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Sample records for cern low energy antiproton ring

  1. Non-linear transverse dynamics for storage rings with application to the low-energy antiproton ring (LEAR) at CERN

    Bengtsson, J.

    1988-01-01

    A tensor equation has been used to derive the equations of motion for the curvilinear coordinate system customary used for accelerators. A Hamiltonian formalism, expanded to third order in the canonical variables, describing the transverse motion in an acceleration has also been developed. Time-dependent perturbation theory has been applied and computerized using a computer algebra system. In particular, the perturbations due to magnetic sextupoles have been calculated to second power in the sextupole strength. The frequency spectra for the betatron motion close to a single resonance has been calculated by using time-independent perturbation theory. It has been shown that information about excited resonances and the type of driving field can be derived from the spectra. In particular, it is possible to obtain the amplitude and the phase of a given resonance. The results have been used to study the perturbations in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring, LEAR at CERN. (With 67 refs.) (author)

  2. Non-linear transverse dynamics for storage rings with applications to the low-energy antiproton ring (LEAR) at CERN

    Bengtsson, J.

    1988-01-01

    A tensor equation has been used to derive the equations of motion for the curvilinear coordinate system customarily used for particle accelerators. A Hamiltonian formalism, expanded to third order in the canonical variables, has also been developed to describe the transverse motion in an accelerator. Time-dependent perturbation theory has been applied and computerized using a computer-algebra system. In particular, the perturbations due to magnetic sextupoles have been calculated to second power in the sextupole strength. The frequency spectra for the horizontal and the vertical betatron motion close to a single resonance have been calculated using time-independent perturbation theory. It has been shown that information about excited resonances and the type of driving field can be derived from the spectra. In particular, it is possible to obtain the amplitude and the phase of a given resonance. The results have been used to study the perturbations in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. (orig.)

  3. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton

    To produce dense antiproton beams at very low energies (110 keV), it has been proposed to install a small decelerator ring between the existing AD ring and the experimental area. Phase-space blowup during deceleration is compensated by electron cooling such that the final emittances are comparable to the 5MeV beam presently delivered by the AD. An immediate consequence is a significant increase in the number of trapped antiprotons at the experiments as outlined in the proposal CERN/SPSC-2009-026; SPCS-P-338. This report describes the machine parameters and layout of the proposal ELENA (Extra Low ENergy Antiproton)ring also gives an approximate estimate of cost and manpower needs. Since the initial estimate, published in 2007 (CERN-AB-2007-079), the ELENA design has evolved considerably. This is due to a new location in the AD hall to acommodate for the possibility of another experimental zone, as suggested by the SPCS, and also due to improvements in the ring optics and layout. The cost estimate that is prese...

  4. Extra Low Energy Antiproton ring ELENA : from the conception to the implementation phase

    Bartmann, W; Breuker, H; Butin, F; Carli, C; Eriksson, T; Maury, S; Pasinelli, S; Tranquille, G; Oelert, W

    2014-01-01

    The Extra Low Energy Antiproton ring (ELENA) is a CERN project aiming at constructing a small 30 m circumference synchrotron to further decelerate antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator AD from 5.3 MeV to 100 keV. Controlled deceleration in a synchrotron equipped with an electron cooler to reduce emittances in all three planes will allow the existing AD experiments to increase substantially their antiproton capture efficiencies and render new experiments possible. The ELENA design is now well advanced and the project is moving to the implementation phase. Component design and construction are taking place at present for installation foreseen during the second half of 2015 and beginning of 2016 followed by ring commissioning until the end of 2016. New electrostatic transfer lines to the experiments will be installed and commissioned during the first half of 2017 followed by the first physics operation with ELENA. Basic limitations like Intra Beam Scattering limiting the emittances obtained under electron ...

  5. CERN: LEP delivers; Looking deeper at spin; Handling low energy antiprotons

    Anon.

    1990-03-15

    One year ago, with the world catalogue of Z particles - the electrically neutral carrier of the weak nuclear force - containing a few hundred examples, it sounded extravagant when proponents of CERN's new LEP electron-positron collider promised a hundred thousand Zs by Christmas 1989. The first round of experiments in the North Area of CERN's SPS proton synchrotron included a considerable investment in studies using high energy muon beams. This paid off with important contribuions to physics, particularly in the measurement of the quark/gluon content (structure functions) of nucleons. ; The LEAR low energy antiproton ring at CERN takes its antimatter beams down to very low kinetic energies - less than 10 MeV - for a unique range of physics studies. However even these modest energies are too high for a series of experiments aiming to explore the effects of gravity on antimatter.

  6. CERN: LEP delivers; Looking deeper at spin; Handling low energy antiprotons

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    One year ago, with the world catalogue of Z particles - the electrically neutral carrier of the weak nuclear force - containing a few hundred examples, it sounded extravagant when proponents of CERN's new LEP electron-positron collider promised a hundred thousand Zs by Christmas 1989. The first round of experiments in the North Area of CERN's SPS proton synchrotron included a considerable investment in studies using high energy muon beams. This paid off with important contribuions to physics, particularly in the measurement of the quark/gluon content (structure functions) of nucleons. ; The LEAR low energy antiproton ring at CERN takes its antimatter beams down to very low kinetic energies - less than 10 MeV - for a unique range of physics studies. However even these modest energies are too high for a series of experiments aiming to explore the effects of gravity on antimatter

  7. A Cryogenic Current Comparator for the Low Energy Antiproton Facilities at CERN

    Fernandes, M; Welsch, CP

    2014-01-01

    Several laboratories have shown the potential of using Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers together with superconductor magnetic shields to measure beam current intensities in the submicro-Ampere regime. CERN, in collaboration with GSI, Jena university and Helmholtz Institute Jena, is currently working on developing an improved version of such a current monitor for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, aiming for better current resolution and overall system availability. This contribution will present the current design, including theoretical estimation of the current resolution; stability limits of SQUID systems and adaptation of the coupling circuit to the AD beam parameters; the analysis of thermal and mechanical cryostat modes.

  8. PHYSICS WITH ULTRA-LOW ENERGY ANTIPROTONS

    M. HOLZSCHEITER

    2001-02-01

    In this report the author describes the current status of the antiproton deceleration (AD) facility at CERN, and highlights the physics program with ultra-low energy antiproton at this installation. He also comments on future possibilities provided higher intensity antiproton beams become available at Fermilab, and review possibilities for initial experiments using direct degrading of high energy antiprotons in material has been developed and proven at CERN.

  9. Antiprotons in the CERN intersecting storage rings

    Bryant, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    High-sensitivity electronics for TTl and ring 2 had been developed and installed, the original experimental stochastic cooling systems in the ISR were rebuilt and considerably improved, the split-field magnet (SFM) vacuum chamber was modified, some steering dipoles were designed, made and installed, and finally innumerable interlocks and computer programs were revised for antiproton operation. (orig./HSI)

  10. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    Bryant, P.; Newman, S.

    1984-01-01

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  11. The CERN antiproton programme

    Herr, H.

    1979-01-01

    A diagram and basic parameters of the ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment) storage ring constructed in CERN are examined. The experimental results of stochastic and electron cooling and the results of measuring of the antiproton lifetime are discussed. The main parameters of the antiproton storage are listed. Comparison between stochastic and electron cooling has shown that the latter is characterized by shorter cooling time independent of the particle number in a beam. Advantage of stochastic cooling lies in its possible usage at higher energies [ru

  12. The CERN Antiproton Collider Programme Accelerators and Accumulation Rings

    Koziol, Heribert

    2004-01-01

    One of CERN's most daring and successful undertakings was the quest for the intermediate bosons, W and Z. In this paper, we describe the accelerator part of the venture which relied on a number of innovations: an extension of the budding method of stochastic cooling by many orders of magnitude; the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator, depending on several novel accelerator methods and technologies; major modifications to the 26 GeV PS Complex; and the radical conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which just had started up as an accelerator, to a protonâ€"antiproton collider. The SPS Collider had to master the beamâ€"beam effect far beyond limits reached ever before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the huge detectors UA1 and UA2.

  13. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  14. Low-energy antiprotons physics and the FLAIR facility

    Widmann, E

    2015-01-01

    FLAIR, the Facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research has been proposed in 2004 as an extension of the planned FAIR facility at Darmstadt, Germany. FLAIR was not included into the modularized start version of FAIR, but the recent installation of the CRYRING storage ring at GSI Darmstadt has opened new perspectives for physics with low-energy antiprotons at FAIR. (paper)

  15. Physics with ultra-low energy antiprotons

    Holtkamp, D.B.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Hughes, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental observation that all forms of matter experience the same gravitational acceleration is embodied in the weak equivalence principle of gravitational physics. However no experiment has tested this principle for particles of antimatter such as the antiproton or the antihydrogen atom. Clearly the question of whether antimatter is in compliance with weak equivalence is a fundamental experimental issue, which can best be addressed at an ultra-low energy antiproton facility. This paper addresses the issue. 20 refs

  16. CERN: Antiprotons probe the nuclear stratosphere

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The outer periphery of heavy stable nuclei is notoriously difficult to study experimentally. While the well understood electromagnetic interaction between electrons (or muons) and protons has given the nuclear charge (or proton) distribution with high precision for almost all stable nuclei, neutron distribution studies are much less precise. This is especially true for large nuclear distances, where the nuclear density is small. A few previous experiments probing the nuclear ''stratosphere'' suggested that far from the centre of the nucleus (of the order of 2 nuclear radii) this stratosphere may be composed predominantly of neutrons. At the end of the sixties the term ''neutron halo'' was introduced to describe this phenomenon, but experimental evidence was scarce or even controversial, and remained so for almost a quarter of a century. Recently, the Warsaw/Munich/Berlin collaboration working within the PS203 experiment at CERN's LEAR low energy antiproton ring, proposed a new method to study the nuclear periphery using stopped antiprotons. The halo now looks firmer. A 200 MeV/c beam of antiprotons was slowed down by interactions with atomic electrons. When antiproton kinetic energy drops well below 1 keV, the particles are captured in the outermost orbits of ''exotic atoms'', where the antiprotons take the place of the usual orbital electrons. With the lower orbits in this antiprotonic atom empty, the antiproton drops toward the nuclear surface, first emitting Auger electrons and later predominantly antiprotonic X-rays. Due to the strong interaction between antiprotons and nucleons, the antiproton succumbs to annihilation with a nucleon in the rarified nuclear stratosphere, far above the innermost Bohr orbit of the atom. The annihilation probability in heavy nuclei is maximal where the nuclear density is about 3% of its central value and extends to densities many orders of magnitude smaller

  17. CERN: Antiprotons probe the nuclear stratosphere

    Anon.

    1995-06-15

    The outer periphery of heavy stable nuclei is notoriously difficult to study experimentally. While the well understood electromagnetic interaction between electrons (or muons) and protons has given the nuclear charge (or proton) distribution with high precision for almost all stable nuclei, neutron distribution studies are much less precise. This is especially true for large nuclear distances, where the nuclear density is small. A few previous experiments probing the nuclear ''stratosphere'' suggested that far from the centre of the nucleus (of the order of 2 nuclear radii) this stratosphere may be composed predominantly of neutrons. At the end of the sixties the term ''neutron halo'' was introduced to describe this phenomenon, but experimental evidence was scarce or even controversial, and remained so for almost a quarter of a century. Recently, the Warsaw/Munich/Berlin collaboration working within the PS203 experiment at CERN's LEAR low energy antiproton ring, proposed a new method to study the nuclear periphery using stopped antiprotons. The halo now looks firmer. A 200 MeV/c beam of antiprotons was slowed down by interactions with atomic electrons. When antiproton kinetic energy drops well below 1 keV, the particles are captured in the outermost orbits of ''exotic atoms'', where the antiprotons take the place of the usual orbital electrons. With the lower orbits in this antiprotonic atom empty, the antiproton drops toward the nuclear surface, first emitting Auger electrons and later predominantly antiprotonic X-rays. Due to the strong interaction between antiprotons and nucleons, the antiproton succumbs to annihilation with a nucleon in the rarified nuclear stratosphere, far above the innermost Bohr orbit of the atom. The annihilation probability in heavy nuclei is maximal where the nuclear density is about 3% of its central value and extends to densities many orders of magnitude smaller. Antiproton annihilation on a proton or on a neutron at the nuclear

  18. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) some months before the start of its particle physics programme

    1983-01-01

    LEAR*)and its enclosure in the PS South Hall in Jan, 1983, 4 months before the start of its particle physics programme. Visible (in red) are the 90 degree bending magnets consisting of 6 blocks each. Separated from the magnets by short straight sections are the quadrupole doublets (blue with read end-plates). The 4 long straight sections house large equipment like septa for injection/ejection, RF-cavities and later (since 1986) electron cooling and an internal target and its associated detector (JETSET experiment). Two small copper tubes spanning across the ring are coaxial lines transmitting the stochastic cooling signals from pickup to kicker. (see also photos 8205747X, 8207133, 8207541X, 8309026) *)see e.g.: H.Koziol and D. Möhl, Phys. Rep. 403-404 (2004), p.271 and references therein

  19. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in its first year of operation

    1983-01-01

    LEAR*) and its enclosure in the PS South Hall in 1983 shortly after the start of its particle physics programme. Visible (in red) are the 90 degree bending magnets consisting of 6 blocks each. Separated from the magnets by short straight sections are the quadrupole doublets (blue with read end-plates). The 4 long straight sections house large equipment like septa for injection/ejection, RF-cavities and later (since 1986) electron cooling and an internal target and its associated detector (JETSET experiment). Several small copper tubes spanning across the ring are coaxial lines transmitting the stochastic cooling signals from pickup to kicker. *)[see H.Koziol and D. Möhl, Phys. Rep. 403-404 (2004), p.271 and references therein

  20. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) some months before the start of its particle physics programme

    1983-01-01

    LEAR [see e.g.: H.Koziol and D. Möhl, Phys. Rep. 403-404 (2004), p.271 and references therein] and its enclosure in the PS South Hall in Jan, 1983, 4 months before the start of its particle physics programme. Visible (in red) are the 90 degree bending magnets consisting of 6 blocks each. Separated from the magnets by short straight sections are the quadrupole doublets (blue with read end-plates). The 4 long straight sections house large equipment like septa for injection/ejection, RF-cavities and later (since 1986) electron cooling and an internal target and its associated detector (JETSET experiment). Two small copper tubes spanning across the ring are coaxial lines transmitting the stochastic cooling signals from pick up to kicker. (see also photos 8205747X, 8207133, 8207541X, 8301550X,8309026X)

  1. Low energy antiproton experiments - A review

    Jungmann, KP; Yamazaki, Y; Wada, M

    2005-01-01

    Low energy antiprotons offer excellent opportunities to study properties of fundamental forces and symmetries in nature. Experiments with them can contribute substantially to deepen our fundamental knowledge in atomic, nuclear and particle physics. Searches for new interactions can be carried out by

  2. The CERN antiproton collector

    Autin, B.

    1984-01-01

    The Antiproton Collector is a new ring of much larger acceptance than the present accumulator. It is designed to receive 10 8 antiprotons per PS cycle. In order to be compatible with the Antiproton Accumulator, the momentum spread and the emittances are reduced from 6% to 0.2% and from 200 π mm mrad to 25 π mm mrad respectively. In addition to the ring itself, the new target area and the modifications to the stochastic systems of the Antiproton Accumulator are described. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross-section at low energy

    Aghai-Khozani, H.; Bianconi, A.; Corradini, M.; Hayano, R.; Hori, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Murakami, Y.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Venturelli, L.; Yamada, H.

    2018-02-01

    Systematic measurements of the annihilation cross sections of low energy antinucleons were performed at CERN in the 80's and 90's. However the antiproton data on medium-heavy and heavy nuclear targets are scarce. The ASACUSA Collaboration at CERN has measured the antiproton annihilation cross section on carbon at 5.3 MeV: the value is (1.73 ± 0.25) barn. The result is compared with the antineutron experimental data and with the theoretical previsions.

  4. Carbon filament beam profile monitor for high energy proton-antiproton storage rings

    Evans, L.R.; Shafer, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The measurement of the evolution of the transverse profile of the stored beams in high energy proton storage rings such as the p-anti p colliders at CERN and at FNAL is of considerable importance. In the present note, a simple monitor is discussed which will allow almost non-destructive measurement of the profile of each individual proton and antiproton bunch separately. It is based on the flying wire technique first used at CEA and more recently at the CPS. A fine carbon filament is passed quickly through the beam, acting as a target for secondary particle production. The flux of secondary particles is measured by two scintillator telescopes, one for protons and one for antiprotons, having an angular acceptance between 30 and 100 mrad. Measurements of secondary particle production performed at FNAL in this angular range show that a very respectable flux can be expected

  5. The Floor's the Limit (Antiproton energies to hit new low)

    2000-01-01

    Celebrating the success of the RFQ in Aarhus. Left to right: Alessanda Lombardi (CERN), Iouri Bylinskii (CERN), Alex Csete (Aarhus), Ulrik Uggerhøj (Aarhus), Ryu Hayano (Tokyo, spokesman ASACUSA), Helge Knudsen (Aarhus), Werner Pirkl (CERN), Ryan Thompson (Aarhus), Søren P. Møller (Aarhus). Although in particle physics we are accustomed to strive for higher and higher energies, this is not always the most interesting thing to do with antiprotons. Indeed, as recent issues of the Bulletin have suggested, the signpost on the road to a closer look at the antiproton points towards ever-lower energies. The CERN Antiproton Decelerator decelerates antipro-tons emerging from a target placed in the path of a 26 GeV/c proton beam from 90 % of to about 10 % of the speed of light. However, even this is far too fast for many of the most interesting experiments on antiprotons planned by Danish and Japanese members of the ASACUSA collaboration. Tokyo University has therefore financed the con...

  6. Space charge and working point studies in the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring

    Huschauer, A; Hancock, S; Kain, V

    2017-01-01

    The Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) is at the heart ofCERN’s heavy ion physics programme and was designed toprovide the high phase space densities required by the exper-iments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). LEIR is the firstsynchrotron of the LHC ion injector chain and it receives aquasi-continuous pulse of lead ions (Pb54+) from Linac3, ex-ploiting a sophisticated multi-turn injection scheme in bothtransverse and longitudinal planes. Seven of these pulses areinjected and accumulated, which requires continuous elec-tron cooling (EC) at low energy to decrease the phase spacevolume of the circulating beam in between two injections.Subsequently, the coasting beam is adiabatically capturedin two bunches, which are then accelerated and extractedtowards the Proton Synchrotron (PS). Figure 1 shows theLEIR magnetic cycle and the different steps required forbeam production.

  7. Extraction of ultra-low-energy antiprotons from the PS200 catching trap for atomic physics experiments

    Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been captured in a large-scale Penning trap at the low energy antiproton ring at CERN. Up to 65% of the captured antiprotons have subsequently been cooled by electron cooling to energies below 1 eV and have been stored up to one hour. This has opened new discussions of the possible use of ultra-low-energy antiprotons for nuclear, atomic, and gravitational physics. For most of these experiments it will be necessary to extract the antiprotons from the trap in the form of either a continuous beam or as a bunched beam, allowing the timing structure to be used for post-acceleration schemes or as a time tag for subsequent measurements. We have designed an extraction scheme to accomplish this and have tested portions of it using a smaller-scale Penning trap loaded with protons. First results in generating a time-correlated beam of particles from a Penning trap are presented. (orig.)

  8. Antiproton chain of the FAIR storage rings

    Katayama, T; Kamerdzhiev, V; Lehrach, A; Maier, R; Prasuhn, D; Stassen, R; Stockhorst, H; Herfurth, F; Lestinsky, M; Litvinov, Yu A; Steck, M; Stöhlker, T

    2015-01-01

    In the Modularized Start Version of the Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt Germany, the 3 GeV antiprotons are precooled in the collector ring and accumulated in the high energy storage ring (HESR). They are further accelerated to 14 GeV or decelerated to 1 GeV for the experiments with a high-density internal target. The powerful beam cooling devices, stochastic cooling and electron cooling will support the provision of a high-resolution antiproton beam. The other option of FAIR is to prepare the low energy, 300 keV antiproton beam connecting the existing storage rings ESR and CRYRING with HESR. Beam physics issues related with these concepts are described. (paper)

  9. Lattices for antiproton rings

    Autin, B.

    1984-01-01

    After a description of the constraints imposed by the cooling of Antiprotons on the lattice of the rings, the reasons which motivate the shape and the structure of these machines are surveyed. Linear and non-linear beam optics properties are treated with a special amplification to the Antiproton Accumulator. (orig.)

  10. LEAP [Low-Energy Antiproton]: A balloon-borne search for low-energy cosmic-ray antiprotons

    Moats, A.R.M.

    1989-01-01

    The LEAP (Low-Energy Antiproton) experiment is a search for cosmic-ray antiprotons in the 120 MeV to 1.2 GeV kinetic energy range. The motivation for this project was the result announced by Buffington et. al. (1981) that indicated an anomalously high antiproton flux below 300 MeV; this result has compelled theorists to propose sources of primary antiprotons above the small secondary antiproton flux produced by high energy cosmic-ray collisions with nuclei in the interstellar medium. LEAP consisted of the NMSU magnetic spectrometer, a time-of-flight system designed at Goddard Space Flight Center, two scintillation detectors, and a Cherenkov counter designed and built at the University of Arizona. Analysis of flight data performed by the high-energy astrophysics group at Goddard Space Flight Center revealed no antiproton candidates found in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range; 3 possible antiproton candidate events were found in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range in an analysis done here at the University of Arizona. However, since it will be necessary to sharpen the calibration on all of the LEAP systems in order to positively identify these events as antiprotons, only an upper limit has been determined at present. Thus, combining the analyses performed at the University of Arizona and Goddard Space Flight Center, 90% confidence upper limits of 3.5 x 10 -5 in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range and 2.3 x 10 -4 in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range for the antiproton/proton ratio is indicated by the LEAP results. LEAP disagrees sharply with the results of the Buffington group, indicating a low antiproton flux at these energies

  11. An apparatus to measure stopping powers for low-energy antiprotons and protons

    Andersen, H H; Ichioka, T; Knudsen, H; Møller, S P; Uggerhøj, U

    2002-01-01

    One of the experiments to be performed under the ASACUSA collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator is a measurement of the energy loss of low energy antiprotons in thin foils. An electrostatic spectrometer has been developed for this task. We describe the design and initial tests of the apparatus with protons. By changing a high-voltage applied on the target the energy of the projectile ions at impact on the target can easily be varied. In this way we have measured the stopping-power and the energy-loss straggling for protons over a wide energy range to below one keV.

  12. CERN: Antiprotons resist annihilation

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Ask any particle physicist what is the eventual fate of an antiproton in matter and he will likely tell you that It annihilates'. True as this answer is, it hides a number of fascinating questions about the actual 'route' followed by the antiproton into the nucleus where it finally stops before annihilating with a nuclear particle

  13. A low-energy antiproton detector prototype for AFIS

    Meng, Lingxin; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Losekamm, Martin; Paul, Stephan; Poeschl, Thomas; Renker, Dieter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced in interactions of primary cosmic rays with earth's exosphere, where a fraction of them will be confined in the geomagnetic field in the inner van Allen Belt. The antiproton-to-proton flux ratio predicted by theory is in good agreement with recent results from the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) published by the PAMELA collaboration. We have designed the AFIS (Antiproton Flux in Space) project in order to extend the measurable range of antiprotons towards the low-energy region. In scope of this project a small antiproton detector consisting of scintillating fibers and silicon photomultipliers is being developed as payload for a CubeSat traversing the SAA in Low Earth Orbit. For the proof of concept we have built a prototype called ''CubeZero'' which completed its first test using pion and proton beams at PSI, Switzerland. Our primary goal was to investigate on the performance of tracking and Bragg peak identification in hardware and software. Analysis of detector performance based on data taken during this beam test is presented in this talk.

  14. Professor Walter Oelert, leader of the team which created the first atoms of antihydrogen at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in January 1996

    Laurent Guiraud

    1996-01-01

    Antiparticles were predicted in the work of Paul Dirac in the 1920's, since when physicists have identified all the necessary antiparticle constituents of an antiparticle atom - antielectrons (positrons), antiprotons and antineutrons. However, an antihydrogen atom wasn't produced until the PS210 experiment at CERN in 1995. PS210 used the LEAR accelerator, which was then nearing the end of its lifetime, so everything in the experiment had to work first time. After installing the equipment in spring 1995, the experiment took place in the autumn, in two hour periods over 4 weeks. The experiment team collided energetic antiprotons from LEAR with a heavy element, a challenge for them as well as the LEAR operators. Proving that antihydrogen atoms had been formed required several more weeks of data analysis, but the announcement that nine antihydrogen atoms had been produced came on 4 January 1996.

  15. OPENMED: A facility for biomedical experiments based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR)

    Carli, Christian

    At present protons and carbon ions are in clinical use for hadron therapy at a growing number of treatment centers all over the world. Nevertheless, only limited direct clinical evidence of their superiority over other forms of radiotherapy is available [1]. Furthermore fundamental studies on biological effects of hadron beams have been carried out at different times (some a long time ago) in different laboratories and under different conditions. Despite an increased availability of ion beams for hadron therapy, beam time for preclinical studies is expected to remain insufficient as the priority for therapy centers is to treat the maximum number of patients. Most of the remaining beam time is expected to be required for setting up and measurements to guarantee appropriate good quality beams for treatments. The proposed facility for biomedical research [2] in support of hadron therapy centers would provide ion beams for interested research groups and allow them to carry out basic studies under well defined conditions. Typical studies would include radiobiological phenomena like relative biological effectiveness with different energies, ion species, and intensities. Furthermore possible studies include the development of advanced dosimetry in heterogeneous materials that resemble the human body, imaging techniques and, at a later stage, when the maximum energy with the LEIR magnets can be reached, fragmentation.

  16. Precocious scaling in antiproton-proton scattering at low energies

    Ion, D.B.; Petrascu, C.; Topor Pop, V.; Popa, V.

    1993-08-01

    The scaling of the diffraction peak in antiproton-proton scattering has been investigated from nera threshold up to 3 GeV/c laboratory momenta. It was shown that the scaling of the differential cross sections are evidentiated with a surprising accuracy not only at high energies, but also at very low ones (e.g. p LAB = 0.1 - 0.5 GeV/c), beyond the resonance and exotic resonance regions. This precocious scaling strongly suggests that the s-channel helicity conservation (SCHC) can be a peculiar property that should be tested in antiproton-proton interaction not only at high energies but also at low energy even below p LAB = 1 GeV/c. (author). 36 refs, 9 figs

  17. A leading-edge hardware family for diagnostics applications and low-level RF in CERN's ELENA ring

    Angoletta, M E; Jaussi, M; Leiononen, P; Levens, T E; Molendijk, J C; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Simonin, J

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) Ring is a new synchrotron that will be commissioned in 2016 to further decelerate the antiprotons transferred from the CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The requirements for the acquisition and treatment of signals for longitudinal diagnostics are very demanding, owing to the revolution frequency swing as well as to the digital signal processing required. The requirements for the Low-Level Radio-Frequency (LLRF) system are very demanding as well, especially in terms of revolution frequency swing, dynamic range and low noise required by the cavity voltage control and digital signal processing to be performed. Both sets of requirements will be satisfied by using a leading-edge hardware family, developed to cover the LLRF needs of all synchrotrons in the Meyrin site; it will be first deployed in 2014 in the CERN’s PSB and in the medical machine MedAustron. This paper gives an overview of the main building blocks of the hardware family and of th...

  18. CERN: Important summer for LEAR physics

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    An integral part of CERN's comprehensive antiproton facilities is the LEAR low energy antiproton ring which came into action for physics in 1983 and has gone on to host many experiments looking at a wide range of physics topics. With CERN's big SPS proton-antiproton collider now in what could be its final production physics run after an illustrious career which began in 1981, the face of antiproton physics at CERN will change over the next few years. However LEAR runs independently of high energy antiproton operations, and any phasing out of collider operations has no direct impact on LEAR

  19. CERN: Important summer for LEAR physics

    Anon.

    1990-12-15

    An integral part of CERN's comprehensive antiproton facilities is the LEAR low energy antiproton ring which came into action for physics in 1983 and has gone on to host many experiments looking at a wide range of physics topics. With CERN's big SPS proton-antiproton collider now in what could be its final production physics run after an illustrious career which began in 1981, the face of antiproton physics at CERN will change over the next few years. However LEAR runs independently of high energy antiproton operations, and any phasing out of collider operations has no direct impact on LEAR.

  20. Physics at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator

    Hori, M

    2013-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen ($\\bar{\\rm H}$) and antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$). The first 12 years of operation saw cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons ($e^+$) and antiprotons ($\\bar{p}$) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium atoms and $\\bar{p}$. Ground-state $\\bar{\\rm H}$ was later trapped for up to $\\sim 1000$ s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ atom, UV transitions were measured to a precision of (2.3-5) $\\times$ $10^{-9}$ by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as $M_{\\bar{p}}/m_e=$1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value. Microwave spectroscopy of $\\bar{p}{\\rm He}^+$ yielded a measurement o...

  1. Stochastic Cooling at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator

    Carli, Christian

    2000-01-01

    When transforming the CERN Antiproton Collector (AC) into the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), the stochastic cooling systems were rebuilt to cope with the new requirements. Instead of using the original three frequency bands, (0.9-1.6 GHz, 1.6-2.45 GHz and 2.4-3.2 GHz) only the first of these was used due to lattice limitations and other constraints. The same pick-ups and kickers are in use at two different energies. As in the AC, simultaneous cooling in all three phase planes is required. Switching between two transmission paths (at 3.5 GeV/c and 2.0 GeV/c) became necessary, including separate notch filters and delay compensation for the kicker sections. The tanks has to be rendered bakeable (150 C) to make the vacuum properties (<10-10 Torr) compatible with deceleration to low energies. Further improvements included programmable, phase-invariant electronic attenuators and amplitude-invariant delays. Experience during commissioning showed that careful optimization (depth and periodicity) of the notch filters...

  2. Around the Laboratories: CERN LEP vintage 1991; SuperLEARative

    Anon.

    1992-01-15

    When CERN's 27-kilometre LEP electron-positron collider finished its 1991 run in mid-November, the four big experiments - Aleph, Delphi, L3 and Opal - had each amassed about 300,000 Z particles over eight months. ; With CERN's SPS ring now only occasionally serving as a protonantiproton collider, the LEAR low energy antiproton ring at CERN is the main client for CERN's antiproton supply system.

  3. Around the Laboratories: CERN LEP vintage 1991; SuperLEARative

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    When CERN's 27-kilometre LEP electron-positron collider finished its 1991 run in mid-November, the four big experiments - Aleph, Delphi, L3 and Opal - had each amassed about 300,000 Z particles over eight months. ; With CERN's SPS ring now only occasionally serving as a protonantiproton collider, the LEAR low energy antiproton ring at CERN is the main client for CERN's antiproton supply system

  4. Design of low energy ring(s)

    Lachaize, Antoine

    During the last two years, several upgrades of the initial baseline scenario were studied with the aim of increasing the average intensity of ion beams in the accelerator chain of the Beta Beam complex. This is the reason why the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) specifications were reconsidered many times [1], [2], [3].General considerations on the optical design were presented at the Beta Beam Task Meetings held at CERN and at Saclay in 2005 [4]. More detailed beam optics studies were performed during the next months. Lattices, RF system parameters, multi-turn injection scheme, fast extraction, closed orbit correction and chromaticity correction systems were proposed for different versions of the RCS [5], [6], [7].Finally, the RCS specifications have stabilized in November 2006 after the fourth Beta Beam Task Meeting when it was decided to fix the maximum magnetic rigidity of ion beams to 14.47 T.m (3.5 GeV equivalent proton energy) and to adopt a ring physical radius of 40 m in order to facilitate injectio...

  5. LEAP: A balloon-borne search for low-energy cosmic ray antiprotons

    Moats, Anne Rosalie Myers

    The LEAP (Low Energy Antiproton) experiment is a search for cosmic ray antiprotons in the 120 MeV to 1.2 GeV kinetic energy range. The motivation for this project was the result announced by Buffington et al. (1981) that indicated an anomalously high antiproton flux below 300 MeV; this result has compelled theorists to propose sources of primary antiprotons above the small secondary antiproton flux produced by high energy cosmic ray collisions with nuclei in the interstellar medium. LEAP consisted of the NMSU magnet spectrometer, a time-of-flight system designed at NASA-Goddard, two scintillation detectors, and a Cherenkov counter. Analysis of flight data performed by the high energy astrophysics group at Goddard Space Flight Center revealed no antiproton candidates found in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range; 3 possible antiproton candidate events were found in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range in an analysis done here at the University of Arizona. However, since it will be necessary to sharpen the calibration on all of the LEAP systems in order to positively identify these events as antiprotons, only an upper limit has been determined at present. Thus, combining the analyses performed at the University of Arizona and NASA-Goddard, 90 percent confidence upper limits of 3.5 x 10-5 in the 120 MeV to 360 MeV range and 2.3 x 10-4 in the 500 MeV to 1.2 GeV range for the antiproton/proton ratio is indicated by the LEAP results. LEAP disagrees sharply with the results of the Buffington group, indicating a low antiproton flux at these energies. Thus, a purely secondary antiproton flux may be adequate at low energies.

  6. The PS 200 catching trap: A new tool for ultra-low energy antiproton physics

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Dyer, P.L.; King, N.S.P.; Lizon, D.C.; Morgan, G.L.; Schauer, M.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Hoibraten, S.; Lewis, R.A.; Otto, T.

    1994-01-01

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been trapped and electron cooled in the PS200 catching trap from a single fast extracted pulse from LEAR. The system is described in detail, different extraction schemes are discussed, and possible applications of this instrument to ultra-low energy atomic and nuclear physics with antiprotons are mentioned

  7. View of the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and portrait of Prof. Tommy Eriksson, in charge of the AD machine.

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is a storage ring at the CERN laboratory in Geneva. It started operation in 2000. It decelerates antiprotons before sending them to several experiments studying antimatter : ALPHA, ASACUSA, ATRAP and ACE.

  8. Antiproton-hydrogen scattering at low-eV energies

    Morgan Jr., D.L.

    1993-01-01

    In the scattering of negative particles other than the electron by atoms at lab-frame energies around 10 eV, an elastic process termed 'brickwall scattering' might lead to a high probability for scattering angles around 180deg. For an antiproton slowing in hydrogen, this backward scattering would result in the loss of nearly all of its energy in a single collision, since it and a hydrogen atom have nearly the same mass. Such energy loss would have a significant effect on the energy distribution of antiprotons at energies where capture by the protons of hydrogen is possible and might, thereby, affect the capture rate and the distribution of capture states. In the semiclassical treatment of the problem with an adiabatic potential energy, brickwall scattering is indeed present, and with a substantial cross section. However, this model appears to underestimate inelastic processes. Based on calculations for negative muons on hydrogen atoms, these processes appear to occur for about the same impact parameters as brickwall scattering and thus substantially reduce its effect. (orig.)

  9. Some preliminary considerations on antiproton-nucleus experiments

    Yavin, A.I.

    1981-05-01

    The antiproton as a probe of the atomic nucleus is discussed in the expectation that fairly intense beams of high quality will be available in 1983 at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) facility at CERN and possibly also in some other laboratories at a later date. Several antiproton-nucleus experiments are proposed, and the possibility of observing antiprotonic nuclei as well as antineutronic nuclei is discussed. It is demonstrated that even for the study of the elementary nucleon-antinucleon systems it could be advantageous to use nuclei rather than protons as target. The possibility of investigating several antiprotonic atomic systems is also briefly discussed [fr

  10. The measurement of antiproton-proton total cross sections and small-angle elastic scattering at low momentum

    Linssen, L.H.A.J.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis two low-momentum antiproton-proton (anti pp) experiments are described. The first one is a set of 24 high statistics anti pp total cross section measurements as a function of the incoming antiproton momentum between p=388 MeV/c and p=599 MeV/c. These measurements simultaneously yield the charge exchange cross section (anti pp → anti nn). The second one comprises two high statistics anti pp small-angle elastic scattering measurements at p=233 MeV/c and p=272 MeV/c. The measurements were carried out using the high quality antiproton beam extracted from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. The physics motivation for these experiments is a search for anti pp resonances or bound states on one hand, and a detailed study of the anti pp interaction on the other hand. (orig.)

  11. Emittance measurements in low energy ion storage rings

    Hunt, J. R.; Carli, C.; Resta-López, J.; Welsch, C. P.

    2018-07-01

    The development of the next generation of ultra-low energy antiproton and ion facilities requires precise information about the beam emittance to guarantee optimum performance. In the Extra-Low ENergy Antiproton storage ring (ELENA) the transverse emittances will be measured by scraping. However, this diagnostic measurement faces several challenges: non-zero dispersion, non-Gaussian beam distributions due to effects of the electron cooler and various systematic errors such as closed orbit offsets and inaccurate rms momentum spread estimation. In addition, diffusion processes, such as intra-beam scattering might lead to emittance overestimates. Here, we present algorithms to efficiently address the emittance reconstruction in presence of the above effects, and present simulation results for the case of ELENA.

  12. Ultra-low energy storage ring at FLAIR

    Welsch, Carsten P.; Papash, A. I.; Gorda, O.; Harasimowicz, J.; Karamyshev, O.; Karamysheva, G.; Newton, D.; Panniello, M.; Putignano, M.; Siggel-King, M. R. F.; Smirnov, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Ultra-low energy electrostatic Storage Ring (USR) at the future Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR) will provide cooled beams of antiprotons in the energy range between 300 keV down to 20 keV and possibly less. The USR has been completely redesigned over the past three years. The ring structure is based on a “split achromat” lattice that allows in-ring experiments with internal gas jet target. Beam parameters might be adjusted in a wide range: from very short pulses in the nanosecond regime to a Coasting beam. In addition, a combined fast and slow extraction scheme was developed that allows for providing external experiments with cooled beams of different time structure. Detailed investigations of the USR, including studies into the ring’s long term beam dynamics, life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with an internal target were carried out. New tools and beam handling techniques for diagnostics of ultra-low energy ions at beam intensities less than 10 6 were developed by the QUASAR Group. In this paper, progress on the USR project will be presented with an emphasis on the expected beam parameters available to the experiments at FLAIR.

  13. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...

  14. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons and protons with atoms and molecules

    Luehr, Armin

    2010-01-01

    Antiproton (anti p) collisions have evolved to a powerful tool for the testing of dynamic electron correlations in atoms and molecules. While advances in the understanding of anti p collisions with the simplest one- and two-electron atoms, H and He, have been achieved experiment and theory did not agree for low-energy anti p+He collisions ( 2 despite its fundamental role in representing the simplest two-electron molecule. The obtained results may be useful for the anti p experiments at CERN (e.g., antihydrogen production) and in particular for the facility design of low-energy anti p storage rings (e.g., at FLAIR) where a precise knowledge of the anti p interaction with the dominant residual-gas molecule H 2 is needed. In this work a nonperturbative, time-dependent numerical approach is developed which describes ionization and excitation of atoms or molecules by either anti p or p impact based on the impact-parameter method. A spectral close-coupling method is employed for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the scattering wave function is expanded in (effective) one- or two-electron eigenstates of the target. This includes for the first time a full two-electron, two-center description of the H 2 molecule in anti p collisions. The radial part of the one-electron eigenstates is expanded in B splines while the two-electron basis is obtained with a configurationinteraction approach. Calculations are performed for anti p collisions with H, H 2 + , and H 2 as well as with He and alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb. Additionally, data are obtained for p collisions with H 2 , Li, Na, and K. The developed method is tested and validated by detailed comparison of the present findings for p impacts and for anti p+He collisions with literature data. On the other hand, total and differential cross sections for ionization and excitation of the targets by anti p impact complement the sparse literature data of this kind. Results gained from different targets

  15. Collisions of low-energy antiprotons and protons with atoms and molecules

    Luehr, Armin

    2010-02-18

    Antiproton (anti p) collisions have evolved to a powerful tool for the testing of dynamic electron correlations in atoms and molecules. While advances in the understanding of anti p collisions with the simplest one- and two-electron atoms, H and He, have been achieved experiment and theory did not agree for low-energy anti p+He collisions (<40 keV), stimulating a vivid theoretical activity. On the other hand, only very few theoretical anti p studies can be found considering molecular as well as other atomic targets, in contrast to proton (p) collisions. This is in particular true for anti p impacts on H{sub 2} despite its fundamental role in representing the simplest two-electron molecule. The obtained results may be useful for the anti p experiments at CERN (e.g., antihydrogen production) and in particular for the facility design of low-energy anti p storage rings (e.g., at FLAIR) where a precise knowledge of the anti p interaction with the dominant residual-gas molecule H{sub 2} is needed. In this work a nonperturbative, time-dependent numerical approach is developed which describes ionization and excitation of atoms or molecules by either anti p or p impact based on the impact-parameter method. A spectral close-coupling method is employed for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in which the scattering wave function is expanded in (effective) one- or two-electron eigenstates of the target. This includes for the first time a full two-electron, two-center description of the H{sub 2} molecule in anti p collisions. The radial part of the one-electron eigenstates is expanded in B splines while the two-electron basis is obtained with a configurationinteraction approach. Calculations are performed for anti p collisions with H, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 2} as well as with He and alkali-metal atoms Li, Na, K, and Rb. Additionally, data are obtained for p collisions with H{sub 2}, Li, Na, and K. The developed method is tested and validated by detailed

  16. Recent progress of laser spectroscopy experiments on antiprotonic helium

    Hori, Masaki

    2018-03-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) collaboration is currently carrying out laser spectroscopy experiments on antiprotonic helium ? atoms at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. Two-photon spectroscopic techniques have been employed to reduce the Doppler width of the measured ? resonance lines, and determine the atomic transition frequencies to a fractional precision of 2.3-5 parts in 109. More recently, single-photon spectroscopy of buffer-gas cooled ? has reached a similar precision. By comparing the results with three-body quantum electrodynamics calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as ?, which agrees with the known proton-to-electron mass ratio with a precision of 8×10-10. The high-quality antiproton beam provided by the future Extra Low Energy Antiproton Ring (ELENA) facility should enable further improvements in the experimental precision. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  17. Physics using cold antiprotons

    Hayano, R S

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress of low-energy antiproton physics by atomic spectroscopy and collisions using slow antiprotons collaboration at CERN AD is presented. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - a neutral three-body system pe**-He**2**+(=pHe**+) produced when antiprotons (p) are stopped in various phases of helium - has tested 3-body QED theories as well as proton-vs-antiproton CPT to within similar to 10**-**8. This was achieved by using a newly- developed radiofrequency quadrupole decelerator. Other ongoing and future experiments using low-energy antiprotons are discussed.

  18. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    Gotta, D; Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; El-Khoury, P; Egger, J P; Gorke, H; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the low-energy antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (33 refs).

  19. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Augsburger, M.; Borchert, G.; Castelli, C.; Chatellard, D.; El-Khoury, P.; Egger, J.-P.; Gorke, H.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Indelicato, P.; Kirch, K.; Lenz, S.; Nelms, N.; Rashid, K.; Schult, O. W. B.; Siems, Th.; Simons, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction

  20. Observation of jets in high transverse energy events at the CERN proton antiproton collider

    Arnison, G.; Astbury, A.; Grayer, G.; Haynes, W.J.; Nandi, A.K.; Roberts, C.; Scott, W.; Shah, T.P.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Eisenhandler, E.; Gibson, W.R.; Honma, A.; Kalmus, P.I.P.; Keeler, R.; Salvi, G.; Thompson, G.; Cochet, C.; DeBeer, M.; Denegri, D.; Givernaud, A.; Laugier, J.P.; Leveque, A.; Locci, E.; Loret, M.; Malosse, J.J.; Rich, J.; Sass, J.; Saudraix, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spiro, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Fontaine, G.; Geer, S.; Ghesquiere, C.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Kryn, D.; Mendiburu, J.P.; Orkin-Lecourtois, A.; Sajot, G.; Vrana, J.; Bacci, C.; Bernabei, R.; Ceradini, F.; Corden, M.; Dallman, D.; D'Angelo, S.; Dowell, J.D.; Edwards, M.; Eggert, K.; Ellis, N.; Erhard, P.; Faissner, H.; Frey, R.; Fruehwirth, R.; Garvey, J.; Giboni, K.L.; Gutierrez, P.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hodges, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Homer, R.J.; Karimaeki, V.; Kenyon, I.; Kernan, A.; Kinnunen, R.; Kozanecki, W.; Lehmann, H.; Leuchs, R.; McMahon, T.; Moricca, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pimia, M.; Radermacher, E.; Ransdell, J.; Reithler, H.; Salvini, G.; Strauss, J.; Sumorok, K.; Szoncso, F.; Tscheslog, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Wahl, H.D.; Watkins, P.; Wilson, J.

    1983-01-01

    With a segmented total absorption calorimeter of large acceptance, we have measured the total transverse energy spectrum for panti p collisions at ssup(1/2)=540 GeV up to μEsub(T)=130 GeV in the pseudo-rapidity range vertical strokeetavertical stroke 40 GeV, the fraction of events with two jets increases with μEsub(T); this event structure is dominant for μEsub(T)> 100 GeV. We measure the inclusive jet cross section up to Esub(T)(jet)=60 GeV and the two-jet mass distribution up to 120 GeV/c 2 . The measured cross sections are compatible with the predictions of hard scattering models based on QCD. (orig.)

