be determined with a precision down to 1.3*10/sup -7/. This constitutes an improvement of a factor 3 over previous measurements, and allows to test accurate three-body calculations of this system that include QED corrections. The observed agreement on the same level can be used to infer CPT limits on the antiproton charge and mass. Furthermore, a first indication of a resonance signal of a two-laser microwave triple experiment to measure the hyperfine splitting of antiprotonic helium could been observed. Such a measurement has the potential to determine the antiproton magnetic moment to a higher precision that it is known today. (19 refs).

  7. FLSR - The Frankfurt low energy storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiebing, K. E.; Alexandrov, V.; Dörner, R.; Enz, S.; Kazarinov, N. Yu.; Kruppi, T.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt Böcking, H.; Völp, M.; Ziel, P.; Dworak, M.; Dilfer, W.

    2010-02-01

    An electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions with a design energy of 50 keV is presently being set up at the Institut für Kernphysik der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Germany (IKF). This new device will provide a basis for new experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. In this article, the design parameters of this instrument are reported.

  8. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP) is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  9. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher Tavakoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  10. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, J D; Lau, E L; Pérez-Mercader, J; Nieto, Michael Martin; Goldman, T; Anderson, John D; Lau, Eunice L; Perez-Mercader, J

    1994-01-01

    We know that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when we try to combine these theories, we must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem and the anomalous spacecraft data which we announce here. This all has led some ``intrepid" theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more ``daring" experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen.

  11. Modeling of the Near-Earth Low-Energy Antiproton Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The local interstellar antiproton spectrum is simulated taking into account antineutron decay, (He,p interaction, secondary and tertiary antiproton production, and the solar modulation in the “force field” approximation. Inclusive invariant cross-sections were obtained through a Monte Carlo procedure using the Multistage Dynamical Model code simulating various processes of the particle production. The results of the simulations provided flux values of 4⋅10−3 to 10−2 and 10−2 to 1.7⋅10−2 antiprotons/(2 s sr GeV at energies of 0.2 and 1 GeV, respectively, for the solar maximum and minimum epochs. Simulated flux of the trapped antiprotons in the inner magnetosphere due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR interactions with the atmospheric constituents exceeds the galactic antiproton flux up to several orders. These simulation results considering the assumptions with the attendant limitations are in comprehensive agreement with the experimental data including the PAMELA ones.

  12. Antiproton-Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    When the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) was stopped in 1996, because of its costly operation, a cheaper way of continuing low-energy antiproton physics was sought. The Antiproton-Collector (AC), added in 1987 to the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) to provide a tenfold intensity increase, was converted into the Antiproton-Decelerator (AD). Antiprotons from the target at 3.5 GeV/c are decelerated to 100 MeV/c, and fast-ejected to the experiments. Major changes were necessary. Above all, the conversion from a constant-field machine to one with a magnetic cycle, modulating the field by an impressive factor 35. New systems for stochastic and electron cooling had to be added. Beam diagnostics at an intensity of only 2E7 antiprotons was a challenge. In 2000, the AD began delivery of antiprotons to the experiments.

  13. The ASACUSA experiment at CERN's AD antiproton decelerator catches antiprotons in helium, where the antiprotons replace electrons, giving exotics atoms.

    CERN Multimedia

    Loïez, P

    2000-01-01

    Photo 03: Laser beams are prepared for shooting at antiprotonic helium atoms. Left to right: Masaki Hori (Tokyo University) and John Eades (CERN). Photo 01: Dye laser triggered by "YAG" laser. Photo 02: Masaki Hori adjusting optical system of laser beams.

  14. Longitudinal beam diagnostic from a distributed electrostatic pick-up in CERN's ELENA ring

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Federmann, S; Molendijk, J; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Secouet, P J; Søby, L; Pedersen, F; Timmins, M

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) Ring is a new synchrotron that will be commissioned in 2016 to further decelerate the antiprotons coming from CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD). Required longitudinal diagnostics include the intensity measurement for bunched and debunched beam and the measurement of Dp/p to assess the electron cooling performance. A novel method for the calculation of these parameters is proposed for ELENA, where signals from the twenty electrostatic Pick-Ups (PU) used for orbit measurements will be combined to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. This requires that the signals be digitally down-converted, rotated and summed so that the many electrostatic PUs will function as a single, distributed PU from the processing system viewpoint. This method includes some challenges and will not be used as the baseline longitudinal diagnostics for the initial ELENA operation. This paper gives an overview of the hardware and digital signal processing involved, as well as of the challenges t...

  15. Physics with thermal antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynes, M.V.; Campbell, L.J.

    1988-01-01

    The same beam cooling techniques that have allowed for high luminosity antiproton experiments at high energy also provide the opportunity for experiments at ultra-low energy. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons collected and cooled at the peak momentum for production can by made available at thermal or sub-thermal energies. In particular, the CERN, PS-200 collaboration is developing an RFO-plused ion trap beam line for the antiproton gravitational mass experiment at LEAR that will provide beams of antiprotons in the energy range 0.001--1000.0 eV. Antiprotons at these energies make these fundamentals particles available for experiments in condensed matter and atomic physics. The recent speculation that antiprotons may form metastable states in some forms of normal matter could open many new avenues of basic and applied research. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  16. The antiproton interaction with an internal 12C target inside the HESR ring at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introzzi, R.; Balestra, F.; Lavagno, A.; Scozzi, F.; Younis, H.

    2016-04-01

    In order to fulfill the goal of producing higher rates of doubly strange hyperons, the P¯ANDA collaboration will use the antiproton ring HESR at the future facility FAIR. The low energy hyperon production by an antiproton beam requires to insert a solid target inside the ring. Unwanted side effects of such an insertion are the overwhelming amount of annihilations, which would make the detectors blind, and the fast depletion of the bunch, which circulates inside the ring. The choice of the target material impacts the hyperon production yield: Carbon turned out to provide enough initial hyperon deceleration and keep secondary interactions below a tolerable level. The use of a very thin Diamond target, together with beam steering techniques, seems to be a satisfactory solution to the above problems and will be described hereafter.

  17. Precision Measurement of Low-Energy Antiprotons with GAPS for Dark Matter and Primordial Black Hole Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Aramaki, T; von Doetinchem, P; Fuke, H; Hailey, C J; Mognet, S A I; Ong, R A; Perez, K M; Zweerink, J

    2014-01-01

    The general antiparticle spectrometer (GAPS) experiment is an indirect dark matter search focusing on antiparticles produced by WIMP annihilation and decay in the Galactic halo. In addition to the very powerful search channel provided by antideuterons, GAPS has a strong capability to measure low-energy antiprotons (0.07 $\\le$ E $\\le$ 0.25 GeV) as dark matter signatures. This is an especially effective means for probing light dark matter, whose existence has been hinted at in the direct dark matter searches, including the recent result from the CDMS-II experiment. While severely constrained by LUX and other direct dark matter searches, light dark matter candidates are still viable in an isospin- violating dark matter scenario and halo-independent analysis. Along with the excellent antideuteron sensitivity, GAPS will be able to detect an order of magnitude more low-energy antiprotons, compared to BESS and PAMELA, providing a precision measurement of low-energy antiproton flux and a unique channel for probing li...

  18. Unified optical-model approach to low-energy antiproton annihilation on nuclei and to antiprotonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, C. J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2001-07-01

    A successful unified description of p¯ nuclear interactions near E=0 is achieved using a p¯ optical potential within a folding model, V opt˜ v¯∗ρ , where a p¯p potential v¯ is folded with the nuclear density ρ. The potential v¯ fits very well the measured p¯p -annihilation cross sections at low energies ( p L10, as well as the few low-energy p¯-annihilation cross sections measured on Ne. Both v¯ and V opt are found to be highly absorptive, which leads to a saturation of reaction cross sections in hydrogen and on nuclei. Predictions are made for p¯-annihilation cross sections over the entire periodic table at these very low energies and the systematics of the calculated cross sections as function of A, Z and E is discussed and explained in terms of a Coulomb-modified strong-absorption model. Finally, optical potentials which fit simultaneously low-energy p¯- 4He observables for E0 are used to assess the reliability of extracting Coulomb modified p¯ nuclear scattering lengths directly from the data. The relationship between different kinds of scattering lengths is discussed and previously published systematics of the p¯ nuclear scattering lengths is updated.

  19. Case study of a magnetic system for low-energy machines

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The extra low-energy antiproton ring (ELENA) is a CERN particle decelerator with the purpose to deliver antiprotons at lowest energies aiming to enhance the study of antimatter. The hexagonal shaped ring with a circumference of about 30 m will decelerate antiprotons from momenta of 100 to 13.7 MeV/c. In this paper, the design approach for a magnet system for such a machine is presented. Due to the extra-low beam rigidity, the design of the magnet system is especially challenging because even small fields, arising for example from residual magnetization and hysteresis, have a major impact on beam dynamics. In total, seven prototype magnets of three different magnet types have been built and tested. This paper outlines challenges, describes solutions for the design of the magnet system and discusses the results of the prototypes.

  20. Case study of a magnetic system for low-energy machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoerling, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The extra low-energy antiproton ring (ELENA) is a CERN particle decelerator with the purpose to deliver antiprotons at lowest energies aiming to enhance the study of antimatter. The hexagonal shaped ring with a circumference of about 30 m will decelerate antiprotons from momenta of 100 to 13.7 MeV /c . In this paper, the design approach for a magnet system for such a machine is presented. Due to the extra-low beam rigidity, the design of the magnet system is especially challenging because even small fields, arising for example from residual magnetization and hysteresis, have a major impact on beam dynamics. In total, seven prototype magnets of three different magnet types have been built and tested. This paper outlines challenges, describes solutions for the design of the magnet system and discusses the results of the prototypes.

  1. Cosmic ray antiprotons at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons provide a powerful tool to probe dark matter annihilations in our galaxy. The sensitivity of this important channel is, however, diluted by sizable uncertainties in the secondary antiproton background. In this work, we improve the calculation of secondary antiproton production with a particular focus on the high energy regime. We employ the most recent collider data and identify a substantial increase of antiproton cross sections with energy. This increase is driven by the violation of Feynman scaling as well as by an enhanced strange hyperon production. The updated antiproton production cross sections are made publicly available for independent use in cosmic ray studies. In addition, we provide the correlation matrix of cross section uncertainties for the AMS-02 experiment. At high energies, the new cross sections improve the compatibility of the AMS-02 data with a pure secondary origin of antiprotons in cosmic rays.

  2. Le CERN trouve un financement extérieur pour un nouveau projet sur l'antimatière

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1997-01-01

    CERN will build a new experimental facility, the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) by transforming an existing CERN machine the "Antiproton Collector", which produces and stores antiprotons into a "all-in-one" machine which can, in addition, decelerate, cool, and eject antiprotons at low energies (5.8 MeV). The transformation will cost about 7 million Swiss Francs, and will be funded by special contributions from several countries, among which are , Denmark, Germany, Italy, Japan, Poland and the United States.

  3. Laser spectroscopy of the antiprotonic helium atom – its energy levels and state lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hidetoshi, Yamaguchi

    2003-01-01

    The antiprotonic atom is a three-body exotic system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus. Its surprising longevity was found and has been studied for more than 10 years. In this work, transition energies and lifetimes of this exotic atom were systematically studied by using the antiproton beam of AD(Antiproton Decelerator) facility at CERN, with an RFQ antiproton decelerator, a narrow-bandwidth laser, Cerenkov counters with fast-response photomultiplier tubes, and cryogenic helium target systems. Thirteen transition energies were determined with precisions of better than 200 ppb by a laser spectroscopy method, together with the elimination of the shift effect caused by collisions with surrounding atoms. Fifteen lifetimes (decay rates) of short-lived states were determined from the time distributions of the antiproton-annihilation signals and the resonance widths of the atomic spectral lines. The relation between the magnitude of the decay rates and the transition multipolarity was inv...

  4. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotorev, Max; Sessler, Andrew; Penn, Gregory; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Charman, Andrew E.

    2012-03-20

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  5. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo model calculations for the antiproton-induced ionization of atomic hydrogen at low impact energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkadi, L

    2015-01-01

    The three-body dynamics of the ionization of the atomic hydrogen by 30 keV antiproton impact has been investigated by calculation of fully differential cross sections (FDCS) using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. The results of the calculations are compared with the predictions of quantum mechanical descriptions: The semi-classical time-dependent close-coupling theory, the fully quantal, time-independent close-coupling theory, and the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state model. In the analysis particular emphasis was put on the role of the nucleus-nucleus (NN) interaction played in the ionization process. For low-energy electron ejection CTMC predicts a large NN interaction effect on FDCS, in agreement with the quantum mechanical descriptions. By examining individual particle trajectories it was found that the relative motion between the electron and the nuclei is coupled very weakly with that between the nuclei, consequently the two motions can be treated independently. A simple ...

  6. Antiproton cloud compression in the ALPHA apparatus at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A., E-mail: andrea.gutierrez@triumf.ca [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Burrows, C. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [Centre for Cold Matter, Imperial College (United Kingdom); Capra, A. [York University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Charlton, M. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Dunlop, R. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); Evetts, N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Fajans, J. [University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Isaac, C. A. [Swansea University, Department of Physics, College of Science (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-11-15

    We have observed a new mechanism for compression of a non-neutral plasma, where antiprotons embedded in an electron plasma are compressed by a rotating wall drive at a frequency close to the sum of the axial bounce and rotation frequencies. The radius of the antiproton cloud is reduced by up to a factor of 20 and the smallest radius measured is ∼ 0.2 mm. When the rotating wall drive is applied to either a pure electron or pure antiproton plasma, no compression is observed in the frequency range of interest. The frequency range over which compression is evident is compared to the sum of the antiproton bounce frequency and the system’s rotation frequency. It is suggested that bounce resonant transport is a likely explanation for the compression of antiproton clouds in this regime.

  7. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics: "Light Antiprotonic Atoms" by R. Hayano

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  8. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Antiproton Mass" by G. Gabrielse

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  9. Experimental investigation of electron cooling and stacking of lead ions in a low energy accumulation ring

    CERN Document Server

    Bosser, Jacques; Chanel, M; Hill, C; Lombardi, A M; MacCaferri, R; Maury, S; Möhl, D; Molinari, G; Rossi, S; Tanke, E; Tranquille, G; Vretenar, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    This report gives the results of a programme of experimental investigations, which were carried out to test stacking of lead ions in a storage ring (the former Low Energy Antiproton Ring, LEAR) at 4.2 MeV per nucleon. The motivation was to demonstrate the feasibility of gaining the large factor in the phase-space density required for injection into the LHC. In the first part of the report, the layout of the experiments is described, the choice of the parameters of the electron cooling system used for stacking is reported and the multi-turn injection using horizontal- and longitudinal- (and in the final project also vertical-) phase space is discussed. In the second part the experimental results are presented. Factors of vital importance are the stacking efficiency, the beam life-time and the cooling time of the ions. The beam decay owing to charge exchange with the residual gas and to recombination by the capture of cooling electrons was intensively studied. Beam instabilities and space-charge effects in the ...

  10. The CERN antiproton target: hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 {\\deg}C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of...

  11. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV /c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii) A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  12. Parallel plate chambers for monitoring the profiles of high-intensity pulsed antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki

    2004-01-01

    Two types of beam profile monitor with thin parallel-plate electrodes have been used in experiments carried out at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) and Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. The detectors were used to measure non-destructively the spatial profiles, absolute intensities, and time structures of 100-300-ns- long beam pulses containing between 10**7 and 10**9 antiprotons. The first of these monitors was a parallel plate ionization chamber operated at gas pressure P=65 mbar. The other was a secondary electron emission detector, and was operated in the ultra-high vacuum of the AD. Both designs may be useful in medical and commercial applications. The position-sensitive electrodes in these detectors were manufactured by a novel method in which a laser trimmer was used to cut strip patterns on metallized polyester foils.

  13. Ring and jet study on the azimuthal substructure of pions at CERN SPS energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabir Kumar Haldar; Sanjib Kumar Manna; Prosenjit Saha; Dipak Ghosh

    2013-04-01

    We have presented an investigation on the ring- and jet-like azimuthal angle sub-structures in the emission of secondary charged hadrons coming from 32S–Ag/Br interactions at 200 A GeV/c. Nuclear photographic emulsion technique has been employed to collect the experimental data. The presence of such substructures, their average behaviour, their size, and their position of occurrence have been examined. The experimental results have also been compared with the results simulated by Monte-Carlo method. The analysis strongly indicates the presence of ring- and jet-like structures in the experimental distributions of particles beyond statistical noise. The experimental results are in good agreement with I M Dremin idea, that the phenomenon is similar to the emission of Cherenkov electromagnetic radiation.

  14. Study of Interaction of Low-Energy Antiprotons with H$^{2}$,He$^{3}$,He$^{4}$,Ne-Nuclei Using a Streamer Chamber in Magnetic Field

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is the systematic study of the interaction between low-energy antiprotons and the H|2,~He|3,~He|4,~Ne-nuclei using a self shunted streamer chamber in a magnetic field exposed to the antiproton beam of the LEAR facility. The properties of the self shunted streamer chamber, which allows the use of the filling gas (hydrogen, helium, neon at a pressure of l~atm) as a target, permit to carry out experiments also in the very low-energy region. \\\\ \\\\ The experimental apparatus is suitable for a large programme of measurements. We plan to measure the @*H|2 cross section and the spectator momentum distributions at @* momenta lower than 250~MeV/c, where data are lacking. It is interesting to study for the first time the @*He|3 and @*He|4 interactions measuring the cross sections and the emitted particle distributions. Among other things the knowledge of the branching ratio of the @*He|4 annihilation channels clarifies some open cosmological questions. The study of the process of nuclear absor...

  15. Modeling and Simulation of Longitudinal Dynamics for Low Energy Ring_High Energy Ring at the Positron-Electron Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivetta, Claudio; Mastorides, T.; Fox, J.D.; Teytelman, D.; Van Winkle, D.; /SLAC

    2007-03-06

    A time domain dynamic modeling and simulation tool for beam-cavity interactions in the Low Energy Ring (LER) and High Energy Ring (HER) at the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) is presented. Dynamic simulation results for PEP-II are compared to measurements of the actual machine. The motivation for this tool is to explore the stability margins and performance limits of PEP-II radio-frequency (RF) systems at future higher currents and upgraded RF configurations. It also serves as a test bed for new control algorithms and can define the ultimate limits of the low-level RF (LLRF) architecture. The time domain program captures the dynamic behavior of the beam-cavity-LLRF interaction based on a reduced model. The ring current is represented by macrobunches. Multiple RF stations in the ring are represented via one or two macrocavities. Each macrocavity captures the overall behavior of all the 2 or 4 cavity RF stations. Station models include nonlinear elements in the klystron and signal processing. This enables modeling the principal longitudinal impedance control loops interacting via the longitudinal beam model. The dynamics of the simulation model are validated by comparing the measured growth rates for the LER with simulation results. The simulated behavior of the LER at increased operation currents is presented via low-mode instability growth rates. Different control strategies are compared and the effects of both the imperfections in the LLRF signal processing and the nonlinear drivers and klystrons are explored.

  16. Fermilab Antiproton Source, Recycler Ring, and Main Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    At the end of its operations in 2011, the Fermilab antiproton production complex consisted of a sophisticated target system, three 8-GeV storage rings (namely the Debuncher, the Accumulator and the Recycler), 25 independent multi-GHz stochastic cooling systems, the world's only relativistic electron cooling system and a team of technical experts equal to none. The accelerator complex at Fermilab supported a broad physics program including the Tevatron Collider Run II, neutrino experiments using 8-GeV and 120-GeV proton beams, as well as a test beam facility and other fixed target experiments using 120-GeV primary proton beams. This paper provides a brief description of Fermilab accelerators as they operated at the end of the Collider Run II (2011).

  17. Antiproton-proton Annihilation Into Two Mesons: The Role Of Relativistic Distortion

    CERN Document Server

    El-Bennich, B O

    2004-01-01

    The more than a decade old data on differential cross sections and analyzing powers in antiproton-proton annihilation into two pions (or two kaons), measured at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN, have stimulated several theoretical investigations. A characteristic feature of the data are the large variations of the scattering observables as a function of the scattering angle and of the laboratory energy already below 100 MeV. Amplitude analyzes reproduce the data with few partial waves (J ≤ 4) and one concludes that the annihilation process is very short- ranged and of the order of the nucleon size. Nonetheless, early models, using either baryonic or quark degrees of freedom, give rise to an even shorter antibaryon-baryon interaction failing to produce substantial higher (J ≥ 2) partial wave amplitudes and consequently to adequately describe the LEAR data. In this thesis, we systematically consider improvements within the framework of quark-line diagrams. We first derive various quar...

  18. Measurement of proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at the European center for nuclear research intersecting storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Amos, Norman A

    1985-01-01

    Proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering was measured at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings. Using the optical theorem, we have extracted the total nuclear cross sections for these collisions. By measuring the interference between the Coulomb amplitude and the nuclear amplitude we have found rho, the ratio of the real part to the imaginary part of the forward nuclear elastic scattering amplitude. Further, we have extracted the nuclear slope parameter in the forward direction. For proton-proton interactions, the total nuclear cross sections measured were 39.95 +- 0.30 mb and 42.19 +- 0.19 mb for center-of-mass energies √s = 30.6 GeV and 52.8 GeV, respectively. The measured values of rho were 0.035 +- 0.009 and 0.071 +- 0.010. For proton-antiproton interactions, the cross sections found were 41.10 +- 0.40 mb and 43.34 +- 0.43 mb, respectively, and the rho values were 0.088 +- 0.025 and 0.066 +- 0.022

  19. Deceleration of MeV antiprotons and muons to keV energies — the anticyclotron A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Cauz, D.; Chatellard, D.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.-P.; Elsener, K.; Eugster, P.; Formisano, F.; Gorini, G.; Hauser, P.; Kottmann, F.; Krafcsik, I.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Missimer, J.; Poggiani, R.; Simons, L. M.; Testera, G.; Torelli, G.; Waldner, F.

    1994-03-01

    A progress report is presented on the development of the anticyclotron — deceleration of antiprotons and negative muons via collisions in a low-pressure gas or thin foils during revolutions in a cyclotron field. Beam tests performed at CERN and PSI are reported and future plans for applications outlined.

  20. Deceleration of MeV antiprotons and muons to keV energies - the anticyclotron. A progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, D.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Cauz, D.; Chatellard, D.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.P.; Elsener, K.; Eugster, P.; Formisano, F.; Gorini, G.; Hauser, P.; Kottmann, F.; Krafcsik, I.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Missimer, J.; Poggiani, R.; Simons, L.M.; Testera, G.; Torelli, G.; Waldner, F. (KFKI Research Inst. for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary) Pisa Univ. (Italy) INFN, Pisa (Italy) Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland) Univ. di Udine (Italy) Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) ETH Zuerich, Villigen (Switzerland) KFKI Research Inst. for Materials Science, Budapest (Hungary) Genova Univ. (Italy) INFN, Genova (Italy))

    1994-03-01

    A progress report is presented on the development of the anticyclotron - deceleration of antiprotons and negative muons via collisions in a low-pressure gas or thin foils during revolutions in a cyclotron field. Beam tests performed at CERN and PSI are reported and future plans for applications outlined. (orig.)

  1. Design of the Proposed Low Energy Ion Collider Ring at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissen, Edward W. [JLAB; Lin, Fanglei [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB

    2013-06-01

    The polarized Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) envisioned at Jefferson Lab will cover a range of center-of-mass energies up to 65 GeV. The present MEIC design could also allow the accommodation of low energy electron-ion collisions (LEIC) for additional science reach. This paper presents the first design of the low energy ion collider ring which is converted from the large ion booster of MEIC. It can reach up to 25 GeV energy for protons and equivalent ion energies of the same magnetic rigidity. An interaction region and an electron cooler designed for MEIC are integrated into the low energy collider ring, in addition to other required new elements including crab cavities and ion spin rotators, for later reuse in MEIC itself. A pair of vertical chicanes which brings the low energy ion beams to the plane of the electron ring and back to the low energy ion ring are also part of the design.

  2. Factorial Correlators and Oscillatory Multiplicity Moments at the CERN SPS Energy for Ring-Like and Jet-Like Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prabir Kumar Haldar; Sanjib Kumar Manna

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of ring-like and jet-like events in terms of factorial correlations and oscillatory multiplicity moments of 32S-Ag/Br interactions at 200 A GeV. The investigation reveals that the correlated moments increase with decrease in bin-bin separation D, following the power law, which suggests the presence of an intermittent nature of self-similar dynamical fluctuations pattern for ring-like and jet-like events. The analysis further shows that the strength of the non-statistical fluctuations is larger for jet-like events than those of ring-like events and total events. However, ring-like and jet-like events are not to be consistent with the total events of the a model of intermittency. To go beyond the lower order correlation, the oscillatory multiplicity moments are used to study the higher order correlation. The ratios Hq (cumulant over factorial moments, Kq/Fq) are determined for ring-like, jet-like and the total events. The presence of few-particle short range correlation is established. It is extremely interesting to observe that the oscillations of ring-like events are different from the jet-like events and the total events. However, in almost all the cases, the simulated interactions fail to replicate the experimental results.

  3. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    A recently proposed model (arXiv:0903.2794) explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the anti-proton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (like pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for Dark Matter searches via antimatter.

  4. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Pasquale; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2009-08-21

    A recently proposed model explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the antiproton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (such as pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for dark matter searches via antimatter.

  5. A low energy optimization of the CERN-NGS neutrino beam for a $\\theta_{13}$ driven neutrino oscillation search

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, André

    2002-01-01

    The possibility to improve the CERN to Gran Sasso neutrino beam performances for $\\theta_{13}$ searches is investigated. We show that by an appropriate optimization of the target and focusing optics of the present CNGS design, we can increase the flux of low energy neutrinos by about a factor 5 compared to the current $\\tau$ optimized focalisation. With the ICARUS 2.35 kton detector at LNGS and in case of negative result, this would allow to improve the limit to $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ by an order of magnitude better than the current limit of CHOOZ at $\\Delta m^2\\approx 3\\times 10^{-3} \\rm eV^2$ within 5 years of nominal CNGS running. This is by far the most sensitive setup of the currently approved long-baseline experiments and is competitive with the proposed JHF superbeam.

  6. The Antiproton Accumulator becomes Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The photos show the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) transformed into Antiproton Decelerator. The AA was used at CERN between 1981 and 1999 before being replaced by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The AA was used to collect and stochastically cool antiprotons used in proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS collider. This lead to the discovery of the W and Z bosons in 1983 and the Nobel Prize for Carlo Rubbia and Simon van der Meer in 1984.

  7. Nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics in low energy storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Electrostatic storage rings operate at very low energies in the keV range and have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Because of the mass independence of electric rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged biomolecules, opening up unique research opportunities. However, earlier measurements have shown strong limitations in maximum beam intensity, fast decay of the stored ion current, and reduced beam lifetime. The nature of these effects has not been fully understood and an improved understanding of the physical processes influencing beam motion and stability in such rings is needed. In this paper, a comprehensive study into nonlinear and long-term beam dynamics studies is presented on the examples of a number of existing and planned electrostatic storage rings using the BETACOOL, OPERA-3D, and MAD-X simulation software. A detailed investigation into ion kinetics, under consideration of effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target, is carried out and yields a consistent explanation of the physical effects in a whole class of storage rings. The lifetime, equilibrium momentum spread, and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with the target are estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the Test Storage Ring, where a low-intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions, are reproduced. Based on these simulations, the conditions for stable ring operation with an extremely low-emittance beam are presented. Finally, results from studies into the interaction of 3-30 keV ions with a gas jet target are summarized.

  8. Measurement of the Shadowing of High-Energy Cosmic Rays by the Moon A Search for TeV-Energy Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kraber, M; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2005-01-01

    The shadowing of high-energy cosmic rays by the Moon has been observed with a significance of 9.4 standard deviations with the L3+C muon spectrometer at CERN. A significant effect of the Earth magnetic field is observed. Since no event deficit on the east side of the Moon has been observed, an upper limit at 90% confidence level on the antiproton to proton ratio of 0.11 is obtained for primary energies around 1 TeV.

  9. Nuclear Excitations by Antiprotons and Antiprotonic Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal aims at the investigation of nuclear excitations following the absorption and annihilation of stopped antiprotons in heavier nuclei and at the same time at the study of the properties of antiprotonic atoms. The experimental arrangement will consist of a scintillation counter telescope for the low momentum antiproton beam from LEAR, a beam degrader, a pion multiplicity counter, a monoisotopic target and Ge detectors for radiation and charged particles. The data are stored by an on-line computer.\\\\ \\\\ The Ge detectors register antiprotonic x-rays and nuclear @g-rays which are used to identify the residual nucleus and its excitation and spin state. Coincidences between the two detectors will indicate from which quantum state the antiprotons are absorbed and to which nuclear states the various reactions are leading. The measured pion multiplicity characterizes the annihilation process. Ge&hyphn. and Si-telescopes identify charged particles and determine their energies.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment will gi...

  10. That was LEAP 05! or Antiproton Physics in a Nutshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Paul

    2005-10-01

    A personally flavored review of selected topics of LEAP 05 is given, with focus on some recent interesting developments in low and medium energy antiproton physics, such as fundamental symmetries and antihydrogen, antihadron-hadron systems, antiproton-proton annihilation, nuclear structure studies with antiprotons, and the FAIR facility for antiproton and ion research.

  11. Inside Hall 193 for the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) ring

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    Installation work is in full swing. A model quadrupole on the left shows where the magnet ring will be. The cables wound on drums are part of the pulse-forming network for the injection kicker. See Annual Report 1979 p. 103, Fig. 9 and photo 7911303. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  12. A radio frequency ring electrode cooler for low-energy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, S. [Sekt. Phys., Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: sophie.heinz@physik.uni-muenchen.de; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35 (Y5), FIN-40351 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Habs, D. [Sekt. Phys., Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hegewisch, S. [Sekt. Phys., Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Huikari, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35 (Y5), FIN-40351 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Nieminen, A. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35 (Y5), FIN-40351 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Rinta-Antila, S. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35 (Y5), FIN-40351 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Schumann, M. [Sekt. Phys., Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Szerypo, J. [Sekt. Phys., Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2004-11-11

    We are investigating a new concept for ion confinement while buffer-gas-cooling low-energy ion beams. Instead of applying the well-established technique of Radio Frequency Quadrupoles (RFQs) where the ions are transversely confined by a quadratic-pseudo potential we are using a stack of thin ring electrodes supplied by an RF field (RF funnel) which creates a box-shaped potential well. In Monte Carlo simulations we have investigated the transmission behavior and cooling performance of the RF funnel. First experimental investigations with ion currents up to 20 nA revealed a promising transmission characteristic which qualifies the RF funnel as high-current cooler.

  13. The PEP-II Project: Low-Energy Ring Design and Project Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2006-01-02

    We describe the present status of the PEP-II project. The project comprises four major systems: Injector, High-Energy Ring (HER), Low-Energy Ring (LER), and Interaction Region (IR). We focus in detail on the design of the LER, as its parameters and requirements are most closely related to those required for the Beijing Tau-Charm Factory rings. The PEP-II LER is a high-current, 3.1-GeV positron ring mounted above the 9-GeV HER. The LER uses a wiggler located in one of its six straight sections to provide emittance control and additional damping. We describe the rather complicated IR, which must transport the LER beam into the plane of the HER, focus it to a common beam size, and separate the beams after the head-on collisions. Both permanent magnet and conventional electromagnets are used in this area. The LER lattice has now adopted a simplified non-interleaved sextupole correction scheme that has reduced the required number of sextupoles substantially. We describe the LER vacuum system, one of the most challenging subsystems in PEP-II. It employs several technologies. In the arcs, aluminum extrusions and titanium sublimation pumps are employed; the straight sections use stainless steel chambers with lumped ion pumps. In the wiggler area, an extended copper photon dump with nonevaporable getter (NEG) pumps is employed to handle the very large synchrotron radiation power. The design of the room-temperature RF system, the bunch-by-bunch longitudinal and transverse feedback systems, and some of the special diagnostics will be described briefly. The PEP-II project remains on schedule to begin commissioning of the HER in April 1997, followed by the LER a year later.

  14. Space Charge Effects and Advanced Modelling for CERN Low Energy Machines

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088716; Rumolo, Giovanni

    The strong space charge regime of future operation of CERN’s circular particle accelerators is investigated and mitigation strategies are developed in the framework of the present thesis. The intensity upgrade of the injector chain of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) prepares the particle accelerators to meet the requirements of the High-Luminosity LHC project. Producing the specified characteristics of the future LHC beams imperatively relies on injecting brighter bunches into the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), the downstream Proton Synchrotron (PS) and eventually the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The increased brightness, i.e. bunch intensity per transverse emittance, entails stronger beam self-fields which can lead to harmful interaction with betatron resonances. Possible beam emittance growth and losses as a consequence thereof threaten to degrade the beam brightness. These space charge effects are partly mitigated by the upgrade of the PSB and PS injection energies. Nevertheless, the space charge tune ...

  15. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-10-24

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap.

  16. Interpretation of Wire-Scanner asymmetric profiles in a Low-Energy ring

    CERN Document Server

    Cieslak-Kowalska, Magdalena Anna

    2016-01-01

    In the CERN PS Booster, wire-scanner profile measurements performed at injection energy are affected by a strong asymmetry. The shape was reproduced with the code PyORBIT, assuming that the effect is due to the beam evolution during the scans, under the influence of space-charge forces and Multiple Coulomb Scattering at the wire itself. Reproducing the transverse profiles during beam evolution allows to use them reliably as input for simulation benchmarking.

  17. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quijada, M. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas UPV/EHU, Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Borisov, A.G. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Universite Paris-Sud, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (France); CNRS, UMR 8625, Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, LCAM, Batiment 351, UPS-11, Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Muino, R.D. [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Centro de Fisica de Materiales, Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Edificio Korta, Avenida de Tolosa 72, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Antiproton beam profile measurements using Gas Electron Multipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, Serge Duarte; Spanggaard, Jens; Tranquille, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    The new beam profile measurement for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is based on a single Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) with a 2D readout structure. This detector is very light, ~0.4% X_0, as required by the low energy of the antiprotons, 5.3 MeV. This overcomes the problems previously encountered with multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) for the same purpose, where beam interactions with the detector severely affect the obtained profiles. A prototype was installed and successfully tested in late 2010, with another five detectors now installed in the ASACUSA and AEgIS beam lines. We will provide a detailed description of the detector and discuss the results obtained. The success of these detectors in the AD makes GEM-based detectors likely candidates for upgrade of the beam profile monitors in all experimental areas at CERN. The various types of MWPC currently in use are aging and becoming increasingly difficult to maintain.

  19. Multiple collision effects on the antiproton production by high energy proton (100 GeV - 1000 GeV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    Antiproton production rates which take into account multiple collision are calculated using a simple model. Methods to reduce capture of the produced antiprotons by the target are discussed, including geometry of target and the use of a high intensity laser. Antiproton production increases substantially above 150 GeV proton incident energy. The yield increases almost linearly with incident energy, alleviating space charge problems in the high current accelerator that produces large amounts of antiprotons.

  20. Ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterberger, Frank [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik

    2011-10-15

    The problem of ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR is studied in the present report. Positive ions are trapped in the negative potential well of the antiproton beam. The ions are produced by the interaction between the antiproton beam and the residual gas. The adverse effects of ion trapping like tune shifts, tune spreads and coherent instabilities are reviewed. The ion production rate by ionization of the residual gas molecules is estimated. The negative potential well and the corresponding electric fields of the antiproton beam are evaluated in order to study the transverse and longitudinal motion of the ions and the accumulation in trapping pockets. The removal of ions can be achieved using clearing electrodes and under certain conditions resonant transverse beam shaking. Diagnostic tools and measurements of trapped ion effects are sketched. (orig.)

  1. Measurement of the Antiproton-Proton Total Cross-Section at the CERN ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a measurement of small angle scattering of antiprotons on protons and of protons on protons at 15/15, 22/22, 26/26 and 31/31 GeV, with the aim of obtaining data on the total cross-section for the scattering of protons on protons, and of determining the ratio of the real to the imaginary scattering amplitude at zero momentum transfer for antiprotons on protons. The measurement is divided into two parts: \\item 1) The measurement of @s^t^o^t(@*p) and @s^t^o^t(pp), using hodoscopes placed at small angles, outside the vacuum pipe, at approximately 9 metres from the intersection point. \\item 2) The measurement of the region in !t!, the momentum transfer squared, around the value !t^c!, where Coulomb and nuclear scattering are equal, in order to deduce the quantity @r = Re f(t=0)/Im f(t=0). This latter measurement is done by employi in earlier @s^t(pp) and @r experiments at the ISR. \\end{enumerate} In both set-ups the measurements are made by recording coincidences between collinear counters in th...

  2. CERN and the high energy frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsesmelis Emmanuel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the particle physics programme at CERN at the high-energy frontier. Starting from the key open questions in particle physics and the large-scale science facilities existing at CERN, concentrating on the Large Hadron Collider(LHC, this paper goes on to present future possibilities for global projects in high energy physics. The paper presents options for future colliders, all being within the framework of the recently updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, and all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics. The paper concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward for high-energy physics research.

  3. Direct detection of antiprotons with the Timepix3 in a new electrostatic selection beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, N.; Aghion, S.; Alozy, J.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Campbell, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lawler, G.; Lebrun, P.; Llopart, X.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Marx, L.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Resch, L.; Røhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Spacek, M.; Storey, J.; Strojek, I. M.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I.; Tlustos, L.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2016-09-01

    We present here the first results obtained employing the Timepix3 for the detection and tagging of annihilations of low energy antiprotons. The Timepix3 is a recently developed hybrid pixel detector with advanced Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold capabilities and has the potential of allowing precise kinetic energy measurements of low energy charged particles from their time of flight. The tagging of the characteristic antiproton annihilation signature, already studied by our group, is enabled by the high spatial and energy resolution of this detector. In this study we have used a new, dedicated, energy selection beamline (GRACE). The line is symbiotic to the AEgIS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator and is dedicated to detector tests and possibly antiproton physics experiments. We show how the high resolution of the Timepix3 on the Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold information allows for a precise 3D reconstruction of the annihilation prongs. The presented results point at the potential use of the Timepix3 in antimatter-research experiments where a precise and unambiguous tagging of antiproton annihilations is required.

