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Sample records for cereus formation sporulation

  1. Air-liquid interface biofilms of Bacillus cereus: formation, sporulation, and dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijman, J.G.E.; Leeuw, de P.P.L.A.; Moezelaar, R.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Bacillus cereus was assessed using 56 strains of B. cereus, including the two sequenced strains, ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987. Biofilm production in microtiter plates was found to be strongly dependent on incubation time, temperature, and medium, as well as the strain used, with

  2. The comER Gene Plays an Important Role in Biofilm Formation and Sporulation in both Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fang; Yu, Yiyang; Wang, Luyao; Luo, Yuming; Guo, Jian-hua; Chai, Yunrong

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria adopt alternative cell fates during development. In Bacillus subtilis, the transition from planktonic growth to biofilm formation and sporulation is controlled by a complex regulatory circuit, in which the most important event is activation of Spo0A, a transcription factor and a master regulator for genes involved in both biofilm formation and sporulation. In B. cereus, the regulatory pathway controlling biofilm formation and cell differentiation is much less clear. In this study, we show that a novel gene, comER, plays a significant role in biofilm formation as well as sporulation in both B. subtilis and B. cereus. Mutations in the comER gene result in defects in biofilm formation and a delay in spore formation in the two Bacillus species. Our evidence supports the idea that comER may be part of the regulatory circuit that controls Spo0A activation. comER likely acts upstream of sda, a gene encoding a small checkpoint protein for both sporulation and biofilm formation, by blocking the phosphor-relay and thereby Spo0A activation. In summary, our studies outlined a conserved, positive role for comER, a gene whose function was previously uncharacterized, in the regulation of biofilm formation and sporulation in the two Bacillus species. PMID:27446060

  3. Sporulation dynamics and spore heat resistance in wet and dry biofilms of Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja

    2016-01-01

    Environmental conditions and growth history can affect the sporulation process as well as subsequent properties of formed spores. The sporulation dynamics was studied in wet and air-dried biofilms formed on stainless steel (SS) and polystyrene (PS) for Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 and the

  4. Sporulation environment of emetic toxin-producing Bacillus cereus strains determines spore size, heat resistance and germination capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, van der M.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Heat resistance, germination and outgrowth capacity of Bacillus cereus spores in processed foods are major factors in causing the emetic type of gastrointestinal disease. In this study, we aim to identify the impact of different sporulation conditions on spore properties of emetic

  5. Cyclic diguanylate regulation of Bacillus cereus group biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Annette; Smith, Veronika; Røhr, Åsmund K; Lindbäck, Toril; Parmer, Marthe P; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Reubsaet, Leon; Økstad, Ole Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Biofilm formation can be considered a bacterial virulence mechanism. In a range of Gram-negatives, increased levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) promotes biofilm formation and reduces motility. Other bacterial processes known to be regulated by c-di-GMP include cell division, differentiation and virulence. Among Gram-positive bacteria, where the function of c-di-GMP signalling is less well characterized, c-di-GMP was reported to regulate swarming motility in Bacillus subtilis while having very limited or no effect on biofilm formation. In contrast, we show that in the Bacillus cereus group c-di-GMP signalling is linked to biofilm formation, and to several other phenotypes important to the lifestyle of these bacteria. The Bacillus thuringiensis 407 genome encodes eleven predicted proteins containing domains (GGDEF/EAL) related to c-di-GMP synthesis or breakdown, ten of which are conserved through the majority of clades of the B. cereus group, including Bacillus anthracis. Several of the genes were shown to affect biofilm formation, motility, enterotoxin synthesis and/or sporulation. Among these, cdgF appeared to encode a master diguanylate cyclase essential for biofilm formation in an oxygenated environment. Only two cdg genes (cdgA, cdgJ) had orthologs in B. subtilis, highlighting differences in c-di-GMP signalling between B. subtilis and B. cereus group bacteria. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Impacts of sporulation temperature, exposure to compost matrix and temperature on survival of Bacillus cereus spores during livestock mortality composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, K; Reuter, T; Gilroyed, B H; McAllister, T A

    2015-04-01

    To investigate impact of sporulation and compost temperatures on feasibility of composting for disposal of carcasses contaminated with Bacillus anthracis. Two strains of B. cereus, 805 and 1391, were sporulated at either 20 or 37°C (Sporulation temperature, ST) and 7 Log10 CFU g(-1) spores added to autoclaved manure in nylon bags (pore size 50 μm) or in sealed vials. Vials and nylon bags were embedded into compost in either a sawdust or manure matrix each containing 16 bovine mortalities (average weight 617 ± 33 kg), retrieved from compost at intervals over 217 days and survival of B. cereus spores assessed. A ST of 20°C decreased spore survival by 1·4 log10 CFU g(-1) (P Compost temperatures >55°C reduced spore survival (P compost temperatures were key factors influencing survival of B. cereus spores in mortality compost. Composting may be most appropriate for the disposal of carcasses infected with B. anthracis at ambient temperatures ≤20°C under thermophillic composting conditions (>55°C). © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Influence of sporulation medium composition on transcription of ger operons and the germination response of spores of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornstra, L.M.; Vries, de Y.P.; Vos, de W.M.; Abee, T.

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 endospores were produced in Y1 medium, a nutrient-rich, chemically defined sporulation medium, and in modified G medium, containing low amounts of nutrients. The average transcription level of the seven ger operons per cell was 3.5 times higher in Y1 medium, and the spores

  8. Converting bacteriophage for sporulation and crystal formation in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlak, F J; Mendelsohn, C L; Thorne, C B

    1979-11-01

    Bacteriophage TP-13, a converting phage for sporulation and crystal formation in Bacillus thuringiensis, was isolated from soil. The phage converted anoligosporogenic (sporulation frequency, 10(-8), acrystalliferous mutant to spore positive, crystal positive at a high frequency. Each plaque formed by TP-13 in a lawn of sensitive cells contained spores and crystals. These spores were heat stable, and each one was capable of producing a plaque from which TP-13 could be reisolated. Conversion of cells to sporulation and crystal formation was independent of the ho-t used for TP-13 propagation. When converted cells were cured of TP-13, they lost the ability to produce spores and crystals. Incubation of TP-13 with antiserum prepared against purified phage particles prevented conversion. TP-13 has some characteristics similar to those of SP-15 and PBS-1, including large size, morphology, and adsorption specificity of motile cells. TP-13 mediated generalized transduction in several strains of B. thuringiensis at frequencies of 10(-6) to 10(-5). Comparison of cotransduction values indicated that TP-13 transduced considerably larger segments of deoxyribonucleic acid than CP-51 or TP-10, two other transducing phages for B. thuringiensis.

  9. Genome-Wide Investigation of Biofilm Formation in Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fang; Yu, Yiyang; Gozzi, Kevin; Chen, Yun; Guo, Jian-Hua; Chai, Yunrong

    2017-07-01

    Bacillus cereus is a soil-dwelling Gram-positive bacterium capable of forming structured multicellular communities, or biofilms. However, the regulatory pathways controlling biofilm formation are less well understood in B. cereus In this work, we developed a method to study B. cereus biofilms formed at the air-liquid interface. We applied two genome-wide approaches, random transposon insertion mutagenesis to identify genes that are potentially important for biofilm formation, and transcriptome analyses by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to characterize genes that are differentially expressed in B. cereus when cells were grown in a biofilm-inducing medium. For the first approach, we identified 23 genes whose disruption by transposon insertion led to altered biofilm phenotypes. Based on the predicted function, they included genes involved in processes such as nucleotide biosynthesis, iron salvage, and antibiotic production, as well as genes encoding an ATP-dependent protease and transcription regulators. Transcriptome analyses identified about 500 genes that were differentially expressed in cells grown under biofilm-inducing conditions. One particular set of those genes may contribute to major metabolic shifts, leading to elevated production of small volatile molecules. Selected volatile molecules were shown to stimulate robust biofilm formation in B. cereus Our studies represent a genome-wide investigation of B. cereus biofilm formation.IMPORTANCE In this work, we established a robust method for B. cereus biofilm studies and applied two genome-wide approaches, transposon insertion mutagenesis and transcriptome analyses by RNA-seq, to identify genes and pathways that are potentially important for biofilm formation in B. cereus We discovered dozens of genes and two major metabolic shifts that seem to be important for biofilm formation in B. cereus Our study represents a genome-wide investigation on B. cereus biofilm formation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  10. Comparative analysis of biofilm formation by Bacillus cereus reference strains and undomesticated food isolates and the effect of free iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik; Muller, Lisette; Tempelaars, Marcel; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja

    2015-05-04

    Biofilm formation of Bacillus cereus reference strains ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987 and 21 undomesticated food isolates was studied on polystyrene and stainless steel as contact surfaces. For all strains, the biofilm forming capacity was significantly enhanced when in contact with stainless steel (SS) as a surface as compared to polystyrene (PS). For a selection of strains, the total CFU and spore counts in biofilms were determined and showed a good correlation between CFU counts and total biomass of these biofilms. Sporulation was favoured in the biofilm over the planktonic state. To substantiate whether iron availability could affect B. cereus biofilm formation, the free iron availability was varied in BHI by either the addition of FeCl3 or by depletion of iron with the scavenger 2,2-Bipyridine. Addition of iron resulted in increased air-liquid interface biofilm on polystyrene but not on SS for strain ATCC 10987, while the presence of Bipyridine reduced biofilm formation for both materials. Biofilm formation was restored when excess FeCl3 was added in combination with the scavenger. Further validation of the iron effect for all 23 strains in microtiter plate showed that fourteen strains (including ATCC10987) formed a biofilm on PS. For eight of these strains biofilm formation was enhanced in the presence of added iron and for eleven strains it was reduced when free iron was scavenged. Our results show that stainless steel as a contact material provides more favourable conditions for B. cereus biofilm formation and maturation compared to polystyrene. This effect could possibly be linked to iron availability as we show that free iron availability affects B. cereus biofilm formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Poly-?-hydroxybutyrate Metabolism Is Unrelated to the Sporulation and Parasporal Crystal Protein Formation in Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; Li, Xin; Qian, Hongliang; Cai, Xia; Li, Xinfeng; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a natural polymer synthesized by many bacteria as a carbon-energy storage material. It was accumulated maximally prior to the spore formation but was degraded during the process of sporulation in Bacillus thuringiensis. Intriguingly, B. thuringiensis also accumulates large amounts of insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) during sporulation, which requires considerable input of carbon and energy sources. How PHB accumulation affects sporulation and ICP formation ...

  12. Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 RpoN (Sigma 54 Is a Pleiotropic Regulator of Growth, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Motility, Biofilm Formation and Toxin Production.

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    Hasmik Hayrapetyan

    Full Text Available Sigma 54 is a transcriptional regulator predicted to play a role in physical interaction of bacteria with their environment, including virulence and biofilm formation. In order to study the role of Sigma 54 in Bacillus cereus, a comparative transcriptome and phenotypic study was performed using B. cereus ATCC 14579 WT, a markerless rpoN deletion mutant, and its complemented strain. The mutant was impaired in many different cellular functions including low temperature and anaerobic growth, carbohydrate metabolism, sporulation and toxin production. Additionally, the mutant showed lack of motility and biofilm formation at air-liquid interphase, and this correlated with absence of flagella, as flagella staining showed only WT and complemented strain to be highly flagellated. Comparative transcriptome analysis of cells harvested at selected time points during growth in aerated and static conditions in BHI revealed large differences in gene expression associated with loss of phenotypes, including significant down regulation of genes in the mutant encoding enzymes involved in degradation of branched chain amino acids, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, flagella synthesis and virulence factors. Our study provides evidence for a pleiotropic role of Sigma 54 in B. cereus supporting its adaptive response and survival in a range of conditions and environments.

  13. Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 RpoN (Sigma 54) Is a Pleiotropic Regulator of Growth, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Motility, Biofilm Formation and Toxin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik; Tempelaars, Marcel; Nierop Groot, Masja; Abee, Tjakko

    2015-01-01

    Sigma 54 is a transcriptional regulator predicted to play a role in physical interaction of bacteria with their environment, including virulence and biofilm formation. In order to study the role of Sigma 54 in Bacillus cereus, a comparative transcriptome and phenotypic study was performed using B. cereus ATCC 14579 WT, a markerless rpoN deletion mutant, and its complemented strain. The mutant was impaired in many different cellular functions including low temperature and anaerobic growth, carbohydrate metabolism, sporulation and toxin production. Additionally, the mutant showed lack of motility and biofilm formation at air-liquid interphase, and this correlated with absence of flagella, as flagella staining showed only WT and complemented strain to be highly flagellated. Comparative transcriptome analysis of cells harvested at selected time points during growth in aerated and static conditions in BHI revealed large differences in gene expression associated with loss of phenotypes, including significant down regulation of genes in the mutant encoding enzymes involved in degradation of branched chain amino acids, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, flagella synthesis and virulence factors. Our study provides evidence for a pleiotropic role of Sigma 54 in B. cereus supporting its adaptive response and survival in a range of conditions and environments.

  14. The metabolic regulation of sporulation and parasporal crystal formation in Bacillus thuringiensis revealed by transcriptomics and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieping; Mei, Han; Zheng, Cao; Qian, Hongliang; Cui, Cui; Fu, Yang; Su, Jianmei; Liu, Ziduo; Yu, Ziniu; He, Jin

    2013-05-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a well-known entomopathogenic bacterium used worldwide as an environmentally compatible biopesticide. During sporulation, B. thuringiensis accumulates a large number of parasporal crystals consisting of insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) that can account for nearly 20-30% of the cell's dry weight. However, the metabolic regulation mechanisms of ICP synthesis remain to be elucidated. In this study, the combined efforts in transcriptomics and proteomics mainly uncovered the following 6 metabolic regulation mechanisms: (1) proteases and the amino acid metabolism (particularly, the branched-chain amino acids) became more active during sporulation; (2) stored poly-β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoin, together with some low-quality substances provided considerable carbon and energy sources for sporulation and parasporal crystal formation; (3) the pentose phosphate shunt demonstrated an interesting regulation mechanism involving gluconate when CT-43 cells were grown in GYS medium; (4) the tricarboxylic acid cycle was significantly modified during sporulation; (5) an obvious increase in the quantitative levels of enzymes and cytochromes involved in energy production via the electron transport system was observed; (6) most F0F1-ATPase subunits were remarkably up-regulated during sporulation. This study, for the first time, systematically reveals the metabolic regulation mechanisms involved in the supply of amino acids, carbon substances, and energy for B. thuringiensis spore and parasporal crystal formation at both the transcriptional and translational levels.