  1. The CERN SPS proton–antiproton collider

    Schmidt, Rudiger

    2016-01-01

    One of CERN's most ambitious and successful projects was the search for the intermediate bosons, W and Z [1]. The accelerator part of the project relied on a number of innovations in accelerator physics and technology. The invention of the method of stochastic cooling and the extension by many orders of magnitude beyond the initial proof of principle demonstration allowed the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator. Major modifications to the 26 GeV PS complex and the conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which had just started up as an accelerator, to a collider were required. The SPS collider had to master the beam–beam effect far beyond limits reached before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the UA1 and UA2 experiments.

  2. Basic physics program for a low energy antiproton source in North America

    Bonner, B.E.; Nieto, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    We summarize much of the important science that could be learned at a North American low energy antiproton source. It is striking that there is such a diverse and multidisciplinary program that would be amenable to exploration. Spanning the range from high energy particle physics to nuclear physics, atomic physics, and condensed matter physics, the program promises to offer many new insights into these disparate branches of science. It is abundantly clear that the scientific case for rapidly proceeding towards such a capability in North America is both alluring and strong. 38 refs., 2 tabs

  3. FLSR - The Frankfurt low energy storage ring

    Stiebing, K.E.; Alexandrov, V.; Doerner, R.; Enz, S.; Kazarinov, N.Yu.; Kruppi, T.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt Boecking, H.; Voelp, M.; Ziel, P.; Dworak, M.; Dilfer, W.

    2010-01-01

    An electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions with a design energy of 50 keV is presently being set up at the Institut fuer Kernphysik der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Germany (IKF). This new device will provide a basis for new experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. In this article, the design parameters of this instrument are reported.

  4. Exploring Sub-Femtosecond Correlated Dynamics with an Ultra-low Energy Electrostatic Storage Ring

    Welsch, C.P.; Grieser, M.; Dorn, A.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the three-body Coulomb problem for single excitation and ionization was claimed to be solved in a mathematically correct way during 1999 until 2004 for electron impact on hydrogen and helium, ion-impact ionization still represents a major challenge for theory. Troubling discrepancies have been observed recently in fully differential cross sections (FDCS) for helium single ionization by fast ion impact and even experimental total cross sections are in striking disagreement with the predictions of all state-of-the-art theories for low-energy antiproton collisions. Therefore, within the future Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR), it has been proposed to combine state-of-the-art many-particle imaging methods with a novel electrostatic storage ring for slow antiprotons in order to realize single and multiple ionization cross section measurements for antiprotons colliding with atoms, molecules and clusters. Total, as well as any differential cross sections up to FDCS including ionization-excitation reactions are envisaged to become available, serving as benchmark data for theory. Here, the present status of experiments in comparison with theory is presented and the layout of an Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) with its integrated reaction microscope at FLAIR is described

  5. Measurement of asymmetries and differential cross sections in antiproton-proton elastic scattering at momenta between 497 and 1550 MeV/c

    Kunne, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    An intermediate energy antiproton proton (anti pp) elastic scattering experiment is described. The data comprise a set of 15 measurements of the differential cross section and the asymmetry between 497 and 1550 MeV/c antiproton momentum. The measurements were carried out using the high quality antiproton beam provided by the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. A conventional polarized target was used, consisting of pentanol. The motivation for the measurements is the study of the anti pp interaction by providing data on the spin observable A on in a momentum range where it has never been measured before. 56 refs.; 55 figs.; 40 tabs

  6. Dynamic studies of multiple configurations of CERN's Antiproton Decelerator Target core under proton beam impact

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2248381

    Antiprotons, like many other exotic particles, are produced by impacting high energy proton beams onto fixed targets. At the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), this is done in the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) Facility. The engineering challenges related to the design of an optimal configuration of the AD-Target system derive from the extremely high energy depositions reached in the very thin target core as a consequence of each proton beam impact. A new target design is foreseen for operation after 2021, triggering multiple R&D activities since 2013 for this purpose. The goal of the present Master Thesis is to complement these activities with analytical and numerical calculations, delving into the phenomena associated to the dynamic response of the target core. In this context, two main studies have been carried out. First, the experimental data observed in targets subjected to low intensity proton pulses was cross-checked with analytical and computational methods for modal analysis, applie...

  7. Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    Photographic Service

    1980-01-01

    The AA in its final stage of construction, before it disappeared from view under concrete shielding. Antiprotons were first injected, stochastically cooled and accumulated in July 1980. From 1981 on, the AA provided antiprotons for collisions with protons, first in the ISR, then in the SPS Collider. From 1983 on, it also sent antiprotons, via the PS, to the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). The AA was dismantled in 1997 and shipped to Japan.

  8. Studies of Lear antiproton deceleration: radiofrequency quadripole or synchrotron

    Iazzourene, F.

    1987-06-01

    The aim of this work is to study a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a synchrotron as decelerating systems for antiprotons extracted from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. Antiprotons at energies lower than those available from LEAR are need by some experiments, eg. the measurement of the mass difference between protons and antiprotons with 10 -9 accuracy, using a Smith and Princeton spectrometer, and the measurement of gravitation on the antiprotons, using a trap. Depending on the LEAR performances, one can conclude that the RFQ is suitable for the experiment on the gravitation, and the synchrotron, owing to its electron cooling system, is a better solution for the experiment on the mass difference measurement, because of the very small acceptance of the spectrometer [fr

  9. FLSR - The Frankfurt low energy storage ring

    Stiebing, K. E.; Alexandrov, V.; Dörner, R.; Enz, S.; Kazarinov, N. Yu.; Kruppi, T.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt Böcking, H.; Völp, M.; Ziel, P.; Dworak, M.; Dilfer, W.

    2010-02-01

    An electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions with a design energy of 50 keV is presently being set up at the Institut für Kernphysik der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Germany (IKF). This new device will provide a basis for new experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. In this article, the design parameters of this instrument are reported.

  10. A Low-Energy Ring Lattice Design

    Cai, Yunhai

    2002-01-01

    The PEP-N project at SLAC [1] consists of a Very Low-Energy small electron Ring (VLER) that will collide with the low-energy 3.1 GeV positron beam (LER) of PEP-II, producing center-of-mass energies between the 1.1 GeV and the J/ψ. The beams will collide head-on and will be separated in the detector magnetic field which is part of the Interaction Region [2]. The IP β functions were chosen such as to optimize both luminosity and beam-beam tune shifts, while keeping the LER tune shifts small. This paper describes the lattice design of the VLER for the ''baseline'' at 500 MeV

  11. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    Nieto, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    It is known that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when one tries to combine these theories, one must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem. This all has led some open-quotes intrepidclose quotes theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more open-quotes daringclose quotes experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen

  12. Modeling of the Near-Earth Low-Energy Antiproton Fluxes

    U. B. Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The local interstellar antiproton spectrum is simulated taking into account antineutron decay, (He,p interaction, secondary and tertiary antiproton production, and the solar modulation in the “force field” approximation. Inclusive invariant cross-sections were obtained through a Monte Carlo procedure using the Multistage Dynamical Model code simulating various processes of the particle production. The results of the simulations provided flux values of 4⋅10−3 to 10−2 and 10−2 to 1.7⋅10−2 antiprotons/(2 s sr GeV at energies of 0.2 and 1 GeV, respectively, for the solar maximum and minimum epochs. Simulated flux of the trapped antiprotons in the inner magnetosphere due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR interactions with the atmospheric constituents exceeds the galactic antiproton flux up to several orders. These simulation results considering the assumptions with the attendant limitations are in comprehensive agreement with the experimental data including the PAMELA ones.

  13. Survey and alignment of the Fermilab recycler antiproton storage ring

    Arics, Babatunde O.O.

    1999-01-01

    In June of 1999 Fermilab commissioned a newly constructed antiproton storage ring, the 'Recycler Ring', in the Main Injector tunnel directly above the Main Injector beamline. The Recycler Ring is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring and is constructed of strontium ferrite permanent magnets. The 3319.4-meter-circumference Recycler Ring consists of 344 gradient magnets and 100 quadrupoles all of which are permanent magnets. This paper discusses the methods employed to survey and align these permanent magnets within the Recycler Ring with the specified accuracy. The Laser Tracker was the major instrument used for the final magnet alignment. The magnets were aligned along the Recycler Ring with a relative accuracy of ±0.25 mm. (author)

  14. Comparison of electromagnetic and hadronic models generated using Geant 4 with antiproton dose measured in CERN.

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Reiazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    After proposing the idea of antiproton cancer treatment in 1984 many experiments were launched to investigate different aspects of physical and radiobiological properties of antiproton, which came from its annihilation reactions. One of these experiments has been done at the European Organization for Nuclear Research known as CERN using the antiproton decelerator. The ultimate goal of this experiment was to assess the dosimetric and radiobiological properties of beams of antiprotons in order to estimate the suitability of antiprotons for radiotherapy. One difficulty on this way was the unavailability of antiproton beam in CERN for a long time, so the verification of Monte Carlo codes to simulate antiproton depth dose could be useful. Among available simulation codes, Geant4 provides acceptable flexibility and extensibility, which progressively lead to the development of novel Geant4 applications in research domains, especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. In this study, the depth dose corresponding to CERN antiproton beam energy by Geant4 recruiting all the standard physics lists currently available and benchmarked for other use cases were calculated. Overall, none of the standard physics lists was able to draw the antiproton percentage depth dose. Although, with some models our results were promising, the Bragg peak level remained as the point of concern for our study. It is concluded that the Bertini model with high precision neutron tracking (QGSP_BERT_HP) is the best to match the experimental data though it is also the slowest model to simulate events among the physics lists.

  15. Low energy current accumulator for high-energy proton rings

    Month, M.

    1977-01-01

    Building current in high-energy p-p colliding beam machines is most appropriately done in a low-energy (small circumference) current accumulator. Three significant factors favor such a procedure: First, large rings tend to be susceptible to unstable longitudinal density oscillations. These can be avoided by pumping up the beam in the accumulator. When the current stack is injected into the storage ring, potentially harmful instability is essentially neutralized. Second, high-field magnets characteristic of future high energy proton rings are designed with superconducting coils within the iron magnetic shield. This means coil construction and placement errors propagate rapidly within the beam aperture. An intermediate ''stacking ring'' allows the minimum use of the superconducting ring aperture. Finally, the coils are vulnerable to radiation heating and possible magnet quenching. By minimizing beam manipulaion in the superconducting environment and using only the central portion of the beam aperture, coil vulnerability can be put at a minimum

  16. The ASACUSA experiment at CERN's AD antiproton decelerator catches antiprotons in helium, where the antiprotons replace electrons, giving exotics atoms.

    Loïez, P

    2000-01-01

    Photo 03: Laser beams are prepared for shooting at antiprotonic helium atoms. Left to right: Masaki Hori (Tokyo University) and John Eades (CERN). Photo 01: Dye laser triggered by "YAG" laser. Photo 02: Masaki Hori adjusting optical system of laser beams.

  17. Longitudinal beam diagnostic from a distributed electrostatic pick-up in CERN's ELENA ring

    Angoletta, M E; Federmann, S; Molendijk, J; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Secouet, P J; Søby, L; Pedersen, F; Timmins, M

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) Ring is a new synchrotron that will be commissioned in 2016 to further decelerate the antiprotons coming from CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD). Required longitudinal diagnostics include the intensity measurement for bunched and debunched beam and the measurement of Dp/p to assess the electron cooling performance. A novel method for the calculation of these parameters is proposed for ELENA, where signals from the twenty electrostatic Pick-Ups (PU) used for orbit measurements will be combined to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. This requires that the signals be digitally down-converted, rotated and summed so that the many electrostatic PUs will function as a single, distributed PU from the processing system viewpoint. This method includes some challenges and will not be used as the baseline longitudinal diagnostics for the initial ELENA operation. This paper gives an overview of the hardware and digital signal processing involved, as well as of the challenges t...

  18. Slowing down of 100 keV antiprotons in Al foils

    K. Nordlund

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Using energy degrading foils to slow down antiprotons is of interest for producing antihydrogen atoms. I consider here the slowing down of 100 keV antiprotons, that will be produced in the ELENA storage ring under construction at CERN, to energies below 10 keV. At these low energies, they are suitable for efficient antihydrogen production. I simulate the antihydrogen motion and slowing down in Al foils using a recently developed molecular dynamics approach. The results show that the optimal Al foil thickness for slowing down the antiprotons to below 5 keV is 910 nm, and to below 10 keV is 840 nm. Also the lateral spreading of the transmitted antiprotons is reported and the uncertainties discussed. Keywords: Antiprotons, Stopping power, Slowing down, Molecular dynamics

  19. Antiproton annihilation in very low-energy antihydrogen scattering by simple atoms and molecules

    Armour, E.A.G.; Gregory, M.R.; Liu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of experimentalists currently working on the preparation of antihydrogen is to trap it at very low temperatures so that its properties can be studied. Of concern to experimentalists are processes that lead to a loss of antihydrogen through annihilation. The dominant annihilation process that leads to the loss of antihydrogen is the annihilation of the antiproton with nuclei through the strong interaction. A recent scattering calculation of antihydrogen with hydrogen at very low energy, using the complex strong interaction potential of Kohno and Weise, has found an average annihilation cross-section of 0.13E -1/2 a 0 -2 , where E is the energy of relative motion. The antihydrogen-helium system is of particular interest to experimentalists as helium may be present as an impurity in the trap. Also there is interest in the possibility of using it to cool antihydrogen. We present a treatment of antihydrogen scattering with helium at very low temperatures. The annihilation cross-sections obtained are much larger than antihydrogen-hydrogen scattering cross-section, making it very unlikely that helium can be used to cool antihydrogen

  20. Antiproton annihilation in very low-energy antihydrogen scattering by simple atoms and molecules

    Armour, E.A.G. [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Gregory, M.R. [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mark.gregory@maths.nottingham.ac.uk; Liu, Y. [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    The aim of experimentalists currently working on the preparation of antihydrogen is to trap it at very low temperatures so that its properties can be studied. Of concern to experimentalists are processes that lead to a loss of antihydrogen through annihilation. The dominant annihilation process that leads to the loss of antihydrogen is the annihilation of the antiproton with nuclei through the strong interaction. A recent scattering calculation of antihydrogen with hydrogen at very low energy, using the complex strong interaction potential of Kohno and Weise, has found an average annihilation cross-section of 0.13E{sup -1/2}a{sub 0}{sup -2}, where E is the energy of relative motion. The antihydrogen-helium system is of particular interest to experimentalists as helium may be present as an impurity in the trap. Also there is interest in the possibility of using it to cool antihydrogen. We present a treatment of antihydrogen scattering with helium at very low temperatures. The annihilation cross-sections obtained are much larger than antihydrogen-hydrogen scattering cross-section, making it very unlikely that helium can be used to cool antihydrogen.

  1. Comprehensive Study for an Optimized Redesign of the CERN's Antiproton Decelerator Target

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2089345; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Muñoz-Cobo, Jose-Luis

    2018-04-16

    The Antiproton Decelerator Target (AD-Target) is a unique device responsible for the production of antiprotons at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). During operation, intense 26 GeV energy proton beams are impacted into its core, made of a 3 mm diameter rod of a high density material such as iridium, creating secondary particles -including antiprotons- from the nuclear reactions induced in its interior. This thesis delves into the characteristics of antiproton production and in particular in the mechanical response of the target core material, which is exposed to a rise of temperature of approximate 2000 degrees Celsius in less than 0.5 microseconds each time is impacted by the primary proton beam. A coupled numerical-experimental approach has been applied for this purpose. Specific computational tools, called hydrocodes, have been used for simulating the extreme dynamic response taking place in the target core and its containing graphite matrix, indicating their potential damage and frag...

  2. An analytical simulation of the ion-antiproton instabilities in the CERN Antiproton Accumulator

    Dainelli, A.; Pusterla, M.

    1988-01-01

    A direct map method with a Mathieu approach to tune modulation is proposed and used to simulate nonlinear effects on particle motion that are generated by a beam-beam-like interaction of antiprotons with ions of the residual gas in the CERN Antiproton Accumulator. Two different Gaussian ion distributions are used, and the effects of the simulated beam-beam force on the particle motion is studied in phase space, with a particular attention to high-order nonlinear resonances. (author) 16 refs., 4 figs

  3. Antiproton acceleration in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron

    Martin, P.; Dinkel, J.; Ducar, R.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron rf systems for colliding beams physics is discussed. The changes in the rf feedback system required for acceleration of antiprotons, and the methods for achieving proper transfer of both protons and antiprotons are described. Data on acceleration and transfer efficiencies are presented

  4. Fermilab Antiproton source, Recycler ring and Main Injector

    Nagaitsev, Sergei [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-03-22

    The antiproton source for a proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab was proposed in 1976 [1]. The proposal argued that the requisite luminosity (~1029 cm-2sec-1) could be achieved with a facility that would produce and cool approximately 1011 antiprotons per day. Funding for the Tevatron I project (to construct the Antiproton source) was initiated in 1981 and the Tevatron ring itself was completed, as a fixed target accelerator, in the summer of 1983 and the Antiproton Source was completed in 1985. At the end of its operations in 2011, the Fermilab antiproton production complex consisted of a sophisticated target system, three 8-GeV storage rings (namely the Debuncher, Accumulator and Recycler), 25 independent multi-GHz stochastic cooling systems, the world’s only relativistic electron cooling system and a team of technical experts equal to none. Sustained accumulation of antiprotons was possible at the rate of greater than 2.5×1011 per hour. Record-size stacks of antiprotons in excess of 3×1012 were accumulated in the Accumulator ring and 6×1012 in the Recycler. In some special cases, the antiprotons were stored in rings for more than 50 days. Note, that over the years, some 1016 antiprotons were produced and accumulated at Fermilab, which is about 17 nanograms and more than 90% of the world’s total man-made quantity of nuclear antimatter. The accelerator complex at Fermilab supported a broad physics program including the Tevatron Collider Run II [2], neutrino experiments using 8 GeV and 120 GeV proton beams, as well as a test beam facility and other fixed target experiments using 120 GeV primary proton beams. The following sections provide a brief description of Fermilab accelerators as they operated at the end of the Collider Run II (2011).

  5. Slowing down of 100 keV antiprotons in Al foils

    Nordlund, K.

    2018-03-01

    Using energy degrading foils to slow down antiprotons is of interest for producing antihydrogen atoms. I consider here the slowing down of 100 keV antiprotons, that will be produced in the ELENA storage ring under construction at CERN, to energies below 10 keV. At these low energies, they are suitable for efficient antihydrogen production. I simulate the antihydrogen motion and slowing down in Al foils using a recently developed molecular dynamics approach. The results show that the optimal Al foil thickness for slowing down the antiprotons to below 5 keV is 910 nm, and to below 10 keV is 840 nm. Also the lateral spreading of the transmitted antiprotons is reported and the uncertainties discussed.

  6. Case study of a magnetic system for low-energy machines

    Daniel Schoerling

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The extra low-energy antiproton ring (ELENA is a CERN particle decelerator with the purpose to deliver antiprotons at lowest energies aiming to enhance the study of antimatter. The hexagonal shaped ring with a circumference of about 30 m will decelerate antiprotons from momenta of 100 to 13.7  MeV/c. In this paper, the design approach for a magnet system for such a machine is presented. Due to the extra-low beam rigidity, the design of the magnet system is especially challenging because even small fields, arising for example from residual magnetization and hysteresis, have a major impact on beam dynamics. In total, seven prototype magnets of three different magnet types have been built and tested. This paper outlines challenges, describes solutions for the design of the magnet system and discusses the results of the prototypes.

  7. Performance of the CERN plasma lens in laboratory and beam tests at the Antiproton Source

    Kowalewicz, R.; Lubrano di Scampamorte, M.; Milner, S.; Pedersen, F.; Riege, H.; Christiansen, J.; Frank, K.; Stetter, M.; Tkotz, R.; Boggasch, E.

    1991-01-01

    The CERN plasma lens is based on a dynamic z-pinch which creates during 500 ns a cylindrical plasma current conductor of 290 mm length and 38 to 45 mm diameter. The lens is designed for pulsed pinched currents of 400 kA and magnetic field gradients of 200 T/m produced with stored energies of 56 kJ. Life tests of different lens components were carried through at a repetition rate of 4.8 s/pulse. The results of the first beam tests of the plasma lens at the CERN antiproton source are very encouraging in view of other potential plasma lens applications

  8. Physics with antiprotons at LEAR

    Kilian, K.

    1984-01-01

    The low energy antiproton ring LEAR started to work at CERN in 1983. It provides clean anti p beams of much higher intensity and much better quality than available so far in the range from 0.1 to 2 GeV/c momentum. 16 of the 17 accepted experiments are installed and 14 of them took first data in 1983. After approx.= 240 hours of LEAR operation very first results are available. One can expect that exciting physics results be produced in many different domains provided LEAR gets enough anti p in the future. (orig.)

  9. The CERN intersecting storage rings and strong interactions at high energies

    Cocconi, Giuseppe

    1973-01-01

    The coming into operation of the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN), near Geneva, has made it possible in the past two years to study the behaviour of matter at the highest densities ever obtained artificially, hundreds of times greater than the density of matter in nuclei and even in the densest stars. An account is given of some of the results obtained thus far; this is followed by a brief discussion of possible future developments. (17 refs).

  10. Measuring and manipulating an accumulated stack of antiprotons in the CERN antiproton accumulator

    Johson, R.; van der Meer, S.; Pederson, F.

    1983-01-01

    The antiproton stack is observed through Schottky scans, both longitudinal and transverse. A particular feature is the wide dynamic range needed for observing both the dense core and the freshly-deposited tail. Separating batches of antiprotons from the stack (unstacking) is a highly automated process including the measurement of the momentum distribution and the generation of a suitable RF function to remove a slice of the desired density. Multiple slices may be removed successively and a process for locally flattening the distribution to obtain equal batch intensities is used. When successive batches are unstacked and ejected, the process may have to be aborted if the particles do not arrive correctly at the user. A ''restack'' facility is provided to return any antiprotons to the stack that have been unstacked but not ejected. A missing-bucket scheme for unstacking low-intensity batches for LEAR is also described

  11. The future of the antiproton accumulator

    Autin, B.

    1983-01-01

    When the Antiproton Accumulator was designed in 1977, it was considered as an element of the high energy proton-antiproton collision experiments in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Since that time, antiproton physics has become more and more popular: a second experimental area was built in the SPS, the Intersecting Storage Rings started a special antiproton programme and a considerable interest has bloomed in the energy range of nuclear physics with the LEAR machine. Moreover, any projection on hadron physics in the coming years shows an insatiable appetite of experimentalists for more antiprotons. Therefore, basic studies have been pursued since the beginning of last year to transform the accumulator into an abundant source of antiprotons

  12. Status of the Frankfurt low energy electrostatic storage ring (FLSR)

    King, F; Kruppi, T; Müller, J; Dörner, R; Schmidt, L Ph H; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Stiebing, K E

    2015-01-01

    Frankfurt low-energy storage ring (FLSR) is an electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions up to q · 80 keV (q being the ion charge state) at Institut für Kernphysik der Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. It has especially been designed to provide a basis for experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions in complete kinematics, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. The ring has ‘racetrack’ geometry with a circumference of 14.23 m. It comprises four experimental/diagnostic sections with regions of enhanced ion density (interaction regions). First beam has successfully been stored in FLSR in summer 2013. Since then the performance of the ring has continuously been improved and an electron target for experiments on dissociative recombination has been installed in one of the experimental sections. (paper)

  13. Status of the Frankfurt low energy electrostatic storage ring (FLSR)

    King, F.; Kruppi, T.; Müller, J.; Dörner, R.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Stiebing, K. E.

    2015-11-01

    Frankfurt low-energy storage ring (FLSR) is an electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions up to q · 80 keV (q being the ion charge state) at Institut für Kernphysik der Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. It has especially been designed to provide a basis for experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions in complete kinematics, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. The ring has ‘racetrack’ geometry with a circumference of 14.23 m. It comprises four experimental/diagnostic sections with regions of enhanced ion density (interaction regions). First beam has successfully been stored in FLSR in summer 2013. Since then the performance of the ring has continuously been improved and an electron target for experiments on dissociative recombination has been installed in one of the experimental sections.

  14. Layout of the LER [Low Energy Ring] Arc

    Hutton, A.

    1990-01-01

    We have recently been trying to accumulate all of the information necessary to decide on the layout of the regular curved arcs of the Low Energy Ring (LER) and there have been several ABC Notes published on different aspects of the problem. This note will describe the layout that has been derived from these considerations

  15. Le CERN trouve un financement extérieur pour un nouveau projet sur l'antimatière

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1997-01-01

    CERN will build a new experimental facility, the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) by transforming an existing CERN machine the "Antiproton Collector", which produces and stores antiprotons into a "all-in-one" machine which can, in addition, decelerate, cool, and eject antiprotons at low energies (5.8 MeV). The transformation will cost about 7 million Swiss Francs, and will be funded by special contributions from several countries, among which are , Denmark, Germany, Italy, Japan, Poland and the United States.

  16. A search for resonances in the antiproton-proton system at low energies

    Walczak, R.

    1981-01-01

    The excitation function of the annihilation and elastic cross-sections for the antiproton-proton scattering have been measured in the mass range from 1910 to 1978 MeV. The experiment was characterized by a mass resolution of about 0.4 MeV (R.M.S.) and a statistical significance of 1.2% (R.M.S.) for the annihilation channel. With this precision a narrow structure at a mass of 1936 MeV was observed. This structure is not of a simple Breit-Wigner shape. However, it might be identified with the S-meson reported by a previous experiment. (orig.)

  17. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    Zolotorev, M.; Sessler, A.; Penn, G.; Wurtele, J. S.; Charman, A. E.

    2012-03-01

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  18. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    Batty, C.J.

    1989-07-01

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  19. Experimental investigation of electron cooling and stacking of lead ions in a low energy accumulation ring

    Bosser, Jacques; Chanel, M; Hill, C; Lombardi, A M; MacCaferri, R; Maury, S; Möhl, D; Molinari, G; Rossi, S; Tanke, E; Tranquille, G; Vretenar, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    This report gives the results of a programme of experimental investigations, which were carried out to test stacking of lead ions in a storage ring (the former Low Energy Antiproton Ring, LEAR) at 4.2 MeV per nucleon. The motivation was to demonstrate the feasibility of gaining the large factor in the phase-space density required for injection into the LHC. In the first part of the report, the layout of the experiments is described, the choice of the parameters of the electron cooling system used for stacking is reported and the multi-turn injection using horizontal- and longitudinal- (and in the final project also vertical-) phase space is discussed. In the second part the experimental results are presented. Factors of vital importance are the stacking efficiency, the beam life-time and the cooling time of the ions. The beam decay owing to charge exchange with the residual gas and to recombination by the capture of cooling electrons was intensively studied. Beam instabilities and space-charge effects in the ...

  20. Electromagnetic simulations for non-ultrarelativistic beams and applications to the CERN low energy machines

    Zannini, C; Rumolo, G; Rijoff, T

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the PS-Booster upgrade project an accurate impedance model is needed in order to determine the effect on the beam stability and assess the impact of the new devices to be installed in the machine. CST 3-D EM simulations are widely used to estimate the impedance contribution of the different devices along the CERN accelerator complex. Unlike the highly relativistic case, in which the reliability of the EM solver has been proved in many specific cases by comparing simulations with analytical results, the nonrelativistic case has been so far not yet benchmarked. In order to use systematically CST 3-D EM simulations for the PS-Booster, or even lower energy machines like the antiproton decelerator ELENA, a validation campaign has been carried out. The main complication to single out the beam coupling impedance, as resulting from the interaction of the beam with the surroundings, consisted of removing reliably the strong contribution of the direct space charge of the source bunch, which is inclu...

  1. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Antiproton Mass" by G. Gabrielse

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  2. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics: "Light Antiprotonic Atoms" by R. Hayano

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  3. The ELENA project at CERN

    Oelert, W

    2015-01-01

    CERN has a longstanding tradition of pursuing fundamental physics on extreme low and high energy scales. The present physics knowledge is successfully described by the Standard Model and the General Relativity. In the anti-matter regime many predictions of this established theory still remain experimentally unverified and one of the most fundamental open problems in physics concerns the question of asymmetry between particles: why is the observable and visible universe apparently composed almost entirely of matter and not of anti-matter? There is a huge interest in the very compelling scientiic case for anti-hydrogen and low energy anti-proton physics, here to name especially the Workshop on New Opportunities in the Physics Landscape at CERN which was convened in May 2009 by the CERN Directorate and culminated in the decision for the final approval of the construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) ring by the Research Board in June 2011. ELENA is a CERN project aiming to construct a small 30 m ci...

  4. The CERN antiproton target: hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 {\\deg}C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of...

  5. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    Claudio Torregrosa Martin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26  GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa’s. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  6. Antiproton production

    Lazarus, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The results for the antiproton momentum spectrum produced in proton reactions on lead at the CERN Antiproton Accumulator is scaled to AGS operating conditions using the Sanford-Wang formula with no correction for target material. Yield predictions as a function of momentum are shown for 28.3 GeV protons on beryllium and results are converted to antiproton beam flux. The AGS Medium Energy Separated Beam has a flux which is a factor of 2 lower than Sanford-Wang predictions. This may be due to factors affecting beam acceptance

  7. High-precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium-first results from the AD of CERN

    Widmann, E

    2001-01-01

    New results of the laser and microwave spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium "atomcules" obtained in the first year of operation of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN are presented. They include the discovery of three new resonant transitions and the determination of the zero-density wavelength of six transitions with an accuracy of 130 ppb in the best case. Auger rates of those states were also determined, and two of them were found to be several orders of magnitude larger than expected from a simple estimate based on the multipolarity Delta l, i.e., the jump in angular momentum required for the antiproton to reach the next lower-lying state of ionized pHe /sup ++/. Furthermore, a first signal of a two-laser microwave triple resonance to measure the hyperfine splitting in antiprotonic helium was observed. (39 refs).

  8. Proposal for the Purchase, Without a New Call for Tenders, of Four Additional Superconducting Quadrupole Magnets for the Duplication of the Low-Beta Insertion of the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR)

    1978-01-01

    Proposal for the Purchase, Without a New Call for Tenders, of Four Additional Superconducting Quadrupole Magnets for the Duplication of the Low-Beta Insertion of the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR)

  9. Measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering and total cross section at a centre-of-mass energy of 546 GeV

    Swol, R.W. van.

    1985-01-01

    The transformation of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) from a fixed target machine into a colliding beam facility allowed the study of antiproton-proton scattering at a centre-of-mass (CM) energy of 546 GeV. This thesis describes the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering and the antiproton-proton total cross section, sigmasub(tot)(anti pp), at the CERN anti pp Collider. The aim of the experiment is to establish the considerable rise with energy of the total cross section, which was predicted after the discovery of rising proton-proton total cross sections at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR), covering an energy range of 20-60 GeV. The experimental method used for measuring sigmasub(tot)(anti pp) with an accuracy of 1-2% consists of the simultaneous measurement of both the elastic scattering event rate at small scattering angles and the inelastic interaction rate. Using the optical theorem, the total and the elastic cross sections can then be obtained without a determination of the machine luminosity. (Auth.)

  10. Investigation of the antiprotonic X-ray spectra of the isotopes 6Li, 7Li and 40Ca

    Barth, H.

    1987-04-01

    With the commissioning of the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN in Geneva a high intensity, high purity antiproton beam became available, enabling precision measurements of antiprotonic X-ray spectra to be carried out. Besides informations about properties of the elementary particle antiproton itself, as for example its mass and its magnetic moment, such measurements provide informations about the strong-interaction potential between antiproton and nucleus at very low energies, which, in turn, can be derived from the elementary antinucleon-nucleon interaction by using microscopic models. This work investigates the antiprotonic X-ray spectra of the isotopes 6 Li, 7 Li and 40 Ca. The data were taken during the experiment PS176 at LEAR. The strong interaction between antiproton and nucleus leads to an energy shift ε and an absorption width Γ of the lower level of the last observable transition and also to intensity reductions, which can be converted to an absorption width for the upper level. For the isotopes 6 Li, 7 Li and 40 Ca the following results were obtained: 6 Li: ε(2p)=(-215±25) eV, Γ(2p)=(660±170) eV and Γ(3d)=(135±16) meV, 7 Li ε(2p)=(-265±20) eV, Γ(2p)=(690±170) eV and Γ(3d)=(129±13) meV, 40 Ca: ε(4f)=(-1060±130) eV, Γ(4f)=(3670±600) eV and Γ(5g)=(34.9±3.3) eV. The results are in fair agreement with theoretical calculations, at the same time showing up the limits of present understanding of antiproton-nucleus interaction. Particularly the spin-orbit part of the strong interaction seems to play a nonnegligible role. (orig.) [de

  11. Modeling and Simulation of Longitudinal Dynamics for Low Energy Ring-High Energy Ring at the Positron-Electron Project

    Rivetta, Claudio; Mastorides, T.; Fox, J.D.; Teytelman, D.; Van Winkle, D.

    2007-01-01

    A time domain dynamic modeling and simulation tool for beam-cavity interactions in the Low Energy Ring (LER) and High Energy Ring (HER) at the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) is presented. Dynamic simulation results for PEP-II are compared to measurements of the actual machine. The motivation for this tool is to explore the stability margins and performance limits of PEP-II radio-frequency (RF) systems at future higher currents and upgraded RF configurations. It also serves as a test bed for new control algorithms and can define the ultimate limits of the low-level RF (LLRF) architecture. The time domain program captures the dynamic behavior of the beam-cavity-LLRF interaction based on a reduced model. The ring current is represented by macrobunches. Multiple RF stations in the ring are represented via one or two macrocavities. Each macrocavity captures the overall behavior of all the 2 or 4 cavity RF stations. Station models include nonlinear elements in the klystron and signal processing. This enables modeling the principal longitudinal impedance control loops interacting via the longitudinal beam model. The dynamics of the simulation model are validated by comparing the measured growth rates for the LER with simulation results. The simulated behavior of the LER at increased operation currents is presented via low-mode instability growth rates. Different control strategies are compared and the effects of both the imperfections in the LLRF signal processing and the nonlinear drivers and klystrons are explored

  12. Study of Interaction of Low-Energy Antiprotons with H$^{2}$,He$^{3}$,He$^{4}$,Ne-Nuclei Using a Streamer Chamber in Magnetic Field

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is the systematic study of the interaction between low-energy antiprotons and the H|2,~He|3,~He|4,~Ne-nuclei using a self shunted streamer chamber in a magnetic field exposed to the antiproton beam of the LEAR facility. The properties of the self shunted streamer chamber, which allows the use of the filling gas (hydrogen, helium, neon at a pressure of l~atm) as a target, permit to carry out experiments also in the very low-energy region. \\\\ \\\\ The experimental apparatus is suitable for a large programme of measurements. We plan to measure the @*H|2 cross section and the spectator momentum distributions at @* momenta lower than 250~MeV/c, where data are lacking. It is interesting to study for the first time the @*He|3 and @*He|4 interactions measuring the cross sections and the emitted particle distributions. Among other things the knowledge of the branching ratio of the @*He|4 annihilation channels clarifies some open cosmological questions. The study of the process of nuclear absor...

  13. An electrostatic storage ring for low kinetic energy electron collisions

    Reddish, T J; Tessier, D R; Sullivan, M R; Thorn, P A [Department of Physics, University of Windsor, Windsor, N9B 3P4 (Canada); Hammond, P; Alderman, A J [School of Physics, CAMSP, University of Western Australia, Perth WA 6009 (Australia); Read, F H [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-01

    The criteria are presented for stable multiple orbits of charged particles in a race-track shaped storage ring and applied to an electrostatic system consisting of two hemispherical deflector analyzers (HDA) connected by two separate sets of cylindrical lenses. The results of charged particle simulations and the formal matrix theory, including aberrations in the energy-dispersive electrostatic 'prisms', are in good agreement with the observed experimental operating conditions for this Electron Recycling Spectrometer (ERS).

  14. Antiproton complex at the FAIR project

    Dolinskii, A.; Knie, K.; Dimopoulou, C.; Gostishchev, V.; Litvinov, S.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes a set of calculations for the antiproton production in a complex composed of target area, collector, separator, beam line and collector ring for the antiproton source of the future FAIR facility (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. The emphasis is on the optimization of the accumulation rate of antiprotons in order to maximize the luminosity of experiments with cooled antiproton beams in the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR). Results of simulations for each component of the antiproton production complex are presented in order to identify the present limitations of the antiproton production rate.

  15. CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR)

    Johnsen, Kjell

    1973-01-01

    It has been realized for many years that it would be possible to obtain a glimpse into a much higher energy region for elementary-particle research if particle beams could be persuaded to collide head-on.

  16. The CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

    Myers, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The following sections are included: Introduction and history ; Phase displacement and stacking ; Vacuum ; Working lines and space charge compensation ; Schottky scans ; Centring the accumulated beam in the aperture ; Inserting markers in the stack ; Acceleration by phase displacement ; Computer control of accelerators ; Working close to the integer ; Low β insertions and luminosity ; Stochastic cooling ; Summary: What did ISR teach us? ; References

  17. Design study of an Antiproton Collector for the Antiproton Accumulator (ACOL)

    Wilson, E.J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Report gives a full description of an Antiproton Collector Ring which, placed around the existing Antiproton Accumulator at CERN, would enhance the antiproton flux available to both the SPS and LEAR by a factor of ten. The new ring and the focusing devices which precede it are designed to accept a much larger fraction of the antiproton production cone from the target. Each pulse of particles will be pre-cooled before being fed to the Antiproton Accumulator, where improved stochastic cooling systems will build up the stack. A full list of parameters is included. (orig.)

  18. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collider

    Oliveros Tautiva, Sandra Jimena

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10 34 cm-2 s-1 luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7x the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5 T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in pp than pp collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller beta* for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  19. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton Antiproton Collider

    Oliveros Tuativa, Sandra Jimena [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10$^{\\,34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7$\\times$ the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5\\,T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in $p\\bar{p}$ than $pp$ collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller $\\beta^{*}$ for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  20. Heavy flavour production and heavy flavour mixing at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    Eijk, B. van.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis some results of the proton-antiproton-collision experiment UA1 with the CERN Super Proton-Antiproton Synchrotron are presented and interpreted. Ch. 1 contians a general introduction to the physics motivations behind the proton-antiproton-collider project, a brief description of the CERN facilities and a summary of collider and UA1 physics achievements. Furthermore the concept of studying heavy flavours via their weak decays into muons is introduced. Ch. 2 gives a brief overview of the UA1 experimental set-up, while those parts of the detector that are relevant for the analysis, presented in this thesis, is discussed in some more detail. Ch. 3 contains a short introduction to, and motivation for the use of Monte Carlo techniques in event simulations, while Ch. 4 describes the framework of the recently developed 'EUROJET' event generator. In Ch. 5 a treatment is given of the theoretical background and concepts like 'quark-mixing' and 'CP-violation' are explained, also other useful definitions and formulae are introduced on which the later analysis of the same-sign to opposite-sign dimuon ratio is built. Data collection and event reconstruction is the subject of Ch. 6, while a detailed comparison between the theoretical models and experimentally obtained distributions is given in Ch. 7. Finally, in Ch. 8 some concluding remarks are made. 182 refs.; 81 figs.; 9 tabs

  1. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H 2 gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10 4 in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter η = (P beam /F rev )·(dF rev /dP beam ). These two measurement techniques are described in this report

  2. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H{sub 2} gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 4} in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter {eta} = (P{sub beam}/F{sub rev}){center_dot}(dF{sub rev}/dP{sub beam}). These two measurement techniques are described in this report.

  3. The antiproton decelerator: AD

    Baird, S.; Berlin, D.; Boillot, J.; Bosser, J.; Brouet, M.; Buttkus, J.; Caspers, F.; Chohan, V.; Dekkers, D.; Eriksson, T.; Garoby, R.; Giannini, R.; Grobner, O.; Gruber, J.; Hemery, J.Y.; Koziol, H.; Maccaferri, R.; Maury, S.; Metzger, C.; Metzmacher, K.; Moehl, D.; Mulder, H.; Paoluzzi, M.; Pedersen, F.; Riunaud, J.P.; Serre, C.; Simon, D.J.; Tranquille, G.; Tuyn, J.; Williams, B.

    1997-01-01

    In view of a possible future programme of physics with low-energy antiprotons, a simplified scheme for the provision of antiprotons at 100 MeV/c has been studied. It uses the present target area and the modified antiproton collector (AC) in its present location. In this report the modifications and the operation are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Perspectives for polarized antiprotons

    Lenisa, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Polarized antiprotons would open a new window in hadron physics providing access to a wealth of single and double spin observables in proton-antiproton interactions. The PAX Collaboration aims to perform the first ever measurement of the spin-dependence of the proton-antiproton cross section at the AD ring at CERN. The spin-dependence of the cross section could in principle be exploited by the spin-filtering technique for the production of a polarized antiproton beam. As a preparatory phase to the experimentation at AD, the PAX Collaboration has initiated a series of dedicated studies with protons at the COSY-ring in Juelich (Germany), aimed at the commissioning of the experimental apparatus and confirmation of the predictions for spin-filtering with protons.

  5. FERMILAB: More antiprotons

    Visnjic, Vladimir

    1993-01-01

    The excellent performance of the Fermilab antiproton complex during the recent Collider run and its future potential are the cumulative result of many improvements over the past few years, ranging from major projects like upgrading the stack-tail stochastic cooling system in the Accumulator to minor improvements like automating tuning procedures. The antiprotons are created when the 120 GeV proton beam from the Main Ring hits the target. A good target should have high yield of antiprotons, should not melt, and should not crack due to shock waves. The old copper target has been replaced by a new one made of nickel. The yield into the Debuncher is 2 x 10 -5 antiprotons/proton. While this is only marginally better than for copper, the nickel target has high melting point energy (1070 J/g) and a low rate of increase in pressure with deposited energy, making it the target of choice for the proton intensities expected in the Main Injector era (June, page 10). Of the broad spectrum of all kinds of secondaries, only a tiny fraction are 8 GeV antiprotons. The 8 GeV negative charge secondaries are bent through 3° by a new pulsed magnet. Instead of a 200-turn magnet with coils separated by epoxy as in the past, the new magnet has one turn carrying 45.5 kA of current. This single turn pulsed magnet uses radiation hard ceramic and is much more robust

  6. People and things. CERN Courier, Jul-Aug 1984, v. 24(6)

    Anon.

    1984-07-15

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. Valuable information on collective nuclear matter has come from another GSI / Berkeley team working at the Bevalac, this time using a streamer chamber to measure pion production in heavy ion collisions and infer the properties of the compressed nuclear matter formed in the 10{sup -23} seconds following the collisions. Judged by the bubbling enthusiasm of its 260 users, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN continues to be a great success. Electron beams have been taken to 800 MeV in the Aladdin storage ring at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, University of Wisconsin- Madison. The UA 1 'Monojets ' were first past the post in this year's traditional 3.9 km relay race round the CERN site.

  7. People and things. CERN Courier, Jul-Aug 1984, v. 24(6)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. Valuable information on collective nuclear matter has come from another GSI / Berkeley team working at the Bevalac, this time using a streamer chamber to measure pion production in heavy ion collisions and infer the properties of the compressed nuclear matter formed in the 10 -23 seconds following the collisions. Judged by the bubbling enthusiasm of its 260 users, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN continues to be a great success. Electron beams have been taken to 800 MeV in the Aladdin storage ring at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, University of Wisconsin- Madison. The UA 1 'Monojets ' were first past the post in this year's traditional 3.9 km relay race round the CERN site

  8. Observation of Ultra-Slow Antiprotons using Micro-channel Plate

    Imao, H.; Torii, H. A.; Nagata, Y.; Toyoda, H.; Shimoyama, T.; Enomoto, Y.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Mohri, A.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    Our group ASACUSA-MUSASHI has succeeded in accumulating several million antiprotons and extracting them as monochromatic ultra-slow antiproton beams (10 eV-1 keV) at CERN AD. We have observed ultra-slow antiprotons using micro-channel plates (MCP). The integrated pulse area of the output signals generated when the MCP was irradiated by ultra-slow antiprotons was 6 times higher than that by electrons. As a long-term effect, we also observed an increase in the background rate presumably due to the radioactivation of the MCP surface. Irradiating the antiproton beams on the MCP induces antiproton-nuclear annihilations only on the first layer of the surface. Low-energy and short-range secondary particles like charged nuclear fragments caused by the "surface nuclear reactions" would be the origin of our observed phenomena.

  9. Search for the top quark at the UA2 detector at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    Moniez, M.

    1988-06-01

    The results of a search for the top quark, done in the UA2 experiment at CERN is presented in this thesis. The data from proton-antiproton collisions, at 546 and 630 GeV energy in the centre-of-mass system, representing a total integrated luminosity of 894 nb -1 accumulated by the UA2 detector, has been used. A signal coming from the semi-leptonic decay of the top quark (t decays to b + electron + neutrino) has been searched for in the event sample containing an identified electron associated with 0.1 or 2 jets. A detailed study of the experimental background coming from misidentified electrons has been made; furthermore, the standard sources of real electrons have been estimated using a simulation program. Taking into account these background evaluations, and using a top production Monte-Carlo, a statistical analysis of the events containing one electron and 2 jets allows us to discuss a lower limit on the top quark mass. An upper limit on top production through the process proton-antiproton goes to top-antitop is derived, as a function of the top mass, from our data. Extrapolating the background and production evaluations to UA2'indicates that this experiment should be sensitive to top masses below 70 GeV/c 2 [fr

  10. Measurement of antiproton annihilation on Cu, Ag and Au with emulsion films

    Aghion, S.; Consolati, G.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Ereditato, A.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Demetrio, A.; Brusa, R.S.; Cabaret, L.; Comparat, D.; Caccia, M.; Castelli, F.; Caravita, R.; Noto, L. Di; Cerchiari, G.; Doser, M.