  4. Direct detection of antiprotons with the Timepix3 in a new electrostatic selection beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacifico, N., E-mail: nicola.pacifico@cern.ch [Institute of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Allgaten 55, 5007 Bergen (Norway); Aghion, S. [Politecnico of Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Alozy, J. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bonomi, G. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); INFN Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); TIFPA/INFN Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Cabaret, L. [Laboratory Aimé Cotton, University of Paris-Sud, ENS Cachan, CNRS, University Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Caccia, M. [INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Science, University of Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); Campbell, M. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Caravita, R. [Department of Physics, University of Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); INFN Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castelli, F. [INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cerchiari, G. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chlouba, K. [Czech Technical University, Prague, Brehov 7, 11519 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); and others

    2016-09-21

    We present here the first results obtained employing the Timepix3 for the detection and tagging of annihilations of low energy antiprotons. The Timepix3 is a recently developed hybrid pixel detector with advanced Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold capabilities and has the potential of allowing precise kinetic energy measurements of low energy charged particles from their time of flight. The tagging of the characteristic antiproton annihilation signature, already studied by our group, is enabled by the high spatial and energy resolution of this detector. In this study we have used a new, dedicated, energy selection beamline (GRACE). The line is symbiotic to the AEgIS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator and is dedicated to detector tests and possibly antiproton physics experiments. We show how the high resolution of the Timepix3 on the Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold information allows for a precise 3D reconstruction of the annihilation prongs. The presented results point at the potential use of the Timepix3 in antimatter-research experiments where a precise and unambiguous tagging of antiproton annihilations is required.

  5. Antiproton Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2007-01-01

    the radiobiological properties using antiprotons at 50 and 125 MeV from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film. Radiobiological experiments were done with Chinese V79 WNRE hamster cells. Monte Carlo particle...... transport codes were investigated and compared with results obtained from the ionization chambers and alanine pellets. A track structure model have been applied on the calculated particle spectrum, and been used to predict the LET-dependent response of the alanine pellets. The particle transport program...... FLUKA produced data which were in excellent agreement with our ionization chamber measurements, and in good agreement with our alanine measurements. FLUKA is now being used to generate a wide range of depth dose data at several energies, including secondary particle–energy spectra, which will be used...

  6. Decay of Hot Nuclei at Low Spins Produced by Antiproton-Annihilation in Heavy Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS208 \\\\ \\\\ The objective of the experiment is to study (i) the thermal excitation energy distribution of antiproton-induced reactions in heavy nuclei and (ii) the decay properties of hot nuclei at low spins via evaporation, multifragmentation and fission as a function of excitation energy. The experimental set-up consists of 4-$\\pi$ detectors: the Berlin Neutron Ball~(BNB) which is a spherical shell of gadolinium-loaded scintillator liquid with an inner and outer diameter of 40 and 160~cm, respectively. This detector counts the number of evaporated neutrons in each reaction. Inside BNB there is a 4-$\\pi$ silicon ball~(BSIB) with a diameter of 20~cm consisting of 162 detectors which measure energy and multiplicity of all emitted charged nuclear particles. The particles are identified via time of flight, energy and pulse shape correlations.

  7. Measurement of the Antiprotonic Lyman- and Balmer X-rays of $\\overline{p}H$ and $\\overline{p}D$ Atoms at Very Low Target Pressures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the energies and intensities of the n @A 1 (Lyman) and n @A 2 (Balmer) tansitions with high accuracy in both @*H and @*D, from which the strong interaction effects of the 1s- and 2p-level can be extracted. These observables may be related to the antiproton-proton and antiproton-neutron scattering length. \\\\ \\\\ Since in these targets collisional Stark effect occurs, we will stop the antiprotons in extreme thin gaseous targets (pressure as low as 10 Torr), where no Stark effect occurs and the 2-1 transition is favoured. In order to use antiprotons with high efficiency despite of the low target density, we will trap antiprotons of a momentum of 100 MeV/c in a magnetic field of cyclotron characteristics. The antiprotons are decelerated by their energy loss in the target gas. The focusing properties of the magnetic field serve to compensate the multiple scattering and we will end up with a concentrated stopping distribution at the centre. Due to the long orbiting time, back...

  8. Non-perturbative measurement of low-intensity charged particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, M.; Geithner, R.; Golm, J.; Neubert, R.; Schwickert, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Tan, J.; Welsch, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-perturbative measurements of low-intensity charged particle beams are particularly challenging to beam diagnostics due to the low amplitude of the induced electromagnetic fields. In the low-energy antiproton decelerator (AD) and the future extra low energy antiproton rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor the operation efficiency. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based cryogenic current comparators (CCC) have been used for measuring slow charged beams in the nA range, showing a very good current resolution. But these were unable to measure fast bunched beams, due to the slew-rate limitation of SQUID devices and presented a strong susceptibility to external perturbations. Here, we present a CCC system developed for the AD machine, which was optimised in terms of its current resolution, system stability, ability to cope with short bunched beams, and immunity to mechanical vibrations. This paper presents the monitor design and the first results from measurements with a low energy antiproton beam obtained in the AD in 2015. These are the first CCC beam current measurements ever performed in a synchrotron machine with both coasting and short bunched beams. It is shown that the system is able to stably measure the AD beam throughout the entire cycle, with a current resolution of 30 {nA}.

  9. CERN Open Days 2013, Meyrin Campus, ZONE D

    CERN Multimedia

    Photo Service, CERN

    2013-01-01

    D1 : Public Lectures / Conférences ; D2 : Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) ; D3 : Linear Accelerators 2 and 3 (LINAC 2, LINAC 3) ; D4 : Accélérateur linéaire 4 (Linac 4) ; D5 : Computer Centre ; D6 : Antiproton Decelerator (AD) ; D7 : “Pôle énergie”

  10. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  11. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels;

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  12. Antiproton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Jakel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V.; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B.à; Solberg, Timothy D.; Sørensen, Brita S.; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G.; Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton–proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with ∼20–30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the rad...

  13. Physics at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, M.; Walz, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen (Hbar ) and antiprotonic helium (pbar He) atoms. The first 12 years of AD operation saw cold Hbar synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons (e+) and antiprotons (pbar ) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold Hbar was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium (Ps) atoms and pbar . Ground-state Hbar was later trapped for up to ˜1000 s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the pbar He atom, deep ultraviolet transitions were measured to a fractional precision of (2.3-5)×10-9 by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as M/me=1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value known to a similar precision. Microwave spectroscopy of pbar He yielded a measurement of the pbar magnetic moment with a precision of 0.3%. More recently, the magnetic moment of a single pbar confined in a Penning trap was measured with a higher precision, as μ=-2.792845(12)μ in nuclear magnetons. Other results reviewed here include the first measurements of the energy loss (-dE/dx) of 1-100 keV pbar traversing conductor and insulator targets; the cross sections of low-energy (therapy. New experiments under preparation attempt to measure the gravitational acceleration of Hbar or synthesize H. Several other future experiments will also be briefly described.

  14. Classification of high-energy antiprotons on electrons background based on calorimeter data in PAMELA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaeva, O. A.; Alekseev, V. V.; Bogomolov, Yu V.; Lukyanov, A. D.; Malakhov, V. V.; Mayorov, A. G.; Rodenko, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    In modern experimental physics a heterogeneous coordinate-sensitive calorimeters are widely used due to their good characteristics and possibilities to obtain a three-dimensional information of particles interactions. Especially it is important at high-energies when electromagnetic or hadron showers are arise. We propose a quit efficient method to identify antiprotons (positrons) with energies more than 10 GeV on electron (proton) background by calorimeter of such kind. We construct the AdaBoost classifier and SVM to separate particles into two classes, different combinations of energy release along reconstructed particle trajectory were used as feature vector. We test a preliminary version of the method on a calorimeter of the PAMELA magnetic spectrometer. For high-energy particles we got a good quality of classification: it lost about 5 · 10‑2 of antiprotons, and less than 4 · 10‑4 of electrons were classified to antiproton class.

  15. Big research in new dimensions. Thinkers of our time about the actual elementary-particle physics at CERN; Grossforschung in neuen Dimensionen. Denker unserer Zeit ueber die aktuelle Elementarteilchenphysik am CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kommer, Christoph (ed.) [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany); DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Satz, Helmut [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Blanchard, Philippe [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Abt. Theoretische Physik

    2016-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Research from the highest energies to the smallest particles at CERN, the laborious way to the Large Hadronic Collider, CERN as accelerator of techniques, culture, and society, a philosophical and sociological perspective of questions concerning CERN, quark matter research at CERN, the FAIR facility for antiproton and ion research. (HSI)

  16. Precision Measurement of the Energies and Line Shapes of Antiprotonic Lyman and Balmer Transitions From Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS207 \\\\ \\\\ For the study of the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nuclear spin-spin and spin-orbital interaction at threshold a high resolution measurement is proposed of the line shapes and energy shifts of antiprotonic K$\\alpha$ and L$\\alpha$ transitions of hydrogen and helium isotopes. The intense LEAR beam, stopped in the cyclotron trap at low gas pressure, provides a unique~X-ray~source with sufficient brightness. Charge coupled devices with their excellent background rejection and energy resolution allow a precise determination of the strong shifts and widths of the 1s hyperfine states of protonium, in addition the detection of the $\\bar{p}$D K$\\alpha$ transition should be possible. A focussing crystal spectrometer with a resolution $\\Delta$E/E of about l0$ ^- ^{4} $, which is superior in the accuracy of the energy determination by two orders of magnitude as compared to the present detection methods, will be used to measure the energies of the L$\\alpha$ transitions. This permits a first direct measure...

  17. ASACUSA Anti-protonic Helium_Final

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Audiovisual Production Service; CERN AD; Paola Catapano; Julien Ordan, Arzur Catel; Paola Catapano; ASACUSA COLLABORATION

    2016-01-01

    Latest precision measurement of the mass of the proton and the anti proton though the production of antiprotonic helium by the ASACUSA experiment at CERN's antimatter factory, with a beam from the Antiproton Decelerator

  18. Measurement of Antiproton-proton Cross-Sections at Low Antiproton Momenta

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment is designed to measure four different cross sections in the momentum range 150~MeV/c to 600~MeV/c: 1)~~~~the differential elastic \\\\ \\\\ 2)~~~~the differential charge exchange\\\\ \\\\ 3)~~~~the annihilation into charged and neutral pions\\\\ \\\\ 4)~~~~and the total cross section via the optical theorem. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment allows one to search once again and with good precision for baryonium. Of special interest is the existence of the S-meson, for which a signal of about 20~MeV-mb was found in a 1981 experiment (performed in the East Hall).\\\\ \\\\ A second point of special interest is the momentum region below 300~MeV/c because the cross sections are basically unknown. We will be able to explore the momentum dependence of this region for the first time.\\\\ \\\\ The elastic cross section is measured by a cylindrical multiwire proportional chamber and a scintillator hodoscope placed around a scattering chamber under vacuum. The charge exchange cross section is measured by a ring of 32~anti-neutron detector...

  19. Beam position pickup for antiprotons to the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The Antiproton Project, launched for proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS (SPS collider), had a side-line for p-pbar collisions in the ISR. A new transfer line, TT6, was constructed to transport antiprotons from the 26 GeV PS to the injection line TT1 of ISR ring 2. Antiprotons were a scarce commodity. For setting up the lines, beam diagnostic devices in the antiproton path had to work reliably and precisely with just a few low-intensity pilot pules: single bunches of about 2x10**9 antiprotons every few hours. Electrostatic pickup electrodes were used to measure beam position. They could be mounted for measurement in the horizontal plane, as in this picture, or at 90 deg, for the vertical plane.

  20. The Antiproton Decelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    A technician works on the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) ring. This machine slows down antiprotons so that they can combine with anti-electrons (positrons) and produce anti-hydrogen. Experiments are set up on the AD to attempt to store antihydrogen and investigate properties of anti-hydrogen, such as its mass.

  1. antiproton focusing horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Was used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). Making an antiproton beam took a lot of time and effort. Firstly, protons were accelerated to an energy of 26 GeV in the PS and ejected onto a metal target. From the spray of emerging particles, a magnetic horn picked out 3.6 GeV antiprotons for injection into the AA through a wide-aperture focusing quadrupole magnet. For a million protons hitting the target, just one antiproton was captured, 'cooled' and accumulated. It took 3 days to make a beam of 3 x 10^11 - three hundred thousand million - antiprotons.

  2. Antiproton Focus Horn

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Was used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). Making an antiproton beam took a lot of time and effort. Firstly, protons were accelerated to an energy of 26 GeV in the PS and ejected onto a metal target. From the spray of emerging particles, a magnetic horn picked out 3.6 GeV antiprotons for injection into the AA through a wide-aperture focusing quadrupole magnet.For a million protons hitting the target, just one antiproton was captured, 'cooled' and accumulated. It took 3 days to make a beam of 3 x 10^11 -, three hundred thousand million - antiprotons.

  3. Secondary emission monitor for keV ion and antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sosa, Alejandro; Bravin, Enrico; Harasimowciz, Janusz; Welsch, C P

    2013-01-01

    Beam profile monitoring of low intensity keV ion and antiproton beams remains a challenging task. A Sec- ondary electron Emission Monitor (SEM) has been de- signed to measure profiles of beams with intensities below 107 and energies as low as 20 keV. The monitor is based on a two stage microchannel plate (MCP) and a phosphor screen facing a CCD camera. Its modular design allows two different operational setups. In this contribution we present the design of a prototype and discuss results from measurements with antiprotons at the AEgIS experiment at CERN. This is then used for a characterization of the monitor with regard to its possible future use at different facilities.

  4. Search for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    CERN Document Server

    Grzonka, D; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Oelert, W.; Diermaier, M.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Glowacz, B.; Moskal, P.; Zielinski, M.; Wolke, M.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Carmignotto, M.; Horn, T.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Asaturyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Eyrich, W.; Hauenstein, F.; Zink, A.

    2015-01-01

    For the production of a polarized antiproton beam various methods have been suggested including the possibility that antiprotons may be produced polarized which will be checked experimentally. The polarization of antiprotons produced under typical conditions for antiproton beam preparation will be measured at the CERN/PS. If the production process creates some polarization a polarized antiproton beam could be prepared by a rather simple modification of the antiproton beam facility. The detection setup and the expected experimental conditions are described.

  5. Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Antiproton - Interactions at Center of Mass Energy = 24.3 GEV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinay Mohan

    Experiment UA6 measured the inclusive production cross section of pi^0, eta, and omega mesons in the p_{T} range 3.5 to 6.1 GeV/c in the reactions;eqalignno {p + p&to M + Xcrnoalign{hbox {rm and}}|{p} + p& to M + Xcr}where M represents a meson and X any other associated particles, at center of mass energy sqrt{s} = 24.3 GeV. The experiment was located at the CERN SppS collider and utilized a fixed hydrogen gas jet as the target in oppositely circulating proton and antiproton beams of momenta 315 GeV/c. The apparatus could be rotated to select either proton-proton or antiproton-proton interactions. The meson production cross section results were obtained from the analysis of 3.7 inverse picobarns (pb ^{-1}) of pp data collected in 1988 and 3.2 pb^{-1} of pp data collected in 1989. The eta/pi ^0 production ratio is measured to be 0.61 +/- 0.03 +/- 0.07 for pp and 0.62 +/- 0.03 +/- 0.07 for pp. The omega/ pi^0 production ratio is measured to be 0.87 +/- 0.16 +/- 0.13 for pp and 0.84 +/- 0.16 +/- 0.13 for pp. The inclusive pi^0 cross section is determined as a function of p_{T} averaged over the rapidity range 0.6 <= y <= 1.2. Comparison of the production between pp and pp reveals no significant difference. The cross section and production ratios are also compared with results from other experiments and found to be in agreement.

  6. CERN Enters the Second Year AD

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    2001 is the year that physics at CERN's new Antiproton Decelerator (AD) really gets up to speed. Changes to the AD since 2000 mean that this year the three experiments, ASACUSA, ATHENA, and ATRAP have had more intense antiproton beams to work with since physics started on 7 May. CERN's Antiproton Decelerator - major improvements for 2001. The AD is a unique machine. Its job is to decelerate not accelerate particle beams, and it has to handle beam energies that vary by an unprecedented factor of 35 from injection to ejection. Since the machine was designed to operate at fixed energy in its first incarnation as a collector of antiprotons for CERN's 1980s proton antiproton collider, this factor of 35 presented a big challenge to the AD team. The team's design goal was to hang onto a quarter of the injected antiprotons through their vertiginous fall in energy, and to repeat the deceleration cycle once per minute. Improvements to the machine over the winter shutdown and through the first four weeks of 2001 run...

  7. Towards an antiproton measurement with AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachlechner, Andreas [RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    AMS-02 is a multi-purpose high-precision particle detector. It has been onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The antiprotons measurement is an important part of the AMS-02 physics program. An excess above the expected spectrum due to interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar matter can hint at exotic sources like dark matter annihilation. The antiproton-to-proton ratio and the antiproton flux itself may also improve the understanding of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays. Due to the very small fraction of antiprotons in the cosmic radiation of about 10{sup -5} compared to protons a very precise particle identification is needed. The main backgrounds are other singly charged particles like protons, electrons, and pions produced within the detector material itself. At lower energies the ring-imaging Cherenkov detector and the time-of-flight system help to separate light particles from protons. The electromagnetic calorimeter and the transition radiation detector redundantly suppress the electron background. The reconstruction of the charge sign by the magnetic spectrometer is limited by its resolution and has to be taken into account carefully. The strategies to identify antiprotons in the cosmic-ray measurement in different energy regions are presented. Methods to suppress and the effect of the backgrounds to the antiproton-to-proton ratio are discussed.

  8. Calibration of the Breit-Rabi Polarimeter for the PAX Spin-Filtering Experiment at COSY/Jülich and AD/CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The PAX(PolarizedAntiproton eXperiment) experiment is proposed to polarize a stored antiproton beam for use at the planned High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the FAIR facility at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany). The polarization build-up will be achieved by spin-filtering, i.e., by a repetitive passage of the antiproton beam through a polarized atomic hydrogen or deuterium gas target. The experimental setup requires a Polarized Internal gas Target (PIT) surrounded with silicon detectors. The PIT includes an Atomic Beam Source (ABS), the target cell and a Breit-Rabi Polarimeter (BRP). The first phase of the Spin-Filtering Studies for PAX covers the commissioning of the PIT components and themeasurement of an absolute calibration standard for the BRP at the COSY ring in Jülich. The spin-filtering with protons aim at confirming the results of the FILTEX experiment and determine the pp hadronic spin dependent cross sections at 50MeV.The second phase will be realized in the Antiproton Decelerator ring (AD) at CERN to po...

  9. Antiproton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Knudsen, Helge V; Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Ratib, Osman; Solberg, Timothy D; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most important means we have for the treatment of localised tumours. It is therefore essential to optimize the technique, and a lot of effort goes into this endeavour. Since the proposal by Wilson in 1946 [R.R. Wilson, Radiology use of fast protons, Radiology 47 (1946) 487.] that proton beams might be better than photon beams at inactivating cancer cells, hadron therapy has been developed in parallel with photon therapy and a substantial knowledge has been gained on the effects of pions, protons and heavy ions (mostly carbon ions). Here we discuss the recent measurements by the CERN ACE collaboration of the biological effects of antiprotons, and argue that these particles very likely are the optimal agents for radiotherapy.

  10. Antiproton impact ionization of atomic hydrogen and helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 INN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We shall present results for antiproton ionization of H and He ranging from fully differential cross sections to total ionization. The calculations have been made in a coupled pseudostate impact parameter approximation. It will be shown that the interaction between the antiproton and the target nucleus is very important at low energies.

  11. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  12. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  13. Beam Performance and Luminosity Limitations in the High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR)

    CERN Document Server

    Lehrach, A; Hinterberger, F; Maier, R; Prasuhn, D

    2006-01-01

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the future International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt is planned as an antiproton synchrotron and storage ring in the momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c. An important feature of this new facility is the combination of phase space cooled beams with dense internal targets (e.g. pellet targets), resulting in demanding beam parameter of two operation modes: high luminosity mode with peak luminosities up to 2*10^32 cm-2 s-1, and high resolution mode with a momentum spread down to 10^-5, respectively. To reach these beam parameters very powerful phase space cooling is needed, utilizing high-energy electron cooling and high-bandwidth stochastic cooling. The effect of beam-target scattering and intra-beam interaction is investigated in order to study beam equilibria and beam losses for the two different operation modes.

  14. Beam performance and luminosity limitations in the high-energy storage ring (HESR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrach, A.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Hinterberger, F.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.

    2006-06-01

    The high-energy storage ring (HESR) of the future International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt is planned as an antiproton synchrotron storage ring in the momentum range 1.5-15 GeV/ c. An important feature of this new facility is the combination of phase space cooled beams and dense internal targets (e.g. pellet targets), which results in demanding beam parameter requirements for two operation modes: high luminosity mode with peak luminosities to 2×10 32 cm -2 s -1, and high-resolution mode with a momentum spread down to 10 -5. To reach these beam parameters one needs a very powerful phase space cooling, utilizing high-energy electron cooling and high-bandwidth stochastic cooling. The effects of beam-target scattering and intra-beam interaction are investigated in order to study beam equilibria and beam losses for the two different operation modes.

  15. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS: Bulgarians Sue CERN for Leniency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, R

    2000-10-13

    In cash-strapped Bulgaria, scientists are wondering whether a ticket for a front-row seat in high-energy physics is worth the price: Membership dues in CERN, the European particle physics lab, nearly equal the country's entire budget for competitive research grants. Faced with that grim statistic and a plea for leniency from Bulgaria's government, CERN's governing council is considering slashing the country's membership dues for the next 2 years.

  16. Decameron dynamics in the high energy antiproton interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Zakharov, B.G.

    1988-08-25

    The asymptotics of high energy anti pp annihilation is expected to proceed via production of the three-sheet final state. This process corresponds to one of the absorptive parts of the decameron-colour decuplet-antidecuplet exchange in the anti pp forward elastic amplitude. We present a perturbative QCD estimation of the energy-independent decameron contribution to the annihilation cross section consistent with the experimental result of 1.5+-0.1 mb evaluated from the related decameron contribution to the difference of anti pp and pp multiplicity distributions.

  17. LEAR: antiproton extraction lines

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1992-01-01

    Antiprotons, decelerated in LEAR to a momentum of 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy of 5.3 MeV), were delivered to the experiments in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction", dispensing some 1E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. Beam-splitters and a multitude of beam-lines allowed several users to be supplied simultaneously.

  18. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays, The Diffuse High Energy Gamma Ray Background and Anti-protons

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, David; Gavish, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Theories for the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) may imply a significant diffuse background in secondary $\\gamma$-rays from the pair cascads the UHECR initiate when interacting with background light. It is shown that, because the spectrum of these secondary $\\gamma$-rays is softer than the measured diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background in the 10-1000 GeV range, the addition of a hard component from the decay of TeV dark matter particles, subject to the implied constraints on its parameters, improves the fit. It is further argued that any compact astrophysical source of $\\bar p$s is unlikely to be as strong as decay of TeV dark matter particles, given bounds set by neutrino observations. The diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background presently sets the strongest lower bound on the lifetime of TeV dark matter particles, and hence on attendant anti-proton production, and further identification of other contributors to this background will further tighten these constraints.

  19. E710, Proton, Antiproton Elastic Scattering at Tevatron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Sasan

    Experiment E710, located at site E0 of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab, was conceived in order to measure pp elastic scattering. The measured parameters were: the total cross section sigma_{t }, the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward scattering amplitude rho, the nuclear slope parameter B, the nuclear curvature parameter C, the total elastic cross section sigma _{el}, and the single diffractive cross section sigma_{sd} . These measurements were taken at center-of-mass energies of sqrt{s}=1.02 and 1.8 TeV.

  20. Three dimensional biological dose distribution of antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegami, Sara; Boll, Rebecca; Sellner, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Welsch, Carsten P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Cockcroft Institute, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Holzscheiter, Michael H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The goal of external beam cancer therapy is to destroy the tumour while sparing the healthy tissue around it. In hadron therapy, the dose profile of heavy charged particles satisfies this request, because most of the energy is deposited at the end of the particle path, in the Bragg peak. Antiprotons are even more promising, thanks to the extra energy released by annihilation when captured in a normal atom at the end of range. The aim of the AD-4/ACE experiment at CERN is to determine the increase in biological dose near the Bragg peak due to densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons. Initial experiments showed the damage to cells inflicted at the end of the beam for identical damage at the skin level to be four times higher for antiprotons than for protons. The radiation field in a spread-out Bragg peak produced with antiprotons is highly mixed and for proper dose planning knowledge of linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological efficiency (RBE) at any point in the target is needed. We are studying a number of detection methods for their response to mixed radiation fields with the goal to obtain a direct measurement of the 3D LET distribution and report on first results.

  1. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS: CERN Link Breathes Life Into Russian Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R

    2000-10-13

    Without fanfare, 600 Russian scientists here at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory, are playing key roles in building the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a machine that will explore fundamental questions such as why particles have mass, as well as search for exotic new particles whose existence would confirm supersymmetry, a popular theory that aims to unify the four forces of nature. In fact, even though Russia is not one of CERN's 20 member states, most top high-energy physicists in Russia are working on the LHC. Some say their work could prove the salvation of high-energy physics back home.

  2. A Second Generation Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Äystö, J; Lindroos, M; Ravn, H L; Van Duppen, P

    2000-01-01

    The proposed Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) at CERN would be an ideal driver for a proton-driven second-generation Radioactive Nuclear Beam facility. We propose to investigate the feasibility of constructing such a facility at CERN close to the present PS Booster ISOLDE facility. The existing ISOLDE facility would be fed with a 10 micro-amps proton beam from SPL, providing the physics community with a low-intensity experimental area. A second, new facility would be built with target stations deep underground, permitting proton beam intensities of more than 100 micro-amps. The secondary beams can be post-accelerated to 20-100 MeV/u and there will be a storage ring complex and large segmented detectors in the experimental area. Also, benefits from a muon-ion collider or from merging the ions and muons should be investigated. Since the antiproton decelerator would be nearby, the opportunities for antiprotonic radioactive atom studies should be pursued as well.

  3. GEANT4 simulation of the ACE beam line : Measurement of the energy distribution of degraded Antiproton beam and the ToF signal of generated pions.

    CERN Document Server

    BRAHIMI, Nihel

    2014-01-01

    The present document describes my 8 weeks work project as a summer student at the AEgIS experiment under the supervision of Michael Doser and what i have learned during this period . It can be devided into three main tasks which are: Theoretical preparations concerning low energy antiproton physics. Learning the basic principles of GEANT4 simu- lation toolkit. Using GEANT4 platform to follow up the work of two technical students (Logan and Conrad) in designing an experiment (ACE beam line ) which aims at improving the methods of detect- ing matter-antimatter annihilations vertices at low energies in terms of resolution and accuracy using hybrid detectors .

  4. Tune measurement for the CERN proton synchrotron booster rings using DSP in VME

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman-Hatchett, A; D'Amico, T E

    1999-01-01

    The CERN PS Booster (PSB) consists of 4 superposed rings supplied with protons from a 50 MeV Linac The CERN PS Booster (PSB) consists of 4 superposed rings supplied with protons from a 50 MeV Linac. The proton beam is then accelerated to 1 GeV and sent either to the 26 GeV Proton Synchrotron (PS) or to the ISOLDE facility. This is carried out in a multi-cycle mode every 1.2 s. For high-intensity beams, the working-point in the tune diagram needs to be changed considerably during acceleration from 50 MeV to 1 GeV and the repeated measurement of the tunes throughout the cycle is an important requirement. Up to now, tune values were obtained through calculations based on quadrupole currents. However, practical experience has shown the need for a direct tune measurement system. For this purpose, a classical kick technique is used. A fixed amplitude kick of duration equal to one revolution period excites coherent betatron oscillations. For fast treatment, a Digital Signal Processing (DSP) module in a VME-standard ...

  5. The Antiproton Depth-Dose Curve in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth-dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge...

  6. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  7. Status Report on the Antiproton Decelerator (AD)

    CERN Document Server

    Erikson, T; Möhl, D

    2001-01-01

    CERN's new Antiproton Decelerator (AD) has been delivering a 100 MeV/c antiproton beam to three experiments (ASACUSA, AHENA and ATRAP) since July 10th, 2000. In this status report, we summarise the initial performance of the AD, draw provisional conclusions from the first month of operation and finally give some prospects for the future.

  8. Storage ring at HIE-ISOLDE Technical design report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grieser, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Raabe, R.; Blaum, K.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Butler, P. A.; Wenander, F.; Woods, P. J.; Aliotta, M.; Andreyev, A.; Artemyev, A.; Atanasov, D.; Aumann, T.; Balabanski, D.; Barzakh, A.; Batist, L.; Bernardes, A. -P.; Bernhardt, D.; Billowes, J.; Bishop, S.; Borge, M.; Borzov, I.; Boston, A. J.; Brandau, C.; Catford, W.; Catherall, R.; Cederkall, J.; Cullen, D.; Davinson, T.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dracoulis, G.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Egelhof, P.; Estrade, A.; Fischer, D.; Flanagan, K.; Fraile, L.; Fraser, M. A.; Freeman, S. J.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Greenlees, P.; Grisenti, R. E.; Habs, D.; von Hahn, R.; Hagmann, S.; Hausmann, M.; He, J. J.; Heil, M.; Huyse, M.; Jenkins, D.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Joss, D. T.; Kadi, Y.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kay, B. P.; Kiselev, O.; Kluge, H. -J.; Kowalska, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kreim, S.; Kroell, T.; Kurcewicz, J.; Labiche, M.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lestinsky, M.; Lotay, G.; Ma, X. W.; Marta, M.; Meng, J.; Muecher, D.; Mukha, I.; Mueller, A.; Murphy, A. St J.; Neyens, G.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Page, R. D.; Pasini, M.; Petridis, N.; Pietralla, N.; Pfuetzner, M.; Podolyak, Z.; Regan, P.; Reed, M. W.; Reifarth, R.; Reiter, P.; Repnow, R.; Riisager, K.; Rubio, B.; Sanjari, M. S.; Savin, D. W.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schippers, S.; Schneider, D.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Shubina, D.; Siesling, E.; Simon, H.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.; Sonnabend, K.; Steck, M.; Stora, T.; Stoehlker, T.; Sun, B.; Surzhykov, A.; Suzaki, F.; Tarasov, O.; Trotsenko, S.; Tu, X. L.; Van Duppen, P.; Volpe, C.; Voulot, D.; Walker, P. M.; Wildner, E.; Winckler, N.; Winters, D. F. A.; Wolf, A.; Xu, H. S.; Yakushev, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yuan, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zuber, K.; Bosch, F.M.

    2012-01-01

    We propose to install a storage ring at an ISOL-type radioactive beam facility for the first time. Specifically, we intend to setup the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored secondary beams tha

  9. The antiproton depth–dose curve in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, N; Jäkel, O; Knudsen, H V; Kovacevic, S

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth–dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Based on this agreement we calculate the antiproton depth–dose curve for antiprotons and compare it with that for protons and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons.

  10. Neutrons from Antiproton Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    Background: Radiotherapy with Antiprotons is currently investigated by the AD-4/ACE collaboration. The hypothesis is that the additional energy released from the antiprotons annihilating at the target nuclei can enable a reduced dose in the entry channel of the primary beam. Furthermore an enhanced...... relative biological effect (RBE) has already been beam measured in spread out Bragg peaks of antiprotons, relative to that found in the plateau region. However, the antiproton annihilation process is associated with a substantial release of secondary particles which contribute to the dose outside...... the neutron spectrum. Additionally, we used a cylindrical polystyrene loaded with several pairs of thermoluminescent detectors containing Lithium-6 and Lithium-7, which effectively detects thermalized neutrons. The obtained results are compared with FLUKA imulations. Results: The results obtained...

  11. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucá, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We study charged particle production (pT>0.5 GeV /c , |η |<0.8 ) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies √{s }=300 GeV , 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η -ϕ space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  12. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nodulman, L.; Aaltonen, T; Albrow, M; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (p(T) > 0.5 GeV/c, vertical bar eta vertical bar < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies root s = 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta - phi space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  13. Measurement of Cosmic Ray antiproton/proton flux ratio at TeV energies with ARGO-YBJ

    CERN Document Server

    Di Sciascio, G

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons provide an important probe for the study of cosmic-ray propagation in the interstellar space and to investigate the existence of Galactic dark matter. The ARGO-YBJ experiment, located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300 m a.s.l., 606 g/cm$^2$), is the only experiment exploiting the full coverage approach at very high altitude presently at work. The ARGO-YBJ experiment is particularly effective in measuring the cosmic ray antimatter content via the observation of the cosmic rays Moon shadowing effect. Based on all the data recorded during the period from July 2006 through November 2009 and a full Monte Carlo simulation, we searched for the existence of the shadow produced by antiprotons at the few-TeV energy region. No evidence of the existence of antiprotons was found in this energy region. Upper limits to the antip/p flux ratio are set to 5 % at a median energy of 2 TeV and 6 % at 5 TeV with a confidence level of 90 %. In the few-TeV energy range this resul...

  14. ALPHA freezes antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratories like CERN can routinely produce many different types of antiparticles. In 1995, the PS210 experiment formed the first antihydrogen atoms and a few years later, in 2002, ATRAP and ATHENA were already able to produce several thousand of them. However, no experiment in the world has succeeded in ‘trapping’ these anti-atoms in order to study them. This is the goal of the ALPHA experiment, which has recently managed to cool down the antiprotons to just a few Kelvin. This represents a major step towards trapping the anti-atom, thus opening a new avenue into the investigation of antimatter properties.   Members of the ALPHA collaboration working on the apparatus in the Antiproton Decelerator experimental hall at CERN. Just like the atom, the anti-atom is neutral. Unlike the atom, the anti-atom is made up of antiprotons (as opposed to protons in the atom) and positrons (as opposed to electrons). In order to thoroughly study the properties of the anti-atoms, scien...

  15. A Study of the Energy Dependence of the Underlying Event in Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Marchese, Luigi Marchese; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; Devoto, Francesco; D'Errico, Maria; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; D'Onofrio, Monica; Donati, Simone; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kim, Young-Jin; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucà, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Prokoshin, Fedor; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Song, Hao; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We study charged particle production in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta-phi space; toward, away, and transverse. The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the underlying event. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the hard component (initial and final-state radiation) from the beam-beam remnant and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  16. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T., E-mail: ksenofon@ikfia.sbras.ru [Yu. G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, 31 Lenin Avenue, 677891 Yakutsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  17. Probing antimatter gravity - The AEGIS experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerbauer, A.; Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E.; Kimura, M.; Koettig, T.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lebrun, P.; Lehner, S.; Liberadzka, J.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nédélec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petráček, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Rienäcker, B.; Røhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Špaček, M.; Storey, J.; Strojek, I. M.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2016-11-01

    The weak equivalence principle states that the motion of a body in a gravitational field is independent of its structure or composition. This postulate of general relativity has been tested to very high precision with ordinary matter, but no relevant experimental verification with antimatter has ever been carried out. The AEGIS experiment will measure the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen to ultimately 1% precision. For this purpose, a pulsed horizontal antihydrogen beam with a velocity of several 100 m s-1 will be produced. Its vertical deflection due to gravity will be detected by a setup consisting of material gratings coupled with a position-sensitive detector, operating as a moiré deflectometer or an atom interferometer. The AEGIS experiment is installed at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator, currently the only facility in the world which produces copious amounts of low-energy antiprotons. The construction of the setup has been going on since 2010 and is nearing completion. A proof-of-principle experiment with antiprotons has demonstrated that the deflection of antiparticles by a few μm due to an external force can be detected. Technological and scientific development pertaining to specific challenges of the experiment, such as antihydrogen formation by positronium charge exchange or the position-sensitive detection of antihydrogen annihilations, is ongoing.

  18. Démarrage de la nouvelle usine à antimatière du CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    CERN?s unique new antimatter factory, the Antiproton Decelerator (AD2) has begun delivering antiprotons to experiments. These experiments will study antimatter in depth to determine if there is a difference between it and ordinary matter.

  19. The CTF3 team who performed the first electron beam recombination in an isochronous ring at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 0210004_1: Part of CTF3 collaboration. From left to right: T. Ekelof (Uppsala), A. Gallo (LNF), P. Royer (Lausanne), F. Tecker (CERN), L. Rinolfi (CERN), A. Ferrari (Uppsala), R. Corsini (CERN), S. Quaglia, (LNF). Photo 0210004_2: A. Ferrari (left), T. Ekelof (middle) and A. Rydberg (right), from Uppsala University, Sweden, standing where the phase monitor HR.PHM60 is installed. Photo 0210004_4: A. Gallo (LNF) standing in front of the RF deflector designed by INFN-Frascati. Photo 0210004_7: The team who designed the CTF3 complex starting from the existing LEP Pre-Injector. From left to right L. Rinolfi, A. Ferrari, F. Tecker (standing up) and R. Corsini, P. Royer (kneeling down) in front of the electron transfer line between the linac and the combiner ring. Photo 0210004_9: The CTF3 team who performed the first electron beam recombination in an isochronous ring at CERN. From left to right, L. Rinolfi, P. Royer, F. Tecker, R. Corsini standing up in front of the two RF deflectors built at CERN and working...

  20. Thermalization of dense hadronic matter in Au + Au collisions at energies available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Somnath; De, Sudipan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2016-11-01

    The conditions of local thermodynamic equilibrium of baryons (nonstrange, strange) and mesons (strange) are presented for central Au + Au collisions at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) energies using the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The net particle density, longitudinal-to-transverse pressure anisotropy, and inverse slope parameters of the energy spectra of nonstrange and strange hadrons are calculated inside a cell in the central region within rapidity window |y |evolution of the entropy densities at FAIR energies are found to be very similar to the ideal hydrodynamic behavior at top Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy.

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Low Energy Experiments that Measure Fundamental Constants and Test Basic Symmetries

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 , 21 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Low Energy Experiments that Measure Fundamental Constants and Test Basic Symmetries by G. GABRIELSE / Professor of Physics and Chair of the Harvard Physics Department, Spokesperson for the ATRAP Collaboration Lecture 1: Particle Traps: the World's Tiniest Accelerators A single elementary particle, or a single ion, can be confined in a tiny accelerator called a particle trap. A single electron was held this way for more than ten months, and antiprotons for months. Mass spectroscopy of exquisite precision is possible with such systems. CERN's TRAP Collaboration thereby compared the charge-to-mass ratios of the antiproton and proton to a precision of 90 parts per trillion, by far the most stringent CPT test done with a baryon system. The important ratio of the masses of the electron and proton have been similarly measured, as have a variety of ions masses, and the neutron mass is most accurately known from such measurements. An i...