  15. The Metabolic Regulation of Sporulation and Parasporal Crystal Formation in Bacillus thuringiensis Revealed by Transcriptomics and Proteomics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieping; Mei, Han; Zheng, Cao; Qian, Hongliang; Cui, Cui; Fu, Yang; Su, Jianmei; Liu, Ziduo; Yu, Ziniu; He, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a well-known entomopathogenic bacterium used worldwide as an environmentally compatible biopesticide. During sporulation, B. thuringiensis accumulates a large number of parasporal crystals consisting of insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) that can account for nearly 20–30% of the cell's dry weight. However, the metabolic regulation mechanisms of ICP synthesis remain to be elucidated. In this study, the combined efforts in transcriptomics and proteomics mainly uncovered the following 6 metabolic regulation mechanisms: (1) proteases and the amino acid metabolism (particularly, the branched-chain amino acids) became more active during sporulation; (2) stored poly-β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoin, together with some low-quality substances provided considerable carbon and energy sources for sporulation and parasporal crystal formation; (3) the pentose phosphate shunt demonstrated an interesting regulation mechanism involving gluconate when CT-43 cells were grown in GYS medium; (4) the tricarboxylic acid cycle was significantly modified during sporulation; (5) an obvious increase in the quantitative levels of enzymes and cytochromes involved in energy production via the electron transport system was observed; (6) most F0F1-ATPase subunits were remarkably up-regulated during sporulation. This study, for the first time, systematically reveals the metabolic regulation mechanisms involved in the supply of amino acids, carbon substances, and energy for B. thuringiensis spore and parasporal crystal formation at both the transcriptional and translational levels. PMID:23408684

  16. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate Metabolism Is Unrelated to the Sporulation and Parasporal Crystal Protein Formation in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Li, Zhou; Li, Xin; Qian, Hongliang; Cai, Xia; Li, Xinfeng; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a natural polymer synthesized by many bacteria as a carbon-energy storage material. It was accumulated maximally prior to the spore formation but was degraded during the process of sporulation in Bacillus thuringiensis. Intriguingly, B. thuringiensis also accumulates large amounts of insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) during sporulation, which requires considerable input of carbon and energy sources. How PHB accumulation affects sporulation and ICP formation remains unclear to date. Intuitively, one would imagine that accumulated PHB provides the energy required for ICP formation. Yet our current data indicate that this is not the case. First, growth curves of the deletion mutants of phaC (encoding the PHB synthase) and phaZ (encoding the PHB depolymerase) were found to be similar to the parent strain BMB171; no difference in growth rate could be observed. In addition we further constructed the cry1Ac10 ICP gene overexpression strains of BMB171 (BMB171-cry), as well as its phaC and phaZ deletion mutants ΔphaC-cry and ΔphaZ-cry to compare their spore and ICP production rates. Again, not much change of ICP production was observed among these strains either. In fact, PHB was still degraded in most ΔphaZ-cry cells as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Together these results indicated that there is no direct association between the PHB accumulation and the sporulation and ICP formation in B. thuringiensis. Some other enzymes for PHB degradation or other energy source may be responsible for the sporulation and/or ICP formation in B. thuringiensis.

  17. A genomic region involved in the formation of adhesin fibers in Bacillus cereus biofilms

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    Joaquín eCaro-Astorga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a bacterial pathogen that is responsible for many recurrent disease outbreaks due to food contamination. Spores and biofilms are considered the most important reservoirs of B. cereus in contaminated fresh vegetables and fruits. Biofilms are bacterial communities that are difficult to eradicate from biotic and abiotic surfaces because of their stable and extremely strong extracellular matrix. These extracellular matrixes contain exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other minor components. Although B. cereus can form biofilms, the bacterial features governing assembly of the protective extracellular matrix are not known. Using the well-studied bacterium B. subtilis as a model, we identified two genomic loci in B. cereus, which encodes two orthologs of the amyloid-like protein TasA of B. subtilis and a SipW signal peptidase. Deletion of this genomic region in B. cereus inhibited biofilm assembly; notably, mutation of the putative signal peptidase SipW caused the same phenotype. However, mutations in tasA or calY did not completely prevent biofilm formation; strains that were mutated for either of these genes formed phenotypically different surface attached biofilms. Electron microscopy studies revealed that TasA polymerizes to form long and abundant fibers on cell surfaces, whereas CalY does not aggregate similarly. Heterologous expression of this amyloid-like cassette in a B. subtilis strain lacking the factors required for the assembly of TasA amyloid-like fibers revealed i the involvement of this B. cereus genomic region in formation of the air-liquid interphase pellicles and ii the intrinsic ability of TasA to form fibers similar to the amyloid-like fibers produced by its B. subtilis ortholog.

  18. Alternative modes of biofilm formation by plant-associated Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tantan; Foulston, Lucy; Chai, Yunrong; Wang, Qi; Losick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The ability to form multicellular communities known as biofilms is a widespread adaptive behavior of bacteria. Members of the Bacillus group of bacteria have been found to form biofilms on plant roots, where they protect against pathogens and promote growth. In the case of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis the genetic pathway controlling biofilm formation and the production of an extracellular matrix is relatively well understood. However, it is unclear whether other members of this genus utilize similar mechanisms. We determined that a plant-associated strain of Bacillus cereus (905) can form biofilms by two seemingly independent pathways. In one mode involving the formation of floating biofilms (pellicles) B. cereus 905 appears to rely on orthologs of many of the genes known to be important for B. subtilis biofilm formation. We report that B. cereus 905 also forms submerged, surface-associated biofilms and in a manner that resembles biofilm formation by the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. This alternative mode, which does not rely on B. subtilis-like genes for pellicle formation, takes place under conditions of glucose fermentation and depends on a drop in the pH of the medium. PMID:25828975

  19. Toxin Profile, Biofilm Formation, and Molecular Characterization of Emetic Toxin-Producing Bacillus cereus Group Isolates from Human Stools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Su Kyung; Chang, Hyun-Joo; Choi, Sung-Wook; Ok, Gyeongsik; Lee, Nari

    2015-11-01

    Emetic toxin-producing Bacillus cereus group species are an important problem, because the staple food for Korean is grains such as rice. In this study, we determined the prevalence (24 of 129 isolates) of emetic B. cereus in 36,745 stool samples from sporadic food-poisoning cases in Korea between 2007 and 2008. The toxin gene profile, toxin production, and biofilm-forming ability of the emetic B. cereus isolates were investigated. Repetitive element sequence polymorphism polymerase chain reaction fingerprints (rep-PCR) were also used to assess the intraspecific biodiversity of these isolates. Emetic B. cereus was present in 0.07% of the sporadic food-poisoning cases. The 24 emetic isolates identified all carried the nheABC and entFM genes and produced NHE enterotoxin. However, they did not have hemolysin BL toxin or related genes. A relationship between biofilm formation and toxin production was not observed in this study. The rep-PCR fingerprints of the B. cereus isolates were not influenced by the presence of toxin genes, or biofilm-forming ability. The rep-PCR assay discriminated emetic B. cereus isolates from nonemetic isolates, even if this assay did not perfectly discriminate these isolates. Further study on emetic isolates possessing a high degree of diversity may be necessary to evaluate the performance of the subtyping assay to discriminate emetic and nonemetic B. cereus isolates and could provide a more accurate indication of the risk from B. cereus strains.

  20. Evidence for Complex Formation of the Bacillus cereus Haemolysin BL Components in Solution

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    Franziska Tausch

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Haemolysin BL is an important virulence factor regarding the diarrheal type of food poisoning caused by Bacillus cereus. However, the pathogenic importance of this three-component enterotoxin is difficult to access, as nearly all natural B. cereus culture supernatants additionally contain the highly cytotoxic Nhe, the second three-component toxin involved in the aetiology of B. cereus-induced food-borne diseases. To better address the toxic properties of the Hbl complex, a system for overexpression and purification of functional, cytotoxic, recombinant (rHbl components L2, L1 and B from E. coli was established and an nheABC deletion mutant was constructed from B. cereus reference strain F837/76. Furthermore, 35 hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against Hbl L2, L1 and B were generated. While mAbs 1H9 and 1D8 neutralized Hbl toxicity and thus, represent important tools for future investigations of the mode-of-action of Hbl on the target cell surface, mAb 1D7, in contrast, even enhanced Hbl toxicity by supporting the binding of Hbl B to the cell surface. By using the specific mAbs in Dot blots, indirect and hybrid sandwich enzyme immuno assays (EIAs, complex formation between Hbl L1 and B, as well as L1 and L2 in solution could be shown for the first time. Surface plasmon resonance experiments with the rHbl components confirmed these results with KD values of 4.7 × 10−7 M and 1.5 × 10−7 M, respectively. These findings together with the newly created tools lay the foundation for the detailed elucidation of the molecular mode-of-action of the highly complex three-component Hbl toxin.

  1. Evidence for Complex Formation of the Bacillus cereus Haemolysin BL Components in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, Franziska; Dietrich, Richard; Janowski, Robert; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Jessberger, Nadja

    2017-01-01

    Haemolysin BL is an important virulence factor regarding the diarrheal type of food poisoning caused by Bacillus cereus. However, the pathogenic importance of this three-component enterotoxin is difficult to access, as nearly all natural B. cereus culture supernatants additionally contain the highly cytotoxic Nhe, the second three-component toxin involved in the aetiology of B. cereus-induced food-borne diseases. To better address the toxic properties of the Hbl complex, a system for overexpression and purification of functional, cytotoxic, recombinant (r)Hbl components L2, L1 and B from E. coli was established and an nheABC deletion mutant was constructed from B. cereus reference strain F837/76. Furthermore, 35 hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Hbl L2, L1 and B were generated. While mAbs 1H9 and 1D8 neutralized Hbl toxicity and thus, represent important tools for future investigations of the mode-of-action of Hbl on the target cell surface, mAb 1D7, in contrast, even enhanced Hbl toxicity by supporting the binding of Hbl B to the cell surface. By using the specific mAbs in Dot blots, indirect and hybrid sandwich enzyme immuno assays (EIAs), complex formation between Hbl L1 and B, as well as L1 and L2 in solution could be shown for the first time. Surface plasmon resonance experiments with the rHbl components confirmed these results with KD values of 4.7 × 10−7 M and 1.5 × 10−7 M, respectively. These findings together with the newly created tools lay the foundation for the detailed elucidation of the molecular mode-of-action of the highly complex three-component Hbl toxin. PMID:28926954

  2. Comparative analysis of biofilm formation by Bacillus cereus reference strains and undomesticated food isolates and the effect of free iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, H.; Muller, L.K.; Tempelaars, M.H.; Abee, T.; Nierop Groot, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation of Bacillus cereus reference strains ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987 and 21 undomesticated food isolates was studied on polystyrene and stainless steel as contact surfaces. For all strains, the biofilm forming capacity was significantly enhanced when in contact with stainless steel (SS)

  3. Effects of Aronia melanocarpa Constituents on Biofilm Formation of Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus

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    Marie Bräunlich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria growing on surfaces form biofilms. Adaptive and genetic changes of the microorganisms in this structure make them resistant to antimicrobial agents. Biofilm-forming organisms on medical devices can pose serious threats to human health. Thus, there is a need for novel prevention and treatment strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the ability of Aronia melanocarpa extracts, subfractions and compounds to prevent biofilm formation and to inhibit bacterial growth of Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus in vitro. It was found that several aronia substances possessed anti-biofilm activity, however, they were not toxic to the species screened. This non-toxic inhibition may confer a lower potential for resistance development compared to conventional antimicrobials.

  4. A transposon mutant library of Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 reveals novel genes required for biofilm formation and implicates motility as an important factor for pellicle-biofilm formation.

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    Okshevsky, Mira; Louw, Matilde Greve; Lamela, Elena Otero; Nilsson, Martin; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2017-11-22

    Bacillus cereus is one of the most common opportunistic pathogens causing foodborne illness, as well as a common source of contamination in the dairy industry. B. cereus can form robust biofilms on food processing surfaces, resulting in food contamination due to shedding of cells and spores. Despite the medical and industrial relevance of this species, the genetic basis of biofilm formation in B. cereus is not well studied. In order to identify genes required for biofilm formation in this bacterium, we created a library of 5000 +  transposon mutants of the biofilm-forming strain B. cereusATCC 10987, using an unbiased mariner transposon approach. The mutant library was screened for the ability to form a pellicle biofilm at the air-media interface, as well as a submerged biofilm at the solid-media interface. A total of 91 genes were identified as essential for biofilm formation. These genes encode functions such as chemotaxis, amino acid metabolism and cellular repair mechanisms, and include numerous genes not previously known to be required for biofilm formation. Although the majority of disrupted genes are not directly responsible for motility, further investigations revealed that the vast majority of the biofilm-deficient mutants were also motility impaired. This observation implicates motility as a pivotal factor in the formation of a biofilm by B. cereus. These results expand our knowledge of the fundamental molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation by B. cereus. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The impact of oxygen availability on stress survival and radical formation of Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.; Pier, I.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.

    2009-01-01

    Both the growth and stress survival of two model Bacillus cereus strains, ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987, were tested in three different conditions varying in oxygen availability, i.e., aerobic, microaerobic and anaerobic conditions. Both B. cereus strains displayed highest growth rates and yields under

  6. The PAS domains of the major sporulation kinase in Bacillus subtilis play a role in tetramer formation that is essential for the autokinase activity.

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    Kiehler, Brittany; Haggett, Lindsey; Fujita, Masaya

    2017-08-01

    Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis is induced upon starvation. In a widely accepted model, an N-terminal "sensor" domain of the major sporulation kinase KinA recognizes a hypothetical starvation signal(s) and autophosphorylates a histidine residue to activate the master regulator Spo0A via a multicomponent phosphorelay. However, to date no confirmed signal has been found. Here, we demonstrated that PAS-A, the most N-terminal of the three PAS domains (PAS-ABC), is dispensable for the activity, contrary to a previous report. Our data indicated that the autokinase activity is dependent on the formation of a functional tetramer, which is mediated by, at least, PAS-B and PAS-C. Additionally, we ruled out the previously proposed notion that NAD(+) /NADH ratio controls KinA activity through the PAS-A domain by demonstrating that the cofactors show no effects on the kinase activity in vitro. In support of these data, we found that the cofactors exist in approximately 1000-fold excess of KinA in the cell and the cofactors' ratio does not change significantly during growth and sporulation, suggesting that changes in the cofactor ratio might not play a role in controlling KinA activity. These data may refute the widely-held belief that the activity of KinA is regulated in response to an unknown starvation signal(s). © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 RpoN (Sigma 54) is a Pleiotropic Regulator of Growth, Carbohydrate, Metabolism, Motility, Biofilm Formation and Toxin Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, H.; Tempelaars, M.H.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2015-01-01

    Sigma 54 is a transcriptional regulator predicted to play a role in physical interaction of bacteria with their environment, including virulence and biofilm formation. In order to study the role of Sigma 54 in Bacillus cereus, a comparative transcriptome and phenotypic study was performed using B.

  8. High-density spore production of a B. cereus aquaculture biological agent by nutrient supplementation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lalloo, R

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available , in particular yeast extract and nutrient broth. The improved sporulation performance of B. cereus could be related to the increased availability of free amino acids, carbohydrates, and minerals in CSL, which had a positive effect on sporulation efficiency...

  9. Heat stress leads to superoxide formation in Bacillus cereus detected using the fluorescent probe MitoSOX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.; Ceragioli, M.; Abee, T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a food-borne human pathogen and food spoilage organism. Spores and vegetative cells of B. cereus can be found almost everywhere and therefore often end up in food processing equipment and food products. To remove spores and vegetative cells from food or equipment, harsh treatments

  10. Effects of Mn2+ Levels on the Resistance Properties of Bacillus cereus Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    manganese levels influence the resistance properties of spores. To determine if this was true for Bacillus cereus , bacteria were sporulated with different... Bacillus cereus as a food-borne pathogen (Setlow and Johnson, 2012), it Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effects of Mn2+ levels on the resistance properties of Bacillus cereus spores 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  11. Bacillus Cereus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of B. cereus in the dairy industry has been recognized since 1938, when the occurrence of bitty ... and pharmaceutical industries. Vegetative cells are not very heat-resistant and are destroyed at time- ... Mannitol Egg Yolk Polymyxin B sulfate agar (MEYP) is widely used in Europe and the United States to ...

  12. A transposon mutant library of Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 reveals novel genes required for biofilm formation and implicates motility as an important factor for pellicle-biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okshevsky, Mira; Louw, Matilde Greve; Lamela, Elena Otero

    2018-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is one of the most common opportunistic pathogens causing foodborne illness, as well as a common source of contamination in the dairy industry. B. cereus can form robust biofilms on food processing surfaces, resulting in food contamination due to shedding of cells and spores. Desp...