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of low energy antiproton annihilations on nuclei (e.g. hadronization and product multiplicities) are not well known, and Monte Carlo simulation packages that use different models provide different descriptions of the annihilation events. In this study, we measured the particle multiplicities resulting from antiproton annihilations on nuclei. The results were compared with predictions obtained using different models in the simulation tools GEANT4 and FLUKA. For this study, we exposed thin targets (Cu, Ag and Au) to a very low energy antiproton beam from CERN's Antiproton Decelerator, exploiting the secondary beamline available in the AEgIS experimental zone. The antiproton annihilation products were detected using emulsion films developed at the Laboratory of High Energy Physics in Bern, where they were analysed at the automatic microscope facility. The fragment multiplicity measured in this study is in good agreement with results obtained with FLUKA simulations for both minimally and heavily ionizing particles.

  11. Measurement of antiproton annihilation on Cu, Ag and Au with emulsion films

    Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Hinterberger, A.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Kawada, J.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lebrun, P.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Müller, S. R.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Rienaecker, B.; RØhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Simon, M.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I. C.; Vamosi, S.; Vladymyrov, M.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zimmer, C.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2017-04-01

    The characteristics of low energy antiproton annihilations on nuclei (e.g. hadronization and product multiplicities) are not well known, and Monte Carlo simulation packages that use different models provide different descriptions of the annihilation events. In this study, we measured the particle multiplicities resulting from antiproton annihilations on nuclei. The results were compared with predictions obtained using different models in the simulation tools GEANT4 and FLUKA. For this study, we exposed thin targets (Cu, Ag and Au) to a very low energy antiproton beam from CERN's Antiproton Decelerator, exploiting the secondary beamline available in the AEgIS experimental zone. The antiproton annihilation products were detected using emulsion films developed at the Laboratory of High Energy Physics in Bern, where they were analysed at the automatic microscope facility. The fragment multiplicity measured in this study is in good agreement with results obtained with FLUKA simulations for both minimally and heavily ionizing particles.

  12. Superconducting beam charge monitors for antiproton storage rings

    Tympel, Volker; Neubert, Ralf; Seidel, Paul; Geithner, René; Golm, Jessica; Stöhlker, Thomas; Kurian, Febian; Sieber, Thomas; Schwickert, Marcus; Fernandes, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    A Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) is a new type of instruments for monitoring charged beams like ions or antiprotons. Using superconducting effects is it possible to create a nondestructive, contactless and easy to calibrate beam measurement system with a high current resolution in amplitude and time. The Meissner effect enables an effective magnetic shielding of the system. The screening current enables creation of DC-transformers and therefore a DC-current measurement system. The combina...

  13. Populations and lifetimes in the $v=n-l-1=2$ and 3 metastable cascades of $\\overline{p} He^{+}$ measured by pulsed and continuous antiproton beams

    Hori, Masaki; Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Torie, H A; Von Egidy, T; Hartmann, F; Ketzer, B; Maierl, C; Pohl, R; Kumakura, M; Morita, N; Horváth, D; Sugai, I

    2004-01-01

    Using the laser spectroscopy, the time evolution of the state population in the v equivalent n-l=2 and 3 metastable cascades of antiprotonic helium atoms were studied. The effects of the collision between antiprotonic helium and the ordinary helium atoms on the atomic cascade were also analyzed. The measurements were done using the pulsed and continuous types of antiproton beams supplied by the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. The studies revealed five phases in the life history of the metastable antiprotonic helium. (Edited abstract) 71 Refs.

  14. Atomic physics of the antimatter explored with slow antiprotons

    Torii, Hiroyuki A.

    2010-01-01

    Frontiers of antimatter physics are reviewed, with a focus on our ASACUSA collaboration, doing research on 'Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons' at the 'Antiproton Decelerator' facility at CERN. Antiprotonic helium atoms give a unique test ground for testing CPT invariance between particles and antiparticles. Laser spectroscopy of this exotic atom has reached a precision of a few parts per billion in determation of the antiproton mass. We also have developed techniques to decelerate antiprotons and cool them to sub-eV energies in an electromagnetic trap at ultra-high vacuum and extract them as an ultra-slow beam at typically 250 eV. This unique low-energy beam opens up the possibility to study ionization and formation of antiprotonic atoms. The antihydrogen has been synthesized at low temperature in nested Penning traps by ATRAP and ATHENA(presently ALPHA) collaborations. Confinement of this neutral anti-atoms in a trap with magnetic field gradient is being studied, with an aim of 1S-2S laser spectroscopy in the future. ASACUSA has prepared a cusp trap for production of antihydrogen atoms, and aims at microwave spectroscopy between the hyperfine states of spin-polarized antihydrogen. A wide variety of low-energy antiproton physics also includes measurement of nuclear scattering, radiational biological effects, and gravity test of antimatter. (author)

  15. Low-energy experiments that measure fundamental constants and test basic symmetries

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    Cold Antihydrogen: Are We There? Cold antihydrogen offers the possibility to precisely compare the structure of antihydrogen and hydrogen atoms, using the well developed tools of laser spectroscopy with antihydrogen atoms cold enough to be trapped in the minimum of a magnetic field gradient. Progress made at CERN's new Antiproton Decelerator will be discussed, along with goals and aspirations, such as measuring the anti-Rydberg constant. ATRAP has observed and studied the interaction of low energy antiprotons and positrons for more than a year, and ATHENA hopes to soon make antiprotons and positrons to interact as well.

  16. A ring image Cerenkov detector for the CERN Omega Spectrometer

    Davenport, M.; Deol, R.S.; Flower, P.S.

    1983-05-01

    A development program has been undertaken to produce a large ring image Cerenkov detector (RICH) for use at the CERN Omega Spectrometer. A prototype Cerenkov counter has been constructed and successfully operated in a high energy particle beam, Cerenkov rings having been observed in an experimental time projection chamber (TPC) using the photoionising agents Triethylamine (TEA) and Tetrakis (dimethylamine) ethylene (TMAE). Systematic measurements have been made of the optical properties of window materials and reflecting surfaces in the vacuum ultraviolet region. Results of these tests are presented, and the design of the large detector based on these experiences together with Monte Carlo simulations of the events expected in the WA69 experiment, is discussed. (author)

  17. CERN: Energy amplifier

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Even under the heavy burden of responsibility as CERN's Director General from 1989-3 the fertile mind of Carlo Rubbia the scientist was never still. A long-time Rubbia 'hobby' has been the search for new sources of nuclear energy, exploiting knowledge and skills from high energy physics. An initial objective was to adopt heavy ion techniques to induce controlled thermonuclear fusion, but in 1994 this quest changed direction. Putting the problems of thermonuclear fusion aside, Rubbia began to explore an alternative route to energy production through controlled nuclear fission. The idea is to use a particle accelerator producing neutrons by spallation (interaction of particles with a target) to feed a fuel/moderator assembly where the neutrons multiply by fission chain reactions. If the energy liberated becomes substantially greater than that needed to drive the accelerator, the process has a net gain and becomes selfsupporting. Hence the name ''Energy Amplifier'' (EA). Similar systems for energy production or for nuclear waste incineration have been proposed at Los Alamos and in Japan and Russia, but appear to require the prior development of innovative linear accelerators. For Rubbia's Amplifier, the requisite accelerator is a reasonable extrapolation of an existing cyclotron such that at the Swiss Paul Scherrer Institute. Moreover, the EA would require fuel rods very similar to those of conventional reactors, rather than demand-ing new technology using liquid fuel loops (molten salts) with on-line separation of radioactive products. Unlike a reactor, the EA's fission reaction is not self-sustaining: it is sub-critical and needs a continuous supply of neutrons from the accelerator. This makes Chernobyl-type meltdowns unlikely: if the accelerator stops, the reaction stops too. Another major advantage is that the old dream of using thorium as a fuel is now made possible. Thorium is not itself fissile, but under neutron

  18. Proton-Antiproton Annihilation into Neutral Strange Mesons

    Ritter, J.; Bertolotto, L.; Buzzo, A.; Debevec, P.; Drijard, D.; Easo, S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Evangelista, C.; Eyrich, W.; Fearnley, T.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Geyer, R.; Hamann, N. H.; Harris, P. G.; Hertzog, D. W.; Hughes, S. A.; Johansson, A.; Johansson, T.; Jones, R. T.; Kilian, K.; Kirsebom, K.; Klett, A.; Korsmo, H.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Marinelli, M.; Moosburger, M.; Mouëllic, B.; Oelert, W.; Ohlsson, S.; Palano, A.; Passaggio, S.; Perreau, J.-M.; Pia, M. G.; Pomp, S.; Price, M.; Reimer, P. E.; Ritter, J.; Robutti, E.; Röhrich, K.; Rook, M.; Sefzick, T.; Rössle, E.; Santroni, A.; Schmitt, H.; Steinkamp, O.; Stinzing, F.; Stugu, B.; Tayloe, R.; Tscheulin, M.; Urban, H. J.; Wirth, H.; Zipse, H.; Jetset (Ps202) Collaboration:

    1997-06-01

    In a search for gluonic hadrons, the formation channels p¯p → K sK s, p¯p → ηη, p¯p → π 0η and p¯p → π 0π 0 were studied in the mass range from 2.1 to 2.4 GeV using the Jetset (PS202) detector and an internal molecular hydrogen cluster jet target installed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. Cross sections for p¯p → K sK s have been obtained and limits are set on the non-observation of the ξ(2230). Conversely, we find evidence for a narrow signal in a preliminary analysis of our p¯p → ηη data consistent with a narrow ξ(2230).

  19. Proton-antiproton annihilation into neutral strange mesons

    Ritter, J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana (United States). Loomis Lab.; Bertolotto, L.; Buzzo, A.; Debevec, P.; Drijard, D.; Easo, S.; Eisenstein, R.A.; Evangelista, C.; Eyrich, W.; Fearnley, T.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Geyer, R.; Hamann, N.H.; Harris, P.G.; Hertzog, D.W.; Hughes, S.A.; Johansson, A.; Johansson, T.; Jones, R.T.; Kilian, K.; Kirsebom, K.; Klett, A.; Korsmo, H.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Marinelli, M.; Moosburger, M.; Mouellic, B.; Oelert, W.; Ohlsson, S.; Palano, A.; Passaggio, S.; Perreau, J.-M.; Pia, M.G.; Pomp, S.; Price, M.; Reimer, P.E.; Robutti, E.; Roehrich, K.; Rook, M.; Sefzick, T.; Roessle, E.; Santroni, A.; Schmitt, H.; Steinkamp, O.; Stinzing, F.; Stugu, B.; Tayloe, R.; Tscheulin, M.; Urban, H.J.; Wirth, H.; Zipse, H.; JETSET Collaboration

    1997-06-01

    In a search for gluonic hadrons, the formation channels pp{yields}K{sub S}K{sub S}, pp{yields}{eta}{eta}, pp{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{eta} and pp{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} were studied in the mass range from 2.1 to 2.4 GeV using the Jetset (PS202) detector and an internal molecular hydrogen cluster jet target installed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. Cross sections for pp{yields}K{sub S}K{sub S} have been obtained and limits are set on the non-observation of the {xi}(2230). Conversely, we find evidence for a narrow signal in a preliminary analysis of our pp{yields}{eta}{eta} d ata consistent with a narrow {xi}(2230). (orig.).

  20. Proton-antiproton annihilation into neutral strange mesons

    Ritter, J.; Bertolotto, L.; Buzzo, A.; Debevec, P.; Drijard, D.; Easo, S.; Eisenstein, R.A.; Evangelista, C.; Eyrich, W.; Fearnley, T.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Geyer, R.; Hamann, N.H.; Harris, P.G.; Hertzog, D.W.; Hughes, S.A.; Johansson, A.; Johansson, T.; Jones, R.T.; Kilian, K.; Kirsebom, K.; Klett, A.; Korsmo, H.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Marinelli, M.; Moosburger, M.; Mouellic, B.; Oelert, W.; Ohlsson, S.; Palano, A.; Passaggio, S.; Perreau, J.-M.; Pia, M.G.; Pomp, S.; Price, M.; Reimer, P.E.; Robutti, E.; Roehrich, K.; Rook, M.; Sefzick, T.; Roessle, E.; Santroni, A.; Schmitt, H.; Steinkamp, O.; Stinzing, F.; Stugu, B.; Tayloe, R.; Tscheulin, M.; Urban, H.J.; Wirth, H.; Zipse, H.

    1997-01-01

    In a search for gluonic hadrons, the formation channels pp→K S K S , pp→ηη, pp→π 0 η and pp→π 0 π 0 were studied in the mass range from 2.1 to 2.4 GeV using the Jetset (PS202) detector and an internal molecular hydrogen cluster jet target installed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. Cross sections for pp→K S K S have been obtained and limits are set on the non-observation of the ξ(2230). Conversely, we find evidence for a narrow signal in a preliminary analysis of our pp→ηη d ata consistent with a narrow ξ(2230). (orig.)

  1. Conceptual Design Report. Antiproton - Proton Collider Upgrade 20 GeV Rings. Technical Components and Civil Construction May, 1988

    None

    1988-05-01

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimate of two new 20 GeV rings which will be required to support the upgrade of the Fermilab Collider with a luminosity goal of 5x10 31 cm-2s-1. The new rings include an antiproton post-accumulator, denoted the Antiproton Super Booster (ASB), and a proton post-booster, denoted the Proton Super Booster (PSB). The siting of the rings is shown in Figure I-1. Both rings are capable of operation at 20 GeV, eliminating the need for ever again injecting beam into the Main Ring below transition, and significantly enhancing Main Ring performance. The Antiproton Super Booster is designed to accept and accumulate up to 4x1012 antiprotons from the existing Antiproton Accumulator, and deliver them to the Main Ring at 20 GeV for acceleration and injection into the Collider. It is also designed to accept diluted antiprotons from the Main Ring at 20 GeV for recooling. The PSB accepts 8.9 GeV protons from the existing Booster and accelerates them to 20 GeV for injection into the Main Ring. The PSB is designed to operate at 5 Hz. The siting shown in Figure I-1 has the attractive feature that it removes all Main Ring injection hardware from the AO straight section, opening the possibility of installing a third proton-antiproton interaction region in the Tevatron Collider.

  2. A measurement of the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton

    Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    A fundamental experiment in gravity proposed by us, is the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. This measurement would constitute the first direct test of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) for antimatter. The availability of low-energy antiprotons at CERN has made such an experiment feasible, and a proposal to carry out such a measurement has been accepted by the CERN Program Committee. We plan to use a time-of-flight technique similar to that pioneered by Fairbank and Witteborn in their measurement of the gravitational force on an electron. Very slow particles are launched into a vertical drift tube and the time-of-flight spectrum of these particles is recorded. This spectrum will exhibit a cut-off point directly related to the gravitational acceleration of the particles. Obtaining very slow antiprotons involves several stages of deceleration. Antiprotons from LEAR will be initially decelerated from 2 MeV to tens of kilovolts by passing them through a thin foil. After capture and cooling in a series of ion traps, the antiprotons will be in a thermal distribution with a temperature of a few degrees Kelvin. These ultra-cold antiprotons will then be released a few at a time into the drift tube. A detector will measure the arrival time of the particles at the exit of the drift tube. H - -ion, which have almost identical electromagnetic properties to the antiprotons, will be used for comparison and as a calibration standard. 7 refs., 1 fig

  3. The Antiproton Accumulator becomes Antiproton Decelerator

    1980-01-01

    The photos show the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) transformed into Antiproton Decelerator. The AA was used at CERN between 1981 and 1999 before being replaced by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The AA was used to collect and stochastically cool antiprotons used in proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS collider. This lead to the discovery of the W and Z bosons in 1983 and the Nobel Prize for Carlo Rubbia and Simon van der Meer in 1984.

  4. Inside Hall 193 for the Antiproton Accumulator (AA) ring

    1979-01-01

    Installation work is in full swing. A model quadrupole on the left shows where the magnet ring will be. The cables wound on drums are part of the pulse-forming network for the injection kicker. See Annual Report 1979 p. 103, Fig. 9 and photo 7911303. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  5. Electron cooling of PB$^{54+}$ ions in the low energy ion ring (LEIR)

    Bosser, Jacques; Chanel, M; MacCaferri, R; Maury, S; Möhl, D; Molinari, G; Tranquille, G

    1998-01-01

    For the preparation of dense bunches of lead ions for the LHC, electron cooling will be essential for accumula tion in a storage ring at 4.2 MeV/u. Tests have been carried out on the LEAR ring (renamed LEIR for Low Energy Ion Ring) in order to determine the optimum parameters for a future state-of-the-art electron cooling device which would be able to cool linac pulses of lead ions in less than 100 ms. The experiments focused on the generation of a stable high intensity electron beam that is needed to free space in both longitudinal and transverse phase space for incoming pulses. Investigations on the ion beam lifetime in the presence of the electron beam and on the dependency of the cooling times on the optical settings of the storage ring will also be discussed. This paper concentrates on the cooling aspects with the multiturn injection, vacuum, and high intensity aspects discussed in a companion paper at this conference.

  6. Nuclear Excitations by Antiprotons and Antiprotonic Atoms

    2002-01-01

    The proposal aims at the investigation of nuclear excitations following the absorption and annihilation of stopped antiprotons in heavier nuclei and at the same time at the study of the properties of antiprotonic atoms. The experimental arrangement will consist of a scintillation counter telescope for the low momentum antiproton beam from LEAR, a beam degrader, a pion multiplicity counter, a monoisotopic target and Ge detectors for radiation and charged particles. The data are stored by an on-line computer.\\\\ \\\\ The Ge detectors register antiprotonic x-rays and nuclear @g-rays which are used to identify the residual nucleus and its excitation and spin state. Coincidences between the two detectors will indicate from which quantum state the antiprotons are absorbed and to which nuclear states the various reactions are leading. The measured pion multiplicity characterizes the annihilation process. Ge&hyphn. and Si-telescopes identify charged particles and determine their energies.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment will gi...

  7. A Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector for the CERN OMEGA spectrometer

    Apsimon, R.J.; Cowell, J.; Flower, P.S.

    1984-12-01

    A large acceptance Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector has been constructed for use at the CERN Omega Spectrometer. The design of the detector is discussed, with attention paid to its principal components, and preliminary results are given which show that the detector is capable of identifying pions and protons at 100 GeV/c. (author)

  8. A radio frequency ring electrode cooler for low-energy ion beams

    Heinz, S.; Aeystoe, J.; Habs, D.; Hegewisch, S.; Huikari, J.; Nieminen, A.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Schumann, M.; Szerypo, J.

    2004-01-01

    We are investigating a new concept for ion confinement while buffer-gas-cooling low-energy ion beams. Instead of applying the well-established technique of Radio Frequency Quadrupoles (RFQs) where the ions are transversely confined by a quadratic-pseudo potential we are using a stack of thin ring electrodes supplied by an RF field (RF funnel) which creates a box-shaped potential well. In Monte Carlo simulations we have investigated the transmission behavior and cooling performance of the RF funnel. First experimental investigations with ion currents up to 20 nA revealed a promising transmission characteristic which qualifies the RF funnel as high-current cooler

  9. Components for the CERN LEP ring

    1987-01-01

    One of the most important experimental setups at the LEP (Large Electron Positron Collider) ring is called OPAL (Omni Purpose Apparatus for LEP). Sulzer-Escher Wyss, Zurich, is to deliver the iron yoke, i.e. the mechanical part of one of the nine OPAL detectors. The contract for the yoke includes essentially the two side parts, each consisting of ten modules and two end caps, the middle part, four special modules and two supporting rings, as well as both the poles. The combined weight of all the supply items comes to some 2300 t. (Auth.).

  10. Measurement of the Shadowing of High-Energy Cosmic Rays by the Moon A Search for TeV-Energy Antiprotons

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kraber, M; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2005-01-01

    The shadowing of high-energy cosmic rays by the Moon has been observed with a significance of 9.4 standard deviations with the L3+C muon spectrometer at CERN. A significant effect of the Earth magnetic field is observed. Since no event deficit on the east side of the Moon has been observed, an upper limit at 90% confidence level on the antiproton to proton ratio of 0.11 is obtained for primary energies around 1 TeV.

  11. The PEP-II Project: Low-Energy Ring Design and Project Status

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the present status of the PEP-II project. The project comprises four major systems: Injector, High-Energy Ring (HER), Low-Energy Ring (LER), and Interaction Region (IR). We focus in detail on the design of the LER, as its parameters and requirements are most closely related to those required for the Beijing Tau-Charm Factory rings. The PEP-II LER is a high-current, 3.1-GeV positron ring mounted above the 9-GeV HER. The LER uses a wiggler located in one of its six straight sections to provide emittance control and additional damping. We describe the rather complicated IR, which must transport the LER beam into the plane of the HER, focus it to a common beam size, and separate the beams after the head-on collisions. Both permanent magnet and conventional electromagnets are used in this area. The LER lattice has now adopted a simplified non-interleaved sextupole correction scheme that has reduced the required number of sextupoles substantially. We describe the LER vacuum system, one of the most challenging subsystems in PEP-II. It employs several technologies. In the arcs, aluminum extrusions and titanium sublimation pumps are employed; the straight sections use stainless steel chambers with lumped ion pumps. In the wiggler area, an extended copper photon dump with nonevaporable getter (NEG) pumps is employed to handle the very large synchrotron radiation power. The design of the room-temperature RF system, the bunch-by-bunch longitudinal and transverse feedback systems, and some of the special diagnostics will be described briefly. The PEP-II project remains on schedule to begin commissioning of the HER in April 1997, followed by the LER a year later

  12. What can an antiproton and a nucleus learn from each other

    Garreta, D.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter attempts to show that the - p-nucleus interaction may provide very useful information, both about the elementary - NN interaction and about nuclear structure. Topics covered include simple features which make a low-energy antiproton an interesting probe of the nucleus; simple features which make a nucleus an interesting target for an antiproton; antiproton-nucleus elastic scattering; antiproton-nucleus inelastic scattering; proton knock-out reactions on nuclei; and annihilation of the antiprotons in nuclei. The aim of experiment PS184 at the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) is to provide accurate data with regard to the - p-nucleus interaction in the following areas: the angular distribution of antiprotons elastically scattered from 12 C, 40 Ca, and 208 Pb; the excitation energy spectra and some angular distributions of antiprotons inelastically scattered from 12 C, 40 Ca, and 208 Pb; and the excitation energy spectra for proton knock-out reaction on 6 Li, 45 Sc, 123 Sb, and 209 B; at forward angles

  13. People and things. CERN Courier, Sep 1984, v. 24(1)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. The symbolic act of the return of the ISR key culminated the closure ceremony for the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings on 26 June. In March of this year, the UK Advisory Board for the Research Councils, together with the UK Science and Engineering Research Council, set up a Review Group, chaired by Sir John Kendrew, to look at future British participation in particle physics. Protons were accelerated to 550 MeV in the Spallation Neutron Source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in June. A LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) Workshop 'Physics with Low Energy Cooled Antiprotons in the ACOL Era' is being organized in La Plagne in the French Alps from 20-27 January 1985. After the successful Workshop on Laser Acceleration of Particles held at the Los Alamos Laboratory in 1982, a Second International Workshop is being hosted by the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) from 7-18 January 1985

  14. People and things. CERN Courier, Sep 1984, v. 24(1)

    Anon.

    1984-09-15

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. The symbolic act of the return of the ISR key culminated the closure ceremony for the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings on 26 June. In March of this year, the UK Advisory Board for the Research Councils, together with the UK Science and Engineering Research Council, set up a Review Group, chaired by Sir John Kendrew, to look at future British participation in particle physics. Protons were accelerated to 550 MeV in the Spallation Neutron Source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in June. A LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) Workshop 'Physics with Low Energy Cooled Antiprotons in the ACOL Era' is being organized in La Plagne in the French Alps from 20-27 January 1985. After the successful Workshop on Laser Acceleration of Particles held at the Los Alamos Laboratory in 1982, a Second International Workshop is being hosted by the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) from 7-18 January 1985.

  15. People and things. CERN Courier, Jan-Feb 1987, v. 27(1)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. The search goes on for gravitational radiation, the existence of such waves was implied by the first formulations of general relativity some sixty years ago, but their detection has taxed the ingenuity of experimenters. Any signals would be easily screened by seismic noise, etc. In an effort to eliminate this background, a network of three highly sensitive cryogenic detectors was set up – one at CERN, used by a Rome group, another at Stanford and a third at Louisiana State. The 1987 JINR-CERN School of Physics is the tenth in a series organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna, USSR) and CERN. The aim is to teach various aspects of high energy physics, especially theoretical, to young experimentalists with at least one year's research experience, coming mainly from Member States of JINR and CERN. The fourth workshop to discuss physics at CERN's LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring will be held at Villars-sur-Ollon, Switzerland, from 6-13 September

  16. People and things. CERN Courier, Jan-Feb 1987, v. 27(1)

    Anon.

    1987-01-15

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. The search goes on for gravitational radiation, the existence of such waves was implied by the first formulations of general relativity some sixty years ago, but their detection has taxed the ingenuity of experimenters. Any signals would be easily screened by seismic noise, etc. In an effort to eliminate this background, a network of three highly sensitive cryogenic detectors was set up – one at CERN, used by a Rome group, another at Stanford and a third at Louisiana State. The 1987 JINR-CERN School of Physics is the tenth in a series organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna, USSR) and CERN. The aim is to teach various aspects of high energy physics, especially theoretical, to young experimentalists with at least one year's research experience, coming mainly from Member States of JINR and CERN. The fourth workshop to discuss physics at CERN's LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring will be held at Villars-sur-Ollon, Switzerland, from 6-13 September.

  17. CERN: Fixed target targets

    Anon.

    1993-03-15

    Full text: While the immediate priority of CERN's research programme is to exploit to the full the world's largest accelerator, the LEP electron-positron collider and its concomitant LEP200 energy upgrade (January, page 1), CERN is also mindful of its long tradition of diversified research. Away from LEP and preparations for the LHC proton-proton collider to be built above LEP in the same 27-kilometre tunnel, CERN is also preparing for a new generation of heavy ion experiments using a new source, providing heavier ions (April 1992, page 8), with first physics expected next year. CERN's smallest accelerator, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring continues to cover a wide range of research topics, and saw a record number of hours of operation in 1992. The new ISOLDE on-line isotope separator was inaugurated last year (July, page 5) and physics is already underway. The remaining effort concentrates around fixed target experiments at the SPS synchrotron, which formed the main thrust of CERN's research during the late 1970s. With the SPS and LEAR now approaching middle age, their research future was extensively studied last year. Broadly, a vigorous SPS programme looks assured until at least the end of 1995. Decisions for the longer term future of the West Experimental Area of the SPS will have to take into account the heavy demand for test beams from work towards experiments at big colliders, both at CERN and elsewhere. The North Experimental Area is the scene of larger experiments with longer lead times. Several more years of LEAR exploitation are already in the pipeline, but for the longer term, the ambitious Superlear project for a superconducting ring (January 1992, page 7) did not catch on. Neutrino physics has a long tradition at CERN, and this continues with the preparations for two major projects, the Chorus and Nomad experiments (November 1991, page 7), to start next year in the West Area. Delicate neutrino oscillation effects could become visible for the first

  18. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-10-24

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap.

  19. Conceptual Design of an Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility

    Peggs, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The Antiproton Generation and Storage Facility (AGSF) creates copious quantities of antiprotons, for bottling and transportation to remote cancer therapy centers. The first step in the generation and storage process is to accelerate an intense proton beam down the Main Linac for injection into the Main Ring, which is a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron that accelerates the protons to high energy. The beam is then extracted from the ring into a transfer line and into a Proton Target. Immediately downstream of the target is an Antiproton Collector that captures some of the antiprotons and focuses them into a beam that is transported sequentially into two antiproton rings. The Precooler ring rapidly manipulates antiproton bunches from short and broad (in momentum) to long and thin. It then performs some preliminary beam cooling, in the fraction of a second before the next proton bunch is extracted from the Main Ring. Pre-cooled antiprotons are passed on to the Accumulator ring before the next antiprotons arrive from the target. The Accumulator ring cools the antiprotons, compressing them into a dense state that is convenient for mass storage over many hours. Occasionally the Accumulator ring decelerates a large number of antiprotons, injecting them into a Deceleration Linac that passes them into a waiting Penning trap

  20. Physics with antiprotons: from antihydrogen to the top-quark

    Koch, H.

    2001-01-01

    The talk gives a survey on experiments performed with antiprotons of different energies. The emphasis will be on results obtained at LEAR/CERN, but the exciting investigations with higher energy antiprotons, leading to the discovery of the intermediate bosons W + , W - , Z 0 and the top quark t, will also be discussed. (orig.)

  1. Low energy ring lattice of the PEP-II asymmetric B-Factory

    Cai, Y.; Donald, M.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Ritson, D.M.; Yan, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Developing a lattice that contains a very low beta value at the interaction point (IP) and has adequate dynamic aperture is one of the major challenges in designing the PEP-II asymmetric B-factory. For the Low Energy Ring (LER) the authors have studied several different chromatic correction schemes since the conceptual design report (CDR). Based on these studies, a hybrid solution with local and semi-local chromatic sextupoles has been selected as the new baseline lattice to replace the local scheme in the CDR. The new design simplifies the interaction region (IR) and reduces the number of sextupoles in the arcs. Arc sextupoles are paired at π phase difference and are not interleaved. In this paper the authors describe the baseline lattice with the emphasis on the lattice changes made since the CDR

  2. Antiproton production in nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN-SPS

    Kadija, K.; Schmitz, N.; Seyboth, P.

    1996-01-01

    A model for antiproton production in nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 GeV per nucleon, based on the wounded nucleon model is developed. The predictions are compared to published nucleon-nucleus and sulphur-nucleus data. The results suggest the presence of similar antiproton production processes in nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions near midrapidity. (orig.)

  3. Theses. Beam studies for the CERN antiproton decelerator and a new interpretation of the resonance theory for betatron motion

    De Ninno, G

    1999-07-01

    The two parts of the thesis are a mission-oriented task devoted to solve some practical problems of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) project at CERN, and a theoretical study leading to a new method for representing and compensating betatron resonances. The AD is a new machine (at the moment under commissioning at CERN) that will allow the collection and the deceleration of an antiproton beam from 3.5 GeV/c down to 100 MeV/c (the momentum favoured for the foreseen physics experiments). The need to employ the AD magnets over a wide range required a careful study of their characteristics. The presence of a solenoid inside the AD electron cooling device generates linear coupling between the transverse degrees of freedom of the single-particle motion. Coupling can lead to operational problems and therefore a compensation scheme had tobe designed. The long-standing problem has been solved of how to establish a relationship between the two standard methods for dealing with linear coupling: the matrix approach and the Hamiltonian approach. The bridge was built by including in the Hamiltonian approach in the high frequency part of the perturbative Hamiltonian due to coupling. The procedure was generalised to the nonlinear case and, a new method was proposed for dealing both with linear and nonlinear resonances. (author)

  4. Theses. Beam studies for the CERN antiproton decelerator and a new interpretation of the resonance theory for betatron motion

    De Ninno, G.

    1999-01-01

    The two parts of the thesis are a mission-oriented task devoted to solve some practical problems of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) project at CERN, and a theoretical study leading to a new method for representing and compensating betatron resonances. The AD is a new machine (at the moment under commissioning at CERN) that will allow the collection and the deceleration of an antiproton beam from 3.5 GeV/c down to 100 MeV/c (the momentum favoured for the foreseen physics experiments). The need to employ the AD magnets over a wide range required a careful study of their characteristics. The presence of a solenoid inside the AD electron cooling device generates linear coupling between the transverse degrees of freedom of the single-particle motion. Coupling can lead to operational problems and therefore a compensation scheme had to be designed. The long-standing problem has been solved of how to establish a relationship between the two standard methods for dealing with linear coupling: the matrix approach and the Hamiltonian approach. The bridge was built by including in the Hamiltonian approach in the high frequency part of the perturbative Hamiltonian due to coupling. The procedure was generalised to the nonlinear case and, a new method was proposed for dealing both with linear and nonlinear resonances. (author)

  5. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    Quijada, M.; Borisov, A.G.; Muino, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnad, Kiran; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Pivi, Mauro

    2008-06-01

    Clouds of low energy electronsin the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energyelectron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  7. The AFIS experiment: Detecting low energetic antiprotons in a low earth orbit, using an active target detector

    Poeschl, Thomas; Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Since the first observation of geomagnetically trapped antiprotons by the PAMELA experiment and the new results on the positron excess by the AMS-02 experiment, the creation and transport of antimatter in the Earth's upper atmosphere attracts more and more attention both at theoretical and experimental side. For this reason the AFIS experiment was initiated to measure the flux of low energetic antiprotons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). We developed an active target detector made from scintillating fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers which allows to detect antiprotons in the energy interval of about 30 MeV-100 MeV. The stopping curve of incoming antiprotons (Bragg peak) and the signal of outgoing pions created from the annihilation, are used for particle identification as well as triggering. We plan to implement this detector on a 3 unit cubesat satellite in the framework the 'Move2Warp' mission, which is carried out as a student project by the Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  8. Measurement of strong interaction parameters in antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium

    Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Chatellard, D; Egger, J P; El-Khoury, P; Gorke, H; Gotta, D; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    In the PS207 experiment at CERN, X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressure. The strong interaction shift and the broadening of the K/sub alpha / transition in antiprotonic hydrogen were $9 determined. Evidence was found for the individual hyperfine components of the protonium ground state. (7 refs).

  9. Space Charge Effects and Advanced Modelling for CERN Low Energy Machines

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088716; Rumolo, Giovanni

    The strong space charge regime of future operation of CERN’s circular particle accelerators is investigated and mitigation strategies are developed in the framework of the present thesis. The intensity upgrade of the injector chain of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) prepares the particle accelerators to meet the requirements of the High-Luminosity LHC project. Producing the specified characteristics of the future LHC beams imperatively relies on injecting brighter bunches into the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), the downstream Proton Synchrotron (PS) and eventually the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The increased brightness, i.e. bunch intensity per transverse emittance, entails stronger beam self-fields which can lead to harmful interaction with betatron resonances. Possible beam emittance growth and losses as a consequence thereof threaten to degrade the beam brightness. These space charge effects are partly mitigated by the upgrade of the PSB and PS injection energies. Nevertheless, the space charge tune ...

  10. Examination of X-ray spectra from the antiprotonic helium isotopes 3He and 4He

    Schneider, M.

    1987-05-01

    Using the high intensity antiprotonic LEAR beam at CERN (Geneva), several measurements were done to investigate the X-ray spectra of the antiprotonic Helium isotopes 3 He and 4 He. For the first time antiprotons were stopped in gases at low pressures (600, 375, 72 and 36 mbar), which permitted observations on nearly isolated atoms. A newly developed method for stopping the antiprotons in gases by means of a focusing cyclotron field surrounding the target gas was used. The field was supplied by a superconducting magnet ('cyclotron trap'). The antiprotons were tangentially injected into the cyclotron field, where they slowed down by ionising the target gas. The inhomogeneous magnetic field guided the antiprotons in spiral orbits to the magnetic center. Thus, even at low pressures a very small stopping volume could be achieved. To detect the X-rays different Si(Li)- and Ge-semiconductor detectors were used, some of which were furnished with 'guard-rings'. They were used to investigate the effects of the strong interaction between the antiproton and the nucleus in the (3d → 2p) transition in both isotopes. The analyzis of this transition permitted directly the determination of the shift and width of the 2p-level. The width of the 3d-level could be determined only indirectly using an intensity balance. The utilization of gases with different pressures permitted investigations of the pressure dependence of the antiprotonic deexcitation process. The results for the widths and shifts were compared with earlier measurements and theoretical predictions. The theory agrees only partly with the measurements. The evaluation of a complex scattering length using an optical model contradicts some of the results of calculations. (orig.) [de

  11. Antiproton production in heavy-ion collisions at energies below the threshold

    Schroeter, A.

    1993-08-01

    In the framework of this thesis the antiproton production in heavy ion collisions at projectile energies far below the threshold for anti p production in nucleon-nucleon collisions (5.63 GeV/u) was studied. A suited detection apparature was developed and constructed at the fragment separator-magnet spectrometer at the Society for Heavy Ion Research (GSI). For the identification of the antiprotons the momentum of the particles emitted in beam direction was measured and their velocity multiple-redundantly determined by means of time-of-flight measurements and threshold Cherenkov detectors. By this way the antiprotons could be in spite of low anti p production cross sections and high production rates for lighter particles (R anti p: R K - -:R π - -∼1:5*10 3 :10 7 ) background-freely determined. By this experiment for Ne+NaF, Cu, Sn, and Bi as well ass Ni+Ni collisions at incident energies between 1.6 GeV/u and 2.0 GeV/u production cross sections for antiprotons in the momentum range between 1.0 GeV/c and 2.2 GeV/c and for kaons and pions between 0.5 GeV/c and 2.8 GeV/c were measured, in order to study the influence of collisional-system size, incident energy, and secondary-particle momentum on the production probabilities and to contribute in comparison with the prognoses of theoretical models to the explanation of the particle production mechanisms. (HSI)

  12. Charmonium and other onia at minimum energy

    Dalpiaz, P.

    1979-01-01

    In recent years considerable interest has been focused at CERN on the experimental possibilities offered by the antiproton-proton collisions to answer some of the fundamental questions of the present-day physics. Various working groups, set up at CERN during the last two years, have examined the physics potentials and the technical feasibility of anti pp colliding devices at various energies. As a consequence of this work, two anti pp projects have already been approved: the ISR anti pp project, and the SPS collider, covering a centre-of-mass energy range from 20 to 540 GeV. The Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) projectsup(2)), allowing the study of phenomena under the 2msub(p) threshold up to 2.3 GeV, is at present under study. Transforming LEAR into a anti pp minicollidersup(2)), it is possible to reach a centre of-mass energy of 3.7 GeV. -Considering, then, the anti pp physics facilities at CERN as a whole project, it is seen that the energy range between 3.7 GeV and 20 GeV remains uncovered. In this report the physics interest of experiments in a centre-of-mass energy range between 2 and 20 GeV will be outlined and the technical feasibility investigated. (orig./FKS)

  13. CRYOGENIC AND VACUUM TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE LOW-ENERGY ELECTROSTATIC CRYOGENIC STORAGE RING

    Orlov, D. A.; Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Hahn, R. von; Grieser, M.; Mallinger, V.; Sieber, T.; Weber, T.; Wolf, A.; Rappaport, M.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic and vacuum concepts for the electrostatic Cryogenic ion Storage Ring (CSR), under construction at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, is presented. The ring will operate in a broad temperature range from 2 to 300 K and is required to be bakeable up to 600 K. Extremely high vacuum and low temperatures are necessary to achieve long lifetimes of the molecular ions stored in the ring so that the ions will have enough time to cool by radiation to their vibrational and rotational ground states. To test cryogenic and vacuum technological aspects of the CSR, a prototype is being built and will be connected to the commercial cryogenic refrigerator recently installed, including a specialized 2-K connection system. The first results and the status of current work with the prototype are also presented

  14. Ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR

    Hinterberger, Frank [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik

    2011-10-15

    The problem of ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR is studied in the present report. Positive ions are trapped in the negative potential well of the antiproton beam. The ions are produced by the interaction between the antiproton beam and the residual gas. The adverse effects of ion trapping like tune shifts, tune spreads and coherent instabilities are reviewed. The ion production rate by ionization of the residual gas molecules is estimated. The negative potential well and the corresponding electric fields of the antiproton beam are evaluated in order to study the transverse and longitudinal motion of the ions and the accumulation in trapping pockets. The removal of ions can be achieved using clearing electrodes and under certain conditions resonant transverse beam shaking. Diagnostic tools and measurements of trapped ion effects are sketched. (orig.)

  15. Large-angle inclusive production of protons, antiprotons and kaons, and particle composition at the CERN ISR

    Alper, B; Booth, P; Bulos, F; Carroll, L J; Damgaard, G; Duff, Brian G; Heymann, Franz F; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jönsson, L B; Klovning, A; Leistam, L; Lillethun, E; Lynch, G; Prentice, M; Quarrie, D; von Dardel, Guy F; Weiss, J M

    1973-01-01

    The production cross-sections for protons, antiprotons and kaons in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies square root s=30.6 and 52.8 GeV at large angles and for the transverse momentum range p /sub T/<1.2 GeV/c for protons and antiprotons and 0.2

  16. People and things. CERN Courier, Sep-Oct 1990, v. 30(7)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events: ; At the June meeting of CERN Council, Director General Carlo Rubbia outlined the plan for the LHC proton collider in the LEP tunnel as CERN's major project for the coming decade. ; After initial trials of injection and storage of oxygen ions last year, CERN's LEAR low energy 'antiproton' ring has electron-cooled oxygen ions, achieving momentum 'spreads' down to 4 x 10 -4 , and stacked up to 13.8 x 10 9 charges at 11.4 MeV per nucleon, with subsequent acceleration taking the ions to 408 Me V per nucleon before extraction for experiments. ; Under the North Holland Physics Publishing imprint, the History of CERN, Volume 1, became available in 1987. ; The Atlanta Conference on the SSC will be held on the 13-15 November and will focus on industrial and scientific opportunities, covering the status of the project, industry, university and laboratory participation, the development efforts now underway for major detectors and progress toward defining the initial research programme

  17. People and things. CERN Courier, Sep-Oct 1990, v. 30(7)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events: ; At the June meeting of CERN Council, Director General Carlo Rubbia outlined the plan for the LHC proton collider in the LEP tunnel as CERN's major project for the coming decade. ; After initial trials of injection and storage of oxygen ions last year, CERN's LEAR low energy 'antiproton' ring has electron-cooled oxygen ions, achieving momentum 'spreads' down to 4 x 10{sup -4} , and stacked up to 13.8 x 10{sup 9} charges at 11.4 MeV per nucleon, with subsequent acceleration taking the ions to 408 Me V per nucleon before extraction for experiments. ; Under the North Holland Physics Publishing imprint, the History of CERN, Volume 1, became available in 1987. ; The Atlanta Conference on the SSC will be held on the 13-15 November and will focus on industrial and scientific opportunities, covering the status of the project, industry, university and laboratory participation, the development efforts now underway for major detectors and progress toward defining the initial research programme.

  18. History, developments and recent performance of the CERN linac 1

    Haseroth, H.; Hill, C.E.; Langbein, K.; Tanke, E.; Tylor, C.; Tetu, P.; Warner, D.; Weiss, M.

    1992-01-01

    In early June 1992 the original CERN 50 MeV proton Linac accelerated its last beam after nearly 33 years of loyal service. Although conceived as a proton machine and commissioned in 1959 as an injector for the 26 GeV Proton Synchrotron, it finished its life as a light-ion source for the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and as a cheap source of particles for tests in the Low Energy Anti-Proton Ring (LEAR). Highlights in its recent history were the installation of RFQs and the upgrading with an ECR source for O 6+ and S 12+ ions. The early parameters and the subsequent modifications as well as the performance are reviewed in this paper. (Author) 8 refs., 3 figs., tab

  19. Multiple collision effects on the antiproton production by high energy proton (100 GeV - 1000 GeV)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Powell, J.

    1987-01-01

    Antiproton production rates which take into account multiple collision are calculated using a simple model. Methods to reduce capture of the produced antiprotons by the target are discussed, including geometry of target and the use of a high intensity laser. Antiproton production increases substantially above 150 GeV proton incident energy. The yield increases almost linearly with incident energy, alleviating space charge problems in the high current accelerator that produces large amounts of antiprotons

  20. Analog measurement of delayed antiproton annihilation time spectra in a high intensity pulsed antiproton beam

    Niestroj, A.; Hayano, R.S.; Ishikawa, T.; Tamura, H.; Torii, H.A.; Morita, N.; Yamazaki, T.; Sugai, I.; Nakayoshi, K.; Horvath, D.; Eades, J.; Widmann, E.

    1996-01-01

    An analog detection system has been developed to measure delayed antiproton annihilation time spectra for laser resonance spectroscopy of metastable antiprotonic helium atoms using the high-intensity pulsed beam of antiprotons from LEAR at CERN. (orig.)