  2. Antiprotonic helium

    CERN Multimedia

    Eades, John

    2005-01-01

    An exotic atom in w hich an electron and an antiproton orbit a helium nucleus could reveal if there are any differences between matter and antimatter. The author describes this unusual mirror on the antiworld (5 pages)

  3. P13, the EMBL macromolecular crystallography beamline at the low-emittance PETRA III ring for high- and low-energy phasing with variable beam focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Michele; Bourenkov, Gleb; Pompidor, Guillaume; Karpics, Ivars; Kallio, Johanna; Bento, Isabel; Roessle, Manfred; Cipriani, Florent; Fiedler, Stefan; Schneider, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    The macromolecular crystallography P13 beamline is part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Integrated Facility for Structural Biology at PETRA III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) and has been in user operation since mid-2013. P13 is tunable across the energy range from 4 to 17.5 keV to support crystallographic data acquisition exploiting a wide range of elemental absorption edges for experimental phase determination. An adaptive Kirk­patrick–Baez focusing system provides an X-ray beam with a high photon flux and tunable focus size to adapt to diverse experimental situations. Data collections at energies as low as 4 keV (λ = 3.1 Å) are possible due to a beamline design minimizing background and maximizing photon flux particularly at low energy (up to 1011 photons s−1 at 4 keV), a custom calibration of the PILATUS 6M-F detector for use at low energies, and the availability of a helium path. At high energies, the high photon flux (5.4 × 1011 photons s−1 at 17.5 keV) combined with a large area detector mounted on a 2θ arm allows data collection to sub-atomic resolution (0.55 Å). A peak flux of about 8.0 × 1012 photons s−1 is reached at 11 keV. Automated sample mounting is available by means of the robotic sample changer ‘MARVIN’ with a dewar capacity of 160 samples. In close proximity to the beamline, laboratories have been set up for sample preparation and characterization; a laboratory specifically equipped for on-site heavy atom derivatization with a library of more than 150 compounds is available to beamline users. PMID:28009574

  4. Feasibility of a ring FEL at low emittance storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, I., E-mail: ilya.agapov@xfel.eu

    2015-09-01

    A scheme for generating coherent radiation at latest generation low emittance storage rings such as PETRA III at DESY (Balewski et al., 2004 [1]) is proposed. The scheme is based on focusing and subsequent defocusing of the electron beam in the longitudinal phase space at the undulator location. The expected performance characteristics are estimated for radiation in the wavelength range of 500–1500 eV. It is shown that the average brightness is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to spontaneous undulator radiation, which can open new perspectives for photon-hungry soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques.

  5. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exihibt high-LET properties. Additionally, the high energy pions are leaving the target with minimal interactions and can be detected external to the body providing a real time feedback on the exact location of the energy deposition. In recent years, we...

  6. The PANDA Experiment at FAIR - Subatomic Physics with Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Messchendorp, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The non-perturbative nature of the strong interaction leads to spectacular phenomena, such as the formation of hadronic matter, color confinement, and the generation of the mass of visible matter. To get deeper insight into the underlying mechanisms remains one of the most challenging tasks within the field of subatomic physics. The antiProton ANnihilations at DArmstadt (PANDA) collaboration has the ambition to address key questions in this field by exploiting a cooled beam of antiprotons at the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) combined with a state-of-the-art and versatile detector. This contribution will address some of the unique features of PANDA that give rise to a promising physics program together with state-of-the-art technological developments.

  7. GPUs for the realtime low-level trigger of the NA62 experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Ammendola, R; Biagioni, A; Chiozzi, S; Cotta Ramusino, A; Fantechi, R; Fiorini, M; Gianoli, A; Graverini, E; Lamanna, G; Lonardo, A; Messina, A; Neri, I; Pantaleo, F; Paolucci, P S; Piandani, R; Pontisso, L; Simula, F; Sozzi, M; Vicini, P

    2015-01-01

    A pilot project for the use of GPUs (Graphics processing units) in online triggering ap- plications for high energy physics experiments (HEP) is presented. GPUs offer a highly parallel architecture and the fact that most of the chip resources are devoted to computa- tion. Moreover, they allow to achieve a large computing power using a limited amount of space and power. The application of online parallel computing on GPUs is shown for the synchronous low level trigger of NA62 experiment at CERN. Direct GPU communication using a FPGA-based board has been exploited to reduce the data transmission latency and results on a first field test at CERN will be highlighted. This work is part of a wider project named GAP (GPU application project), intended to study the use of GPUs in real-time applications in both HEP and medical imagin

  8. Projects for ultra-high-energy circular colliders at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomyagkov, A. V.; Koop, I. A.; Levichev, E. B.; Piminov, P. A.; Sinyatkin, S. V.; Shatilov, D. N.; Benedict, M.; Oide, K.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-12-01

    Within the Future Circular Collider (FCC) design study launched at CERN in 2014, it is envisaged to construct hadron (FCC-hh) and lepton (FCC-ee) ultra-high-energy machines aimed to replace the LHC upon the conclusion of its research program. The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics is actively involved in the development of the FCC-ee electron-positron collider. The Crab Waist (CR) scheme of the collision region that has been proposed by INP and will be implemented at FCC-ee is expected to provide high luminosity over a broad energy range. The status and development of the FCC project are described, and its parameters and limitations are discussed for the lepton collider in particular.

  9. The new low frequency accelerating systems for the CERN PS booster

    CERN Document Server

    Krusche, A

    1998-01-01

    A set of four, ferrite-loaded, low-frequency RF cavities equipped with local RF feedback has been built and installed in the CERN PS Booster rings. Together with the modified existing RF systems they now serve for acceleration as well as RF gymnastics of protons and heavy ions up to the highest beam intensities. The systems specifications with a frequency range of about 0.6 to 1.8 MHz and a nomina l RF peak voltage of 8 kV satisfy specifically the requirements of acceleration on harmonic 1 of the future proton beam for the LHC. The system design has been guided by the request for safety margins for high beam intensity operation and ease of maintenance and repair. Some design aspects are presented as well as the performance achieved.

  10. Measurement of the cosmic ray antiproton/proton flux ratio at TeV energies with the ARGO-YBJ detector

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons provide an important probe to study the cosmic ray propagation in the interstellar space and to investigate the existence of dark matter. Acting the Earth-Moon system as a magnetic spectrometer, paths of primary antiprotons are deflected in the opposite sense with respect to those of the protons in their way to the Earth. This effect allows, in principle, the search for antiparticles in the direction opposite to the observed deficit of cosmic rays due to the Moon (the so-called `Moon shadow'). The ARGO-YBJ experiment, located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300 m a.s.l., 606 g/cm$^2$), is particularly effective in measuring the cosmic ray antimatter content via the observation of the cosmic rays shadowing effect due to: (1) good angular resolution, pointing accuracy and long-term stability; (2) low energy threshold; (3) real sensitivity to the geomagnetic field. Based on all the data recorded during the period from July 2006 through November 2009 and on a fu...

  11. Physicists produce first antiatom

    CERN Multimedia

    Watson, A

    1996-01-01

    Researchers at the European Center for Particle Physics (CERN) created 11 atoms of antihydrogen using the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring. Physicists forecast that the creation of the first antiatoms will aid in the understanding of antimatter.

  12. A Beam Interlock System for CERN High Energy Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Schmidt, R

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (The European Organisation for Nuclear Research) is one of the largest and most complicated machines envisaged to date. The LHC has been conceived and designed over the course of the last 25 years and represents the cutting edge of accelerator technology with a collision energy of 14TeV, having a stored beam energy over 100 times more powerful than the nearest competitor. Commissioning of the machine is already nderway and operation with beam is intended for Autumn 2007, with 7TeV operation expected in 2008. The LHC is set to answer some of the fundemental questions in theoretical physics, colliding particles with such high energy that the inner workings of the quantum world can be revealed. Colliding particles together at such high energy makes very high demands on machine operation and protection. The specified beam energy requires strong magnetic fields that are made in superconducting dipole magnets, these magnets are kept only around two degrees above absolute zero...

  13. The Fermilab recycler ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  14. Antiproton Annihilation Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    propulsion system, a nuclear thermal hydrogen propulsion system, and an antiproton annihilation propulsion system. Since hauling chemical fuel into low...greater. Section 8.4 and Appendix B contain a comparative cost study of a storable chemical fuel propulsion system, a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen

  15. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  16. A detector to search for antiproton decay at the Fermilab antiproton accumulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, T. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Buchanan, C.; Corbin, B.; Lindgren, M.; Muller, T.; Scott, A. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (United States); Geer, S.; Marriner, J.; Martens, M.; Ray, R.; Streets, J.; Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Gustafson, R. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Hu, M.; Snow, G.R. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); APEX Collaboration

    1998-07-11

    We describe the experimental apparatus used by the APEX experiment (Experiment 868) at the Fermilab antiproton accumulator. The experiment is designed to search for decays of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons as they traverse a 3.7 m long evacuated decay tank inserted in a straight section of the antiproton accumulator ring. The detector components in the experimental set-up are discussed individually, and the performance of the experiment during data-taking is described. (orig.)

  17. D{sup -} energy spectrum in toroidal quantum ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, C A; Gutierrez, W; Garcia, L F [Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Marin, J H, E-mail: jhmarin@unal.edu.c [Universidad Nacional-Colombia, Medellin-Colombia, AA3840 (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    The structure of energy spectrum of the negative donor centre in a toroidal-shaped quantum ring with two different morphologies of the cross-section is analyzed. By using the adiabatic procedure we have deduced a one-dimensional wave equation with periodic conditions which describes the low-lying energy levels related to the electrons rotation around the symmetry axis. Our results are in good agreement with those previously obtained as the size of the ring cross-section tends to zero.

  18. SPARC Collaboration: New Strategy for Storage Ring Physics at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Stöhlker, Thomas; Bräuning-Demian, Angela; Lestinsky, Michael; Herfurth, Frank; Maier, Rudolf; Prasuhn, Dieter; Schuch, Reinhold; Steck, Markus

    2014-01-01

    SPARC collaboration at FAIR pursues the worldwide unique research program by utilizing storage ring and trapping facilities for highly-charged heavy ions. The main focus is laid on the exploration of the physics at strong, ultra-short electromagnetic fields including the fundamental interactions between electrons and heavy nuclei as well as on the experiments at the border between nuclear and atomic physics. Very recently SPARC worked out a realization scheme for experiments with highly-charged heavy-ions at relativistic energies in the High-Energy Storage Ring HESR and at very low-energies at the CRYRING coupled to the present ESR. Both facilities provide unprecedented physics opportunities already at the very early stage of FAIR operation. The installation of CRYRING, dedicated Low-energy Storage Ring (LSR) for FLAIR, may even enable a much earlier realisation of the physics program of FLAIR with slow anti-protons.

  19. Serach for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to study polarization effects in the production of antiprotons at the PS test beam line T11 at 3.5 GeV/c momentum. A polarization in the production process has never been studied but if existing it would allow for a rather simple and cheap way to generate a polarized antiproton beam with the existing facilities at CERN.

  20. Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgun, E; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-03-21

    Solar-thermal fuels reversibly store solar energy in the chemical bonds of molecules by photoconversion, and can release this stored energy in the form of heat upon activation. Many conventional photoswichable molecules could be considered as solar thermal fuels, although they suffer from low energy density or short lifetime in the photoinduced high-energy metastable state, rendering their practical use unfeasible. We present a new approach to the design of chemistries for solar thermal fuel applications, wherein well-known photoswitchable molecules are connected by different linker agents to form molecular rings. This approach allows for a significant increase in both the amount of stored energy per molecule and the stability of the fuels. Our results suggest a range of possibilities for tuning the energy density and thermal stability as a function of the type of the photoswitchable molecule, the ring size, or the type of linkers.

  1. ELENA prepares a bright future for antimatter research

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    At its recent session in June, the CERN Council approved the construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) – an upgrade of the existing Antiproton Decelerator. ELENA will allow the further deceleration of antiprotons, resulting in an increased number of particles trapped downstream in the experimental set-ups. This will give an important boost to antimatter research in the years to come.   Layout of the AD experimental hall: the Antiproton Decelerator ring (purple); the ALPHA, ASACUSA, and ATRAP experiments (green); the ACE experiment (not pictured); and the new ELENA ring (blue). The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is CERN’s widely recognized facility for the study of antimatter properties. The recent successes of the AD experiments are just the latest in a long list of important scientific results that started with LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring). The scientific demand for low-energy antiprotons at the AD continues to grow. There are now four experiments runnin...

  2. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  3. A technology developed at CERN captures the sun's energy

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    A civil-engineering company has recently started using thermal solar panels based on ultra-high vacuum technology developed at CERN. By efficiently preventing heat loss, the technology allows water to be heated to several hundred degrees, even in a temperate climate.   The field of solar panels using technology developed at CERN. On Tuesday 15 June the Geneva branch of the civil-engineering company Colas opened a new solar power plant based on ultra-high vacuum technology developed at CERN. Measuring a total of 80 square metres, the environmentally friendly "solar field" heats close to 80,000 litres of bitumen to 180 degrees. "To be able to reach such a high temperature, I drew on the ultra-high vacuum technologies I learned about at CERN", explains Cristoforo Benvenuti, who invented the panels. The ultra-high vacuum is what makes these solar panels so innovative. "It's very attractive because it minimises heat loss", continues Benvenuti. &...

  4. Gas Electron multipliers for low energy beams

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, F; Ropelewski, L; Spanggaard, J; Tranquille, G

    2010-01-01

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) find their way to more and more applications in beam instrumentation. Gas Electron Multiplication uses a very similar physical phenomenon to that of Multi Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPC) but for small profile monitors they are much more cost efficient both to produce and to maintain. This paper presents the new GEM profile monitors intended to replace the MWPCs currently used at CERN’s low energy Antiproton Decelerator (AD). It will be shown how GEMs overcome the documented problems of profile measurements with MWPCs for low energy beams, where the interaction of the beam with the detector has a large influence on the measured profile. Results will be shown of profile measurements performed at 5 MeV using four different GEM prototypes, with discussion on the possible use of GEMs at even lower energies needed at the AD in 2013.

  5. Strangeness production and hypernucleus formation in antiproton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Formation mechanism of fragments with strangeness in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport approach combined with a statistical model (GEMINI) for describing the decays of excited fragments. Production of strange particles in the antiproton induced nuclear reactions is modeled within the LQMD model, in which all possible reaction channels such as elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic scattering in antibaryon-baryon, baryon-baryon and meson-baryon collisions have been included. A coalescence approach is developed for constructing hyperfragments in phase space after de-excitation of nucleonic fragments. The combined approach could describe the production of fragments in low-energy antiproton induced reactions. Hyperfragments are formed within the narrower rapidities and lower kinetic energies. It has advantage to produce heavier hyperfragments and hypernuclides with strangeness s=-2 (double-$\\Lambda$ fra...

  6. The production of dense lead-ion beams for the CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bosser, Jacques; Chanel, M; MacCaferri, R; Molinari, G; Maury, S; Möhl, D; Tranquille, G

    2000-01-01

    To reach the design luminosity for lead-ions in the LHC, the present Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) has to be converted into a Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR). Since the present ECR lead-ion source does not provide sufficient intensity, the main goal of LEIR is to act as a low-energy (4.2MeV/u) accumulator where the ion beam is stacked and cooled (with the help of an electron-cooler) to reach the required intensity and emittances. An experimental program has been carried out at LEAR in recent years in order to test the cooling and stacking process with the present electron-cooler. A variety of results have been reported at previous conferences. This paper will focus on the electron cooling aspects resulting from the afore mentioned experiments. Taking into account the experience

  7. Testing Quantum Chromodynamics with Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, S J

    2004-01-01

    The antiproton storage ring HESR to be constructed at GSI will open up a new range of perturbative and nonperturbative tests of QCD in exclusive and inclusive reactions. I discuss 21 tests of QCD using antiproton beams which can illuminate novel features of QCD. The proposed experiments include the formation of exotic hadrons, measurements of timelike generalized parton distributions, the production of charm at threshold, transversity measurements in Drell-Yan reactions, and searches for single-spin asymmetries. The interactions of antiprotons in nuclear targets will allow tests of exotic nuclear phenomena such as color transparency, hidden color, reduced nuclear amplitudes, and the non-universality of nuclear antishadowing. The AdS/CFT correspondence of large $N_C$ supergravity theory in higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter space with supersymmetric QCD in 4-dimensional space-time has important implications for hadron phenomenology in the conformal limit, including the nonperturbative derivation of counting rul...

  8. Sub-ppm laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and a CPT-violation limit on the antiprotonic charge and mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, M; Eades, J; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Sakaguchi, J; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Horváth, D; Yamazaki, T

    2001-08-27

    Six laser-resonant transitions have been detected in metastable antiprotonic helium atoms produced at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. They include UV transitions from the last metastable states in the v = n-l-1 = 0 and 1 cascades. Zero-density frequencies were obtained from measured pressure shifts with fractional precisions between 1.3 x 10(-7) and 1.6 x 10(-6). By comparing these with QED calculations and the antiproton cyclotron frequency, we deduce that the antiproton and proton charges and masses agree to within 6 x 10(-8) with a confidence level of 90%.

  9. Energy-dependent partial-wave analysis of all antiproton-proton scattering data below 925 MeV/c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Daren; Timmermans, Rob G. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a renewed experimental interest in antiproton-proton scattering with an intense, possibly polarized antiproton beam. On the theoretical side, significant progress has been made in the understanding of the nuclear force from chiral effective field theory. Purpose: We provide a hi

  10. Overlap knock-out effects in the CERN intersecting storage rings (ISR)

    CERN Document Server

    Gourber, J P; Myers, S

    1977-01-01

    Overlap knock-out arises from an overlap between frequencies present in a bunched beam and the betatron frequencies in a stack. The 'single ring' effect in the interaction of a bunched beam with a stack in the same ring. Here the coupling forces are fairly linear and are transmitted by machine elements. The 'two-ring' effect is the interaction of a bunched beam with a stack in the other ring. Here the coupling forces are nonlinear since they are produced by the beam-beam interaction. A brief outline of the general theory of these effects is given. The single ring and two-ring dipole effects have been observed and shown to cause a large increase in the transverse size of the stacked beam. (4 refs).

  11. Parameter optimization for Doppler laser cooling of a low-energy heavy ion beam at the storage ring S-LSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Kazuya; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2014-05-01

    S-LSR is a compact ion storage ring constructed at Kyoto University several years ago. The ring is equipped with a Doppler laser cooling system aimed at beam crystallization. Bearing in mind hardware limitations in S-LSR, we try to find an optimum set of primary experimental parameters for the production of an ultracold heavy ion beam. Systematic molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for this purpose. It is concluded that the detuning and spot size of the cooling laser should be chosen around -42 MHz and 1.5 mm, respectively, for the most efficient cooling of 40 keV ^{24}Mg^+ beams in S-LSR. Under the optimum conditions, the use of the resonant coupling method followed by radio-frequency field ramping enables us to reach an extremely low beam temperature on the order of 0.1 K in the transverse degrees of freedom. The longitudinal degree of freedom can be cooled to close to the Doppler limit; i.e., to the mK range. We also numerically demonstrate that it is possible to establish a stable, long one-dimensionally ordered state of ions.

  12. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  13. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Aghai-Khozani, H; Corradini, M; De Salvador, D; Hayano, R; Hori, M; Kobayashi, T; Leali, M; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Mascagna, V; Prest, M; Seiler, D; Soter, A; Todoroki, K; Vallazza, E; Venturelli, L

    2015-01-01

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ∼130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at 125 keV.

  14. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Star Collaboration; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is to understand the force between nucleons, which is a necessary step for understanding the structure of nuclei and how nuclei interact with each other. Rutherford discovered the atomic nucleus in 1911, and the large body of knowledge about the nuclear force that has since been acquired was derived from studies made on nucleons or nuclei. Although antinuclei up to antihelium-4 have been discovered and their masses measured, little is known directly about the nuclear force between antinucleons. Here, we study antiproton pair correlations among data collected by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), where gold ions are collided with a centre-of-mass energy of 200 gigaelectronvolts per nucleon pair. Antiprotons are abundantly produced in such collisions, thus making it feasible to study details of the antiproton-antiproton interaction. By applying a technique similar to Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity interferometry, we show that the force between two antiprotons is attractive. In addition, we report two key parameters that characterize the corresponding strong interaction: the scattering length and the effective range of the interaction. Our measured parameters are consistent within errors with the corresponding values for proton-proton interactions. Our results provide direct information on the interaction between two antiprotons, one of the simplest systems of antinucleons, and so are fundamental to understanding the structure of more-complex antinuclei and their properties.

  15. Antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation of the sem......Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation...

  16. Antiproton--Proton Scattering Experiments with Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Lenisa, P; Lenisa, Paolo; Rathmann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The document describes the physics case of the PAX experiment using polarized antiprotons, which has recently been proposed for the new Facility for Antiprotons and Ions Research (FAIR) at GSI--Darmstadt. Polarized antiprotons provide access to a wealth of single-- and double--spin observables, thereby opening a new window to physics uniquely accessible at the HESR. The polarized antiprotons would be most efficiently produced by spin--filtering in a dedicated Antiproton Polarizer Ring (APR) using an internal polarized hydrogen gas target. In the proposed collider scenario of the PAX experiment, polarized protons stored in a COSY--like Cooler Storage Ring (CSR) up to momenta of 3.5 GeV/c are bombarded head--on with 15 GeV/c polarized antiprotons stored in the HESR. This asymmetric double--polarized antiproton--proton collider is ideally suited to map, e.g., the transversity distribution in the proton. The proposed detector consists of a large--angle apparatus optimized for the detection of Drell--Yan electron ...

  17. LEP the lord of the collider rings at CERN 1980-2000

    CERN Document Server

    Schopper, Herwig Franz

    2009-01-01

    Housed by a 4 m diameter tunnel of 27 km circumference, with huge underground labs and numerous surface facilities, and set up with a precision of 0.1 mm per kilometer, the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) was not only the largest but also one of the most sophisticated scientific research instrument ever created by Man. Located at CERN, near Geneva, LEP was built during the years 1983 - 1989, was operational until 2000, and corroborated the standard model of particle physics through continous high precision measurements. The Author, director-general of CERN during the crucial period of the construction of LEP, recounts vividly the convoluted decision-making and technical implementation processes - the tunnel alone being a highly challenging geo- and civil engineering project - and the subsequent extremely fruitful period of scientific research. Finally he describes the difficult decision to close down LEP, at a time when the discovery of the Higgs boson seemed within reach. LEP was eventually dismantled...

  18. Autumn study on storage rings

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The first two weeks of October have seen storage ring people from accelerator Laboratories throughout the world at CERN to study the fundamental problems of very high energy protonproton colliding beam machines.

  19. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply

  20. Fifty years of the CERN Proton Synchrotron Volume 2

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Manglunki, Django; Burnet, Jean-Paul; Carli, Christian; Chanel, Michel; Garoby, Roland; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hancock, Steven; Haseroth, Helmut; Hübner, Kurt; Küchler, Detlef; Lewis, Julian; Lombardi, Alessandra; Martini, Michel; Maury, Stephan; Métral, Elias; Möhl, Dieter; Plass, Günther; Rinolfi, Louis; Scrivens, Richard; Steerenberg, Rende; Steinbach, Charles; Vretenar, Maurizio; Zickler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This report sums up in two volumes the first 50 years of operation of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. After an introduction on the genesis of the machine, and a description of its magnet and powering systems, the first volume focuses on some of the many innovations in accelerator physics and instrumentation that it has pioneered, such as transition crossing, RF gymnastics, extractions, phase space tomography, or transverse emittance measurement by wire scanners. The second volume describes the other machines in the PS complex: the proton linear accelerators, the PS Booster, the LEP pre-injector, the heavy-ion linac and accumulator, and the antiproton rings.

  1. Fifty years of the CERN Proton Synchrotron Volume 1

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Carli, Christian; Chanel, Michel; Garoby, Roland; Gilardoni, Simone; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hancock, Steven; Haseroth, Helmut; Hübner, Kurt; Küchler, Detlef; Lewis, Julian; Lombardi, Alessandra; Manglunki, Django; Martini, Michel; Maury, Stephan; Métral, Elias; Möhl, Dieter; Plass, Günther; Rinolfi, Louis; Scrivens, Richard; Steerenberg, Rende; Steinbach, Charles; Vretenar, Maurizio; Zickler,Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This report sums up in two volumes the first 50 years of operation of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. After an introduction on the genesis of the machine, and a description of its magnet and powering systems, the first volume focuses on some of the many innovations in accelerator physics and instrumentation that it has pioneered, such as transition crossing, RF gymnastics, extractions, phase space tomography, or transverse emittance measurement by wire scanners. The second volume describes the other machines in the PS complex: the proton linear accelerators, the PS Booster, the LEP pre-injector, the heavy-ion linac and accumulator, and the antiproton rings.

  2. Software development agreement between CERN and the Indian Department of Atomic Energy

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The development and prototyping work for the LHC computing facility is being organised as a project that includes many scientific institutes and industrial partners, coordinated by CERN. The project is nicknamed LCG (after LHC Computing Grid). Addendum No. 1 to the Protocol dated 24/09/02 to the 1991 co-operation agreement between CERN and the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India defines the collaboration between CERN and DAE on software development for the LCG Prototype Project. Photo 01: Signing the addendum are G. Govindrajan (left), Director of the Electronics and Instrumentation Group at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India and Dr. Hans Hoffmann, CERN Director for Technology Transfer and for Scientific Computing. Looking on are Christoph Eck (far left), resource manager of the LCG Project and Les Robertson, LCG Project Leader. Photo 02: (left to right) Christoph Eck, resource manager of the LCG Project; G. Govindrajan, Director of the Electronics and Instrumentation G...

  3. Software development agreement between CERN and the Indian Department of Atomic Energy

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The development and prototyping work for the LHC computing facility is being organised as a project that includes many scientific institutes and industrial partners, coordinated by CERN. The project is nicknamed LCG (after LHC Computing Grid). Addendum No. 1 to the Protocol dated 24/09/02 to the 1991 co-operation agreement between CERN and the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India defines the collaboration between CERN and DAE on software development for the LCG Prototype Project. Signing the addendum are G. Govindrajan (left), Director of the Electronics and Instrumentation Group at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India and Dr. Hans Hoffmann, CERN Director for Technology Transfer and for Scientific Computing.

  4. Optimization of low ring polycylic aromatic biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, N.; Abdul-Talib, S.; Tay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are recalcitrance and persistence that finally turn into problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered to be the primary mechanism of PAHs removal from the environment due to its organic criteria. This study is carried out to optimize degradation process of low ring PAHs. Bacteria used in this study was isolated from sludge collected from Kolej Mawar, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor. Working condition namely, substrate concentration, bacteria concentration, pH and temperature were optimized. PAHs in the liquid sample was extracted by using solid phase microextractio equipped with a 7 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SPME fibr. Removal of PAHs were assessed by measuring PAHs concentration using GC-FID. Results from the optimization study of biodegradation indicated that maximum rate of PAHs removal occurred at 100 mgL-1 of PAHs, 10% bacteria concentration, pH 7.0 and 30°C. These working condition had proved the effectiveness of using bacteria in biodegradation process of PAHs.

  5. Cosmic ray antiproton measurements in the 4-19 GeV energy range using the NMSU/WiZard-matter antimatter superconducting spectrometer 2 (MASS2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Brunetti, M.T.; Codini, A.; Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy)]|[INFN, Rome (Italy); Hof, M. [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Golden, R.L.; Stochaj, S.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Brancaccio, F.M. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    The p/p-ratio from 4 to 19 GeV has been measured using the NMSU/WiZard balloon borne matter antimatter superconducting spectrometer (MASS2) instrument. This is the first confirmation of the cosmic ray antiproton component made in this energy range since their discovery in 1979. The MASS2 instrument is an updated version of the instrument flown in 1979. The p/p- ratio is 1.52x10{sup -}4.

  6. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Welsch, C P; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Knudsen, H; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  7. Mr Bikash Sinha, Director of SAHA & VECC and Prof. Rolf Heuer, Director general of CERN, sign a collaboration agreements between SAHA (Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics), VECC (Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre), India and CERN ISOLDE.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    Mr Bikash Sinha, Director of SAHA & VECC and Prof. Rolf Heuer, Director general of CERN, sign a collaboration agreements between SAHA (Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics), VECC (Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre), India and CERN ISOLDE.

  8. Simulation study of elliptic flow of charged hadrons produced in Au + Au collisions at energies available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S.; Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A.

    2017-01-01

    Centrality and system geometry dependence of azimuthal anisotropy of charged hadrons measured in terms of the elliptic flow parameter are investigated using Au+Au event samples at incident beam energy 20 A and 40 A GeV generated by ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) and a multiphase transport (AMPT) models. The Monte Carlo-Glauber model is employed to estimate the eccentricity of the overlapping zone at an early stage of the collisions. Anisotropies present both in the particle multiplicity distribution and in the kinetic radial expansion are examined by using standard statistical and phenomenological methods. In the context of the upcoming Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment to be held at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), the present set of simulated results provide us not only with an opportunity to examine the expected collective behavior of hadronic matter at high baryon density and moderate temperature, but when compared with similar results obtained from Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments, they also allow us to investigate how anisotropy of hadronic matter may differ or agree with its low-baryon-density and high-temperature counterpart.

  9. Antiprotons get biological

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    After its final run in September, the first results of the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) look very promising. It was the first experiment to take data on the biological effects of antiproton beams to evaluate the potential of antiprotons in radiation therapy.

  10. Nuclear dynamics induced by antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Reaction dynamics in collisions of antiprotons on nuclei is investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics model. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions of antiprotons on nucleons have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca and $^{181}$Ta from a low to high incident momenta. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the dynamics of particle production in phase space. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions, which lead to the delayed emission in antiproton-nucleus collisions.

  11. Binding Energy of Excitons in a Quantum Ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2008-01-01

    The binding energy of excitons confined to a quantum ring under the influence of perpendicular homogeneous magnetic field is calculated as a function of the ring radius. Calculations are made by using the method of exact diagonalization within the effective-mass approximation. The feature of binding energy of the ground state as a function of the ring radius for several values of the magnetic field has been revealed. The interesting feature of our study is that, in a quantum ring, the geometric structure of excitons may reveal transition.

  12. Pion, Kaon and Antiproton Production in $Pb+Pb$ Collisions at LHC Energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV : A Model-based Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Guptaroy, P

    2014-01-01

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) had produced a vast amount of high precision data for high energy heavy ion collision. We attempt here to study (i) transverse momenta spectra, (ii) $K/\\pi$, $p/\\pi$ ratio behaviours, (iii)rapidity distribution, and (iv) the nuclear modification factors of the pion, kaon and antiproton produced in $p+p$ and $Pb+Pb$ collisions at energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV, on the basis of Sequential Chain Model (SCM). Comparisons of the model-based results with the measured data on these observables are generally found to be modestly satisfactory.

  13. The construction of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter: delivery of the 3rd and 4th endcap "Dees" and Ring Flanges to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Delivery of the 3rd and 4th Dees and Ring Flanges of the CMS-ECAL endcaps to CERN. The pictures show also an endcap crystal with its VPT (Vacuum PhotoTriode), the aluminium blackplates of the endcap Dees and four mock supercrystals (5x5 crystals) attached in their position on the backplate, along with 138 positional spacers. Finally, endcap assembly in the CMS construction hall in Cessy (neighbouring France) is also shown.

  14. LHC to skip low-energy test runs

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartwright, Jon

    2007-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider will not be ready in time to perform a low-energy "engineering run", which was originally scheduled to take place this November, according to an official at CERN. This will leave the operators no chance to gain exerinece with the particle accelerator's steering and detection systems before the high-energy runs begin in spring next year." (1 page)

  15. Channeling of high-energy particles in bent crystals - Experiments at the CERN SPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurichter, A.; Biino, C.; Clément, M.; Doble, N.; Elsener, K.; Fidecaro, G.; Freund, A.; Gatignon, L.; Grafström, P.; Gyr, M.; Hage-Ali, M.; Herr, W.; Keppler, P.; Kirsebom, K.; Klem, J.; Major, J.; Medenwaldt, R.; Mikkelsen, U.; Møller, S. P.; Siffert, P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Vilakazi, Z. Z.; Weisse, E.

    2000-04-01

    During the latest decade, experiments have been performed at the CERN SPS to investigate the use of high-energy channeled nuclei in bent crystals for extraction, beam splitting and beam bending. An understanding of channeling in a bent crystal with extraction and deflection efficiencies for different energies, crystal types and ions has been developed. Furthermore, the long-standing question of radiation damage has been addressed with encouraging outcome. This makes extrapolations possible for the construction of, e.g., an extraction device for the LHC at CERN, RHIC at Brookhaven or new splitting elements in high-energy beams.We present the main results obtained and discuss existing and future applications of bent crystals in high-energy physics.

  16. Design Considerations for High Energy Electron -- Positron Storage Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, B.

    1966-11-01

    High energy electron-positron storage rings give a way of making a new attack on the most important problems of elementary particle physics. All of us who have worked in the storage ring field designing, building, or using storage rings know this. The importance of that part of storage ring work concerning tests of quantum electrodynamics and mu meson physics is also generally appreciated by the larger physics community. However, I do not think that most of the physicists working tin the elementary particle physics field realize the importance of the contribution that storage ring experiments can make to our understanding of the strongly interacting particles. I would therefore like to spend the next few minutes discussing the sort of things that one can do with storage rings in the strongly interacting particle field.

  17. Study of X-Ray and $\\gamma$-Ray Spectra from Antiprotonic Atoms at the Slowly Extracted Antiproton Beam of LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will study the X-ray spectra of antiprotonic atoms and the $\\gamma$ spectra of residual nuclei after the antiproton absorption. We intend to begin with measurements on selected isotopically pure targets. Strong interaction effects, the antiproton absorption and the atomic cascade are analysed through the measurement of energies, lineshapes, relative and absolute intensities of all observable lines. The experiments are continued to determine st in resolved fine structure levels and in different isotopes of the same element. Coincidence techniques may be applied. All components of the experimental set-up are already existing from previous experiments and we could begin the measurements with any slowly extracted beam of low energy at LEAR.

  18. A Combined Interpretation of CR Nuclei and Antiproton High Energy Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Evoli, C; Grasso, D; Maccione, L

    2009-01-01

    In the last months several ballon and satellite experiments improved significantly our knowledge of cosmic rays (CR) spectra at high energy. In particular CREAM allowed to measure B/C, C/O and N/O up to 1 TeV and PAMELA the anti-p/p ratio up to 100 GeV with unprecedented accuracy. These measurements offer a valuable probe of CR propagation properties. We performed a statistical analysis to test the compatibility of these results, as well as other most significant experimental data, with the predictions of a new numerical CR diffusion package (DRAGON). We found that above 1 GeV all data are consistent with a diffusion scenario in a well defined range of values of the diffusion coefficient energy power index and normalization.

  19. ASACUSA hits antiproton jackpot

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Japanese-European ASACUSA collaboration, which takes its name from the oldest district of Tokyo, approaches the antimatter enigma in a different way from the other two AD experiments, by inserting antiprotons into ordinary atoms. Last month the collaboration succeeded in trapping about a million antiprotons. The ASACUSA antiproton trap (lower cylinder), surmounted by its liquid helium reservoir. Looking on are Ken Yoshiki-Franzen, Zhigang Wang, Takahito Tasaki, Suzanne Reed, John Eades, Masaki Hori, Yasunori Yamazaki, Naofumi Kuroda, Jun Sakaguchi, Berti Juhasz, Eberhard Widmann and Ryu Hayano. A key element of the ASACUSA apparatus is its decelerating Radiofrequency Quadrupole magnet, RFQD. After tests with protons in Aarhus, this was installed in ASACUSA's antiproton beam last October (Bulletin 41/2000, 9 October 2000). Constructed by Werner Pirkl's group in PS Division, the RFQD works by applying an electric field to the AD antiproton pulse the opposite direction to its motion. As the antiprotons slo...

  20. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  1. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  2. Low-energy neutrino factory design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; /Fermilab /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Bogacz, S.A.; /Jefferson Lab; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    The design of a low-energy (4 GeV) neutrino factory (NF) is described, along with its expected performance. The neutrino factory uses a high-energy proton beam to produce charged pions. The {pi}{sup {+-}} decay to produce muons ({mu}{sup {+-}}), which are collected, accelerated, and stored in a ring with long straight sections. Muons decaying in the straight sections produce neutrino beams. The scheme is based on previous designs for higher energy neutrino factories, but has an improved bunching and phase rotation system, and new acceleration, storage ring, and detector schemes tailored to the needs of the lower energy facility. Our simulations suggest that the NF scheme we describe can produce neutrino beams generated by {approx} 1.4 x 10{sup 21} {mu}{sup +} per year decaying in a long straight section of the storage ring, and a similar number of {mu}{sup -} decays.

  3. Measurement and simulation of lineal energy distribution at the CERN high energy facility with a tissue equivalent proportional counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollet, S; Autischer, M; Beck, P; Latocha, M

    2007-01-01

    The response of a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) in a mixed radiation field with a neutron energy distribution similar to the radiation field at commercial flight altitudes has been studied. The measurements have been done at the CERN-EU High-Energy Reference Field (CERF) facility where a well-characterised radiation field is available for intercomparison. The TEPC instrument used by the ARC Seibersdorf Research is filled with pure propane gas at low pressure and can be used to determine the lineal energy distribution of the energy deposition in a mass of gas equivalent to a 2 microm diameter volume of unit density tissue, of similar size to the nuclei of biological cells. The linearity of the detector response was checked both in term of dose and dose rate. The effect of dead-time has been corrected. The influence of the detector exposure location and orientation in the radiation field on the dose distribution was also studied as a function of the total dose. The microdosimetric distribution of the absorbed dose as a function of the lineal energy has been obtained and compared with the same distribution simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code. The dose equivalent was calculated by folding this distribution with the quality factor as a function of linear energy transfer. The comparison between the measured and simulated distributions show that they are in good agreement. As a result of this study the detector is well characterised, thanks also to the numerical simulations the instrument response is well understood, and it's currently being used onboard the aircrafts to evaluate the dose to aircraft crew caused by cosmic radiation.

  4. Moon Shadow by Cosmic Rays under the Influence of Geomagnetic Field and Search for Antiprotons at Multi-TeV Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B S; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang Zhaxisangzhu, Yi; Zhou, X X

    2007-01-01

    We have observed the shadowing of galactic cosmic ray flux in the direction of the moon, the so-called moon shadow, using the Tibet-III air shower array operating at Yangbajing (4300 m a.s.l.) in Tibet since 1999. Almost all cosmic rays are positively charged; for that reason, they are bent by the geomagnetic field, thereby shifting the moon shadow westward. The cosmic rays will also produce an additional shadow in the eastward direction of the moon if cosmic rays contain negatively charged particles, such as antiprotons, with some fraction. We selected 1.5 x10^{10} air shower events with energy beyond about 3 TeV from the dataset observed by the Tibet-III air shower array and detected the moon shadow at $\\sim 40 \\sigma$ level. The center of the moon was detected in the direction away from the apparent center of the moon by 0.23$^\\circ$ to the west. Based on these data and a full Monte Carlo simulation, we searched for the existence of the shadow produced by antiprotons at the multi-TeV energy region. No evid...