  13. Functional analysis of the sporulation-specific diadenylate cyclase CdaS in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cao; Ma, Yang; Wang, Xun; Xie, Yuqun; Ali, Maria K.; He, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a recently discovered bacterial secondary messenger molecule, which is associated with various physiological functions. In the genus Bacillus, the intracellular level and turnover of c-di-AMP are mainly regulated by three diadenylate cyclases (DACs), including DisA, CdaA and CdaS, and two c-di-AMP-specific phosphodiesterases (GdpP and PgpH). In this study, we demonstrated that CdaS protein from B. thuringiensis is a hexameric DAC protein that can convert ATP or ADP to c-di-AMP in vitro and the N-terminal YojJ domain is essential for the DAC activity. Based on the markerless gene knock-out method, we demonstrated that the transcription of cdaS was initiated by the sporulation-specific sigma factor σH and the deletion of cdaS significantly delayed sporulation and parasporal crystal formation. These findings contrast with similar experiments conducted using B. subtilis, wherein transcription of its cdaS was initiated by the sigma factor σG. Deletion of all the three DAC genes from a single strain was unsuccessful, suggesting that c-di-AMP is an indispensable molecule in B. thuringiensis. Phylogenetic analysis indicated increased diversity of CdaS in the B. cereus and B. subtilis Bacillus subgroups. In summary, this study identifies important aspects in the regulation of c-di-AMP in the genus Bacillus. PMID:26441857

  14. Functional analysis of the sporulation-specific diadenylate cyclase CdaS in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao eZheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP is a recently discovered bacterial secondary messenger molecule, which is associated with various physiological functions. In Bacillus, the intracellular level and turnover of c-di-AMP is mainly regulated by three diadenylate cyclases (DACs, including DisA, CdaA and CdaS, and one c-di-AMP-specific phosphodiesterase. In this study, we demonstrated that CdaS protein from B. thuringiensisis is a hexameric DAC protein that can convert ATP or ADP to c-di-AMP in vitro and the N-terminal YojJ domain was essential for the DAC activity. Based on the markerless gene knock-out method, we demonstrated that the transcription of cdaS was initiated by the sporulation-specific sigma factor σH and the deletion of cdaS significantly delayed sporulation and parasporal crystal formation. These findings contrast with similar experiments conducted using B. subtilis, wherein transcription of its cdaS was initiated by the sigma factor σG. Deletion of all the three DAC genes from a single strain was unsuccessful, suggesting that c-di-AMP is an indispensable molecule in B. thuringiensis. Phylogenetic analysis indicated increased diversity of CdaS in the B. cereus and B. subtilis Bacillus subgroups. In summary, this study identifies important aspects in the regulation of c-di-AMP in Bacillus.

  15. Functional analysis of the sporulation-specific diadenylate cyclase CdaS in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cao; Ma, Yang; Wang, Xun; Xie, Yuqun; Ali, Maria K; He, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a recently discovered bacterial secondary messenger molecule, which is associated with various physiological functions. In the genus Bacillus, the intracellular level and turnover of c-di-AMP are mainly regulated by three diadenylate cyclases (DACs), including DisA, CdaA and CdaS, and two c-di-AMP-specific phosphodiesterases (GdpP and PgpH). In this study, we demonstrated that CdaS protein from B. thuringiensis is a hexameric DAC protein that can convert ATP or ADP to c-di-AMP in vitro and the N-terminal YojJ domain is essential for the DAC activity. Based on the markerless gene knock-out method, we demonstrated that the transcription of cdaS was initiated by the sporulation-specific sigma factor σ(H) and the deletion of cdaS significantly delayed sporulation and parasporal crystal formation. These findings contrast with similar experiments conducted using B. subtilis, wherein transcription of its cdaS was initiated by the sigma factor σ(G). Deletion of all the three DAC genes from a single strain was unsuccessful, suggesting that c-di-AMP is an indispensable molecule in B. thuringiensis. Phylogenetic analysis indicated increased diversity of CdaS in the B. cereus and B. subtilis Bacillus subgroups. In summary, this study identifies important aspects in the regulation of c-di-AMP in the genus Bacillus.

  16. A four-gene operon in Bacillus cereus produces two rare spore-decorating sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi; Mukherjee, Thiya; Bowler, Kyle; Namdari, Sholeh; Snow, Zachary; Prestridge, Sarah; Carlton, Alexandra; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2017-05-05

    Bacterial glycan structures on cell surfaces are critical for cell-cell recognition and adhesion and in host-pathogen interactions. Accordingly, unraveling the sugar composition of bacterial cell surfaces can shed light on bacterial growth and pathogenesis. Here, we found that two rare sugars with a 3-C-methyl-6-deoxyhexose structure were linked to spore glycans in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10876. Moreover, we identified a four-gene operon in B. cereus ATCC 14579 that encodes proteins with the following sequential enzyme activities as determined by mass spectrometry and one- and two-dimensional NMR methods: CTP:glucose-1-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, CDP-Glc 4,6-dehydratase, NADH-dependent SAM:C-methyltransferase, and NADPH-dependent CDP-3-C-methyl-6-deoxyhexose 4-reductase. The last enzyme predominantly yielded CDP-3-C-methyl-6-deoxygulose (CDP-cereose) and likely generated a 4-epimer CDP-3-C-methyl-6-deoxyallose (CDP-cillose). Some members of the B. cereus sensu lato group produce CDP-3-C-methyl-6-deoxy sugars for the formation of cereose-containing glycans on spores, whereas others such as Bacillus anthracis do not. Gene knockouts of the Bacillus C-methyltransferase and the 4-reductase confirmed their involvement in the formation of cereose-containing glycan on B. cereus spores. We also found that cereose represented 0.2-1% spore dry weight. Moreover, mutants lacking cereose germinated faster than the wild type, yet the mutants exhibited no changes in sporulation or spore resistance to heat. The findings reported here may provide new insights into the roles of the uncommon 3-C-methyl-6-deoxy sugars in cell-surface recognition and host-pathogen interactions of the genus Bacillus. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Cereulide formation by Bacillus weihenstephanensis and mesophilic emetic Bacillus cereus at temperature abuse depends on pre-incubation conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Line; Budde, Birgitte Bjørn; Henrichsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    . weihenstephanensis MC67 occurred in stationary growth phase, as previously observed for B. cereus, and biomass formation and cereulide formation showed a linear correlation. During incubation at 5 °C for 1, 2 and 3 weeks growth was inhibited and as a consequence no detectable cereulide production occurred for any...... of the three strains. Similar resultswere obtained for the mesophilic B. cereus strains when incubated at 8 °C, whereas B. weihenstephanensis MC67 grew to stationary phase and produced 0.002 µg cereulide/cm2 agar surface in 1 week. Raising the temperature from 5 °C to 25 °C for 24 h after 1 week of incubation...... the temperature from 8 °C (instead of from 5 °C) to 25 °C for 24 h, while a considerably lower level was produced by B. weihenstephanensis MC67 (0.10 µg cereulide /cm2). If the temperature was raised from 5 °C and 8 °C to 25 °C for 24 h after an increased incubation time for 2 and 3 weeks, all three strains...

  18. Genomic determinants of sporulation in Bacilli and Clostridia: towards the minimal set of sporulation-specific genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael Y; Mekhedov, Sergei L; Puigbo, Pere; Smirnov, Sergey; Wolf, Yuri I; Rigden, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    Three classes of low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria (Firmicutes), Bacilli, Clostridia and Negativicutes, include numerous members that are capable of producing heat-resistant endospores. Spore-forming firmicutes include many environmentally important organisms, such as insect pathogens and cellulose-degrading industrial strains, as well as human pathogens responsible for such diseases as anthrax, botulism, gas gangrene and tetanus. In the best-studied model organism Bacillus subtilis, sporulation involves over 500 genes, many of which are conserved among other bacilli and clostridia. This work aimed to define the genomic requirements for sporulation through an analysis of the presence of sporulation genes in various firmicutes, including those with smaller genomes than B. subtilis. Cultivable spore-formers were found to have genomes larger than 2300 kb and encompass over 2150 protein-coding genes of which 60 are orthologues of genes that are apparently essential for sporulation in B. subtilis. Clostridial spore-formers lack, among others, spoIIB, sda, spoVID and safA genes and have non-orthologous displacements of spoIIQ and spoIVFA, suggesting substantial differences between bacilli and clostridia in the engulfment and spore coat formation steps. Many B. subtilis sporulation genes, particularly those encoding small acid-soluble spore proteins and spore coat proteins, were found only in the family Bacillaceae, or even in a subset of Bacillus spp. Phylogenetic profiles of sporulation genes, compiled in this work, confirm the presence of a common sporulation gene core, but also illuminate the diversity of the sporulation processes within various lineages. These profiles should help further experimental studies of uncharacterized widespread sporulation genes, which would ultimately allow delineation of the minimal set(s) of sporulation-specific genes in Bacilli and Clostridia. PMID:22882546

  19. Bacterial metabolites from intra- and inter-species influencing thermotolerance: the case of Bacillus cereus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Govea, Mayra Alejandra; García, Santos; Heredia, Norma

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial metabolites with communicative functions could provide protection against stress conditions to members of the same species. Yet, information remains limited about protection provided by metabolites in Bacillus cereus and inter-species. This study investigated the effect of extracellular compounds derived from heat shocked (HS) and non-HS cultures of B. cereus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the thermotolerance of non-HS vegetative and sporulating B. cereus. Cultures of B. cereus and G. stearothermophilus were subjected to HS (42 or 65 °C respectively for 30 min) or non-HS treatments. Cells and supernatants were separated, mixed in a combined array, and then exposed to 50 °C for 60 min and viable cells determined. For spores, D values (85 and 95 °C) were evaluated after 120 h. In most cases, supernatants from HS B. cereus cultures added to non-HS B. cereus cells caused their thermotolerance to increase (D 50 12.2-51.9) when compared to supernatants from non-HS cultures (D 50 7.4-21.7). While the addition of supernatants from HS and non-HS G. stearothermophilus cultures caused the thermotolerance of non-HS cells from B. cereus to decrease initially (D 50 3.7-7.1), a subsequent increase was detected in most cases (D 50 18-97.7). In most cases, supernatants from sporulating G. stearothermophilus added to sporulating cells of B. cereus caused the thermotolerance of B. cereus 4810 spores to decline, whereas that of B. cereus 14579 increased. This study clearly shows that metabolites in supernatants from either the same or different species (such as G. stearothermophilus) influence the thermotolerance of B. cereus.

  20. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling of Clostridium perfringens SM101 during Sporulation Extends the Core of Putative Sporulation Genes and Genes Determining Spore Properties and Germination Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Y.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Abee, T.; Wells-Bennik, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of bacterial spores is a highly regulated process and the ultimate properties of the spores are determined during sporulation and subsequent maturation. A wide variety of genes that are expressed during sporulation determine spore properties such as resistance to heat and other adverse

  1. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of Clostridium perfringens SM101 during sporulation extends the core of putative sporulation genes and genes determining spore properties and germination characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Y.; Hijum, van S.A.F.T.; Abee, T.; Wells-Bennik, M.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of bacterial spores is a highly regulated process and the ultimate properties of the spores are determined during sporulation and subsequent maturation. A wide variety of genes that are expressed during sporulation determine spore properties such as resistance to heat and other adverse

  2. The Water Cycle, a Potential Source of the Bacterial Pathogen Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillard, Julien; Dupont, Christian M. S.; Berge, Odile; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Oriol-Gagnier, Stéphanie; Doussan, Claude; Broussolle, Véronique; Gillon, Marina; Clavel, Thierry; Bérard, Annette

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of the sporulating soil-dwelling Bacillus cereus sensu lato (B. cereus sl) which includes foodborne pathogenic strains has been extensively studied in relation to its various animal hosts. The aim of this environmental study was to investigate the water compartments (rain and soil water, as well as groundwater) closely linked to the primary B. cereus sl reservoir, for which available data are limited. B. cereus sl was present, primarily as spores, in all of the tested compartments of an agricultural site, including water from rain to groundwater through soil. During rain events, leachates collected after transfer through the soil eventually reached the groundwater and were loaded with B. cereus sl. In groundwater samples, newly introduced spores of a B. cereus model strain were able to germinate, and vegetative cells arising from this event were detected for up to 50 days. This first B. cereus sl investigation in the various types of interrelated environments suggests that the consideration of the aquatic compartment linked to soil and to climatic events should provide a better understanding of B. cereus sl ecology and thus be relevant for a more accurate risk assessment of food poisoning caused by B. cereus sl pathogenic strains. PMID:25918712

  3. Sporulation and delta-endotoxin synthesis by Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, A

    2002-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is distinguished from the very closely related Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis by the presence of several plasmid-encoded delta-endotoxin genes. These delta-endotoxins, synthesized as protoxins, are produced in large quantities during sporulation and are packaged into intracellular inclusions. Ingestion of the inclusions by insect larvae leads to protoxin solubilization and conversion to toxins each specific for one of several orders of insects. The toxins form cation-selective channels in the membrane of cells lining the larval midgut with subsequent lethality. In most cases, delta-endotoxin synthesis and sporulation are closely coupled. The latter process in B. thuringiensis is probably virtually identical to that in Bacillus subtilis with the additional use of mother cell sporulation forms of RNA polymerase for the synthesis of the delta-endotoxins. There are other more subtle plasmid-encoded functions or plasmid interactions related to regulating protoxin synthesis. Consideration of both plasmid and chromosomal genes is thus critical for defining this organism.

  4. Biodiversity in Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pielaat A; Fricker M; Nauta MJ; van Leusden FM; MGB

    2006-01-01

    In het kader van een EU project zijn door de verschillende partners experimenten uitgevoerd om inzicht te krijgen in de variatie in eigenschappen van B. cereus-stammen welke bijdragen aan de mate van virulentie. Hiertoe zijn 100 B. cereus-stammen geselecteerd en eigenschappen zoals toxine-vorming,

  5. Biodiversity in Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pielaat A; Fricker M; Nauta MJ; Leusden FM van; MGB

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have been performed by different partners to identify variability in properties of Bacillus cereus strains that contribute to the extent of their virulence as part of an EU project. To this end, 100 B. cereus strains were selected and screened for biological properties, such as toxin

  6. A structured model for vegetative growth and sporulation in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starzak, M.; Bajpai, R.K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A mathematical model has been developed for the 6-endotoxin producing Bacillus thuringiensis. The structure of the model involves the processes taking place during vegetative growth, those leading to the initiation of sporulation under conditions of carbon and/or nitrogen limitation, and the sporulation events. The key features in the model are the pools of compounds, such as PRPP, IMP, ADP/ATP, GDP/GTP, pyrimidine nucleotides, NAD/NADH{sub 2}, amino acids, nucleic acids, cell wall, and vegetative and sporulation proteins. These, along with a-factors that control the nature of RNA-polymerase during the different phases, effectively stimulate the vegetative growth and sporulation. The initiation of sporulation is controlled by the intracellular concentration of GTP. Results of simulation of vegetative growth, initiation of sporulation, spore protein formation, and production of {delta}-endotoxin under C- or N-limitation are presented.

  7. Clostridium perfringens Sporulation and Sporulation-Associated Toxin Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jihong; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium perfringens to form spores plays a key role during the transmission of this Gram-positive bacterium to cause disease. Of particular note, the spores produced by food poisoning strains are often exceptionally resistant to food environment stresses such as heat, cold and preservatives, which likely facilitates their survival in temperature-abused foods. The exceptional resistance properties of spores made by most type A food poisoning strains and some type C foodborne disease strains involves their production of a variant small acid soluble protein-4 that binds more tightly to spore DNA compared to the small acid soluble protein-4 made by most other C. perfringens strains. Sporulation and germination by C. perfringens and Bacillus spp. share both similarities and differences. Finally, sporulation is essential for production of C. perfringens enterotoxin, which is responsible for the symptoms of C. perfringens type A food poisoning, the second most common bacterial foodborne disease in the USA. During this foodborne disease, C. perfringens is ingested with food and then, using sporulation-specific alternate sigma factors, this bacterium sporulates and produces the enterotoxin in the intestines. PMID:27337447

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Sexual Sporulation Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, K.; Heemst, van D.; Slakhorst, M.; Debets, A.J.M.; Heyting, C.