  1. CERN: Higher energies at LEP

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    This year will be the last that CERN's 27-kilometre LEP electron-positron collider will run routinely at around 45 GeV per beam. In the run, scheduled to begin in May, the four big experiments will top up their harvest so far of over 12 million Z particles for a final polishing of precision Z data. Behind the scenes, LEP is being prepared for higher energy running and a new phase of physics. After a brief technical stop in October, the aim is for a test run of up to 70 GeV per beam before the end of the year. Higher energy demands more radiofrequency power, which will be supplied by superconducting cavities. With this goal in mind, a programme of development work began at CERN over ten years ago, when LEP was still on the drawing board. Initially this effort focused on cavities made from sheet niobium, but later switched to copper covered by a sputtered niobium film, which gives better thermal and r.f. performance (September 1990, page 24). The first industrially-manufactured four-cavity niobium coated module, complete with its cryostat and r.f plumbing, was installed in LEP in 1993. Although it quickly achieved its nominal accelerating gradient of 6 MV/m, its reliability was affected by unforeseen problems in the associated power couplers. This delayed the installation schedule, but after a crash programme of design and modification of the power couplers, together with improvements in actual cavity design and manufacture, module supply and testing has now attained a satisfactory rhythm. Two modules installed in LEP amassed between them over 50 days of continuous running in 1994, and confidence is now high that the emphasis can shift towards integrating the cavities into LEP, rather than running the cavities themselves. During LEP's 1994-5 winter shutdown, modules are being installed at Points 2 and 6. Later, additional cavities will be installed in Points 2, 6 and 8 prior to embarking on the higher energy test run at the end of the year. After

  2. Cryogenic Concept for the Low-energy Electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at MPI-K in Heidelberg

    Hahn, R. von; Andrianarijaona, V.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Fadil, H.; Grieser, M.; Mallinger, V.; Orlov, D. A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Ullrich, J.; Weber, T.; Wolf, A.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Quack, H.; Rappaport, M.; Zajfman, D.

    2006-01-01

    At the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg a next generation electrostatic storage ring for cryogenic temperatures is under development. The main focus of this unique machine is the research on ions, molecules and clusters up to bio molecules in the energy range of 20-300 keV at low temperatures down to 2 Kelvin. The achievement of this low temperature for all material walls seen by the ions in the storage ring will allow novel experiments to be performed, such as rotational and vibrational state control of molecular ions and their interaction with ultra-low energy electrons and laser radiation. The low temperature of the storage ring not only causes a strong reduction of black body radiation incident onto the stored particles, but also acts as a large cryopump, expected to lead to a vacuum in the 10-15 mbar range. In this paper the cryogenic concept of the storage ring and the related vacuum design will be presented

  3. Status of the anti-proton production beam in the CERN PS

    Cappi, R.; Evans, B.J.; Garoby, R.

    1990-01-01

    A new scheme was put into operation in November 1988 to upgrade the proton beam delivered by the 26 GeV Proton Synchrotron (PS) for anti-proton production. It makes use of quasi-adiabatic manipulations of the RF parameters to squeeze a beam filling 1/2 of the PS circumference into a 1/4 turn and can in theory preserve the longitudinal emittance. A maximum intensity of 1.68 e 13 ppp in 5 bunches at 26 GeV has been reached in the course of 22 weeks of operation. The limitations of the performance are analysed together with possible improvements. (author) 6 refs., 9 figs

  4. What can an antiproton and a nucleus learn from each other

    Garreta, D.

    1982-05-01

    Simple features which make a low-energy antiproton an interesting probe of the nucleus, and a nucleus an interesting target for an antiproton are presented. Then antiproton-nucleus inelastic and elastic scattering, proton knock-out reactions on nuclei, annihilation of the antiproton in nuclei are reviewed. The aims of the experiment PS184 at LEAR are given

  5. Measurement of the Antiproton-Proton Total Cross-Section at the CERN ISR

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a measurement of small angle scattering of antiprotons on protons and of protons on protons at 15/15, 22/22, 26/26 and 31/31 GeV, with the aim of obtaining data on the total cross-section for the scattering of protons on protons, and of determining the ratio of the real to the imaginary scattering amplitude at zero momentum transfer for antiprotons on protons. The measurement is divided into two parts: \\item 1) The measurement of @s^t^o^t(@*p) and @s^t^o^t(pp), using hodoscopes placed at small angles, outside the vacuum pipe, at approximately 9 metres from the intersection point. \\item 2) The measurement of the region in !t!, the momentum transfer squared, around the value !t^c!, where Coulomb and nuclear scattering are equal, in order to deduce the quantity @r = Re f(t=0)/Im f(t=0). This latter measurement is done by employi in earlier @s^t(pp) and @r experiments at the ISR. \\end{enumerate} In both set-ups the measurements are made by recording coincidences between collinear counters in th...

  6. Weighing the antiproton

    Hayano, Ryugo S., E-mail: hayano@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Antiprotonic helium is a metastable three-body neutral atom consisting of an antiproton, a helium nucleus and an electron, which we serendipitously discovered some 20 years ago. The antiproton, which normally annihilates within a few picoseconds when injected into matter, can be 'stored' in this system for up to several microseconds, and laser spectroscopy is possible within this time window. From the laser transition frequency, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio can be deduced to high precision. Recent progress at CERN's antiproton decelerator (AD) will be discussed.

  7. Direct detection of antiprotons with the Timepix3 in a new electrostatic selection beamline

    Pacifico, N., E-mail: nicola.pacifico@cern.ch [Institute of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Allgaten 55, 5007 Bergen (Norway); Aghion, S. [Politecnico of Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Alozy, J. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bonomi, G. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); INFN Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); TIFPA/INFN Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Cabaret, L. [Laboratory Aimé Cotton, University of Paris-Sud, ENS Cachan, CNRS, University Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Caccia, M. [INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Science, University of Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); Campbell, M. [Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Caravita, R. [Department of Physics, University of Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); INFN Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castelli, F. [INFN Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cerchiari, G. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chlouba, K. [Czech Technical University, Prague, Brehov 7, 11519 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); and others

    2016-09-21

    We present here the first results obtained employing the Timepix3 for the detection and tagging of annihilations of low energy antiprotons. The Timepix3 is a recently developed hybrid pixel detector with advanced Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold capabilities and has the potential of allowing precise kinetic energy measurements of low energy charged particles from their time of flight. The tagging of the characteristic antiproton annihilation signature, already studied by our group, is enabled by the high spatial and energy resolution of this detector. In this study we have used a new, dedicated, energy selection beamline (GRACE). The line is symbiotic to the AEgIS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator and is dedicated to detector tests and possibly antiproton physics experiments. We show how the high resolution of the Timepix3 on the Time-of-Arrival and Time-over-Threshold information allows for a precise 3D reconstruction of the annihilation prongs. The presented results point at the potential use of the Timepix3 in antimatter-research experiments where a precise and unambiguous tagging of antiproton annihilations is required.

  8. Evidence For The Production Of Slow Antiprotonic Hydrogen In Vacuum

    Zurlo, N.; Amsler, C.; Bonomi, G.; Carraro, C.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Doser, M.; Fontana, A.; Funakoshi, R.; Genova, P.; Hayano, R.S.; Jorgensen, L.V.; Kellerbauer, A.; Lagomarsino, V.; Landua, R.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Macri, M.; Madsen, N.; Manuzio, G.; Mitchard, D.; Montagna, P.; Posada, L.G.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Rotondi, A.; Testera, G.; der Werf, D.P.Van; Variola, A.; Venturelli, L.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We present evidence showing how antiprotonic hydrogen, the quasistable antiproton-proton (pbar-p) bound system, has been synthesized following the interaction of antiprotons with the hydrogen molecular ion (H2+) in a nested Penning trap environment. From a careful analysis of the spatial distributions of antiproton annihilation events, evidence is presented for antiprotonic hydrogen production with sub-eV kinetic energies in states around n=70, and with low angular momenta. The slow antiprotonic hydrogen may be studied using laser spectroscopic techniques.

  9. Antiproton Radiation Therapy

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2007-01-01

    the radiobiological properties using antiprotons at 50 and 125 MeV from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film. Radiobiological experiments were done with Chinese V79 WNRE hamster cells. Monte Carlo particle...... transport codes were investigated and compared with results obtained from the ionization chambers and alanine pellets. A track structure model have been applied on the calculated particle spectrum, and been used to predict the LET-dependent response of the alanine pellets. The particle transport program...... FLUKA produced data which were in excellent agreement with our ionization chamber measurements, and in good agreement with our alanine measurements. FLUKA is now being used to generate a wide range of depth dose data at several energies, including secondary particle–energy spectra, which will be used...

  10. The calibration of the central electromagnetic calorimeter of UA1 proton-antiproton experiment at CERN

    Malosse, J.J.

    1987-03-01

    The most important result of the UA1 experiment at CERN has been the discovery of the weak intermediate vector bosons W + , W - and Z 0 . We describe the calibration of the electromagnetic calorimeter, which gives the signature of the electronic mode of desintegration of the intermediate bosons and measures their masses. We shall discuss this process and give some experimental results [fr

  11. Decay of Hot Nuclei at Low Spins Produced by Antiproton-Annihilation in Heavy Nuclei

    2002-01-01

    % PS208 \\\\ \\\\ The objective of the experiment is to study (i) the thermal excitation energy distribution of antiproton-induced reactions in heavy nuclei and (ii) the decay properties of hot nuclei at low spins via evaporation, multifragmentation and fission as a function of excitation energy. The experimental set-up consists of 4-$\\pi$ detectors: the Berlin Neutron Ball~(BNB) which is a spherical shell of gadolinium-loaded scintillator liquid with an inner and outer diameter of 40 and 160~cm, respectively. This detector counts the number of evaporated neutrons in each reaction. Inside BNB there is a 4-$\\pi$ silicon ball~(BSIB) with a diameter of 20~cm consisting of 162 detectors which measure energy and multiplicity of all emitted charged nuclear particles. The particles are identified via time of flight, energy and pulse shape correlations.

  12. Angular distribution of Pionization particles from experiments on CERN-storage rings

    Jabs, A

    1972-01-01

    The angular distribution of secondary charged particles arising from high energy interaction in the CERN storage rings has been measured. The measurements near the centre-of-mass energies (20-50) GeV have been taken in the angle range of 20-90 degrees relative to the recoil axis. A complex formula is suggested to explain the variations described experimentally. Good agreement between the theoretical and experimental data is found. Simplifications are possible in the formula which allow the two-centre emission structure to be explained. It is shown that the angular dependence cannot be explained solely from rotary impulse behaviour. (9 refs).

  13. Limitations on anti p-p luminosity with direct injection and stacking of antiprotons

    Courant, E.D.; Teng, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    If protons of very high energy impinge on a target, a large part of the resulting antiprotons are sufficiently collimated to be injectible into a stacking and accelerating ring. They can then be stacked and injected into the main proton accelerator so as to produce anti p-p collisions without low energy antiproton cooling. A scheme is presented for the VBA, where 20 TeV protons produce 9 x 10 -4 antiprotons per proton at 100 GeV, which are then stacked, accelerated to 1 TeV, and injected into the main ring. With 16 proton pulses of 10 15 protons, one obtains a luminosity of the order of 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 with a beam-beam tune shift of 10 -3 per interaction region. The beams are bunched into 1000 bunches; the orbits are separated by means of relatively modest electostatic electrodes

  14. Measurement of the Antiprotonic Lyman- and Balmer X-rays of $\\overline{p}H$ and $\\overline{p}D$ Atoms at Very Low Target Pressures

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure the energies and intensities of the n @A 1 (Lyman) and n @A 2 (Balmer) tansitions with high accuracy in both @*H and @*D, from which the strong interaction effects of the 1s- and 2p-level can be extracted. These observables may be related to the antiproton-proton and antiproton-neutron scattering length. \\\\ \\\\ Since in these targets collisional Stark effect occurs, we will stop the antiprotons in extreme thin gaseous targets (pressure as low as 10 Torr), where no Stark effect occurs and the 2-1 transition is favoured. In order to use antiprotons with high efficiency despite of the low target density, we will trap antiprotons of a momentum of 100 MeV/c in a magnetic field of cyclotron characteristics. The antiprotons are decelerated by their energy loss in the target gas. The focusing properties of the magnetic field serve to compensate the multiple scattering and we will end up with a concentrated stopping distribution at the centre. Due to the long orbiting time, back...

  15. Polarization of antiprotons by the Stern-Gerlach effect

    Kewisch, J.; Rossmanith, R.; Onel, Y.; Penzo, A.; Kreiser, H.

    1988-01-01

    A method to obtain polarized antiprotons in the low energy storage ring LEAR via spatial separation of opposite spin states is described in earlier papers (Y. Onel et al., 1986). We will discuss here in more detail a) the integration of the special magnets (spin splitter) into the LEAR optics and b) some first tracking results of particle and spin motion in these optics. (orig./HSI)

  16. Antiproton radiotherapy

    Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Jakel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V.; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B.à; Solberg, Timothy D.; Sørensen, Brita S.; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G.; Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton–proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with ∼20–30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the rad...

  17. Anitproton-matter interactions in antiproton applications

    Morgan, David L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    By virtue of the highly energetic particles released when they annihilate in matter, antiprotons have a variety of potentially important applications. Among others, these include remote 3-D density and composition imaging of the human body and also of thick, dense materials, cancer therapy, and spacecraft propulsion. Except for spacecraft propulsion, the required numbers of low energy antiprotons can be produced, stored, and transported through reliance on current or near term technology. Paramount to these applications and to fundamental research involving antiprotons is knowledge of how antiprotons interact with matter. The basic annihilation process is fairly well understood, but the antiproton annihilation and energy loss rates in matter depend in complex ways on a number of atomic processes. The rates, and the corresponding cross sections, were measured or are accurately predictable only for limited combinations of antiproton kinetic energy and material species.

  18. Study of chi production properties at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

    Kourkoumelis, C.; Resvanis, L.K.; Filippas, T.A.; Fokitis, E.; Fabjan, C.W.; Fields, T.; Fowler, E.; Lissauer, D.; Mannelli, I.; Mouzourakis, P.; Nappi, A.; Willis, W.J.; Goldberg, M.

    1979-01-01

    The inclusive production of electron pairs with and without additional photons was measured at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR). The investigation of J/psi particles with associated photons indicated that 47 +- 8% of the J/psi were produced via the photonic decay of one of the chi(3.5) states. The upper limit of the production cross-section ratio times the branching ratio into electron pairs of psi' relative to J/psi was found to be 2% at centre-of-mass energy of √s = 62 GeV. (Auth.)

  19. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  20. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  1. Non-perturbative measurement of low-intensity charged particle beams

    Fernandes, M.; Geithner, R.; Golm, J.; Neubert, R.; Schwickert, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Tan, J.; Welsch, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-perturbative measurements of low-intensity charged particle beams are particularly challenging to beam diagnostics due to the low amplitude of the induced electromagnetic fields. In the low-energy antiproton decelerator (AD) and the future extra low energy antiproton rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor the operation efficiency. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based cryogenic current comparators (CCC) have been used for measuring slow charged beams in the nA range, showing a very good current resolution. But these were unable to measure fast bunched beams, due to the slew-rate limitation of SQUID devices and presented a strong susceptibility to external perturbations. Here, we present a CCC system developed for the AD machine, which was optimised in terms of its current resolution, system stability, ability to cope with short bunched beams, and immunity to mechanical vibrations. This paper presents the monitor design and the first results from measurements with a low energy antiproton beam obtained in the AD in 2015. These are the first CCC beam current measurements ever performed in a synchrotron machine with both coasting and short bunched beams. It is shown that the system is able to stably measure the AD beam throughout the entire cycle, with a current resolution of 30 {nA}.

  2. Three-Body Protonium Formation in a Collision Between a Slow Antiproton ({barp}) and Muonic Hydrogen: {H_{μ}}—Low Energy {barp + (p μ^-)_{1s} → (barp p)_{1s} + μ^-} Reaction

    Sultanov, Renat A.; Guster, D.; Adhikari, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    A bound state of a proton, p, and its counterpart antiproton, {barp}, is a protonium atom {Pn = (barp p)}. The following three-charge-particle reaction: {barp +(p μ^-)_{1s} → (barp {p})_{1s} + μ^-} is considered in this work, where {μ^-} is a muon. At low-energies muonic reaction {Pn} can be formed in the short range state with α = 1 s or in the first excited state: α = 2 s/2 p, where {barp} and p are placed close enough to each other and the effect of the {barp}-p nuclear interaction becomes significantly stronger. The cross sections and rates of the Pn formation reaction are computed in the framework of a few-body approach based on the two-coupled Faddeev-Hahn-type (FH-type) equations. Unlike the original three-body Faddeev method the FH-type equation approach is formulated in terms of only two but relevant components: {{Ψ}_1} and {Ψ_2}, of the system's three-body wave function {Ψ}, where {{Ψ}={Ψ}_1+{Ψ}_2}. In order to solve the FH-type equations {Ψ_1} is expanded in terms of the input channel target eigenfunctions, i.e. in this work in terms of the {({p} μ^-)} eigenfunctions. At the same time {Ψ_2} is expanded in terms of the output channel two-body wave function, that is in terms of the protonium {(bar{{p}} {p})} eigenfunctions. A total angular momentum projection procedure is performed, which leads to an infinite set of one-dimensional coupled integral-differential equations for unknown expansion coefficients.

  3. CERN Open Days 2013, Meyrin Campus, ZONE D

    Photo Service, CERN

    2013-01-01

    D1 : Public Lectures / Conférences ; D2 : Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) ; D3 : Linear Accelerators 2 and 3 (LINAC 2, LINAC 3) ; D4 : Accélérateur linéaire 4 (Linac 4) ; D5 : Computer Centre ; D6 : Antiproton Decelerator (AD) ; D7 : “Pôle énergie”

  4. On the determination of the energy of antiprotonic X-rays by critical absorption and the theoretical discussion of results

    Joedicke, B.

    1985-06-01

    This work examines the possibility of measuring the energies of antiprotonic X-rays by critical absorption. Scanning the periodic table many isotopes are found where the energy of an antiprotonic X-ray coincides with a K-absorption-edge of a chemical element. Those candidates where the energy can be measured with high accuracy are discussed here. Also a computer program which calculates transition energies of antiprotonic atoms is examined. Necessary additions are listed and the corrections are shown. In combination with this program the candidates are the basis for a precise determination of the mass of the antiproton. (orig.) [de

  5. CERN and the high energy frontier

    Tsesmelis Emmanuel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the particle physics programme at CERN at the high-energy frontier. Starting from the key open questions in particle physics and the large-scale science facilities existing at CERN, concentrating on the Large Hadron Collider(LHC, this paper goes on to present future possibilities for global projects in high energy physics. The paper presents options for future colliders, all being within the framework of the recently updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, and all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics. The paper concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward for high-energy physics research.

  6. State of development of CERN proton storage rings

    Huber, H

    1973-01-01

    The storage rings are briefly described and the 'luminosity', meaning a standardised counting method, is stated for the energies available at the centre of gravity. The maximum of luminosity reached so far is compared with the maximum possible luminosity and the reasons for the discrepancy are discussed. An example shows graphs of luminosity and of the beams after completion of the storage process, as functions of time. (2 refs).

  7. SPARC experiments at the high-energy storage ring

    Stöhlker, Thomas; Litvinov, Yuri A; Bagnoud, Vincent; Dimopoulou, Christina; Dolinskii, Alexei; Geppert, Christopher; Hagmann, Siegbert; Katayama, Takeshi; Kühl, Thomas; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Steck, Markus; Bechstedt, Ulf; Maier, Rudolf; Prasuhn, Dieter; Stockhorst, Hans; Schuch, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    The physics program of the SPARC collaboration at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) focuses on the study of collision phenomena in strong and even extreme electromagnetic fields and on the fundamental interactions between electrons and heavy nuclei up to bare uranium. Here we give a short overview on the challenging physics opportunities of the high-energy storage ring at FAIR for future experiments with heavy-ion beams at relativistic energies with particular emphasis on the basic beam properties to be expected. (paper)

  8. Measurement of Antiproton-proton Cross-Sections at Low Antiproton Momenta

    2002-01-01

    The experiment is designed to measure four different cross sections in the momentum range 150~MeV/c to 600~MeV/c: 1)~~~~the differential elastic \\\\ \\\\ 2)~~~~the differential charge exchange\\\\ \\\\ 3)~~~~the annihilation into charged and neutral pions\\\\ \\\\ 4)~~~~and the total cross section via the optical theorem. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment allows one to search once again and with good precision for baryonium. Of special interest is the existence of the S-meson, for which a signal of about 20~MeV-mb was found in a 1981 experiment (performed in the East Hall).\\\\ \\\\ A second point of special interest is the momentum region below 300~MeV/c because the cross sections are basically unknown. We will be able to explore the momentum dependence of this region for the first time.\\\\ \\\\ The elastic cross section is measured by a cylindrical multiwire proportional chamber and a scintillator hodoscope placed around a scattering chamber under vacuum. The charge exchange cross section is measured by a ring of 32~anti-neutron detector...

  9. Precision Measurement of the Energies and Line Shapes of Antiprotonic Lyman and Balmer Transitions From Hydrogen and Helium Isotopes

    2002-01-01

    % PS207 \\\\ \\\\ For the study of the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nuclear spin-spin and spin-orbital interaction at threshold a high resolution measurement is proposed of the line shapes and energy shifts of antiprotonic K$\\alpha$ and L$\\alpha$ transitions of hydrogen and helium isotopes. The intense LEAR beam, stopped in the cyclotron trap at low gas pressure, provides a unique~X-ray~source with sufficient brightness. Charge coupled devices with their excellent background rejection and energy resolution allow a precise determination of the strong shifts and widths of the 1s hyperfine states of protonium, in addition the detection of the $\\bar{p}$D K$\\alpha$ transition should be possible. A focussing crystal spectrometer with a resolution $\\Delta$E/E of about l0$ ^- ^{4} $, which is superior in the accuracy of the energy determination by two orders of magnitude as compared to the present detection methods, will be used to measure the energies of the L$\\alpha$ transitions. This permits a first direct measure...

  10. People and things. CERN Courier, March 1982, v. 22(2)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. From 3-6 May, a 'Workshop on Accelerator Orbit and Particle Tracking Programs' will be held at Brookhaven. The focus will be primarily on computer simulation of non-linear magnetic effects as they influence beam lifetime in storage rings.The 1982 CERN School of Computing will be held from 29 August to 11 September in Zinal, Valais, Switzerland. This will be the seventh such school and will cover topics of current interest in computing which are relevant to data processing needs in high energy physics. This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the discovery of the neutron by Sir James Chadwick. To commemorate the event, the UK Institute of Physics, in collaboration with the UK Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell, is organizing an international conference at Cambridge from 13-17 September. The layout of the proposed Stanford Linear Collider SLC has been changed for environmental reasons. A workshop on physics with low energy cooled antiprotons at the new LEAR ring, currently under construction at CERN, will be held at Erice, Sicily, from 9-16 May. To stimulate interest in the problems of particle acceleration to the multi-TeV range, ECFA is organizing a meeting to review the limitations and prospects of both conventional and novel particle acceleration techniques. The 1982 CERN School of Physics will take place in Cambridge, UK, from 5-18 September

  11. In the steps of the antiproton

    Amsler, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Sixty years after the discovery of the antiproton at Berkeley, a look at some of the ways that studies with antiprotons at CERN have cast light on basic physics and, in particular, on fundamental symmetries.

  12. A possible method to produce a polarized antiproton beam at intermediate energies

    Spinka, H.; Vaandering, E.W.; Hofmann, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    A feasible and conservative design for a medium energy polarized antiproton beam has been presented. The design requires an intense beam of unpolarized antiprotons (≥ 10 7 /sec) from a typical secondary beam line in order to achieve reasonable anti pp elastic scattering count rates. All three beam spin directions can be achieved. Methods were discussed to reverse the spin directions in modest times, and to change to a polarized proton beam if desired. It is expected that experiments with such a beam would have a profound effect on the understanding of the anti NN interaction at intermediate energies

  13. Centrality and collision system dependence of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions at AGS energies

    Sako, H.; Ahle, L.; Akiba, Y.

    1997-12-01

    Antiproton production in heavy ion collisions reflects subtle interplay between initial production and absorption by nucleons. Because the AGS energies (10--20 A·GeV/c) are close to the antiproton production threshold, antiproton may be sensitive to cooperative processes such as QGP and hadronic multi-step processes. On the other hand, antiproton has been proposed as a probe of baryon density due to large N anti N annihilation cross sections. Cascade models predict the maximum baryon density reaches about 10 times the normal nucleus density in central Au+Au collisions, where the strong antiproton absorption is expected. In this paper, the authors show systematic studies of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions

  14. Antiproton physics at BNL

    Lazarus, D.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-06-07

    A review of antiproton physics at the Brookhaven AGS in past decade is given as well as a description of the present high energy physics program. Existing and potential facilities for antiproton physics at the AGS are discussed and are found to provide useful antiproton intensities over the momentum range proposed for SUPERLEAR in a multiple user environment. (orig.)

  15. Low emittance electron storage rings

    Levichev, E. B.

    2018-01-01

    Low-emittance electron (positron) beams are essential for synchrotron light sources, linear collider damping rings, and circular Crab Waist colliders. In this review, the principles and methods of emittance minimization are discussed, prospects for developing relativistic electron storage rings with small beam phase volume are assessed, and problems related to emittance minimization are examined together with their possible solutions. The special features and engineering implementation aspects of various facilities are briefly reviewed.

  16. Beam diagnostics for low energy beams

    J. Harasimowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-energetic ion and antimatter beams are very attractive for a number of fundamental studies. The diagnostics of such beams, however, is a challenge due to low currents down to only a few thousands of particles per second and significant fraction of energy loss in matter at keV beam energies. A modular set of particle detectors has been developed to suit the particular beam diagnostic needs of the ultralow-energy storage ring (USR at the future facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research, accommodating very low beam intensities at energies down to 20 keV. The detectors include beam-profile monitors based on scintillating screens and secondary electron emission, sensitive Faraday cups for absolute intensity measurements, and capacitive pickups for beam position monitoring. In this paper, the design of all detectors is presented in detail and results from beam measurements are shown. The resolution limits of all detectors are described and options for further improvement summarized. Whilst initially developed for the USR, the instrumentation described in this paper is also well suited for use in other low-intensity, low-energy accelerators, storage rings, and beam lines.

  17. Beam position pickup for antiprotons to the ISR

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The Antiproton Project, launched for proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS (SPS collider), had a side-line for p-pbar collisions in the ISR. A new transfer line, TT6, was constructed to transport antiprotons from the 26 GeV PS to the injection line TT1 of ISR ring 2. Antiprotons were a scarce commodity. For setting up the lines, beam diagnostic devices in the antiproton path had to work reliably and precisely with just a few low-intensity pilot pules: single bunches of about 2x10**9 antiprotons every few hours. Electrostatic pickup electrodes were used to measure beam position. They could be mounted for measurement in the horizontal plane, as in this picture, or at 90 deg, for the vertical plane.

  18. A new approach to experiments with non-relativistic antiprotons

    Poth, H.

    1990-05-01

    Is low-energy antiproton physics phasing out with the present round of experiments or are there good reasons to continue at an improved slow antiproton facility which could be located at a high intensity hadron accelerator? We point out, that there are four frontiers where substantial advances could be made. In particular, we discuss the low-energy frontier and emphasize that experiments with no-relativistic antiprotons would increase drastically the sensitivity and would reveal new effects. (orig.)

  19. Before the Ring: synthesis of linear organic molecules in astrophysical ices by low energy electron impact

    Huels, Michael A.; Bass Andrew, D.; Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Sanche, Leon

    The question of the origin for the building blocks of life, either synthesized here on earth, or in space [1], has been the subject of much debate, experimental investigation, or astronomical observation, much of it stimulated by the early experiments of Miller [2], and subsequent space radiation related variations thereof [3-5]. And while the precise details of the formation of even the simplest biomolecules that make up life on earth still remain shrouded inmystery, one of the notions that persist throughout the debate is that the building blocks of life, such as amino-acids, or even the cyclic components of RNA and DNA, or other cyclic hydrocarbons (e.g. PHAs), where synthesized via radiolysis [6] either in the earths proto-atmosphere, its early oceans, or in the near interstellar space surrounding the early earth. Here we provide experimental evidence for the hypothesis that interactions of low energy secondary electrons and ions, formed during the radiolysis of matter, with atoms and molecules in the medium, may have played, and may still play an important role in the chemical transformation of astrophysical or planetary surface ices [7], where they lead to the synthesis of more complex chemical species from less complex, naturally occurring components. We report the synthesis and desorption of new chemical species from simple molecular surface ices, containing CH4 / CD4 , C2 D2 , O2 , CO, CO2 , or N2 in various combination mixtures, irradiated by low energy (CO+ (n = 1-3), among others. The formation of all these linear, pre-biotic molecular species, produced here by electron initiated cation-reactions in simple molecular films, suggests that similar mechanisms likely precede the synthesis of life's most basic cyclic molecular components in planetary, or astrophysical surface ices that are continuously subjected to the types of space radiations (UV, X-or -ray, or heavy ions) that can generate such low energy secondary electrons. [Funded by NSERC and Canadian

  20. Big research in new dimensions. Thinkers of our time about the actual elementary-particle physics at CERN; Grossforschung in neuen Dimensionen. Denker unserer Zeit ueber die aktuelle Elementarteilchenphysik am CERN

    Kommer, Christoph (ed.) [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany); DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Satz, Helmut [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Blanchard, Philippe [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Abt. Theoretische Physik

    2016-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Research from the highest energies to the smallest particles at CERN, the laborious way to the Large Hadronic Collider, CERN as accelerator of techniques, culture, and society, a philosophical and sociological perspective of questions concerning CERN, quark matter research at CERN, the FAIR facility for antiproton and ion research. (HSI)

  1. CERN: Fixed target targets

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: While the immediate priority of CERN's research programme is to exploit to the full the world's largest accelerator, the LEP electron-positron collider and its concomitant LEP200 energy upgrade (January, page 1), CERN is also mindful of its long tradition of diversified research. Away from LEP and preparations for the LHC proton-proton collider to be built above LEP in the same 27-kilometre tunnel, CERN is also preparing for a new generation of heavy ion experiments using a new source, providing heavier ions (April 1992, page 8), with first physics expected next year. CERN's smallest accelerator, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring continues to cover a wide range of research topics, and saw a record number of hours of operation in 1992. The new ISOLDE on-line isotope separator was inaugurated last year (July, page 5) and physics is already underway. The remaining effort concentrates around fixed target experiments at the SPS synchrotron, which formed the main thrust of CERN's research during the late 1970s. With the SPS and LEAR now approaching middle age, their research future was extensively studied last year. Broadly, a vigorous SPS programme looks assured until at least the end of 1995. Decisions for the longer term future of the West Experimental Area of the SPS will have to take into account the heavy demand for test beams from work towards experiments at big colliders, both at CERN and elsewhere. The North Experimental Area is the scene of larger experiments with longer lead times. Several more years of LEAR exploitation are already in the pipeline, but for the longer term, the ambitious Superlear project for a superconducting ring (January 1992, page 7) did not catch on. Neutrino physics has a long tradition at CERN, and this continues with the preparations for two major projects, the Chorus and Nomad experiments (November 1991, page 7), to start next year in the West Area. Delicate neutrino oscillation effects could become

  2. Cooling equilibrium and beam loss with internal targets in high energy storage rings

    Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Hasse, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Lehrach, A.; Zenkevich, P.

    2006-01-01

    The beam cooling equilibrium with internal target interaction is analyzed for parameters relevant to the proposed High Energy Storage Ring (HESR). For the proposed experiments with anti-protons high luminosities together with low momentum spreads are required. Rate equations are used to predict the rms equilibrium beam parameters. The cooling and IBS rate coefficients are obtained from simplified models. Energy loss straggling in the target and the associated beam loss are analyzed analytically assuming a thin target. A longitudinal kinetic simulation code is used to study the evolution of the momentum distribution in coasting and bunched beams. Analytic expressions for the target induced momentum tail are found in good agreement with the simulation results

  3. Exploration of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton Antiproton Collider

    Oliveros, Sandra J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Summers, Don [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Cremaldi, Lucien [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Acosta, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Neuffer, David [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-04-12

    New physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. We explore a 10$^{\\,34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity, 100 TeV $p\\bar{p}$ collider with 7$\\times$ the energy of the LHC but only 2$\\times$ as much NbTi superconductor, motivating the choice of 4.5 T single bore dipoles. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in $p\\bar{p}$ than $pp$ collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per beam crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller $\\beta^{*}$ for higher luminosity. A Fermilab-like $\\bar p$ source would disperse the beam into 12 momentum channels to capture more antiprotons. Because stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, 12 cooling ring sets would be used. Each set would include phase rotation to lower momentum spreads, equalize all momentum channels, and stochastically cool. One electron cooling ring would follow the stochastic cooling rings. Finally antiprotons would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring by joining them to new bunches with synchrotron damping.

  4. Antiproton fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion

    Perkins, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    With 180 MJ/microg, antiprotons offer the highest stored energy per unit mass of any known entity. The use of antiprotons to promote fast ignition in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule and produce high target gains with only modest compression of the main fuel is investigated. Unlike standard fast ignition where the ignition energy is supplied by energetic, short pulse laser, the energy here is supplied through the ionization energy deposited when antiprotons annihilate at the center of a compressed fuel capsule. This can be considered in-situ fast ignition as it obviates the need for the external injection of the ignition energy. In the first of two candidate schemes, the antiproton package is delivered by a low-energy ion beam. In the second, autocatalytic scheme, the antiprotons are preemplaced at the center of the capsule prior to compression. In both schemes, the author estimates that ∼10 12 antiprotons are required to initiate fast ignition in a typical ICF capsule and show that incorporation of a thin, heavy metal shell is desirable to enhance energy deposition within the ignitor zone. In addition to eliminating the need for a second, energetic fast laser and vulnerable final optics, this scheme would achieve central ignition without reliance on laser channeling through halo plasma or Hohlraum debris. However, in addition to the practical difficulties of storage and manipulation of antiprotons at low energy, the other large uncertainty for the practicality of such a speculative scheme is the ultimate efficiency of antiproton production in an external, optimized facility. Estimates suggest that the electrical wall plug energy per pulse required for the separate production of the antiprotons is of the same order as that required for the conventional slow compression driver

  5. Nucleon charge exchange reaction and antiproton elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    Kronenfeld, J.

    1985-02-01

    This work treats the medium energy nuclear (p,n) charge exchange reaction to analog states and the low energy elastic scattering of antiprotons and investigates the central aspects of a microscopic theory based on multiple-scattering series which are pertinent to these reactions. A two-step term of the Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation (DWIA) in treating the (p,n) reaction, was included. For the very absorptive p-bar interaction with nuclei we conjecture that a partial infinite summation, constituing a renormalization of the single scattering term of the optical potential series provides the dominant feature of this interaction. In this work the excitation of analog states is calculated and it was found that the (p,n) reaction is described fairly well by the DWIA. In the first part of the work the (p,n) reaction in the energy range 100-200 MeV was treated. The DWIA calculations were based on eikonalization. In the second part of the work the p-barA interaction with the selfconsistent scheme mentioned above, for scattering energies 30-120 MeV, was examined. (author)

  6. Energy spectra of quantum rings.

    Fuhrer, A; Lüscher, S; Ihn, T; Heinzel, T; Ensslin, K; Wegscheider, W; Bichler, M

    2001-10-25

    Quantum mechanical experiments in ring geometries have long fascinated physicists. Open rings connected to leads, for example, allow the observation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, one of the best examples of quantum mechanical phase coherence. The phase coherence of electrons travelling through a quantum dot embedded in one arm of an open ring has also been demonstrated. The energy spectra of closed rings have only recently been studied by optical spectroscopy. The prediction that they allow persistent current has been explored in various experiments. Here we report magnetotransport experiments on closed rings in the Coulomb blockade regime. Our experiments show that a microscopic understanding of energy levels, so far limited to few-electron quantum dots, can be extended to a many-electron system. A semiclassical interpretation of our results indicates that electron motion in the rings is governed by regular rather than chaotic motion, an unexplored regime in many-electron quantum dots. This opens a way to experiments where even more complex structures can be investigated at a quantum mechanical level.

  7. CERN and high energy physics, the grand picture

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The lecture will touch on several topics, to illustrate the role of CERN in the present and future of high-energy physics: how does CERN work? What is the role of the scientific community, of bodies like Council and SPC, and of international cooperation, in the definition of CERN's scientific programme? What are the plans for the future of the LHC and of the non-LHC physics programme? What is the role of R&D and technology transfer at CERN?

  8. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    Bassler, Niels

    . The stopping power of high-energetic antiprotons in tissue, is similar to that of protons. Most energy is lost per unit distance as the particle comes to rest, but when the antiprotons stops, each one will annihilate on a nuclei, releasing 1.9 GeV of energy. Most of this energy is carried away by pions, gamma...... rays and neutrons, but a part of the annihilation energy is still deposited locally as recoiling nuclear fragments with limited range. These fragments will also increase the relative biological effect at the annihilation vertex. We have masured the biological effect of an antiproton beam for the first...... to handle antiprotons. This will enable us to do treatment planning with antiprotons, and thereby bring us closer to answer the question of the potential clinical benefit of antiprotons....

  9. Search for W→cs-bar, Z→cc-bar,bb-bar in muon-jet events at the CERN proton-antiproton collider

    Ransdell, J.

    1988-01-01

    A search for quark decays of the W and Z particles produced in proton-antiproton collisions at √s of 630 GeV in the UA1 experiment at the CERN collider is described. The search was made in the channels W→cs-bar, Z→cc-bar,bb-bar where b and c quarks were identified by the presence of a high-p/sub T/ muon in or near a jet. Although these decay channels avoid the copious background of QCD produced light quark and gluon jets, it was not possible to detect a W or Z signal because of the large cross section for strong cc-bar and bb-bar production

  10. CERN

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the efforts at CERN to stimulate exchange of technological information with industry have steadily gained momentum. A 'Meeting on technology arising from high energy physics' was held in April 1974. Over 300 participants from industry, other research centres and universities heard three days of review talks on advanced technology and were able to see over 250 exhibits of equipment and the techniques emerging from the European particle physics programme

  11. Formation and decay of nuclei heated with high-energy antiprotons

    Lott, B; Eades, J.; Egidy, T.v.; Figuera, P.; Fuchs, H.; Galin, J.; Gulda, K.; Goldenbaum, F.; Hilscher, D.; Jahnke, U.; Jastrzebski, J.; Kurcewicz, W.; Morjean, M.; Pausch, G.; Péghaire, A.; Pienkowski, L.; Polster, D.; Proschitzki, S.; Quednau, B.; Rossner, H.; Schmid, S.; Schmid, W.; Ziem, P.

    1999-01-01

    The decay of nuclei excited via the annihilation of 1.2 GeV antiprotons has been investigated. Thanks to the ability to determine the excitation energy, E sup * , for all events, largely irrespective of their mass partitions, the probabilities of the different channels at play could be estimated as a function of E sup *. The data show the prevalence of fission and evaporation up to E sup * = 4 MeV/nucleon, with no hint of a transition towards multifragmentation.

  12. Study of the reaction pp. -->. p(n. pi. /sup +/) at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    Broll, C [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1976-07-01

    New results are presented on the diffraction dissociation of protons into (n..pi../sup +/) systems at the CERN intersecting storage rings. The data were taken at the centre of mass energy ..sqrt..s=45GeV and a very high statistics of events (nearly 75,000) was obtained. The experiment was performed at the Split Field Magnet whose description is made as well as that of the special neutron devices and of the trigger logic. The software chain (pattern recognition, geometrical reconstruction and kinematical fitting) is also described. A particular emphasis is put on the four-dimensional acceptance correction applied to the events. Phenomenological comments are given on two different but complementary approaches: the impact parameter description in the s-channel and the Deck model. The physics results are shown with in particular, detailed studies for the five following variables: the momentum transfer from proton to proton, the (n..pi../sup +/) invariant mass, the Jackson angles of this system and the momentum transfer from proton to neutron. A comparison with the pion-exchange Deck model is performed, showing a qualitative agreement with the data. Several experiments at a lower energy are also compared: on the average, there is little evolution with energy.

  13. Calibration of the Breit-Rabi Polarimeter for the PAX Spin-Filtering Experiment at COSY/Jülich and AD/CERN

    Barschel, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The PAX(PolarizedAntiproton eXperiment) experiment is proposed to polarize a stored antiproton beam for use at the planned High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the FAIR facility at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany). The polarization build-up will be achieved by spin-filtering, i.e., by a repetitive passage of the antiproton beam through a polarized atomic hydrogen or deuterium gas target. The experimental setup requires a Polarized Internal gas Target (PIT) surrounded with silicon detectors. The PIT includes an Atomic Beam Source (ABS), the target cell and a Breit-Rabi Polarimeter (BRP). The first phase of the Spin-Filtering Studies for PAX covers the commissioning of the PIT components and themeasurement of an absolute calibration standard for the BRP at the COSY ring in Jülich. The spin-filtering with protons aim at confirming the results of the FILTEX experiment and determine the pp hadronic spin dependent cross sections at 50MeV.The second phase will be realized in the Antiproton Decelerator ring (AD) at CERN to po...

  14. CERN Enters the Second Year AD

    2001-01-01

    2001 is the year that physics at CERN's new Antiproton Decelerator (AD) really gets up to speed. Changes to the AD since 2000 mean that this year the three experiments, ASACUSA, ATHENA, and ATRAP have had more intense antiproton beams to work with since physics started on 7 May. CERN's Antiproton Decelerator - major improvements for 2001. The AD is a unique machine. Its job is to decelerate not accelerate particle beams, and it has to handle beam energies that vary by an unprecedented factor of 35 from injection to ejection. Since the machine was designed to operate at fixed energy in its first incarnation as a collector of antiprotons for CERN's 1980s proton antiproton collider, this factor of 35 presented a big challenge to the AD team. The team's design goal was to hang onto a quarter of the injected antiprotons through their vertiginous fall in energy, and to repeat the deceleration cycle once per minute. Improvements to the machine over the winter shutdown and through the first four weeks of 2001 run...

  15. A measurement of the gravitational acceleration of the anti-proton

    Holzscheiter, M H

    1990-01-01

    A fundamental experiment in gravity proposed by us, is the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. This measurement would constitute the first direct test of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) for antimatter. The availability of low-energy antiprotons at CERN has made such an experiment feasible, and a proposal to carry out such a measurement has been accepted by the CERN Program Committee. We plan to use a time-of-flight technique similar to that pioneered by Fairbank and Witteborn in their measurement of the gravitational force on an electron. Very slow particles are launched into a vertical drift tube and the time-of-flight spectrum of these particles is recorded. This spectrum will exhibit a cut-off point directly related to the gravitational acceleration of the particles. Obtaining very slow antiprotons involves several stages of deceleration. Antiprotons from LEAR will be initially decelerated from 2 MeY to tens of kilovolts by passing them through a thin foil. After capture and cooling ...

  16. Measurements of cascade times of antiprotons in molecular hydrogen and helium

    Bianconi, A; Corradini, M; Donzella, A; Gómez, G; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Venturelli, L; Vilar, R; Zenoni, A; Bertin, A; Bruschi, M; Capponi, M; De Castro, S; Donà, R; Galli, D; Giacobbe, B; Marconi, U; Massa, I; Piccinini, M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Spighi, R; Vagnoni, V M; Vecchi, S; Villa, M; Vitale, A; Zoccoli, A; Cicalò, C; De Falco, A; Masoni, A; Puddu, G; Serci, S; Usai, G L; Gorchakov, O E; Prakhov, S N; Rozhdestvensky, A M; Tretyak, V I; Poli, M; Gianotti, P; Guaraldo, C; Lanaro, A; Lucherini, V; Petrascu, C; Ableev, V G; Ricci, R A; Vannucci, Luigi; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Montagna, P; Rotondi, A; Salvini, P; Mirfakhraee, N; Bussa, M P; Busso, L; Cerello, P G; Denisov, O Yu; Ferrero, L; Garfagnini, R; Grasso, A; Maggiora, A; Panzarasa, A; Panzieri, D; Tosello, F; Botta, E; Bressani, Tullio; Calvo, D; Costa, S; D'Isep, F; Feliciello, A; Filippi, A; Marcello, S; Agnello, M; Iazzi, F; Minetti, B; Tessaro, S; Santi, L

    2000-01-01

    The OBELIX experiment at CERN collected samples of antiproton annihilations at rest in different gaseous targets, such as hydrogen, deuterium and helium. We analyze a set of the Obelix data using a new technique for measuring, for the first time, the cascade times independent of the capture energy and of the antiproton stopping power. We report on measurements of the cascade times for hydrogen at 3.4, 5.8, 9.8 and 150 mbar and for helium at 8.2, 50 and 150 mbar pressure. An estimate of the antiproton capture energy in hydrogen is also presented. (12 refs).

  17. Antiproton impact ionization of atomic hydrogen and helium

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 INN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We shall present results for antiproton ionization of H and He ranging from fully differential cross sections to total ionization. The calculations have been made in a coupled pseudostate impact parameter approximation. It will be shown that the interaction between the antiproton and the target nucleus is very important at low energies.

  18. Laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    Hori, M

    2005-01-01

    When antiprotons (i.e. the antimatter counterpart of protons) are stopped in helium gas, 97% of them annihilate within picoseconds by reacting with the helium nuclei; a 3% fraction, however, survive with an anomalously long lifetime of several microseconds. This longevity is due to the formation of antiprotonic helium, which is a three-body Rydberg atom composed of an antiproton, electron, and helium nucleus. The ASACUSA experimental collaboration has recently synthesized large numbers of these atoms using CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility, and measured the atom's transition frequencies to 60 parts per billion by laser spectroscopy. By comparing the experimental results with recent three-body QED calculations and the known antiproton cyclotron frequency, we were able to show that the antiproton mass and charge are the same as the corresponding proton values to a precision of 10 parts per billion. Ongoing and future series of experiments will further improve the experimental precision by using chirp-compe...