  5. An Energy Recovery Electron Linac On Ring Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolitsa Merminga; Geoffrey Krafft; Valeri Lebedev; Ilan Ben-Zvi

    2001-09-01

    Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33} (per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. Electron beam polarization appears to be crucial for many of the experiments. Two accelerator design scenarios have been examined in detail: colliding rings and recirculating linac-on-ring. Although the linac-on-ring scenario is not as well developed as the ring-ring scenario, comparable luminosities appear feasible. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations; (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors; (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. This technology has been demonstrated at Jefferson Lab's IR FEL with cw current up to 5 mA and beam energy up to 50 MeV. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at higher currents (a few hundred mA) and higher energies (a few GeV) as well. The report begins with a brief overview of Jefferson Lab's experience with energy recovery and summarize its benefits. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented next. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed next and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  6. Colliding beam physics at Fermilab: interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.K. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the colliding beams experment department at Fermilab was to bring about collisions of the stored beams in the energy doubler/saver and main ring, and construct experimental areas with appropriate detectors. To explore the feasibility of using the main ring as a storage device, several studies were carried out to investigate beam growth, loss, and the backgrounds in detectors at possible intersection regions. This range of developments constituted the major topics at the 1977 Summer Study reported here. Emphasis in part one is on interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding. 40 papers from this part are included in the data base. (GHT)

  7. In-medium nuclear interactions of low-energy hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2007-11-01

    KN(ρ) beyond that expected from tKNfree within the impulse approximation. Attempts to explain the extra absorptivity for the relatively weak interaction of K mesons in terms of a hypothetical exotic S=+1 pentaquark Θ+ strength are reviewed. For antiprotons the exceptionally broad data base due to the recent results of the PS209 collaboration at CERN are analyzed, together with results of radiochemical experiments. We discuss the dependence of the phenomenological pbar-nucleus interaction on the model adopted for the neutron density, showing how the neutron densities favored by our comprehensive analysis are compatible with densities from other sources, including our own analysis of pionic atoms. It is also shown how the strong absorptivity of the pbar-nucleus interaction, which leads to the prediction of saturation of widths in deeply bound pbar-atom states, also explains the observed saturation effects in low-energy pbar annihilation on nuclei. For Σ hyperons we review the evidence, from continuum Σ- hypernuclear (π-,K+) spectra obtained recently at KEK on C, Si, Ni, In and Bi, for substantial repulsion in the Σ-nucleus interaction, and the relationship to the inner repulsion established earlier from the density-dependence analysis of Σ- atoms and by analyses of past (K-,π±) AGS experiments. Lastly, for Ξ hyperons we review prospects of measuring X-ray spectra in Ξ- atoms and thereby extracting meaningful information on the Ξ-nucleus interaction. The significance of the latter to the physics of ΛΛ hypernuclei and to extrapolation into multistrange hypernuclei are briefly reviewed.

  8. Measurement of cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum at solar minimum with a long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Haino, S; Hams, T; Hasegawa, M; Horikoshi, A; Kim, K C; Kusumoto, A; Lee, M H; Makida, Y; Matsuda, S; Matsukawa, Y; Mitchell, J W; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, R; Ormes, J F; Sakai, K; Sasaki, M; Seo, E S; Shinoda, R; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Thakur, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons has been measured in the range 0.17 to 3.5 GeV, based on 7886 antiprotons collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The antiproton spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary antiproton calculations. Cosmologically primary antiprotons have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated antiproton spectra. The BESS-Polar II result shows no evidence of primary antiprotons originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  9. Low-energy neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Ludhova, Livia

    2016-01-01

    There exist several kinds of sources emitting neutrinos in the MeV energy range. These low-energy neutrinos from different sources can be often detected by the same multipurpose detectors. The status-of-art of the feld of solar neutrinos, geoneutrinos, and the search for sterile neutrino with artifcial neutrino sources is provided here; other neutrino sources, as for example reactor or high-energy neutrinos, are described elsewhere. For each of these three felds, the present-day motivation and open questions, as well as the latest experimental results and future perspectives are discussed.

  10. High Energy Booster Options for a Future Circular Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Stoel, Linda; Bartmann, Wolfgang; Burkart, Florian; Goddard, Brennan; Herr, Werner; Kramer, Thomas; Milanese, Attilio; Rumolo, Giovanni; Shaposhnikova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In case a Future Circular Collider for hadrons (FCC-hh) is constructed at CERN, the tunnels for SPS, LHC and the 100 km collider will be available to house a High Energy Booster (HEB). The different machine options cover a large technology range from an iron-dominated machine in the 100 km tunnel to a superconducting machine in the SPS tunnel. Using a modified LHC as reference, these options are compared with respect to their energy reach, magnet technology and filling time of the collider. Potential issues with beam transfer, reliability and beam stability are presented.

  11. Proceedings of the 2011 CERN - Latin American School of High-Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grojean, C.; Mulders, M.; Spiropulu (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    The CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lectures on quantum field theory, quantum chromodynamics, flavour physics and CP-violation, physics beyond the Standard Model, neutrino physics, particle cosmology, ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and heavy-ion physics, as well as a presentation of recent results form the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and short introduction to the principles of particle physics instrumentation.

  12. 5th CERN - Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Spiropulu, M; CLASHEP 2009; CLASHEP2009

    2010-01-01

    The CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lectures on quantum field theory, quantum chromodynamics, physics beyond the Standard Model, neutrino physics, flavour physics and CP violation, particle cosmology, high-energy astro-particle physics, and heavy-ion physics, as well as trigger and data acquisition, and commissioning and early physics analysis of the ATLAS and CMS experiments. Also included are write-ups of short review projects performed by the student discussions groups.

  13. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    2010-01-01

    Proceedings of the Japan Academy, Series B Vol. 86 (2010) No. 1 P 1-10 Language: Next Article http://dx.doi.org/10.2183/pjab.86.1 JST.JSTAGE/pjab/86.1 Reviews Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants Ryugo S. HAYANO1) 1) Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo Released 2010/01/14 Keywords: antiproton, CERN, fundamental physical constants, laser spectroscopy Full Text PDF [1604K] Abstracts References(25) Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended val...

  14. Progress in Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Drendel, Brian; Gollwitzer, Keith; Johnson, Stan; Lebedev, Valeri; Leveling, Anthony; Morgan, James; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Peterson, Dave; Sondgeroth, Alan; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Fermilab Collider Run II has been ongoing since 2001. During this time peak luminosities in the Tevatron have increased from approximately 10 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1} to 300 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup 02}sec{sup -1}. A major contributing factor in this remarkable performance is a greatly improved antiproton production capability. Since the beginning of Run II, the average antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 2 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr to about 24 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. Peak antiproton stacking rates presently exceed 28 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. The antiproton stacking rate has nearly doubled since 2005. It is this recent progress that is the focus of this paper. The process of transferring antiprotons to the Recycler Ring for subsequent transfer to the collider has been significantly restructured and streamlined, yielding additional cycle time for antiproton production. Improvements to the target station have greatly increased the antiproton yield from the production target. The performance of the Antiproton Source stochastic cooling systems has been enhanced by upgrades to the cooling electronics, accelerator lattice optimization, and improved operating procedures. In this paper, we will briefly report on each of these modifications.

  15. Low-Mass Dileptons at the CERN-SPS Evidence for Chiral Restoration?

    CERN Document Server

    Rapp, R

    1999-01-01

    Using a rather complete description of the in-medium $\\rho$ spectral function - being constrained by various independent experimental information - we calculate pertinent dilepton production rates from hot and dense hadronic matter. The strong broadening of the $\\rho$ resonance entails a reminiscence to perturbative $q\\bar q$ annihilation rates in the vicinity of the phase boundary. The application to dilepton observables in Pb(158AGeV)+Au collisions - incorporating recent information on the hadro-chemical composition at CERN-SpS energies - essentially supports the broadening scenario. Possible implications for the nature of chiral symmetry restoration are outlined.

  16. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghai-Khozani, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Barna, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Corradini, M. [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy); Salvador, D. De [Università di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Hayano, R. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Hori, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Kobayashi, T. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V. [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy); Prest, M. [Università degli Studi dell’Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia (Italy); Seiler, D. [TUM Department of Physics E12 (Germany); Soter, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik (Germany); Todoroki, K. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Vallazza, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Venturelli, L., E-mail: venturelli@bs.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Brescia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ∼130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at ∼125 keV.

  17. Gem Detectors For the Transverse Profile Measurement of Low Energy Antiprotons and High Energy Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Spanggaard, J; Duarte Pinto, S; Tranquille, G

    2013-01-01

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) are finding more and more applications in beam instrumentation. Gas Electron Multiplication is a very similar physical phenomenon to that which occurs in Multi Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPC), but for small profile monitors GEMs are much more cost effective to produce and maintain. \

  18. Enhanced production of low-mass electron-positron pairs in 40-AGeV Pb-Au collisions at the CERN SPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamová, D; Agakichiev, G; Appelshäuser, H; Belaga, V; Braun-Munzinger, P; Cherlin, A; Damjanović, S; Dietel, T; Dietrich, L; Drees, A; Esumi, S I; Filimonov, K; Fomenko, K; Fraenkel, Z; Garabatos, C; Glässel, P; Hering, G; Holeczek, J; Kushpil, V; Lenkeit, B; Maas, A; Marín, A; Milosević, J; Milov, A; Miśkowiec, D; Panebrattsev, Yu; Petchenova, O; Petrácek, V; Pfeiffer, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Rehak, P; Richter, M; Sako, H; Schmitz, W; Sedykh, S; Seipp, W; Sharma, A; Shimansky, S; Slívová, J; Specht, H J; Stachel, J; Sumbera, M; Tilsner, H; Tserruya, I; Wessels, J P; Wienold, T; Windelband, B; Wurm, J P; Xie, W; Yurevich, S; Yurevich, V

    2003-07-25

    We report on first measurements of low-mass electron-positron pairs in Pb-Au collisions at the CERN SPS beam energy of 40 AGeV. The observed pair yield integrated over the range of invariant masses 0.2e(+)e(-) annihilation with a modified rho propagator. They may be linked to chiral symmetry restoration and support the notion that the in-medium modifications of the rho are more driven by baryon density than by temperature.

  19. Oscillations at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Dwyer, D A

    2015-01-01

    A concise summary of the "Oscillation at low energies" parallel session at the 2014 Neutrino Oscillation Workshop is provided. Plans to use man-made neutrinos and antineutrinos to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, search for sterile neutrinos, and to observe coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering were discussed. Potential measurements of solar neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, and geoneutrinos are also summarized.

  20. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Blüm, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L. M.

    1992-09-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cyclotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm3. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH4 drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman α transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time.

  1. Concept for the Antiproton Production Target at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Knie, K; Franzke, B; Gostishchev, V; Steck, M; Sievers, P

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the status of the antiproton (pbar) production area at the future FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) complex at GSI, Darmstadt [1]. This area is composed of the pbar production target, a magnetic horn for the collection of the pbars, and the pbar separator between target and Collector Ring (CR). The emphasis is on the optimization of the accumulation rate of antiprotons to maximize the expected peak and average luminosity for the experiment. As the doses in the target area will be very high, also radiation protection issues will be addressed.

  2. Parton cascade description of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at CERN SPS energies?

    CERN Document Server

    Kinder-Geiger, Klaus; Geiger, Klaus; Srivastava, Dinesh Kumar

    1997-01-01

    We examine Pb+Pb collisions at CERN SPS energy 158 A GeV, by employing the earlier developed and recently refined parton-cascade/cluster-hadronization model and its Monte Carlo implementation. This space-time model involves the dynamical interplay of perturbative QCD parton production and evolution, with non-perturbative parton-cluster formation and hadron production through cluster decays. Using computer simulations, we are able to follow the entwined time-evolution of parton and hadron degrees of freedom in both position and momentum space, from the instant of nuclear overlap to the final yield of particles. We present and discuss results for the multiplicity distributions, which agree well with the measured data from the CERN SPS, including those for K mesons. The transverse momentum distributions of the produced hadrons are also found to be in good agreement with the preliminary data measured by the NA49 and the WA98 collaboration for the collision of lead nuclei at the CERN SPS. The analysis of the time ...

  3. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in low-mass bottom-quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Majersky, O.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We report a measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry, AFB , in b b ¯ pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions and identified by muons from semileptonic b -hadron decays. The event sample is collected at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector and corresponds to 6.9 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We obtain an integrated asymmetry of AFB(b b ¯ ) =(1.2 ±0.7 )% at the particle level for b -quark pairs with invariant mass, mb b ¯ , down to 40 GeV /c2 and measure the dependence of AFB(b b ¯ ) on mb b ¯ . The results are compatible with expectations from the standard model.

  4. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in low-mass bottom-quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernández; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; López, O González; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Majersky, O; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Fernández, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2016-01-01

    We report a measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry, $A_{FB}$, in $b\\bar{b}$ pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions and identified by muons from semileptonic $b$-hadron decays. The event sample was collected at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV with the CDF II detector and corresponds to 6.9 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. We obtain an integrated asymmetry of $A_{FB}(b\\bar{b})=(1.2 \\pm 0.7)$\\% at the particle level for $b$-quark pairs with invariant mass, $m_{b\\bar{b}}$, down to $40$ GeV/$c^2$ and measure the dependence of $A_{FB}(b\\bar{b})$ on $m_{b\\bar{b}}$. The results are compatible with expectations from the standard model.

  5. CERN Rocks

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 15th CERN Hardronic Festival took place on 17 July on the terrace of Rest 3 (Prévessin). Over 1000 people, from CERN and other International Organizations, came to enjoy the warm summer night, and to watch the best of the World's High Energy music. Jazz, rock, pop, country, metal, blues, funk and punk blasted out from 9 bands from the CERN Musiclub and Jazz club, alternating on two stages in a non-stop show.  The night reached its hottest point when The Canettes Blues Band got everybody dancing to sixties R&B tunes (pictured). Meanwhile, the bars and food vans were working at full capacity, under the expert management of the CERN Softball club, who were at the same time running a Softball tournament in the adjacent "Higgs Field". The Hardronic Festival is the main yearly CERN music event, and it is organized with the support of the Staff Association and the CERN Administration.

  6. Energy Extraction in the CERN Large Hadron Collider a Project Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Kazmine, B; Medvedko, A S; Sytchev, V V; Vasilev, L B

    2001-01-01

    In case of a resistive transition (quench), fast and reliable extraction of the magnetic energy, stored in the superconducting coils of the electromagnets of a particle collider, represents an important part of its magnet protection system. In general, the quench detectors, the quench heaters and the cold by-pass diodes across each magnet, together with the energy extraction facilities provide the required protection of the quenching superconductors against damage due to local energy dissipation. In CERN's LHC machine the energy stored in each of its eight superconducting dipole chains exceeds 1300 MJ. Following an opening of the extraction switches this energy will be absorbed in large extraction resistors located in the underground collider tunnel or adjacent galleries, during the exponential current decay. Also the sixteen, 13 kA quadrupole chains (QF, QD) and more than one hundred and fifty, 600 A circuits of the corrector magnets will be equipped with extraction systems. The extraction switch-gear is bas...

  7. Low energy positron injector (LEPI)

    CERN Document Server

    Antropov, V K; Korotaev, Yu V

    2003-01-01

    The LEPI for the LEP storage ring is described. A radioactive source **2**2Na is the positron source. After deceleration in a solid target, in a magnetic trap and in a gas medium to the thermal velocity the positrons are stored during approximately equals 100 s. For injection into the storage ring the positrons are extracted by a pulse electric field and accelerated to the required energy. (Edited abstract) 4 Refs.

  8. Progress of the stochastic cooling system of the Collector Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulou, C; Bohm, R; Dolinskyy, O; Franzke, B; Hettrich, R; Maier, W; Menges, R; Nolden, F; Peschke, C; Petri, P; Steck, M; Thorndahl, L

    2013-01-01

    An overview of the recent achievements and ongoing developments for the stochastic cooling system of the Collector Ring is given. In focus are the hardware developments as well as the progress in predicting the system performance. The system operates in the frequency band 1-2 GHz, it has to provide fast 3D cooling of antiproton, rare isotope and stable heavy ion beams. The main challenges are (i) the cooling of antiprotons by means of cryogenic movable pick-up electrodes and (ii) the fast two-stage cooling (pre-cooling by the Palmer method, followed by the notch filter method) of the hot rare isotope beams (RIBs). Recently, a novel code for simulating the cooling process in the time domain has been developed at CERN. First results for the momentum cooling for heavy ions in the CR will be shown in comparison with results obtained in the frequency domain with the Fokker-Planck approach.

  9. Antiproton–to–electron mass ratio determined by two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sótér A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has recently carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. Three transition frequencies were determined with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing the results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as 1836.1526736(23.

  10. Low Energy Hadron Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pennington, Michael R

    2000-01-01

    Ask a group of particle theorists about low energy hadron physics and they will say that this is a subject that belongs to the age of the dinosaurs. However, it is GeV physics that controls the outcome of every hadronic interaction at almost every energy. Confinement of quarks and gluons (and any other super-constituents) means that it is the femto-universe that determines what experiments detect. What we have to learn at the start of the 21st century is discussed.

  11. The domination of Saturn's low latitude ionosphere by ring `rain'

    CERN Document Server

    O'Donoghue, J; Melin, H; Jones, G H; Cowley, S W H; Miller, S; Baines, K H; Blake, J S D

    2013-01-01

    Saturn's ionosphere is produced when the otherwise neutral atmosphere is exposed to a flow of energetic charged particles or solar radiation. At low latitudes the latter should result in a weak planet-wide glow in infrared (IR), corresponding to the planet's uniform illumination by the Sun. The observed low-latitude ionospheric electron density is lower and the temperature higher than predicted by models. A planet-ring magnetic connection has been previously suggested in which an influx of water from the rings could explain the lower than expected electron densities in Saturn's atmosphere. Here we report the detection of a pattern of features, extending across a broad latitude band from ~25 to 60 degrees, that is superposed on the lower latitude background glow, with peaks in emission that map along the planet's magnetic field lines to gaps in Saturn's rings. This pattern implies the transfer of charged water products from the ring-plane to the ionosphere, revealing the influx on a global scale, flooding betw...

  12. 2016 CERN-JINR European School of High-Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 CERN-JINR European School of High-Energy Physics will take place in Skeikampen (near to Lillehammer), Norway, on 15-28 June 2016.   The School is targeted particularly at students in experimental HEP, who are in the final years of work towards their PhDs, although candidates at an earlier or later stage in their studies may be considered. ** The deadline for applications has been extended to 19 February 2016 ** Sponsorship may be available for a small number of students from developing countries. Further details are available here.

  13. 9th CERN - Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The CERN – Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is targeted particularly at students in experimental HEP who are in the final years of work towards their PhDs. However, it is anticipated that some post-doctoral students in experimental HEP, and some students in phenomenology, including some masters students, will also be accepted. It should be noted that some pre-knowledge of the subjects is necessary in order to be able to profit fully from the lecture courses.

  14. Measurements of neutron cross sections for advanced nuclear energy systems at n_TOF (CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbagallo M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The n_TOF facility operates at CERN with the aim of addressing the request of high accuracy nuclear data for advanced nuclear energy systems as well as for nuclear astrophysics. Thanks to the features of the neutron beam, important results have been obtained on neutron induced fission and capture cross sections of U, Pu and minor actinides. Recently the construction of another beam line has started; the new line will be complementary to the first one, allowing to further extend the experimental program foreseen for next measurement campaigns.

  15. Simulation of Instability at Transition Energy with a New Impedance Model for CERN PS

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Na; Biancacci, Nicolo; Migliorati, Mauro; Persichelli, Serena; Sterbini, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Instabilities driven by the transverse impedance are proven to be one of the limitations for the high intensity reach of the CERN PS. Since several years, fast single bunch vertical instability at transition energy has been observed with the high intensity bunch serving the neu-tron Time-of-Flight facility (n-ToF). In order to better understand the instability mechanism, a dedicated meas-urement campaign took place. The results were compared with macro-particle simulations with PyHEADTAIL based on the new impedance model developed for the PS. Instability threshold and growth rate for different longitu-dinal emittances and beam intensities were studied.

  16. Integrating INIS into a high energy physics information environment thoughts from CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Yeomans, Joanne; Baudic, Romain; Picchioli, Ingrid; International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management : Strategies, Information Management and Human Resource Development. Special Session : The Role of INIS in Knowledge Preservation

    2004-01-01

    Information searchers from the high energy physics community expect an integrated information environment. The CERN Library offers its print and electronic collections through a combined Web interface and maintains the database by semi-automated processes to upload bibliographic and full-text records. Suggestions are offered by which INIS could develop its own Web interface and better match HEP users’ expectations. These include implementing full-text linking, increasing currency, expanding search and display functions and developing the richness of the data. Links with the National Nuclear Data Center and Crossref could also increase its visibility.

  17. Dr. Hirotaka Sugawara, Director General of Japan's high energy physics laboratory, KEK, visited the Antiproton Decelerator, AD

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    L. to r.: Masaki Hori, member of the ASACUSA collaboration, John Eades, contact person for ASACUSA, Dr. Hirotaka Sugawara, Werner Pirkl, the PS Division engineer responsible for the Radio Frequency Quadrupole decelerator in the foreground, and Kurt H bner, CERN's Director of Accelerators

  18. Experimental and numerical studies on the proposed application of hollow electron beam collimation for the LHC at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Moens, Vince; Redaelli, Stefano; Rivkin, Leonid

    This thesis work was carried out in the framework of U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (USLARP), a collaboration between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the U.S. Department of Energy. The first half of the work was completed at Fermilab (USA), the location of the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider and the second largest particle collider in the world. The second half was completed at CERN (Switzerland), the location of the largest proton collider in the world (Large Hadron Collider (LHC)).\

  19. Enhanced collaboration between CERN and India

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    On Monday 22 June, Bikash Sinha, Director of the SAHA Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP) and the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) in Kolkata, India and Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General, signed new protocols to the long standing agreement between the Indian Atomic Energy Commission and CERN. This provides a framework for collaboration in low energy nuclear physics between SAHA and VECC and the ISOLDE experiment at CERN. SINP and VECC Director Bikash Sinha and CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer signing the ISOLDE Protocols. SINP and VECC Director Bikash Sinha and CERN Research Director Sergio Bertolucci with representatives of the ISOLDE and RD51 Collaborations.INDIA has a long standing tradition in basic nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry. SINP is a leading institute for basic research and training in physical and biophysical sciences with particular competence in nuclear spectroscopy a...

  20. Beam-energy dependence of the directed flow of protons, antiprotons, and pions in Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-04-25

    Rapidity-odd directed flow (v1) measurements for charged pions, protons, and antiprotons near midrapidity (y=0) are reported in sNN=7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter dv1/dy|y=0 shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton dv1/dy|y=0 changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  1. Beam-Energy Dependence of Directed Flow of Protons, Antiprotons and Pions in Au+Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    Rapidity-odd directed flow($v_1$) measurements for charged pions, protons and antiprotons near mid-rapidity ($y=0$) are reported in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV Au + Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter $dv_1/dy|_{y=0}$ shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton $dv_1/dy|_{y=0}$ changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  2. Detection of low-energy antinuclei in space using an active-target particle detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, Thomas; Greenwald, Daniel; Konorov, Igor; Paul, Stephan [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Measuring antimatter in space excellently probes various astrophysical processes. The abundances and energy spectra of antiparticles reveal a lot about the creation and propagation of cosmic-ray particles in the universe. Abnormalities in their spectra can reveal exotic sources or inaccuracies in our understanding of the involved processes. The measurement of antiprotons and the search for antideuterons and antihelium are optimal at low kinetic energies since background from high-energy cosmic-ray collisions is low. For this reason, we are developing an active-target particle detector capable of detecting ions and anti-ions in the energy range of 30-100 MeV per nucleon. The detector consists of 900 scintillating fibers coupled to silicon photomultipliers and is designed to operate on nanosatellites. The primary application of the detector will be the Antiproton Flux in Space (AFIS) mission, whose goal is the measurement of geomagnetically trapped antiprotons inside Earth's inner radiation belt. In this talk, we explain our particle identification technique and present results from first in-beam measurements with a prototype.

  3. CERN's LEIR Digital LLRF : system overview and operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, ME; Blas, A; Bracke, E; Butterworth, A; Dubouchet, F; Findlay, A; Pedersen, F; Sanchez-Quesada, J

    2010-01-01

    The Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) is an accumulation and acceleration ring in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ion injector chain. After its successful start in 2005, it has been running in three operational campaigns. The LEIR low-level RF (LLRF) system is the first all-digital system to operate in a CERN circular machine. Its capabilities include beam control tasks as well as dual-harmonic cavity voltage/phase servoing. All the system’s control parameters are fully configurable, remotely and in-between cycles; extensive built-in observation capabilities and diagnostics are available. The system is flexible, powerful and extremely reliable. This paper outlines the main building blocks and operational features, along with results obtained during the first years of operation.

  4. In the CERN Library

    CERN Multimedia

    1963-01-01

    Seen in this picture is Noria Christophoridou, librarian of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission, who has been sent by her government to CERN for a year to widen her experience of library and documentation services. In the photograph she is providing information to Kurt Gottfried, a CERN visiting scientist from Harvard University, who is spending a year with CERN's Theory Division

  5. Development of narrowband lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We review some lasers developed by the ASACUSA collaboration of CERN, to carry out spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. These lasers were based on the technique of continuous-wave injection seeding of pulsed lasers. The laser output covered the wavelength regions 264–1154 nm, with peak powers of ~ 1 MW and spectral resolutions of 6–40 MHz. The devices were recently used to measure the transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium atoms to a fractional precision of several parts in ~ 109.

  6. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  7. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions?

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    After an introduction to the controversial problem of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) catalyzed by neutrons on metallic hydride surfaces we present the results of an experiment, made in collaboration with ENEA Labs in Frascati, to search neutrons from plasma discharges in electrolytic cells. The negative outcome of our experiment goes in the direction of ruling out those theoretical models expecting LENR to occur in condensed matter systems under specific conditions. Our criticism on the theoretical foundations of such models will also be presented.

  8. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutilainen, Mikko Antero [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    This thesis studies the high-energy collisions of protons and antiprotons. The data used in the measurement were collected during 2004-2005 with the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to 0.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. High energy hadron collisions usually produce collimated sprays of particles called jets. The energy of the jets is measured using a liquid Argon-Uranium calorimeter and the production angle is determined with the help of silicon microstrip and scintillating fiber trackers. The inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions is measured as a function of jet transverse momentum pT in six bins of jet rapidity at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement covers jet transerve momenta from 50 GeV up to 600 GeV and jet rapidities up to |y| = 2.4. The data are collected using a set of seven single jet triggers. Event and jet cuts are applied to remove non-physical backgrounds and cosmic-ray interactions. The data are corrected for jet energy calibration, cut and trigger efficiencies and finite jet pT resolution. The corrections are determined from data and the methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulation. The main experimental challenges in the measurement are the calibration of jet energies and the determination of the jet pT resolution. New methods are developed for the jet energy calibration that take into account physical differences between the {gamma}+jet and dijet calibration samples arising from quark and gluon jet differences. The uncertainty correlations are studied and provided as a set of uncertainty sources. The production of particle jets in hadron collisions is described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). When the transverse jet momentum is large, the contributions from long-distance physics processes are small and the production rates of jets can be predicted by perturbative QCD. The

  9. Energy transfer between a passing vortex ring and a flexible plate in an ideal quiescent fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, JiaCheng; Peterson, Sean D., E-mail: peterson@mme.uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Porfiri, Maurizio [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Recent advancements in highly deformable smart materials have lead to increasing interest in small-scale energy harvesting research for powering low consumption electronic devices. One such recent experimental study by Goushcha et al. explored energy harvesting from a passing vortex ring by a cantilevered smart material plate oriented parallel to and offset from the path of the ring in an otherwise quiescent fluid. The present study focuses on modeling this experimental study using potential flow to facilitate optimization of the energy extraction from the passing ring to raise the energy harvesting potential of the device. The problem is modeled in two-dimensions with the vortex ring represented as a pair of counter-rotating free vortices. Vortex pair parameters are determined to match the convection speed of the ring in the experiments, as well as the imposed pressure loading on the plate. The plate is approximated as a Kirchhoff-Love plate and represented as a finite length vortex sheet in the fluid domain. The analytical model matches experimental measurements, including the tip displacement, the integrated force along the entire plate length as a function of vortex ring position, and the pressure along the plate. The potential flow solution is employed in a parametric study of the governing dimensionless parameters in an effort to guide the selection of plate properties for optimal energy harvesting performance. Results of the study indicate an optimal set of plate properties for a given vortex ring configuration, in which the time-scale of vortex advection matches that of the plate vibration.

  10. Development of Stripline Kickers for Low Emittance Rings: Application to the Beam Extraction Kicker for CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)728476; Toral Fernandez, Fernando

    In the framework of the design study of Future Linear Colliders, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) aims for electron-positron collisions with high luminosity at a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. To achieve the luminosity requirements, Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) are required: they reduce the beam emittance before the beam is accelerated in the main linac. Several injection and extraction systems are needed to inject and extract the beam from the PDRs and DRs. The work of this Thesis consists of the design, fabrication and laboratory tests of the first stripline kicker prototype for beam extraction from the CLIC DRs, although the methodology proposed can be extended to stripline kickers for any low emittance ring. The excellent field homogeneity required, as well as a good transmission of the high voltage pulse through the electrodes, has been achieved by choosing a novel electrode shape. With this new geometry, it has been possible to benefit from all the advantages that the most...

  11. Investigation and optimization of transverse non-linear beam dynamics in the high-energy storage ring HESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsch, Dominic Markus

    2010-03-10

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is part of the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) which is planned as a major extension to the present facility of the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt. The HESR will provide antiprotons in the momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c for the internal target experiment PANDA. The demanding requirements of PANDA in terms of beam quality and luminosity together with a limited production rate of antiprotons call for a long beam life time and a minimum of beam loss. Therefore, an effective closed orbit correction and a sufficiently large dynamic aperture of the HESR are crucial. With this thesis I present my work on both of these topics. The expected misalignments of beam guiding magnets have been estimated and used to simulate the closed orbit in the HESR. A closed orbit correction scheme has been developed for different ion optical settings of the HESR and numerical simulations have been performed to validate the scheme. The proposed closed orbit correction method which uses the orbit response matrix has been benchmarked at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Juelich. A chromaticity correction scheme for the HESR consisting of sextupole magnets has been developed to reduce tune spread and thus to minimize the emittance growth caused by betatron resonances. The chromaticity correction scheme has been optimized through dynamic aperture calculations. The estimated field errors of the HESR dipole and quadrupole magnets have been included in the non-linear beam dynamics studies. Investigations concerning their optimization have been carried out. The ion optical settings of the HESR have been improved using dynamic aperture calculations and the technique of frequency map analysis. The related diffusion coefficient was also used to predict long-term stability based on short-term particle tracking. With a reasonable reduction of the quadrupole magnets field errors and a

  12. CERN stop-over for KEK and Fermilab Directors

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    En route for a meeting of the International Committee for Future Accelerators, ICFA, held at Germany's DESY laboratory, the Directors of Japan's KEK laboratory and Fermilab in the United States had a stop-over at CERN last Wednesday 7 February. Dr Hirotaka Sugawara, Director General of Japan's high energy physics laboratory, KEK, visited the Antiproton Decelerator, AD. From left to right, Masaki Hori, member of the ASACUSA collaboration, John Eades, contact person for ASACUSA, Dr Hirotaka Sugawara, Werner Pirkl, the PS Division engineer responsible for the Radio Frequency Quadrupole decelerator in the foreground, and Kurt Hübner, CERN's Director of Accelerators. Dr Michael S. Witherell, Director of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Fermilab, visited construction sites for the LHC, ATLAS, and CMS. He is seen here with a module of the CMS hadronic calorimeter in building 186.

  13. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Immanuel eBittner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  14. Inside bluetooth low energy

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (LE) is one of the latest enhancement to Bluetooth technology and, as the name suggests, it is aimed at ultra low power devices, such as heart rate monitors, thermometers, and sensors. Due to very low power consumption, devices compliant with this standard can operate for several years on coin cell batteries without the need for recharging. This cutting-edge book helps you understand the whats , whys , and hows of Bluetooth LE. It includes a broad view of the technology, identifies the various building blocks, and explains how they come together. You also find discussions on Bluetooth basics, providing the background information needed to master Bluetooth LE.The book explains the architecture of Bluetooth LE stack and the functionality provided by each of the layers. You find expert guidance in setting up your own system in a quick and efficient manner with inexpensive, easily available hardware and just a couple of PCs running Linux. This unique volume features two chapters that are dedi...

  15. Low-energy antinucleon-nucleus interaction revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2015-08-01

    Annihilation cross sections of antiprotons and antineutrons on the proton between 50 and 400 MeV/c show Coulomb focusing below 200 MeV/c and almost no charge-dependence above 200 MeV/c. Similar comparisons for heavier targets are not possible for lack of overlap between nuclear targets studied with and beams. Interpolating between -nucleus annihilation cross sections with the help of an optical potential to compare with -nucleus annihilation cross sections reveal unexpected features of Coulomb interactions in the latter. Direct comparisons between -nucleus and -nucleus annihilations at very low energies could be possible if cross sections are measured on the same targets and at the same energies as the available cross sections for . Such measurements may be feasible in the foreseeable future.

  16. Innovative low-mass cooling systems for the ALICE ITS Upgrade detector at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez Marzoa, Manuel

    The Phase-1 upgrade of the LHC to full design luminosity, planned for 2019 at CERN, requires the modernisation of the experiments around the accelerator. The Inner Tracking System (ITS), the innermost detector at the ALICE experiment, will be upgraded by replacing the current apparatus by new silicon pixels arranged in 7 cylindrical layers. Each layer is composed by multiple independent modules, named staves, which provide mechanical support and cooling to the chips. This thesis aims to develop and validate experimentally an ultra-lightweight stave cooling system for the ITS Upgrade. The moderate thermal requirements, with a nominal power density of 0.15 W/cm^2 and a maximum chip temperature of 30ºC, are counterweighted by extreme low-mass restrictions, obliging to resort to lightweight, non-metallic materials, such as carbon fibre-reinforced polymers and plastics. Novel lightweight stave concepts were developed and experimentally validated, meeting the thermal requirements with minimal material inventory. T...

  17. Low momentum particle detector for the NA61 experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Márton, Krisztina, E-mail: marton.krisztina@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, MTA Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Kiss, Gábor, E-mail: kiss.gabor@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, MTA Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Eötvös University, Budapest (Hungary); László, András, E-mail: Andras.Laszlo@cern.ch [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, MTA Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Varga, Dezső, E-mail: Dezso.Varga@cern.ch [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, MTA Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-11-01

    The NA61 Experiment at CERN SPS is a large acceptance hadron spectrometer, aimed to studying hadron–hadron, hadron–nucleus, and nucleus–nucleus interactions in a fixed target environment. The present paper discusses the construction and performance of the Low Momentum Particle Detector (LMPD), a small time projection chamber unit which has been added to the NA61 setup in 2012. The LMPD considerably extends the detector acceptance towards the backward region, surrounding the target in hadron–nucleus interactions. The LMPD features simultaneous range and ionization measurements, which allows for particle identification and momentum measurement in the 0.1–0.25 GeV/c momentum range for protons. The possibility of Z=1 particle identification in this range is directly demonstrated.

  18. Low Momentum Particle Detector for the NA61 Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Márton, Krisztina; László, András; Varga, Dezsö

    2014-01-01

    The NA61 Experiment at CERN SPS is a large acceptance hadron spectrometer, aimed at studying of hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus interactions in a fixed target environment. The present paper discusses the construction and performance of the Low Momentum Particle Detector (LMPD), a small time projection chamber unit which has been added to the original NA61 setup. The LMPD considerably extends the detector acceptance towards the backward region, surrounding the target in hadron-nucleus interactions. The LMPD features simultaneous range and ionization measurements, which allows for particle identification and momentum measurement in the 0.1 - 0.25 GeV/c momentum range for protons. The possibility of proton identification in this range is directly demonstrated.

  19. K-shell ionization by antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehler, G.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.; Soff, G.

    1987-08-01

    We present calculations for the impact-parameter dependence of K-shell ionization rates in p-bar-Cu and in p-bar-Ag collisions at various projectile energies. We show that the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential on the Rutherford trajectory and the antibinding effect caused by the negative charge of the antiproton result in a considerable increase of the ionization probability. Total ionization cross sections for proton and antiproton projectiles are compared with each other and with experimental ionization cross sections for protons.

  20. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.;

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  1. The Charge Asymmetry In W Bosons Produced In Proton- Antiproton Collisions At Center Of Mass Energy = 1.96 Tev

    CERN Document Server

    Torborg, J

    2005-01-01

    The primary mode of production of W+ bosons in a pp¯ collider is u + d¯ → W+. The u quark generally carries more momentum than the d and the resultant W+ tends to be boosted in the proton direction. Similarly, W- bosons are boosted in the anti-proton direction. This is observed as an asymmetry in the rapidity distributions of positive and negative W bosons. Measurement of this asymmetry serves as a. probe of the momentum distribution of partons within the proton. These distributions are required as input to the calculation of every pp¯ production cross section. This thesis presents the first measurement at DØ of the charge asymmetry of the W boson production cross section as measured in W → eν decays in 0.3 fb-1 of pp¯ collisions collected with the DØ Detector. Theoretical predictions made using the CTEQ6.1M and MRST(2004) proton distribution functions are compared with the measurement.

  2. Investigation by techniques of electron stimulated desorption of the merits of glow discharge cleaning of the surfaces of vacuum chambers at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, A W; Williams, E M

    1973-01-01

    To provide surface cleaning of the CERN intersecting storage rings, in which the pressure is below 10/sup -10/ torr over a 2 km length of mostly elliptical pipe (160*52 mm), ion bombardment during a glow discharge has been utilized. The discharge in argon at a pressure of about 3*10/sup -2/ torr was carried out intermittently in the course of a 15 h bake-out at 300 degrees C. Subsequent electron scrubbing enabled the electron desorption efficiency of the surface of the ISR vacuum chambers to be reduced by two to three orders of magnitude. Information is given on the apparatus used and the procedure adopted, together with a discussion of the diagnostic technique and a consideration of the action of the discharge cleaning. (15 refs).

  3. Design of 2-4 GHz Equalizers for the Antiproton Accumulator Stacktail System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deibele, C.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    1999-01-01

    The antiproton source at Fermilab requires storage of antiprotons during the production of antiprotons. A fundamental part of the storage process involves stochastic cooling, which requires that the frequency spectrum from the pickups has notches at the revolution frequency and harmonics of the revolution frequency of the antiprotons in the storage ring. A system has been developed for broadband notches but suffers from dispersion. The dispersion inhibits the cooling process and therefore an equalizer is required. The process for designing the equalizers is described and results shown.