    2001-01-01

    For the genetic dissection of sexual sporulation in Aspergillus nidulans, we started a collection of ascosporeless mutants. After mutagenization of conidiospores with high doses of UV, we isolated 20 mutants with defects in ascospore formation. We crossed these mutants in two successive rounds with

  9. Global analysis of the sporulation pathway of Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Fimlaid

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive, spore-forming pathogen Clostridium difficile is the leading definable cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea worldwide. C. difficile infections are difficult to treat because of their frequent recurrence, which can cause life-threatening complications such as pseudomembranous colitis. The spores of C. difficile are responsible for these high rates of recurrence, since they are the major transmissive form of the organism and resistant to antibiotics and many disinfectants. Despite the importance of spores to the pathogenesis of C. difficile, little is known about their composition or formation. Based on studies in Bacillus subtilis and other Clostridium spp., the sigma factors σ(F, σ(E, σ(G, and σ(K are predicted to control the transcription of genes required for sporulation, although their specific functions vary depending on the organism. In order to determine the roles of σ(F, σ(E, σ(G, and σ(K in regulating C. difficile sporulation, we generated loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding these sporulation sigma factors and performed RNA-Sequencing to identify specific sigma factor-dependent genes. This analysis identified 224 genes whose expression was collectively activated by sporulation sigma factors: 183 were σ(F-dependent, 169 were σ(E-dependent, 34 were σ(G-dependent, and 31 were σ(K-dependent. In contrast with B. subtilis, C. difficile σ(E was dispensable for σ(G activation, σ(G was dispensable for σ(K activation, and σ(F was required for post-translationally activating σ(G. Collectively, these results provide the first genome-wide transcriptional analysis of genes induced by specific sporulation sigma factors in the Clostridia and highlight that diverse mechanisms regulate sporulation sigma factor activity in the Firmicutes.

  10. Bacillus cereus Biofilms—Same, Only Different

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majed, Racha; Faille, Christine; Kallassy, Mireille; Gohar, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus displays a high diversity of lifestyles and ecological niches and include beneficial as well as pathogenic strains. These strains are widespread in the environment, are found on inert as well as on living surfaces and contaminate persistently the production lines of the food industry. Biofilms are suspected to play a key role in this ubiquitous distribution and in this persistency. Indeed, B. cereus produces a variety of biofilms which differ in their architecture and mechanism of formation, possibly reflecting an adaptation to various environments. Depending on the strain, B. cereus has the ability to grow as immersed or floating biofilms, and to secrete within the biofilm a vast array of metabolites, surfactants, bacteriocins, enzymes, and toxins, all compounds susceptible to act on the biofilm itself and/or on its environment. Within the biofilm, B. cereus exists in different physiological states and is able to generate highly resistant and adhesive spores, which themselves will increase the resistance of the bacterium to antimicrobials or to cleaning procedures. Current researches show that, despite similarities with the regulation processes and effector molecules involved in the initiation and maturation of the extensively studied Bacillus subtilis biofilm, important differences exists between the two species. The present review summarizes the up to date knowledge on biofilms produced by B. cereus and by two closely related pathogens, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis. Economic issues caused by B. cereus biofilms and management strategies implemented to control these biofilms are included in this review, which also discuss the ecological and functional roles of biofilms in the lifecycle of these bacterial species and explore future developments in this important research area. PMID:27458448

  11. Characterization of Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands LM; Dufrenne JB; Leusden FM; MGB

    2002-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitary microorganism that may cause food borne disease. Pathogenicity, however, depends on various characteristics such as the ability to form (entero)-toxin(s) that can not be detected by microbiological methods. Further characterization of pathogenic properties is not only

  12. Recent progress in Bacillus subtilis sporulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Douglas; Dworkin, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can initiate the process of sporulation under conditions of nutrient limitation. Here, we review some of the last five years of work in this area, with a particular focus on the decision to initiate sporulation, DNA translocation, cell-cell communication, protein localization and spore morphogenesis. The progress we describe has implications not just for the study of sporulation but also for other biological systems where homologs of sporulation-specific proteins are involved in vegetative growth. PMID:22091839

  13. Interactive and Single Effects of Ectomycorrhiza Formation and Bacillus cereus on Metallothionein MT1 Expression and Phytoextraction of Cd and Zn by Willows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna; Dabrowska, Grazyna; Baum, Christel; Niedojadlo, Katarzyna; Leinweber, Peter

    2012-03-01

    Single and joint ectomycorrhizal (+ Hebeloma mesophaeum) and bacterial (+ Bacillus cereus) inoculations of willows (Salix viminalis) were investigated for their potential and mode of action in the promotion of cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) phytoextraction. Dual fungal and bacterial inoculations promoted the biomass production of willows in contaminated soil. Single inoculations either had no effect on the plant growth or inhibited it. All inoculated willows showed increased concentrations of nutritional elements (N, P, K and Zn) and decreased concentrations of Cd in the shoots. The lowest biomass production and concentration of Cd in the willows (+ B. cereus) were combined with the strongest expression of metallothioneins. It seems that biotic stress from bacterial invasion increased the synthesis of these stress proteins, which responded in decreased Cd concentrations. Contents of Cd and Zn in the stems of willows were combination-specific, but were always increased in dual inoculated plants. In conclusion, single inoculations with former mycorrhiza-associated B. cereus strains decreased the phytoextraction efficiency of willows by causing biotic stress. However, their joint inoculation with an ectomycorrhizal fungus is a very promising method for promoting the phytoextraction of Cd and Zn through combined physiological effects on the plant.

  14. Etude du système de communication cellulaire NprR-NprX au sein du groupe Bacillus cereus

    OpenAIRE

    Dubois, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In sporulating Bacillus, major processes like virulence gene expression and sporulation are regulated by communication systems involving signaling peptides and regulators of the RNPP family. In this work, we investigated the role of one such regulator, NprR, in bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group. This work can be divided into three complementary parts.The first part consisted to demonstrate that NprR is involved in a quorum-sensing system. We showed that NprR is a transcriptional regulator...

  15. Bacillus cereus acid stress responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous Gram-positive organism, which frequently causes foodborne illnesses. The widespread prevalence of B. cereus makes it a common contaminant in fresh foods where it also can cause spoilage. To prevent food-borne diseases and food spoilage, foods are often processed

  16. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) fuels the tricarboxylic acid cycle and de novo lipid biosynthesis during Bacillus anthracis sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Marat R; Ahn, Jong-Sam; Widhelm, Todd J; Eckrich, Valerie M; Endres, Jennifer L; Driks, Adam; Rutkowski, Gregory E; Wingerd, Kevin L; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2017-06-01

    Numerous bacteria accumulate poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) as an intracellular reservoir of carbon and energy in response to imbalanced nutritional conditions. In Bacillus spp., where PHB biosynthesis precedes the formation of the dormant cell type called the spore (sporulation), the direct link between PHB accumulation and efficiency of sporulation was observed in multiple studies. Although the idea of PHB as an intracellular carbon and energy source fueling sporulation was proposed several decades ago, the mechanisms underlying PHB contribution to sporulation have not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that PHB deficiency impairs Bacillus anthracis sporulation through diminishing the energy status of the cells and by reducing carbon flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and de novo lipid biosynthesis. Consequently, this metabolic imbalance decreased biosynthesis of the critical components required for spore integrity and resistance, such as dipicolinic acid (DPA) and the spore's inner membrane. Supplementation of the PHB deficient mutant with exogenous fatty acids overcame these sporulation defects, highlighting the importance of the TCA cycle and lipid biosynthesis during sporulation. Combined, the results of this work reveal the molecular mechanisms of PHB contribution to B. anthracis sporulation and provide valuable insight into the metabolic requirements for this developmental process in Bacillus species. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Genetic evidence for the involvement of the S-layer protein gene sap and the sporulation genes spo0A, spo0B, and spo0F in Phage AP50c infection of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, Roger D; Beaber, John W; Zemansky, Jason; Kaur, Ajinder P; George, Matroner; Biswas, Biswajit; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Hannah, Ryan M; Pope, Robert K; Read, Timothy D; Stibitz, Scott; Calendar, Richard; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2014-03-01

    In order to better characterize the Bacillus anthracis typing phage AP50c, we designed a genetic screen to identify its bacterial receptor. Insertions of the transposon mariner or targeted deletions of the structural gene for the S-layer protein Sap and the sporulation genes spo0A, spo0B, and spo0F in B. anthracis Sterne resulted in phage resistance with concomitant defects in phage adsorption and infectivity. Electron microscopy of bacteria incubated with AP50c revealed phage particles associated with the surface of bacilli of the Sterne strain but not with the surfaces of Δsap, Δspo0A, Δspo0B, or Δspo0F mutants. The amount of Sap in the S layer of each of the spo0 mutant strains was substantially reduced compared to that of the parent strain, and incubation of AP50c with purified recombinant Sap led to a substantial reduction in phage activity. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole-genome sequences of B. cereus sensu lato strains revealed several closely related B. cereus and B. thuringiensis strains that carry sap genes with very high similarities to the sap gene of B. anthracis. Complementation of the Δsap mutant in trans with the wild-type B. anthracis sap or the sap gene from either of two different B. cereus strains that are sensitive to AP50c infection restored phage sensitivity, and electron microscopy confirmed attachment of phage particles to the surface of each of the complemented strains. Based on these data, we postulate that Sap is involved in AP50c infectivity, most likely acting as the phage receptor, and that the spo0 genes may regulate synthesis of Sap and/or formation of the S layer.

  18. Role of the alpha-glucanase Agn2p in ascus-wall endolysis following sporulation in fission yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Nick; van Rijssel, Jos; Distel, Ben; Hochstenbach, Frans

    2007-01-01

    During sporulation in the ascomyceteous fungus Schizosaccharomyces pombe, diploid cells undergo differentiation into asci containing four haploid ascospores, which are highly resistant to environmental stresses. Although the morphogenetic processes involved in ascospore formation have been studied

  19. Pirated Siderophores Promote Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandchamp, Gabrielle M; Caro, Lews; Shank, Elizabeth A

    2017-05-15

    In microbial communities, bacteria chemically and physically interact with one another. Some of these interactions are mediated by secreted specialized metabolites that act as either intraspecies or interspecies signals to alter gene expression and to change cell physiology. Bacillus subtilis is a well-characterized soil microbe that can differentiate into multiple cell types, including metabolically dormant endospores. We were interested in identifying microbial interactions that affected sporulation in B. subtilis Using a fluorescent transcriptional reporter, we observed that coculturing B. subtilis with Escherichia coli promoted sporulation gene expression via a secreted metabolite. To identify the active compound, we screened the E. coli Keio Collection and identified the sporulation-accelerating cue as the siderophore enterobactin. B. subtilis has multiple iron acquisition systems that are used to take up the B. subtilis- produced siderophore bacillibactin, as well as to pirate exogenous siderophores such as enterobactin. While B. subtilis uses a single substrate binding protein (FeuA) to take up both bacillibactin and enterobactin, we discovered that it requires two distinct genes to sporulate in response to these siderophores (the esterase gene besA for bacillibactin and a putative esterase gene, ybbA , for enterobactin). In addition, we found that siderophores from a variety of other microbial species also promote sporulation in B. subtilis Our results thus demonstrate that siderophores can act not only as bacterial iron acquisition systems but also as interspecies cues that alter cellular development and accelerate sporulation in B. subtilis IMPORTANCE While much is known about the genetic regulation of Bacillus subtilis sporulation, little is understood about how other bacteria influence this process. This work describes an interaction between Escherichia coli and B. subtilis that accelerates sporulation in B. subtilis The interaction is mediated by the E

  20. Isopeptide bonds of the major pilin protein BcpA influence pilus structure and bundle formation on the surface of Bacillus cereus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickx, Antoni P.A.; Poor, Catherine B.; Jureller, Justin E.; Budzik, Jonathan M.; He, Chuan; Schneewind, Olaf (UC)

    2012-09-05

    Bacillus cereus strains elaborate pili on their surface using a mechanism of sortase-mediated cross-linking of major and minor pilus components. Here we used a combination of electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to visualize these structures. Pili occur as single, double or higher order assemblies of filaments formed from monomers of the major pilin, BcpA, capped by the minor pilin, BcpB. Previous studies demonstrated that within assembled pili, four domains of BcpA -- CNA{sub 1}, CNA{sub 2}, XNA and CNA{sub 3} -- each acquire intramolecular lysine-asparagine isopeptide bonds formed via catalytic glutamic acid or aspartic acid residues. Here we showed that mutants unable to form the intramolecular isopeptide bonds in the CNA2 or CNA3 domains retain the ability to form pilus bundles. A mutant lacking the CNA{sub 1} isopeptide bond assembled deformed pilin subunits that failed to associate as bundles. X-ray crystallography revealed that the BcpA variant Asp{sup 312}Ala, lacking an aspartyl catalyst, did not generate the isopeptide bond within the jelly-roll structure of XNA. The Asp{sup 312}Ala mutant was also unable to form bundles and promoted the assembly of deformed pili. Thus, structural integrity of the CNA{sub 1} and XNA domains are determinants for the association of pili into higher order bundle structures and determine native pilus structure.

  1. The Arthromitus stage of Bacillus cereus: intestinal symbionts of animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.; Jorgensen, J. Z.; Dolan, S.; Kolchinsky, R.; Rainey, F. A.; Lo, S. C.

    1998-01-01

    In the guts of more than 25 species of arthropods we observed filaments containing refractile inclusions previously discovered and named "Arthromitus" in 1849 by Joseph Leidy [Leidy, J. (1849) Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 4, 225-233]. We cultivated these microbes from boiled intestines of 10 different species of surface-cleaned soil insects and isopod crustaceans. Literature review and these observations lead us to conclude that Arthromitus are spore-forming, variably motile, cultivable bacilli. As long rod-shaped bacteria, they lose their flagella, attach by fibers or fuzz to the intestinal epithelium, grow filamentously, and sporulate from their distal ends. When these organisms are incubated in culture, their life history stages are accelerated by light and inhibited by anoxia. Characterization of new Arthromitus isolates from digestive tracts of common sow bugs (Porcellio scaber), roaches (Gromphodorhina portentosa, Blaberus giganteus) and termites (Cryptotermes brevis, Kalotermes flavicollis) identifies these flagellated, spore-forming symbionts as a Bacillus sp. Complete sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from four isolates (two sow bug, one hissing roach, one death's head roach) confirms these as the low-G+C Gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus cereus. We suggest that B. cereus and its close relatives, easily isolated from soil and grown on nutrient agar, enjoy filamentous growth in moist nutrient-rich intestines of healthy arthropods and similar habitats.

  2. Catabolite repression of enzyme synthesis does not prevent sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, J M; Uratani-Wong, B; Freese, E

    1980-03-01

    In the presence of excess glucose, a decrease of guanine nucleotides in Bacillus subtilis initiated sporulation but did not prevent catabolite repression of three enzymes. Therefore, the ultimate mechanism(s) repressing enzyme synthesis differs from that suppressing sporulation.

  3. Occurrence and behavior of Bacillus cereus in naturally contaminated ricotta salata cheese during refrigerated storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanu, Carlo; Scarano, Christian; Spanu, Vincenzo; Pala, Carlo; Casti, Daniele; Lamon, Sonia; Cossu, Francesca; Ibba, Michela; Nieddu, Gavino; De Santis, Enrico P L

    2016-09-01

    The present study shows the fate of Bacillus cereus in refrigerated ricotta salata cheese during shelf-life. 144 ricotta salata cheese belonging to nine naturally contaminated batches were stored refrigerated and analyzed at 24 h, 30, 60 and 90 days of storage. Total bacterial count, B. cereus spores and vegetative forms, intrinsic properties and composition were determined. The presence of spores was sporadic while the prevalence and the level of B. cereus vegetative cells decreased respectively from 83.3 % to 4.65 ± 0.74 cfu g(-1) at the beginning of the observation period to 33.3 % and 1.99 ± 0.55 cfu g(-1) after 90 days. No information is currently available on the fate of B. cereus in ricotta salata. The production process of ricotta salata includes steps such as whey heating followed by slow cooling of clots, which expose to the risk of spore germination and successive growth to levels compatible with toxins production. The prolonged refrigerated storage was not favorable to sporulation, explaining the successive death of vegetative cells. The present study demonstrate the potential risk of food poisoning as consequence of pre-formed emetic toxins in ricotta salata. Food safety of ricotta salata relies on the rapid refrigeration of the product during critical phases for cereulide production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High-Throughput Genetic Screens Identify a Large and Diverse Collection of New Sporulation Genes in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Jacqueline; Lim, Hoong Chuin; Bernhardt, Thomas G.; Rudner, David Z.