  19. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    2006-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  20. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    2007-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  1. The measurement of the real part of the proton-antiproton elastic scattering amplitude at a C.M.S. energy of 546 GEV and the rise of the total cross section

    Kluit, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the experimental study of the elastic scattering of protons and anti-protons at a centre of mass energy of 546 GeV at the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN. The measurement of ρ, i.e. the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the nuclear part of elastic scattering amplitude for proton-antiproton at zero momentum transfer squared (-t = 0 GeV 2 ), at a centre of mass energy of √s = 546 GeV is described. The implications of the result of this measurement for the behaviour of the total cross section in the TeV domain are derived. The hypothesis is investigated whether there is a relation between the rise of the total cross section and the rise of the total jet cross section, as calculated in perturbative QCD and observed by the UA1 experiment. 104 refs.; 40 figs.; 16 tabs

  2. LEAR: antiproton extraction lines

    Photographic Service

    1992-01-01

    Antiprotons, decelerated in LEAR to a momentum of 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy of 5.3 MeV), were delivered to the experiments in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction", dispensing some 1E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. Beam-splitters and a multitude of beam-lines allowed several users to be supplied simultaneously.

  3. A new description of high energy antiproton (proton)-proton elastic scattering

    Barshay, S.; Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa. Dept. of Physics); Goldberg, J.

    1987-01-01

    We develop a generalization of the geometric picture for high-energy antiproton (proton)-proton elastic scattering. The eikonal at each impact parameter is considered to have fluctuations about an average value, and is thus characterized by a distribution. A connection to parton branching is made through the specific form of the distribution function for the eikonal. A unified physical theory with significant fluctuations accurately describes the anti p(p)-p data at both √s = 546 GeV and 53 GeV. The fluctuation parameter is remarkably well given by that directly observed in multiparticle production. (orig.)

  4. New description of high energy antiproton (proton)-proton elastic scattering

    Barshay, S; Goldberg, J

    1987-10-15

    We develop a generalization of the geometric picture for high-energy antiproton (proton)-proton elastic scattering. The eikonal at each impact parameter is considered to have fluctuations about an average value, and is thus characterized by a distribution. A connection to parton branching is made through the specific form of the distribution function for the eikonal. A unified physical theory with significant fluctuations accurately describes the anti p(p)-p data at both ..sqrt..s = 546 GeV and 53 GeV. The fluctuation parameter is remarkably well given by that directly observed in multiparticle production.

  5. Antiproton Production beam and Reverse Injection System

    Chadwick, G.

    1981-08-16

    The objectives of this project are two fold: (1) To extract high energy protons from the Main Ring (MR) and target them to produce antiprotons which are subsequently captured in the existing Booster accelerator; and (2) to provide a channel for injecting either protons or antiprotons into the MR from the booster in a direction opposite to that of the normal proton acceleration as colliding beams can be created. The present design, therefore, is in support of two separate larger projects, viz., the collisions of protons in the Tevatron (normal circulation direction) with 'reverse injected' protons in the MR, and the collision of normal direction protons with reverse injected antiprotons either in the MR or in the Tevatron. Figure 1 shows the layout of the project area. It spans the shortest distance between possible injection/ejection points in the existing accelerator structures, hence minimizing costs. The tunnel will lie underground at the level of the MR and booster.

  6. Electron identification for transverse momentum above 10 GeV/c in UA2' at the proton-antiproton collider at CERN

    Meyer, J.P.

    1989-11-01

    The CERN decision to increase the luminosity of the proton-antiproton collider (ACOL) at 630 GeV in the center of mass by about one order of magnitude, has motivated the upgrade of the UA2 detector in order to search for the top quark. The main improvement of the detector consists in a better electron identification and an increase of the hadronic calorimeter coverage. The upgraded central detector uses new techniques to identify electrons, in particular a scintillating fiber detector (SFD). This detector of cylindrical geometry have been built at the CEN Saclay (DPhPE) using ∼ 60,000 fibers arranged in 24 layers. It measures tracks (6 points in space) as well as the position of electromagnetic preshowers. It rejects fake electrons, simulated by the spacial overlap of a π o and a hadron, with the help of a precise measurement of the distance between track and preshower. Using data from a small integrated luminosity 46 nb -1 achieved on 1987, we have studied the UA2 electron identification improvement. Comparing the electron transverse momentum spectra observed both in the old and the new detector we have found that the electron identification of the new UA2 apparatus has improved by an order of magnitude. The expected increase of the luminosity for the coming runs and the good knowledge of the UA2 apparatus will make it possible to improve tests of the standard model and in particular to achieve a better sensitivity for the top quark search [fr

  7. Travelling CERN Exhibition ''When Energy Becomes Matter''

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The European Laboratory for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics together with the Institute of Physics of the Jagiellonian University and the University of Mining and Metallurgy, and under the auspices of the Polish National Atomic Energy Agency organized in the Museum of Nature in Cracow from October 16 till December 16, 2000 the exhibition ''When Energy Becomes Matter''. The Office of the ''Festival Cracow 2000'' was the main sponsor of that event. The exhibition was a part of the F estival Cracow 2000'' called ''Festival of Youngsters Cracow 2000''. Invitations, posters and information leaflets were sent to more than 3000 schools in southern Poland. The exhibition was divided into four specially designed quadrants. In the first the visitor was informed what kind of scales are in use to describe the Universe and the atom. The second introduced elementary particles via the cosmic ray demonstrations. Particle acceleration was demonstrated with the help of a TV set. The third segment was devoted to the Large Hadron Collider and its experiments: CMS, ATLAS, ALICE and LHCb. The last segment was an attempt to explain what are quarks, leptons and intermediate bosons. In addition it was also explained what is antimatter and why symmetry is broken in Nature. In one of the rooms we arranged the cinema where five movies was continuously presented. Thanks to the Cracow TV it was possible to prepare Polish translations of the films: B ack to creation , P owers of ten , L HC - time machine , S tars underground , and G eneva event . Another attraction of the exhibition was the Internet room equipped with the help of Polish Telecommunication. The exhibition was open seven days per week from 10 to 17 h. During the working days every 20 minutes a new group of about 25-30 people was visiting the exhibition. Each group was guided by students and PhD students from our Institute, Jagiellonian University and University of Mining

  8. The PANDA experiment: Antiproton physics at FAIR

    Montagna, P.

    2011-01-01

    The new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), under construction at the GSI laboratory at Darmstadt, in a few years will make available, among different types of beams, even antiproton beams with unique features. Through a High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) for antiprotons, an antiproton beam will be available in a momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c, which will interact on a hydrogen target. The products of the interaction, including hadronic systems with strangeness and/or charm, will be detected with the PANDA magnetic spectrometer (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt), and the spectroscopic analysis will allow a detailed investigation on a number of open problems of the hadronic physics, as the quark confinement, the existence of non-conventional meson states (so-called glueballs and hybrids), the structure of hadrons and of the strong interaction, with particular attention to charmonium spectroscopy. An overview of the scientific program of PANDA and the current status of the project will be presented.

  9. Lamb shift of energy levels in quantum rings

    Kryuchkyan, G Yu; Kyriienko, O; Shelykh, I A

    2015-01-01

    We study the vacuum radiative corrections to energy levels of a confined electron in quantum rings. The calculations are provided for the Lamb shift of energy levels in a low-momentum region of virtual photons and for both one-dimensional and two-dimensional quantum rings. We show that contrary to the well known case of a hydrogen atom the value of the Lamb shift increases with the magnetic momentum quantum number m. We also investigate the dependence of the Lamb shift on magnetic flux piercing the ring and demonstrate a presence of magnetic-flux-dependent oscillations. For a one-dimensional ring the value of the shift strongly depends on the radius of the ring. It is small for semiconductor rings but can attain measurable quantities in natural organic ring-shape molecules, such as benzene, cycloalcanes and porphyrins. (paper)

  10. Comparison of proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering at very high energies

    Gauron, P.; Nicolescu, B.; Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris; Leader, E.

    1985-09-01

    The ISR results on the differential cross-sections for pp and anti-pp show unambiguously that the crossing-odd amplitude is still important at very high energies. Comparison of ISR and CERN collider anti-pp data suggests that the crossing-odd amplitude is growing maximally fast with energy. We explore the phenomenological consequences of such a ''maximal odderon'' behaviour at TeV energies

  11. Lifetimes of relativistic heavy-ion beams in the High Energy Storage Ring of FAIR

    Shevelko, V. P.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Stöhlker, Th.; Tolstikhina, I. Yu.

    2018-04-01

    The High Energy Storage Ring, HESR, will be constructed at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR, Darmstadt. For the first time, it will be possible to perform experiments with cooled high-intensity stable and radioactive heavy ions at highly relativistic energies. To design experiments at the HESR, realistic estimations of beam lifetimes are indispensable. Here we report calculated cross sections and lifetimes for typical U88+ , U90+ , U92+ , Sn49+ and Sn50+ ions in the energy range E = 400 MeV/u-5 GeV/u, relevant for the HESR. Interactions with the residual gas and with internal gas-jet targets are also considered.

  12. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  13. A multiple-orbit time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on a low energy electrostatic storage ring

    Sullivan, M. R.; Spanjers, T. L.; Thorn, P. A.; Reddish, T. J.; Hammond, P.

    2012-11-01

    The results are presented for an electrostatic storage ring, consisting of two hemispherical deflector analyzers (HDA) connected by two separate sets of cylindrical lenses, used as a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Based on the results of charged particle simulations and formal matrix model, the Ion Storage Ring is capable of operating with multiple stable orbits, for both single and multiply charged ions simultaneously.

  14. Awards for high-energy physics at CERN

    2005-01-01

    Dave Barney of CMS with the Outreach Prize awarded by the European Physical Society. The European Physical Society (EPS) has awarded two prizes to CERN physicists. Dave Barney of CMS shared his Outreach Prize with Peter Kalmus of Queen Mary, University of London. This prize is awarded for communicating particle physics to the public. The NA31 collaboration and its spokesman, Heinrich Wahl, received the 2005 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize for their work on CP violation undertaken at CERN.

  15. Measure of back angle cross sections of antiproton-nucleus elastic scattering at 48 and 180 MeV

    Berrada, M.

    1986-04-01

    Antiproton-nucleus elastic scattering was studied in the LEAR ring at CERN. The scattering cross section at back angles (θ LAB = 142 to 164 deg inclusive) was measured using plastic scintillation detectors. Analysis of experimental data at 47 MeV for a CH target and at 182 MeV for CH, C12, 016, and 018 targets produces differential cross sections for back angles less than or equal to a few dozen microbarns. These results agree with theoretical microscopic predictions. The analysis improves understanding of antiproton-nucleus interaction and introduces a constraint on the construction of optical potentials. The antiproton-nucleus potential is shown to be highly absorbing, thereby excluding S type potentials, and removing the ambiguity arising from the analysis of antiprotonic atoms. The results also show that there is no attractive pocket in the real potential likely to lead to an increase of the back angle cross sections [fr

  16. CERN

    2007-01-01

    "Geat ready for the mother of all particle accelerator: the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), nearing completion at CERN, the International particle physics lab headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland." (1 paragraph)

  17. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  18. The Antiproton Depth-Dose Curve in Water

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth-dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge...

  19. Storage ring at HIE-ISOLDE Technical design report

    Grieser, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Raabe, R.; Blaum, K.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Butler, P. A.; Wenander, F.; Woods, P. J.; Aliotta, M.; Andreyev, A.; Artemyev, A.; Atanasov, D.; Aumann, T.; Balabanski, D.; Barzakh, A.; Batist, L.; Bernardes, A. -P.; Bernhardt, D.; Billowes, J.; Bishop, S.; Borge, M.; Borzov, I.; Boston, A. J.; Brandau, C.; Catford, W.; Catherall, R.; Cederkall, J.; Cullen, D.; Davinson, T.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dracoulis, G.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Egelhof, P.; Estrade, A.; Fischer, D.; Flanagan, K.; Fraile, L.; Fraser, M. A.; Freeman, S. J.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Greenlees, P.; Grisenti, R. E.; Habs, D.; von Hahn, R.; Hagmann, S.; Hausmann, M.; He, J. J.; Heil, M.; Huyse, M.; Jenkins, D.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Joss, D. T.; Kadi, Y.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kay, B. P.; Kiselev, O.; Kluge, H. -J.; Kowalska, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kreim, S.; Kroell, T.; Kurcewicz, J.; Labiche, M.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lestinsky, M.; Lotay, G.; Ma, X. W.; Marta, M.; Meng, J.; Muecher, D.; Mukha, I.; Mueller, A.; Murphy, A. St J.; Neyens, G.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Page, R. D.; Pasini, M.; Petridis, N.; Pietralla, N.; Pfuetzner, M.; Podolyak, Z.; Regan, P.; Reed, M. W.; Reifarth, R.; Reiter, P.; Repnow, R.; Riisager, K.; Rubio, B.; Sanjari, M. S.; Savin, D. W.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schippers, S.; Schneider, D.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Shubina, D.; Siesling, E.; Simon, H.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.; Sonnabend, K.; Steck, M.; Stora, T.; Stoehlker, T.; Sun, B.; Surzhykov, A.; Suzaki, F.; Tarasov, O.; Trotsenko, S.; Tu, X. L.; Van Duppen, P.; Volpe, C.; Voulot, D.; Walker, P. M.; Wildner, E.; Winckler, N.; Winters, D. F. A.; Wolf, A.; Xu, H. S.; Yakushev, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yuan, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zuber, K.; Bosch, F.M.

    We propose to install a storage ring at an ISOL-type radioactive beam facility for the first time. Specifically, we intend to setup the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored secondary beams

  20. Operational experience with bunch rotation momentum reduction in the Fermilab antiproton source

    Bharadwaj, V.; Griffin, J.E.; MacLachlan, J.A.; Martin, P.S.; Meisner, K.G.; Wildman, D.

    1987-01-01

    In the Fermilab antiproton accumulation system antiprotons are produced by the delivery of trains of 120 GeV proton bunches to a production target from which antiprotons are collected with mean energy 8 GeV (kinetic) and momentum spread Δrho/rho > 3%. The antiproton beam has the time structure of the incident protons. The proton bunch spacing-to-length ratio is made as large as possible (> 20:1) so that the resulting antiproton momentum spread may be reduced by ''bunch rotation'' in a ''debunching'' ring where time spread is exchanged for momentum spread. Details of these procedures are described elsewhere; in this paper the authors report on the efficacy of these procedures during routine operation

  1. Low-emittance Storage Rings

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The effects of synchrotron radiation on particle motion in storage rings are discussed. In the absence of radiation, particle motion is symplectic, and the beam emittances are conserved. The inclusion of radiation effects in a classical approximation leads to emittance damping: expressions for the damping times are derived. Then, it is shown that quantum radiation effects lead to excitation of the beam emittances. General expressions for the equilibrium longitudinal and horizontal (natural) emittances are derived. The impact of lattice design on the natural emittance is discussed, with particular attention to the special cases of FODO-, achromat- and theoretical-minimum-emittance-style lattices. Finally, the effects of betatron coupling and vertical dispersion (generated by magnet alignment and lattice tuning errors) on the vertical emittance are considered.

  2. Collisions involving antiprotons and antihydrogen: an overview

    Jonsell, S.

    2018-03-01

    I give an overview of experimental and theoretical results for antiproton and antihydrogen scattering with atoms and molecules (in particular H, He). At low energies (>1 keV) there are practically no experimental data available. Instead I compare the results from different theoretical calculations, of various degrees of sophistication. At energies up to a few tens of eV, I focus on simple approximations that give reasonably accurate results, as these allow quick estimates of collision rates without embarking on a research project. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  3. Elementary design of a 30 TeV on 30 TeV proton antiproton collider

    Kondo, Takahiko

    1984-01-01

    A crude conceptual design was made for a 30TeV on 30TeV antiproton-proton collider. The choice of energy and antiproton-proton (instead of PP) are somewhat arbitrary. The basic parameters of the main ring are listed in a table; the bending radius, ring radius and circumference are 11.1km, 14.4km, and 90.6km, respectively; 7680 dipole magnets with maximum field of 9 Tesla; 1280 quadrupole magnets with maximum gradient of 200Tesla/m. The development of high-field, low-heat loss dipoles and quadrupoles are essential, together with the consideration for their mass production method. On the other hand, the possibility of obtaining antiproton-proton luminosity exceeding 10 32 /cm 2 sec is suggested without any fundamental limitation. With such high luminosity, however, it should be pointed out that particle detectors must face their limitation due to extremely high rate, high multiplicity interaction, requiring large steps of detector research and development efforts. (Aoki, K.)

  4. Low energy bar pp physics

    Amsler, C.; Crowe, K.

    1989-02-01

    A detailed investigation of proton-antiproton interactions at low energy has become feasible with the commissioning of the LEAR facility in 1983. We shall shortly review the status of bar pp annihilation at rest and the physics motivations for second generation experiments with the Crystal Barrel detector. This type of detector would be adequate for the study of both Kp and bar pp interactions on an extracted beam of the KAON Factory. We shall conclude with a few remarks on the physics opportunities with bar p's at the KAON Factory which, in our opinion, will not be covered by the present LEAR facility. 11 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  5. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS: CERN Link Breathes Life Into Russian Physics.

    Stone, R

    2000-10-13

    Without fanfare, 600 Russian scientists here at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory, are playing key roles in building the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a machine that will explore fundamental questions such as why particles have mass, as well as search for exotic new particles whose existence would confirm supersymmetry, a popular theory that aims to unify the four forces of nature. In fact, even though Russia is not one of CERN's 20 member states, most top high-energy physicists in Russia are working on the LHC. Some say their work could prove the salvation of high-energy physics back home.

  6. The antiproton depth–dose curve in water

    Bassler, N; Jäkel, O; Knudsen, H V; Kovacevic, S

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the depth–dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Based on this agreement we calculate the antiproton depth–dose curve for antiprotons and compare it with that for protons and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons.

  7. Efficient Low Rank Tensor Ring Completion

    Wang, Wenqi; Aggarwal, Vaneet; Aeron, Shuchin

    2017-01-01

    Using the matrix product state (MPS) representation of the recently proposed tensor ring decompositions, in this paper we propose a tensor completion algorithm, which is an alternating minimization algorithm that alternates over the factors in the MPS representation. This development is motivated in part by the success of matrix completion algorithms that alternate over the (low-rank) factors. In this paper, we propose a spectral initialization for the tensor ring completion algorithm and ana...

  8. Deceleration of Antiprotons in Support of Antiproton Storage/Utilization Research

    Howe, Steven D.; Jackson, Gerald P.; Pearson, J. Boise; Lewis, Raymond A.

    2005-01-01

    Antimatter has the highest energy density known to mankind. Many concepts have been studied that use antimatter for propulsion. All of these concepts require the development of high density storage. H-bar Technologies, under contract with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, has undertaken the first step toward development of high density storage. Demonstration of the ability to store antiprotons in a Penning Trap provides the technology to pursue research in alternative storage methods that may lead to eventually to high density concepts. H-bar Technologies has undertaken research activity on the detailed design and operations required to decelerate and redirect the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) antiproton beam to lay the groundwork for a source of low energy antiprotons. We have performed a detailed assessment of an antiproton deceleration scheme using the FNAL Main Injector, outlining the requirements to significantly and efficiently lower the energy of antiprotons. This task shall require a combination of: theoretical/computation simulations, development of specialized accelerator controls programming, modification of specific Main Injector hardware, and experimental testing of the modified system. Testing shall be performed to characterize the system with a goal of reducing the beam momentum from 8.9 GeV/c to a level of 1 GeV/c or less. We have designed an antiproton degrader system that will integrate with the FNAL decelerated/transferred beam. The degrader shall be designed to maximize the number of low energy antiprotons with a beam spot sized for acceptance by the Mark I test hardware

  9. Electron-muon coincidences in proton-proton collisions at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

    Clark, A G; Darriulat, Pierre; Eggert, K; Hungerbühler, V; Jenni, Peter; Lapuyade, C; Modis, T; Pérez, P; Renshall, H; Richter, Burton; Smadja, G; Strauss, J; Strolin, P; Tarnopolsky, G J; Teiger, J; Tur, C; Vialle, J P; Zaccone, Henri; Zallo, A; Zylberstejn, A

    1978-01-01

    In an experiment carried out at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings with a highly selective electron spectrometer system and a magnetized iron filter to detect muons, the authors have observed 32+or-16 dilepton events of the type p+p to mu /sup +or-/+e/sup -or+/+... The integrated luminosity of the experiment was (2.0+or-0.1)*10/sup 37/ cm /sup -2/, and the over-all detection efficiency 0.14+or-0.07. Interpreting this signal as due to charmed meson-pair production, the authors estimate a model-dependent acceptance of 6.5*10/sup -5/ per event, and a cross-section sigma (p+p to D+D+...)=(18+or-9) mu b, with a scale uncertainty of 50% due to the detection efficiency. (9 refs).

  10. A review of accelerator and particle physics at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    Jacob, M.; Johnsen, K.

    1984-01-01

    The last meeting of the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings Committee (ISRC) was held on 27 January 1984, following the closing of the ISR for colliding-beam physics in December 1983. This report consists of the written versions of the two review talks presented at that meeting. K. Johnsen describes the history and importance of the ISR for accelerator physics, from the first ideas on colliding-beam devices to the final operation. M. Jacob gives his view of the role of the ISR physics programme in the development of particle physics up to and including the latest available results. The preface is by G. Bellettini, the last chairman of the ISR Committee. (orig.)

  11. Muon, positron and antiproton interactions with atoms and molecules

    Armour, Edward A G, E-mail: edward.armour@nottingham.ac.u [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, a description is given of some interesting processes involving the interaction of a muon, a positron, or an antiproton with atoms and molecules. The process involving a muon is the resonant formation of the muonic molecular ion, dt{mu}, in the muon catalyzed fusion cycle. In the case of a positron, the process considered is positron annihilation in low-energy positron scattering by the hydrogen molecule. The antiproton is considered as the nucleus of an antihydrogen atom interacting with simple atoms. Attention is given to antiproton annihilation through the strong interaction. An outline is given of proposed tests of fundamental physics to be carried out using antihydrogen.

  12. Radiation safety at CERN

    Hoefert, M [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, operates proton accelerators up to an energy of 450 GeV and an electron-positron storage ring in the 50 GeV energy range for fundamental high-energy particle physics. A strong radiation protection group assures the radiation safety of these machines both during their operation and in periods of maintenance and repair. Particular radiation problems in an accelerator laboratory are presented and recent developments in radiation protection at CERN discussed. (author)

  13. Inclusive measurements of hyperon production at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

    Erhan, S.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the inclusive reactions: pp→LAMBDA 0 +x, and pp→anti LAMBDA 0 +x, pp→exactly equal to - +x, pp→SIGMA+-(1385)+x) at equivalent laboratory moments of 1500 GeV/c (√s=53 GeV) and 2100 GeV/c (√s=62 GeV) at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR). An estimate of the total LAMBDA 0 and anti LAMBDA 0 inclusive cross sections is presented. The measured data are extrapolated to x = 0 using √s = 44 GeV CERN Intersecting Storage Ring results. The cross sections for LAMBDA 0 and anti LAMBDA 0 are found to be 4.42 +- 0.18 mb and 1.17 +- 0.40 mb at 1500 GeV/c and 4.72 +- 0.18 mb. and 1.37 +- 0.48 mb at 2100 GeV/c respectively. The total exactly equal to - inclusive cross section in the region x > 0.4 is found to be. In addition, results are presented of searches for reactions: pp →(LAMBDA 0 anti LAMBDA 0 ) +x and pp→(LAMBDA 0 LAMBDA 0 )+x. Pair production of LAMBDA 0 anti LAMBDA 0 with x > 0.6 is measured to be 1.7 +-/0.2μb, while LAMBDA 0 LAMBDA 0 cross section in the same x range is less than 1.0 +- 0.1 μb

  14. The design of the optical components and gas control systems of the CERN Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector

    Apsimon, R.J.; Cowell, J.; Flower, P.S.

    1985-06-01

    A large Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector (RICH) has been commissioned for use at the CERN Omega Spectrometer. The general design of the device is discussed, and the dependence of the attainable spatial resolution and range of particle identification on its optical parameters is illustrated. The construction and performance of the major optical components and gas systems of the detector are also described. (author)

  15. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    Nodulman, L.; Aaltonen, T; Albrow, M; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (p(T) > 0.5 GeV/c, vertical bar eta vertical bar < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies root s = 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta - phi space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  16. ALPHA freezes antiprotons

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratories like CERN can routinely produce many different types of antiparticles. In 1995, the PS210 experiment formed the first antihydrogen atoms and a few years later, in 2002, ATRAP and ATHENA were already able to produce several thousand of them. However, no experiment in the world has succeeded in ‘trapping’ these anti-atoms in order to study them. This is the goal of the ALPHA experiment, which has recently managed to cool down the antiprotons to just a few Kelvin. This represents a major step towards trapping the anti-atom, thus opening a new avenue into the investigation of antimatter properties.   Members of the ALPHA collaboration working on the apparatus in the Antiproton Decelerator experimental hall at CERN. Just like the atom, the anti-atom is neutral. Unlike the atom, the anti-atom is made up of antiprotons (as opposed to protons in the atom) and positrons (as opposed to electrons). In order to thoroughly study the properties of the anti-atoms, scien...

  17. Cern

    2009-01-01

    "La réparation de l'accélérateur géant de particules LHC, qui devrait redémarrer mi-novembre aprés une panne de plus d'un an, a coûté 23 millions d'euros, selon un haut responsable du Centre européen de recherche nucléaire (CERN), cité vendredi par les médias espagnols" (1 paragraph)

  18. A Study of the Energy Dependence of the Underlying Event in Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Marchese, Luigi; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; Devoto, Francesco; D'Errico, Maria; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; D'Onofrio, Monica; Donati, Simone; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kim, Young-Jin; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucà, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Prokoshin, Fedor; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Song, Hao; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta-phi space; toward, away, and transverse. The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the underlying event. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the hard component (initial and final-state radiation) from the beam-beam remnant and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  19. Superconducting magnets for high energy storage rings

    Sampson, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets were developed for the proton-proton intersecting storage accelerator ISABELLE. Full size prototypes of both kinds of magnets were constructed and successfully tested. The coils are fabricated from a single layer of wide braided superconductor and employ a low temperature iron core. This method of construction leads to two significant performance advantages; little or no training, and the ability of the coil to absorb its total magnetic stored energy without damage. A high pressure (15 atm) helium gas system is used for cooling. Measurements of the random field errors are compared with the expected field distribution. Three magnets (two dipoles and one quadrupole) were assembled into a segment of the accelerator ring structure (half cell). The performance of this magnet array, which is coupled in series both electrically and cryogenically, is also summarized

  20. The antiproton ion collider at FAIR

    Fabbietti, L.; Faestermann, T.; Homolka, J.; Kienle, P.; Kruecken, R.; Ring, P.; Suziki, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Frankze, B.; Kozhuharov, C.; Nolden, F.; Cargnelli, M.; Fuhrmann, H.; Hirtl, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Hayano, R.S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Lenske, H.; Litvinov, Y.; Shatunov, Y.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Vostrikov, V.A.; Wycech, S.

    2005-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to determine the charge and the matter radii instable and short lived nuclei using an pBar-A collider. The experiment makes use of the appropriately modified electron-ion collider Elise, to collide 30 MeV anti-protons with 740 AMeV ions. The anti-protons are first collected in the CR ring with 3 GeV energy and then cooled in the RESR ring to 30 MeV. The heavy ions produced in the SFRS are precooled in the CR ring, cooled in the RESR ring to 740 AMeV and fed to the NESR ring. The total pBar-nucleon annihilation cross-section is measured detecting the loss of stored ions and the pBar-n, pBar-p cross-sections detecting the A - 1 (Z - 1 or N - 1) nuclei left over after the annihilation, using the Schottcky method. Theoretical predictions show that the annihilation cross-section is proportional to the mean squared radius. (author)

  1. The CTF3 team who performed the first electron beam recombination in an isochronous ring at CERN.

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 0210004_1: Part of CTF3 collaboration. From left to right: T. Ekelof (Uppsala), A. Gallo (LNF), P. Royer (Lausanne), F. Tecker (CERN), L. Rinolfi (CERN), A. Ferrari (Uppsala), R. Corsini (CERN), S. Quaglia, (LNF). Photo 0210004_2: A. Ferrari (left), T. Ekelof (middle) and A. Rydberg (right), from Uppsala University, Sweden, standing where the phase monitor HR.PHM60 is installed. Photo 0210004_4: A. Gallo (LNF) standing in front of the RF deflector designed by INFN-Frascati. Photo 0210004_7: The team who designed the CTF3 complex starting from the existing LEP Pre-Injector. From left to right L. Rinolfi, A. Ferrari, F. Tecker (standing up) and R. Corsini, P. Royer (kneeling down) in front of the electron transfer line between the linac and the combiner ring. Photo 0210004_9: The CTF3 team who performed the first electron beam recombination in an isochronous ring at CERN. From left to right, L. Rinolfi, P. Royer, F. Tecker, R. Corsini standing up in front of the two RF deflectors built at CERN and working...

  2. [Medium energy meson research

    Crowe, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    The activities of this group are primarily concerned with experiments using the Crystal Barrel Detector. This detector is installed and operating at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. QCD, the modem theory of the strong interaction, is reasonably well understood at high energies, but unfortunately, low-energy QCD is still not well understood, and is far from being adequately tested. The Crystal Barrel experiments are designed to provide some of the tests. The basic line of research involves meson spectroscopy, analyses bearing on the quark and/or gluon content of nuclear states, and the exploration of mechanisms and rules which govern p bar p annihilation dynamics. The Crystal Barrel Detector detects and identifies charged and neutral particles with a geometric acceptance close to 100%. The principal component of the detector is an array of 1,380 CsI(TI) crystals. These crystals surround a Jet Drift Chamber (JDC), located in a 1.5 Tesla magnetic field, which measures the momentum and dE/dx of charged particles. One of the very interesting physics goals of the detector is a search for exotic mesonic states -- glueballs and hybrids. Annihilation at rest will be studied with both liquid and gaseous hydrogen targets. The gaseous target offers the possibility of triggering on atomic L-shell X rays so that specific initial angular momentum states can be studied.These topics as well as other related topics are discussed in this report

  3. Radiation studies in the antiproton source

    Church, M.

    1990-01-01

    Experiment E760 has a lead glass (Pb-G) calorimeter situated in the antiproton source tunnel in the accumulator ring at location A50. This location is exposed to radiation from several sources during antiproton stacking operations. A series of radiation studies has been performed over the last two years to determine the sources of this radiation and as a result, some shielding has been installed in the antiproton source in order to protect the lead glass from radiation damage

  4. Investigation of the antiprotonic X-ray spectrum of the lithium isotopes 6Li and 7Li

    Guigas, R.

    1981-09-01

    Antiprotons of the low-energy separated anti p-beam K 23 at CERN in Geneva have been stopped in thin (0.6 g/cm 2 ) targets of the Lithium isotopes 6 Li and 7 Li. The characteristic X-rays of the formed antiprotonic atoms were measured with four identical high-resolution Si (Li) detectors. Three lines of the N- series, four lines of the M-series and the 3d-2p transition of the Balmer series were observed. The measured relative intensities of the M- and N-series transitions are well described by the simple cascade model of Eisenberg and Kessler. The 3d-2p transition is considerably influenced by the strong interaction between antiproton and nucleus and thus drastically reduced in intensity. The analysis of this transition yields the shift and width of the 2p level, whereas the width of the 3d level is deduced from intensity considerations. (orig./HSI)

  5. Tinkering at the main-ring lattice

    Ohnuma, S.

    1982-08-23

    To improve production of usable antiprotons using the proton beam from the main ring and the lossless injection of cooled antiprotons into the main ring, modifications of the main ring lattice are recommended.

  6. Results from high energy photoproduction at the CERN SPS

    Richard, F.

    1979-09-01

    Results from a photoproduction experiment using the CERN spectrometer with a tagged photon beam giving energies between 20 and 70 GeV are presented here. Charm physics and vector meson searches are emphasized. A luminosity of 80 events/nb was obtained on events with a detected charged kaon and of 60 events/nb on events with at least four prongs. Results on an emulsion exposure using the same apparatus are also presented

  7. Study of an energy upgrade of the CERN PS Booster

    Hanke, K; Angoletta, M E; Bartmann, W; Bartolome, S; Bertone, C; Blas, A; Borburgh, J; Bozzini, D; Butterworth, A; Carli, C; Dahlen, P; Dobers, T; Findlay, A; Folch, R; Gilbert, N; Hansen, J; Hermanns, T; Jensen, S; Le Roux, P; Lopez-Hernandez, L A; Mahner, E; Masi, A; Mikulec, B; Muttoni, Y; Newborough, A; Nisbet, D; Nonis, M; Olek, S; Paoluzzi, M; Pittet, S; Puccio, B; Raginel, V; Ruehl, I; Tan, J; Todd, B; Weterings, W; Widorski, W

    2011-01-01

    CERN’s LHC injector chain will have to deliver beams with ultimate brilliance as the LHC is heading for increased luminosity in the coming years. In order to overcome bottlenecks in the injector chain, an increase of the beam transfer energy from the CERN Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) to the Proton Synchrotron (PS) has been investigated as a possible upgrade scenario. This paper gives an overview of the technical solutions and summarizes the conclusions of the feasibility study.

  8. Undulator tunability and synchrotron ring-energy

    Viccaro, P.J.; Sheony, G.K.

    1992-01-01

    An undulator has two properties which make it an extremely attractive source of electromagnetic radiation. The first is that the radiation is concentrated in a number of narrow energy bands known as harmonics of the device. The second characteristic is that under favorable operating conditions, the energy of these harmonics can be shifted or open-quote tunedclose quotes over an energy interval which can be as large as two or three times the value of the lowest energy harmonic. Both the photon energy of an undulator as well as its tunability are determined by the period, λ, of the device, the magnetic gap, G (which is larger than the minimum aperture required for injection and operation of the storage ring) and the storage ring energy E R . Given the photon energy, E p , the above parameters ultimately define the limits of operation or tunability of the undulator. In general, the larger the tunability range, the more useful the device. Therefore, for a given required maximum photon energy, it is desirable to find the operating conditions and device parameters which result in the largest tunability interval possible. With this in mind, we have investigated the question of undulator tunability with emphasis on the role of the ring energy in order to find the smallest E R consistent with the desired tunability interval and photon energy. As a guideline, we have included a preliminary criteria, concerning the tunability requirements for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to be built at Argonne. The analysis is aimed at X-ray undulator sources on the APS but is applicable to any storage ring

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Low Energy Experiments that Measure Fundamental Constants and Test Basic Symmetries

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 , 21 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Low Energy Experiments that Measure Fundamental Constants and Test Basic Symmetries by G. GABRIELSE / Professor of Physics and Chair of the Harvard Physics Department, Spokesperson for the ATRAP Collaboration Lecture 1: Particle Traps: the World's Tiniest Accelerators A single elementary particle, or a single ion, can be confined in a tiny accelerator called a particle trap. A single electron was held this way for more than ten months, and antiprotons for months. Mass spectroscopy of exquisite precision is possible with such systems. CERN's TRAP Collaboration thereby compared the charge-to-mass ratios of the antiproton and proton to a precision of 90 parts per trillion, by far the most stringent CPT test done with a baryon system. The important ratio of the masses of the electron and proton have been similarly measured, as have a variety of ions masses, and the neutron mass is most accurately known from such measurements. An i...

  10. D{sup -} energy spectrum in toroidal quantum ring

    Gomez, C A; Gutierrez, W; Garcia, L F [Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Marin, J H, E-mail: jhmarin@unal.edu.c [Universidad Nacional-Colombia, Medellin-Colombia, AA3840 (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    The structure of energy spectrum of the negative donor centre in a toroidal-shaped quantum ring with two different morphologies of the cross-section is analyzed. By using the adiabatic procedure we have deduced a one-dimensional wave equation with periodic conditions which describes the low-lying energy levels related to the electrons rotation around the symmetry axis. Our results are in good agreement with those previously obtained as the size of the ring cross-section tends to zero.

  11. Antiproton production

    Allaby, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    The basic definitions used in the physics literature on particle production are reviewed. The data on anti p production are interpreted in order to provide an estimate of the yield of anti p's from typical target at the antiproton accumulator, including the effects of re-absorption in the target. (orig.)

  12. Antiproton Target

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  13. Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage.

    Durgun, E; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-03-21

    Solar-thermal fuels reversibly store solar energy in the chemical bonds of molecules by photoconversion, and can release this stored energy in the form of heat upon activation. Many conventional photoswichable molecules could be considered as solar thermal fuels, although they suffer from low energy density or short lifetime in the photoinduced high-energy metastable state, rendering their practical use unfeasible. We present a new approach to the design of chemistries for solar thermal fuel applications, wherein well-known photoswitchable molecules are connected by different linker agents to form molecular rings. This approach allows for a significant increase in both the amount of stored energy per molecule and the stability of the fuels. Our results suggest a range of possibilities for tuning the energy density and thermal stability as a function of the type of the photoswitchable molecule, the ring size, or the type of linkers.

  14. Optics Design and Performance of an Ultra-Low Emittance Damping Ring for the Compact Linear Collider

    Korostelev, M S

    2006-01-01

    A high-energy (0.5-3.0 TeV centre of mass) electron-positron Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is being studied at CERN as a new physics facility. The design study has been optimized for 3 TeV centre-of-mass energy. Intense bunches injected into the main linac must have unprecedentedly small emittances to achieve the design luminosity 1035cm-2s-1 required for the physics experiments. The positron and electron bunch trains will be provided by the CLIC injection complex. This thesis describes an optics design and performance of a positron damping ring developed for producing such ultra-low emittance beam. The linear optics of the CLIC damping ring is optimized by taking into account the combined action of radiation damping, quantum excitation and intrabeam scattering. The required beam emittance is obtained by using a TME (Theoretical Minimum Emittance) lattice with compact arcs and short period wiggler magnets located in dispersionfree regions. The damping ring beam energy is chosen as 2.42 GeV. The lattice featu...

  15. Measurement of the antiproton/proton ratio at TeV energies with the ARGO-YBJ detector

    Di Sciascio, Giuseppe; Iuppa, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons provide an important probe for the study of cosmic-ray propagation in the interstellar space and to investigate the existence of Galactic dark matter. Cosmic rays are hampered by the Moon, therefore a deficit of cosmic rays in its direction is expected (the so-called Moon shadow). The Earth-Moon system acts as a magnetic spectrometer. In fact, due to the geomagnetic field the center of the Moon shifts westward by an amount depending on the primary cosmic ray energy. Paths of primary antiprotons are therefore deflected in an opposite sense in their way to the Earth. This effect allows, in principle, the search of antiparticles in the opposite direction of the observed Moon shadow. The ARGO-YBJ experiment, in stable data taking since November 2007 with an energy threshold of a few 100s of GeV, is observing the Moon shadow with high statistical significance. Using about 1 year data, an upper limit of the p-bar/p flux ratio in the few-TeV energy region is set to a few percent with a confidence level of 90%.

  16. Spectroscopy of antiproton helium atoms

    Hayano, Ryugo

    2005-01-01

    Antiproton helium atom is three-body system consisting of an antiproton, electrons and a helium nucleus (denoted by the chemical symbol, p-bar H + ). The authors produced abundant atoms of p-bar 4 He + , and p-bar 3 He + in a cooled He gas target chamber stopping the p-bar beam decelerated to approximately 100 keV in the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN. A precision laser spectroscopy on the atomic transitions in the p-bar 4 He + , and in p-bar 3 He + was performed. Principle of laser spectroscopy and various modifications of the system to eliminate factors affecting the accuracy of the experiment were described. Deduced mass ratio of antiproton and proton, (|m p -bar - m p |)/m p reached to the accuracy of 10 ppb (10 -8 ) as of 2002, as adopted in the recent article of the Particle Data Group by P.J. Mohr and B.N. Taylor. This value is the highest precise data for the CPT invariance in baryon. In future, antihydrogen atoms will be produced in the same facility, and will provide far accurate value of antiproton mass thus enabling a better confirmation of CPT theorem in baryon. (T. Tamura)

  17. Physicists produce first antiatom

    Watson, A

    1996-01-01

    Researchers at the European Center for Particle Physics (CERN) created 11 atoms of antihydrogen using the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring. Physicists forecast that the creation of the first antiatoms will aid in the understanding of antimatter.

  18. Beam Commissioning of the PEP-II High Energy Ring

    Wienands, U.; Anderson, S.; Assmann, R.; Bharadwaj, V.; Cai, Y.; Clendenin, J.; Corredoura, P.; Decker, F.J.; Donald, M.; Ecklund, S.; Emma, P.; Erickson, R.; Fox, J.; Fieguth, T.; Fisher, A.; Heifets, S.; Hill, A.; Himel, T.; Iverson, R.; Johnson, R.; Judkins, J.; Krejcik, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lee, M.; Mattison, T.; Minty, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Phinney, N.; Placidi, M.; Prabhakar, S.; Ross, M.; Smith, S.; Schwarz, H.; Stanek, M.; Teytelman, D.; Traller, R.; Turner, J.; Zimmermann, F.; Barry, W.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Corlett, J.; Decking, W.; Furman, M.; Nishimura, H.; Portmann, G.; Rimmer, R.; Zholents, A.; Zisman, M.; Kozanecki, W.; Hofmann, A.; Zotter, B.; Steier, C.; Bialowons, W.; Lomperski, M.; Lumpkin, A.; Reichel, I.; Safranek, J.; Smith, V.; Tighe, R.; Sullivan, M.; Byrd, J.; Li, D.

    1998-01-01

    The PEP-II High Energy Ring (HER), a 9 GeV electron storage ring, has been in commissioning since spring 1997. Initial beam commissioning activities focused on systems checkout and commissioning and on determining the behavior of the machine systems at high beam currents. This phase culminated with the accumulation of 0.75 A of stored beam-sufficient to achieve design luminosity--in January 1998 after 3.5 months of beam time. Collisions with the 3 GeV positron beam of the Low Energy Ring (LER) were achieved in Summer of 1998. At high beam currents, collective instabilities have been seen. Since then, commissioning activities for the HER have shifted in focus towards characterization of the machine and a rigorous program to understand the machine and the beam dynamics is presently underway

  19. The proton-antiproton collider

    Evans, L.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this lecture is the CERN Proton-Antiproton (panti p) Collider, in which John Adams was intimately involved at the design, development, and construction stages. Its history is traced from the original proposal in 1966, to the first panti p collisions in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in 1981, and to the present time with drastically improved performance. This project led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson in 1983 and produced one of the most exciting and productive physics periods in CERN's history. (orig.)

  20. Status Report of Projects Activities at CERN

    Missiaen, Dominique; Dobers, Tobias; Fuchs, Jean-Frederic; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Jones, Mark; Mainaud Durand, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Besides the Long Shut-Down 1 (LS1), some projects are still progressing at CERN. Among them, it has to be mentioned LINAC4, a future essential part of the LHC injector chain, AWAKE, a project to verify the approach of using protons to drive a strong wakefield in a plasma, ELENA, a small compact ring for cooling and decelerating antiproton and HIE-Isolde, not to forget the long term studies for CLIC and FCC. This paper describes the status of these projects from the survey and alignment point of view.

  1. Design for a practical, low-emittance damping ring

    Krejcik, P.

    1988-01-01

    The luminosity requirements for future high-energy linear colliders calls for very low emittances in the two beams. These low emittances can be achieved with damping rings, but, in order to reach the design goal of a factor 10 improvement over present day machines, great care must be taken in their design. This paper emphasizes the need to address simultaneously all of the factors which limit the operational emittance in the ring. Particularly since in standard designs there is a conflict between different design parameters which makes it difficult to extrapolate such designs to very low emittances. The approach chosen here is to resolve such conflicts by separating their design solutions. Wigglers are used predominantly in zero-dispersion regions to achieve the desired damping rate, whereas in the arcs high dispersion insertions are made in regions of zero curvature to allow for easier chromaticity control

  2. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  3. Antiprotons are another matter

    Hynes, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Theories of gravity abound, whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer these properties from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster, and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependance in the earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to ∼4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H - ions which simulates the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton, yet is a baryon to ∼0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H - ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of ∼10 6 to 10 7 particles

  4. Antiprotons are another matter

    Hynes, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    Theories of gravity abound whereas experiments in gravity are few in number. An important experiment in gravity that has not been performed is the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Although there have been attempts to infer this property from those of normal matter, none of these theoretical arguments are compelling. Modern theories of gravity that attempt to unify gravity with the other forces of nature predict that in principle antimatter can fall differently than normal matter in the Earth's field. Some of these supergravity theories predict that antimatter will fall faster and that normal matter will fall with a small Baryon-number dependence in the Earth's field. All of these predictions violate the Weak Equivalence Principle, a cornerstone of General Relativity, but are consistent with CPT conservation. In our approved experiment at LEAR (PS-200) we will test the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter by measuring the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton. Through a series of deceleration stages, antiprotons from LEAR will be lowered in energy to ≅ 4 Kelvin at which energy the gravitational effect will be measureable. The measurement will employ the time-of-flight technique wherein the antiprotons are released vertically in a drift tube. The spectrum of time-of-flight measurements can be used to extract the gravitational acceleration experienced by the particles. The system will be calibrated using H - ions which simulate the electromagnetic behavior of the antiproton yet are baryons to ≅ 0.1%. To extract the gravitational acceleration of the antiproton relative to the H - ion with a statistical precision of 1% will require the release of ≅ 10 6 -10 7 particles. (orig.)