  4. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  5. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Sótér, A; Kobayashi, T; Barna, D; Horvath, D; Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  6. Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wilding, D; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9~K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal.

  7. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde;

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Antiprotons travel through tissue in a manner similar to that for protons until they reach the end of their range where they annihilate and deposit additional energy. This makes them potentially interesting for radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to conduct the first e...

  8. Collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations of the ionization and excitation cross section for antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen ions are performed in an impact energy range from 0.5 keV to 10 MeV. The Born-Oppenheimer and Franck-Condon approximations as well as the impact parameter...

  9. Hands on CERN an education project on the Internet using real high energy particle collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, E K

    1999-01-01

    An educational project primarily aimed at teachers and 15 to 18 year- old students describing the essential features of a modern high energy physics experiment has been created. The whole education package is available on the Internet. It gives a detailed description of the physics processes involved and the Standard Model of Microcosm. Real particle collisions produced with the facilities at the European particle physics laboratory (CERN) are displayed using the platform-independent programming language Java, enabling interaction with the user. The project has been used by several groups of teachers and students, and has increased their knowledge of, and interest in, particle physics. This project complements the traditional physics education and introduces students to contemporary fundamental physics. (7 refs).

  10. Observation of Single Isolated Electrons of High Transverse Momentum in Events with Missing Transverse Energy at the CERN pp Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, M.; Kofoed-Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    We report the results of a search for single isolated electrons of high transverse momentum at the CERN collider. Above 15 GeV/c, four events are found having large missing transverse energy along a direction opposite in azimuth to that of the high-pT electron. Both the configuration of the events...

  11. The Belgian Minister of Economy, Energy, Foreign Trade and Science Policy, Marc Verwilghen, with CERN's Director-General, Robert Aymar.

    CERN Multimedia

    Michel Blanc

    2005-01-01

    Marc Verwilghen, Belgian Minister of Economy, Energy, Foreign Trade and Science Policy, came to CERN on 8 April 2005, where he visited the CMS assembly hall and underground cavern, as well as the hall where the LHC superconducting magnets are being tested.

  12. Coincidence studies with antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We present a short overview of a new method for calculating fully differential cross sections that is able to describe any aspect of coincidence measurements involving heavy projectiles. The method is based upon impact parameter close coupling with pseudostates. Examples from antiproton impact ionization are shown.

  13. Behaviour and Perceptions of the Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery Service Users High Energy Physicists at CERN- a Case Study

    CERN Document Server

    Eastwood, E J

    1998-01-01

    CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, situated in Geneva, Switzerland, has a rare user population, which consists of more than 10,000 high energy physicists coming from other institutes scattered in Europe and the rest of the world. They come to CERN to share accelerators and research infrastructures and services. Therefore, the library and particularly the ILL-DD Service have a substantial number of potential users. As it is a research library, with many varied subject interests, and experiences the 'normal' budget restrictions, the CERN Library collection cannot accommodate all the documents in all of subjects potentially required. Therefore, the ILL-DD Service is performing an important task. During a one month period this year, we distributed a User Survey. Primarily this was to gauge the level of user satisfaction and to discover if the service was performing competently. Using these results along with statistics collected about the users requests, drawing on experience, and consulting publ...

  14. X-rays from anti-protonic hydrogen and deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorringe, T.P.; Davies, J.D.; Lowe, J.; Nelson, J.M.; Playfer, S.M.; Pyle, G.J.; Squier, G.T.A.; Baker, C.A.; Batty, C.J.; Clark, S.A.; Kilvington, A.I.; Moir, J.; Sakamoto, S.; Welsh, R.E.; Winter, R.G.; Lingeman, E.W.A.

    1985-11-07

    Antiprotons from the LEAR facility at CERN were stopped in targets of gaseous H/sub 2/ or D/sub 2/. Yields of L X-rays were measured. K-series from anti p-p atoms were observed. The measured shift and width for the 1s level are ..delta..Esub(1s)=-0.73+-0.15 keV and GAMMAsub(1s)=0.85+-0.39 keV. (orig.).

  15. Heating nuclei with 8 GeV/c antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Lefort, T; Hsi, W C; Beaulieu, L; Viola, V E; Pienkowski, L; Korteling, R G; Leforest, R; Martin, E; Ramakrishnan, E; Rowland, D; Ruangma, A; Winchester, E M; Yennello, S J; Gushue, S; Remsberg, L P; Back, B B; Breuer, H

    1999-01-01

    Studies of the heating effect of 8 GeV/c pi sup - and antiproton beams incident on a sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au nucleus have been conducted at Brookhaven AGS accelerator with the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4 pi detector array. Enhanced energy deposition for antiprotons relative to negative pions and protons in this energy regime is observed. The results are consistent with predictions of an intranuclear cascade code.

  16. Control of intrabunch dynamics at CERN SPS ring using 3.2 GS/s digital feedback channel

    CERN Document Server

    Rivetta, C; Cesaratto, J M; Dusatko, J; Pivi, M; Pollock, K; Turgut, O; Bartosik, H; Hofle, W; Kotzian, G; Li, K

    2013-01-01

    The feedback control of intra-bunch instabilities driven by electron-cloud or strong head-tail interaction requires bandwidth sufficient to sense the vertical position and apply correction fields to multiple sections of a nanosecondscale bunch. These requirements impose challenges and limits in the design of the feedback channel. We present experimental measurements taken from the CERN SPS machine development studies with an intrabunch feedback channel prototype. The performance of a 3.2 GS/s digital processing system is evaluated, quantifying the effect of noise and limits of the feedback channel in the bunch stability as well as transient and steady state motion of the bunch. The controllers implemented are general purpose 16 tap FIR filters and the impact on the bunch stability of controller parameters are analyzed and quantified. These studies, based on the limited feedback prototype, are crucial to validate reduced models of the system and macroparticle simulation codes, including the feedback channel. T...

  17. The Old New Frontier: Studying the CERN-SPS Energy Range with NA61/SHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szuba Marek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With the Large Hadron Collider entering its third year of granting us insight into the highest collision energies to date, one should nevertheless keep in mind the unexplored physics potential of lower energies. A prime example here is the NA61/SHINE experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Using its large-acceptance hadronic spectrometer, SHINE aims to accomplish a number of physics goals: measuring spectra of identified hadrons in hadron-nucleus collisions to provide reference for accelerator neutrino experiments and cosmic-ray observatories, investigating particle properties in the large transverse-momentum range for hadron+hadron and hadron+nucleus collisions for studying the nuclear modification factor at SPS energies, and measuring hadronic observables in a particularly interesting region of the phase diagram of strongly-interacting matter to study the onset of deconfinement and search for the critical point of stronglyinteracting matter with nucleus-nucleus collisions. This contribution shall summarise results obtained so far by NA61/SHINE, as well as present the current status and plans of its experimental programme.

  18. The CERN Large Hadron Collider as a tool to study high-energy density matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Gryaznov, V; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Kain, V; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Temporal, M

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate two extremely powerful 7 TeV proton beams. Each beam will consist of 2808 bunches with an intensity per bunch of 1.15*10/sup 11/ protons so that the total number of protons in one beam will be about 3*10/sup 14/ and the total energy will be 362 MJ. Each bunch will have a duration of 0.5 ns and two successive bunches will be separated by 25 ns, while the power distribution in the radial direction will be Gaussian with a standard deviation, sigma =0.2 mm. The total duration of the beam will be about 89 mu s. Using a 2D hydrodynamic code, we have carried out numerical simulations of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper target that is irradiated with one of the LHC beams. These calculations show that only the first few hundred proton bunches will deposit a high specific energy of 400 kJ/g that will induce exotic states of high energy density in matter.

  19. The CERN Large Hadron Collider as a tool to study high-energy density matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N A; Kain, V; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Temporal, M; Hoffmann, D H H; Fortov, V E

    2005-04-08

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate two extremely powerful 7 TeV proton beams. Each beam will consist of 2808 bunches with an intensity per bunch of 1.15x10(11) protons so that the total number of protons in one beam will be about 3x10(14) and the total energy will be 362 MJ. Each bunch will have a duration of 0.5 ns and two successive bunches will be separated by 25 ns, while the power distribution in the radial direction will be Gaussian with a standard deviation, sigma=0.2 mm. The total duration of the beam will be about 89 mus. Using a 2D hydrodynamic code, we have carried out numerical simulations of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper target that is irradiated with one of the LHC beams. These calculations show that only the first few hundred proton bunches will deposit a high specific energy of 400 kJ/g that will induce exotic states of high energy density in matter.

  20. Missing energy signature from invisible decays of dark photons at the CERN SPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gninenko, S. N.; Krasnikov, N. V.; Kirsanov, M. M.; Kirpichnikov, D. V.

    2016-11-01

    The dark photon (A' ) production through the mixing with the bremsstrahlung photon from the electron scattering off nuclei can be accompanied by the dominant invisible A' decay into dark-sector particles. In this work we discuss the missing energy signature of this process in the experiment NA64 aiming at the search for A'→invisible decays with a high-energy electron beam at the CERN SPS (The Super Proton Synchrotron). We show the distinctive distributions of variables that can be used to distinguish the A'→invisible signal from background. The results of the detailed simulation of the detector response for the events with and without A' emission are presented. The efficiency of the signal event selection is estimated. It is used to evaluate the sensitivity of the experiment and show that it allows us to probe the still unexplored area of the mixing strength 10-6≲ɛ ≲10-2 and masses up to MA'≲1 GeV . The results obtained are compared with the results from other calculations. In the case of the signal observation, a possibility of extraction of the parameters MA' and ɛ by using the shape of the missing energy spectrum is discussed.

  1. Energy-dependent evolution of the ring current during the magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temporin, Ayako; Ebihara, Yusuke; Fritz, Theodore A.

    The ring current is known to mainly consist of two components of ions; one having energy from keV to tens of keV (low-energy), and the other having energy from 100keV to several hundreds keV(high-energy) in the quiet time. According to the past observations, the low-energy component increases during the storm main phase, and decreases during the storm recovery phase. However, the behavior of the high-energy component and the relationship between the two components are less known. For the purpose of understanding the behavior of the ring current in detail, we use data from the ion mass spectrometer called MICS and the magnetometer called MFE aboard the Polar satellite. We focus on the differential flux of protons with 31-80keV (as a proxy of the low-energy component) and those with 125-173keV (as a proxy of the high-energy component) at a pitch angle of 90 degrees when the Polar satellite crossed the magnetic equatorial plane. Pre-storm condition (t1), intense phase of magnetic storm (t2), and decline phase (t3) are identified based on the Dst index. We selected 27 subsets from January 1997 to March 2000 and from April 2001 to April 2002. We obtained the following major results. (1) In the low-energy component, the proton flux tends to increase during the intense phase, and decrease during the decline phase with an exception in the pre-noon sector. (2) In the high-energy component, the proton flux tends to be stationary during the intense phase. During the decline phase, the flux tends to increase, and occasionally, exceeds that in the pre-storm condition. (3) The magnetic field tends to decrease during the intense phase, and increase during the decline phase. The anti-correlation between the low-energy component and the magnetic field may indicate a diamagnetic response. The weak correlation between the high-energy component and the magnetic field during the decline phase may indicate an adiabatic variation of high-energy component. It is suggested that the high-energy

  2. Missing energy signature from invisible decays of dark photons at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Gninenko, S N; Kirsanov, M M; Kirpichnikov, D V

    2016-01-01

    The dark photon ($A'$) production through the mixing with the bremsstrahlung photon from the electron scattering off nuclei can be accompanied by the dominant invisible $A'$ decay into dark-sector particles. In this work we discuss the missing energy signature of this process in the experiment NA64 aiming at the search for $A'\\to invisible$ decays with a high-energy electron beam at the CERN SPS. We show the distinctive distributions of variables that can be used to distinguish the $A'\\to invisible$ signal from background. The results of the detailed simulation of the detector response for the events with and without $A'$ emission are presented. The efficiency of the signal event selection is estimated. It is used to evaluate the sensitivity of the experiment and show that it allows to probe the still unexplored area of the mixing strength $10^{-6}\\lesssim \\epsilon \\lesssim 10^{-2}$ and masses up to $M_{A'} \\lesssim 1$ GeV. The results obtained are compared with the results from other calculations. In the cas...

  3. Conceptual Design of the Low-Power and High-Power SPL A Superconducting H$^-$ Linac at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Atieh, S; Aviles Santillana, I; Bartmann, W; Borburgh, J; Brunner, O; Calatroni, S; Capatina, O; Chambrillon, J; Ciapala, E; Eshraqi, M; Ferreira, L; Garoby, R; Goddard, B; Hessler, C; Hofle, W; Horvath-Mikulas, S; Junginger, T; Kozlova, E; Lebbos, E; Lettry, J; Liao, K; Lombardi, A M; Macpherson, A; Montesinos, E; Nisbet, D; Otto, T; Paoluzzi, M; Papke, K; Parma, V; Pillon, F; Posocco, P; Ramberger, S; Rossi, C; Schirm, K; Schuh, M; Scrivens, R; Torres Sanchez, R; Valuch, D; Valverde Alonso, N; Wegner, R; Weingarten, W; Weisz, S

    2014-01-01

    The potential for a superconducting proton linac (SPL) at CERN started to be seriously considered at the end of the 1990s. In the first conceptual design report (CDR), published in 2000 [1], most of the 352 MHz RF equipment from LEP was re-used in an 800 m long linac, and the proton beam energy was limited to 2.2 GeV. During the following years, the design was revisited and optimized to better match the needs of a high-power proton driver for neutrino physics. The result was a more compact (470 m long) accelerator capable of delivering 5 MW of beam power at 3.5 GeV, using state-of-the-art superconducting RF cavities at 704 MHz. It was described in a second CDR, published in 2006 [2]. Soon afterwards, when preparation for increasing the luminosity of the LHC by an order of magnitude beyond nominal became an important concern, a low-power SPL (LP-SPL) was studied as a key component in the renovation of the LHC injector complex. The combination of a 4 GeV LP-SPL injecting into a new 50 GeV synchrotron (PS2) was ...

  4. The CPLEAR detector at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, R; Alhalel, T; Angelopoulos, Angelos; Apostolakis, Alcibiades J; Aslanides, Elie; Backenstoss, Gerhard; Bal, F; Bard, J P; Barraca, D; Bee, C P; Behnke, O; Benelli, A; Bennet, J; Bertin, V; Blanc, F; Bloch, P; Bonnet, M; Bula, C; Calzas, A; Carlson, P J; Carroll, M; Carvalho, J; Cawley, E; Charalambous, S; Chardalas, M; Chardin, G; Charra, P; Chertok, M B; Cody, A; Da Silva, J; Damianoglou, D; Daniel, R; Danielsson, M; Dechelette, Paul; Dedieu, M; Dedoussis, S; Dejardin, M; Derré, J; Dijksman, A; Dinkespiler, B; Dodgson, M; Dröge, M; Duclos, J; Dudragne, J; Durand, D; Ealet, A; Eckart, B; Eleftheriadis, C; Engster, Claude; Evangelou, I; Faravel, L; Fassnacht, P; Faure, J L; Felder, C; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fetscher, W; Fidecaro, Maria; Filipcic, A; Francis, D; Fry, J; Fuglesang, C; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gally, Y; Gamet, R; Garreta, D; Geiss, D; Geralis, R; Gerber, H J; Go, A; Gumplinger, P; Guyon, D; Guyot, C; Harrison, P; Harrison, P F; Haselden, A; Hayman, P J; Hazen, E S; Henry-Coüannier, F; Heyes, W G; Hollander, R W; Hubert, E; Jacobs, C; Jansson, K; Johner, H U; Jon-And, K; Karkour, N; Kérek, A; Kesseler, G; Kettle, P R; King, D; Klados, T; Kochowski, Claude; Kokkas, P; Kontek, K; Kreuger, R; Lawry, T; Lecouturier, T; Le Gac, R; Leimgruber, F; Linget, D; Liolios, A; Löfstedt, B; Louis, F; Machado, E; Maley, P; Mall, U; Mandic, I; Manthos, N; Marel, Gérard; Marin, C P; Martin, H; Michau, J C; Mikuz, M; Miller, J; Montanet, François; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nanni, F; Onofre, A; Pagels, B; Papadopoulos, I M; Pavlopoulos, P; Pelucchi, F; Petit, P; Philippoussis, K; Pinto da Cunha, J; Policarpo, Armando; Polivka, G; Postma, H; Rheme, C; Rickenbach, R; Roberts, B L; Rozaki, E; Ruf, T; Sacks, L; Sakelliou, L; Sanders, P; Santoni, C; Sarigiannis, K; Schäfer, M; Schaller, L A; Schietinger, T; Schopper, A; Schune, P; Soares, A; Steinacher, M; Tatsis, S; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thibault, C; Touchard, F; Touramanis, C; Triantis, F A; Tröster, D A; Tsamouranis, I; Tschopp, H; Tsilimigras, Panayiotis; Van Beveren, E; van Eijk, C W E; Van Koningsfeld, V; Vanuxem, J P; Varner, G S; Verweij, H; Vlachos, S; Warner, D; Watson, E; Weber, P; Wendler, H; Wigger, O; Witzig, C; Wolter, M; Yéche, C; Zavrtanik, D; Zimmerman, D

    1996-01-01

    The CPLEAR collaboration has constructed a detector at CERN for an extensive programme of CP-, T- and CPT-symmetry studies using ${\\rm K}^0$ and $\\bar{\\rm K}^0$ produced by the annihilation of $\\bar{\\rm p}$'s in a hydrogen gas target. The ${\\rm K}^0$ and $\\bar{\\rm K}^0$ are identified by their companion products of the annihilation ${\\rm K}^{\\pm} \\pi^{\\mp}$ which are tracked with multiwire proportional chambers, drift chambers and streamer tubes. Particle identification is carried out with a liquid Cherenkov detector for fast separation of pions and kaons and with scintillators which allow the measurement of time of flight and energy loss. Photons are measured with a lead/gas sampling electromagnetic calorimeter. The required antiproton annihilation modes are selected by fast online processors using the tracking chamber and particle identification information. All the detectors are mounted in a 0.44 T uniform field of an axial solenoid of diameter 2 m and length 3.6 m to form a magnetic spectrometer capable o...

  5. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  6. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  7. Field Simulations and Mechanical Implementation of Electrostatic Elements for the ELENA Transfer Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Barna, D; Borburgh, J; Carli, C; Vanbavinckhove, G

    2014-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) complex at CERN will be extended by an extra low energy anti-proton ring (ELENA) [1] further decelerating the anti-protons thus improving their trapping. The kinetic energy of 100 keV at ELENA extraction facilitates the use of electrostatic transfer lines to the experiments. The mechanical implementation of the electrostatic devices are presented with focus on their alignment, bakeout compatibility, ultra-high vacuum compatibility and polarity switching. Field optimisations for an electrostatic crossing device of three beam lines are shown.

  8. Implications of energy and momentum conservation for particle emission in A +A collisions at energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Antoni; Kiełbowicz, Mirosław; Rybicki, Andrzej

    2017-02-01

    We construct a simple model of heavy-ion collisions, local in the impact parameter plane, and appropriate for energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). This model can be regarded as a new realization of the "fire-streak" approach, originally applied to studies of lower-energy nucleus-nucleus reactions. Starting from local energy and momentum conservation, we nicely describe the broadening of the pion rapidity distribution when going from central to peripheral Pb +Pb collisions at √{sN N}=17.3 GeV. The results of our calculations are compared with SPS experimental data. We discuss the resulting implications on the role of energy and momentum conservation for the dynamics of particle production in heavy-ion collisions. A specific space-time picture emerges, where the longitudinal evolution of the system strongly depends on the position in the impact parameter (bx,by ) plane. This picture is consistent with our earlier findings on the longitudinal evolution of the system as deduced from electromagnetic effects on charged-pion directed flow and can provide an explanation for specific low-pT phenomena seen in the fragmentation region of Pb +Pb collisions.

  9. Space Charge Compensation in the Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport Line with Negative Hydrogen Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Valerio-Lizarraga, C; Leon-Monzon, I; Lettry, J; Midttun, O; Scrivens, R

    2014-01-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Tranport (LEBT) using the package IBSimu1, which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H- beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  10. Operation of the GTS-LHC Source for the Hadron Injector at CERN%CERN用于强子研究加速器系统离子注入的离子源GTS-LHC运行状况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Dumas; C.Hill; D.Hitz; D.Küchler; C.Mastrostefano; M.O'Neil; R.Scrivens

    2007-01-01

    The GTS-LHC ion source,designed and build by CEA Grenoble,was installed and commissioned at CERN in 2005.Since than the source has delivered oxygen and lead ion beams (O4+ and Pb27+ from the source,Pb54+ from the linac)for the commissioning of the Low Energy Ion Ring(LEIR).Results of this operation and attempts to improve the source performance and reliability,and the linac performance will be presented in this paper.

  11. CERN theorist gets a Heineman

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    A CERN theorist is among the recipients of the American Physical Society's annual Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics. The 2006 recipients of the Dannie Heineman Prize. From left to right : Peter van Nieuwenhuizen of the Stony Brook University (New York), Sergio Ferrara of CERN and Daniel Freedman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Picture taken in Rome in June 2005. The 2006 prize recognises the development of supergravity by Sergio Ferrara of CERN, Daniel Freedman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Peter van Nieuwenhuizen of the State University of New York, Stony Brook. The trio won the award for constructing and developing the first super-symmetric extension of Einstein's theory of general relativity. By providing a special class of field theories for the low-energy manifestation of superstrings, supergravity has played an important role in theoretical physics in the last thirty years. This is not the first time that supergravity has won an award. In 1993, the trio ...

  12. CP violation in K/sup 0/ (anti K/sup 0/) -> 2. gamma. decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, R.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Zoupanos, G.

    1985-06-01

    With the newly available intense K/sup 0/(anti K/sup 0/) beams of the low energy antiproton ring (LEAR) at CERN, measurements, of CP violation in channels other than K->..pi pi.. are possible. We study CP violation in the K/sup 0/(anti K/sup 0/)->2..gamma.. decay.

  13. Big Data Challenges in High Energy Physics Experiments: The ATLAS (CERN) Fast TracKer Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We live in the era of “Big Data” problems. Massive amounts of data are produced and captured, data that require significant amounts of filtering to be processed in a realistically useful form. An excellent example of a “Big Data” problem is the data processing flow in High Energy Physics experiments, in our case the ATLAS detector in CERN. In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 40 million collisions of bunches of protons take place every second, which is about 15 trillion collisions per year. For the ATLAS detector alone 1 Mbyte of data is produced for every collision or 2000 Tbytes of data per year. Therefore what is needed is a very efficient real-time trigger system to filter the collisions (events) and identify the ones that contain “interesting” physics for processing. One of the upgrades of the ATLAS Trigger system is the Fast TracKer system. The Fast TracKer is a real-time pattern matching machine able to reconstruct the tracks of the particles in the inner silicon detector of the ATLAS experim...

  14. Geant4 simulation of the CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopovich, D A; Reinhard, M I; Cornelius, I M; Rosenfeld, A B

    2010-09-01

    The CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility is used for testing and calibrating both active and passive radiation dosemeters for radiation protection applications in space and aviation. Through a combination of a primary particle beam, target and a suitable designed shielding configuration, the facility is able to reproduce the neutron component of the high altitude radiation field relevant to the jet aviation industry. Simulations of the facility using the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) toolkit provide an improved understanding of the neutron particle fluence as well as the particle fluence of other radiation components present. The secondary particle fluence as a function of the primary particle fluence incident on the target and the associated dose equivalent rates were determined at the 20 designated irradiation positions available at the facility. Comparisons of the simulated results with previously published simulations obtained using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, as well as with experimental results of the neutron fluence obtained with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, are made.

  15. CERN – Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics | Arequipa, Peru | 6-19 March 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The CERN – Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics targets particularly at students in experimental HEP who are in the final years of work towards their PhDs.   However, it is anticipated that some post-doctoral students in experimental HEP, and some students in phenomenology, including some Masters students, will also be accepted. It should be noted that some pre-knowledge of the subjects is necessary in order to be able to profit fully from the lecture courses. Demand for admission to the CERN – Latin-American Schools of High-Energy Physics exceeds the number of available places, so a competitive selection is made based on information provided on the application form and the letter of recommendation from the candidate's professor or supervisor. The application deadline is 16 November 2012 More information here.

  16. In de ingewanden van CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The large underground ring of the CERN, length of 27km, is still opened for the public. Next year, the LHC and its enormous detectors increasingly faster will take up duty in the tunnel. (3 pages + photos)

  17. TSR: A storage and cooling ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, P.A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Davinson, T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Flanagan, K.; Freeman, S.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Grieser, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lazarus, I.H. [S.T.F.C. Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Litvinov, Yu.A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lotay, G. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Page, R.D. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Raabe, R. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Siesling, E.; Wenander, F. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Woods, P.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  18. Search for first-generation leptoquarks in the jets and missing transverse energy topology in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsybychev, Dmitri

    2004-03-01

    The authors performed a search for the pair production of first-generation leptoquarks using 191 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data recorded by the CDF experiment during Run II of the Tevatron. The leptoquarks are sought via their decay into a neutrino and quark, which yields missing transverse energy and several high-E{sub T} jets. Several control regions were studied to check the background estimation from Standard Model sources, with good agreement observed in data. In the leptoquark signal region, 124 events were observed with 118.3 {+-} 14.5 expected from background. Therefore, no evidence for leptoquark production was observed, and limits were set on the cross section times the squared branching ratio. Using the next-to-leading order cross section for leptoquark production, they excluded the mass interval 78 to 117 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level for 100% branching ratio into neutrino plus quark.

  19. Germany at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    From left to right: Maximilian Metzger, CERN's Secretary-General, Hermann Schunck, Director at the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, and Robert Aymar, CERN's Director-General, talking to Wolfgang Holler from Butting, one of the companies at the "Germany at CERN" exhibition. Far right : Susanne-Corinna Langer-Greipl from BMBF, delegate to the CERN Finance Committee. For three days, CERN's Main Building was transformed into a showcase for German industry. Twenty-nine companies from sectors related to particle physics (electrical engineering, vacuum and low temperature technology, radiation protection, etc.) were here for the ninth "Germany at CERN" exhibition, organised by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), which gave them the opportunity to meet scientists and administrators from the Laboratory. On 1 March the exhibition was visited by a German delegation headed by Dr Hermann Schunck, Director at BMBF.

  20. Status and Early Commissioning Results for the PEP-IIB-Factory High Energy Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienands, H.-Ulrich

    1997-05-01

    The PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring (HER) is a 2.2 km 9 GeV electron ring for 1 A beam current, construction of which is currently being completed at SLAC. The HER beam will collide with positrons from the 3.1 GeV, 2 A Low Energy Ring which is on a one-year later schedule. The SLAC linac will serve as high-intensity, low-emittance injector for the facility. By March 1997 the HER magnet and power system will have been installed and checked out. The vacuum system---capable of absorbing 10 MW of synchrotron radiation---will be closed and evacuated. Two initial rf stations with four cavities each, sufficient to support beams up to several hundred mA, will have been installed. The beam-position monitor (BPM) system consists of about 300 button-type BPM and is capable of single-turn data acquisition. A sophisticated beam-loss monitor system using Cherenkov detectors is capable of localizing losses over a 10-6 intensity range. A phased commissioning plan has been adopted with initial beam commissioning activities scheduled to commence in spring 1997, focusing on lattice optics diagnosis and tuning. We will present our experience checking out the various accelerator systems and our beam commissioning plans. First results of beam commissioning will be presented as they are available.

  1. About the creation of proton–antiproton pair at electron–positron collider in the energy range of ψ(3770 mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Ahmadov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The process of electron–positron annihilation into proton–antiproton pair is considered within the vicinity of ψ(3770 resonance. The interference between the pure electromagnetic intermediate state and the ψ(3770 state is evaluated. It is shown that this interference is destructive and the relative phase between these two contributions is large (ϕ0≈250°.

  2. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bluem, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik); Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Egger, J.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L.M. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)); Eades, J.; Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Gotta, D. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik)

    1992-05-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cylcotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm{sup 3}. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH{sub 4} drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman {alpha} transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time. (orig.).

  3. CERN, some astonishing ideas

    CERN Document Server

    Gourber, J P

    1982-01-01

    An account is given of the large (26.6 km) collision and storage ring of the CERN electron-positron collision accelerator under construction. This ring will incorporate a number of bending electromagnets, and the original and surprising design for them, the 'iron-concrete' cores are described, together with the technique for fabrication. A performance comparable with all-steel magnets but at considerably reduced cost is claimed.

  4. Relative Biological Effect of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael

    nuclear research facility CERN. A beam of 126 MeV antiprotons, corresponding to about 12 cm range in water, was spread out to a SOBP with a width of 1 cm. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film, and the results were used for benchmarking...

  5. Measurement of the antiproton stopping power of gold - the Barkas effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1991-05-01

    The stopping power of gold has been measured for antiprotons in the energy range 0.2-3 MeV using a novel time-of-flight technique. The antiproton stopping power is found to be less than half the equivalent proton stopping power near the electronic stopping power maximum. In the high-energy limit the two stopping powers merge.

  6. Measurement of the antiproton stopping power of gold - the Barkas effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E.; Worm, T. (Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation, Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1991-05-06

    The stopping power of gold has been measured for antiprotons in the energy range 0.2-3 MeV using a novel time-of-flight technique. The antiproton stopping power is found to be less than half the equivalent proton stopping power near the electronic stopping power maximum. In the high-energy limit the two stopping powers merge. (orig.).

  7. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long (actually a row of 11 rods, each 1 cm long) and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing made of stainless steel. The casing had fins for forced-air cooling. In this picture, the 26 GeV high-intensity beam from the PS enters from the right, where a scintillator screen, with circles every 5 mm in radius, permits precise aim at the target centre. See also 7903034 and 7905094.

  8. AA antiproton production target

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing of stainless steel. At the entrance to the target assembly was a scintillator screen, imprinted with circles every 5 mm in radius, which allowed to precisely aim the 26 GeV high-intensity proton beam from the PS onto the centre of the target rod. The scintillator screen was a 1 mm thick plate of Cr-doped alumina. See also 7903034 and 7905091.

  9. Storm- Time Dynamics of Ring Current Protons: Implications for the Long-Term Energy Budget in the Inner Magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkioulidou, M.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    The ring current energy budget plays a key role in the global electrodynamics of Earth's space environment. Pressure gradients developed in the inner magnetosphere can shield the near-Earth region from solar wind-induced electric fields. The distortion of Earth's magnetic field due to the ring current affects the dynamics of particles contributing both to the ring current and radiation belts. Therefore, understanding the long-term evolution of the inner magnetosphere energy content is essential. We have investigated the evolution of ring current proton pressure (7 - 600 keV) in the inner magnetosphere based on data from the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard Van Allen Probe B throughout the year 2013. We find that although the low-energy component of the protons (governed by convective timescales and is very well correlated with the Dst index, the high-energy component (>100 keV) varies on much longer timescales and shows either no or anti-correlation with the Dst index. Interestingly, the contributions of the high- and low-energy protons to the total energy content are comparable. Our results indicate that the proton dynamics, and as a consequence the total energy budget in the inner magnetosphere (inside geosynchronous orbit), is not strictly controlled by storm-time timescales as those are defined by the Dst index.

  10. Development of an Abort Gap Monitor for High-Energy Proton Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Turner, W.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-11-01

    The fill pattern in proton synchrotrons usually features an empty gap, longer than the abort kicker raise time, for machine protection. This gap is referred to as the "abort gap," and any particles, which may accumulate in it due to injection errors and diffusion between RF buckets, would be lost inside the ring, rather than in the beam dump, during the kicker firing. In large proton rings, due to the high energies involved, it is vital to monitor the build up of charges in the abort gap with a high sensitivity. We present a study of an abort gap monitor based on a photomultiplier with a gated microchannel plate, which would allow for detecting low charge densities by monitoring the synchrotron radiation emitted. We show results of beam test experiments at the Advanced Light Source using a Hamamatsu 5916U MCP-PMT and compare them to the specifications for the Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Development of an abort gap monitor for high-energy proton rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beche, Jean-Francois; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Denes, Peter; Placidi, Massimo; Turner, William; Zolotorev, Max

    2004-05-03

    The fill pattern in proton synchrotrons usually features an empty gap, longer than the abort kicker raise time, for machine protection. This gap is referred to as the ''abort gap'' and any particles, which may accumulate in it due to injection errors and diffusion between RF buckets, would be lost inside the ring, rather than in the beam dump, during the kicker firing. In large proton rings, due to the high energies involved, it is vital to monitor the build up of charges in the abort gap with a high sensitivity. We present a study of an abort gap monitor based on a photomultiplier with a gated microchannel plate, which would allow for detecting low charge densities by monitoring the synchrotron radiation emitted. We show results of beam test experiments at the Advanced Light Source using a Hamamatsu 5916U MCP-PMT and compare them to the specifications for the Large Hadron Collider

  12. Low-energy mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Wessel; Hviid, Christian Anker

    2014-01-01

    and with as little energy consumption as 41.1 kWh/m2/year including heating and all building services with no use of renewable energy such as PVcells or solar heating. One of the key means of reaching the objectives was to implement mechanical ventilation with low pressure loss and therefore low energy consumption....... The project consists of two buildings, building one is 6 stories high, and building two is 4 stories high. The buildings have a gross area of 50,500 m2 including underground parking. The ventilation and indoor climate concept was to use mechanical ventilation together with mechanical cooling and fanassisted...

  13. Single and double ionization of helium by fast antiproton and proton impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Mo-dash-barller, S.P.; Elsener, K.; Rensfelt, K.H.; Uggerho-dash-barj, E.

    1986-10-27

    The first ion-atom--collision data obtained with antiprotons are presented. We measured the single- and double-ionization cross section for 0.5-5-MeV antiprotons and protons colliding with helium. For ion energies above --2 MeV, the single-ionization cross section is the same for protons and antiprotons. However, surprisingly, the double-ionization cross section for antiprotons is approximately a factor of 2 larger than that for protons. The present data constitute a challenge for future theoretical models of charged-particle--atom collisions.

  14. Fragmentation Of Quark And Gluon Jets In Proton- Antiproton Collisions At Center Of Mass Energies = 1.8 Tev

    CERN Document Server

    Pronko, A P

    2005-01-01

    We report the first model independent measurement of charged particle multiplicities in quark and gluon jets, Nq and Ng, produced at the Tevatron in pp¯ collisions with center-of-mass energy 1.8 TeV and recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermi-lab. The measurements are made for jets with average energies 41 and 53 GeV by counting charged particle tracks in cones with opening angle of &thetas;c = 0.28, 0.36, and 0.47 rad around the jet axis. The corresponding jet hardness Q = Ejet&thetas;c varies in the range from 12 GeV to 25 GeV. At Q = 19.2 GeV, the ratio of multiplicities r = Ng/Nq is found to be 1.64 ± 0.17, where statistical and systematic uncertainties are added in quadrature. The results are in agreement with re-summed perturbative QCD calculations and are consistent with recent e +e− measurements.

  15. CERN data stories: CERN Analysis Preservation, CERN Open Data and HEPData

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Presentation given at THOR Madrid Bootcamp, Ph.D. day. Introduction: CERN Community specific aspects: High-Energy Physics Motivation Resulting community services CERN Open Data HEPData CERN Analysis Preservation INSPIRE Conclusions and missing pieces​​​​​​

  16. Androgynous, Reconfigurable Closed Loop Feedback Controlled Low Impact Docking System With Load Sensing Electromagnetic Capture Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James L. (Inventor); Carroll, Monty B. (Inventor); Morales, Ray H. (Inventor); Le, Thang D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a fully androgynous, reconfigurable closed loop feedback controlled low impact docking system with load sensing electromagnetic capture ring. The docking system of the present invention preferably comprises two Docking- assemblies, each docking assembly comprising a load sensing ring having an outer face, one of more electromagnets, one or more load cells coupled to said load sensing ring. The docking assembly further comprises a plurality of actuator arms coupled to said load sensing ring and capable of dynamically adjusting the orientation of said load sensing ring and a reconfigurable closed loop control system capable of analyzing signals originating from said plurality of load cells and of outputting real time control for each of the actuators. The docking assembly of the present invention incorporates an active load sensing system to automatically dynamically adjust the load sensing ring during capture instead of requiring significant force to push and realign the ring.

  17. Dr. Andras Siegler, President of the Hungarian CERN Committee, Ministry of Education, Research and Development Division, Budapest, Hungary

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr András Siegler, President of the Hungarian CERN Committee, Ministry of Education, Research and Development Division (right) and Barbara Vizkelety Secretary of the Hungarian CERN Committee visiting the ASACUSA experiment on the Antiproton Decelerator Photo 02: Dr András Siegler, President of the Hungarian CERN Committee, Ministry of Education, Research and Development Division (right) visiting the ASACUSA experiment on the Antiproton Decelerator with (from left to right) Dezso Horvath, Cecilia Jarlskog, Barbara Vizkelety Secretary of the Hungarian CERN Committee. Photo 03: Dr András Siegler, President of the Hungarian CERN Committee, Ministry of Education, Research and Development Division (right) and Barbara Vizkelety Secretary of the Hungarian CERN Committee visiting the ASACUSA experiment on the Antiproton Decelerator.

  18. Antiproton-proton elastic scattering at 3.0 and 4.0 GeV/C; Difusion elastica antiproton-proton a 3,0 y 4,0 GeV/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unamuno, S.

    1965-07-01

    This paper presents the results-obtained in studying the two-prong interactions observed in the Saclay 81 cm hydrogen bubble chamber exposed to the 3.0 and 4.0 GeV/c antiproton beams from CERN Proton-Synchroton. Total elastic cross-sections corresponding to both energies are given. The results are given. The results are compared with those of p-p scaterring at different energies and with those of p-p scattering. Several optical-models, from the simples one (the black disk model) to a rather elaborated, four-parameters model have been applied. These models can explain some of the experimental results but fail in predicting the angular distribution of large angle scattering. (Author)

  19. CERN, Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider (pages 1-3) is being built at CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva. CERN offers some extremely exciting opportunities to see "big bang" in action. (1 page)

  20. The new dc power supply system for the main ring magnets of the 28 GeV CERN proton synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Jahn, K; Steckmann, E

    1972-01-01

    High overload capacity, low residual ripple, exact reproducibility of periodic current pulses and very great reliability in long-term duty are essential requirements for a modern power supply system for feeding beam-guide magnets. These requirements can be met with certainty and at reasonable cost by the use of high-performance single-anode mercury-arc converters with suitable electronic control and protective equipment. (4 refs).