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis into a dormant spore is among the most well-characterized developmental pathways in biology. Classical genetic screens performed over the past half century identified scores of factors involved in every step of this morphological process. More recently, transcriptional profiling uncovered additional sporulation-induced genes required for successful spore development. Here, we used transposon-sequencing (Tn-seq) to assess whether there were any sporulation genes left to be discovered. Our screen identified 133 out of the 148 genes with known sporulation defects. Surprisingly, we discovered 24 additional genes that had not been previously implicated in spore formation. To investigate their functions, we used fluorescence microscopy to survey early, middle, and late stages of differentiation of null mutants from the B. subtilis ordered knockout collection. This analysis identified mutants that are delayed in the initiation of sporulation, defective in membrane remodeling, and impaired in spore maturation. Several mutants had novel sporulation phenotypes. We performed in-depth characterization of two new factors that participate in cell–cell signaling pathways during sporulation. One (SpoIIT) functions in the activation of σE in the mother cell; the other (SpoIIIL) is required for σG activity in the forespore. Our analysis also revealed that as many as 36 sporulation-induced genes with no previously reported mutant phenotypes are required for timely spore maturation. Finally, we discovered a large set of transposon insertions that trigger premature initiation of sporulation. Our results highlight the power of Tn-seq for the discovery of new genes and novel pathways in sporulation and, combined with the recently completed null mutant collection, open the door for similar screens in other, less well-characterized processes. PMID:26735940

  5. Concerted action of sphingomyelinase and non-hemolytic enterotoxin in pathogenic Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria M Doll

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus causes food poisoning and serious non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe, which is present in most B. cereus strains, is considered to be one of the main virulence factors. However, a B. cereus ΔnheBC mutant strain lacking Nhe is still cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. In a screen for additional cytotoxic factors using an in vitro model for polarized colon epithelial cells we identified B. cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase as a strong inducer of epithelial cell death. Using single and double deletion mutants of sph, the gene encoding for SMase, and nheBC in B. cereus we demonstrated that SMase is an important factor for B. cereus cytotoxicity in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo. SMase substantially complemented Nhe induced cytotoxicity in vitro. In addition, SMase but not Nhe contributed significantly to the mortality rate of larvae in vivo in the insect model Galleria mellonella. Our study suggests that the role of B. cereus SMase as a secreted virulence factor for in vivo pathogenesis has been underestimated and that Nhe and SMase complement each other significantly to cause full B. cereus virulence hence disease formation.

  6. Concerted Action of Sphingomyelinase and Non-Hemolytic Enterotoxin in Pathogenic Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Viktoria M.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus causes food poisoning and serious non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe), which is present in most B. cereus strains, is considered to be one of the main virulence factors. However, a B. cereus ΔnheBC mutant strain lacking Nhe is still cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. In a screen for additional cytotoxic factors using an in vitro model for polarized colon epithelial cells we identified B. cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase) as a strong inducer of epithelial cell death. Using single and double deletion mutants of sph, the gene encoding for SMase, and nheBC in B. cereus we demonstrated that SMase is an important factor for B. cereus cytotoxicity in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo. SMase substantially complemented Nhe induced cytotoxicity in vitro. In addition, SMase but not Nhe contributed significantly to the mortality rate of larvae in vivo in the insect model Galleria mellonella. Our study suggests that the role of B. cereus SMase as a secreted virulence factor for in vivo pathogenesis has been underestimated and that Nhe and SMase complement each other significantly to cause full B. cereus virulence hence disease formation. PMID:23613846

  7. CodY Promotes Sporulation and Enterotoxin Production by Clostridium perfringens Type A Strain SM101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jihong; Freedman, John C; Evans, Daniel R; McClane, Bruce A

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D strains cause enterotoxemia and enteritis in livestock via epsilon toxin production. In type D strain CN3718, CodY was previously shown to increase the level of epsilon toxin production and repress sporulation. C. perfringens type A strains producing C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) cause human food poisoning and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Sporulation is critical for C. perfringens type A food poisoning since spores contribute to transmission and resistance in the harsh food environment and sporulation is essential for CPE production. Therefore, the current study asked whether CodY also regulates sporulation and CPE production in SM101, a derivative of C. perfringens type A food-poisoning strain NCTC8798. An isogenic codY -null mutant of SM101 showed decreased levels of spore formation, along with lower levels of CPE production. A complemented strain recovered wild-type levels of both sporulation and CPE production. When this result was coupled with the earlier results obtained with CN3718, it became apparent that CodY regulation of sporulation varies among different C. perfringens strains. Results from quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis clearly demonstrated that, during sporulation, codY transcript levels remained high in SM101 but rapidly declined in CN3718. In addition, abrB gene expression patterns varied significantly between codY -null mutants of SM101 and CN3718. Compared to the levels in their wild-type parents, the level of abrB gene expression decreased in the CN3718 codY -null mutant strain but significantly increased in the SM101 codY -null mutant strain, demonstrating CodY-dependent regulation differences in abrB expression between these two strains. This difference appears to be important since overexpression of the abrB gene in SM101 reduced the levels of sporulation and enterotoxin production, supporting the involvement of AbrB repression in regulating C. perfringens sporulation. Copyright © 2017

  8. Asexual and sexual replication in sporulating organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bohyun; Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2007-08-01

    Replication via sporulation is the replication strategy for all multicellular life, and may even be observed in unicellular life (such as with budding yeast). We consider diploid populations replicating via one of two possible sporulation mechanisms. (1) Asexual sporulation, whereby adult organisms produce single-celled diploid spores that grow into adults themselves. (2) Sexual sporulation, whereby adult organisms produce single-celled diploid spores that divide into haploid gametes. The haploid gametes enter a haploid “pool,” where they may recombine with other haploids to form a diploid spore that then grows into an adult. We consider a haploid fusion rate given by second-order reaction kinetics. We work with a simplified model where the diploid genome consists of only two chromosomes, each of which may be rendered defective with a single point mutation of the wild-type. We find that the asexual strategy is favored when the rate of spore production is high compared to the characteristic growth rate from a spore to a reproducing adult. Conversely, the sexual strategy is favored when the rate of spore production is low compared to the characteristic growth rate from a spore to a reproducing adult. As the characteristic growth time increases, or as the population density increases, the critical ratio of spore production rate to organism growth rate at which the asexual strategy overtakes the sexual one is pushed to higher values. Therefore, the results of this model suggest that, for complex multicellular organisms, sexual replication is favored at high population densities and low growth and sporulation rates.

  9. Dielectric monitoring of growth and sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafzadeh, M H; Belloy, L; Esteban, G; Navarro, J M; Ghommidh, C

    2005-04-01

    On-line permittivity and optical density measurements have been used to monitor biomass concentration and sporulation status during growth of a spore-forming bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis, in fed-batch culture. The correlation between permittivity, optical density and other observations showed three distinct phases of growth: growth itself, transition and sporulation. The permittivity variations during the transition and sporulation phases could be related to the sporulation development: the evolution pattern of the ratio of optical density to permittivity was representative of the culture state, and during the sporulation phase, a permittivity index could be build to measure the extend of spore liberation.

  10. Polyphosphate storage during sporulation in the gram-negative bacterium Acetonema longum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocheva, Elitza I; Dekas, Anne E; McGlynn, Shawn E; Morris, Dylan; Orphan, Victoria J; Jensen, Grant J

    2013-09-01

    Using electron cryotomography, we show that the Gram-negative sporulating bacterium Acetonema longum synthesizes high-density storage granules at the leading edges of engulfing membranes. The granules appear in the prespore and increase in size and number as engulfment proceeds. Typically, a cluster of 8 to 12 storage granules closely associates with the inner spore membrane and ultimately accounts for ∼7% of the total volume in mature spores. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyses show that the granules contain high levels of phosphorus, oxygen, and magnesium and therefore are likely composed of polyphosphate (poly-P). Unlike the Gram-positive Bacilli and Clostridia, A. longum spores retain their outer spore membrane upon germination. To explore the possibility that the granules in A. longum may be involved in this unique process, we imaged purified Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus subtilis, and Clostridium sporogenes spores. Even though B. cereus and B. thuringiensis contain the ppk and ppx genes, none of the spores from Gram-positive bacteria had granules. We speculate that poly-P in A. longum may provide either the energy or phosphate metabolites needed for outgrowth while retaining an outer membrane.

  11. Evaluation of the Sporicidal Activity of Ethanol Extract of Arctium lappa Root against Bacillus cereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihe Karbasizade

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacillus cereus is one of the most common causes of food spoilage, keratitis, endophthalmitis, and panophthalmitis. These bacteria produce spores which are resistant to chemical and physical agents. Nowadays, the sporicidal properties of plants have been considered as alternatives to chemical sporicidal agents. Materials and Methods: In this empirical-experimental study the effect of ethanol extract of edible burdock (Arctium lappa root has been studied on Bacillus cereus spores. In this investigation, the suspensions of tested microorganisms were cultured in sporulating agar. Sporulation process was assessed by optical microscopy following the staining of spores. Then the produced spores were exposed to various concentrations (100, 150, 200, 250, 300 mg/mL of ethanol extract of edible burdock (Arctium lappa root and finally the remaining spores were counted. With increasing concentrations of ethanol extract, the number of spores declined. Results: Pearson correlation showed inverse relation between the spores count and concentration of ethanol extract of edible burdock (Arctium lappa root (r=-0.765, p<0.001. The most effective extract concentration was 300 mg /mL. Conclusion: Ethanol extract of edible burdock (Arctium lappa root, has sporicidal activity. Only, the sporicidal nature of ethanol extract has been evaluated by this study; therefore, the assessment of other extracts and essences is necessary.

  12. The RecA-Dependent SOS Response Is Active and Required for Processing of DNA Damage during Bacillus subtilis Sporulation.

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    Fernando H Ramírez-Guadiana

    Full Text Available The expression of and role played by RecA in protecting sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis from DNA damage has been determined. Results showed that the DNA-alkylating agent Mitomycin-C (M-C activated expression of a PrecA-gfpmut3a fusion in both sporulating cells' mother cell and forespore compartments. The expression levels of a recA-lacZ fusion were significantly lower in sporulating than in growing cells. However, M-C induced levels of ß-galactosidase from a recA-lacZ fusion ~6- and 3-fold in the mother cell and forespore compartments of B. subtilis sporangia, respectively. Disruption of recA slowed sporulation and sensitized sporulating cells to M-C and UV-C radiation, and the M-C and UV-C sensitivity of sporangia lacking the transcriptional repair-coupling factor Mfd was significantly increased by loss of RecA. We postulate that when DNA damage is encountered during sporulation, RecA activates the SOS response thus providing sporangia with the repair machinery to process DNA lesions that may compromise the spatio-temporal expression of genes that are essential for efficient spore formation.

  13. Inactivation of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells by gastric acid and bile during in vitro gastrointestinal transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus can cause diarrhoeal food poisoning by production of enterotoxins in the small intestine. The prerequisite for diarrhoeal disease is thus survival during gastrointestinal passage. Methods Vegetative cells of 3 different B. cereus strains were cultivated in a real composite food matrix, lasagne verde, and their survival during subsequent simulation of gastrointestinal passage was assessed using in vitro experiments simulating transit through the human upper gastrointestinal tract (from mouth to small intestine). Results No survival of vegetative cells was observed, despite the high inoculum levels of 7.0 to 8.0 log CFU/g and the presence of various potentially protective food components. Significant fractions (approx. 10% of the consumed inoculum) of B. cereus vegetative cells survived gastric passage, but they were subsequently inactivated by bile exposure in weakly acidic intestinal medium (pH 5.0). In contrast, the low numbers of spores present (up to 4.0 log spores/g) showed excellent survival and remained viable spores throughout the gastrointestinal passage simulation. Conclusion Vegetative cells are inactivated by gastric acid and bile during gastrointestinal passage, while spores are resistant and survive. Therefore, the physiological form (vegetative cells or spores) of the B. cereus consumed determines the subsequent gastrointestinal survival and thus the infective dose, which is expected to be much lower for spores than vegetative cells. No significant differences in gastrointestinal survival ability was found among the different strains. However, considerable strain variability was observed in sporulation tendency during growth in laboratory medium and food, which has important implications for the gastrointestinal survival potential of the different B. cereus strains. PMID:23034184

  14. A Novel Cell Type Enables B. subtilis To Escape From Unsuccessful Sporulation In Minimal Medium

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    Herve Joel Defeu Soufo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sporulation is the most enduring survival strategy developed by several bacterial species. However, spore development of the model organism Bacillus subtilis has mainly been studied by means of media or conditions optimized for the induction of sporogenesis. Here, I show that during prolonged growth during stationary phase in minimal medium, B. subtilis undergoes an asymmetric cell division that produces small and round-shaped, DNA containing cells. In contrast to wild-type cells, mutants harboring spo0A or spoIIIE/sftA double mutations neither sporulate nor produce this special cell type, providing evidence that the small round cells emerge from the abortion of endospore formation. In most cases observed, the small round cells arise in the presence of sigma H but absence of sigma F activity, different from cases of abortive sporulation described for rich media. These data suggest that in minimal media, many cells are able to initiate but fail to complete spore development, and therefore return to normal growth as rods. This work reveals that the continuation of asymmetric cell division, which results in the formation of the small round cells, is a way for cells to delay or escape from - unsuccessful - sporulation. Based on these findings, I suggest to name the here described cell type as dwarf cells to distinguish them from the well-known minicells observed in mutants defective in septum placement or proper chromosome partitioning.

  15. The IspA protease's involvement in the regulation of the sporulation process of Bacillus thuringiensis is revealed by proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-Chu; Shen, Li-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Chu; Chak, Kin-Fu

    2003-12-19

    We have observed that the process of sporulation of the ispA-deficient mutant was delayed under phase-contrast microscopy. The protein profiles of the ispA-deficient mutant have been analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The results of a proteomic analysis using MALDI-TOF MS indicated that a sporulation-associated protein, pro- [Formula: see text], was upregulated, while two other sporulation-associated proteins, SpoVD and SpoVR, were downregulated in the ispA-deficient mutant. It has been known that pro- [Formula: see text] is a precursor of [Formula: see text] and is required for gene expression related to the late stage of sporulation. Moreover, SpoVD and SpoVR are known to be involved in the formation of the spore cortex. Based on these observations, we propose that the delay in the sporulation process observed in the ispA-deficient mutant may be due to a failure of [Formula: see text] to signal sporulation. This phenomenon may be further enhanced by insufficient amount of SpoVD and SpoVR for cortex formation. In this study, we have revealed for the first time a possible pathway for the regulation of sporulation-associated proteins via IspA.

  16. VPS13 regulates membrane morphogenesis during sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Sook; Neiman, Aaron M

    2012-06-15

    The hereditary disorders chorea acanthocytosis and Cohen syndrome are caused by mutations in different members of a family of genes that are orthologs of yeast VPS13. In vegetatively growing yeast, VPS13 is involved in the delivery of proteins to the vacuole. During sporulation, VPS13 is important for formation of the prospore membrane that encapsulates the daughter nuclei to give rise to spores. We report that VPS13 is required for multiple aspects of prospore membrane morphogenesis. VPS13 (1) promotes expansion of the prospore membrane through regulation of phosphatidylinositol phosphates, which in turn activate the phospholipase D, Spo14; (2) is required for a late step in cytokinesis that gives rise to spores; and (3) regulates a membrane-bending activity that generates intralumenal vesicles. These results demonstrate that Vps13 plays a broader role in membrane biology than previously known, which could have important implications for the functions of VPS13 orthologs in humans.