  5. Serach for polarization effects in the antiproton production process

    It is proposed to study polarization effects in the production of antiprotons at the PS test beam line T11 at 3.5 GeV/c momentum. A polarization in the production process has never been studied but if existing it would allow for a rather simple and cheap way to generate a polarized antiproton beam with the existing facilities at CERN.

  6. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    a further enhancement due to their annihilation at the end of the path. The work presented here aimed to establish and validate an experimental procedure for the quantification of plasmid and genomic DNA damage resulting from antiproton exposure. Immunocytochemistry was used to assess DNA damage in directly......Radiotherapy employs ionizing radiation to induce lethal DNA lesions in cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. Due to their pattern of energy deposition, better therapeutic outcomes can, in theory, be achieved with ions compared to photons. Antiprotons have been proposed to offer...... and indirectly exposed human fibroblasts irradiated in both plateau and Bragg peak regions of a 126 MeV antiproton beam at CERN. Cells were stained post irradiation with an anti-γ-H2AX antibody. Quantification of the γ-H2AX foci-dose relationship is consistent with a linear increase in the Bragg peak region...

  7. GPUs for the realtime low-level trigger of the NA62 experiment at CERN

    Ammendola, R; Biagioni, A; Chiozzi, S; Cotta Ramusino, A; Fantechi, R; Fiorini, M; Gianoli, A; Graverini, E; Lamanna, G; Lonardo, A; Messina, A; Neri, I; Pantaleo, F; Paolucci, P S; Piandani, R; Pontisso, L; Simula, F; Sozzi, M; Vicini, P

    2015-01-01

    A pilot project for the use of GPUs (Graphics processing units) in online triggering ap- plications for high energy physics experiments (HEP) is presented. GPUs offer a highly parallel architecture and the fact that most of the chip resources are devoted to computa- tion. Moreover, they allow to achieve a large computing power using a limited amount of space and power. The application of online parallel computing on GPUs is shown for the synchronous low level trigger of NA62 experiment at CERN. Direct GPU communication using a FPGA-based board has been exploited to reduce the data transmission latency and results on a first field test at CERN will be highlighted. This work is part of a wider project named GAP (GPU application project), intended to study the use of GPUs in real-time applications in both HEP and medical imagin

  8. Potential kaon and antiproton beams at BNL

    Lazarus, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    The AGS at Brookhaven is the worlds most prolific producer of kaons and low energy antiprotons during operations. With the imminent operation of the AGS Booster which will increase intensities by an anticipated factor of six in the next few years, it will become possible to have purified beams of particles containing strange quarks and anti-quarks with intensities comparable to the pion beams which have so successfully dominated precision hadron spectroscopy in the past. 10 refs., 3 figs

  9. Scaling in inelastic proton-proton interactions at storage ring energies of 23-63 GeV

    Thome, W.

    1980-02-01

    In this paper inelastic proton-proton interactions are studied with low transversal momenta ( approx. equal to 350 MeV/c) of the final state hadrons. The reaction products from p-p collisions have been detected for the first time visually, using two large streamer chambers which enclose one interaction region of the CERN storage rings almost completely. (orig./HSI) [de

  10. The International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR

    Gutbrod, H. H.

    2008-01-01

    The proposed project FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) is an international accelerator facility of the next generation and will be built as a new company FAIR GmbH next to the site of GSI. About 15 countries have expressed their intention to become shareholders. FAIR builds on the experience and technological developments already made at the existing GSI facility, and at the FAIR partner institutes world wide and incorporates new technological concepts. At its heart is a double ring facility with a circumference of 1100 meters. A system of cooler-storage rings for effective beam cooling at high energies and various experimental halls will be connected to the facility. The existing GSI accelerators - together with the planned proton-linac - serve as injector for the new facility. The double-ring synchrotron will provide ion beams of unprecedented intensities as well as of considerably increased energy. Thereby intense beams of secondary beams - unstable nuclei or antiprotons - can be produced. The system of storage-cooler rings allows the quality of these secondary beams - their energy spread and emittance - to be drastically improved. Moreover, in connection with the double ring synchrotron, an efficient parallel operation of up to four scientific programs can be realized at a time. The project is based on many technological innovations, the most important of which are five beam properties: Highest Beam Intensities, Brilliant Beam Quality, Higher Beam Energies, Highest Beam Power, Parallel Operation

  11. ELENA prepares a bright future for antimatter research

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    At its recent session in June, the CERN Council approved the construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) – an upgrade of the existing Antiproton Decelerator. ELENA will allow the further deceleration of antiprotons, resulting in an increased number of particles trapped downstream in the experimental set-ups. This will give an important boost to antimatter research in the years to come.   Layout of the AD experimental hall: the Antiproton Decelerator ring (purple); the ALPHA, ASACUSA, and ATRAP experiments (green); the ACE experiment (not pictured); and the new ELENA ring (blue). The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is CERN’s widely recognized facility for the study of antimatter properties. The recent successes of the AD experiments are just the latest in a long list of important scientific results that started with LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring). The scientific demand for low-energy antiprotons at the AD continues to grow. There are now four experiments runnin...

  12. Beam Profile Measurement with Flying Wires at the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    Hu, Martin; Krider, John; Lorman, Eugene; Marchionni, Alberto; Pishchalnikov, Yu M; Pordes, Stephen; Slimmer, David; Wilson, Peter R; Zagel, James

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring is a high vacuum fixed energy antiproton storage ring with stochastic and electron cooling systems. Flying wires were installed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring for transverse beam profile measurement. The following note describes the system configuration, calibration and resolution of the flying wire system, as well as analysis of the transverse beam profile in the presence of both cooling systems.

  13. Polarized beams in high energy storage rings

    Montague, B W [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1984-11-01

    In recent years there has been a considerable advance in understanding the spin motion of particles in storage rings and accelerators. The survey presented here outlines the early historical development in this field, describes the basic ideas governing the kinetics of polarized particles in electromagnetic fields and shows how these have evolved into the current description of polarized beam behaviour. Orbital motion of particles influences their spin precession, and depolarization of a beam can result from excitation of spin resonances by orbit errors and oscillations. Electrons and positrons are additionally influenced by the quantized character of synchrotron radiation, which not only provides a polarizing mechanism but also enhances depolarizing effects. Progress in the theoretical formulation of these phenomena has clarified the details of the physical processes and suggested improved methods of compensating spin resonances. Full use of polarized beams for high-energy physics with storage rings requires spin rotators to produce longitudinal polarization in the interaction regions. Variants of these schemes, dubbed Siberian snakes, provide a curious precession topology which can substantially reduce depolarization in the high-energy range. Efficient polarimetry is an essential requirement for implementing polarized beams, whose utility for physics can be enhanced by various methods of spin manipulation.

  14. A Beam Interlock System for CERN High Energy Accelerators

    Todd, Benjamin; Schmidt, R

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (The European Organisation for Nuclear Research) is one of the largest and most complicated machines envisaged to date. The LHC has been conceived and designed over the course of the last 25 years and represents the cutting edge of accelerator technology with a collision energy of 14TeV, having a stored beam energy over 100 times more powerful than the nearest competitor. Commissioning of the machine is already nderway and operation with beam is intended for Autumn 2007, with 7TeV operation expected in 2008. The LHC is set to answer some of the fundemental questions in theoretical physics, colliding particles with such high energy that the inner workings of the quantum world can be revealed. Colliding particles together at such high energy makes very high demands on machine operation and protection. The specified beam energy requires strong magnetic fields that are made in superconducting dipole magnets, these magnets are kept only around two degrees above absolute zero...

  15. Characterization of CERN-EU high energy reference radiation fields with recombination chamber

    Golnik, N.

    1998-01-01

    The CERN-EU reference radiation field facility (called CERFF) is available behind a shielding of high-energy particles beam at CERN since 1993. At present the parameters of the radiation from beam target are well investigated, however, there are still some serious doubts concerning contribution of low-LET concurrent radiation. This paper presents an experimental procedure for determination of the contribution from the concurrent radiation by measuring the absorbed dose and recombination index of radiation quality at different beam intensities. Additionally, the values of H * (10) were measured in several measuring locations. Measurements were performed with a REM-2 recombination chamber and compared with those obtained by using a HANDI-TEPC instrument. (author)

  16. Cryogenic tunable microwave cavity at 13GHz for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    Sakaguchi, J.; Gilg, H.; Hayano, R.S.; Ishikawa, T.; Suzuki, K.; Widmann, E.; Yamaguchi, H.; Caspers, F.; Eades, J.; Hori, M.; Barna, D.; Horvath, D.; Juhasz, B.; Torii, H.A.; Yamazaki, T.

    2004-01-01

    For the precise measurement of the hyperfine structure of antiprotonic helium, microwave radiation of 12.9GHz frequency is needed, tunable over +/-100MHz. A cylindrical microwave cavity is used whose front and rear faces are meshed to allow the antiprotons and laser beams to enter. The cavity is embedded in a cryogenic helium gas target. Frequency tuning of ∼300MHz with Q values of 2700-3000 was achieved using over-coupling and an external triple stub tuner. We also present Monte-Carlo simulations of the stopping distribution of antiprotons in the low-density helium gas using the GEANT4 package with modified energy loss routines

  17. Overlap knock-out effects in the CERN intersecting storage rings (ISR)

    Gourber, J P; Myers, S

    1977-01-01

    Overlap knock-out arises from an overlap between frequencies present in a bunched beam and the betatron frequencies in a stack. The 'single ring' effect in the interaction of a bunched beam with a stack in the same ring. Here the coupling forces are fairly linear and are transmitted by machine elements. The 'two-ring' effect is the interaction of a bunched beam with a stack in the other ring. Here the coupling forces are nonlinear since they are produced by the beam-beam interaction. A brief outline of the general theory of these effects is given. The single ring and two-ring dipole effects have been observed and shown to cause a large increase in the transverse size of the stacked beam. (4 refs).

  18. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-11-04

    © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is to understand the force between nucleons, which is a necessary step for understanding the structure of nuclei and how nuclei interact with each other. Rutherford discovered the atomic nucleus in 1911, and the large body of knowledge about the nuclear force that has since been acquired was derived from studies made on nucleons or nuclei. Although antinuclei up to antihelium-4 have been discovered and their masses measured, little is known directly about the nuclear force between antinucleons. Here, we study antiproton pair correlations among data collected by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), where gold ions are collided with a centre-of-mass energy of 200 gigaelectronvolts per nucleon pair. Antiprotons are abundantly produced in such collisions, thus making it feasible to study details of the antiproton-antiproton interaction. By applying a technique similar to Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity interferometry, we show that the force between two antiprotons is attractive. In addition, we report two key parameters that characterize the corresponding strong interaction: the scattering length and the effective range of the interaction. Our measured parameters are consistent within errors with the corresponding values for proton-proton interactions. Our results provide direct information on the interaction between two antiprotons, one of the simplest systems of antinucleons, and so are fundamental to understanding the structure of more-complex antinuclei and the ir properties.

  19. Measurement of interaction between antiprotons

    The Star Collaboration; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is to understand the force between nucleons, which is a necessary step for understanding the structure of nuclei and how nuclei interact with each other. Rutherford discovered the atomic nucleus in 1911, and the large body of knowledge about the nuclear force that has since been acquired was derived from studies made on nucleons or nuclei. Although antinuclei up to antihelium-4 have been discovered and their masses measured, little is known directly about the nuclear force between antinucleons. Here, we study antiproton pair correlations among data collected by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), where gold ions are collided with a centre-of-mass energy of 200 gigaelectronvolts per nucleon pair. Antiprotons are abundantly produced in such collisions, thus making it feasible to study details of the antiproton-antiproton interaction. By applying a technique similar to Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity interferometry, we show that the force between two antiprotons is attractive. In addition, we report two key parameters that characterize the corresponding strong interaction: the scattering length and the effective range of the interaction. Our measured parameters are consistent within errors with the corresponding values for proton-proton interactions. Our results provide direct information on the interaction between two antiprotons, one of the simplest systems of antinucleons, and so are fundamental to understanding the structure of more-complex antinuclei and their properties.

  20. A naturally occurring trap for antiprotons

    Eades, J.; Morita, N.; Ito, T.M.

    1993-05-01

    The phenomenon of delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium is the first instance of a naturally occurring trap for antimatter in ordinary matter. Recent studies of this effect at CERN are summarized, and plans are described for laser excitation experiments to test its interpretation in terms of metastable exotic helium atom formation. (author)

  1. Recent results from proton-antiproton colliders

    Geer, S.

    1990-03-01

    New results from the CERN and Fermilab proton-antiproton colliders are summarised. The areas covered are jet physics, direct photon production, W and Z production and decay, heavy flavor production, the search for the top quark, and the search for more exotic phenomena. 46 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation of the sem......Theoretical antiproton and proton cross sections for ionization and excitation of hydrogen molecules as well as energy spectra of the ionized electrons were calculated in the impact-energy range from 8  to  4000  keV. The cross sections were computed with the close-coupling formulation...

  3. CERN: LEP to higher energy/LHC magnet string test

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    At 19.45 on 31 October, CERN's LEP electron-positron collider, equipped with superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities, registered its first events at a record collision energy of 130 GeV. During November, LEP went on to operate in the 130-140 GeV collision energy range. Fabrication and installation of the superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities needed to boost the energy of LEP's electron and positron beams have speeded up as confidence and expertise have increased. 16 additional cavities were installed in a brief technical stop during October. For the substantially upgraded machine to supply 65 GeV beams immediately and at luminosities comparable to those routinely attained before shows that the complicated technology needed for the superconducting cavities and mastering the machine itself are well under control - yet another remarkable achievement in CERN's tradition of remarkable achievements. Before the end-1995 run, LEP had been operating around the Z resonance at 91 GeV ever since its commissioning in 1989. LEP precision data on the Z, the electrically neutral carrier of the weak nuclear force, is now complete, and attention shifts toward the next major objective, accumulating data on the W, the Z's electrically charged counterpart. Unlike the Z, produced singly in electron-positron annihilations, the electrically charged Ws have to be produced in pairs. During the coming long shutdown, more superconducting modules will be installed to prepare for recommencement of operations in June, this time at collision energies of 161 GeV, allowing a first step across a longawaited 2W threshold. Later in the year more cavities will be ready to boost collision energies to 176 GeV. However in the meantime the LEP experiments, no longer blinded by the Z resonance, will be keeping a sharp eye open for new physics, and in particular for signs of as yet unseen supersymmetric particles. Theorists have long been convinced that our

  4. High energy elastic hadron scattering

    Fearnly, T.A.

    1986-04-01

    The paper deals with the WA7 experiment at the CERN super proton synchrotron (SPS). The elastic differential cross sections of pion-proton, kaon-proton, antiproton-proton, and proton-proton at lower SPS energies over a wide range of momentum transfer were measured. Some theoretical models in the light of the experimental results are reviewed, and a comprehensive impact parameter analysis of antiproton-proton elastic scattering over a wide energy range is presented. A nucleon valence core model for high energy proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is described

  5. Autumn study on storage rings

    1974-01-01

    The first two weeks of October have seen storage ring people from accelerator Laboratories throughout the world at CERN to study the fundamental problems of very high energy protonproton colliding beam machines.

  6. Antiproton-decelerating Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQD), inner structure.

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The inner structure of the RFQD, withdrawn from its tank. In picture _06, the upstream end is in the back and the view is on the downstream exit. The RFQD has a length of 3.5 m and operates at a frequency of 202.4 MHz. It further decelerates antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (3.5 MeV/c to 100 MeV/c, or 5.3 MeV) to very low energies around 50 keV.

  7. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  8. LEP the lord of the collider rings at CERN 1980-2000

    Schopper, Herwig Franz

    2009-01-01

    Housed by a 4 m diameter tunnel of 27 km circumference, with huge underground labs and numerous surface facilities, and set up with a precision of 0.1 mm per kilometer, the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) was not only the largest but also one of the most sophisticated scientific research instrument ever created by Man. Located at CERN, near Geneva, LEP was built during the years 1983 - 1989, was operational until 2000, and corroborated the standard model of particle physics through continous high precision measurements. The Author, director-general of CERN during the crucial period of the construction of LEP, recounts vividly the convoluted decision-making and technical implementation processes - the tunnel alone being a highly challenging geo- and civil engineering project - and the subsequent extremely fruitful period of scientific research. Finally he describes the difficult decision to close down LEP, at a time when the discovery of the Higgs boson seemed within reach. LEP was eventually dismantled...

  9. Practical Uses of Antiprotons

    Jackson, Gerald P.

    2003-01-01

    The production of commercial quantities of antiprotons has been a reality for many years now. The deceleration and trapping of antiprotons is a relatively new activity, but has been sufficiently proven to be translated into a business enterprise. Now that NASA has a portable Penning trap for transporting antiprotons, all the elements are in place to begin the commercial distribution of antiprotons. The list of potential customers for antiprotons is continuously growing, with detailed market analyses already performed on some medical and propulsion applications. In this paper these applications are reviewed, along with their appetite for antiprotons and the steps needed to bring them to market.

  10. Practical Uses of Antiprotons

    Jackson, Gerald P.

    The production of commercial quantities of antiprotons has been a reality for many years now. The deceleration and trapping of antiprotons is a relatively new activity, but has been sufficiently proven to be translated into a business enterprise. Now that NASA has a portable Penning trap for transporting antiprotons, all the elements are in place to begin the commercial distribution of antiprotons. The list of potential customers for antiprotons is continuously growing, with detailed market analyses already performed on some medical and propulsion applications. In this paper these applications are reviewed, along with their appetite for antiprotons and the steps needed to bring them to market.

  11. A study of the production of high -psub(T) π0s at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    Kourkoumelis, C.; Resvanis, L.K.; Filippas, T.A.; Fokitis, E.; Cnops, A.M.; Iwata, S.; Palmer, R.B.; Rahm, D.C.; Rehak, P.; Stumer, I.

    1980-01-01

    The inclusive cross-section for π 0 production near 90 0 in pp collisions at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings has been studied for the psub(T) range 3 0 → γγ decay were resolved and measured separately for sub(T)u values up to 10 GeV/c. Results indicate an agreement with the psub(T) -8 behaviour for the lower values of psub(T) and a slower decrease of the cross-section for the higher values of psub(T). The high-psub(T) data deviate the scaling expression psub(T)sup(-n)F(kappasub(T)), which holds for the lower psub(T) values (psub(T) < 8 GeV/c). (orig.)

  12. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-01-01

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/(micro)g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ((bar p)) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both (bar p)-driven ablative compression and (bar p)-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of ∼3x10 15 injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - (bar p) annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/(bar p)) - range from ∼3 for volumetric ignition targets to ∼600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply methods would be

  13. On the utility of antiprotons as drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    Perkins, L. John; Orth, Charles D.; Tabak, Max

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90 MJ μg -1 and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons (p-bar) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both p-bar-driven ablative compression and p-bar-driven fast ignition, in association with zero- and one-dimensional target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of ∼3 x 10 15 injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains-i.e. fusion yields divided by the available p-p-bar annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88 GeV/p-bar)-range from ∼3 for volumetric ignition targets to ∼600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply methods would be

  14. On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

    2003-10-20

    By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply

  15. Storage Rings

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10 -6 eV to 3.5 x 10 12 eV (LHC, 7 x 10 12 eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or positron beams

  16. A technology developed at CERN captures the sun's energy

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    A civil-engineering company has recently started using thermal solar panels based on ultra-high vacuum technology developed at CERN. By efficiently preventing heat loss, the technology allows water to be heated to several hundred degrees, even in a temperate climate.   The field of solar panels using technology developed at CERN. On Tuesday 15 June the Geneva branch of the civil-engineering company Colas opened a new solar power plant based on ultra-high vacuum technology developed at CERN. Measuring a total of 80 square metres, the environmentally friendly "solar field" heats close to 80,000 litres of bitumen to 180 degrees. "To be able to reach such a high temperature, I drew on the ultra-high vacuum technologies I learned about at CERN", explains Cristoforo Benvenuti, who invented the panels. The ultra-high vacuum is what makes these solar panels so innovative. "It's very attractive because it minimises heat loss", continues Benvenuti. &...

  17. Search for exotic phenomena in association with W/sup +-/ and Z/sup 0/ decays at the CERN proton antiproton collider

    Rubbia, C.

    1984-01-01

    Using a sample of 66 charged Intermediate Vector Boson events (W/sup +-/ → iota/sup +-/ν/sub iota/) and 9 neutral Intermediate Vector Boson events (Z 0 → iota/sup +/iota/sup -/) produced at the CERN SPS Collider the properties of the underlying event, and the properties of jets produced in association with the Intermediate Vector Bosons have been compared with the corresponding properties from minimum-bias and hadronic-multijet events. The underlying events associated with Intermediate Vector Boson production are similar to the minimum-bias data with the additional occurrence of an occasional jet. The properties of these jets suggest they arise from initial-state gluon bremsstrahlung. The Z 0 events however sometimes contain some jet excess beyond expectation

  18. Laser-driven ultrafast antiproton beam

    Li, Shun; Pei, Zhikun; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Zhang, Lingang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Tongjun; Yu, Yong; Bu, Zhigang

    2018-02-01

    Antiproton beam generation is investigated based on the ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulse by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell and Geant4 simulations. A high-flux proton beam with an energy of tens of GeV is generated in sequential radiation pressure and bubble regime and then shoots into a high-Z target for producing antiprotons. Both yield and energy of the antiproton beam increase almost linearly with the laser intensity. The generated antiproton beam has a short pulse duration of about 5 ps and its flux reaches 2 × 10 20 s - 1 at the laser intensity of 2.14 × 10 23 W / cm 2 . Compared to conventional methods, this new method based on the ultra-intense laser pulse is able to provide a compact, tunable, and ultrafast antiproton source, which is potentially useful for quark-gluon plasma study, all-optical antihydrogen generation, and so on.

  19. Charm Production in Interactions of Antiproton with Proton and Nuclei at \\bar{it{P}}it{ANDA} Energies

    Shyam, R.; Tsushima, K.

    2018-05-01

    We study the production of charmed baryons in the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nucleus interactions within a fully covariant model that is based on an effective Lagrangian approach. The baryon production proceeds via the t-channel D^0 and D^{*0} meson-exchange diagrams. We have also explored the production of the charm-baryon hypernucleus ^{16}_{Λ_c^+}O in the antiproton-^{16}O collisions. For antiproton beam momenta of interest to the {\\bar{P}}ANDA experiment, the 0° differential cross sections for the formation of ^{16}_{Λ_c^+}O hypernuclear states with simple particle-hole configurations, have magnitudes in the range of a few μ b/sr.

  20. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Knudsen, H; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  1. Cosmic ray antiproton measurements in the 4-19 GeV energy range using the NMSU/WiZard-matter antimatter superconducting spectrometer 2 (MASS2)

    Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Brunetti, M.T.; Codini, A.; Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy)]|[INFN, Rome (Italy); Hof, M. [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Golden, R.L.; Stochaj, S.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Brancaccio, F.M. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    The p/p-ratio from 4 to 19 GeV has been measured using the NMSU/WiZard balloon borne matter antimatter superconducting spectrometer (MASS2) instrument. This is the first confirmation of the cosmic ray antiproton component made in this energy range since their discovery in 1979. The MASS2 instrument is an updated version of the instrument flown in 1979. The p/p- ratio is 1.52x10{sup -}4.

  2. Ring and jet study on the azimuthal substructure of pions at CERN ...

    Abstract. We have presented an investigation on the ring- and jet-like azimuthal angle sub- structures in the emission of secondary charged hadrons coming from 32S–Ag/Br interactions at. 200 A GeV/c. Nuclear photographic emulsion technique has been employed to collect the exper- imental data. The presence of such ...

  3. Polar lunar power ring: Propulsion energy resource

    Galloway, Graham Scott

    1990-01-01

    A ring shaped grid of photovoltaic solar collectors encircling a lunar pole at 80 to 85 degrees latitude is proposed as the primary research, development, and construction goal for an initial lunar base. The polar Lunar Power Ring (LPR) is designed to provide continuous electrical power in ever increasing amounts as collectors are added to the ring grid. The LPR can provide electricity for any purpose indefinitely, barring a meteor strike. The associated rail infrastructure and inherently expandable power levels place the LPR as an ideal tool to power an innovative propulsion research facility or a trans-Jovian fleet. The proposed initial output range is 90 Mw to 90 Gw.

  4. Antiprotons get biological

    2003-01-01

    After its final run in September, the first results of the Antiproton Cell Experiment (ACE) look very promising. It was the first experiment to take data on the biological effects of antiproton beams to evaluate the potential of antiprotons in radiation therapy.

  5. The biological effectiveness of antiproton irradiation

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Beyer, Gerd; Blackmore, Ewart; DeMarco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Durand, Ralph E.; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Moller, Soren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Smathers, James B.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhoj, Ulrik I.; Vranjes, Sanja; Withers, H. Rodney; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Antiprotons travel through tissue in a manner similar to that for protons until they reach the end of their range where they annihilate and deposit additional energy. This makes them potentially interesting for radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to conduct the first ever measurements of the biological effectiveness of antiprotons. Materials and methods: V79 cells were suspended in a semi-solid matrix and irradiated with 46.7 MeV antiprotons, 48 MeV protons, or 6 Co γ-rays. Clonogenic survival was determined as a function of depth along the particle beams. Dose and particle fluence response relationships were constructed from data in the plateau and Bragg peak regions of the beams and used to assess the biological effectiveness. Results: Due to uncertainties in antiproton dosimetry we defined a new term, called the biologically effective dose ratio (BEDR), which compares the response in a minimally spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) to that in the plateau as a function of particle fluence. This value was ∼3.75 times larger for antiprotons than for protons. This increase arises due to the increased dose deposited in the Bragg peak by annihilation and because this dose has a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Conclusion: We have produced the first measurements of the biological consequences of antiproton irradiation. These data substantiate theoretical predictions of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation within the Bragg peak, and suggest antiprotons warrant further investigation

  6. Further evidence for low-energy protonium production in vacuum

    Lodi Rizzini, E; Zurlo, N; Charlton, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Hayano, R; Jorgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Macri, M; Manuzio, G; Montagna, P; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; van der Werf, D P

    2012-01-01

    We describe an experiment performed in the ATHENA apparatus in which there is evidence that the antiproton-proton bound state, protonium, has been produced at very low energies in vacuum following the interaction of cold antiprotons with a trapped cloud of molecular hydrogen ions. The latter were confined in a centrifugally separated belt outside a positron plasma used for antihydrogen formation. Studies have been performed at low positron plasma temperatures in which the protonium annihilation signal has been identified along with that from antihydrogen, and we discuss how their contributions can be disentangled. With the positron plasma heated to around 10000 K the ions become distributed in the positrons, and the majority of the annihilation signal can be explained in terms of protonium formation, as antihydrogen creation is heavily suppressed. In this case we compare the observed protonium formation rate with expectations from theory and find reasonable accord, when experimental systematics are taken into...

  7. Recent operational performance of the CERN Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector

    Apsimon, R.J.; Flower, P.S.; Freeston, K.A.

    1985-10-01

    We discuss the design and construction of the Time Projection chambers (TPCs) of the Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector (RICH). Details are given of the TPC high voltage system and its monitoring and control. In addition, the operation and monitoring of the readout is described together with results of tests on the performance of the front end amplifiers. The operation of the RICH TPCs and electronics during the first data run of WA69, in 1984, is discussed together with relevant results from laboratory tests. Results from the preliminary analysis of a sample of data from the 1984 run are also presented

  8. Intermediate energy electron cooling for antiproton sources using a Pelletron accelerator

    Cline, D.B.; Adney, J.; Ferry, J.; Kells, W.; Larson, D.J.; Mills, F.E.; Sundquist, M.

    1983-01-01

    It has been shown at FNAL that the electron cooling of protons is a very efficient method for reaching high luminosity in a proton beam. The emittance of the 120 KeV electron beam used at Fermilab corresponds to a cathode temperature of 0.1 eV. In order to apply cooling techniques to GeV proton beams the electron energies required are in the MeV range. In the experiment reported in this paper the emittance of a 3-MeV Pelletron electron accelerator was measured to determine that its emittance scaled to a value appropriate for electron cooling. The machine tested was jointly owned and operated by the University of California at Santa Barbara and National Electrostatics Corporation for research into free-electron lasers which also require low emittance beams for operation. This paper describes the thermal emittance of the beam to be the area in phase space in which 90% of the beam trajectories lie and goes on to describe the emittance-measurement method both in theory and application

  9. An Antiproton Ion Collider (AIC) for Measuring Neutron and Proton Distributions in Stable and Radioactive Nuclei

    Kienle, Paul

    2005-01-01

    An antiproton-ion collider is proposed to independently determine mean square radii for protons and neutrons in stable and short lived nuclei by means of antiproton absorption at medium energies. The experiment makes use of the electron ion collider complex (ELISE) of the GSI FAIR project with appropriate modifications of the electron ring to store, cool and collide antiprotons of 30 MeV energy with 740A MeV energy ions.The total absorption cross-section of antiprotons by the stored ions will be measured by detecting their loss by means of the Schottky noise spectroscopy method. Cross sections for the absorption on protons and neutrons, respectively, will be studied by detection of residual nuclei with A-1 either by the Schottky method or by analysing them in recoil detectors after the first dipole stage of the NESR following the interaction zone. With a measurement of the A-1 fragment momentum distribution, one can test the momentum wave functions of the annihilated neutron and proton, respectively. Furthermore by changing the incident ion energy the tails of neutron and proton distribution can be measured.The absorption cross section is at asymptotic energies in leading order proportional to the mean square radius of the nucleus. Predicted cross sections and luminosities show that the method is applicable to nuclei with production rates of about 105 s-1 or lower, depending on the lifetime of the ions in the NESR, and for half-lives down to 1 second

  10. High energy density physics studies at the facility for antiprotons and ion research: the HEDgeHOB collaboration

    Tahir, N.A.; Stoehlker, T.; Geissel, H.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I.V.; Fortov, V.E.; Piriz, A.R.; Redmer, R.; Deutsch, C.

    2011-01-01

    The forthcoming Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, is going to be a unique accelerator facility that will deliver high quality, strongly bunched, well focused, intense beams of heavy ions that will lead to unprecedented specific power deposition in solid matter. This will generate macroscopic samples of High Energy Density (HED) matter with fairly uniform physical conditions. These samples can be used to study the thermophysical and transport properties of HED matter. Extensive theoretical work has been carried out over the past decade to design numerous dedicated experiments to study HED physics at the FAIR, which has provided the basis for the HEDgeHOB (High Energy Density Matter Generated by Heavy Ion Beams) scientific proposal. This work is still in progress as the feasibility studies for more experimental schemes are being carried out. Another, very important research area that will benefit tremendously from the FAIR facility, is the production of radioactive beams. A superconducting fragment separator, Super-FRS is being designed for the production and separation of rare radioactive isotopes. Unlike the HED targets, the Super-FRS production target should not be destroyed or damaged by the beam, but should remain intact during the long experimental campaign. However, the high level of specific power deposited in the production target by the high intensity ion beam at FAIR, could cause serious problems to the target survival. These HED issues related to the Super-FRS production target are also discussed in the present paper (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Using the circulating beam in the Fermilab antiproton accumulator for experiments

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Fermilab Accumulator is a storage ring optimized for stacking and stochastic cooling 8 GeV antiprotons for the Tevatron collider. Minor modifications have been made to provide for beam in the energy range 8.0-2.9 GeV of luminosity /approximately/10 31 cm -2 s/sup - 1/ with a hydrogen jet internal target. Experience to date consists of machine studies and detector engineering run with protons. 7 refs

  12. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    Kavanagh, J.N.; Currell, F.J.; Prise, K.M.; Schettino, G.; Currell, F.J.; Timson, D.J.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Bassler, N.; Herrmann, R.

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy employs ionizing radiation to induce lethal DNA lesions in cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. Due to their pattern of energy deposition, better therapeutic outcomes can, in theory, be achieved with ions compared to photons. Antiprotons have been proposed to offer a further enhancement due to their annihilation at the end of the path. The work presented here aimed to establish and validate an experimental procedure for the quantification of plasmid and genomic DNA damage resulting from antiproton exposure. Immunocytochemistry was used to assess DNA damage in directly and indirectly exposed human fibroblasts irradiated in both plateau and Bragg peak regions of a 126 MeV antiproton beam at CERN. Cells were stained post irradiation with an anti-γ-H2AX antibody. Quantification of the γ-H2AX foci-dose relationship is consistent with a linear increase in the Bragg peak region. A qualitative analysis of the foci detected in the Bragg peak and plateau region indicates significant differences highlighting the different severity of DNA lesions produced along the particle path. Irradiation of desalted plasmid DNA with 5 Gy antiprotons at the Bragg peak resulted in a significant portion of linear plasmid in the resultant solution. (authors)

  13. The control systems for the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron ring power supplies

    Kuhn, H K

    1981-01-01

    The dedicated control system for the 16 voltage-controlled Main Ring pulsed supplies, allowing the reproduction of the desired B and Q fields to better than +or-2*10/sup -4/ at injection is described. It outlines both the hardware (smoothed function generators) and software side. Current measurements via DVMs or the B train off the reference magnets are used as inputs to the correction algorithm which is based on successive approximation. The algorithm enables the machine operators to trim selectively both the closed orbit and/or the betatron wave number of the machine within 1 to a few cycles. The control system related computer memory requirements are given. (0 refs).

  14. Software development agreement between CERN and the Indian Department of Atomic Energy

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The development and prototyping work for the LHC computing facility is being organised as a project that includes many scientific institutes and industrial partners, coordinated by CERN. The project is nicknamed LCG (after LHC Computing Grid). Addendum No. 1 to the Protocol dated 24/09/02 to the 1991 co-operation agreement between CERN and the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India defines the collaboration between CERN and DAE on software development for the LCG Prototype Project. Signing the addendum are G. Govindrajan (left), Director of the Electronics and Instrumentation Group at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India and Dr. Hans Hoffmann, CERN Director for Technology Transfer and for Scientific Computing.

  15. Software development agreement between CERN and the Indian Department of Atomic Energy

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The development and prototyping work for the LHC computing facility is being organised as a project that includes many scientific institutes and industrial partners, coordinated by CERN. The project is nicknamed LCG (after LHC Computing Grid). Addendum No. 1 to the Protocol dated 24/09/02 to the 1991 co-operation agreement between CERN and the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India defines the collaboration between CERN and DAE on software development for the LCG Prototype Project. Photo 01: Signing the addendum are G. Govindrajan (left), Director of the Electronics and Instrumentation Group at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India and Dr. Hans Hoffmann, CERN Director for Technology Transfer and for Scientific Computing. Looking on are Christoph Eck (far left), resource manager of the LCG Project and Les Robertson, LCG Project Leader. Photo 02: (left to right) Christoph Eck, resource manager of the LCG Project; G. Govindrajan, Director of the Electronics and Instrumentation G...

  16. Possible kaon and antiproton factory designs for TRIUMF

    Craddock, M K [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada); Kost, C J; Richardson, J R [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). TRIUMF Facility

    1979-12-01

    Two alternative designs based on proton synchrotrons and isochronous ring cyclotrons, respectively are considered for accelerating high currents (<30 ..mu..A) from TRIUMF (0.45 GeV) to energies high enough for the production of high fluxes of kaons (8-10 GeV) and antiprotons (25-30 GeV). The first synchrotron would be fast cycling at 20 Hz, with third harmonic flat-topping to aid in injection and extraction. The cw beam from TRIUMF would be extracted in 100-turn macropulses at 22 ..mu..sec intervals. With 400 ..mu..A in TRIUMF and injection over 8-20 % of the magnet cycle, 30-80 ..mu..A could be accelerated to 10 GeV. A second synchrotron would accelerate 30 ..mu..A to 30 GeV for production of antiprotons. The ring cyclotron option would also be built in two stages, 0.45 to 3 GeV (15 sectors, 10 m radius) and 3 to 8.5 GeV (30 sectors, 20 m radius). With superconducting magnets (5 T) the weight of steel could be kept below 2000 tons for each ring. Large field-free regions between the spiral ium ions, are obtained with an av the polarimetry installation is being carried out.

  17. The construction of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter: delivery of the 3rd and 4th endcap "Dees" and Ring Flanges to CERN

    2006-01-01

    Delivery of the 3rd and 4th Dees and Ring Flanges of the CMS-ECAL endcaps to CERN. The pictures show also an endcap crystal with its VPT (Vacuum PhotoTriode), the aluminium blackplates of the endcap Dees and four mock supercrystals (5x5 crystals) attached in their position on the backplate, along with 138 positional spacers. Finally, endcap assembly in the CMS construction hall in Cessy (neighbouring France) is also shown.

  18. ASACUSA hits antiproton jackpot

    2001-01-01

    The Japanese-European ASACUSA collaboration, which takes its name from the oldest district of Tokyo, approaches the antimatter enigma in a different way from the other two AD experiments, by inserting antiprotons into ordinary atoms. Last month the collaboration succeeded in trapping about a million antiprotons. The ASACUSA antiproton trap (lower cylinder), surmounted by its liquid helium reservoir. Looking on are Ken Yoshiki-Franzen, Zhigang Wang, Takahito Tasaki, Suzanne Reed, John Eades, Masaki Hori, Yasunori Yamazaki, Naofumi Kuroda, Jun Sakaguchi, Berti Juhasz, Eberhard Widmann and Ryu Hayano. A key element of the ASACUSA apparatus is its decelerating Radiofrequency Quadrupole magnet, RFQD. After tests with protons in Aarhus, this was installed in ASACUSA's antiproton beam last October (Bulletin 41/2000, 9 October 2000). Constructed by Werner Pirkl's group in PS Division, the RFQD works by applying an electric field to the AD antiproton pulse the opposite direction to its motion. As the antiprotons slo...

  19. Experiments with low-energy antimatter

    Consolati G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on antimatter allow us to shed light on fundamental issues of contemporary physics. The only antiatom presently available, antihydrogen, is produced making use of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD facility at CERN. International collaborations currently on the floor (ALPHA, ASACUSA and ATRAP have succeeded in producing antihydrogen and are now involved in its confinement and manipulation. The AEGIS experiment is currently completing the commissioning of the apparatus which will generate and manipulate antiatoms. The present paper, after a report on the main results achieved with antihydrogen physics, gives an overview of the AEGIS experiment, describes its current status and discusses its first target.

  20. Study of X-Ray and $\\gamma$-Ray Spectra from Antiprotonic Atoms at the Slowly Extracted Antiproton Beam of LEAR

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will study the X-ray spectra of antiprotonic atoms and the $\\gamma$ spectra of residual nuclei after the antiproton absorption. We intend to begin with measurements on selected isotopically pure targets. Strong interaction effects, the antiproton absorption and the atomic cascade are analysed through the measurement of energies, lineshapes, relative and absolute intensities of all observable lines. The experiments are continued to determine st in resolved fine structure levels and in different isotopes of the same element. Coincidence techniques may be applied. All components of the experimental set-up are already existing from previous experiments and we could begin the measurements with any slowly extracted beam of low energy at LEAR.

  1. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  2. Energy dependence of the emittance of damping ring beams

    Stiening, R.

    1985-01-01

    The energy at which the SLC damping rings are operated was chosen to be 1.21 GeV. At the time that that specification was made, the repetition rate of the SLC was expected to be 180 Hz. It is now anticipated that the repetition rate during the initial year of operation of the SLC will be 120 Hz. The following curves which show the output emittance of the damping rings as a function of input emittance and energy suggest that there is a range of energies over which the rings can be operated without changing the SLC luminosity. It should be noted that in the era of polarized beams, the damping ring energy will be fixed at the design value on account of the spin precession required in the LTR and RTL transport lines. The SLC design output emittance of the damping rings is 3 x 10 -5 radian-meters. Because of space charge disruption and quantum emission downstream of the damping rings, much lower values than the design value may not have a large beneficial effect on the luminosity. 3 figures

  3. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  4. Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons

    Fornengo, N.; Vittino, A.; Maccione, L.

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a ''thermal'' relic at about 40–80 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 3–4 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modelling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints

  5. Regge pole plus cut model for proton-antiproton elastic scattering at collider and tevatron energies

    Aleem, Fazal; Saleem, Mohammad

    1988-01-01

    The Regge pole plus cut model has been used to explain the data at the collider energies √=546 and 630 GeV and the most recent differential cross-section results at √=1.8 TeV. Predictions of the model at 1.8 and 40 TeV are compared with those of Bourrely et al. (1984). (author). 22 refs., 7 figs

  6. Study of the anti-hydrogen atom and ion formation in the collisions antiproton-positronium

    Comini, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    The future CERN experiment called GBAR intends to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter on Earth using cold (neV) anti-hydrogen atoms undergoing a free fall. The experiment scheme first needs to cool anti-hydrogen positive ions, obtained thanks to two consecutive reactions occurring when an antiproton beam collides with a dense positronium cloud.The present thesis studies these two reactions in order to optimise the production of the anti-ions. The total cross sections of both reactions have been computed in the framework of a perturbation theory model (Continuum Distorted Wave - Final State), in the range 0 to 30 keV antiproton kinetic energy; several excited states of positronium have been investigated. These cross sections have then been integrated to a simulation of the interaction zone where antiprotons collide with positronium; the aim is to find the optimal experimental parameters for GBAR. The results suggest that the 2P, 3D or, to a lower extend, 1S states of positronium should be used, respectively with 2, less than 1 or 6 keV antiprotons. The importance of using short pulses of antiprotons has been underlined; the positronium will have to be confined in a tube of 20 mm length and 1 mm diameter. In the prospect of exciting the 1S-3D two-photon transition in positronium at 410 nm, a pulsed laser system had already been designed. It consists in the frequency doubling of an 820 nm pulsed titanium-sapphire laser. The last part of the thesis has been dedicated to the realisation of this laser system, which delivers short pulses (9 ns) of 4 mJ energy at 820 nm. (author) [fr

  7. Mr Bikash Sinha, Director of SAHA & VECC and Prof. Rolf Heuer, Director general of CERN, sign a collaboration agreements between SAHA (Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics), VECC (Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre), India and CERN ISOLDE.

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    Mr Bikash Sinha, Director of SAHA & VECC and Prof. Rolf Heuer, Director general of CERN, sign a collaboration agreements between SAHA (Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics), VECC (Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre), India and CERN ISOLDE.

  8. The LEP e+e−ring at the energy frontier of circular lepton colliders

    Hofmann, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The Large Electron Positron ring (LEP) was a circular lepton collider at CERN. It operated at beam energies around 47GeV to produce the neutral Z0 particle and above 80 GeV to create pairs of the charged W± bosons. At these high energies the emission of synchrotron radiation was important and demanded a very high voltage of the RF-system. It also influenced the choice of many other machine parameters. This presentation tries to show how the basic accelerator physics was used to optimize the machine and to find innovative solutions for some problems: magnets with concrete between the laminations, modulated cavities, Nb-Cu superconducting cavities, nonevaporable getter pumps, optics analysis from multi-turn data and many more.

  9. QCD in high-energy proton-proton and proton-antiproton collisions

    Baier, R.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical investigation of nucleon-nucleon collisions at high energies allows to explore the structure of the nucleon by large momentum transfer (deep-inelastic) processes. In these lectures the structure of the nucleon from momentum scales Q > 1 GeV/c ( -16 cm) is discussed. In the first lecture the basic concepts of the parton model and of perturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD) are introduced, and applied to deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. The following lectures cover large transverse momentum, psub(T), hadronic processes, massive dilepton production and production of prompt real photons at large psub(T). The present status of the theoretical understanding of these processes is summarized. (Auth.)

  10. Study of massive electron pair production at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    Kourkoumelis, C.; Resvanis, L.K.; Filippas, T.A.; Fokitis, E.; Cnops, A.M.; Cobb, J.H.; Hogue, R.; Iwata, S.; Palmer, R.B.; Rahm, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Data from a study of electron pairs produced in pp collisions (√s = 53 and 63 GeV) are used to extend measurements of the scaling function down to m/√s approx. 0.07 (4.5 3 d 2 delta/dmdy/sub(y = 0) = (2.60 +- 0.13) x 10 -32 exp [(-2.0 +- 0.7)m/√s](1 - m/√s) 9 . 7+-0 . 4 cm 2 GeV 2 . The average transverse momentum of dielectrons was found to be 1.43 +- 0.07 GeV, independent of mass (in the range 4.5 2 theta, where α = 1.15 +- 0.34. The angular decay of UPSILON at the same energies was found to have α = 0.31 +- 0.35. (orig.)

  11. Light quark spectroscopy at the Fermilab antiproton accumulator

    Armstrong, T.; Bettoni, D.; Bharadwaj, V.; Biino, C.; Borreani, G.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Buzzo, A.; Calabrese, R.; Ceccucci, A.; Cester, R.; Church, M.; Dalpiaz, P.F.; Dibenedetto, R.; Dimitroyannis, D.; Fabbri, M.G.; Fast, J.; Gianoli, A.; Ginsburg, C.; Gollwitzer, K.; Hahn, A.; Hasan, M.A.; Hsueh, S.; Lewis, R.; Luppi, E.; Macri, M.; Majewska, A.; Mandelkern, M.; Marchetto, F.; Marinelli, M.; Marques, J.; Marsh, W.; Martini, M.; Masuzawa, M.; Menichetti, E.; Migliori, A.; Mussa, R.; Pallavicini, M.; Palestini, S.; Pastrone, N.; Patrignani, C.; Peoples, J. Jr.; Pesando, L.; Petrucci, F.; Pia, M.G.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.; Ray, R.; Reid, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Roccuzzo, B.; Rosen, J.L.; Santroni, A.; Sarmiento, M.; Savrie, M.; Scalisi, A.; Schultz, J.; Seth, K.K.; Smith, A.; Smith, G.A.; Sozzi, M.; Trokenheim, S.; Weber, M.; Werkema, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.L.; Zioulas, G.