  1. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Asner, David M.; /PNL, Richland; Baldini, Wander; /INFN, Ferrara; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; /Fermilab; Chakravorty, Alak; /St. Xavier U., Chicago; Colas, Paul; /Saclay; Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab; Drutskoy, Alexey; /Moscow, ITEP; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  2. Taking Energy to the Physics Classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this…

  3. QCD physics at hadron storage rings: From COSY to FAIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    James Ritman

    2006-05-01

    As a result of the rapid rise of the coupling constant at low momentum transfers, perturbation theory is not an appropriate method to describe the strong interaction. In this kinematic regime other methods such as lattice QCD or effective field theories are more appropriate to investigate the appearance of a still unsettled phenomena: confinement and chiral symmetry breaking. Furthermore, the confinement of quarks and gluons to hadrons allows crucial tests of fundamental symmetries that are inherent to the QCD Lagrangian but are broken in hadronic systems. Thus, high precision measurements of the production and decay of specific hadronic states provides decisive benchmarks to investigate the properties of QCD in this regime. A new series of experiments are being prepared using nearly full acceptance detectors for neutral and charged particles around internal targets in high intensity, phase-space-cooled hadronic beams. Later this year, it is planned to transfer the WASA detector from the CELSIUS to the COSY ring in order to measure the production and various decay channels of the and ' mesons, thereby investigating the violation of P, C, T, and combinations thereof, as well as isospin violation. The experimental and theoretical techniques employed here will provide an important basis to extend these investigations to the static and dynamical properties of hadrons with charm quark content with the high energy storage ring for antiprotons at the new GSI/FAIR facility. Additional related perspectives will be opened at the new facility ranging from the properties of hadrons in dense nuclear matter to measurements of the nucleon's transverse spin distribution in the valence quark region using polarized antiprotons.

  4. Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Carpenter, P T; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hurt, J L; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  5. France at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    From 19 to 22 June, for the 8th edition of France at CERN, 31 French companies presented their latest technology to the Laboratory. Demonstrating the latest in French technology during France at CERN. The France at CERN exhibition was inaugurated by Mr. Bernard Frois, Director of the Department Energy, Transport, Environment and Natural Resources at the Technology Directorate of the Ministry of Research. 'France is happy to be a Member of CERN, which is a successful example of the construction of scientific Europe,' he declared during the inauguration, 'this exhibition is an excellent opportunity to put fundamental research and advanced technology in contact.' Mr. Philippe Petit, French Ambassador to Switzerland, and Mr. Alexandre Defay, technical adviser of the Minister of Research, were also present to represent France and its industry. Representing CERN at the 19 June opening of the exhibition was Claude Detraz, who said, 'I hope that this exhibition will make it possible to weave stronger links between ...

  6. Review of Low Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Vergados, J D

    2007-01-01

    Some issues regarding low energy neutrinos are reviewed. We focus on three aspects i)We show that by employing very low energy (a few keV) electron neutrinos, neutrino disappearance oscillations can be investigated by detecting recoiling electrons with low threshold spherical gaseous TPC's. In such an experiment, which is sensitive to the small mixing angle theta13, the novel feature is that the oscillation length is so small that the full oscillation takes place inside the detector. Thus one can determine accurately all the oscillation parameters and, in particular, measure or set a good limit on theta13. ii) Low threshold gaseous TPC detectors can also be used in detecting nuclear recoils by exploiting the neutral current interaction. Thus these robust and stable detectors can be employed in supernova neutrino detection. iii) The lepton violating neutrinoless double decay is investigated focusing on how the absolute neutrino mass can be extracted from the data

  7. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Section 06 - 08*) of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A vacuum-tank, two bending magnets (BST06 and BST07 in blue) with a quadrupole (QDN07, in red) in between, another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and a further tank . The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of BST06 contained the stack core pickup for stochastic cooling (see 7906193, 7906190, 8005051), the two other tanks served mainly as vacuum chambers in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on BST06. *) see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984)

  8. Comparison of Optimized Single and Multifield Irradiation Plans of Antiproton, Proton and Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Kantemiris, Ioannis; Karaiskos, Pantelis;

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotons have been suggested as a possibly superior modality for radiotherapy, due to the energy released when antiprotons annihilate, which enhances the Bragg peak and introduces a high-LET component to the dose. However, concerns are expressed about the inferior lateral dose distribution...

  9. S142 set-up to detect X-ray from antiproton-proton atoms (protonium).

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This experiment was designed by the Daresbury-Mainz-TRIUMF Collaboration and was located in the m14 partially separated antiproton beam in the PS South Hall. It used a gaseous hydrogen target, 1 m long, surrounded by a ring of proportional counters, surrounded in turn by a ring of 36 scintillators strips to aid in the annihilation product identification. Ugo Gastaldi (centre)

  10. Summary of the AccNet-EuCARD Workshop on Optics Measurements, Corrections and Modelling for High-Performance Storage Rings “OMCM”, CERN, Geneva, 20-22 June 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, R; Calaga, R; Einfeld, D; Giovannozzi, M; Koutchouk, J-P; Milardi, C; Safranek, J; Tomás, R; Wenninger, J; Zimmermann, F

    2012-01-01

    The LHC, its luminosity upgrade HL-LHC, its injectors upgrade LIU and other high performance storage rings around the world are facing challenging requirements for optics measurements, correction and modelling. This workshop aims to do a review of the existing techniques to measure and control linear and non-linear optics parameters. The precise optics determination has proven to be a key ingredient to improve the performance of the past and present accelerators. From 20 to 22 June 2011 an international workshop, “OMCM,” was held at CERN with the goal of assessing the limits of the present techniques and evaluating new paths for improvement. The OMCM workshop was sponsored and supported by CERN and by the European Commission under the FP7 “Research Infrastructures” project EuCARD, grant agreement no. 227579.

  11. Liner surface improvements for low friction piston ring packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderberg, C.; Dimkovski, Z.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2014-01-01

    The development of engine components in the automotive industry is governed by several constraints such as environmental legislation and customer expectations. About a half of the frictional losses in an internal combustion engine come from the interactions between the piston assembly and cylinder liner surface. The tribological considerations in the contact between the piston ring and cylinder liner have attracted much attention over the past few decades. Many non-conventional cylinder liner finishes have been, and are being, developed with the aim to reduce friction losses and oil consumption, but the effects of the surface finish on piston ring pack performance is not well understood. One way of reducing friction in the cylinder system is to reduce the tangential load from the piston ring pack, focusing on the oil control ring. However, the side-effect of this is a disappointingly increased oil consumption. In this study a number of different cylinder liner surface specifications were developed and implemented in test engines with the aim of maintaining the level for oil consumption when decreasing the tangential load for the piston ring pack. To improve our understanding of the result, the same surfaces were evaluated in elastic and elasto-plastic rough contact and hydrodynamic flow simulation models. It is shown that oil consumption is strongly related to surface texture on the cylinder liners and at lower speeds (900-1200 rpm), a ‘rougher surface’ with a high core (e.g. Sk) and valley roughness (e.g. Svk) results in higher oil consumption. At the medium speed range (1200-3600 rpm), oil consumption continues to dominate for the ‘rough’ surfaces but with a visible influence of a lower oil consumption for a decreased roughness within the ‘rough’ surface group. ‘Smooth’ surfaces with a ‘smooth’ core (Sk), irrespective of the valley component (Svk), show similar oil consumption. For engine speeds above 3600 rpms, an increase in plateau

  12. The Very Low 1-9 GeV/c Tertiary Beam Extension of the H8 Beam Line of CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2016-01-01

    The H8 beam line on the North Area of CERN SPS is a multipurpose experimental secondary particle beam able to transport particles of various types (hadrons, electrons, muons and ions) in a large momentum range from 10 GeV/c up to the top SPS energy (400 or 450 GeV/C). During the 2003-2004 shutdown the beam line was modi?fied in order to accommodate a new tertiary beam line, able to produce and transport particles in the momentum range of 1 to 9 GeV/c. Such low momentum hadron and electron particle beams are requested by the LHC experiments in order to calibrate various sub-detector systems. The design and first performance results from this new tertiary beam are described here.

  13. Fusion Revisits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    It's going to be a hot summer at CERN. At least in the Main Building, where from 13 July to 20 August an exhibition is being hosted on nuclear fusion, the energy of the Stars. Nuclear fusion is the engine driving the stars but also a potential source of energy for mankind. The exhibition shows the different nuclear fusion techniques and research carried out on the subject in Europe. Inaugurated at CERN in 1993, following collaboration between Lausanne's CRPP-EPFL and CERN, with input from Alessandro Pascolini of Italy's INFN, this exhibition has travelled round Europe before being revamped and returning to CERN. 'Fusion, Energy of the Stars', from 13 July onwards, Main Building

  14. Quantum scattering at low energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derezinski, Jan; Skibsted, Erik

    2009-01-01

    For a class of negative slowly decaying potentials, including V(x):=−γ|x|−μ with 0low-energy regime. Using appropriate modifiers of the Isozaki–Kitada type we show that scattering theory is well behaved on the whole continuous spectrum...

  15. Quantum scattering at low energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derezinski, Jan; Skibsted, Erik

    For a class of negative slowly decaying potentials, including with , we study the quantum mechanical scattering theory in the low-energy regime. Using modifiers of the Isozaki--Kitada type we show that scattering theory is well behaved on the {\\it whole} continuous spectrum of the Hamiltonian...

  16. [The CERN and the megascience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Peris, José

    2006-01-01

    In this work we analyse the biggest particle accelerator in the world: the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ring shaped tunnel is 27 km long and it is buried over 110 meters underground, straddling the border betwen France and Switzerland at the CERN laboratory near Geneva. Its mission is to recreate the conditions that existed shortly after the Big-Bang and to look for the hypothesised Higgs particle. The LHC will accelerate protons near the speed of the light and collide them head on at an energy of to 14 TeV (1 TeV = 10(12) eV). Keeping such high energy in the proton beams requires enormous magnetic fields which are generated by superconducting electromagnets chilled to less than two degrees above absolute zero. It is expected that LHC will be inaugurated in summer 2007.

  17. Occurrence of annual growth rings in Rhizophora mangle in a region with low climate seasonality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRUNNA T. SOUZA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The formation of annual growth rings has been confirmed for several mangrove species in the last decade, among which is the Rhizophora mangle. However, the record of annual rings for this species was made in a region with high hydric seasonality, a widely recognized induction factor of annual rings in tropical species. In this sense, the present study aimed to verify the occurrence of annual growth rings in R. mangle in the mangroves of Guaratiba (Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil, a region with low hydric seasonality. For this purpose, the crossdating technique was applied in ten trees collected with known age (seven years. The growth rings are characterized by alternating layers of low vessel density (earlywood and high vessel density (latewood. Multiple regression analysis indicated that growth rings width variation is driven by precipitation, water surplus, water deficit and water storage. Crossdating analysis confirmed the existence of annual growth rings in the R. mangle in Guaratiba. This discovery in a region with low hydric seasonality increases the dendrocronological potential of this species and suggests the importance of biological factors (eg. phenological behavior as complementary inductors for the formation of growth rings in this species.

  18. Occurrence of annual growth rings in Rhizophora mangle in a region with low climate seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Brunna T; Estrada, Gustavo C D; Soares, Mário L G; Callado, Cátia H

    2016-01-01

    The formation of annual growth rings has been confirmed for several mangrove species in the last decade, among which is the Rhizophora mangle. However, the record of annual rings for this species was made in a region with high hydric seasonality, a widely recognized induction factor of annual rings in tropical species. In this sense, the present study aimed to verify the occurrence of annual growth rings in R. mangle in the mangroves of Guaratiba (Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil), a region with low hydric seasonality. For this purpose, the crossdating technique was applied in ten trees collected with known age (seven years). The growth rings are characterized by alternating layers of low vessel density (earlywood) and high vessel density (latewood). Multiple regression analysis indicated that growth rings width variation is driven by precipitation, water surplus, water deficit and water storage. Crossdating analysis confirmed the existence of annual growth rings in the R. mangle in Guaratiba. This discovery in a region with low hydric seasonality increases the dendrocronological potential of this species and suggests the importance of biological factors (eg. phenological behavior) as complementary inductors for the formation of growth rings in this species.

  19. Two pioneering artists visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    On Monday, 19 January, CERN physicists welcomed musician Tim Blake - progressive rock keyboard and theremin player - and architectural lighting designer Patrice Warrener - inventor of the Chromolithe Polychromatic Illumination system, used in Lyon’s “Fête des Lumières”. Together, they make up the musical duo "Crystal Machine".   The artists visit the Antiproton Decelerator. (Image: Django Manglunki.)   Their visit began with an introduction to CERN by their friend Django Manglunki, project leader for the ion injector chain, and an improvised discussion on the LHC extraction system with Roger Barlow, kicker magnet controls expert and progressive rock fan. This was followed by a quick trip to the CCC, the server room and the SPS RF amplifiers in BA3. Next on the itinerary was a tour of the AD and anti-hydrogen experiments led by Michael Doser, AEgIS Spokesperson. A leisurely lunch followed, in the company ...

  20. Italy at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    From 23 to 26 June, Italian industry went on display at CERN for the ninth time. Twenty-four Italian firms working closely with CERN showed off the latest high-energy physics technology developed by them. Guido Possa, Vice-Minister for Education, Universities and Research, inaugurated the exhibition on 24 June. He took the opportunity afforded by his visit to tour Building SM18, where LHC magnets are tested and assembled, before inspecting the assembly hall for ATLAS detector components. Guido Possa, Italian Vice-Minister for Education, Universities and Research, is seen visiting one of the "Italy at CERN" exhibition stands.

  1. FRANCE AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    From 23 to 25 September, French industry exhibited products and technologies which are related to the field of particle physics. Twenty five companies presented their latest developments in electrical engineering, IT, vacuum & low temperature technologies, and civil engineering. Bernard Frois, Director of the Energy, Transport, and Environment Department of the French Ministry for Research and New Technologies inaugurated the exhibition on 23 September. To make the most of his visit, he also visited the assembly halls of CMS and ATLAS and the hall where the superconducting magnets for the LHC are tested. From left to right: Jean-Claude Brisson, ILO, Robert Aymar, designated CERN Director General, Françoise Le Moign, Assistant General Consul at Geneva, Alain Guillouët, Head of the economic mission in Switzerland, French Embassy, Thierry Boquien, Ubifrance, French agency for international development of companies, Bernard Frois, Director of the Department for Energy, Transport, and Environment of the Fre...

  2. CERN Choir

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

      Do you like singing? The CERN Choir is looking for basses and tenors Join us! Programme Spring Session 2015: Donizetti: Misere & Missa di Gloria e Credo Bellini: Salve Regina Bruckner: Requiem in D minor Next concert: Sunday 31 May 2015 at 17:00 Musicales de Comesières (GE) Rehearsals at CERN Main Auditorium, building 500 On Wednesdays from 20.00 to 22:00 Membership fee: January to June 150 CHF September to December: 100CHF Contact: Baudouin.bleus@cern.ch Facebook/Choeur-du-CERN

  3. Low-Energy Proton Testing Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Xapsos, M.A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony; Friendlich, M.R.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Hakey, Mark C.; Dodd, Paul E.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Sierawski, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Use of low-energy protons and high-energy light ions is becoming necessary to investigate current-generation SEU thresholds. Systematic errors can dominate measurements made with low-energy protons. Range and energy straggling contribute to systematic error. Low-energy proton testing is not a step-and-repeat process. Low-energy protons and high-energy light ions can be used to measure SEU cross section of single sensitive features; important for simulation.

  4. Energy transfer between energetic ring current H(+) and O(+) by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the frequency range below the helium gyrofrequency can be excited in the equatorial region of the outer magnetosphere by cyclotron resonant instability with anisotropic ring current H(+) ions. As the unducted waves propagate to higher latitudes, the wave normal should become highly inclined to the ambient magnetic field. Under such conditions, wave energy can be absorbed by cyclotron resonant interactions with ambient O(+), leading to ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Resonant wave absorption peaks in the vicinity of the bi-ion frequency and the second harmonic of the O(+) gyrofrequrency. This absorption should mainly occur at latitudes between 10 deg and 30 deg along auroral field lines (L is greater than or equal to 7) in the postnoon sector. The concomitant ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can contribute to the isotropization and geomagnetic trapping of collapsed O(+) ion conics (or beams) that originate from a low-altitude ionospheric source region. During geomagnetic storms when the O(+) content of the magnetosphere is significantly enhanced, the absorption of EMIC waves should become more efficient, and it may contribute to the observed acceleration of O(+) ions of ionospheric origin up to ring current energies.

  5. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A section of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A large vacuum-tank, a quadrupole (QDN09*), a bending magnet (BST08), another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and (in the background) a further bending magnet (BST08). The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of QDN09 contained the kickers for stochastic pre-cooling (see 790621, 8002234, 8002637X), the other one served mainly as vacuum chamber in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on QFW08. * see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984) See under 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261 and 8202324. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  6. Search for first-generation leptoquarks in the jets and missing transverse energy topology in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsybychev, Dmitri [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2004-04-01

    The authors performed a search for the pair production of first-generation leptoquarks using 191 pb-1 of proton-antiproton collision data recorded by the CDF experiment during Run II of the Tevatron. The leptoquarks are sought via their decay into a neutrino and quark, which yields missing transverse energy and several high-ET jets. Several control regions were studied to check the background estimation from Standard Model sources, with good agreement observed in data. In the leptoquark signal region, 124 events were observed with 118.3 ± 14.5 expected from background. Therefore, no evidence for leptoquark production was observed, and limits were set on the cross section times the squared branching ratio. Using the next-to-leading order cross section for leptoquark production, they excluded the mass interval 78 to 117 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level for 100% branching ratio into neutrino plus quark.

  7. Approximate calculation of electronic energy levels of axially symmetric quantum dot and quantum ring by using energy dependent effective mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yu-Min; Yu Zhong-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of electronic structures about the semiconductor quantum dot and the semiconductor quantum ring are presented in this paper. To reduce the calculation costs, for the quantum dot and the quantum ring, their simplified axially symmetric shapes are utilized in our analysis. The energy dependent effective mass is taken into account in solving the Schrodinger equations in the single band effective mass approximation. The calculated results show that the energy dependent effective mass should be considered only for relatively small volume quantum dots or small quantum rings. For large size quantum materials, both the energy dependent effective mass and the parabolic effective mass can give the same results. The energy states and the effective masses of the quantum dot and the quantum ring as a function of geometric parameters are also discussed in detail.

  8. Experiments on Antiprotons: Antiproton-Nucleon Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Owen; Keller, Donald V.; Mermond, Ronald; Segre, Emilio; Steiner, Herbert M.; Ypsilantis, Tom

    1957-07-22

    In this paper experiments are reported on annihilation and scattering of antiprotons in H{sub 2}O , D{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2}. From the data measured it is possible to obtain an antiproton-proton and an antiproton-deuteron cross section at 457 Mev (lab). Further analysis gives the p-p and p-n cross sections as 104 mb for the p-p reaction cross section and 113 mb for the p-n reaction cross section. The respective annihilation cross sections are 89 and 74 mb. The Glauber correction necessary in order to pass from the p-d to the p-n cross section by subtraction of the p-p cross section is unfortunately large and somewhat uncertain. The data are compared with the p-p and p-n cross sections and with other results on p-p collisions.

  9. 7Be (n ,α )4He Reaction and the Cosmological Lithium Problem: Measurement of the Cross Section in a Wide Energy Range at n_TOF at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, M.; Musumarra, A.; Cosentino, L.; Maugeri, E.; Heinitz, S.; Mengoni, A.; Dressler, R.; Schumann, D.; Käppeler, F.; Colonna, N.; Finocchiaro, P.; Ayranov, M.; Damone, L.; Kivel, N.; Aberle, O.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea-Correa, J.; Barros, S.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y. H.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cristallo, S.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dupont, E.; Duran, I.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Furman, W.; Ganesan, S.; García-Rios, A.; Gawlik, A.; Glodariu, T.; Göbel, K.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Kimura, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lerendegui, J.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lo Meo, S.; Lonsdale, S. J.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Mazzone, A.; Mendoza, E.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Pappalardo, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Piscopo, M.; Plompen, A.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.; Rajeev, K.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Rout, P.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J.; Sabate-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Vollaire, J.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wolf, C.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.; n TOF Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The energy-dependent cross section of the 7Be (n ,α )4He reaction, of interest for the so-called cosmological lithium problem in big bang nucleosynthesis, has been measured for the first time from 10 meV to 10 keV neutron energy. The challenges posed by the short half-life of 7Be and by the low reaction cross section have been overcome at n_TOF thanks to an unprecedented combination of the extremely high luminosity and good resolution of the neutron beam in the new experimental area (EAR2) of the n_TOF facility at CERN, the availability of a sufficient amount of chemically pure 7Be, and a specifically designed experimental setup. Coincidences between the two alpha particles have been recorded in two Si -7Be -Si arrays placed directly in the neutron beam. The present results are consistent, at thermal neutron energy, with the only previous measurement performed in the 1960s at a nuclear reactor. The energy dependence reported here clearly indicates the inadequacy of the cross section estimates currently used in BBN calculations. Although new measurements at higher neutron energy may still be needed, the n_TOF results hint at a minor role of this reaction in BBN, leaving the long-standing cosmological lithium problem unsolved.

  10. Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons \\\\ ASACUSA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Matsuda, Y; Lodi-rizzini, E; Kuroda, N; Schettino, G; Hori, M; Pirkl, W; Mascagna, V; Malbrunot, C L S; Yamazaki, Y; Eades, J; Simon, M; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Nagata, Y; Uggerhoj, U I; Mc cullough, R W; Toekesi, K M; Venturelli, L; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J; Kanai, Y; Hayano, R; Knudsen, H; Kristiansen, H; Todoroki, K; Bartel, M A; Moller, S P; Charlton, M; Leali, M; Diermaier, M; Kolbinger, B

    2002-01-01

    ASACUSA (\\underline{A}tomic \\underline{S}pectroscopy \\underline{A}nd \\underline{C}ollisions \\underline{U}sing \\underline{S}low \\underline{A}ntiprotons) is a collaboration between a number of Japanese and European research institutions, with the goal of studying bound and continuum states of antiprotons with simple atoms.\\\\ Three phases of experimentation are planned for ASACUSA. In the first phase, we use the direct $\\overline{p}$ beam from AD at 5.3 MeV and concentrate on the laser and microwave spectroscopy of the metastable antiprotonic helium atom, $\\overline{p}$He$^+$, consisting of an electron and antiproton bound by the Coulomb force to the helium nucleus. Samples of these are readily created by bringing AD antiproton beam bunches to rest in helium gas. With the help of techniques developed at LEAR for resonating high precision laser beams with antiproton transitions in these atoms, ASACUSA achieved several of these first-phase objectives during a few short months of AD operation in 2000. Six atomic tr...

  11. Measurement of the Z31 contribution to the stopping power using MeV protons and antiprotons: The Barkas effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Möller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Uggerhöj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1989-04-01

    The stopping power for antiprotons has been measured for the first time. The antiproton stopping power of silicon is found to be 3%-19% lower than for equivelocity protons over the energy range 3.01 to 0.538 MeV. The ``Z31 contribution'' to the stopping power (the Barkas effect) is deduced by comparing the stopping power for protons and antiprotons.

  12. Courrier CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Example of the cover page of the French version of the CERN Courier; Courrier CERN from January 1962. The journal was published both in English and French up to volume 45, no. 5, June 2005. Since then there is a single-language edition where articles are published either in French or English with an abstract in the other language.

  13. Low energy gauge unification theory

    CERN Document Server

    Li Tian Jun

    2002-01-01

    Because of the problems arising from the fermion unification in the traditional Grand Unified Theory and the mass hierarchy between the 4-dimensional Planck scale and weak scale, we suggest the low energy gauge unification theory with low high-dimensional Planck scale. We discuss the non-supersymmetric SU(5) model on M sup 4 xS sup 1 /Z sub 2 xS sup 1 /Z sub 2 and the supersymmetric SU(5) model on M sup 4 xS sup 1 /(Z sub 2 xZ sub 2 ')xS sup 1 /(Z sub 2 xZ sub 2 ')xS sup 1 /(Z sub 2 xZ sub 2 '). The SU(5) gauge symmetry is broken by the orbifold projection for the zero modes, and the gauge unification is accelerated due to the SU(5) asymmetric light KK states. In our models, we forbid the proton decay, still keep the charge quantization, and automatically solve the fermion mass problem. We also comment on the anomaly cancellation and other possible scenarios for low energy gauge unification.

  14. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  15. The Design of a Large Booster Ring for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Nissen, Todd Satogata, Yuhong Zhang

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present the current design of the large booster ring for the Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab. The booster ring takes 3 GeV protons or ions of equivalent rigidity from a pre-booster ring, and accelerates them to 20 GeV for protons or equivalent energy for light to heavy ions before sending them to the ion collider ring. The present design calls for a figure-8 shape of the ring for superior preservation of ion polarization. The ring is made of warm magnets and shares a tunnel with the two collider rings. Acceleration is achieved by warm RF systems. The linear optics has been designed with the transition energy above the highest beam energy in the ring so crossing of transition energy will be avoided. Preliminary beam dynamics studies including chromaticity compensation are presented in this paper.

  16. CERN OVERVIEW animation

    CERN Multimedia

    Arzur Catel Torres

    2015-01-01

    This animation shows how the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) works. The film begins with an aerial view of CERN near Geneva, with outlines of the accelerator complex, including the underground Large Hadron Collider (LHC), 27-km in circumference. The positions of the four largest LHC experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are revealed before we see protons travelling around the LHC ring. The proton source is a simple bottle of hydrogen gas. An electric field is used to strip hydrogen atoms of their electrons to yield protons. Linac 2, the first accelerator in the chain, accelerates the protons to the energy of 50 MeV. The beam is then injected into the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), which accelerates the protons to 1.4 GeV, followed by the Proton Synchrotron (PS), which pushes the beam to 25 GeV. Protons are then sent to the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) where they are accelerated to 450 GeV. The protons are finally transferred to the two beam pipes of the LHC. The beam in one pipe circulates clockwise while ...

  17. CERN & Society

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Non Member State Summer Students 2015 are interviewed about their decision to study STEM subjects, to apply for CERN NMSSS programme, their experience onsite @CERN and takeaways, their future goals and aspirations, offering also advice to fellow students.The Non Member State Summer Student Programme stands for a unique opportunity for students from all over the world to spend their summer at CERN in Geneva, getting involved in some of the world’s biggest experiments. For 8 weeks, summer students gather on-site at CERN and join in the day-to-day work of research. The Programme targets advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students of physics, computing and engineering, particularly from developing countries. Participating students receive scientific training, attend lectures and work on laboratory-based projects alongside with CERN experts and fellow students.

  18. ELENA’s International Collaboration is born

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    On 13 June, ten institutes signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for the construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA). Allowing the further deceleration of antiprotons from the Antimatter Decelerator, ELENA will significantly increase the number of particles trapped downstream in the experimental set-ups. This will give an important boost to antimatter research in the years to come.   Electrostatic triplet lenses - a device that will transport antiprotons from ELENA to the experiments. The electrostatic device was successfully tested with the ASACUSA experiment two weeks ago. ELENA - an upgrade of the existing Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - was approved by the CERN Council last year under the condition that external user institutions would contribute to its construction. On 13 June, the foundation stone of the new international collaboration was laid with the signature of the MoU. ELENA is a small magnetic decelerator ring 30 m in circumference that will fit inside the ...

  19. Low-energy neutrino measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Davide D'angelo

    2012-10-01

    Low-energy solar neutrino detection plays a fundamental role in understanding both solar astrophysics and particle physics. After introducing the open questions on both fields, we review here the major results of the last two years and expectations for the near future from Borexino, Super-Kamiokande, SNO and KamLAND experiments as well as from upcoming (SNO+) and planned (LENA) experiments. Scintillator neutrino detectors are also powerful antineutrino detectors which can detect neutrinos emitted by the Earth crust and mantle. First measurements of geoneutrinos have occurred which can bring fundamental contribution in understanding the geophysics of the planet.

  20. Physics motivations for future CERN accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    de Roeck, A; Gianotti, F; de Roeck, Albert; Ellis, John; Gianotti, Fabiola

    2001-01-01

    We summarize the physics motivations for future accelerators at CERN. We argue that (a) a luminosity upgrade for the LHC could provide good physics return for a relatively modest capital investment, (b) CLIC would provide excellent long-term perspectives within many speculative scenarios for physics beyond the Standard Model, (c) a Very Large Hadron Collider could provide the first opportunity to explore the energy range up to about 30 TeV, (d) a neutrino factory based on a muon storage ring would provide an exciting and complementary scientific programme and a muon collider could be an interesting later option.

  1. Monte-Carlo simulation of events for (un)polarized Drell-Yan with antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Bianconi, A

    2004-01-01

    The complete knowledge of the nucleon spin structure at leading twist requires also addressing the transverse spin distribution of quarks, or transversity, which is yet unexplored because of its chiral-odd nature. Transversity can be best extracted from single-spin asymmetries in fully polarized Drell-Yan processes with antiprotons, where valence contributions are involved anyway. Alternatively, in single-polarized Drell-Yan the transversity happens convoluted with another chiral-odd function, which is likely to be responsible for the well known (and yet unexplained) violation of the Lam-Tung sum rule in the corresponding unpolarized cross section. We present Monte-Carlo simulations for the unpolarized and single-polarized Drell-Yan $\\bar{p} p^{(\\uparrow)} \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^- X$ with antiproton beam energies of 40 and 15 GeV as a test case, in order to estimate the minimum number of events needed to extract the above chiral-odd distributions from future measurements at the HESR ring at GSI. It is important to stu...

  2. Maximum trapped field of a ring bulk superconductor by low pulsed field magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchimoto, M. [Hokkaido Institute of Technology, 7-15 Maeda, Teine-ku, Sapporo 006-8585 (Japan)], E-mail: tsuchi@hit.ac.jp; Kamijo, H. [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38, Hikari-cho, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan)

    2007-10-01

    Pulsed field magnetization is an important technique for a bulk superconducting magnet, which is one practical application of a bulk high T{sub c} superconductor (HTS). Full magnetization of a ring HTS is effective to obtain large trapped field for low pulsed field magnetization. In this study, trapped field in a ring bulk superconductor by the low pulsed field magnetization is numerically analyzed under assumption of variable shielding current by the temperature control. Differences between one-dimensional Bean model and axisymmetric three-dimensional numerical solution are discussed through the analysis. There is maximum trapped field in the axisymmetric three-dimensional model because of finite thickness of the ring HTS. The shielding current density and inner radius of the ring HTS are discussed to obtain the maximum trapped field.

  3. Low-energy Coulomb excitation of Sr,9896 beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, E.; Zielińska, M.; Péru, S.; Goutte, H.; Hilaire, S.; Görgen, A.; Korten, W.; Doherty, D. T.; Bastin, B.; Bauer, C.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Bruyneel, B.; Butler, P. A.; Butterworth, J.; Cederkäll, J.; Delahaye, P.; Dijon, A.; Ekström, A.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fransen, C.; Georgiev, G.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hess, H.; Iwanicki, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Larsen, A. C.; Ljungvall, J.; Lutter, R.; Marley, P.; Moschner, K.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Pakarinen, J.; Petts, A.; Reiter, P.; Renstrøm, T.; Seidlitz, M.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Sotty, C.; Srebrny, J.; Stefanescu, I.; Tveten, G. M.; Van de Walle, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wiens, A.; De Witte, H.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.

    2016-11-01

    The structure of neutron-rich Sr,9896 nuclei was investigated by low-energy safe Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams at the REX-ISOLDE facility, CERN, with the MINIBALL spectrometer. A rich set of transitional and diagonal E 2 matrix elements, including those for non-yrast structures, has been extracted from the differential Coulomb-excitation cross sections. The results support the scenario of a shape transition at N =60 , giving rise to the coexistence of a highly deformed prolate and a spherical configuration in 98Sr, and are compared to predictions from several theoretical calculations. The experimental data suggest a significant contribution of the triaxal degree of freedom in the ground state of both isotopes. In addition, experimental information on low-lying states in 98Rb has been obtained.

  4. Ring Counter Based ATPG for Low Transition Test Pattern Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begam, V M Thoulath; Baulkani, S

    2015-01-01

    In test mode test patterns are applied in random fashion to the circuit under circuit. This increases switching transition between the consecutive test patterns and thereby increases dynamic power dissipation. The proposed ring counter based ATPG reduces vertical switching transitions by inserting test vectors only between the less correlative test patterns. This paper presents the RC-ATPG with an external circuit. The external circuit consists of XOR gates, full adders, and multiplexers. First the total number of transitions between the consecutive test patterns is determined. If it is more, then the external circuit generates and inserts test vectors in between the two test patterns. Test vector insertion increases the correlation between the test patterns and reduces dynamic power dissipation. The results prove that the test patterns generated by the proposed ATPG have fewer transitions than the conventional ATPG. Experimental results based on ISCAS'85 and ISCAS'89 benchmark circuits show 38.5% reduction in the average power and 50% reduction in the peak power attained during testing with a small size decoding logic.

  5. CERN Technical Training 2005 - ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    Learning for the LHC!ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme, in an extended format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments.ELEC-2005 is composed of four Terms that will run throughout the year:Winter Term: Introduction to electronics in HEP (January-February, 6 lectures) Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Winter Term: Electronics applications in HEP experiments (November-December, 10 lectures) Lectures within each Term will take place on Tuesdays and Thursd...

  6. Energy dependence of negatively charged pion production in proton-proton interactions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)663936; Dominik, Wojciech; Gaździck, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This thesis presents inclusive spectra of the negatively charged pions produced in inelastic proton-proton interactions measured at five beam momenta: 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c. The measurements were conducted in the NA61/SHINE experiment at CERN using a system of five Time Projection Chambers. The negatively charged pion spectra were calculated based on the negatively charged hadron spectra. Contribution of hadrons other than the primary pions was removed using EPOS simulations. The results were corrected for effects related to detection, acceptance, reconstruction efficiency and the analysis technique. Two-dimensional spectra were derived as a function of rapidity and transverse momentum or transverse mass. The spectra were parametrised by widths of the rapidity distributions, inverse slope parameters of the transverse mass distributions, mean transverse masses and the total pion multiplicities. The negatively charged pion spectra in proton-proton interactions belong to a broad NA61/SHINE programme of se...

  7. The Antiproton Depth Dose Curve Measured with Alanine Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, Johnny Witterseh; Palmans, Hugo;

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen et Olsen for conversion of calculated dose...

  8. $^7Be(n,\\alpha)^4He$ reaction and the Cosmological Lithium Problem: measurement of the cross section in a wide energy range at n_TOF (CERN)

    CERN Document Server

    Barbagallo, M.; Cosentino, L.; Maugeri, E.; Heinitz, S.; Mengoni, A.; Dressler, R.; Schumann, D.; Käppeler, F.; Colonna, N.; Finocchiaro, P.; Ayranov, M.; Damone, L.; Kivel, N.; Aberle, O.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea-Correa, J.; Barros, S.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y. H.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cristallo, S.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dupont, E.; Duran, I.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Furman, W.; Ganesan, S.; García-Rios, A.; Gawlik, A.; Glodariu, T.; Göbel, K.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Kimura, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lerendegui, J.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lo Meo, S.; Lonsdale, S. J.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Mazzone, A.; Mendoza, E.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Pappalardo, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Piscopo, M.; Plompen, A.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.; Rajeev, K.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Rout, P.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J.; Sabate-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Vollaire, J.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wolf, C.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2016-01-01

    The energy-dependent cross section of the 7Be(n,alpha)4He reaction, of interest for the so-called Cosmological Lithium Problem in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, has been measured for the first time from 10 meV to 10 keV neutron energy. The challenges posed by the short half-life of 7Be and by the low reaction cross section have been overcome at n_TOF thanks to an unprecedented combination of the extremely high luminosity and good resolution of the neutron beam in the new experimental area (EAR2) of the n_TOF facility at CERN, the availability of a sufficient amount of chemically pure 7Be, and a specifically designed experimental setup. Coincidences between the two alpha-particles have been recorded in two Si-7Be-Si arrays placed directly in the neutron beam. The present results are consistent, at thermal neutron energy, with the only previous measurement performed in the 60's at a nuclear reactor. The energy dependence here reported clearly indicates the inadequacy of the cross section estimates currently used in ...

  9. Cooling of ions and antiprotons with magnetized electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Mollers, B; Walter, M; Zwicknagel, G; Carli, Christian; Nersisyan, H

    2004-01-01

    Electron cooling is a well-established method to improve the phase space quality of ion beams in storage rings. More recently antiprotons have been cooled in traps, first by electrons and then by positrons in order to produce antihydrogen atoms as simplest form of antimatter for CPT-tests. During these cooling processes the light particles are guided by strong external magnetic fields which imposes a challenge to the theoretical description. Within the binary collision model we treat the Coulomb interaction as second-order perturbation to the helix motion of the light particles and also by numerical simulations. In the complementary dielectric theory we calculate the polarization of the light particles by solving the nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson equation as well as linear response. It turns out that the linearization becomes dubious at low ion velocities. In the presence of a strong magnetic field the numerically expensive solution of the Vlasov-Poisson equation is the method of choice, alternatively one may empl...

  10. Extremal energy shifts of radiation from a ring near a rotating black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Karas, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Radiation from a narrow circular ring shows a characteristic double-horn profile dominated by photons having energy around the maximum or minimum of the allowed range, i.e. near the extremal values of the energy shift. The energy span of a spectral line is a function of the ring radius, black hole spin, and observer's view angle. We describe a useful approach to calculate the extremal energy shifts in the regime of strong gravity. Then we consider an accretion disk consisting of a number of separate nested annuli in the equatorial plane of Kerr black hole, above the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO). We suggest that the radial structure of the disk emission could be reconstructed using the extremal energy shifts of the individual rings deduced from the broad wings of a relativistic spectral line.

  11. Constraining the gravitational wave energy density of the Universe using Earth's ring

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The search for gravitational waves is one of today's major scientific endeavors. A gravitational wave can interact with matter by exciting vibrations of elastic bodies. Earth itself is a large elastic body whose so-called normal-mode oscillations ring up when a gravitational wave passes. Therefore, precise measurement of vibration amplitudes can be used to search for the elusive gravitational-wave signals. Earth's free oscillations that can be observed after high-magnitude earthquakes have been studied extensively with gravimeters and low-frequency seismometers over many decades leading to invaluable insight into Earth's structure. Making use of our detailed understanding of Earth's normal modes, numerical models are employed for the first time to accurately calculate Earth's gravitational-wave response, and thereby turn a network of sensors that so far has served to improve our understanding of Earth, into an astrophysical observatory exploring our Universe. In this article, we constrain the energy density o...