  17. Emetic toxin-producing strains of Bacillus cereus show distinct characteristics within the Bacillus cereus group.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlin, Frédéric; Fricker, Martina; Pielaat, Annemarie; Heisterkamp, Simon; Shaheen, Ranad; Salonen, Mirja Salkinoja; Svensson, Birgitta; Nguyen-the, Christophe; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2006-01-01

    One hundred representative strains of Bacillus cereus were selected from a total collection of 372 B. cereus strains using two typing methods (RAPD and FT-IR) to investigate if emetic toxin-producing hazardous B. cereus strains possess characteristic growth and heat resistance profiles. The strains

  18. A plasmid-borne Rap-Phr system regulates sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis in insect larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazion, Fernanda; Perchat, Stéphane; Buisson, Christophe; Vilas-Bôas, Gislayne; Lereclus, Didier

    2017-10-02

    The entomopathogen Bacillus thuringiensis species harbours numerous plasmids essentially studied for their involvement in pathogenicity, as Cry-plasmids. The life cycle of B. thuringiensis in the insect host is regulated by the sequential activation of quorum sensing systems to kill, survive and sporulate. In this study, we characterize a new quorum sensing system belonging to the Rap-Phr family. The Rap8-Phr8 system is borne by the pHT8_1 plasmid, a small cryptic plasmid from the B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD73 strain. Our results demonstrate that the Rap8 protein inhibits sporulation and biofilm formation through the Spo0A pathway. The Rap8 activity is inhibited by the mature Phr8 heptapeptide YAHGKDI. The key residues specific for the Rap phosphatase activity are conserved in Rap8 suggesting a common mode of action. Interestingly, we show that the Rap8-Phr8 system is specifically required for regulating sporulation of B. thuringiensis in insect larvae. This system may allow the bacteria to exert a tight control of the sporulation process in the host cadaver for optimizing the multiplication, the survival and the dissemination of the bacteria. Thus, our results suggest that pHT8_1 provides advantages for adaptation and evolution of B. thuringiensis in its ecological niche. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Genome characteristics of a novel phage from Bacillus thuringiensis showing high similarity with phage from Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihui Yuan

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is an important entomopathogenic bacterium belongs to the Bacillus cereus group, which also includes B. anthracis and B. cereus. Several genomes of phages originating from this group had been sequenced, but no genome of Siphoviridae phage from B. thuringiensis has been reported. We recently sequenced and analyzed the genome of a novel phage, BtCS33, from a B. thuringiensis strain, subsp. kurstaki CS33, and compared the gneome of this phage to other phages of the B. cereus group. BtCS33 was the first Siphoviridae phage among the sequenced B. thuringiensis phages. It produced small, turbid plaques on bacterial plates and had a narrow host range. BtCS33 possessed a linear, double-stranded DNA genome of 41,992 bp with 57 putative open reading frames (ORFs. It had a typical genome structure consisting of three modules: the "late" region, the "lysogeny-lysis" region and the "early" region. BtCS33 exhibited high similarity with several phages, B. cereus phage Wβ and some variants of Wβ, in genome organization and the amino acid sequences of structural proteins. There were two ORFs, ORF22 and ORF35, in the genome of BtCS33 that were also found in the genomes of B. cereus phage Wβ and may be involved in regulating sporulation of the host cell. Based on these observations and analysis of phylogenetic trees, we deduced that B. thuringiensis phage BtCS33 and B. cereus phage Wβ may have a common distant ancestor.

  20. Genome characteristics of a novel phage from Bacillus thuringiensis showing high similarity with phage from Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying; Wu, Dandan; Liu, Pengming; Wu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an important entomopathogenic bacterium belongs to the Bacillus cereus group, which also includes B. anthracis and B. cereus. Several genomes of phages originating from this group had been sequenced, but no genome of Siphoviridae phage from B. thuringiensis has been reported. We recently sequenced and analyzed the genome of a novel phage, BtCS33, from a B. thuringiensis strain, subsp. kurstaki CS33, and compared the gneome of this phage to other phages of the B. cereus group. BtCS33 was the first Siphoviridae phage among the sequenced B. thuringiensis phages. It produced small, turbid plaques on bacterial plates and had a narrow host range. BtCS33 possessed a linear, double-stranded DNA genome of 41,992 bp with 57 putative open reading frames (ORFs). It had a typical genome structure consisting of three modules: the "late" region, the "lysogeny-lysis" region and the "early" region. BtCS33 exhibited high similarity with several phages, B. cereus phage Wβ and some variants of Wβ, in genome organization and the amino acid sequences of structural proteins. There were two ORFs, ORF22 and ORF35, in the genome of BtCS33 that were also found in the genomes of B. cereus phage Wβ and may be involved in regulating sporulation of the host cell. Based on these observations and analysis of phylogenetic trees, we deduced that B. thuringiensis phage BtCS33 and B. cereus phage Wβ may have a common distant ancestor.

  1. Effect of ozone on fungus sporulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuss, F.R.

    1950-01-01

    A total of 30 organisms among the Phycomycetes, Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes, and the Fungi Imperferti were exposed to ozone at a concentration of 110 ppm., a temperature of 79/sup 0/F., and an average humidity of 87%. Three to four testings were made for each organism. All transfers from test tube cultures were made to standard size 9 centimeter plates containing Difco commercial potato-dextrose-agar mixed to the proportion of 39 grams agar per 1000 cc distilled water. Under the conditions outlined in this study it was found that ozone will induce earlier and more abundant sporulation of certain fungi, but in general the spore germinations were adversely affected. Notable exceptions with respect to spore germination were Diapor the phaseolorum, Lenzites trabea, and two species of Diplodia, the spores of which germinated better after exposure to ozone. Fungi possessing white or light mycelium were inhibited by the gas. Thus there appears to be a correlation between mycelial color and inhibition or stimulation to sporulation. Aerial growth of all organisms tested was suppressed or greatly reduced by ozone. 35 references, 6 tables.

  2. Sporulation during growth in a gut isolate of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Cláudia R; Earl, Ashlee M; Barbosa, Teresa M; Kolter, Roberto; Henriques, Adriano O

    2014-12-01

    Sporulation by Bacillus subtilis is a cell density-dependent response to nutrient deprivation. Central to the decision of entering sporulation is a phosphorelay, through which sensor kinases promote phosphorylation of Spo0A. The phosphorelay integrates both positive and negative signals, ensuring that sporulation, a time- and energy-consuming process that may bring an ecological cost, is only triggered should other adaptations fail. Here we report that a gastrointestinal isolate of B. subtilis sporulates with high efficiency during growth, bypassing the cell density, nutritional, and other signals that normally make sporulation a post-exponential-phase response. Sporulation during growth occurs because Spo0A is more active per cell and in a higher fraction of the population than in a laboratory strain. This in turn, is primarily caused by the absence from the gut strain of the genes rapE and rapK, coding for two aspartyl phosphatases that negatively modulate the flow of phosphoryl groups to Spo0A. We show, in line with recent results, that activation of Spo0A through the phosphorelay is the limiting step for sporulation initiation in the gut strain. Our results further suggest that the phosphorelay is tuned to favor sporulation during growth in gastrointestinal B. subtilis isolates, presumably as a form of survival and/or propagation in the gut environment. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Bacillus cereus responses to acid stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, Maarten; Abee, Tjakko

    2011-01-01

    Coping with acid environments is one of the prerequisites for the soil saprophytic and human pathogenic lifestyle of Bacillus cereus. This minireview highlights novel insights in the responses displayed by vegetative cells and germinating spores of B. cereus upon exposure to low pH as well as

  4. Bacillus cereus spore formation, structure and germination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Y.P.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial spores arespecializeddifferentiated celltypes for

  5. ISOLATION, CHARACTERIZATION MORPHOLOGICAL AND EVALUATION OF MYCELIAL GROWTH AND SPORULATION OF VARIOUS MEANS CULTURE OF Quambalaria sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ediellen Mayara Corrêa Gomes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of microorganisms is strategic for plant protection. The objective was to analyze the morphological characteristics and the mycelial growth and sporulation on different culture media fungus Quambalaria sp. Morphological characterization was based on color, type of colonies, type and size of spores were used taxonomic keys and specialized literature for description and identification of fungal structures. For the assessment of mycelial growth and sporulation were used means potato dextrose agar culture (PDA, vegetable-agar (V8 agar and oatmeal agar (OA. two isolates were obtained denominated Q1 and Q2 showed that different types of colonies and mycelial growth, and the spores of both characterized as hyaline, miniature format with obovoid the fusiform and its chambered hyphae. A linear relationship between sporulation and mycelial growth was observed, that is, the larger the sporulation, the greater mycelial growth. The means of V8-agar culture was the most stimulated mycelial growth and sporulation isolated Q1 and the BDA through the isolated Q2, with the MIGS of 11.07 and 10.57 mm day-1, respectively. The results of this study allow us to base the start of a study on the Quambalaria gender, in northern Brazil and to add to the few reported studies on this pathosystem. Keywords: leaf spot; eucalyptus; phytopathogen; forest pathology.

  6. Chitinases CtcB and CfcI modify the cell wall in sporulating aerial mycelium of Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, Jolanda M.; Nitsche, Benjamin M.; Krijgsheld, Pauline; van Wijk, Alle; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Wösten, Han A.; Ram, Arthur F.; van der Maarel, Marc J. E. C.

    Sporulation is an essential part of the life cycle of the industrially important filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. The formation of conidiophores, spore-bearing structures, requires remodelling of the fungal cell wall, as demonstrated by the differences in carbohydrate composition of cell walls

  7. Extending the Bacillus cereus group genomics to putative food-borne pathogens of different toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Auger, Sandrine [Genetique Microbienne; Galleron, Nathalie [Genetique Microbienne; Segurens, Beatrice [Center National Sequencage, F-91057 Evry, France; Simon, Jorg [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; Dossat, Carole [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Broussolle, Veronique [Securite et Qualite des Produits d' Origine Vegetale; Brillard, Julien [Securite et Qualite des Produits d' Origine Vegetale; Guinebretiere, Marie-Helene [Securite et Qualite des Produits d' Origine Vegetale; Sanchis, Vincent [Genetique Microbienne; Nguen-the, Christophe [Securite et Qualite des Produits d' Origine Vegetale; Lereclus, Didier [Genetique Microbienne; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wincker, Patrick [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Weissenbach, Jean [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Ehrlich, Dusko [Genetique Microbienne; Sorokin, Alexei [Genetique Microbienne

    2008-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group represents sporulating soil bacteria containing pathogenic strains which may cause diarrheic or emetic food poisoning outbreaks. Multiple locus sequence typing revealed a presence in natural samples of these bacteria of about 30 clonal complexes. Application of genomic methods to this group was however biased due to the major interest for representatives closely related to Bacillus anthracis. Albeit the most important food-borne pathogens were not yet defined, existing data indicate that they are scattered all over the phylogenetic tree. The preliminary analysis of the sequences of three genomes discussed in this paper narrows down the gaps in our knowledge of the B. cereus group. The strain NVH391-98 is a rare but particularly severe food-borne pathogen. Sequencing revealed that the strain should be a representative of a novel bacterial species, for which the name Bacillus cytotoxis or Bacillus cytotoxicus is proposed. This strain has a reduced genome size compared to other B. cereus group strains. Genome analysis revealed absence of sigma B factor and the presence of genes encoding diarrheic Nhe toxin, not detected earlier. The strain B. cereus F837/76 represents a clonal complex close to that of B. anthracis. Including F837/76, three such B. cereus strains had been sequenced. Alignment of genomes suggests that B. anthracis is their common ancestor. Since such strains often emerge from clinical cases, they merit a special attention. The third strain, KBAB4, is a typical facultative psychrophile generally found in soil. Phylogenic studies show that in nature it is the most active group in terms of gene exchange. Genomic sequence revealed high presence of extra-chromosomal genetic material (about 530 kb) that may account for this phenomenon. Genes coding Nhe-like toxin were found on a big plasmid in this strain. This may indicate a potential mechanism of toxicity spread from the psychrophile strain community. The results of this genomic

  8. Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Preterm Neonate

    OpenAIRE

    Hilliard, Nicholaus J; Schelonka, Robert L.; Waites, Ken B.

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an uncommon but potentially serious bacterial pathogen causing infections of the bloodstream, lungs, and central nervous system of preterm neonates. A case of bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a 19-day-old preterm neonate who was successfully treated with vancomycin, tobramycin, meropenem, and clindamycin is described. Implications for the diagnostic laboratory and clinicians when Bacillus species are detected in normally sterile sites are discussed, and the small numbers o...

  9. Salt-sensitivity of σH and Spo0A prevents sporulation of Bacillus subtilis at high osmolarity avoiding death during cellular differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widderich, Nils; Rodrigues, Christopher D.A.; Commichau, Fabian M.; Fischer, Kathleen E.; Ramirez-Guadiana, Fernando H.; Rudner, David Z.; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Summary The spore-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis frequently experiences high osmolarity as a result of desiccation in the soil. The formation of a highly desiccation-resistant endospore might serve as a logical osmostress escape route when vegetative growth is no longer possible. However, sporulation efficiency drastically decreases concomitant with an increase in the external salinity. Fluorescence microscopy of sporulation-specific promoter fusions to gfp revealed that high salinity blocks entry into the sporulation pathway at a very early stage. Specifically, we show that both Spo0A- and SigH-dependent transcription are impaired. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the association of SigH with core RNA polymerase is reduced under these conditions. Suppressors that modestly increase sporulation efficiency at high salinity map to the coding region of sigH and in the regulatory region of kinA, encoding one the sensor kinases that activates Spo0A. These findings led us to discover that B. subtilis cells that overproduce KinA can bypass the salt-imposed block in sporulation. Importantly, these cells are impaired in the morphological process of engulfment and late forespore gene expression and frequently undergo lysis. Altogether our data indicate that B. subtilis blocks entry into sporulation in high-salinity environments preventing commitment to a developmental program that it cannot complete. PMID:26712348

  10. Extending the cereus group genomics to putative food-bornepathogens of different toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla; Goltsman, Eugene; Auger, Sandrine; Galleron,Nathalie; Segurens, Beatrice; Dossat, Carole; Land, Miriam L.; Broussole,Veronique; Brillard, Julien; Guinebretiere, Marie-Helene; Sanchis,Vincent; Nguen-the, Christophe; Lereclus, Didier; Richardson, Paul; Winker, Patrick; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S.Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2006-08-24

    The cereus group represents sporulating soil bacteriacontaining pathogenic strains which may cause diarrheic or emetic foodpoisoning outbreaks. Multiple locus sequence typing revealed a presencein natural samples of these bacteria of about thirty clonal complexes.Application of genomic methods to this group was however biased due tothe major interest for representatives closely related to B. anthracis.Albeit the most important food-borne pathogens were not yet defined,existing dataindicate that they are scattered all over the phylogenetictree. The preliminary analysis of the sequences of three genomesdiscussed in this paper narrows down the gaps in our knowledge of thecereus group. The strain NVH391-98 is a rare but particularly severefood-borne pathogen. Sequencing revealed that the strain must be arepresentative of a novel bacterial species, for which the name Bacilluscytotoxis is proposed. This strain has a reduced genome size compared toother cereus group strains. Genome analysis revealed absence of sigma Bfactor and the presence of genes encoding diarrheic Nhe toxin, notdetected earlier. The strain B. cereus F837/76 represents a clonalcomplex close to that of B. anthracis. Including F837/76, three such B.cereus strains had been sequenced. Alignment of genomes suggests that B.anthracis is their common ancestor. Since such strains often emerge fromclinical cases, they merit a special attention. The third strain, KBAB4,is a typical psychrotrophe characteristic to unbiased soil communities.Phylogenic studies show that in nature it is the most active group interms of gene exchange. Genomic sequence revealed high presence ofextra-chromosomal genetic material (about 530 kb) that may account forthis phenomenon. Genes coding Nhe-like toxin were found on a big plasmidin this strain. This may indicate a potential mechanism of toxicityspread from the psychrotrophic strain community. The results of thisgenomic work and ecological compartments of different strains incite