    1993-01-01

    Fermilab-experiment E-760 has confirmed the f 2 (1520) state in the 3π 0 final state in antiproton-proton annihilations in-flight (∼3.0 to 3.6 GeV c.m. energy), seen previously by Crystal Barrel and other groups at CERN at rest. The f 2 (1520) is also seen in its 2π 0 decay mode in the 2π 0 η channel and 2η decay mode in the π 0 2η channel. There are indications of this state in the 3η decay channel. The invariant mass spectrum is rich in states near 2 GeV, and amplitude and spin/parity analysis of the Dalitz plot is in progress in this mass region. (orig.)

  12. Colliding beam physics at Fermilab: interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding

    Walker, J.K. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the colliding beams experment department at Fermilab was to bring about collisions of the stored beams in the energy doubler/saver and main ring, and construct experimental areas with appropriate detectors. To explore the feasibility of using the main ring as a storage device, several studies were carried out to investigate beam growth, loss, and the backgrounds in detectors at possible intersection regions. This range of developments constituted the major topics at the 1977 Summer Study reported here. Emphasis in part one is on interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding. 40 papers from this part are included in the data base. (GHT)

  13. Searching for antiproton decay at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator

    Geer, S.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes an experimental search for antiproton decay at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. The E868 (APEX) experimental setup is described. The APEX data is expected to be sensitive to antiproton decay if the antiproton lifetimes is less than a few times 100,000 years

  14. Operation of the GTS-LHC Source for the Hadron Injector at CERN

    Dumas, L; Hitz, D; Küchler, D; Mastrostefano, C; O'Neill, M; Scrivens, R

    2007-01-01

    The GTS-LHC ion source, designed and build by CEA Grenoble, was installed and commissioned at CERN in 2005. Since than the source has delivered oxygen and lead ion beams (O4+ and Pb27+ from the source, Pb54+ from the linac) for the commissioning of the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR). Results of this operation and attempts to improve the source performance and reliability, and the linac performance will be presented in this paper.

  15. Operation of the GTS-LHC source for the hadron injector at CERN

    Dumas, L.; Hill, C.; Hitz, D.; Kuchler, D.; Mastrostefano, C.; O'Neil, M.; Scrivens, R.

    2007-01-01

    The GTS-LHC ion source, designed and build by CEA Grenoble, was installed and commissioned at CERN in 2005. Since than the source has delivered oxygen and lead ion beams (O4+ and Pb27+ from the source, Pb54+ from the linac) for the commissioning of the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR). Results of this operation and attempts to improve the source performance and reliability, and the linac performance will be presented in this paper. (authors)

  16. Operation of the GTS-LHC source for the hadron injector at CERN

    Dumas, L.; Hill, C.; Hitz, D.; Kuchler, D.; Mastrostefano, C.; O' Neil, M.; Scrivens, R. [CERN, AB ABP HSL, CH-1211 Geneva 23, (Switzerland); CEA, DRFMC SBT, F-38054 Grenoble, (France)

    2007-07-01

    The GTS-LHC ion source, designed and build by CEA Grenoble, was installed and commissioned at CERN in 2005. Since than the source has delivered oxygen and lead ion beams (O4+ and Pb27+ from the source, Pb54+ from the linac) for the commissioning of the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR). Results of this operation and attempts to improve the source performance and reliability, and the linac performance will be presented in this paper. (authors)

  17. High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN

    Hanson, Gail G.

    2013-01-01

    The highlight of our last budget period, June 1, 2010, to May 31, 2013, was the discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), announced on July 4, 2012, and for which Francois Englert and Peter Higgs were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics on October 8, 2013. The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964 to explain how elementary particles obtain mass and was the missing piece of the Standard Model. However, the Standard Model does not describe everything that we know. There are many unanswered questions, such as how can the Higgs boson have the mass that we have observed, are there more Higgs bosons, why is there more matter than antimatter, and what is the invisible dark matter, which constitutes about 85% of the matter in the universe. Our group played a significant role in the discovery of the Higgs boson and in subsequent analyses. We also carried out searches for new physics, in ways that could help elucidate some of the remaining questions. Our role in the CMS detector focused on the Tracker, a silicon strip outer tracker and pixel inner tracker.

  18. An energy recovery electron linac-on-ring collider

    Merminga, L.; Krafft, G.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2000-01-01

    We present the design of high-luminosity electron-proton/ion colliders in which the electrons are produced by an Energy Recovering Linac (ERL). Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10 33 (per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at currents of a few hundred mA and multi-GeV energies. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented

  19. CERN scientists take part in the Tevatron Run II performance review committee

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Tevatron Run II is under way at Fermilab, exploring the high-energy frontier with upgraded detectors that will address some of the biggest questions in particle physics.Until CERN's LHC switches on, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider is the world's only source of top quarks. It is the only place where we can search for supersymmetry, for the Higgs boson, and for signatures of additional dimensions of space-time. The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently convened a high-level international review committee to examine Fermilab experts' first-phase plans for the accelerator complex. Pictured here with a dipole magnet in CERN's LHC magnet test facility are the four CERN scientists who took part in the DOE's Tevatron review. Left to right: Francesco Ruggiero, Massimo Placidi, Flemming Pedersen, and Karlheinz Schindl. Further information: CERN Courier 43 (1)

  20. An experiment to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic ray antiprotons from 100 to 1000 MeV

    Salamon, M. H.; Price, P. B.; Barwick, S. W.; Lowder, D. M.; Ahlen, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Production models were developed and the confirmation of each one had significant astrophysical impact. These include radical modifications of propagation models, cosmic ray antiprotons injection from neighboring domains of antimatter, p production by evaporating primordial black holes, and cosmic ray p's as annihilation products of supersymmetry particles that might make up the dark dynamical mass of the Galaxy. It is that p's originating from supersymmetric parents might have distinct spectral features that would survive solar modulation; in one model, higgsino annihilation proceeds through the bb quark-antiquark channel, producing a spectral bump at approx. 0.3 GeV in the p spectrum.

  1. 5th CERN - Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics

    Grojean, C; Spiropulu, M

    2010-01-01

    The CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lectures on quantum field theory, quantum chromodynamics, physics beyond the Standard Model, neutrino physics, flavour physics and CP violation, particle cosmology, high-energy astro-particle physics, and heavy-ion physics, as well as trigger and data acquisition, and commissioning and...

  2. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in low-mass bottom-quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Majersky, O.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We report a measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry, AFB , in b b ¯ pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions and identified by muons from semileptonic b -hadron decays. The event sample is collected at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector and corresponds to 6.9 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We obtain an integrated asymmetry of AFB(b b ¯ ) =(1.2 ±0.7 )% at the particle level for b -quark pairs with invariant mass, mb b ¯ , down to 40 GeV /c2 and measure the dependence of AFB(b b ¯ ) on mb b ¯ . The results are compatible with expectations from the standard model.

  3. Development of Stripline Kickers for Low Emittance Rings: Application to the Beam Extraction Kicker for CLIC Damping Rings

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)728476; Toral Fernandez, Fernando

    In the framework of the design study of Future Linear Colliders, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) aims for electron-positron collisions with high luminosity at a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. To achieve the luminosity requirements, Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) are required: they reduce the beam emittance before the beam is accelerated in the main linac. Several injection and extraction systems are needed to inject and extract the beam from the PDRs and DRs. The work of this Thesis consists of the design, fabrication and laboratory tests of the first stripline kicker prototype for beam extraction from the CLIC DRs, although the methodology proposed can be extended to stripline kickers for any low emittance ring. The excellent field homogeneity required, as well as a good transmission of the high voltage pulse through the electrodes, has been achieved by choosing a novel electrode shape. With this new geometry, it has been possible to benefit from all the advantages that the most...

  4. Double excitation of helium in collisions with proton and antiproton impact in the energy range 50-500 keV

    Purkait, M.

    2009-01-01

    Double-electron excitation processes of helium atoms by proton and antiproton impact have been theoretically investigated using the four-body formalism of boundary corrected continuum intermediate state (BCCIS-4B) approximation in the energy range of 50-500 keV. In this formalism, the presence of the projectile in the exit channels is described by distorting the final bound state wave functions with coulomb waves (associated with the projectile-electron interactions). The results are in good agreement with the other theoretical and experimental results. Reasonably better agreements have been found in the intermediate and high energy regions. Contributions to the cross section of the different magnetic sub-shells are also analysed.

  5. A study of events with large total transverse energy produced in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    Piekarz, H.

    1994-09-01

    Properties of events originating from proton-antiproton interactions in which the total transverse energy, Σ|E T |, of the event exceeded 400 GeV are presented. These events were produced at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider operating at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV and recorded in the D0 detector. The authors describe their analysis method which minimizes the effect of multiple interactions in the data sample. Based on a data sample of 5.45 ± 0.65 pb -1 , the topology of these hard scattering events as well as preliminary results for the cross-section, dσ/dΣ|E T |, are presented and discussed

  6. New Experiments with Antiprotons

    Kaplan, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Fermilab operates the world's most intense antiproton source. Recently proposed experiments can use those antiprotons either parasitically during Teva-tron Collider running or after the Tevatron Collider finishes in about 2011. For example, the annihilation of 8 GeV antiprotons might make the world's most intense source of tagged D0 mesons, and thus the best near-term opportunity to study charm mixing and search for new physics via its CP-violation signature. Other possible precision measurements include properties of the X(3872) and the charmonium system. An experiment using a Penning trap and an atom interferometer could make the world's first measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter. These and other potential measurements using antiprotons could yield a broad physics program at Fermilab in the post-Tevatron era.

  7. 1988 CERN school of physics

    1991-01-01

    The CERN School of Physics is intended to give young experimental physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These Proceedings contain reports of lecture series on the following topics: introduction to field theory and to weak interactions, heavy ion collisions, perturbative QCD, the standard model, proton-antiproton collider results and detectors, cosmology. (orig.)

  8. 1986 CERN school of physics

    1987-01-01

    The CERN school of physics is intended to give young experimental physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain reports of lecture series on the following topics: introduction to symmetries and gauge theories, quark dynamics, experimental tests of gauge theories, proton antiproton collider results and detectors, physics at LEP, superphysics, and quantum black holes. (orig.)

  9. QCD studies with anti-protons at FAIR: Indian participation in PANDA

    Kailas, S.; Roy, B.J.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Varma, R.

    2011-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is a future project at GSI which will extend hadron physics studies up to the charm meson region using antiproton beams together with a state-of-the-art detector antiproton annihilation at Darmstadt (PANDA). The physics aim, in a broader sense, is to address the fundamental problems of hadron physics and aspects of quantum chromo-dynamics (QCD) at low energies. The proposed work in India will consist of several parts: R and D studies of silicon micro-strip detector, development of a scintillator hodoscope with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout, studies of SiPM as photon counter and simulation studies of the detector design as well as physics case studies. The present article describes the physics motivation and initial progress made towards achieving these goals. (author)

  10. Design and jump phenomenon analysis of an eccentric ring energy harvester

    Wang, Yu-Jen; Chen, Chung-De

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a wheel-mounted eccentric ring energy harvester that is driven by centripetal and gravitational forces during wheel rotation. The natural frequency of the eccentric ring matches the wheel rotation frequency at any car speed because its character length is designed equal to the wheel radius. Consequently, the eccentric ring oscillates with a relatively large swing angle at the wheel speed to generate high levels of power. The nonlinear dynamic behavior of the eccentric ring is investigated to ensure that the proposed design produces steady swing angles, especially at high wheel speeds. Herein, the jump phenomenon of the dynamic motion of the eccentric ring is analyzed by using the Duffing equation and the linearization process. The discriminant value obtained from the analysis confirms that no jump phenomenon occurs at all wheel speeds if the eccentric ring is properly designed. In the experiment, the eccentric ring is integrated with magnets and a coil set to generate 318–442 μW at constant wheel speeds between 300 and 500 rpm. This shows that the proposed device is a potential power source for low-power wheel-mounted electronics, such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, and thermometers. (paper)

  11. Design and jump phenomenon analysis of an eccentric ring energy harvester

    Wang, Yu-Jen; Chen, Chung-De

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a wheel-mounted eccentric ring energy harvester that is driven by centripetal and gravitational forces during wheel rotation. The natural frequency of the eccentric ring matches the wheel rotation frequency at any car speed because its character length is designed equal to the wheel radius. Consequently, the eccentric ring oscillates with a relatively large swing angle at the wheel speed to generate high levels of power. The nonlinear dynamic behavior of the eccentric ring is investigated to ensure that the proposed design produces steady swing angles, especially at high wheel speeds. Herein, the jump phenomenon of the dynamic motion of the eccentric ring is analyzed by using the Duffing equation and the linearization process. The discriminant value obtained from the analysis confirms that no jump phenomenon occurs at all wheel speeds if the eccentric ring is properly designed. In the experiment, the eccentric ring is integrated with magnets and a coil set to generate 318-442 μW at constant wheel speeds between 300 and 500 rpm. This shows that the proposed device is a potential power source for low-power wheel-mounted electronics, such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, and thermometers.

  12. Experiment to measure the gravitational force on the antiproton

    Brown, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    A collaboration has been formed to measure the acceleration of antiprotons in the earth's gravitational field. The technique is to produce, decelerate, and trap quantities of antiprotons, to cool them to untralow energy, and to measure their acceleration in a time-of-flight experiment. Present plans and the results of initial efforts toward this end are presented

  13. Low emittance optics of photon factory storage ring at KEK

    Kamiya, Y.; Katoh, M.; Honjo, I.; Araki, A.; Kihara, M.

    1987-01-01

    A new optics is being successfully tested at the Photon Factory Storage Ring (PF-RING) in order to reduce the emittance to 0.13 mm mrad, about one third of the present value. This optics with four additional quadrupole magnets is a modified version of one of the optics designed as an option at the early period of PF construction. One advantage of this new optics is that the beta-function at RF-sections is smaller than that of the old option. The other advantage is that the dispersion function is zero at the long straight sections for insertion devices and RF cavities. The aim of this paper is to describe the new low-emittance optics as well as the parameters of the new quadrupole magnets and power supplies. Some preliminary results of machine study are also presented

  14. Energy transfer between a passing vortex ring and a flexible plate in an ideal quiescent fluid

    Hu, JiaCheng; Peterson, Sean D., E-mail: peterson@mme.uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Porfiri, Maurizio [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Recent advancements in highly deformable smart materials have lead to increasing interest in small-scale energy harvesting research for powering low consumption electronic devices. One such recent experimental study by Goushcha et al. explored energy harvesting from a passing vortex ring by a cantilevered smart material plate oriented parallel to and offset from the path of the ring in an otherwise quiescent fluid. The present study focuses on modeling this experimental study using potential flow to facilitate optimization of the energy extraction from the passing ring to raise the energy harvesting potential of the device. The problem is modeled in two-dimensions with the vortex ring represented as a pair of counter-rotating free vortices. Vortex pair parameters are determined to match the convection speed of the ring in the experiments, as well as the imposed pressure loading on the plate. The plate is approximated as a Kirchhoff-Love plate and represented as a finite length vortex sheet in the fluid domain. The analytical model matches experimental measurements, including the tip displacement, the integrated force along the entire plate length as a function of vortex ring position, and the pressure along the plate. The potential flow solution is employed in a parametric study of the governing dimensionless parameters in an effort to guide the selection of plate properties for optimal energy harvesting performance. Results of the study indicate an optimal set of plate properties for a given vortex ring configuration, in which the time-scale of vortex advection matches that of the plate vibration.

  15. The Antiproton Accumulator and Collector and the discovery of the W & Z intermediate vector bosons

    Chohan, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    The following sections are included: Preface ; Brief outline of the overall scheme for antiprotons of the SPS as a collider ; Antiproton production and accumulation ; The AA and AC storage rings ; Stochastic cooling and stacking ; Post-acceleration of antiprotons and beams for SPS Collider ; Proton test beams for the AA and AC from the PS ; The W and Z discoveries and the Nobel Prize ; Accumulator performance ; Acknowledgements and conclusions ; References

  16. Commissioning of Fermilab's Electron Cooling System for 8-GeV Antiprotons

    Nagaitsev, Sergei; Burov, Alexey; Carlson, Kermit; Gai, Wei; Gattuso, Consolato; Hu, Martin; Kazakevich, Grigory; Kramper, Brian J; Kroc, Thomas K; Leibfritz, Jerry; Prost, Lionel; Pruss, Stanley M; Saewert, Greg W; Schmidt, Chuck; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V; Sutherland, Mary; Tupikov, Vitali; Warner, Arden

    2005-01-01

    A 4.3-MeV electron cooling system has been installed at Fermilab in the Recycler antiproton storage ring and is being currently commissioned. The cooling system is designed to assist accumulation of 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. This paper will report on the progress of the electron beam commissioning effort as well as on detailed plans of demonstrating the cooling of antiprotons.

  17. Metastable states in antiprotonic helium atoms an island stability in a sea of continuum

    Korobov, V I

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution we consider a phenomenon of metastable states in antiprotonic helium atoms, precise spectroscopy of these states and a present-day study of the electromagnetic properties of antiprotons. Calculation of nonrelativistic energies, relativistic and QED corrections as well as the fine and hyperfine structure and the magnetic moment of an antiproton are the main parts of this study. Refs. 22 (nevyjel)

  18. Possible kaon and antiproton factory designs for TRIUMF

    Craddock, M.K.; Kost, C.J.; Richardson, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Two alternative designs based on proton synchrotrons and isochronous ring cyclotrons, respectively are considered for accelerating high currents (<30 μA) from TRIUMF (0.45 GeV) to energies high enough for the production of high fluxes of kaons (8-10 GeV) and antiprotons (25-30 GeV). The first synchrotron would be fast cycling at 20 Hz, with third harmonic flat-topping to aid in injection and extraction. The cw beam from TRIUMF would be extracted in 100-turn macropulses at 22 μsec intervals. With 400 μA in TRIUMF and injection over 8-20 % of the magnet cycle, 30-80 μA could be accelerated to 10 GeV. A second synchrotron would accelerate 30 μA to 30 GeV for production of antiprotons. The ring cyclotron option would also be built in two stages, 0.45 to 3 GeV (15 sectors, 10 m radius) and 3 to 8.5 GeV (30 sectors, 20 m radius). With superconducting magnets (5 T) the weight of steel could be kept below 2000 tons for each ring. Large field-free regions between the spiral sector magnets allow room for multiple SIN-style accelerating cavities, permitting energy gains of many MeV/turn. Second or third harmonic cavities and the phase compression effect help in achieving separated turn extraction. Up to 100 % of the beam in TRIUMF could be accelerated to 8.5 GeV. (auth)

  19. Possible kaon and antiproton factory designs for TRIUMF

    Craddock, M.K.; Kost, C.J.; Richardson, J.R.

    1979-11-01

    Two alternative designs based on proton synchrotrons and isochronous ring cyclotrons, respectively are considered for accelerating high currents (>=30 μA) from TRIUMF (0.45 GeV) to energies high enough for the production of high fluxes of kaons (8-10 GeV) and antiprotons (25-30 GeV). The first synchrotron would be fast cycling at 20 Hz, with third harmonic flat-topping to aid in injection and extraction. The cw beam from TRIUMF would be extracted in 100-turn macropulses at 22 μsec intervals. With 400 μA in TRIUMF and injection over 8-20% of the magnet cycle, 30-80 μA could be accelerated to 10 GeV. A second synchrotron would accelerate 30 μA to 30 GeV for production of antiprotons. The ring cyclotron option would also be built in two stages, 0.45 to 3 GeV (15 sectors, 10 m radius) and 3 to 8.5 GeV (30 sectors, 20 m radius). With superconducting magnets (5 T) the weight of steel could be kept below 2000 tons for each ring. Large field-free regions between the spiral sector magnets allow room for multiple SIN-style accelerating cavities, permitting energy gains of many MeV/turn. Second or third harmonic cavities and the phase compression effect help in achieving separated turn extraction. Up to 100% of the beam in TRIUMF could be accelerated to 8.5 GeV. (auth)

  20. Low Energy Conference 2009

    2009-07-01

    11 of the 19 presentations have been indexed for the database. The following national organisations jointly organised the Low-energy Conference 2009: The Norwegian Society for the Conservation of Nature, the Norwegian Society of Engineers and Technologists, Norwegian Technology, the Federation of Norwegian Industries and the Low-Energy Program. Energy efficiency is often given little attention in the ongoing debates concerning different initiatives in order to reduce greenhouse emissions. The aim of the conference was to set energy efficiency on the agenda as an important environmental instrument. Both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - IPCC and the International Energy Agency - IEA regard energy efficiency as one of the fastest and most effective ways of reducing greenhouse emissions. Despite of this little is done. Many countries are ahead of Norway - why are we lagging behind? The Low-Energy conference has a broad approach: Nigel Jollands from the International Energy Agency -IEA puts energy efficiency in a global perspective. Soeren Rise from Teqniq in Denmark informs about the Danes' energy saving agreement, which appears to have been a success. The conference increased the competencies on concrete energy efficiency solutions, how to speed up the marketing of energy-friendly buildings and technologies, possibilities through industry and the impact of EU-directives and other instruments in order to trigger the potential. The conference closed with a discussion panel of leading energy politicians. The conference contributed to raise the debate in advance of the General election in Norway and the climate negotiations in Copenhagen during the autumn 2009. (EW)

  1. Antiproton tagging and vertex fitting in a Timepix3 detector

    Aghion, S.; The AEGIS collaboration; Antonello, M.; Belov, A.; Bonomi, G.; Brusah, R. S.; Caccia, M.; Camper, A.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Evans, C.; Fanì, M.; Ferragut, R.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Guatieri, F.; Hackstock, P.; Haider, S.; Hinterberger, A.; Holmestad, H.; Kellerbauer, A.; Khalidova, O.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lansonneur, P.; Lebrun, P.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Marton, J.; Matveev, V.; Müller, S. R.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Rienaecker, B.; Robert, J.; Røhne, O. M.; Rotondi, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Smestad, L.; Sorrentino, F.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I. C.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zimmer, C.; Zmeskal, J.; Zurlo, N.

    2018-01-01

    Studies of antimatter are important for understanding our universe at a fundamental level. There are still unsolved problems, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. The AEgIS experiment at CERN aims at measuring the gravitational fall of antihydrogen in order to determine the gravitational force on antimatter. The proposed method will make use of a position-sensitive detector to measure the annihilation point of antihydrogen. Such a detector must be able to tag the antiproton, measure its time of arrival and reconstruct its annihilation point with high precision in the vertical direction. This work explores a new method for tagging antiprotons and reconstructing their annihilation point. Antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN was used to obtain data on direct annihilations on the surface of a silicon pixel sensor with Timepix3 readout. These data were used to develop and verify a detector response model for annihilation of antiprotons in this detector. Using this model and the a...

  2. The international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR: Challenges and Opportunities

    Hoehne, C.

    2009-01-01

    The status of FAIR, the planned 'Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research', is presented in this contribution. FAIR will be a world unique particle accelerator facility to be built as a joint project by - as of today - 16 member countries. FAIR, which is planned for construction adjacent to the GSI site in Germany, is an integrated system of particle accelerators, 2 superconducting synchrotrons and 8 storage rings, which will provide high energy and high intensity beams of ions from hydrogen to uranium with unprecedented quality and in full parallel mode. In addition highest luminosity secondary beams of rare isotopes and beams of antiprotons will be available. FAIR will combine physics research topics from different communities, i.e. nuclear physics, hadron physics, heavy-ion physics, plasma physics, atomic physics and accelerator development. Details of FAIR and the physics projects will be presented in this contribution.

  3. Impact of thermal and intermediate energy neutrons on the semiconductor memories for the CERN accelerators

    Cecchetto, Matteo; Gerardin, Simone

    A wide quantity of SRAM memories are employed along the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the main CERN accelerator, and they are subjected to high levels of ionizing radiations which compromise the reliability of these devices. The Single Event Effect (SEE) qualification for components to be used in the complex high-energy accelerator at CERN relies on the characterization of two cross sections: 200-MeV protons and thermal neutrons. However, due to cost and time constraints, it is not always possible to characterize the SEE response of components to thermal neutrons, which is often regarded as negligible for components without borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG). Nevertheless, as recent studies show, the sensitivity of deep sub-micron technologies to thermal neutrons has increased owing to the presence of Boron 10 as a dopant and contact contaminant. The very large thermal neutron fluxes relative to high-energy hadron fluxes in some of the heavily shielded accelerator areas imply that even comparatively small therm...

  4. Improved forced impulse method calculations of single and double ionization of helium by collision with high-energy protons and antiprotons

    Ford, A.L.; Reading, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Our previous forced impulse method calculations of single and double ionization of helium by protons and antiprotons have been improved by including d orbitals in the target centre basis. The calculations are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the ratio R of double to single ionization, without the 1.35 scaling factor we applied to our previous results. We also compare the separate single and double ionization cross sections to experiment and find good agreement. Experimental cross sections differential in projectile scattering angle at large angle (greater than 2.5 mrad) are compared to our impact parameter dependent ionization probabilities at small impact parameter, for the double to single ratio. The agreement is good, except at the lowest energy we have considered, 0.3 eV. (Author)

  5. Exclusive ϒ photoproduction in hadronic collisions at CERN LHC energies

    Gonçalves, V.P., E-mail: barros@ufpel.edu.br [High and Medium Energy Group, Instituto de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Moreira, B.D.; Navarra, F.S. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-06

    The exclusive ϒ photoproduction in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at LHC energies is investigated using the color dipole formalism and considering different models for the ϒ wave function and forward dipole–target scattering amplitude. Our goal is to update the color dipole predictions and estimate the theoretical uncertainty present in these predictions. We present predictions for the kinematical ranges probed by the ALICE, CMS and LHCb Collaborations.

  6. Beam-energy dependence of the directed flow of protons, antiprotons, and pions in Au+Au collisions.

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-04-25

    Rapidity-odd directed flow (v1) measurements for charged pions, protons, and antiprotons near midrapidity (y=0) are reported in sNN=7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter dv1/dy|y=0 shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton dv1/dy|y=0 changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  7. Beam-Energy Dependence of the Directed Flow of Protons, Antiprotons, and Pions in Au+Au Collisions

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Rapidity-odd directed flow (v1) measurements for charged pions, protons, and antiprotons near midrapidity (y =0) are reported in √sNN =7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions as recorded by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. At intermediate impact parameters, the proton and net-proton slope parameter dv1/dy|y=0 shows a minimum between 11.5 and 19.6 GeV. In addition, the net-proton dv1/dy|y=0 changes sign twice between 7.7 and 39 GeV. The proton and net-proton results qualitatively resemble predictions of a hydrodynamic model with a first-order phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined matter, and differ from hadronic transport calculations.

  8. Investigation and optimization of transverse non-linear beam dynamics in the high-energy storage ring HESR

    Welsch, Dominic Markus

    2010-03-10

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) is part of the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) which is planned as a major extension to the present facility of the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt. The HESR will provide antiprotons in the momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c for the internal target experiment PANDA. The demanding requirements of PANDA in terms of beam quality and luminosity together with a limited production rate of antiprotons call for a long beam life time and a minimum of beam loss. Therefore, an effective closed orbit correction and a sufficiently large dynamic aperture of the HESR are crucial. With this thesis I present my work on both of these topics. The expected misalignments of beam guiding magnets have been estimated and used to simulate the closed orbit in the HESR. A closed orbit correction scheme has been developed for different ion optical settings of the HESR and numerical simulations have been performed to validate the scheme. The proposed closed orbit correction method which uses the orbit response matrix has been benchmarked at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Juelich. A chromaticity correction scheme for the HESR consisting of sextupole magnets has been developed to reduce tune spread and thus to minimize the emittance growth caused by betatron resonances. The chromaticity correction scheme has been optimized through dynamic aperture calculations. The estimated field errors of the HESR dipole and quadrupole magnets have been included in the non-linear beam dynamics studies. Investigations concerning their optimization have been carried out. The ion optical settings of the HESR have been improved using dynamic aperture calculations and the technique of frequency map analysis. The related diffusion coefficient was also used to predict long-term stability based on short-term particle tracking. With a reasonable reduction of the quadrupole magnets field errors and a

  9. Status of the PEP-II B-factory high energy ring

    Wienands, U.; Reuter, E.; Bellomo, P.; Daly, E.; Fisher, A.; Gracia, J.; Kulikov, A.; Kurita, N.; Pietryka, M.; Seeman, J.T.; Taylor; Belser, C.; Bertolini, L.; Mugge, M.; Swan, J.

    1996-01-01

    The 9 GeV High Energy Ring (HER) of the PEP-II B Factory is an electron storage ring under construction at SLAC. Significant progress has been made in the last year on all systems. As of mid 1996, all 192 dipoles have been installed, with installation of the quadrupoles underway. The vacuum system, for design currents up to 3 A average, is in production using a recently commissioned e-beam welder. Beam instrumentation systems are being fabricated. The interaction region will bring the HER beam into collision with the 3 GeV beam of the Low Energy Ring; design of this section of the HER is in an advanced stage. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. The 3rd Nordic meeting on high energy reactions in nuclei

    Green, A.M.; Kullander, S.

    Abstracts of the 31 lectures given at the meeting are presented. Major emphasis was placed on the nucleon-nucleon and nucleon-antinucleon interaction in bound and unbound systems. Four of the ten sessions were devoted to this subject. Two sessions contained lecture and seminars on 'Isobars in nuclei', two were devoted to hadron-nucleus reactions, one to high-energy heavy-ion reactions and one to new developments of experimental tools. This latter session had two talks, one about channeling with GeV particles and the other about the planned low-energy antiproton facility LEAR at CERN. Talks of more general character were 'The experimental programme at the CERN SC', 'Accelerator produced nuclear fuel' and 'The upsilons, a new family of quark-antiquark bound state'. (JIW)

  11. Nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies: The CERN WA80 experiment

    Plasil, F.; Albrecht, R.; Awes, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    QCD lattice calculations predict that, at sufficiently high energy densities, hadronic matter undergoes a transition to a new phase of matter, the quark-gluon plasma, in which quarks and gluons are deconfined over a relatively large volume. It has been suggested that collisions between heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies may produce the energy densities, estimated to be greater than 2 to 3 GeV/fm 3 , necessary for this phase transition to occur. An important goal of the first experiments with ultrarelativistic heavy-ion beams at the SPS accelerator at CERN is to investigate the extent to which this suggestion is correct. The primary experimental quantity used for estimating the energy density is the transverse energy, E/sub T/. We present here energies measured at zero degrees, together with transverse energy measurements. Estimates of attained energy densities and preliminary transverse momentum distributions of neutral products are also presented. 24 refs., 7 figs

  12. Antiprotonic helium atomcules

    Sauge Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available About 3% of antiprotons ( stopped in helium are long-lived with microsecond lifetimes, against picoseconds in all other materials. This unusual longevity has been ascribed to the trapping of on metastable bound states in He+ helium atom-molecules thus named atomcules. Apart from their unique dual structure investigated by laser spectroscopy – a near-circular quasi-classical Rydberg atom with l ~ n – 1 ~ 37 or a special diatomic molecule with a negatively charged nucleus in high rotational state with J = l – the chemical physics aspects of their interaction with other atoms or molecules constitute an interesting topic for molecular physics. While atomcules may resist to million collisions in helium, molecular contaminants such as H2 are likely to destroy them in a single one, down to very low temperatures. In the Born-Oppenheimer framework, we interpret the molecular interaction obtained by ab initio quantum chemical calculations in terms of classical reactive channels, with activation barriers accounting for the experiments carried out in He and H2. From classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the thermalization stage strongly quenches initial populations, thus reduced to a recovered 3 % trapping fraction. This work illustrates the pertinence of chemical physics concepts to the study of exotic processes involving antimatter. New insights into the physico-chemistry of cold interstellar radicals are anticipated.

  13. LINAC4 low energy beam measurements

    Hein, L M; Lallement, J B; Lombardi, A M; Midttun, O; Posocco, P; Scrivens, R

    2012-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator for negative Hydrogen ions (H−), which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac (Linac2) as linear injector for the CERN accelerators. The low energy part, comprising a 45 keV Low Energy Beam Transport system (LEBT), a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) is being assembled in a dedicated test stand for pre-commissioning with a proton beam. During 2011 extensive measurements were done after the source and after the LEBT with the aim of preparing the RFQ commissioning and validating the simulation tools, indispensable for future source upgrades. The measurements have been thoroughly simulated with a multi-particle code, including 2D magnetic field maps, error studies, steering studies and the generation of beam distribution from measurements. Emittance, acceptance and transmission measurements will be presented and compared to the results of the simulations.

  14. Redesign of CERN LINAC3 RFQ for Lead 29+

    Benedetti, Stefano; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lombardi, Alessandra; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    CERN Linac3 is at the heart of the CERN Heavy Ion Facility, providing 4.2 MeV/u ion beams to the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR). It mostly accelerates 208Pb29+, though in recent years runs were performed with 40Ar11+ and 129Xe22+, in view of the raising interest of the physics community towards lighter ions experiments. In the framework of the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project, measurements and beam dynamics simulations showed that a transmission bottleneck of Linac3 is represented by the RFQ. As this accelerator was originally designed for 208Pb25+, the lower beam rigidity of the heavy ions currently in used – and planned to be used – permits a redesign of the RFQ aimed at increasing its transverse acceptance, and thus the transmitted beam current. The methodology adopted and the results of this study are presented.

  15. Low energy particle composition

    Gloeckler, G.

    1975-01-01

    More than 50 papers presented at this Conference dealt with the composition of low energy particles. The topics can be divided roughly into two broad categories. The first is the study of the energy spectra and composition of the steady or 'quiet-time' particle flux, whose origin is at this time unknown. The second category includes the study of particles and photons which are associated with solar flares or active regions on the sun. (orig.) [de

  16. Second CERN group produces cold atoms of antihydrogen

    Levi-Goss, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    A new experiment, by CERN's ATRAP collaboration, which introduced a technique for determining the quantum state in which antihydrogen atoms are formed was discussed. To make antihydrogen, antiprotons were taken from CERN's Antiproton Decelerator, further slowed down, and trapped with a configuration of electric fields. The evidence gathered confirmed that the H over bar atoms formed in the experiment occupy highly excited Rydberg states. (Edited abstract) 5 Refs.

  17. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H.; Gunion, J.; Kamon, T.; Lopez, J.L.; Kao, C.

    1995-04-01

    The authors summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, they evaluate the capabilities of various e + e - , p bar p and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, they discuss capabilities of future facilities to disentangle the anticipated spectrum of super-particles, and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. The authors then comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e + e - machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry

  18. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H.; Eberl, H.; Feng, J.L.; Fujii, K.; Gunion, John F.; Kamon, T.; Kao, C.; Lopez, J.L.; Majerotto, W.; McIntyre, P.; Munroe, Ray B.; Murayama, H.; Paige, F.; Porod, W.; Sender, J.; Sopczak, A.; Tata, X.; Tsukamoto, T.; White, J.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, we evaluate the capabilities of various e^+e^-, p\\bar p and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, we discuss capabilities of future facilities to dis-entangle the anticipated spectrum of super-particles and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. We comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e^+e^- machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry.

  19. Magnet design for a low-emittance storage ring

    Johansson, Martin; Anderberg, Bengt; Lindgren, Lars-Johan

    2014-01-01

    The magnet design of the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring replaces the conventional support girder + discrete magnets scheme of previous third-generation light sources with a compact integrated design having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block. The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring, currently under construction, pursues the goal of low electron beam emittance by using a multi-bend achromat magnet lattice, which is realised by having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block, 2.3–3.4 m long. With this magnet design solution, instead of having 1320 individual magnets, the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is built up using 140 integrated ‘magnet block’ units, containing all these magnet elements. Major features of this magnet block design are compactness, vibration stability and that the alignment of magnet elements within each unit is given by the mechanical accuracy of the CNC machining rather than individual field measurement and adjustment. This article presents practical engineering details of implementing this magnet design solution, and mechanical + magnetic field measurement results from the magnet production series. At the time of writing (spring 2014), the production series, which is totally outsourced to industry, is roughly half way through, with mechanical/magnetic QA conforming to specifications. It is the conclusion of the authors that the MAX IV magnet block concept, which has sometimes been described as new or innovative, is from a manufacturing point of view simply a collection of known mature production methods and measurement procedures, which can be executed at fixed cost with a low level of risk

  20. Measuring the low-energy cosmic ray spectrum with the AFIS detector

    Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan; Poeschl, Thomas [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    High-energy cosmic rays interact with Earth's upper atmosphere and produce antiprotons, which can be trapped in Earth's magnetic field. The Antiproton Flux in Space (AFIS) Mission will measure the flux of trapped antiprotons with energies less than 100 MeV aboard the nanosatellite MOVE 2. An active-target tracking detector comprised of scintillating plastic fibers and silicon photomultipliers is already under construction at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen. As a precursor to the space-bound mission, a prototype version of the detector will be launched aboard a balloon from Kiruna, Sweden as part of the REXUS/BEXUS student program by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). Named AFIS-P, it will be used to measure the low-energy part of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies less than 100 MeV-per-nucleon. Spectrometers in previous balloon missions were not sensitive in this low-energy region. Thus AFIS-P will deliver unprecedented data, while simultaneously allowing us to field-test the AFIS detector.

  1. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  2. Equipment and detectors calibration behind shielding of CERN high-energy particle accelerator SPS: June 2007

    Spurny, Frantisek; Ploc, Ondrej

    2008-02-01

    High energy stray radiation fields have been realised since 1993 at CERN also in the frame of CEC-CERN collaboration on the project: 'Detection and the Dosimetry of Neutrons and Charged Particles at Aviation Altitudes in the Earth's Atmosphere'. They are formed at the H6 beam of the north experimental area of the SPS facility. Two shielding configurations have been built, with the top concrete, resp. top iron shielding. Many intercalibration experiments have been realised since the beginning. After an interruption due to technical problems, two other campaigns have been realised during 2006 year, another one during the June 2007. This report describes analyses and discusses the most of results obtained during the last, 2007 run.. (author)

  3. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  4. Interaction of antiprotons with nuclei

    Hrtánková, Jaroslava; Mareš, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 945, JAN (2016), s. 197-215 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-04301S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : antiproton-nucleus interaction * antiproton annihilation * antiproton nuclear bound states Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2016

  5. Magnet design for a low-emittance storage ring

    Johansson, Martin; Anderberg, Bengt; Lindgren, Lars-Johan

    2014-01-01

    The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring, currently under construction, pursues the goal of low electron beam emittance by using a multi-bend achromat magnet lattice, which is realised by having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block, 2.3–3.4 m long. With this magnet design solution, instead of having 1320 individual magnets, the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is built up using 140 integrated ‘magnet block’ units, containing all these magnet elements. Major features of this magnet block design are compactness, vibration stability and that the alignment of magnet elements within each unit is given by the mechanical accuracy of the CNC machining rather than individual field measurement and adjustment. This article presents practical engineering details of implementing this magnet design solution, and mechanical + magnetic field measurement results from the magnet production series. At the time of writing (spring 2014), the production series, which is totally outsourced to industry, is roughly half way through, with mechanical/magnetic QA conforming to specifications. It is the conclusion of the authors that the MAX IV magnet block concept, which has sometimes been described as new or innovative, is from a manufacturing point of view simply a collection of known mature production methods and measurement procedures, which can be executed at fixed cost with a low level of risk. PMID:25177980

  6. Low-energy QCD

    Ecker, G.

    1995-11-01

    After a brief introduction to chiral perturbation theory, the effective field theory of the standard model at low energies, two recent applications are reviewed: elastic pion-pion scattering to two-loop accuracy and the complete renormalized pion-nucleon Lagrangian to O(P 3 ) in the chiral expansion. (author)

  7. Enhanced production of low-mass electron-positron pairs in 40-AGeV Pb-Au collisions at the CERN SPS.

    Adamová, D; Agakichiev, G; Appelshäuser, H; Belaga, V; Braun-Munzinger, P; Cherlin, A; Damjanović, S; Dietel, T; Dietrich, L; Drees, A; Esumi, S I; Filimonov, K; Fomenko, K; Fraenkel, Z; Garabatos, C; Glässel, P; Hering, G; Holeczek, J; Kushpil, V; Lenkeit, B; Maas, A; Marín, A; Milosević, J; Milov, A; Miśkowiec, D; Panebrattsev, Yu; Petchenova, O; Petrácek, V; Pfeiffer, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Rehak, P; Richter, M; Sako, H; Schmitz, W; Sedykh, S; Seipp, W; Sharma, A; Shimansky, S; Slívová, J; Specht, H J; Stachel, J; Sumbera, M; Tilsner, H; Tserruya, I; Wessels, J P; Wienold, T; Windelband, B; Wurm, J P; Xie, W; Yurevich, S; Yurevich, V

    2003-07-25

    We report on first measurements of low-mass electron-positron pairs in Pb-Au collisions at the CERN SPS beam energy of 40 AGeV. The observed pair yield integrated over the range of invariant masses 0.2e(+)e(-) annihilation with a modified rho propagator. They may be linked to chiral symmetry restoration and support the notion that the in-medium modifications of the rho are more driven by baryon density than by temperature.

  8. K-shell ionization by antiprotons

    Mehler, G.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.; Soff, G.

    1987-01-01

    We present first calculations for the impact parameter dependence of K-shell ionization rates in anti pCu and in anti pAg collisions at various projectile energies. We show that the effect of the attractive Coulomb potential on the Rutherford trajectory and the anti-binding effect caused by the negative charge of the antiproton result in a considerable increase of the ionization probability. Total ionization cross-sections for proton and antiproton projectiles are compared with each other and with experimental ionization cross-sections for protons. (orig.)

  9. CERN's LEIR Digital LLRF : system overview and operational experience

    Angoletta, ME; Blas, A; Bracke, E; Butterworth, A; Dubouchet, F; Findlay, A; Pedersen, F; Sanchez-Quesada, J

    2010-01-01

    The Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) is an accumulation and acceleration ring in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ion injector chain. After its successful start in 2005, it has been running in three operational campaigns. The LEIR low-level RF (LLRF) system is the first all-digital system to operate in a CERN circular machine. Its capabilities include beam control tasks as well as dual-harmonic cavity voltage/phase servoing. All the system’s control parameters are fully configurable, remotely and in-between cycles; extensive built-in observation capabilities and diagnostics are available. The system is flexible, powerful and extremely reliable. This paper outlines the main building blocks and operational features, along with results obtained during the first years of operation.

  10. Proceedings of the 2011 CERN - Latin American School of High-Energy Physics

    Grojean, C.; Mulders, M.; Spiropulu

    2011-01-01

    The CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lectures on quantum field theory, quantum chromodynamics, flavour physics and CP-violation, physics beyond the Standard Model, neutrino physics, particle cosmology, ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and heavy-ion physics, as well as a presentation of recent results form the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and short introduction to the principles of particle physics instrumentation

  11. The CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field (CERF) facility: applications and latest developments

    Silari, Marco; Pozzi, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    The CERF facility at CERN provides an almost unique high-energy workplace reference radiation field for the calibration and test of radiation protection instrumentation employed at high-energy accelerator facilities and for aircraft and space dosimetry. This paper describes the main features of the facility and supplies a non-exhaustive list of recent (as of 2005) applications for which CERF is used. Upgrade work started in 2015 to provide the scientific and industrial communities with a state-of-the-art reference facility is also discussed.

  12. Proceedings of the 2011 CERN - Latin American School of High-Energy Physics

    Grojean, C.; Mulders, M.; Spiropulu, [eds.

    2011-07-01

    The CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lectures on quantum field theory, quantum chromodynamics, flavour physics and CP-violation, physics beyond the Standard Model, neutrino physics, particle cosmology, ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and heavy-ion physics, as well as a presentation of recent results form the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and short introduction to the principles of particle physics instrumentation.

  13. The Low-Level Control System for the CERN PS Multi-Turn Extraction Kickers

    Schipper, J; Boucly, C; Carlier, E; Fowler, T; Gaudillet, H; Noulibos, R; Sermeus, L

    2010-01-01

    To reduce the beam losses when preparing high intensity proton beam for the CERN Neutrino to Gran Sasso (CNGS) facility, a new Multi-Turn extraction (MTE) scheme has been implemented in the PS, to replace the present Continuous Transfer (CT) to the SPS. Industrial off-the-shelf components have been used for the low-level part of the MTE kicker control system. National Instruments PXI systems are used to control the high voltage pulse generators and a SIEMENS programmable logic controller (PLC) handles the centralised oil cooling and gas insulation sub-systems

  14. Experiments at CERN in 1997

    1997-11-01

    This book summarises the current experimental programme at CERN. The experiments listed are taking place at one of the following machines: the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP), the Super Proton Synchroton (SPS), the 28 GeV Proton Synchrotron (PS), including the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) for slow antiprotons and the ISOLDE facility for short-lived ions. The three experiments now approved for installation at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the R and D projects aimed at the development of new detector technologies and data acquisition systems for the LHC experiments are also listed. (orig./WL)

  15. Very low energy geothermics

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Very low energy geothermics correspond to temperatures below 30 C and has been developed to cover heating and cooling needs of recent individual houses or tertiary industries using heat pumps and low depth aquifers (<100 m). Geothermal heat pumps industry has made great strides in European Northern countries, China, Japan and the United States of America. Geothermal heat pumps are less energy consuming than air heat pumps and require less cooling fluid and maintenance. The Aquapac procedure has been developed in France in 1983 by the AFME (French Energy Control Agency), EdF and the BRGM (Geologic and Mining Research Office) to encourage the use of geothermal heat pump for domestic and sanitary water heating and to make a survey of low-depth aquifers in the whole french territory. The decay of energy costs that started in 1986 has led to a loss of interest for the Aquapac procedure, even in the tertiary industries for which the air-conditioning demand is growing up. (J.S.). 1 tab

  16. LEAR looks ahead

    Anon.