  12. For CERN's Golden Jubilee, the Canton of Geneva, supported by the Pays de Gex local authorities, lit up eight points around the LHC ring.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    On the date of CERN's fiftieth anniversary, 29 September 2004, the Organization's Host State authorities gave the Laboratory a gift of light. As night fell, twenty-four powerful floodlights blazed into the night sky from the eight access points to the future LHC. (View from Bernex, Switzerland)

  13. For CERN's Golden Jubilee, the Canton of Geneva, supported by the Pays de Gex local authorities, lit up eight points around the LHC ring.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    On the date of CERN's fiftieth anniversary, 29 September 2004, the Organization's Host State authorities gave the Laboratory a gift of light. As night fell, twenty-four powerful floodlights blazed into the night sky from the eight access points to the future LHC. (View from Mourex, France)

  14. Great excavations refitting an existing tunnel ring at CERN for a new, more complex particle accelerator challenged designers to succeed under extraordinary conditions

    CERN Multimedia

    Wallis, S

    2001-01-01

    Caverns up to 35 m wide, 42 m high and 82 m long are now under construction at CERN to house the detectors which will be used for the LHC. The size and difficult geological conditions have made this a very challenging project (8 pages).

  15. 21 September 2010 - Chairman of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission A. Parvez, CERN Director-General R. Heuer, Staff Association President G. Deroma, Ambassador to the UN Z. Akram (showing a symbol of the funds raised by CERN Staff for Pakistan)and Adviser for Non-Member States R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    21 September 2010 - Chairman of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission A. Parvez, CERN Director-General R. Heuer, Staff Association President G. Deroma, Ambassador to the UN Z. Akram (showing a symbol of the funds raised by CERN Staff for Pakistan)and Adviser for Non-Member States R. Voss.

  16. 1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

  17. CERN News: Selection of the type of superconducting coil for the Omega project; New intensity records at the proton synchrotron; Progress with the Spiral Reader film measuring equipment; New technique at transition energy on the proton synchrotron; CERN Courier 10th anniversary; Equipment travelling from and to Serpukhov

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    CERN News: Selection of the type of superconducting coil for the Omega project; New intensity records at the proton synchrotron; Progress with the Spiral Reader film measuring equipment; New technique at transition energy on the proton synchrotron; CERN Courier 10th anniversary; Equipment travelling from and to Serpukhov

  18. Search for invisible decays of sub-GeV dark photons in missing-energy events at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, D.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a direct search for sub-GeV dark photons (A') which might be produced in the reaction e^- Z \\to e^- Z A' via kinetic mixing with photons by 100 GeV electrons incident on an active target in the NA64 experiment at the CERN SPS. The A's would decay invisibly into dark matter particles resulting in events with large missing energy. No evidence for such decays was found with 2.75\\cdot 10^{9} electrons on target. We set new limits on the \\gamma-A' mixing strength and exclude the invisible A' with a mass < 100 MeV as an explanation of the muon g_\\mu-2 anomaly.

  19. Search for Invisible Decays of Sub-GeV Dark Photons in Missing-Energy Events at the CERN SPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, D.; Burtsev, V.; Cooke, D.; Crivelli, P.; Depero, E.; Dermenev, A. V.; Donskov, S. V.; Dubinin, F.; Dusaev, R. R.; Emmenegger, S.; Fabich, A.; Frolov, V. N.; Gardikiotis, A.; Gninenko, S. N.; Hösgen, M.; Kachanov, V. A.; Karneyeu, A. E.; Ketzer, B.; Kirpichnikov, D. V.; Kirsanov, M. M.; Kovalenko, S. G.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kravchuk, L. V.; Krasnikov, N. V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lyubovitskij, V. E.; Lysan, V.; Matveev, V. A.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Myalkovskiy, V. V.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Petuhov, O.; Polyakov, V. A.; Radics, B.; Rubbia, A.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tlisov, D. A.; Toropin, A. N.; Trifonov, A. Yu.; Vasilishin, B.; Vasquez Arenas, G.; Ulloa, P.; Zhukov, K.; Zioutas, K.; NA64 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We report on a direct search for sub-GeV dark photons (A' ), which might be produced in the reaction e-Z →e-Z A' via kinetic mixing with photons by 100 GeV electrons incident on an active target in the NA64 experiment at the CERN SPS. The dark photons would decay invisibly into dark matter particles resulting in events with large missing energy. No evidence for such decays was found with 2.75 ×1 09 electrons on target. We set new limits on the γ -A' mixing strength and exclude the invisible A' with a mass ≲100 MeV as an explanation of the muon gμ-2 anomaly.

  20. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Walsh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A wireless powered implantable atrial defibrillator consisting of a battery driven hand-held radio frequency (RF power transmitter (ex vivo and a passive (battery free implantable power receiver (in vivo that enables measurement of the intracardiac impedance (ICI during internal atrial defibrillation is reported. The architecture is designed to operate in two modes: Cardiac sense mode (power-up, measure the impedance of the cardiac substrate and communicate data to the ex vivo power transmitter and cardiac shock mode (delivery of a synchronised very low tilt rectilinear electrical shock waveform. An initial prototype was implemented and tested. In low-power (sense mode, >5 W was delivered across a 2.5 cm air-skin gap to facilitate measurement of the impedance of the cardiac substrate. In high-power (shock mode, >180 W (delivered as a 12 ms monophasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (M-VLTR or as a 12 ms biphasic very-low-tilt-rectilinear (B-VLTR chronosymmetric (6ms/6ms amplitude asymmetric (negative phase at 50% magnitude shock was reliably and repeatedly delivered across the same interface; with >47% DC-to-DC (direct current to direct current power transfer efficiency at a switching frequency of 185 kHz achieved. In an initial trial of the RF architecture developed, 30 patients with AF were randomised to therapy with an RF generated M-VLTR or B-VLTR shock using a step-up voltage protocol (50–300 V. Mean energy for successful cardioversion was 8.51 J ± 3.16 J. Subsequent analysis revealed that all patients who cardioverted exhibited a significant decrease in ICI between the first and third shocks (5.00 Ω (SD(σ = 1.62 Ω, p < 0.01 while spectral analysis across frequency also revealed a significant variation in the impedance-amplitude-spectrum-area (IAMSA within the same patient group (|∆(IAMSAS1-IAMSAS3[1 Hz − 20 kHz] = 20.82 Ω-Hz (SD(σ = 10.77 Ω-Hz, p < 0.01; both trends being absent in all patients that failed to cardiovert

  1. Feasibility study for a biomedical experimental facility based on LEIR at CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abler, Daniel; Garonna, Adriano; Carli, Christian; Dosanjh, Manjit; Peach, Ken

    2013-07-01

    In light of the recent European developments in ion beam therapy, there is a strong interest from the biomedical research community to have more access to clinically relevant beams. Beamtime for pre-clinical studies is currently very limited and a new dedicated facility would allow extensive research into the radiobiological mechanisms of ion beam radiation and the development of more refined techniques of dosimetry and imaging. This basic research would support the current clinical efforts of the new treatment centres in Europe (for example HIT, CNAO and MedAustron). This paper presents first investigations on the feasibility of an experimental biomedical facility based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring LEIR accelerator. Such a new facility could provide beams of light ions (from protons to neon ions) in a collaborative and cost-effective way, since it would rely partly on CERN's competences and infrastructure. The main technical challenges linked to the implementation of a slow extraction scheme for LEIR and to the design of the experimental beamlines are described and first solutions presented. These include introducing new extraction septa into one of the straight sections of the synchrotron, changing the power supply configuration of the magnets, and designing a new horizontal beamline suitable for clinical beam energies, and a low-energy vertical beamline for particular radiobiological experiments.

  2. The CPLEAR particle identification detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Rozaki, E.; Sakeliou, L. (Univ. Athens (Greece)); Backenstoss, G.; Kuzminski, J.; Rickenbach, R.; Wildi, M. (Univ. Basel (Switzerland)); Carlson, P.; Francis, D.; Jansson, K.; Jon-And, K.; Kerek, A.; Szilagyi, S. (Manne Siegbahn Inst. Stockholm (Sweden)); Carvalho, J.; Cobbaert, H.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Machado, E.; Onofre, A.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Policarpo, A. (Univ. Coimbra, LIP (Portugal) Technical Univ., Delft (Netherlands)); Charalambous, S.; Chardalas, M.; Dedoussis, S.; Touramanis, C. (Univ. Thessaloniki (Greece)); Fassnacht, P.; Pelucchi, F. (CPPM, Marseille (France) CSNSM, Orsay (France) P. Scherrer Inst., Villingen (Switzerland) DPhPe, CEN-Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Fetcher, W.; Gerber, H.J. (Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik, ETH Villingen (Switzerland)); Fuglesang, C.; Kesseler, G.; Montanet, F. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Go, A.; Lawry, T.; Miller, J.; Roberts, B.L.; Varner, G.; Warner, D.; Zimmerman, D. (Univ. Boston,; CPLEAR Collaboration

    1992-01-01

    The CPLEAR experiment will measure CP violation parameters in the neutral kaon system, using a low energy antiproton beam from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. One of its subdetectors, the Particle Identification Detector (PID), makes a fast separation of pions and kaons, which is essential for the experiment. This article describes the design of the PID and its performance during beam tests and during initial runs at LEAR. A pion rejection efficiency of 99.7% for the first level trigger (after 60 ns) is found in the relevant momentum region. (orig.).

  3. Energy Spectra of a Magnetic Quantum Ring with an Off-Center Impurity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate the low-lying spectra of a single-electron magnetic quantum ring with an offcenter Coulomb impurity, where the magnetic field is zero within the ring and constant elsewhere. The impurity, either an acceptor or a donor, is located at a distance d as measured from the plane of the ring along the vertical z direction.The magnetic moments are found in order to get visible discontinuities at the points of the ground-state orbital angular momentum L transitions induced by magnetic fields.

  4. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Lettry, Jacques; Midttun, Øystein; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H(-) beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  5. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A., E-mail: cristhian.alfonso.valerio.lizarraga@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico); Midttun, Øystein [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  6. Low-Loss Polymer-Based Ring Resonator for Resonant Integrated Optical Gyroscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Qian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Waveguide ring resonator is the sensing element of resonant integrated optical gyroscope (RIOG. This paper reports a polymer-based ring resonator with a low propagation loss of about 0.476 dB/cm for RIOG. The geometrical parameters of the waveguide and the coupler of the resonator were optimally designed. We also discussed the optical properties and gyroscope performance of the polymer resonator which shows a high quality factor of about 105. The polymer-based RIOG exhibits a limited sensitivity of less than 20 deg/h for the low and medium resolution navigation systems.

  7. Planar Hall ring sensor for ultra-low magnetic moment sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hung, Tran Quang; Terki, Ferial; Kamara, Souleymanne

    2015-01-01

    The field sensitivity of a planar Hall effect (PHE) micro-ring type biosensor has been investigated as a function of magnetizing angle of the sensor material, for the sensing of low magnetic moment superparamagnetic labels. The field sensitivity is maximal at a magnetizing angle of α = 20......°. At this optimized magnetizing angle, the field sensitivity of a PHE sensor is about 3.6 times higher than that measured at the conventional configuration, α = 90°. This optimization enables the PHE-ring sensor to detect superparamagnetic biolabels with ultra-low magnetic moments down to 4 × 10-13 emu....

  8. Planar Hall ring sensor for ultra-low magnetic moment sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tran Quang; Terki, Ferial; Kamara, Souleymanne; Kim, Kunwoo; Charar, Salam; Kim, CheolGi

    2015-04-01

    The field sensitivity of a planar Hall effect (PHE) micro-ring type biosensor has been investigated as a function of magnetizing angle of the sensor material, for the sensing of low magnetic moment superparamagnetic labels. The field sensitivity is maximal at a magnetizing angle of α = 20°. At this optimized magnetizing angle, the field sensitivity of a PHE sensor is about 3.6 times higher than that measured at the conventional configuration, α = 90°. This optimization enables the PHE-ring sensor to detect superparamagnetic biolabels with ultra-low magnetic moments down to 4 × 10-13 emu.

  9. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrivens, R., E-mail: richard.scrivens@cern.ch; Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-02-15

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup −} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup −} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  10. Linac4 Low Energy Beam Measurements with Negative Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Scrivens, R; Crettiez, O; Dimov, V; Gerard, D; Granemann Souza, E; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Lallement, J B; Lettry, J; Lombardi, A; Midttun, O; Pasquino, C; Raich, U; Riffaud, B; Roncarolo, F; Valerio-Lizarraga, C A; Wallner, J; Yarmohammadi Satri, M; Zickler, T

    2014-01-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H- linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H- beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  11. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivens, R; Bellodi, G; Crettiez, O; Dimov, V; Gerard, D; Granemann Souza, E; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Lallement, J-B; Lettry, J; Lombardi, A; Midttun, Ø; Pasquino, C; Raich, U; Riffaud, B; Roncarolo, F; Valerio-Lizarraga, C A; Wallner, J; Yarmohammadi Satri, M; Zickler, T

    2014-02-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H(-) linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H(-) beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  12. Low-momentum NN interactions and all-order summation of ring diagrams of symmetric nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, L.-W.; Holt, J. W.; Kuo, T. T. S.; Brown, G. E.

    2009-05-01

    We study the equation of state for symmetric nuclear matter using a ring-diagram approach in which the particle-particle hole-hole (pphh) ring diagrams within a momentum model space of decimation scale Λ are summed to all orders. The calculation is carried out using the renormalized low-momentum nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction Vlow-k, which is obtained from a bare NN potential by integrating out the high-momentum components beyond Λ. The bare NN potentials of CD-Bonn, Nijmegen, and Idaho have been employed. The choice of Λ and its influence on the single particle spectrum are discussed. Ring-diagram correlations at intermediate momenta (k≃2fm-1) are found to be particularly important for nuclear saturation, suggesting the necessity of using a sufficiently large decimation scale so that the above momentum region is not integrated out. Using Vlow-k with Λ~3fm-1, we perform a ring-diagram computation with the above potentials, which all yield saturation energies E/A and Fermi momenta kF(0) considerably larger than the empirical values. On the other hand, similar computations with the medium-dependent Brown-Rho scaled NN potentials give satisfactory results of E/A≃-15 MeV and kF(0)≃1.4fm-1. The effect of this medium dependence is well reproduced by an empirical three-body force of the Skyrme type.

  13. Cooperation between CERN and ITER

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Service

    2008-01-01

    CERN and the International Fusion Organisation ITER have just signed a first cooperation agreeement. The Director-General of the International Fusion Energy Organization, Mr Kaname Ikeda, and CERN Director-General, Robert Aymar, signed a cooperation agreement at a meeting on the Meyrin site on Thursday 6 March.

  14. Experimental results on low alpha electron-storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin, D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Hama, H. [UVSOR Facility, Okazaki (Japan). Inst. for Molecular Science; Nadji, A. [LURE, Orsay (France). Centre Univ. de Paris-Sud

    1995-09-01

    The authors report on experiments performed in two synchrotron light sources, UVSOR and Super-ACO, where the momentum compaction factor is reduced in order to reduce the bunch length. By controlling the second-order momentum compaction factor, UVSOR and Super-ACO have managed to reduce the first-order momentum compaction factor by 100. At low current the resulting bunch lengths are less than 10 ps, a factor of 10 smaller than normal. Measurements of current dependent bunch lengthening in UVSOR are presented and the cause of the bunch lengthening is determined to be potential-well distortion. The authors also show that by operating with a negative momentum compaction factor, SuperACO has achieved shorter bunch lengthening and higher peak currents than at positive momentum compaction.

  15. Advanced nuclear energy systems and the need of accurate nuclear data: the n_TOF project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Colonna, N; Praena, J; Lederer, C; Karadimos, D; Sarmento, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Plag, R; Massimi, C; Calviani, M; Guerrero, C; Paradela, C; Belloni, F

    2010-01-01

    To satisfy the world's constantly increasing demand for energy, a suitable mix of different energy sources has to be devised. In this scenario, an important role could be played by nuclear energy, provided that major safety, waste and proliferation issues affecting current nuclear reactors are satisfactorily addressed. To this purpose, a large effort has been under way for a few years towards the development of advanced nuclear systems with the aim of closing the fuel cycle. Generation IV reactors, with full or partial waste recycling capability, accelerator driven systems, as well as new fuel cycles are the main options being investigated. The design of advanced systems requires improvements in basic nuclear data, such as cross-sections for neutron-induced reactions on actinides. In this paper, the main concepts of advanced reactor systems are described, together with the related needs of new and accurate nuclear data. The present activity in this field at the neutron facility n\\_TOF at CERN is discussed.

  16. Energy partition in low energy fission

    CERN Document Server

    Mirea, M

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic excitation energy of fission fragments is dynamically evaluated in terms of the time dependent pairing equations. These equations are corroborated with two conditions. One of them fixes the number of particles and the another separates the pairing active spaces associated to the two fragments in the vicinity of the scission configuration. The fission path is obtained in the frame of the macroscopic-microscopic model. The single particle level schemes are obtained within the two center Woods-Saxon shell model. It is shown that the available intrinsic dissipated energy is not shared proportionally to the masses of the two fission fragments. If the heavy fragment possesses nucleon numbers close to the magic ones, the accumulated intrinsic excitation energy is lower than that of the light fragment.

  17. Laser Spectroscopy of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %PS205 %title\\\\ \\\\Following the discovery of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms ($\\overline{p}He^{+} $) at KEK in 1991, systematic studies of their properties were made at LEAR from 1991 to 1996. In the first two years the lifetime of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ in liquid and gaseous helium at various temperatures and pressures was measured and the effect of foreign gases on the lifetime of these atoms was investigated. Effects were also discovered which gave the antiproton a 14\\% longer lifetime in $^4$He than in $^3$He, and resulted in important differences in the shape of the annihilation time spectra in the two isotopes.\\\\ \\\\Since 1993 laser spectroscopy of the metastable $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atoms became the main focus of PS205. Transitions were stimulated between metastable and non-metastable states of the $\\overline{p}He^{+}$ atom by firing a pulsed dye laser beam into the helium target every time an identified metastable atom was present (Figure 1). If the laser frequency matched the transition energy, the...

  18. Anomalous fiber optic gyroscope signals observed above spinning rings at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajmar, M; Plesescu, F; Seifert, B [Space Propulsion and Advanced Concepts, Austrian Research Centers GmbH - ARC, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)], E-mail: martin.tajmar@arcs.ac.at

    2009-02-01

    Precision fiber optic gyroscopes were mounted mechanically de-coupled above spinning rings inside a cryostat. Below a critical temperature (typically <30 K), the gyroscopes measure a significant deviation from their usual offset due to Earth's rotation. This deviation is proportional to the applied angular ring velocity with maximum signals towards lower temperatures. The anomalous gyroscope signal is about 8 orders of magnitude smaller then the applied angular ring velocity, compensating about one third of the Earth rotation offset at an angular top speed of 420 rad/s. Moreover, our data shows a parity violation as the effect appears to be dominant for rotation against the Earth's spin. No systematic effect was found to explain this effect including the magnetic environment, vibration and helium gas friction suggesting that our observation is a new low temperature phenomenon. Tests in various configurations suggest that the rotating low temperature helium may be the source of our anomalous signals.

  19. Low energy (anti)atoms for precision tests of basic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Silveira, D M; Veloso, M; Cesar, C L

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in techniques to manipulate and study, with high precision, atomic hydrogen, from one hand, and successful trapping schemes for positrons and antiprotons, from the other hand, have encouraged the pursuit of experiments to test CPT violation and the weak equivalence principle (WEP) through the comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen. A description of the hydrogen trap and laser system being built in Rio, to trap and perform high resolution spectroscopy on cold hydrogen, is presented along with a discussion on the techniques and experimental system being implemented by the ATHENA collaboration at CERN to produce cold antihydrogen. A new technique to make a cold antihydrogen beam is proposed. (25 refs).

  20. Low Energy Supergravity Revisited (I)

    CERN Document Server

    Moultaka, Gilbert; Tant, Damien

    2016-01-01

    General forms of the K\\"ahler and superpotenials that lead to consistent low energy broken Supersymmetry originating from $N=1$ Supergravity have been classified and used for model building since more than three decades. We point out the incompleteness of this classification. Focusing in this paper mainly on the case of minimal K\\"ahler potential, we adopt a rigorous approach that retrieves on the one hand the known forms, and demonstrate on the other hand the existence of a whole set of new forms for the superpotential of which we give a complete classification. The latter forms involve a new type of chiral superfields having the unusual property of belonging neither to the hidden sector nor to the conventional observable sector. We argue how new possibilities for model building can arise, comparing the obtained forms with the conventional ones, and discuss the gravity mediation of supersymmetry breaking and the vacuum structure in the presence of the new type of chiral superfields. In the simplest case, we ...

  1. Proceedings of the 2009 CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics, Recinto Quirama, Colombia, 15 - 28 March 2009

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lectures on quantum field theory, quantum chromodynamics, physics beyond the Standard Model, neutrino physics, flavour physics and CP violation, particle cosmology, high-energy astro-particle physics, and heavy-ion physics, as well as trigger and data acquisition, and commissioning and...

  2. Reaching record-low β* at the CERN Large Hadron Collider using a novel scheme of collimator settings and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R.; Bracco, C.; De Maria, R.; Giovannozzi, M.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Redaelli, S.; Quaranta, E.; Salvachua, B.

    2017-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is built to collide intense proton beams with an unprecedented energy of 7 TeV. The design stored energy per beam of 362 MJ makes the LHC beams highly destructive, so that any beam losses risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets or damage to accelerator components. Collimators are installed to protect the machine and they define a minimum normalized aperture, below which no other element is allowed. This imposes a limit on the achievable luminosity, since when squeezing β* (the β-function at the collision point) to smaller values for increased luminosity, the β-function in the final focusing system increases. This leads to a smaller normalized aperture that risks to go below the allowed collimation aperture. In the first run of the LHC, this was the main limitation on β*, which was constrained to values above the design specification. In this article, we show through theoretical and experimental studies how tighter collimator openings and a new optics with specific phase-advance constraints allows a β* as small as 40 cm, a factor 2 smaller than β*=80 cm used in 2015 and significantly below the design value β*=55 cm, in spite of a lower beam energy. The proposed configuration with β*=40 cm has been successfully put into operation and has been used throughout 2016 as the LHC baseline. The decrease in β* compared to 2015 has been an essential contribution to reaching and surpassing, in 2016, the LHC design luminosity for the first time, and to accumulating a record-high integrated luminosity of around 40 fb-1 in one year, in spite of using less bunches than in the design.

  3. LEAR is dead, long live LEIR!

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) experiment has now been dismantled. Only the dipoles remain for use in the future LEIR (Low Energy Ion Ring) experiment, the new ring which will supply lead ions to the LHC experiments.

  4. Secondary electron emission in antiproton-carbon foil collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Kuroki, K. (Inst. of Physics, Coll. of Arts and Sciences, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Andersen, L.H.; Horsdal-Pedersen, E.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-04-01

    Energy spectra of electrons emitted in the forward direction by antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foil targets were measured in the incident energy region from 500 to 750 keV. In the spectra for antiproton impact, no sharp anticusp, which is expected in place of the cusp in the case of the proton impact, is recognized and a small bump is found at 50 eV below the cusp energy. The spectral profile in the equivelocity region, including smearing out of the anticusp, together with the energy and intensity of the bump, is consistent with a theoretical prediction for wake-riding electrons based on the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. (orig.).

  5. Triple pelvic ring fixation in patients with severe pregnancy-related low back and pelvic pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwienen, C.M. van; Bosch, E.W. van den; Snijders, C.J.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2004-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Single-group prospective follow-up study. OBJECTIVES: To assess the functional outcome of internal fixation of the pelvic ring in patients with severe pregnancy-related low back and pelvic pain (PLBP) in whom all other treatments failed. BACKGROUND DATA: More than half of all pregnant

  6. Identification and analysis of charged hadrons in p+p interactions from NA61/SHINE experiment at CERN SPS energies

    CERN Document Server

    Pulawski, Szymon

    The phase-transition of strongly interacting matter is a very interesting phenom- ena, which still is not fully understood. Signi cant contribution to improving knowledge about properties of the onset of decon nement of strongly interact- ing matter might come from the NA61/SHINE experiment at CERN. The main goal of this xed-target experiment is to discover the critical point and study the properties of the onset of decon nement. This goal has been reached by the pre- cise measurement of the hadron production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions in a wide range of system sizes and collision energies. The main goal of this thesis was to obtained two-dimensional spectra of positively and negatively charged pions, kaons and protons produced in p + p interactions at SPS energy range (20 ; 30 : 9 ; 40 ; 80 ; 158 GeV=c ). This studies are necessary for understanding of the onset of decon nement. For this purpose, identi cation and correction techniques dedicated...

  7. The CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility for dosimetry at commercial flight altitudes and in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitaroff, A; Cern, M Silari

    2002-01-01

    A reference facility for the calibration and intercomparison of active and passive detectors in broad neutron fields has been available at CERN since 1992. A positively charged hadron beam (a mixture of protons and pions) with momentum of 120 GeV/c hits a copper target, 50 cm thick and 7 cm in diameter. The secondary particles produced in the interaction traverse a shield, at 90 degrees with respect to the direction of the incoming beam. made of either 80 to 160 cm of concrete or 40 cm of iron. Behind the iron shield, the resulting neutron spectrum has a maximum at about 1 MeV, with an additional high-energy component. Behind the 80 cm concrete shield, the neutron spectrum has a second pronounced maximum at about 70 MeV and resembles the high-energy component of the radiation field created by cosmic rays at commercial flight altitudes. This paper describes the facility, reports on the latest neutron spectral measurements, gives an overview of the most important experiments performed by the various collaborating institutions over recent years and briefly addresses the possible application of the facility to measurements related to the space programme.

  8. The CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility for dosimetry at commercial flight altitudes and in space

    CERN Document Server

    Mitaroff, Angela

    2002-01-01

    A reference facility for the calibration and intercomparison of active and passive detectors in broad neutron fields has been available at CERN since 1992. A positively charged hadron beam (a mixture of protons and pions) with momentum of 120 GeV/c hits a copper target, 50 cm thick and 7 cut in diameter. The secondary particles produced in the interaction traverse a shield, at 90 degrees with respect to the direction of the incoming beam, made of either 80 to 160 cm of concrete or 40 cm of iron. Behind the iron shield, the resulting neutron spectrum has a maximum at about 1 MeV, with an additional high-energy component. Behind the 80 cm concrete shield, the neutron spectrum has a second pronounced maximum at about 70 MeV and resembles the high-energy component of the radiation field created by cosmic rays at commercial flight altitudes. This paper describes the facility, reports on the latest neutron spectral measurements, gives an overview of the most important experiments performed by the various collaborat...

  9. Design and fabrication of a cryostat for low temperature mechanical testing for the Mechanical and Materials Engineering group at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Aviles Santillana, I; Gerardin, A; Guinchard, M; Langeslag, S A E; Sgobba, S

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical testing of materials at low temperatures is one of the cornerstones of the Mechanical and Materials Engineering (MME) group at CERN. A long tradition of more than 20 years and a unique know - how of such tests has been developed with an 18 kN double-walled cryostat. Large campaigns of material qualification have been carried out and the mechanical behaviour of materials at 4 K has been vastly studied in sub - size samples for projects like LEP, LHC and its experiments. With the aim of assessing the mechanical properties of materials of higher strength and/or issued from heavy gauge products for which testing standardized specimens of larger cross section might be more adapted, a new 100 kN cryostat capable of hosting different shapes of normalized samples has been carefully designed and fabricated inhouse together with the associated tooling and measurement instrumentation. It has been conceived to be able to adapt to different test frames both dynamic and static, which will be of paramount importa...

  10. Energy dependence of hadronic observables in central Pb+Pb reactions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Alt, C; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, A; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Farantatos, G; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kliemant, M; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, Peter; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Markert, C; Mateev, M; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczynski, S; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R; Richard, A; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, C; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Trubnikov, V; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wetzler, A; Wlodarczyk, Z; Yoo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J

    2005-01-01

    In this contribution the energy dependence of various hadronic observables as measured by the NA49 experiment in the beam energy range between 20 and 158 AGeV is presented. These include m/sub t/ and rapidity distributions, particle ratio fluctuations, as well as HBT radii. The data are put in the context of results from the AGS and RHIC.

  11. Characterization of extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometers in the CERF high-energy broad neutron field at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Charitonidis, N.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Severino, C.; Silari, M.

    2012-12-01

    controlled workplace field. The CERF (CERN-EU high-energy reference field) facility is a unique example of such a field, where a number of experimental campaigns and Monte Carlo simulations have been performed over the past years. With the aim of performing this kind of workplace performance test, four different ERBSS with different degrees of validation, operated by three groups (CERN, INFN-LNF and Politecnico of Milano), were exposed in two fixed positions at CERF. Using different unfolding codes (MAXED, GRAVEL, FRUIT and FRUIT SGM), the experimental data were analyzed to provide the neutron spectra and the related dosimetric quantities. The results allow assessing the overall performance of each ERBSS and of the unfolding codes, as well as comparing the performance of three ERRCs when used in a neutron field with energy distribution different from the calibration spectrum.

  12. PS, septum magnet for ejection of antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiprotons circulated in the PS in the sense opposite to that of the so far normal protons (or positive ions). A new ejection system with a new septum magnet was installed in straight section 58 for antiproton ejection, first towards the ISR and then to the principal customer, the SPS p-pbar Collider. Later on, when the PS delivered leptons for LEP, the antiproton ejection system was use for the ejection of electrons.

  13. Poland at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    On 17 October 2000, the second Polish industrial and technological exhibition opens at CERN*. The first one was held five years ago and nine of the companies that were present then have come back again this year. Six of those companies were awarded contracts with CERN in 1995. Three Polish officials were present at the Opening Ceremony today: Mrs Malgorzata Kozlowska, Under-secretary of State in the State Committee for Scientific Research, Mr Henryk Ogryczak, Under-secretary of State in Ministry of Economy and Prof. Jerzy Niewodniczanski, President of National Atomic Energy Agency.

  14. HEDgeHOB High-energy density matter generated by heavy ion beams at the future facility for antiprotons and ion research

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Wouchuk, G; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E; Hoffmann, D H H; Schmidt, R

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the theoretical work that has been carried out during the past few years to assess the capabilities of intense heavy ion beams to induce states of High-Energy Density (HED) in matter. This work has shown that two different experimental schemes can be used to study HED physics employing intense ion beams. These schemes have been named HIHEX [Heavy Ion Heating and EXpansion] and LAPLAS [LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences], respectively. The first scheme involves isochoric and uniform heating and subsequent isentropic expansion of matter while the latter deals with low entropy compression of matter using multiple shock reflection technique. This work has been done within the framework of the HEDgeHOB [High Energy Density Matter Generated by Heavy Ion Beams] collaboration that has been formed to organize and facilitate construction of experimental facilities and later to perform experimental work in the field of HED matter at the future accelerator facility, FAIR [Facility for Antipr...

  15. LLRF05 : Workshop on Low Level RF, CERN. 10-13 October 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Sophisticated Low Level RF systems are needed in modern particle accelerators to deal with the characteristics of state-of-the-art RF accelerating structures and their power sources, and to meet unprecedented levels of performance. The goal of the LLRF05 workshop is to share experience between linac and synchrotron projects (SNS, J-PARC, ILC, LHC etc.) and to discuss the best engineering practice.

  16. Participants of the LLRF05 : Workshop on Low Level RF, CERN 10-13 October 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Sophisticated Low Level RF systems are needed in modern particle accelerators to deal with the characteristics of state-of-the-art RF accelerating structures and their power sources, and to meet unprecedented levels of performance. The goal of the LLRF05 workshop is to share experience between linac and synchrotron projects (SNS, J-PARC, ILC, LHC etc.) and to discuss the best engineering practice.

  17. Radiography at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    What is industrial radiography? It is a non-destructive method with a wide variety of applications, such as inspecting the quality of a weld. It uses high-energy radioactive sources or an X-ray generator.   Is this inspection technique used at CERN? Yes, it is widely used at CERN by the EN-MME Group, which outsources the work to one or more companies, depending on the workload. Is it possible to carry out radiography anywhere at CERN? Yes, it is possible to carry out radiography in any building/accelerator/experiment area at CERN (including in areas which are not normally subject to radiological hazards). When is radiography carried out? It normally takes place outside of working hours (7 p.m. to 6 a.m.). How will I know if radiography is taking place in my building? If this activity is planned in a CERN building, notices will be affixed to all of its main entrance doors at least 24 hours in advance. What are the risks? There is a risk of exposure to very high levels of radiation, dep...

  18. Anomalous Fiber Optic Gyroscope Signals Observed above Spinning Rings at Low Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Tajmar, M; Seifert, B

    2008-01-01

    Precision fiber optic gyroscopes were mounted mechanically de-coupled above spinning rings inside a cryostat. Below a critical temperature (typically <30 K), the gyroscopes measure a significant deviation from their usual Earth rotation offset proportional to the applied angular ring velocity with maximum signals towards lower temperatures. The anomalous gyroscope signal is about 8 orders of magnitude smaller then the applied angular ring velocity, compensating about one third of the Earth rotation offset at an angular top speed of 420 rad/s. Moreover, our data shows a parity violation as the effect appears to be dominant for rotation against the Earth's spin. No systematic effect was found to explain this effect including the magnetic environment, vibration and helium gas friction suggesting that our observation is a new low temperature phenomenon. Tests in various configurations suggest that the anomalous signals is originating from the rotating helium in our facilities.

  19. 8th CERN - Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Zanderighi, G; CLASHEP 2015; CLASHEP2015

    2016-01-01

    The CERN–Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lecture notes on the Standard Model of electroweak interactions, flavour physics, neutrino physics, Higgs physics, new physics beyond the standard model, quantum chromodynamics under extreme conditions, cosmology, an introduction to experimental facilities at the high-energy frontier, and practical statistics for particle physicists.

  20. Search for Associated Chargino-Neutralino Production in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenschein, Ulla [Albert Ludwigs Univ. of Freiburg (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    interacting, carrying away energy and momentum and leading to detector signatures with large missing energy. Supersymmetric particles have been searched for at the electron-positron collider LEP up to the kinematic limit. No evidence for these particles has been observed which results in lower limits on their masses. Additional constraints stem from precision measurements of quantities, which are sensitive to corrections from SUSY particles and from the search for dark matter in cosmological experiments. The search for SUSY particles beyond the reach of LEP is continued at larger energy regimes at present and future hadron colliders. In its second phase of data taking (Run II), the center-of-mass energy of the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron at Fermilab has been raised and the luminosity has been increased considerably. The D0 experiment, one of the two Tevatron experiments, has been upgraded accordingly. The Tevatron collider allows to probe a substantial SUSY mass range beyond the LEP limits. The search will be continued at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is presently being constructed at the European Research laboratory for particle physics CERN in Geneva. At hadron colliders the supersymmetric partners of quarks and gluons are copiously produced in strong interactions, provided they are light enough. Within most of the established SUSY models, these particles are too heavy to be produced at a sufficient rate at the Tevatron collider and the production of the lighter super-partners of the Higgs and gauge bosons, the charginos and neutralinos, becomes an important source of SUSY particles. Decays of these particles result in final states with leptons or hadrons and large missing energy. Leptonic final states can be separated more easily from the large background of hadronic Standard Model processes. A search for the associated production of the lightest chargino and the second lightest neutralino has been performed in final states with two electrons, an additional

  1. A Good Statistics Study of Antiproton Interactions with Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment extends the study of inclusive pion production and the correlation between pions which result from hadron-nucleus collisions at intermediate and high energies to the antiproton-nucleus system. It is part of a long term systematic search for exotic nuclear phenomena. The correlation data will be used to extract, via pion interferometry, the size and coherence of the annihilation source in nuclei. In addition, the reaction @* + A @A p + A* will be studied to look for structure in the proton spectra which antiproton-nucleus bound states.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental system is based on a flexible, broad range, large acceptance (1~steradian) spectrometer which consists of an 80~cm diameter dipole magnet surrounded with detector arrays. These detectors provide momentum, energy loss, Cerenkov and time of flight information for up to ten ejectiles per event. Momentum resolution varies from 1\\% to 3\\%, depending on energy.

  2. Robot adventures at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Imagine if the CERN robots had an end-of-year party... From retrieving data tapes to handling material safely, the robots at CERN fulfill numerous tasks. Find out more: http://cern.ch/go/VjX7 Produced by: CERN Video Productions Director: Christoph M. Madsen Copyright © 2015 CERN. Terms of use: http://copyright.web.cern.ch/

  3. High-energy terahertz wave parametric oscillator with a surface-emitted ring-cavity configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Xu, Wentao; Duan, Pan; Yan, Chao; Tang, Longhuang; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-05-15

    A surface-emitted ring-cavity terahertz (THz) wave parametric oscillator has been demonstrated for high-energy THz output and fast frequency tuning in a wide frequency range. Through the special optical design with a galvano-optical scanner and four-mirror ring-cavity structure, the maximum THz wave output energy of 12.9 μJ/pulse is achieved at 1.359 THz under the pump energy of 172.8 mJ. The fast THz frequency tuning in the range of 0.7-2.8 THz can be accessed with the step response of 600 μs. Moreover, the maximum THz wave output energy from this configuration is 3.29 times as large as that obtained from the conventional surface-emitted THz wave parametric oscillator with the same experimental conditions.

  4. Event simulation based on three-fluid hydrodynamics for collisions at energies available at the Dubna Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility and at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Darmstadt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batyuk, P.; Blaschke, D.; Bleicher, M.; Ivanov, Yu. B.; Karpenko, Iu.; Merts, S.; Nahrgang, M.; Petersen, H.; Rogachevsky, O.

    2016-10-01

    We present an event generator based on the three-fluid hydrodynamics approach for the early stage of the collision, followed by a particlization at the hydrodynamic decoupling surface to join to a microscopic transport model, ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics, to account for hadronic final-state interactions. We present first results for nuclear collisions of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research-Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility energy scan program (Au+Au collisions, √{sN N}=4 -11 GeV ). We address the directed flow of protons and pions as well as the proton rapidity distribution for two model equations of state, one with a first-order phase transition and the other with a crossover-type softening at high densities. The new simulation program has the unique feature that it can describe a hadron-to-quark matter transition which proceeds in the baryon stopping regime that is not accessible to previous simulation programs designed for higher energies.

  5. High energy density physics effects predicted in simulations of the CERN HiRadMat beam-target interaction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Experiments have been done at the CERN HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials) facility in which large cylindrical copper targets were irradiated with 440 GeV proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The primary purpose of these experiments was to confirm the existence of hydrodynamic tunneling of ultra-relativistic protons and their hadronic shower in solid materials, that was predicted by previous numerical simulations. The experimental measurements have shown very good agreement with the simulation results. This provides confidence in our simulations of the interaction of the 7 TeV LHC (Large Hadron Collider) protons and the 50 TeV Future Circular Collider (FCC) protons with solid materials, respectively. This work is important from the machine protection point of view. The numerical simulations have also shown that in the HiRadMat experiments, a significant part of thetarget material is be converted into different phases of High Energy Density (HED) matter, including two-phase solid-liquid mixture, expanded as well as compressed hot liquid phases, two-phase liquid-gas mixture and gaseous state. The HiRadMat facility is therefore a unique ion beam facility worldwide that is currently available for studying the thermophysical properties of HED matter. In the present paper we discuss the numerical simulation results and present a comparison with the experimental measurements.