  11. Influence of lysogeny of Tectiviruses GIL01 and GIL16 on Bacillus thuringiensis growth, biofilm formation, and swarming motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an entomopathogenic bacterium that has been used as an efficient biopesticide worldwide. Despite the fact that this bacterium is usually described as an insect pathogen, its life cycle in the environment is still largely unknown. B. thuringiensis belongs to the Bacillus cereus group of bacteria, which has been associated with many mobile genetic elements, such as species-specific temperate or virulent bacteriophages (phages). Temperate (lysogenic) phages are able to establish a long-term relationship with their host, providing, in some cases, novel ecological traits to the bacterial lysogens. Therefore, this work focuses on evaluating the potential influence of temperate tectiviruses GIL01 and GIL16 on the development of different life traits of B. thuringiensis. For this purpose, a B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis plasmid-cured (nonlysogenic) strain was used to establish bacterial lysogens for phages GIL01 and GIL16, and, subsequently, the following life traits were compared among the strains: kinetics of growth, metabolic profiles, antibiotics susceptibility, biofilm formation, swarming motility, and sporulation. The results revealed that GIL01 and GIL16 lysogeny has a significant influence on the bacterial growth, sporulation rate, biofilm formation, and swarming motility of B. thuringiensis. No changes in metabolic profiles or antibiotic susceptibilities were detected. These findings provide evidence that tectiviruses have a putative role in the B. thuringiensis life cycle as adapters of life traits with ecological advantages. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of liquid non-sporulating Streptomyces coelicolor cultures demonstrates the existence of a complex differentiation comparable to that occurring in solid sporulating cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagüe, Paula; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; López-García, María Teresa; Rioseras, Beatriz; Martín, Juan Francisco; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces species produce many clinically relevant secondary metabolites and exhibit a complex development that includes hyphal differentiation and sporulation in solid cultures. Industrial fermentations are usually performed in liquid cultures, conditions in which Streptomyces strains generally do not sporulate, and it was traditionally assumed that no differentiation took place. The aim of this work was to compare the transcriptomes of S. coelicolor growing in liquid and solid cultures, deepening the knowledge of Streptomyces differentiation. Microarrays demonstrated that gene expression in liquid and solid cultures were comparable and data indicated that physiological differentiation was similar for both conditions. Eighty-six percent of all transcripts showed similar abundances in liquid and solid cultures, such as those involved in the biosynthesis of actinorhodin (actVA, actII-4) and undecylprodigiosin (redF); activation of secondary metabolism (absR1, ndsA); genes regulating hydrophobic cover formation (aerial mycelium) (bldB, bldC, bldM, bldN, sapA, chpC, chpD, chpE, chpH, ramA, ramC, ramS); and even some genes regulating early stages of sporulation (wblA, whiG, whiH, whiJ). The two most important differences between transcriptomes from liquid and solid cultures were: first, genes related to secondary metabolite biosynthesis (CDA, CPK, coelichelin, desferrioxamine clusters) were highly up-regulated in liquid but not in solid cultures; and second, genes involved in the final stages of hydrophobic cover/spore maturation (chpF, rdlA, whiE, sfr) were up-regulated in solid but not in liquid cultures. New information was also provided for several non-characterized genes differentially expressed in liquid and solid cultures which might be regulating, at least in part, the metabolic and developmental differences observed between liquid and solid cultures.

  13. Transcriptomic analysis of liquid non-sporulating Streptomyces coelicolor cultures demonstrates the existence of a complex differentiation comparable to that occurring in solid sporulating cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Yagüe

    Full Text Available Streptomyces species produce many clinically relevant secondary metabolites and exhibit a complex development that includes hyphal differentiation and sporulation in solid cultures. Industrial fermentations are usually performed in liquid cultures, conditions in which Streptomyces strains generally do not sporulate, and it was traditionally assumed that no differentiation took place. The aim of this work was to compare the transcriptomes of S. coelicolor growing in liquid and solid cultures, deepening the knowledge of Streptomyces differentiation. Microarrays demonstrated that gene expression in liquid and solid cultures were comparable and data indicated that physiological differentiation was similar for both conditions. Eighty-six percent of all transcripts showed similar abundances in liquid and solid cultures, such as those involved in the biosynthesis of actinorhodin (actVA, actII-4 and undecylprodigiosin (redF; activation of secondary metabolism (absR1, ndsA; genes regulating hydrophobic cover formation (aerial mycelium (bldB, bldC, bldM, bldN, sapA, chpC, chpD, chpE, chpH, ramA, ramC, ramS; and even some genes regulating early stages of sporulation (wblA, whiG, whiH, whiJ. The two most important differences between transcriptomes from liquid and solid cultures were: first, genes related to secondary metabolite biosynthesis (CDA, CPK, coelichelin, desferrioxamine clusters were highly up-regulated in liquid but not in solid cultures; and second, genes involved in the final stages of hydrophobic cover/spore maturation (chpF, rdlA, whiE, sfr were up-regulated in solid but not in liquid cultures. New information was also provided for several non-characterized genes differentially expressed in liquid and solid cultures which might be regulating, at least in part, the metabolic and developmental differences observed between liquid and solid cultures.

  14. The Phylogeny of Bacillus cereus sensu lato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okinaka, Richard T; Keim, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The three main species of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. anthracis, were recognized and established by the early 1900 s because they each exhibited distinct phenotypic traits. B. thuringiensis isolates and their parasporal crystal proteins have long been established as a natural pesticide and insect pathogen. B. anthracis, the etiological agent for anthrax, was used by Robert Koch in the 19th century as a model to develop the germ theory of disease, and B. cereus, a common soil organism, is also an occasional opportunistic pathogen of humans. In addition to these three historical species designations, are three less-recognized and -understood species: B. mycoides, B. weihenstephanensis, and B. pseudomycoides. All of these "species" combined comprise the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group. Despite these apparently clear phenotypic definitions, early molecular approaches to separate the first three by various DNA hybridization and 16S/23S ribosomal sequence analyses led to some "confusion" because there were limited differences to differentiate between these species. These and other results have led to frequent suggestions that a taxonomic change was warranted to reclassify this group to a single species. But the pathogenic properties of B. anthracis and the biopesticide applications of B. thuringiensis appear to "have outweighed pure taxonomic considerations" and the separate species categories are still being maintained. B. cereus sensu lato represents a classic example of a now common bacterial species taxonomic quandary.

  15. Aeration effects on metabolic events during sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafzadeh, Mohammad H; Schorr-Galindo, Sabine; La, Hyun-Joon; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2014-07-01

    The metabolism of Bacillus thuringiensis during its sporulation process was investigated under different concentrations of oxygen. At the beginning of sporulation, the aeration conditions were regulated to obtain different oxygen transfer rates (OTR) in four separate fermentations, representing interrupted, limited, non-limited, and saturated oxygenation, respectively. A higher OTR resulted in a higher pH, up to about 9 in the case of saturated oxygenation, while the interrupted oxygenation resulted in a significantly acidic culture. In contrast, the absence of oxygen resulted in rapid sporangia lysis and caused acidification of the medium, indicating a distinctly different sporangia composition and different metabolism. The bacterium also showed different CO2 production rates during sporulation, although a maximum point was observed in every case.With a higher OTR, the maximal value was observed after a longer time and at a lower value (40, 26, and 13 mmol/L/h for limited, non-limited, and saturated cases, respectively). Despite the exhaustion of glucose prior to the sporulation phase, the interrupted oxygenation resulted in acetate, lactate, and citrate in the medium with a maximum concentration of 4.8, 1.3, and 5.0 g/L, respectively. Notwithstanding, while the metabolic events differed visibly in the absence of oxygen, once sporulation was triggered, it was completed, even in the case of an interrupted oxygen supply.

  16. Linking Bacillus cereus genotypes and carbohydrate utilization capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warda, Alicja K.; Siezen, Roland J.; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H.J.; Jong, de Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Nierop Groot, Masja N.; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together

  17. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warda, A.K.; Siezen, R.J.; Boekhorst, J.; Wells-Bennik, M.H.; Jong, A. de; Kuipers, O.P.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with

  18. Cleaning and Disinfection of Bacillus cereus Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Amanda; Klein, Dan; Lopolito, Paul; Schwarz, John Spencer

    2016-01-01

    Methodology has been evolving for the testing of disinfectants against bacterial single-species biofilms, as the difficulty of biofilm remediation continues to gain much-needed attention. Bacterial single-species biofilm contamination presents a real risk to good manufacturing practice-regulated industries. However, mixed-species biofilms and biofilms containing bacterial spores remain an even greater challenge for cleaning and disinfection. Among spore-forming microorganisms frequently encountered in pharmaceutical manufacturing areas, the spores of Bacillus cereus are often determined to be the hardest to disinfect and eradicate. One of the reasons for the low degree of susceptibility to disinfection is the ability of these spores to be encapsulated within an exopolysachharide biofilm matrix. In this series of experiments, we evaluated the disinfectant susceptibility of B. cereus biofilms relative to disassociated B. cereus spores and biofilm from a non-spore-forming species. Further, we assessed the impact that pre-cleaning has on increasing that susceptibility. Methodology has been evolving for the testing of disinfectants against bacterial single-species biofilms, as the difficulty of biofilm remediation continues to gain much-needed attention. Bacterial single-species biofilm contamination presents a real risk to good manufacturing practice-regulated industries. However, mixed-species biofilms and biofilms containing bacterial spores remain an even greater challenge for cleaning and disinfection. Among spore-forming microorganisms frequently encountered in pharmaceutical manufacturing areas, the spores of Bacillus cereus are often determined to be the hardest to disinfect and eradicate. One of the reasons for the low degree of susceptibility to disinfection is the ability of these spores to be encapsulated within an exopolysachharide biofilm matrix. In this series of experiments, we evaluated the disinfectant susceptibility of B. cereus biofilms relative to

  19. How Quorum Sensing Connects Sporulation to Necrotrophism in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Perchat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate adaptation properties, cell fate or commitment to sporulation. The infectious cycle of Bacillus thuringiensis in the insect host is a powerful model to investigate the role of quorum sensing in natural conditions. It is tuned by communication systems regulators belonging to the RNPP family and directly regulated by re-internalized signaling peptides. One such RNPP regulator, NprR, acts in the presence of its cognate signaling peptide NprX as a transcription factor, regulating a set of genes involved in the survival of these bacteria in the insect cadaver. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of NprX and independently of its transcriptional activator function, NprR negatively controls sporulation. NprR inhibits expression of Spo0A-regulated genes by preventing the KinA-dependent phosphorylation of the phosphotransferase Spo0F, thus delaying initiation of the sporulation process. This NprR function displays striking similarities with the Rap proteins, which also belong to the RNPP family, but are devoid of DNA-binding domain and indirectly control gene expression via protein-protein interactions in Bacilli. Conservation of the Rap residues directly interacting with Spo0F further suggests a common inhibition of the sporulation phosphorelay. The crystal structure of apo NprR confirms that NprR displays a highly flexible Rap-like structure. We propose a molecular regulatory mechanism in which key residues of the bifunctional regulator NprR are directly and alternatively involved in its two functions. NprX binding switches NprR from a dimeric inhibitor of sporulation to a tetrameric transcriptional activator involved in the necrotrophic lifestyle of B. thuringiensis. NprR thus tightly coordinates sporulation and necrotrophism, ensuring survival and dissemination of the bacteria during host infection.

  20. How Quorum Sensing Connects Sporulation to Necrotrophism in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchat, Stéphane; Talagas, Antoine; Poncet, Sandrine; Lazar, Noureddine; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier; Nessler, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate adaptation properties, cell fate or commitment to sporulation. The infectious cycle of Bacillus thuringiensis in the insect host is a powerful model to investigate the role of quorum sensing in natural conditions. It is tuned by communication systems regulators belonging to the RNPP family and directly regulated by re-internalized signaling peptides. One such RNPP regulator, NprR, acts in the presence of its cognate signaling peptide NprX as a transcription factor, regulating a set of genes involved in the survival of these bacteria in the insect cadaver. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of NprX and independently of its transcriptional activator function, NprR negatively controls sporulation. NprR inhibits expression of Spo0A-regulated genes by preventing the KinA-dependent phosphorylation of the phosphotransferase Spo0F, thus delaying initiation of the sporulation process. This NprR function displays striking similarities with the Rap proteins, which also belong to the RNPP family, but are devoid of DNA-binding domain and indirectly control gene expression via protein-protein interactions in Bacilli. Conservation of the Rap residues directly interacting with Spo0F further suggests a common inhibition of the sporulation phosphorelay. The crystal structure of apo NprR confirms that NprR displays a highly flexible Rap-like structure. We propose a molecular regulatory mechanism in which key residues of the bifunctional regulator NprR are directly and alternatively involved in its two functions. NprX binding switches NprR from a dimeric inhibitor of sporulation to a tetrameric transcriptional activator involved in the necrotrophic lifestyle of B. thuringiensis. NprR thus tightly coordinates sporulation and necrotrophism, ensuring survival and dissemination of the bacteria during host infection.

  1. Effect of saccharides on growth, sporulation rate and δ-endotoxin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sucrose, lactose and maltose) as carbon sources on growth and sporulation rate of Bacillus thuringiensis MPK13 as well as δ-endotoxin production was investigated using 400 ml shake flasks culture. Substantially high growth and sporulation ...

  2. Bacillus cereus in melk en grasland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaghuis, B.; Tadic, M.

    1997-01-01

    De bacterie Bacillus cereus komt het meest voor in rauwe melk van koeien die in de wei lopen. Grond bleek namelijk de meeste van deze bacteriën te bevatten. Als de koeien op stal staan is de besmetting van melk met deze bacterie duidelijk lager. Dit zijn de belangrijkste conclusies van onderzoek op

  3. Effects of temperature on the germination, sporulation, and in - vivo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of temperature on the germination, sporulation, and in - vivo infection of Sphaerotheca fuliginea (powdery mildew) on water melon ( Citrullus lanathus . L) ... Significant difference (P<0.05) was observed among the temperature levels on mycelium length with highest length observed at 20°C, but least was at 40°C.

  4. Effects of whey on the colonization and sporulation of arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... fungus (AMF) Glomus intraradices'(G.i.) inoculated to lentil plant and the effects of changing P ratio in the soil and plant as a result of whey application, changing salt, pH and CaCO3 values on AMF colonization and sporulation. It is found that macro and micro nutrient elements have increased significantly ...

  5. Spatio-Temporal Evolution of Sporulation in Bacillus thuringiensis Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khoury, Nay; Majed, Racha; Perchat, Stéphane; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Gohar, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis can produce a floating biofilm which includes two parts: a ring and a pellicle. The ring is a thick structure which sticks to the culture container, while the pellicle extends over the whole liquid surface and joins the ring. We have followed over time, from 16 to 96 h, sporulation in the two biofilm parts. Sporulation was followed in situ in 48-wells polystyrene microtiterplates with a fluorescence binocular stereomicroscope and a spoIID-yfp transcriptional fusion. Sporulation took place much earlier in the ring than in the pellicle. In 20 h-aged biofilms, spoIID was expressed only in the ring, which could be seen as a green fluorescent circle surrounding the non-fluorescent pellicle. However, after 48 h of culture, the pellicle started to express spoIID in specific area corresponding to protrusions, and after 96 h both the ring and the whole pellicle expressed spoIID. Spore counts and microscopy observations of the ring and the pellicle harvested separately confirmed these results and revealed that sporulation occured 24 h-later in the pellicle comparatively to the ring, although both structures contained nearly 100% spores after 96 h of culture. We hypothesize that two mechanisms, due to microenvironments in the biofilm, can explain this difference. First, the ring experiences a decreased concentration of nutrients earlier than the pellicle, because of a lower exchange area with the culture medium. An second, the ring is exposed to partial dryness. Both reasons could speed up sporulation in this biofilm structure. Our results also suggest that spores in the biofilm display a phenotypic heterogeneity. These observations might be of particular significance for the food industry, since the biofilm part sticking to container walls - the ring - is likely to contain spores and will therefore resist both to washing and to cleaning procedures, and will be able to restart a new biofilm when food production has resumed.