    1985-06-15

    From 19 to 26 January in Tignes in the French Alps, 180 members of CERN's newest physics community met to review progress and discuss plans for the future. These physicists use the LEAR low energy antiproton ring which came into action in 1983 and whose unique low energy beams have attracted an unanticipated level of participation from all over the world.

  17. Enhanced antiproton production in Pb(160 A GeV)+Pb reactions evidence for quark gluon matter?

    Bleicher, M; Bass, S A; Soff, S; Stöcker, H

    2000-01-01

    The centrality dependence of the antiproton per participant ratio is studied in Pb(160 AGeV)+Pb reactions. Antiproton production in collisions of heavy nuclei at the CERN/SPS seems considerably enhanced as compared to conventional hadronic physics, given by the antiproton production rates in $pp$ and antiproton annihilation in $\\bar{p}p$ reactions. This enhancement is consistent with the observation of strong in-medium effects in other hadronic observables and may be an indication of partial restoration of chiral symmetry.

  18. Detection of low-energy antinuclei in space using an active-target particle detector

    Poeschl, Thomas; Greenwald, Daniel; Konorov, Igor; Paul, Stephan [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Measuring antimatter in space excellently probes various astrophysical processes. The abundances and energy spectra of antiparticles reveal a lot about the creation and propagation of cosmic-ray particles in the universe. Abnormalities in their spectra can reveal exotic sources or inaccuracies in our understanding of the involved processes. The measurement of antiprotons and the search for antideuterons and antihelium are optimal at low kinetic energies since background from high-energy cosmic-ray collisions is low. For this reason, we are developing an active-target particle detector capable of detecting ions and anti-ions in the energy range of 30-100 MeV per nucleon. The detector consists of 900 scintillating fibers coupled to silicon photomultipliers and is designed to operate on nanosatellites. The primary application of the detector will be the Antiproton Flux in Space (AFIS) mission, whose goal is the measurement of geomagnetically trapped antiprotons inside Earth's inner radiation belt. In this talk, we explain our particle identification technique and present results from first in-beam measurements with a prototype.

  19. Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wilding, D; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9~K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal.

  20. High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN - Energy Frontier Experiment

    Hanson, Gail G. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) near Geneva, Switzerland, is now the highest energy accelerator in the world, colliding protons with protons. On July 4, 2012, the two general-purpose experiments, ATLAS and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, announced the observation of a particle consistent with the world’s most sought-after particle, the Higgs boson, at a mass of about 125 GeV (approximately 125 times the mass of the proton). The Higgs boson is the final missing ingredient of the standard model, in which it is needed to allow most other particles to acquire mass through the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. We are members of the team in the CMS experiment that found evidence for the Higgs boson through its decay to two photons, the most sensitive channel at the LHC. We are proposing to carry out studies to determine whether the new particle has the properties expected for the standard model Higgs boson or whether it is something else. The new particle can still carry out its role in electroweak symmetry breaking but have other properties as well. Most theorists think that a single standard model Higgs boson cannot be the complete solution – there are other particles needed to answer some of the remaining questions, such as the hierarchy problem. The particle that has been observed could be one of several Higgs bosons, for example, or it could be composite. One model of physics beyond the standard model is supersymmetry, in which every ordinary particle has a superpartner with opposite spin properties. In supersymmetric models, there must be at least five Higgs bosons. In the most popular versions of supersymmetry, the lightest supersymmetric particle does not decay and is a candidate for dark matter. This proposal covers the period from June 1, 2013, to March 31, 2016. During this period the LHC will finally reach its design energy, almost twice the energy at which it now runs. We will

  1. CERN Rocks

    2004-01-01

    The 15th CERN Hardronic Festival took place on 17 July on the terrace of Rest 3 (Prévessin). Over 1000 people, from CERN and other International Organizations, came to enjoy the warm summer night, and to watch the best of the World's High Energy music. Jazz, rock, pop, country, metal, blues, funk and punk blasted out from 9 bands from the CERN Musiclub and Jazz club, alternating on two stages in a non-stop show.  The night reached its hottest point when The Canettes Blues Band got everybody dancing to sixties R&B tunes (pictured). Meanwhile, the bars and food vans were working at full capacity, under the expert management of the CERN Softball club, who were at the same time running a Softball tournament in the adjacent "Higgs Field". The Hardronic Festival is the main yearly CERN music event, and it is organized with the support of the Staff Association and the CERN Administration.

  2. Collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen molecular ions

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations of the ionization and excitation cross section for antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen ions are performed in an impact energy range from 0.5 keV to 10 MeV. The Born-Oppenheimer and Franck-Condon approximations as well as the impact parameter...

  3. Beam loading in high-energy storage rings

    Wilson, P.B.

    1974-06-01

    The analysis of beam loading in the RF systems of high-energy storage rings (for example, the PEP e/sup /minus//e/sup +/ ring) is complicated by the fact that the time, T/sub b/, between the passage of successive bunches is comparable to the cavity filling time, T/sub b/. In this paper, beam loading expressions are first summarized for the usual case in which T/sub b/ /much lt/ T/sub f/. The theory of phase oscillations in the heavily-beam-loaded case is considered, and the dependence of the synchrotron frequency and damping constant for the oscillations on beam current and cavity tuning is calculated. Expressions for beam loading are then derived which are valid for any value of the ratio T/sub b//T/sub f/. It is shown that, for the proposed PEP e/sup /minus//e/sup +/ ring parameters, the klystron power required is increased by about 3% over that calculated using the standard beam loading expressions. Finally, the analysis is extended to take into account the additional losses associated with the excitation of higher-order cavity modes. A rough numerical estimate is made of the loss enhancement to be expected for PEP RF system. It is concluded that this loss enhancement might be substantial unless appropriate measures are taken in the design and tuning of the accelerating structure

  4. Experimental and numerical studies on the proposed application of hollow electron beam collimation for the LHC at CERN

    Moens, Vince; Redaelli, Stefano; Rivkin, Leonid

    This thesis work was carried out in the framework of U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program (USLARP), a collaboration between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the U.S. Department of Energy. The first half of the work was completed at Fermilab (USA), the location of the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider and the second largest particle collider in the world. The second half was completed at CERN (Switzerland), the location of the largest proton collider in the world (Large Hadron Collider (LHC)).\

  5. Energy Extraction in the CERN Large Hadron Collider a Project Overview

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Kazmine, B; Medvedko, A S; Sytchev, V V; Vasilev, L B

    2001-01-01

    In case of a resistive transition (quench), fast and reliable extraction of the magnetic energy, stored in the superconducting coils of the electromagnets of a particle collider, represents an important part of its magnet protection system. In general, the quench detectors, the quench heaters and the cold by-pass diodes across each magnet, together with the energy extraction facilities provide the required protection of the quenching superconductors against damage due to local energy dissipation. In CERN's LHC machine the energy stored in each of its eight superconducting dipole chains exceeds 1300 MJ. Following an opening of the extraction switches this energy will be absorbed in large extraction resistors located in the underground collider tunnel or adjacent galleries, during the exponential current decay. Also the sixteen, 13 kA quadrupole chains (QF, QD) and more than one hundred and fifty, 600 A circuits of the corrector magnets will be equipped with extraction systems. The extraction switch-gear is bas...

  6. Improved Study of the Antiprotonic Helium Hyperfine Structure

    Pask, T.; Dax, A.; Hayano, R.S.; Hori, M.; Horvath, D.; Juhasz, B.; Malbrunot, C.; Marton, J.; Ono, N.; Suzuki, K.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report the initial results from a systematic study of the hyperfine (HF) structure of antiprotonic helium (n,l) = (37,~35) carried out at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. We performed a laser-microwave-laser resonance spectroscopy using a continuous wave (cw) pulse-amplified laser system and microwave cavity to measure the HF transition frequencies. Improvements in the spectral linewidth and stability of our laser system have increased the precision of these measurements by a factor of five and reduced the line width by a factor of three compared to our previous results. A comparison of the experimentally measured transition frequencies with three body QED calculations can be used to determine the antiproton spin magnetic moment, leading towards a test of CPT invariance.

  7. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  8. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    Sótér, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Barna, D.; Horváth, D.; Hori, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  9. Coincidence studies with antiprotons

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We present a short overview of a new method for calculating fully differential cross sections that is able to describe any aspect of coincidence measurements involving heavy projectiles. The method is based upon impact parameter close coupling with pseudostates. Examples from antiproton impact ionization are shown.

  10. Progress in antiproton physics

    Miettinen, H.I.

    1976-09-01

    Some recent results on proton-antiproton collisions are reviewed. The duality structure of processes where baryon number or strangeness may be annihilated receives particular attention. Attempts to obtain experimental information on the impact parameter space structure of multiparticle processes are discussed. Suggestions for future research are made

  11. Low energy plasma observations at synchronous orbit

    Reasoner, D.L.; Lennartsson, W.

    1977-08-01

    The University of California at San Diego Auroral Particles Experiment on the ATS-6 Satellite in synchronous orbit has detected a low-energy plasma population which is separate and distinct from both the ring current and plasma sheet populations. These observations suggest that this plasma is the outer zone of the plasmasphere. During magnetically active periods, this low energy plasma is often observed flowing sunward. In the dusk sector, enhanced plasma flow is often observed for 1-2 hours prior to the onset of a substorm-associated particle injection. (author)

  12. Very low intensity storage-ring profile monitor

    Hardek, T.; Kells, W.; Lai, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Fermilab Colliding Beams Group has now accomplished several cooling experiments (electron and stochastic methods) on proton beams in the ''electron cooling'' synchrotron ring built for this purpose. A key to analyzing the performance of any test cooling system is a complete set of beam diagnostics to measure the beam emittances in all three planes. For longitudinal emittance the authors use Schottky scans (although very low intensities make this difficult, necessitating a departure from the conventional method by bunching the beams). A description is given of the MCP telescope and readout which evolved independently as a complete monitor system using residual gas in lieu of Mg vapor. To date all transverse measurements of coasting beam profiles have been obtained in this mode. 2 refs

  13. Medium energy electron cooling R and D at Fermilab -- Context and status

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    Electron cooling at the proposed Recycler 8 GeV storage ring has been identified as a key element in exploiting the capacity of the Fermilab Main Injector for an additional factor of ten in Tevatron luminosity above the goal for the next collider run, ultimately to > 10 33 cm -2 s -1 . The most basic requirement for increased luminosity is a large stack of antiprotons cooled to emittance comparable to that of the proton beam. Although electron cooling is inferior to the stochastic technique for cooling large emittance beams, its rate is practically independent of the antiproton intensity. For cooling intense beams of low or moderate emittance, electron cooling excels. The realization of electron cooling for 8 GeV antiprotons requires major extension of existing practice in electron energy and length of the cooling interaction region. It will require 4.3 MeV dc electron beam maintaining high quality and precise collinearity with the antiprotons over a 66 m straight section. The initial goal of the R and D project is 200 mA electron current in about three years; the plan is to reach 2 A over the following three years

  14. Testing Quantum Chromodynamics with Antiprotons

    Brodsky, S.

    2004-10-21

    The antiproton storage ring HESR to be constructed at GSI will open up a new range of perturbative and nonperturbative tests of QCD in exclusive and inclusive reactions. I discuss 21 tests of QCD using antiproton beams which can illuminate novel features of QCD. The proposed experiments include the formation of exotic hadrons, measurements of timelike generalized parton distributions, the production of charm at threshold, transversity measurements in Drell-Yan reactions, and searches for single-spin asymmetries. The interactions of antiprotons in nuclear targets will allow tests of exotic nuclear phenomena such as color transparency, hidden color, reduced nuclear amplitudes, and the non-universality of nuclear antishadowing. The central tool used in these lectures are light-front Fock state wavefunctions which encode the bound-state properties of hadrons in terms of their quark and gluon degrees of freedom at the amplitude level. The freedom to choose the light-like quantization four-vector provides an explicitly covariant formulation of light-front quantization and can be used to determine the analytic structure of light-front wave functions. QCD becomes scale free and conformally symmetric in the analytic limit of zero quark mass and zero {beta} function. This ''conformal correspondence principle'' determines the form of the expansion polynomials for distribution amplitudes and the behavior of non-perturbative wavefunctions which control hard exclusive processes at leading twist. The conformal template also can be used to derive commensurate scale relations which connect observables in QCD without scale or scheme ambiguity. The AdS/CFT correspondence of large N{sub C} supergravity theory in higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter space with supersymmetric QCD in 4-dimensional space-time has important implications for hadron phenomenology in the conformal limit, including the nonperturbative derivation of counting rules for exclusive processes and

  15. Do positrons and antiprotons respect the weak equivalence principle?

    Hughes, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    We resolve the difficulties which Morrison identified with energy conservation and the gravitational red-shift when particles of antimatter, such as the positron and antiproton, do not respect the weak equivalence principle. 13 refs

  16. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN: Signatures, physical observables and experimental results

    Harris, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions have become available with the recent experiments at CERN utilizing 200 GeV/n oxygen and sulfur beams. Physics motivations for these experiments are presented: a description of predicted signatures for possible formation of a quark-gluon plasma and physical observables that are expected to provide important information for understanding the dynamics of these collisions. A presentation will be made of some of the first experimental results to emerge from this new field. 28 refs., 9 figs

  17. Simulation of Instability at Transition Energy with a New Impedance Model for CERN PS

    Wang, Na; Biancacci, Nicolo; Migliorati, Mauro; Persichelli, Serena; Sterbini, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Instabilities driven by the transverse impedance are proven to be one of the limitations for the high intensity reach of the CERN PS. Since several years, fast single bunch vertical instability at transition energy has been observed with the high intensity bunch serving the neu-tron Time-of-Flight facility (n-ToF). In order to better understand the instability mechanism, a dedicated meas-urement campaign took place. The results were compared with macro-particle simulations with PyHEADTAIL based on the new impedance model developed for the PS. Instability threshold and growth rate for different longitu-dinal emittances and beam intensities were studied.

  18. 9th CERN - Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics

    2017-01-01

    The CERN – Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is targeted particularly at students in experimental HEP who are in the final years of work towards their PhDs. However, it is anticipated that some post-doctoral students in experimental HEP, and some students in phenomenology, including some masters students, will also be accepted. It should be noted that some pre-knowledge of the subjects is necessary in order to be able to profit fully from the lecture courses.

  19. 2016 CERN-JINR European School of High-Energy Physics

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 CERN-JINR European School of High-Energy Physics will take place in Skeikampen (near to Lillehammer), Norway, on 15-28 June 2016.   The School is targeted particularly at students in experimental HEP, who are in the final years of work towards their PhDs, although candidates at an earlier or later stage in their studies may be considered. ** The deadline for applications has been extended to 19 February 2016 ** Sponsorship may be available for a small number of students from developing countries. Further details are available here.

  20. Integrating INIS into a high energy physics information environment thoughts from CERN

    Yeomans, Joanne; Baudic, Romain; Picchioli, Ingrid; International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management : Strategies, Information Management and Human Resource Development. Special Session : The Role of INIS in Knowledge Preservation

    2004-01-01

    Information searchers from the high energy physics community expect an integrated information environment. The CERN Library offers its print and electronic collections through a combined Web interface and maintains the database by semi-automated processes to upload bibliographic and full-text records. Suggestions are offered by which INIS could develop its own Web interface and better match HEP users’ expectations. These include implementing full-text linking, increasing currency, expanding search and display functions and developing the richness of the data. Links with the National Nuclear Data Center and Crossref could also increase its visibility.

  1. CAS - CERN Accelerator School: Free Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs

    2018-01-01

    These proceedings collate lectures given at the course on Free Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs (FELsand ERLs), organised by the CERN Accelerator School (CAS). The course was held at the Hotel Scandic HamburgEmporio, Hamburg, Germany from 31 May to 10 June 2016, in collaboration with DESY. Following introductorylectures on radiation issues, the basic requirements on linear accelerators and ERLs are discussed. Undulators andthe process of seeding and lasing are then treated in some detail, followed by lectures on various beam dynamicsand controls issues.

  2. Two photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN’s AD

    Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms using counter-propagating ultraviolet laser beams. This excited some non-linear transitions of the antiproton at the wavelengths λ = 139.8–197.0 nm, in a way that reduced the thermal Doppler broadening of the observed resonances. The resulting narrow spectral lines allowed the measurement of three transition frequencies with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing these values with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was derived as 1836.1526736(23). We briefly review these results.

  3. Enhanced collaboration between CERN and India

    2009-01-01

    On Monday 22 June, Bikash Sinha, Director of the SAHA Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP) and the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) in Kolkata, India and Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General, signed new protocols to the long standing agreement between the Indian Atomic Energy Commission and CERN. This provides a framework for collaboration in low energy nuclear physics between SAHA and VECC and the ISOLDE experiment at CERN. SINP and VECC Director Bikash Sinha and CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer signing the ISOLDE Protocols. SINP and VECC Director Bikash Sinha and CERN Research Director Sergio Bertolucci with representatives of the ISOLDE and RD51 Collaborations.INDIA has a long standing tradition in basic nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry. SINP is a leading institute for basic research and training in physical and biophysical sciences with particular competence in nuclear spectroscopy a...

  4. Enhancing the low-level tape layer of CERN Tape Archive software

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160814; Ruse, Laura Cristina; Vasilescu, Laura

    CERN manages the largest scientific data archive in the HEP domain. The archive currently holds over 180 Petabytes, with forecasts of up to 100PB of new data added per year. Considering this numbers, the most cost-effective solution for storage in terms of capacity and maintenance is represented by magnetic tapes. The drawback of this solution is the access time which can raise to several minutes for a series of files. In an environment where very large volumes of physics data are being traded from tape to disk and vice versa, this issue becomes a serious performance bottleneck. This thesis introduces two low-level tape access optimizations: first, adding support for the Recommended Access Order (RAO), a mechanism offered by the tape hardware infrastructure to compute the file order corresponding to the minimum access time. We will present our solution for including RAO in the file retrieval operations in CERN tape archive software in order to benefit from the reduced reading time. The second optimization ...

  5. The Antiproton-Ion-Collider at FAIR

    Kruecken, R.; Fabbietti, L.; Faestemann, T.; Homolka, J.; Kienle, P.; Ring, P.; Suzuki, K.; Bosch, F.; Franzke, B.; Kozhuharov, Ch.; Litvinov, Y.; Nolden, F.; Cargnelli, M.; Fuhrmann, H.; Hirtl, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Hayano, R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2006-01-01

    An antiproton-ion collider (AIC) has been proposed for the FAIR Project at Darmstadt to independently determine rms radii for protons and neutrons in stable and short lived nuclei by means of antiproton annihilation at medium energies. The AIC makes use of the ELISe electron ion collider complex to store, cool and collide antiprotons of 30 MeV energy with short lived radioactive ions in the NESR. The exotic nuclei are produced by projectile fragmentation or projectile fission and separated in the Super FRS. By detecting the loss of stored ions using the Schottky method the total absorption cross-section for antiprotons on the stored ions with mass A will be measured. Cross sections for the absorption on protons and neutrons, respectively, will be measured by the detection of residual nuclei with A-1 either by the Schottky method or by detecting them in recoil detectors after the first dipole stage of the NESR following the interaction zone. The absorption cross sections are in first order directly proportional to the mean square radii

  6. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions?

    CERN. Geneva; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    After an introduction to the controversial problem of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) catalyzed by neutrons on metallic hydride surfaces we present the results of an experiment, made in collaboration with ENEA Labs in Frascati, to search neutrons from plasma discharges in electrolytic cells. The negative outcome of our experiment goes in the direction of ruling out those theoretical models expecting LENR to occur in condensed matter systems under specific conditions. Our criticism on the theoretical foundations of such models will also be presented.

  7. In the CERN Library

    CERN PhotoLab

    1963-01-01

    Seen in this picture is Noria Christophoridou, librarian of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission, who has been sent by her government to CERN for a year to widen her experience of library and documentation services. In the photograph she is providing information to Kurt Gottfried, a CERN visiting scientist from Harvard University, who is spending a year with CERN's Theory Division

  8. CERN stop-over for KEK and Fermilab Directors

    2001-01-01

    En route for a meeting of the International Committee for Future Accelerators, ICFA, held at Germany's DESY laboratory, the Directors of Japan's KEK laboratory and Fermilab in the United States had a stop-over at CERN last Wednesday 7 February. Dr Hirotaka Sugawara, Director General of Japan's high energy physics laboratory, KEK, visited the Antiproton Decelerator, AD. From left to right, Masaki Hori, member of the ASACUSA collaboration, John Eades, contact person for ASACUSA, Dr Hirotaka Sugawara, Werner Pirkl, the PS Division engineer responsible for the Radio Frequency Quadrupole decelerator in the foreground, and Kurt Hübner, CERN's Director of Accelerators. Dr Michael S. Witherell, Director of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Fermilab, visited construction sites for the LHC, ATLAS, and CMS. He is seen here with a module of the CMS hadronic calorimeter in building 186.

  9. Localized chromaticity correction of low-beta insertions in storage rings

    Donald, M.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Moshammer, H.; Sullivan, M.; Forest, E.; Robin, D.; Zholents, A.

    1993-01-01

    The correction of the chromaticity of low-beta insertions in the storage rings is usually made with sextupole lenses in the ring's arcs. When decreasing the beta functions at the insertion point (IP), this technique becomes fairly ineffective, since it fails to properly correct the higher order chromatic aberrations. Here the authors consider the approach where the chromatic effects of the quadrupole lenses generating low beta functions at the IP are corrected locally with two families of sextupoles, one family for each plane. Each family has two pairs of sextupoles which are located symmetrically on both sides of the IP. The sextupole-like aberrations of individual sextupoles are eliminated by utilizing optics forming a -I transformation between sextupoles in the pair. The optics also includes bending magnets which preserve equal dispersion functions at the two sextupoles in each pair. At sextupoles in one family, the vertical beta function is made large and the horizontal is made small. The situation is reversed in the sextupoles of the other family. The betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate a second order chromatic aberration. The application of the localized chromatic correction is demonstrated using as an example the lattice design for the Low Energy Ring of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL PEP-II B Factory

  10. Localized chromaticity correction of low-beta insertions in storage rings

    Donald, M.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Moshammer, H.; Sullivan, M.; Forest, E.; Robin, D.; Zholents, A.

    1993-04-01

    The correction of the chromaticity of low-beta insertions in the storage rings is usually made with sextupole lenses in the ring's arcs. When decreasing the beta functions at the insertion point (IP), this technique becomes fairly ineffective, since it fails to properly correct the higher order chromatic aberrations. Here we consider the approach where the chromatic effects of the quadrupole lenses generating low beta functions at the IP are corrected locally with two families of sextupoles, one family for each plane. Each family has two pairs of sextupoles which are located symmetrically on both sides of the IP. The sextupole-like aberrations of individual sextupoles are eliminated by utilizing optics forming a -I transformation between sextupoles in the pair. The optics also includes bending magnets which preserve equal dispersion functions at the two sextupoles in each pair. At sextupoles in one family, the vertical beta function is made large and the horizontal is made small. The situation is reversed in the sextupoles of the other family. The betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate a second order chromatic aberration. The application of the localized chromatic correction is demonstrated using as an example the lattice design for the Low Energy Ring of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL PEP-II B Factory

  11. Implement of a magnetic spectrometer at the CERN intersecting stockage rings (900 spectrometer in the R608 experiment)

    Reyrolle, M.

    1985-01-01

    By adding a new spectrometer at 90 0 in the R608 experiment at CERN (ISR) we can search correlations between some systems of particles fully measured in the forward and transverse directions. The corresponding new electronic trigger, which selects events with momentum above a chosen threshold, is mixed or not to the forward trigger, in order to record correlated or inclusive data from the collisions p-p, p-anti-p, α-α. In the 90 0 spectrometer, we build drift chambers, set before the dipolar magnet. We studied the spatial resolution and the methods to associate tracks before and after this magnet. We developed the method to determine the momenta, by taking account of the variations of the deflecting power: the accuracy of this method is better than O.3%, and the global resolution is about 0.01 P 2 . We proposed also how to identify the particles from time of flight measurements and aerogel cerenkov counters [fr

  12. Inside bluetooth low energy

    Gupta, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (LE) is one of the latest enhancement to Bluetooth technology and, as the name suggests, it is aimed at ultra low power devices, such as heart rate monitors, thermometers, and sensors. Due to very low power consumption, devices compliant with this standard can operate for several years on coin cell batteries without the need for recharging. This cutting-edge book helps you understand the whats , whys , and hows of Bluetooth LE. It includes a broad view of the technology, identifies the various building blocks, and explains how they come together. You also find discussions on Bluetooth basics, providing the background information needed to master Bluetooth LE.The book explains the architecture of Bluetooth LE stack and the functionality provided by each of the layers. You find expert guidance in setting up your own system in a quick and efficient manner with inexpensive, easily available hardware and just a couple of PCs running Linux. This unique volume features two chapters that are dedi...

  13. On the Optimum Dispersion of a Storage Ring for Electron Cooling with High Space Charge

    Bosser, Jacques; Chanel, M; Marié, L; Möhl, D; Tranquille, G

    2000-01-01

    With the intense electron beams used for cooling, matching of the ion and electron velocity over the largest possible fraction of the beam profile becomes important. In this situation, a finite dispersion from the ring in the cooling section can lead to an appreciable gain in the transverse cooling speed. Based on a simple model of the cooling force, an expression for the "optimum" dispersion as a function of the electron beam intensity, the momentum spread and other properties of the ion beam will be derived. This simple theory will be compared to measurements made on the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) at CERN during 1997.

  14. Compression of a mixed antiproton and electron non-neutral plasma to high densities

    Aghion, Stefano; Amsler, Claude; Bonomi, Germano; Brusa, Roberto S.; Caccia, Massimo; Caravita, Ruggero; Castelli, Fabrizio; Cerchiari, Giovanni; Comparat, Daniel; Consolati, Giovanni; Demetrio, Andrea; Di Noto, Lea; Doser, Michael; Evans, Craig; Fanì, Mattia; Ferragut, Rafael; Fesel, Julian; Fontana, Andrea; Gerber, Sebastian; Giammarchi, Marco; Gligorova, Angela; Guatieri, Francesco; Haider, Stefan; Hinterberger, Alexander; Holmestad, Helga; Kellerbauer, Alban; Khalidova, Olga; Krasnický, Daniel; Lagomarsino, Vittorio; Lansonneur, Pierre; Lebrun, Patrice; Malbrunot, Chloé; Mariazzi, Sebastiano; Marton, Johann; Matveev, Victor; Mazzotta, Zeudi; Müller, Simon R.; Nebbia, Giancarlo; Nedelec, Patrick; Oberthaler, Markus; Pacifico, Nicola; Pagano, Davide; Penasa, Luca; Petracek, Vojtech; Prelz, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Rienaecker, Benjamin; Robert, Jacques; Røhne, Ole M.; Rotondi, Alberto; Sandaker, Heidi; Santoro, Romualdo; Smestad, Lillian; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Testera, Gemma; Tietje, Ingmari C.; Widmann, Eberhard; Yzombard, Pauline; Zimmer, Christian; Zmeskal, Johann; Zurlo, Nicola; Antonello, Massimiliano

    2018-04-01

    We describe a multi-step "rotating wall" compression of a mixed cold antiproton-electron non-neutral plasma in a 4.46 T Penning-Malmberg trap developed in the context of the AEḡIS experiment at CERN. Such traps are routinely used for the preparation of cold antiprotons suitable for antihydrogen production. A tenfold antiproton radius compression has been achieved, with a minimum antiproton radius of only 0.17 mm. We describe the experimental conditions necessary to perform such a compression: minimizing the tails of the electron density distribution is paramount to ensure that the antiproton density distribution follows that of the electrons. Such electron density tails are remnants of rotating wall compression and in many cases can remain unnoticed. We observe that the compression dynamics for a pure electron plasma behaves the same way as that of a mixed antiproton and electron plasma. Thanks to this optimized compression method and the high single shot antiproton catching efficiency, we observe for the first time cold and dense non-neutral antiproton plasmas with particle densities n ≥ 1013 m-3, which pave the way for an efficient pulsed antihydrogen production in AEḡIS.

  15. Innovative low-mass cooling systems for the ALICE ITS Upgrade detector at CERN

    Gomez Marzoa, Manuel

    The Phase-1 upgrade of the LHC to full design luminosity, planned for 2019 at CERN, requires the modernisation of the experiments around the accelerator. The Inner Tracking System (ITS), the innermost detector at the ALICE experiment, will be upgraded by replacing the current apparatus by new silicon pixels arranged in 7 cylindrical layers. Each layer is composed by multiple independent modules, named staves, which provide mechanical support and cooling to the chips. This thesis aims to develop and validate experimentally an ultra-lightweight stave cooling system for the ITS Upgrade. The moderate thermal requirements, with a nominal power density of 0.15 W/cm^2 and a maximum chip temperature of 30ºC, are counterweighted by extreme low-mass restrictions, obliging to resort to lightweight, non-metallic materials, such as carbon fibre-reinforced polymers and plastics. Novel lightweight stave concepts were developed and experimentally validated, meeting the thermal requirements with minimal material inventory. T...

  16. On the antiproton discovery

    Piccioni, O.

    1989-01-01

    The author of this article describes his own role in the discovery of the antiproton. Although Segre and Chamberlain received the Nobel Prize in 1959 for its discovery, the author claims that their experimental method was his idea which he communicated to them informally in December 1954. He describes how his application for citizenship (he was Italian), and other scientists' manipulation, prevented him from being at Berkeley to work on the experiment himself. (UK)

  17. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  18. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    Harkay, K.C.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  19. Single-Particle Dynamics in Electron Storage Rings with Extremely Low Emittance

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-05-31

    Electron storage rings are widely used for high luminosity colliders, damping rings in high-energy linear colliders, and synchrotron light sources. They have become essential facilities to study high-energy physics and material and medical sciences. To further increase the luminosity of colliders or the brightness of synchrotron light sources, the beam emittance is being continually pushed downward, recently to the nanometer region. In the next decade, another order of reduction is expected. This requirement of ultra-low emittance presents many design challenges in beam dynamics, including better analysis of maps and improvement of dynamic apertures. To meet these challenges, we have refined transfer maps of common elements in storage rings and developed a new method to compute the resonance driving terms as they are built up along a beamline. The method is successfully applied to a design of PEP-X as a future light source with 100-pm emittance. As a result, we discovered many unexpected cancelations of the fourth-order resonance terms driven by sextupoles within an achromat.

  20. Radiative polarization in high-energy storage rings

    Mane, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Electron and positron beams circulating in high-energy storage rings become spontaneously polarized by the emission of synchrotron radiation. The asymptotic degree of polarization that can be attained is strongly affected by so-called depolarizing resonances. Detailed experimental measurements of the polarization were made SPEAR about ten years ago, but due to lack of a suitable theory only a limited theoretical fit to the data has so far been achieved. The author presents a general formalism for calculating depolarizing resonances, which has been coded into a computer program called SMILE, and use it to fit the SPEAR data. By the use of suitable approximations, the author is able to fit both higher order and nonlinear resonances, and thereby to interpret many hitherto unexplained features in the data, and to resolve a puzzle concerning the asymmetry of certain resonance widths seen in the data. 18 refs., 2 figs

  1. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  2. Transverse Characteristics of Hadron Production in Elementary and Nuclear Collisions at the CERN SPS Energies

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2076476; Bialkowska, H

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive study of transverse phenomena at CERN-SPS energies has been performed using data collected by the NA49 experiment. Results on p, p, pi+ and pi- production in elementary hadronic interactions (p + p, pi+ +p and pi- + p) as well as in nuclear collisions (centrality-defined p + Pb, C + C, Si + Si And Pb + Pb) are presented. The dependence of transverse momentum spectra, and in particular the - xF correlations, on particle species, collision energy, size and structure of the colliding objects has been investigated. Particle composition, in terms of the nuclear modification factors RpA (pT) for different xF regions – and particle ratios, has been also studied. The whole set of experimental data puts strong constraints on theoretical models aiming at the description of hadron production in the studied reactions.

  3. submitter Projects for ultra-high-energy circular colliders at CERN

    Bogomyagkov, A V; Levichev, E B; Piminov, P A; Sinyatkin, S V; Shatilov, D N; Benedict, M; Oide, K; Zimmermann, F

    2016-01-01

    Within the Future Circular Collider (FCC) design study launched at CERN in 2014, it is envisaged to construct hadron (FCC-hh) and lepton (FCC-ee) ultra-high-energy machines aimed to replace the LHC upon the conclusion of its research program. The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics is actively involved in the development of the FCC-ee electron–positron collider. The Crab Waist (CR) scheme of the collision region that has been proposed by INP and will be implemented at FCC-ee is expected to provide high luminosity over a broad energy range. The status and development of the FCC project are described, and its parameters and limitations are discussed for the lepton collider in particular.

  4. The CERN Super Proton Synchrotron as a tool to study high energy density physics

    Tahir, N A; Brugger, M; Assmann, R; Shutov, A V; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov3, V E

    2008-01-01

    An experimental facility named HiRadMat, will be constructed at CERN to study the impact of the 450 GeV c−1 proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) on solid targets. This is designed to study damage caused to the equipment including absorbers, collimators and others in case of an accidental release of the beam energy. This paper presents two-dimensional numerical simulations of target behavior irradiated by the SPS beam. These numerical simulations have shown that the target will be completely destroyed in such an accident, thereby generating high energy density (HED) matter. This study therefore suggests that this facility may also be used for carrying out dedicated experiments to study HED states in matter.

  5. Solar low energy dwellings

    Hestnes, Anne Grete

    2000-01-01

    By now, a lot has been learnt about how to reduce energy use in dwellings using solar and low energy technologies, and many good examples can be found throughout Europe. Still, they are not quite the common feature we would expect them to be, i.e. they have not really penetrated the market. The reason for this is in part a result of the fact that the designers and developers of these buildings have not looked at what the market wants and needs, but rather at how to use a set of given technologies. The buildings are the result of a technology push rather than a market pull and have therefore, often, been detached or semidetached dwellings with different solar technologies added on in less than optimal ways. In order to increase market penetration, it is time to look at the market trends and relate to these. Fortunately, quite a few European architects have realized this and have started designing somewhat different residential buildings. The paper focuses on examples of the new trends in solar residential architecture and by that, hopefully, it shows that we are on the right track. (au)

  6. 1984 CERN school of physics

    1985-01-01

    The CERN School of Physics is intended to give young experimental physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These Proceedings contain reports of lecture series on the following topics: proton antiproton physics, experimental tests of gauge theories, QCD, phenomenology of Higgs particles, the electroweak model, unification and supersymmetry. In addition, there is a report of a special lecture on elementary supersymmetry. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  7. Simulations of the low-dimensional molecular-based spin systems: dodecanuclear nickel ring

    Kamieniarz, G.; Haglauer, M.; Caramico D'Auria, A.; Esposito, F.; Gatteschi, D.

    2005-01-01

    The numerical exact diagonalization technique exploiting the point-group symmetry is worked out for the anisotropic Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian with the ring geometry. It is applied in large-scale simulations to the supramolecule Ni 12 (O 2 CMe) 12 (chp) 12 (H 2 O) 6 (THF) 6 , yielding the low-level energy spectra as a function of the single-ion anisotropy D and the thermodynamic functions. The strength of the constant D is analysed and estimated at D/k B =1.5K. The results for the zero-field susceptibility and the field-dependent magnetization are presented and compared with experimental data

  8. Cosmic-ray antiprotons as a probe of a photino-dominated universe

    Silk, J.; Srednicki, M.

    1984-01-01

    Observational tests of the hypothesis that the universe is flat and dominated by dark matter in the form of massive photinos include the production of significant fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays in our galactic halo. Specification of the cosmological photino density and the masses of scalar quarks and leptons determines the present annihilation rate. The predicted number of low-energy cosmic-ray antiprotons is comparable to the observed flux.

  9. High yield of low-energy pions from a high-energy primary proton beam

    Bertin, A.; Capponi, S.; De Castro, S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the first measurement on the yield of pions with momentum smaller than 220 MeV/c, produced by a 300 GeV/c proton beam. The measurements, performed at the CERN super proton synchrotron using tungsten production targets of different lengths, are discussed referring to the possibility of extending to high-energy laboratories the access to fundamental research involving low-energy pions and muons

  10. TSR: A storage and cooling ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    Butler, P.A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Davinson, T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Flanagan, K.; Freeman, S.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Grieser, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lazarus, I.H. [S.T.F.C. Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Litvinov, Yu.A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lotay, G. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Page, R.D. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Raabe, R. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Siesling, E.; Wenander, F. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Woods, P.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  11. TSR: A Storage Ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    Butler, P A; Blaum, K; Grieser, M; Davinson, T; Woods, P J; Flanagan, K; Freeman, S J; Lazarus, I H; Litvinov, Yu A; Raabe, R; Siesling, E; Wenander, F

    2016-01-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  12. The Bess Investigation of the Origin of Cosmic-ray Antiprotons and Search for Cosmological Antimatter

    Mitchell, John; Yamamoto, Akira; Yoshimura, Koji; Makida, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Shinya; Hasegawa, Masaya; Horikoshi, Atsushi; Tanaka,Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Junichi; Nishimura, Jun; hide

    2008-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) collaboration has made precise measurements of the spectra of cosmic ray antiprotons and light nuclei and conducted a sensitive search for antinuclei. Ten BESS high-latitude flights, eight from Canada and two from Antarctica, span more than a Solar cycle between 1993 and 2007/2008. BESS measurements of low-energy antiprotons constrain candidate models for dark matter including the possible signature of primordial black hole evaporation. The stringent BESS measurements of antiprotons and the elemental and isotopic spectra of H and He provide strong constraints on models of cosmic-ray transport in the Galaxy and Solar System. BESS has also reported the first antideuterium upper limit. BESS employs a superconducting magnetic-rigity spectrometer with time-of-flight and aerogel Cherenkov detectors to identify incident particles by charge, charge sign, mass, and energy. The BESS-Polar long-duration instrument has reduced lower energy limit of 100 MeV (top of the atmosphere) to increase its sensitivity to possible primary antiproton sources. BESS-Polar II was rebuilt with extended magnet lifetime, improved detector and electronic performance, and greater data storage capacity. It was flown fro Antarctica December 2007-January 2008, recording about 4.6 bission events during 24.5 days at float altitude with the magnet on. During the flight the influence of a high-speed stream in the Solar wind was observed. Details of the BESS-Polar II instrument and flight performance are reported elsewhere at this conference. The successful BESS-Polar II flight at Solar minimum is especially important. Most cosmic-ray antiprotons are secondary products of nuclear interactions of primary cosmic-ray nuclei with the interstellar gas, giving a spectrum that peaks at about 2 GeV and falls rapidly to higher and lower energies. However, BESS data taken in the previous Solar minimum show a small excess over secondary

  13. AEGIS at CERN: Measuring Antihydrogen Fall

    Giammarchi, Marco G.

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of the AEGIS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator is the test of fundamental laws such as the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) and CPT symmetry. In the first phase of AEGIS, a beam of antihydrogen will be formed whose fall in the gravitational field is measured in a Moire' deflectometer; this will constitute the first test of the WEP with antimatter.

  14. US-CERN Virtual Visits: Building Transcontinental Connections for High Energy Physics

    Gonski, Julia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    For nearly fifteen years, Virtual Visits at CERN have been bringing high-energy physics research directly to the public, through the use of videoconferencing systems at both ATLAS and CMS experimental sites. Over 30,000 people from all seven continents have participated in Virtual Visits to date, engaging students, teachers, artists, and general enthusiasts alike. While these connections often take place in science festivals or classrooms, the versatility of the medium allows the visit to be customized for any audience. In particular, Virtual Visit connections to the United States can integrate a population for which distance from the experiment may hinder education and awareness. Examples of such targeted audiences include US Congressional offices and other governmental institutions, to enhance dialogue about the benefits of global basic research, and historically underrepresented or underserved minority groups. Both the foundational work and future possibilities of US Virtual Visit connections is discussed.

  15. Hands on CERN an education project on the Internet using real high energy particle collisions

    Johansson, E K

    1999-01-01

    An educational project primarily aimed at teachers and 15 to 18 year- old students describing the essential features of a modern high energy physics experiment has been created. The whole education package is available on the Internet. It gives a detailed description of the physics processes involved and the Standard Model of Microcosm. Real particle collisions produced with the facilities at the European particle physics laboratory (CERN) are displayed using the platform-independent programming language Java, enabling interaction with the user. The project has been used by several groups of teachers and students, and has increased their knowledge of, and interest in, particle physics. This project complements the traditional physics education and introduces students to contemporary fundamental physics. (7 refs).

  16. Development of an abort gap monitor for high-energy proton rings

    Beche, Jean-Francois; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Denes, Peter; Placidi, Massimo; Turner, William; Zolotorev, Max

    2004-01-01

    The fill pattern in proton synchrotrons usually features an empty gap, longer than the abort kicker raise time, for machine protection. This gap is referred to as the ''abort gap'' and any particles, which may accumulate in it due to injection errors and diffusion between RF buckets, would be lost inside the ring, rather than in the beam dump, during the kicker firing. In large proton rings, due to the high energies involved, it is vital to monitor the build up of charges in the abort gap with a high sensitivity. We present a study of an abort gap monitor based on a photomultiplier with a gated microchannel plate, which would allow for detecting low charge densities by monitoring the synchrotron radiation emitted. We show results of beam test experiments at the Advanced Light Source using a Hamamatsu 5916U MCP-PMT and compare them to the specifications for the Large Hadron Collider

  17. Development of an Abort Gap Monitor for High-Energy Proton Rings

    Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Turner, W.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-01-01

    The fill pattern in proton synchrotrons usually features an empty gap, longer than the abort kicker raise time, for machine protection. This gap is referred to as the 'abort gap', and any particles, which may accumulate in it due to injection errors and diffusion between RF buckets, would be lost inside the ring, rather than in the beam dump, during the kicker firing. In large proton rings, due to the high energies involved, it is vital to monitor the build up of charges in the abort gap with a high sensitivity. We present a study of an abort gap monitor based on a photomultiplier with a gated microchannel plate, which would allow for detecting low charge densities by monitoring the synchrotron radiation emitted. We show results of beam test experiments at the Advanced Light Source using a Hamamatsu 5916U MCP-PMT and compare them to the specifications for the Large Hadron Collider

  18. Field Simulations and Mechanical Implementation of Electrostatic Elements for the ELENA Transfer Lines

    Barna, D; Borburgh, J; Carli, C; Vanbavinckhove, G

    2014-01-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) complex at CERN will be extended by an extra low energy anti-proton ring (ELENA) [1] further decelerating the anti-protons thus improving their trapping. The kinetic energy of 100 keV at ELENA extraction facilitates the use of electrostatic transfer lines to the experiments. The mechanical implementation of the electrostatic devices are presented with focus on their alignment, bakeout compatibility, ultra-high vacuum compatibility and polarity switching. Field optimisations for an electrostatic crossing device of three beam lines are shown.

  19. Can Low Energy Electrons Affect High Energy Physics Accelerators?

    Cimino, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    The properties of the electrons participating in the build up of an electron cloud (EC) inside the beam-pipe have become an increasingly important issue for present and future accelerators whose performance may be limited by this effect. The EC formation and evolution are determined by the wall-surface properties of the accelerator vacuum chamber. Thus, the accurate modeling of these surface properties is an indispensible input to simulation codes aimed at the correct prediction of build-up thresholds, electron-induced instability or EC heat load. In this letter, we present the results of surface measurements performed on a prototype of the beam screen adopted for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which presently is under construction at CERN. We have measured the total secondary electron yield (SEY) as well as the related energy distribution curves (EDC) of the secondary electrons as a function of incident electron energy. Attention has been paid, for the first time in this context, to the probability at which low-energy electrons (<∼ 20 eV) impacting on the wall create secondaries or are elastically reflected. It is shown that the ratio of reflected to true-secondary electrons increases for decreasing energy and that the SEY approaches unity in the limit of zero primary electron energy

  20. AA antiproton production target

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The first version of the antiproton production target was a tungsten rod, 11 cm long and 3 mm in diameter. The rod was embedded in graphite, pressure-seated into an outer casing of stainless steel. At the entrance to the target assembly was a scintillator screen, imprinted with circles every 5 mm in radius, which allowed to precisely aim the 26 GeV high-intensity proton beam from the PS onto the centre of the target rod. The scintillator screen was a 1 mm thick plate of Cr-doped alumina. See also 7903034 and 7905091.