  6. Light-by-light scattering in ultraperipheral Pb-Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Lebiedowicz, Piotr; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    We calculate cross sections for diphoton production in (semi)exclusive PbPb collisions, relevant for the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The calculation is based on the equivalent photon approximation in the impact parameter space. The cross sections for the elementary γ γ →γ γ subprocess are calculated including two different mechanisms. We take into account box diagrams with leptons and quarks in the loops. In addition, we consider a vector-meson dominance (VDM-Regge) contribution with virtual intermediate hadronic (vector-like) excitations of the photons. We get measurable cross sections in PbPb collisions. This opens a possibility to study the γ γ →γ γ (quasi)elastic scattering at the LHC. We present many interesting differential distributions which could be measured by the ALICE, CMS, or ATLAS Collaborations at the LHC. We study whether a separation or identification of different components (boxes, VDM-Regge) is possible. We find that the cross section for elastic γ γ scattering could be measured in the heavy-ion collisions for subprocess energies smaller than Wγ γ≈15 -20 GeV.

  7. CERN choir

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Don't forget a special performance of Joseph Haydn's Creation, an oratorio in three parts, given by the CERN choir and the Annecy choir Pro Musica, this Sunday at 8.30 p.m. at the Grand Casino. Tickets (38 CHF) are available at Fnac Rive and Balexert.

  8. Plascore receives awards from CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Plascore recently was awarded two honors from CERN, European High Energy Physics Lab, for its involvement in the manufacture of Thermoplastic Honeycomb panels for their large superconducting super collider (1/2 page).

  9. Low Energy Background Spectrum in CDMSlite

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, D

    2016-01-01

    One trend in dark matter direct detection is the development of techniques which will lower experimental thresholds and achieve sensitivity to light mass dark matter particles. In doing so, it is necessary to have an understanding of the low energy spectrum of the major background components. Geant4 has a number of specialized low energy physics processes that can be implemented when simulating an experimental geometry. To understand this low energy region for the Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS), a variety of these models have been simulated and compared against theoretical calculations and SuperCDMS calibration data. Most of the low energy processes include a more complete description of the atomic structure, allowing us to observe the phenomenon of Compton steps in the simulation. An important application of this low energy background modeling is for the SuperCDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite). CDMSlite has reached world-leading sensitivities in the search for low mass weakly...

  10. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams Generating High-Energy-Density Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, IV; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. This data has been used as input to a sophisticated two--dimensional hydrodynamic computer code, BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1~m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy de...

  11. CERN News - Physics restarts in the LHC at new record energy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Visual Media Office; Marion Viguier; Paola Catapano

    2012-01-01

    The LHC has started proton collisions at the unprecedent energy of 4 TeV per beam. This video celebrates the new milestone and explains the physics challenges and ecxpectations for the two larger experiments ATLAS and CMS through the words of the current physics coordinators Richard Hawkings and Greg Landsberg.

  12. CERN Control Centre (CCC) - Collision tests at record-breaking energy of 13 TeV

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    during the night of 20 May, protons collided in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the record-breaking energy of 13 TeV for the first time. These pictures show the LHC operations team on the morning of 21 of May.

  13. Fragmentation of methane molecules by antiproton impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh, Arash; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Extending previous work for proton impact, we have investigated the fragmentation of methane molecules due to collisions with antiprotons in the 25 keV to 5 MeV impact energy range. The multi-center nature of the problem is addressed by using a spectral representation of the molecular Hartree-Fock-level Hamiltonian and a single-center expansion of the initially populated molecular orbitals. The two-center basis generator method (TC-BGM) is used for orbital propagation. Electron-removal cross sections obtained from the TC-BGM solutions are complemented with a dynamical decay-route fragmentation model to calculate cross sections for the production of fragment ions. Good agreement with the available experimental data is observed for CH4+,CH3+,CH2+and CH+. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  14. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams generating high-energy-density matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N A; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/ c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. These data have been used as input to a sophisticated two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1 m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy deposition region will extend to a length of about 35 m over the beam duration. This is due to the fact that first few tens of bunches deposit sufficient energy that leads to high pressure that generates an outgoing radial shock wave. Shock propagation leads to continuous reduction in the density at the target center that allows the protons delivered in subsequent bunches to penetrate deeper and deeper into the target. This phenomenon has also been seen in case of heavy-ion heated targets [N. A. Tahir, A. Kozyreva, P. Spiller, D. H. H. Hoffmann, and A. Shutov, Phys. Rev. E 63, 036407 (2001)]. This effect needs to be considered in the design of a sacrificial beam stopper. These simulations have also shown that the target is severely damaged and is converted into a huge sample of high-energy density (HED) matter. In fact, the inner part of the target is transformed into a strongly coupled plasma with fairly uniform physical conditions. This work, therefore, has

  15. Bosons production $W^{\\pm}$ via $e^{-}$ p-collisions at CERN LEP/LHC energies with a $W{\\pm}$ anomalous magnetic moment

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the production of charged bosons in deep inelastic e/sup - /p-scattering, in the context of an electroweak model, in which the vector boson self interactions may be different from those prescribed by the electroweak standard model. We show that even small deviations from the standard model value of kappa ( kappa =1) implies an observable deviation in the W/sup +or-/ production rates at CERN LEP /LHC energies.

  16. 7th CERN - Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mulders, M; CLASHEP 2013; CLASHEP2013

    2015-01-01

    The CERN–Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lecture notes on the Standard Model of electroweak interactions, quantum chromodynamics, flavour physics, quantum chromodynamics under extreme conditions, cosmic-ray physics, cosmology, recent highlights of LHC results, practical statistics for particle physicists and a short introduction to the principles of particle physics instrumentation.

  17. Measurements and simulation of induced activity at the CERN-EU high- energy reference field facility

    CERN Document Server

    Brugger, M; Mitaroff, W A; Roesler, S

    2003-01-01

    Samples of aluminum, copper, stainless steel, iron, boron nitride, carbon composite and water were irradiated by the stray radiation field produced by interactions of high-energy hadrons in a copper target. The specific activity induced in the samples was measured by gamma spectrometry. In addition, the isotope production in the samples was calculated with detailed Monte-Carlo simulations using the FLUKA code. Results of the simulation are in reasonable agreement with the measured activities. 7 Refs.

  18. Particle production in antiproton induced nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The quantum molecular dynamics model has been improved to investigate the reaction dynamics induced by antiprotons. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca, $^{112}$Sn, $^{181}$Ta, $^{197}$Au and $^{238}$U from a low to high incident momentum. The rapidity and momentum distributions of $\\pi^{+}$ and protons from the LEAR measurements can be well reproduced. The impacts of system size and incident momentum on particle emissions are investigated from the inclusive spectra, transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the particle production. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions when the incident moment...

  19. Interpretation of the cosmic ray positron and antiproton fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Lipari, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The spectral shape of cosmic ray positrons and antiprotons has been accurately measured in the broad kinetic energy range 1-350 GeV. In the higher part of this range (E > 30 GeV) the e+ and pbar are both well described by power laws with spectral indices gamma[e+] = 2.77 +-0.02 and gamma[pbar] = 2.78 +- 0.04 that are approximately equal to each other and to the spectral index of protons. In the same energy range the positron/antiproton flux ratio has the approximately constant value 2.04+-0.04, that is consistent with being equal to the ratio e_/pbar calculated for the conventional mechanism of production, where the antiparticles are created as secondaries in the inelastic interactions of primary cosmic rays with interstellar gas. The positron/antiproton ratio at lower energy is significantly higher (reaching the approximate value e+/pbar = 100 for E around 1 GeV), but in the entire energy range 1-350 GeV, the flux ratio is consistent with being equal to ratio of the production rates in the conventional mecha...

  20. Low energy + scattering on = nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swapan Das; Arun K Jain

    2003-11-01

    The data for the total cross-section of + scattering on various nuclei have been analysed in the Glauber multiple scattering theory. Energy-dependent +-nucleus optical potential is generated using the forward +-nucleon scattering amplitude and the nuclear density distribution. Along with this, the calculated total +-nucleus cross-sections using the effective +-nucleon cross-section inside the nucleus are also presented.

  1. Simon van der Meer and Carlo Rubbia celebrate their awarding of the Nobel Prize in 1984 with a toast at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    1984-01-01

    CERN's 1984 Nobel prizewinners Carlo Rubbia (left) and Simon van der Meer, who were awarded the prize for their roles in discovering the W+, W- and Z0 particles, the carriers of Nature's weak force. Carlo Rubbia's work allowed CERN's Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) to collide protons and antiprotons, while Simon van der Meer's technical virtuosity made the project possible.

  2. Calculated LET-Spectrum of Antiprotons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    Introduction Antiprotons as a new beam modality in radiotherapy are being investigated by the AD-4/ACE collaboration since 2002. A beam of antiprotons hitting a water phantom exhibit a similar depth-dose curve as that known from protons, except that the Bragg-peak is significantly pronounced due...

  3. The proton injector for the accelerator facility of antiproton and ion research (FAIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, C., E-mail: c.ullmann@gsi.de; Kester, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Berezov, R.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Vinzenz, W. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, IRFU, F-91191-Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-02-15

    The new international accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, is one of the largest research projects worldwide and will provide an antiproton production rate of 7 × 10{sup 10} cooled pbars per hour. This is equivalent to a primary proton beam current of 2 × 10{sup 16} protons per hour. For this request a high intensity proton linac (p-linac) will be built with an operating rf-frequency of 325 MHz to accelerate a 35 mA proton beam at 70 MeV, using conducting crossed-bar H-cavities. The repetition rate is 4 Hz with beam pulse length of 36 μs. The microwave ion source and low energy beam transport developed within a joint French-German collaboration GSI/CEA-SACLAY will serve as an injector of the compact proton linac. The 2.45 GHz ion source allows high brightness ion beams at an energy of 95 keV and will deliver a proton beam current of 100 mA at the entrance of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm., rms)

  4. CHEP 1992 Computing in high energy physics videotapes : lectures, CERN, Geneva, 21 Sep 1992

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear predicament or nuclear option - Synopsis of three lectures : 1- The physical basis of nuclear technology. Physics of fission. Chain reaction in reactors and weapons. Fission fragments. Separration of isotopes. Radiochemistry. 2- Nuclear reactors with slow and fast neutrons. Power, size, fuel and waste. Plutonium production. Dose rate, shielding and health hazard. The lessons of Chernobyl. 3- Nuclear weapons. Types, energy, blast and fallout. Fusion and hydrogen bombs. What to do with nuclear weapons when you cannot use them? Testing. Nonmilittary use. Can we get rid of the nuclear weapon? Nuclear proliferation. Is there a nuclear future?

  5. Low-Beta Insertions inducing Chromatic Aberrations in Storage Rings and their Local and Global Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, S

    2010-01-01

    The chromatic aberrations induced by low-β insertions can seriously limit the performance of circular colliders. The impact is twofold: (1) a substantial off-momentum beta-beating wave traveling around the ring and leading to a net reduction of the mechanical aperture of the low-beta quadrupoles but also impacting on the hierarchy of the collimator and protection devices of the machine, (2) a huge non-linear chromaticity which, when combined with the magnetic imperfections of the machine, could substantially reduce the momentum acceptance of the ring by pushing slightly off-momentum particles towards non-linear resonances. These effects will be analyzed and illustrated in the framework of the LHC insertions upgrade Phase I [1] and a strategy for correction will be developed, requiring a deep modification of the LHC overall optics.

  6. Study of Anti-Hydrogen and Plasma Physics 4.Observation of Antiproton Beams and Nonneutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Fujiwara, Makoto; Kuroda, Naofumi

    2004-01-01

    Diagnostics of antiproton beams and nonneutral plasmas are described in this chapter. Parallel plate secondary electron emission detectors are used to non-destructively observe the beam position and intensity without loss. Plastic scintillation tracking detectors are useful in determining the position of annihilations of antiprotons in the trap. Three-dimensional imaging of antiprotons in a Penning trap is discussed. The unique capability of antimatter particle imaging has allowed the observation of the spatial distribution of particle loss in a trap. Radial loss is localized to small spots, strongly breaking the azimuthal symmetry expected for an ideal trap. By observing electrostatic eigen-modes of nonneutral plasmas trapped in the Multi-ring electrode trap, the non-destructive measurement of plasma parameters is performed.

  7. Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  8. 14th April 2008 - Signature of a Cooperation Agreement between Turkey represented by the President of the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority O. Cakiroglu and CERN, represented by Director-General R. Aymar.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    14th April 2008 - Signature of a Cooperation Agreement between Turkey represented by the President of the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority O. Cakiroglu and CERN, represented by Director-General R. Aymar.

  9. Visit of Mr. Susumu Yoda, Japanese Atomic Energy Commission, Mr. Nobuo Natsume, Vice-President, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan (CRIEPI), Mr. Nobuya Yoshiki, CRIEPI, Mrs. Seiko Ichikawa, Interpreter, with Mr. Taylor of CERN, visiting SM18

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Visit of Mr. Susumu Yoda, Japanese Atomic Energy Commission, Mr. Nobuo Natsume, Vice-President, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan (CRIEPI), Mr. Nobuya Yoshiki, CRIEPI, Mrs. Seiko Ichikawa, Interpreter, with Mr. Taylor of CERN, visiting SM18

  10. 29 August 2013 - Director Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, India D. Srivastava signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Coordinator of India-ALICE Collaboration T. Nayak present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    29 August 2013 - Director Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, India D. Srivastava signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Coordinator of India-ALICE Collaboration T. Nayak present throughout.

  11. 25 September 2012 - Signature of an Agreement between the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, represented by the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission Chairman A. Parvez and CERN, represented by its Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    25 September 2012 - Signature of an Agreement between the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, represented by the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission Chairman A. Parvez and CERN, represented by its Director-General R. Heuer.

  12. Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

  13. Cooperation between CERN and ITER

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN and the International Fusion Organisation ITER have just signed a first cooperation agreeement. Kaname Ikeda, the Director-General of the International Fusion Energy Organisation (ITER) (on the right) and Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN, signing the agreement.The Director-General of the International Fusion Energy Organization, Mr Kaname Ikeda, and CERN Director-General, Robert Aymar, signed a cooperation agreement at a meeting on the Meyrin site on Thursday 6 March. One of the main purposes of this agreement is for CERN to give ITER the benefit of its experience in the field of technology as well as in administrative domains such as finance, procurement, human resources and informatics through the provision of consultancy services. Currently in its start-up phase at its Cadarache site, 70 km from Marseilles (France), ITER will focus its research on the scientific and technical feasibility of using fusion energy as a fu...

  14. The low-energy frontier

    CERN Multimedia

    Lindner, Axel

    2007-01-01

    "Particle Physics are hoping to find a host of new low-mass particles that might hint at physics beyond the Standrad Model. The authors describe the unusually small-scale experiments being built to hunt for this "hidden sector" of reality." (3,5 pages)

  15. Design Low Crosstalk Ring-Slot Array Structure for Label-Free Multiplexed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Huang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically demonstrate a low crosstalk ring-slot array structure used for label-free multiplexed sensing. The proposed sensors array is based on an array of three ring-slot and input/output line defect coupling waveguides. Each ring-slot cavity has slightly different cavity spacing and different resonant frequency. Results obtained using two dimensional finite-difference time-domain (2D-FDTD simulation indicate that the resonant frequencies of each sensor unit in response to the refractive index variations are independent. The refractive index sensitivity is 134 ~ 145.5 nm/RIU (refractive index unit and the Q factors more than 104 can be achieved. The calculated detect limit lower than 1.13 × 10−4 RIU is obtained. In addition, an extremely small crosstalk lower than −25.8 dB is achieved among the array of three ring-slot cavities. The results demonstrate that this multiplexed sensor array is a promising platform for integrated optical devices and enables highly parallel label-free detection.

  16. Incident energy dependence of the transverse flow: from SIS/GSI to SPS/CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nara, Yasushi; Ohtsuka, N.; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Maruyama, Toshiki; Niita, Koji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ohnishi, Akira

    1997-05-01

    One of aims on collision of the high energy heavy ions is to produce the quark gluon plasma (QGP) at a laboratory to know its properties. It has hitherto been discussed frequently what can be a signal of the QGP. Frankfurt Group predicted to be there a flow in a system with large mass number such as Au+Au collision using the relativistic quantum molecular dynamics (RQMD), which is also recently confirmed to be present in experiment. It is important in frame-work of the Hadronic cascade theory to investigate the mean field dependency of the capital delta. Thus, here were shown some results how prediction on the Hadronic cascade changed with the mean field of the capital delta. As a result, it was found that effect of potential was larger than one of flow, that effect of the capital delta potential was found over 2 GeV, and so on. (G.K.)

  17. The CERN/LHC energy extraction switches and their arc detector system

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Kazmine, B; Kuper, E; Kusnetsov, N; Medvedko, A; Ovchar, V; Vassilevski, A

    2004-01-01

    To extract the large amount of energy stored in the magnetic field of the LHC superconducting dipoles (8 chains with 1350 MJ each) and quadrupoles (16 chains with about 24 MJ each), opening switches will be used. The switches consist of an array of electromechanical D.C. breakers, specifically designed for this particular application. The opening process transfers the magnet excitation current from the array of eight breakers to the extraction resistors, rapidly deexciting the magnet chain. The arcing behavior in breakers of the array has been studied. In order to facilitate the maintenance of the switches an arc detector has been developed. This paper describes the design of the extraction switches and presents the test results, obtained at the LHC pilot extraction facility.

  18. CERN experiment provides first glimpse inside cold antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "The ATRAP experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN has detected and measured large numbers of cold antihydrogen atoms. Relying on ionization of the cold antiatoms when they pass through a strong electric field gradient, the ATRAP measurement provides the first glimpse inside an antiatom, and the first information about the physics of antihydrogen. The results have been accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters" (1 page).

  19. Low energy ghosts and the Jeans' instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümrükçüoǧlu, A. Emir; Mukohyama, Shinji; Sotiriou, Thomas P.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a massless canonical scalar field minimally coupled to general relativity can become a tachyonic ghost at low energies around a background in which the scalar's gradient is spacelike. By performing a canonical transformation we demonstrate that this low energy ghost can be recast, at the level of the action, in a form of a fluid that undergoes a Jeans-like instability affecting only modes with large wavelength. This illustrates that low energy tachyonic ghosts do not lead to a catastrophic quantum vacuum instability, unlike the usual high-energy ghost degrees of freedom.

  20. Single track nanodosimetry of low energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bantsar, A. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Grosswendt, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Pszona, S. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)], E-mail: pszona@ipj.gov; Kula, J. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2009-02-11

    Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides (for instance, {sup 125}I) with a predominant energy spectrum below 3 keV are an active area of research towards the clinical application of radiopharmaceuticals. Hence, the necessity for an adequate description of the effects of radiation by low-energy electrons on nanometric biological targets seems to be unquestionable. Experimental nanodosimetry for low-energy electrons has been accomplished with a device named JET COUNTER. The present paper describes, for the first time, nanodosimetric experiments in nanometer-sized cavities of nitrogen using low energy electrons ranging from 100 eV to 2 keV.

  1. Single track nanodosimetry of low energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantsar, A.; Grosswendt, B.; Pszona, S.; Kula, J.

    2009-02-01

    Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides (for instance, 125I) with a predominant energy spectrum below 3 keV are an active area of research towards the clinical application of radiopharmaceuticals. Hence, the necessity for an adequate description of the effects of radiation by low-energy electrons on nanometric biological targets seems to be unquestionable. Experimental nanodosimetry for low-energy electrons has been accomplished with a device named JET COUNTER. The present paper describes, for the first time, nanodosimetric experiments in nanometer-sized cavities of nitrogen using low energy electrons ranging from 100 eV to 2 keV.

  2. Measurement of Balmer and Lyman X-rays in antiprotonic hydrogen isotopes at pressures below 300 hPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, R.; Bluem, P.; Gotta, D.; Heitlinger, K.; Rohmann, D.; Schneider, M.; Egger, J.; Simons, L.M.; Elsener, K.

    1989-09-01

    X-rays of Balmer and Lyman transitions in antiprotonic hydrogen and of Balmer transitions in antiprotonic deuterium were observed at pressures below 300 hPa using Si(Li) semiconductor detectors. The measurement was performed at the LEAR-facility at a beam momentum of 202 MeV/c. In order to stop antiprotons in a low pressure gaseous target with high efficiency, a novel technique, the cyclotron trap has been used. Absolute yields were determined and compared with cascade calculations. A distinct difference in the cascade of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium is found. The parameters of strong interaction in antiprotonic hydrogen are determined to be /epsilon//sub 1s/=-(620+-100) eV, /Gamma//sub 1s/=(1130+-170) eV and /Gamma//sub 2p/=(32+-10) meV. (orig.).

  3. On 18 November 2010, CERN signed an agreement with the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) GmbH, the company that is co-ordinating the construction of the accelerator and experiment facilities for the FAIR project in Germany.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    The agreement, which was signed by CERN's director-general, Rolf Heuer (left) and FAIR's scientific director Boris Sharkov, concerns collaboration in accelerator sciences and technologies and other scientific domains of mutual interest.

  4. CERN Shuttle

    CERN Multimedia

    General Infrastructure Services Department

    2011-01-01

    As of Monday 21 February, a new schedule will come into effect for the Airport Shuttle (circuit No. 4) at the end of the afternoon: Last departure at 7:00 pm from Main Buildig, (Bldg. 500) to Airport (instead of 5:10 p.m.); Last departure from Airport to CERN, Main Buildig, (Bldg. 500), at 7:30 p.m. (instead of 5:40 p.m.). Group GS-IS

  5. Fluctuations as a test of chemical nonequilibrium at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begun, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that large chemical potential leads to the significant increase of multiplicity fluctuations for bosons, and makes the fluctuations infinite in the case of Bose-Einstein condensation. It allows us to distinguish between the models that explain the anomalous proton to pion ratio and the low transverse momentum enhancement of pion spectra in Pb+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider within chemical equilibrium or nonequilibrium models. The effects of resonance decays, finite size of the system, requirements to the event statistics, different momentum cuts, and limited detector acceptance are considered. The obtained results show the possibility to observe a substantial increase of the normalized kurtosis for positively or negatively charged pions in the case of nonequilibrium or partial pion condensation using currently measured data.

  6. Femtosecond laser direct writing of single mode polymer micro ring laser with high stability and low pumping threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsanasab, Gholam-Mohammad; Moshkani, Mojtaba; Gharavi, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    We have demonstrated an optically pumped polymer microring laser fabricated by two photon polymerization (TPP) of SU-8. The gain medium is an organic dye (Rhodamine B) doped in SU-8, and the laser cavity is a double coupled microring structure. Single mode lasing was obtained from the two coupled rings each with 30 µm and 29 µm radii using Vernier effect. Low laser threshold of 0.4 µJ/mm(2) is achieved using 1 µm wide polymer waveguides and the quality factor is greater than 10(4) at 612.4 nm wavelength. The lasing remained stable with pump energies from threshold to energies as high as 125 times the threshold.

  7. Proposal for the Award of Two Contracts for the Technical Services for Work on Components of CERN Particle Accelerators and High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This document concerns the award of two contracts for the technical services for work on components of CERN particle accelerators and high energy physics experiments. Following a market survey carried out among 73 firms in fourteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-3156/SPL) was sent on 4 November 2002 to three consortia in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from the three consortia. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of two contracts with: 1) the consortium SERCO FACILITIES MANAGEMENT (NL) - GERARD PERRIER INDUSTRIE (FR) - INEO ALPES (FR), the lowest bidder, for approximately 55% of the technical services for work on components of CERN particle accelerators and high energy physics experiments, for an initial period of five years and for a total amount not exceeding 37 435 270 euros (54 902 500 Swiss francs), subject to revision for inflation from 1 January 2005. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial five-...

  8. Cryogenic Studies for the Proposed CERN Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC)

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F

    2011-01-01

    The LHeC (Large Hadron electron Collider) is a proposed future colliding beam facility for lepton-nucleon scattering particle physics at CERN. A new 60 GeV electron accelerator will be added to the existing 27 km circumference 7 TeV LHC for collisions of electrons with protons and heavy ions. Two basic design options are being pursued. The first is a circular accelerator housed in the existing LHC tunnel which is referred to as the "Ring-Ring" version. Low field normal conducting magnets guide the particle beam while superconducting (SC) RF cavities cooled to 2 K are installed at two opposite locations at the LHC tunnel to accelerate the beams. For this version in addition a 10 GeV re-circulating SC injector will be installed. In total four refrigerators with cooling capacities between 1.2 kW and 3 kW @ 4.5 K are needed. The second option, referred to as the "Linac-Ring" version consists of a race-track re-circulating energy-recovery type machine with two 1 km long straight acceleration sections. The 944 hi...

  9. Interaction of antiprotons with Rb atoms and a comparison of antiproton stopping powers of the atoms H, Li, Na, K, and Rb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Fischer, Nicolas; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Ionization and excitation cross sections as well as electron-energy spectra and stopping powers of the alkali metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb colliding with antiprotons were calculated using a time-dependent channel-coupling approach. An impact-energy range from 0.25 to 4000 keV was considered....... The target atoms are treated as effective one-electron systems using a model potential. The results are compared with calculated cross sections for antiproton-hydrogen atom collisions....

  10. Energy transfer, orbital angular momentum, and discrete current in a double-ring fiber array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeyev, C. N.; Volyar, A. V. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Yavorsky, M. A. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Universite Bordeaux and CNRS, LOMA, UMR 5798, FR-33400 Talence (France)

    2011-12-15

    We study energy transfer and orbital angular momentum of supermodes in a double-ring array of evanescently coupled monomode optical fibers. The structure of supermodes and the spectra of their propagation constants are obtained. The geometrical parameters of the array, at which the energy is mostly confined within the layers, are determined. The developed method for finding the supermodes of concentric arrays is generalized for the case of multiring arrays. The orbital angular momentum carried by a supermode of a double-ring array is calculated. The discrete lattice current is introduced. It is shown that the sum of discrete currents over the array is a conserved quantity. The connection of the total discrete current with orbital angular momentum of discrete optical vortices is made.

  11. Measurements of the Decays $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0\\proton\\antiproton$, $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^{*0}\\proton\\antiproton$, $B^0 \\to D^{-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+$, and $B^0 \\to D^{*-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Y; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, S; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of branching fractions of $B^0$ decays to multi-body final states containing protons, based on 232 million $\\Upsilon(4S)\\to B\\bar{B}$ decays collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy $B$ factory. We measure the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0\\proton\\antiproton)=(1.13\\pm0.06\\pm0.08)\\times 10^{-4}$, ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^{*0}\\proton\\antiproton)=(1.01\\pm0.10\\pm0.09)\\times 10^{-4}$, ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to D^{-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+)=(3.38\\pm0.14\\pm0.29)\\times 10^{-4}$, and ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to D^{*-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+)=(4.81\\pm0.22\\pm0.44)\\times 10^{-4}$ where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. We present a search for the charmed pentaquark state, $\\Theta_c(3100)$ observed by H1 and put limits on the branching fraction ${\\cal B} (B^0 \\to \\Theta_c \\antiproton\\pi^+)\\times{\\cal B}(\\Theta_c \\to D^{*-}\\proton)<14\\times10^{-6}$ and ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\Theta_c \\antiproton\\pi^+)\\times{\\cal B}(\\Theta_c\\to D^-\\proton)<9\\time...

  12. Towards a Low Energy Society from me

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen; Christensen, Bente Lis

    The book is based on energy planning research at Technical University of Denmark. With 1980 as a base year, two possible scenarios for future development in Denmark are analysed and described with respect to technology used and life style practised. In a high-energy society the country's energy...... consumption is almost doubled by 2030, and in a low-energy society energy consumption in 2030 can be less than one third of that in the base year. In this updated version a chapter is added dealing with what actually happened over the first 20 years of the scenario period, in which energy consumption stayed...

  13. Storage Rings in the Sky: Gamma Ray Bursts and Galactic Gravitational Collapse Stored Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greyber, H. D.

    2004-05-01

    The recent discovery of almost 100% polarization of the prompt gamma ray emission from GRB021206, (1), confirms my 44 year old ``Strong" Magnetic Field" model (SMF) for galactic dynamics. In SMF, Storage Ring particles were accelerated long ago during the original gravitational collapse of the pregalactic/prequasar plasma cloud that is permeated by an almost uniform primordial magnetic field (2,3) The enormous, intense, slender, relativistic, stable, completely coherent Storage Ring stores a very small fraction of the huge galactic gravitational collapse energy in an almost radiationless state, unless disturbed. The concept of an Astrophysical Storage Ring was introduced by me in l961. At first it was to explain galactic structure, but soon it proved useful to explain active galactic nuclei (AGN) and the dynamics of quasar/AGN jets. AGN and galactic morphology, energetics and dynamics vary as the ratio of magnetic energy to rotational energy in the particular object. Gamma ray bursts (GRB) are due simply to a ``rock". i.e. a white dwarf, ordinary star, neutron sstar, asteroid, planet, etc. falling rapidly through the Storage Ring and being almost instantly vaporized into a hot plasma fireball, causing an electromagnetic shower (2) Then the fireball speeds into the huge organized magnetic field surrounding the current ring, thus generating very highly polarized prompt gamma ray emission (as seen in GRB021206) from the synchrotron radiation process. The timing fits the GRB observations nicely. For instance, a ``rock" racing at 1000 kilometers per second across a 20,000 km. path in the beam would produce a twenty second burst. Other times, a target might track across a short chord for a short burst. Space missions have shown that often typical currents in space plasmas are made up of slender filaments. Thus the puzzling less than one millisecond spikes observed in some GRB are simply describing the structure of that particular ring current at that particular time. 1

  14. Low-Beta insertions inducing chromatic aberrations in storage rings and their local and global correction

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, S

    2010-01-01

    The chromatic aberrations induced by low-β insertions can seriously limit the performance of circular colliders. The impact is twofold: (1) a substantial off-momentum beta-beating wave traveling around the ring and leading to a net reduction of the mechanical aperture of the lowbeta quadrupoles but also impacting on the hierarchy of the collimator and protection devices of the machine, (2) a huge non-linear chromaticity which, when combined with the magnetic imperfections of the machine, could substantially reduce the momentum acceptance of the ring by pushing slightly off-momentum particles towards non-linear resonances. These effects will be analyzed and illustrated in the framework of the LHC insertions upgrade Phase I [1] and a strategy for correction will be developed, requiring a deep modification of the LHC overall optics.

  15. Evaluation on Geant4 Hadronic Models for Pion Minus, Pion Plus and Neutron Particles as Major Antiproton Annihilation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Reiazi, Reza; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 is an open source simulation toolkit based on C++, which its advantages progressively lead to applications in research domains especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. However, it was shown that Geant4 does not give a reasonable result in the prediction of antiproton dose especially in Bragg peak. One of the reasons could be lack of reliable physic model to predict the final states of annihilation products like pions. Considering the fact that most of the antiproton deposited dose is resulted from high-LET nuclear fragments following pion interaction in surrounding nucleons, we reproduced depth dose curves of most probable energy range of pions and neutron particle using Geant4. We consider this work one of the steps to understand the origin of the error and finally verification of Geant4 for antiproton tracking. Geant4 toolkit version 9.4.6.p01 and Fluka version 2006.3 were used to reproduce the depth dose curves of 220 MeV pions (both negative and positive) and 70 MeV neutrons. The geometry applied in the simulations consist a 20 × 20 × 20 cm3 water tank, similar to that used in CERN for antiproton relative dose measurements. Different physic lists including Quark-Gluon String Precompound (QGSP)_Binary Cascade (BIC)_HP, the recommended setting for hadron therapy, were used. In the case of pions, Geant4 resulted in at least 5% dose discrepancy between different physic lists at depth close to the entrance point. Even up to 15% discrepancy was found in some cases like QBBC compared to QGSP_BIC_HP. A significant difference was observed in dose profiles of different Geant4 physic list at small depths for a beam of pions. In the case of neutrons, large dose discrepancy was observed when LHEP or LHEP_EMV lists were applied. The magnitude of this dose discrepancy could be even 50% greater than the dose calculated by LHEP (or LHEP_EMV) at larger depths. We found that effect different Geant4 physic list in

  16. Evaluation on Geant4 Hadronic Models for Pion Minus, Pion Plus and Neutron Particles as Major Antiproton Annihilation Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Reiazi, Reza; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 is an open source simulation toolkit based on C++, which its advantages progressively lead to applications in research domains especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. However, it was shown that Geant4 does not give a reasonable result in the prediction of antiproton dose especially in Bragg peak. One of the reasons could be lack of reliable physic model to predict the final states of annihilation products like pions. Considering the fact that most of the antiproton deposited dose is resulted from high-LET nuclear fragments following pion interaction in surrounding nucleons, we reproduced depth dose curves of most probable energy range of pions and neutron particle using Geant4. We consider this work one of the steps to understand the origin of the error and finally verification of Geant4 for antiproton tracking. Geant4 toolkit version 9.4.6.p01 and Fluka version 2006.3 were used to reproduce the depth dose curves of 220 MeV pions (both negative and positive) and 70 MeV neutrons. The geometry applied in the simulations consist a 20 × 20 × 20 cm(3) water tank, similar to that used in CERN for antiproton relative dose measurements. Different physic lists including Quark-Gluon String Precompound (QGSP)_Binary Cascade (BIC)_HP, the recommended setting for hadron therapy, were used. In the case of pions, Geant4 resulted in at least 5% dose discrepancy between different physic lists at depth close to the entrance point. Even up to 15% discrepancy was found in some cases like QBBC compared to QGSP_BIC_HP. A significant difference was observed in dose profiles of different Geant4 physic list at small depths for a beam of pions. In the case of neutrons, large dose discrepancy was observed when LHEP or LHEP_EMV lists were applied. The magnitude of this dose discrepancy could be even 50% greater than the dose calculated by LHEP (or LHEP_EMV) at larger depths. We found that effect different Geant4 physic list in

  17. Aluminizing and subsequent nitriding of plain carbon low alloy steels for piston ring applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindumadhavan, P.N.; Keng Wah, H.; Prabhakar, O. [Nanyang Technol. Univ., Singapore (Singapore). Div. of Mater. Eng.; Makesh, S. [Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building, University of Maryland, 20783, College Park, MD (United States); Gowrishankar, N. [I P Rings Ltd., D 11/12, Industrial Estate, 603209, Maraimalainagar (India)

    2000-05-22

    Nitriding is a case hardening process that is commonly used for increasing the wear life of automotive piston rings. However, special alloy steels are required to achieve high surface hardness and nitrided case depth values required by the automotive industry. The cost of such alloy steels is one of the major components of the total cost of the nitrided piston ring. To address this issue, efforts have been directed towards development of cheaper raw materials as substitutes for nitridable steels. In this study, an attempt has been made to increase the surface hardness of two plain carbon low alloy steels by aluminizing and subsequent diffusion treatment and nitriding. The process parameters for the aluminizing operation are discussed. Results indicate that a near twofold increase in surface hardness is achievable by aluminizing followed by diffusion treatment and nitriding (580-1208 HV for EN32B steel and 650-1454 HV for 15CR3 steel). It has also been found that the nitrided case depth obtained (0.11-0.13 mm for EN32B steel and 0.10-0.14 mm for 15CR3 steel) matches well with the general requirements of the piston ring industry. The diffusion of aluminum into the alloy layer has also been discussed and the theoretical predictions were compared with actual values of Al concentration, as obtained by SEM-EDS system. It is found that Fick's law gives a fairly good prediction of the actual Al concentration profile, in spite of the complexity of the diffusion path. X-Ray diffraction studies have confirmed the presence of AlN in the alloy layer, which could be instrumental in the significant increase in surface hardness. It is proposed that aluminizing followed by diffusion treatment and nitriding of plain carbon low alloy steels could provide an alternative to the use of expensive nitridable steels for piston ring applications. (orig.)

  18. CERN celebrates 50 years of world-leading research

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On the 29th September 1954 representatives of the 12 founding Mmebers States of CERN (including UK) ratified the Organisation's convention, paving the way for the establishment of one of the world's leading fundamental physics reserach institutions. (Special issue with differents articles: Bid for beta beams at CERN; CERN's golden jubilee; Climbing the energy scale; The next 20 years; Working at CERN; CERN and industry; What's in it for British business?) (13½ pages)

  19. Design of a compact Faraday cup for low energy, low intensity ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero, E. D.; Sosa, A.; Andreazza, W.; Bravin, E.; Lanaia, D.; Voulot, D.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Beam intensity is one of the key parameters in particle accelerators, in particular during machine commissioning, but also during operation for experiments. At low beam energies and low intensities a number of challenges arise in its measurement as commonly used non-invasive devices are no longer sensitive enough. It then becomes necessary to stop the beam in order to measure its absolute intensity. A very compact Faraday cup for determining ion beam currents from a few nanoamperes down to picoamperes for the HIE-ISOLDE post-accelerator at CERN has been designed, built and tested with beam. It has a large aperture diameter of 30 mm and a total length of only 16 mm, making it one of the most compact designs ever used. In this paper we present the different steps that were involved in the design and optimization of this device, including beam tests with two early prototypes and the final monitor. We also present an analysis of the losses caused by secondary particle emission for different repelling electrode voltages and beam energies. Finally, we show that results obtained from an analytical model for electron loss probability combined with Monte Carlo simulations of particles trajectories provide a very good agreement with experimental data.

  20. Global, Energy-Dependent Ring Current Response During Two Large Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Burch, J. L.; De Pascuale, S.; Fuselier, S. A.; Genestreti, K. J.; Kurth, W. S.; LLera, K.; McComas, D. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Valek, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Two recent large (~200 nT) geomagnetic storms occurred during 17--18 March 2015 and 22--23 June 2015. The global, energy-dependent ring current response to these two extreme events is investigated using both global imaging and multi-point in situ observations. Energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging by the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission provides a global view of ring current ions. Local measurements are provided by two multi-spacecraft missions. The two Van Allen Probes measure in situ plasma (including ion composition) and fields at ring current and plasmaspheric L values. The recently launched Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) comprises four spacecraft that have just begun to measure particles (including ion composition) and fields at outer magnetospheric L-values. We analyze the timing and energetics of the stormtime evolution of ring current ions, both trapped and precipitating, using TWINS ENA images and in situ data by the Van Allen Probes and MMS.