  6. Spatio-Temporal Evolution of Sporulation in Bacillus thuringiensis Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nay El Khoury

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available B. thuringiensis can produce a floating biofilm which includes two parts: a ring and a pellicle. The ring is a thick structure which sticks to the culture container, while the pellicle extends over the whole liquid surface and joins the ring. We have followed over time, from 16 h to 96 h, sporulation in the two biofilm parts. Sporulation was followed in situ in 48-wells polystyrene microtiterplates with a fluorescence binocular stereomicroscope and a spoIID-yfp transcriptional fusion. Sporulation took place much earlier in the ring than in the pellicle. In 20 h-aged biofilms, spoIID was expressed only in the ring, which could be seen as a green fluorescent circle surrounding the non-fluorescent pellicle. However, after 48 h of culture, the pellicle started to express spoIID in specific area corresponding to protrusions, and after 96 h both the ring and the whole pellicle expressed spoIID. Spore counts and microscopy observations of the ring and the pellicle harvested separately confirmed these results and revealed that sporulation occured 24 h-later in the pellicle comparatively to the ring, although both structures contained nearly 100% spores after 96 h of culture. We hypothesize that two mechanisms, due to microenvironments in the biofilm, can explain this difference. First, the ring experiences a decreased concentration of nutrients earlier than the pellicle, because of a lower exchange area with the culture medium. An second, the ring is exposed to partial dryness. Both reasons could speed up sporulation in this biofilm structure. Our results also suggest that spores in the biofilm display a phenotypic heterogeneity. These observations might be of particular significance for the food industry, since the biofilm part sticking to container walls - the ring - is likely to contain spores and will therefore resist both to washing and to cleaning procedures, and will be able to restart a new biofilm when food production has resumed.

  7. Model-based definition of population heterogeneity and its effects on metabolism in sporulating Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohashi, Mineo; Ohashi, Yoshiaki; Tani, Saeka; Ishii, Kotaro; Itaya, Mitsuhiro; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Kawamura, Fujio; Tomita, Masaru; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2007-08-01

    The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms dormant, robust spores as a tactic to ensure survival under conditions of starvation. However, the sporulating culture includes sporulating and non-sporulating cells, because a portion of the cell population initiates sporulation in wild-type strain. We anticipated that the population effect must be considered carefully to analyse samples yielding population heterogeneity. We first built a mathematical model and simulated for signal transduction of the sporulation cue to see what mechanisms are responsible for generating the heterogeneity. The simulated results were confirmed experimentally, where heterogeneity is primarily modulated by negative feedback circuits, resulting in generation of a bistable response within the sporulating culture. We also confirmed that mutants relevant to negative feedback yield either sporulating or non-sporulating subpopulations. To see the effect of molecular mechanism between sporulating and non-sporulating cells in distinct manner, metabolome analysis was conducted using the above mutants. The metabolic profiles exhibited distinct characteristics with time regardless of whether sporulation was initiated or not. In addition, several distinct characteristics of metabolites were observed between strains, which was inconsistent with previously reported data. The results imply that careful consideration must be made in the interpretation of data obtained from cells yielding population heterogeneity.

  8. Pathogenicity and characterization of a novel Bacillus cereus sensu lato isolate toxic to the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata Wied.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiu, Luca; Falchi, Giovanni; Floris, Ignazio; Marche, Maria Giovanna; Mura, Maria Elena; Satta, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The lethal and sub-lethal effects of sporulated cultures of a novel Bacillus cereus sensu lato strain lacking detectable cry genes and identified through morphological and genetic analyses, have been studied on the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata. The lethal effects on young larvae were concentration dependent, with a median lethal concentration (LC50) of 4.48 × 10(8)spores/g of diet. Sporulated cultures of this strain significantly extended development time and reduced immature survival, and the size of emerging fly adults. Besides spores, the toxicity has been associated to the insoluble extra-spore fraction characterized through a proteomic approach. The profile of the extra-spore protein fraction (ES) showed major protein bands within the 35-65 kDa range. The results of mass spectrometry analysis highlighted the presence of putative virulence factors, including members of protein families previously associated to the insecticidal action of other microbial entomopathogens. These proteins include metalloproteases, peptidases and other enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of hand hygiene procedures for removing Bacillus cereus spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Teppei; Hayashi, Shunji; Hosoda, Kouichi; Morisawa, Yuji; Hirai, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming bacterium. B. cereus occasionally causes nosocomial infections, in which hand contamination with the spores plays an important role. Therefore, hand hygiene is the most important practice for controlling nosocomial B. cereus infections. This study aimed to determine the appropriate hand hygiene procedure for removing B. cereus spores. Thirty volunteers' hands were experimentally contaminated with B. cereus spores, after which they performed 6 different hand hygiene procedures. We compared the efficacy of the procedures in removing the spores from hands. The alcohol-based hand-rubbing procedures scarcely removed them. The soap washing procedures reduced the number of spores by more than 2 log10. Extending the washing time increased the spore-removing efficacy of the washing procedures. There was no significant difference in efficacy between the use of plain soap and antiseptic soap. Handwashing with soap is appropriate for removing B. cereus spores from hands. Alcohol-based hand-rubbing is not effective.

  10. The Endospore-Forming Pathogen Bacillus cereus Exploits a Small Colony Variant-Based Diversification Strategy in Response to Aminoglycoside Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Elrike; Kranzler, Markus; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2015-12-08

    environments to combat B. cereus in a tailored manner. The reported induction of SCV in an endospore-forming human pathogen requires further research to broaden our understanding of a yet unexplored antibiotic resistance mechanism in sporulating bacteria. Our work also raises a general question about the ecological meaning of SCV subpopulation emergence and importance of SCV in sporeformer populations as an alternative route, next to sporulation, to cope with stresses encountered in natural niches, such as soil or host interfaces. Copyright © 2015 Frenzel et al.

  11. Incidence and characterization of bacillus cereus isolated From egyptian foods.

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Y. E. [يسرى السيد صالح; M.Z. El-Fouly; Khalil, M. S.; Abo-State, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, 178 strains of Bacillus cereus were isolated from different Egyptian foods. Isolation was performed, using MYP and PEMBA media and confirmed by staining and biochemical tests. B. cereus occurred in 98% of test minced meat, 60% of sausage, 48% of rice grains, 44% of Koshari or ice-cream and 36% of pasteurized milk samples. The characteristics of these B. cereus isolates in terms of biochemical reactions, antibiotic susceptibility, pathogenicity and toxigenicity were studied. ...

  12. Necrotizing gastritis due to Bacillus cereus in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Scanff, J; Mohammedi, I; Thiebaut, A; Martin, O; Argaud, L; Robert, D

    2006-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is increasingly being acknowledged as a serious bacterial pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We present a case of acute necrotizing gastritis caused by B. cereus in a 37-year-old woman with acute myeloblastic leukemia, who recovered following total parenteral nutrition and treatment with imipenem and vancomycin. B. cereus was isolated from gastric mucosa and blood cultures. Up to now, no case of acute necrotizing gastritis due to this organism has been reported.

  13. BACILLUS CEREUS: ISOLATION IN JENNET MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Scatassa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jennet milk as human food is hypoallergenic for patients affected by Cow Milk Protein Allergy and multiple food allergies. For these pathologies, jennet milk represents the best alternative to other types of milk. Therefore, jennet milk consumers are very sensible to the effects of pathogens' contaminations, and several hygienic practices during the milk production need to be adopted. During regular monitoring in one Sicilian jennet farm, Bacillus cereus in the milk was detected. In 3 bulk milk samples (maximum concentration: 1.2 x 103 ufc/ml, in 3 individual milk samples (10, 20 e 60 ufc/ml, in the milk filter (5 ufc/cm2, in the soil (maximum concentration: 1.5 x 103 ufc/g, on the hands and the gloves of two milkers, on the animal hide (from 1 to 3 ufc/cm2. No spores were detected. A total of 8 Bacillus cereus s.s. strains were analyzed for diarrhoic toxin, and 6 strains producing enterotoxins resulted. The improvement of environmental and milking hygienic conditions reduced Bacillus cereus concentration.

  14. Bacillus cereus from the environment is genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    OGAWA, Hirohito; OHNUMA, Miyuki; SQUARRE, David; MWEENE, Aaron Simanyengwe; EZAKI, Takayuki; FUJIKURA, Daisuke; OHNISHI, Naomi; THOMAS, Yuka; HANG’OMBE, Bernard Mudenda; HIGASHI, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    To follow-up anthrax in Zambia since the outbreak in 2011, we have collected samples from the environment and the carcasses of anthrax-suspected animals, and have tried to isolate Bacillus anthracis. In the process of identification of B. anthracis, we collected two isolates, of which colonies were similar to B. anthracis; however, from the results of identification using the molecular-based methods, two isolates were genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus, of which clinical manifestation is severe and fatal (e.g., pneumonia). In this study, we showed the existence of bacteria suspected to be highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia, indicating the possibility of an outbreak caused by highly pathogenic B. cereus. PMID:25797134

  15. Bacillus cereus from the environment is genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hirohito; Ohnuma, Miyuki; Squarre, David; Mweene, Aaron Simanyengwe; Ezaki, Takayuki; Fujikura, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Naomi; Thomas, Yuka; Hang'ombe, Bernard Mudenda; Higashi, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    To follow-up anthrax in Zambia since the outbreak in 2011, we have collected samples from the environment and the carcasses of anthrax-suspected animals, and have tried to isolate Bacillus anthracis. In the process of identification of B. anthracis, we collected two isolates, of which colonies were similar to B. anthracis; however, from the results of identification using the molecular-based methods, two isolates were genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus, of which clinical manifestation is severe and fatal (e.g., pneumonia). In this study, we showed the existence of bacteria suspected to be highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia, indicating the possibility of an outbreak caused by highly pathogenic B. cereus.

  16. Effects of whey on the colonization and sporulation of arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to research the effect of 2 different doses of whey [50 ml kg-1(W50) and 100 ml kg-1(W100)], an important organic waste, on colonization and sporulation of arbuscular mycorhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus intraradices'(G.i.) inoculated to lentil plant and the effects of changing P ratio in the soil and plant as ...

  17. How Quorum Sensing Connects Sporulation to Necrotrophism in Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane Perchat; Antoine Talagas; Sandrine Poncet; Noureddine Lazar; Inès Li de la Sierra-Gallay; Michel Gohar; Didier Lereclus; Sylvie Nessler

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate adaptation properties, cell fate or commitment to sporulation. The infectious cycle of Bacillus thuringiensis in the insect host is a powerful model to investigate the role of quorum sensing in natural conditions. It is tuned by communication systems regulators belonging to the RNPP family and directly regulated by re-internalized signaling peptides. One such RNPP regulator, NprR, acts in the presence of its cognate signaling peptide NprX as a transcr...

  18. Inducible Expression of spo0A as a Universal Tool for Studying Sporulation in Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Dembek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile remains a leading nosocomial pathogen, putting considerable strain on the healthcare system. The ability to form endospores, highly resistant to environmental insults, is key to its persistence and transmission. However, important differences exist between the sporulation pathways of C. difficile and the model Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis. Amongst the challenges in studying sporulation in C. difficile is the relatively poor levels of sporulation and high heterogeneity in the sporulation process. To overcome these limitations we placed Ptet regulatory elements upstream of the master regulator of sporulation, spo0A, generating a new strain that can be artificially induced to sporulate by addition of anhydrotetracycline (ATc. We demonstrate that this strain is asporogenous in the absence of ATc, and that ATc can be used to drive faster and more efficient sporulation. Induction of Spo0A is titratable and this can be used in the study of the spo0A regulon both in vitro and in vivo, as demonstrated using a mouse model of C. difficile infection (CDI. Insights into differences between the sporulation pathways in B. subtilis and C. difficile gained by study of the inducible strain are discussed, further highlighting the universal interest of this tool. The Ptet-spo0A strain provides a useful background in which to generate mutations in genes involved in sporulation, therefore providing an exciting new tool to unravel key aspects of sporulation in C. difficile.

  19. Nitrate salts suppress sporulation and production of enterotoxin in Clostridium perfringens strain NCTC8239.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasugi, Mayo; Otsuka, Keisuke; Miyake, Masami

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A is a common source of food-borne illness in humans. Ingested vegetative cells sporulate in the small intestinal tract and in the process produce C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE). Although sporulation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of food-borne illness, the molecules triggering/inhibiting sporulation are still largely unknown. It has previously been reported by our group that sporulation is induced in C. perfringens strain NCTC8239 co-cultured with Caco-2 cells in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM). In contrast, an equivalent amount of spores was not observed when bacteria were co-cultured in Roswell Park Memorial Institute-1640 medium (RPMI). In the present study it was found that, when these two media are mixed, RPMI inhibits sporulation and CPE production induced in DMEM. When a component of RPMI was added to DMEM, it was found that calcium nitrate (Ca[NO 3 ] 2 ) significantly inhibits sporulation and CPE production. The number of spores increased when Ca(NO 3 ) 2 -deficient RPMI was used. The other nitrate salts significantly suppressed sporulation, whereas the calcium salts used did not. qPCR revealed that nitrate salts increased expression of bacterial nitrate/nitrite reductase. Furthermore, it was found that nitrite and nitric oxide suppress sporulation. In the sporulation stages, Ca(NO 3 ) 2 down-regulated the genes controlled by Spo0A, a master regulator of sporulation, but not spo0A itself. Collectively, these results indicate that nitrate salts suppress sporulation and CPE production by down-regulating Spo0A-regulated genes in C. perfringens strain NCTC8239. Nitrate reduction may be associated with inhibition of sporulation. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Prevalence of enterotoxigenic Bacillus Cereus and Its enterotoxins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) and enterotoxins in milk and milk products. Design: A random sampling of milk products was carried out. Setting: Market milk and milk products were collected from retail shops in Nairobi and analysed for contamination with ...

  1. Bacillus cereus: emetic toxin production and gamma hypothesis for growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesta-Peters, E.G.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a food spoilage microorganism and a pathogen. Growth of B. cereus can be prevented or delayed by adding growth limiting compounds to the food product or by altered storage conditions. Combinations of growth limiting factors

  2. Presence of Bacillus cereus in street foods in Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murindamombe, Gervas Y; Collison, Ernest K; Mpuchane, Sisai F; Gashe, Berhanu A

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microbiological safety and quality of street foods sold in Gaborone, Botswana. A total of 148 point-of-sale composite street food samples were bought and analyzed between June 2001 and May 2002. The analysis focused on the level of contamination of various street foods with Bacillus cereus. The B. cereus (vegetative and spores), total spore, and total viable counts were determined on all the samples. Also B. cereus isolates from 444 individual point-of-sale food samples were characterized with respect to their biochemical profiles and enterotoxigenic properties. The B. cereus contamination rate for point-of-sale foods was 65%. The B. cereus counts ranged from not detectable to levels as high as 9.1 log CFU/g. Despite the high rate of contamination of some samples, generally, most samples had B. cereus counts of less than 4 log CFU/g; hence, they were of acceptable microbiological quality. Bacillus diarrheal enterotoxin was detected from 52 isolates from individual portions of meals using the B. cereus enterotoxin reversed passive latex agglutination kit. Results of the assay revealed that 59.6% of the B. cereus isolates were enterotoxigenic. Most of the enterotoxigenic isolates were obtained from vegetable samples.

  3. Transcriptional Profile during Deoxycholate-Induced Sporulation in a Clostridium perfringens Isolate Causing Foodborne Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasugi, Mayo; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Fujita, Masaya; Sarker, Mahfuzur R; Miyake, Masami

    2016-05-15

    Clostridium perfringens type A is a common source of foodborne illness (FBI) in humans. Vegetative cells sporulate in the small intestinal tract and produce the major pathogenic factor C. perfringens enterotoxin. Although sporulation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of FBI, the mechanisms inducing sporulation remain unclear. Bile salts were shown previously to induce sporulation, and we confirmed deoxycholate (DCA)-induced sporulation in C. perfringens strain NCTC8239 cocultured with human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. In the present study, we performed transcriptome analyses of strain NCTC8239 in order to elucidate the mechanism underlying DCA-induced sporulation. Of the 2,761 genes analyzed, 333 were up- or downregulated during DCA-induced sporulation and included genes for cell division, nutrient metabolism, signal transduction, and defense mechanisms. In contrast, the virulence-associated transcriptional regulators (the VirR/VirS system, the agr system, codY, and abrB) were not activated by DCA. DCA markedly increased the expression of signaling molecules controlled by Spo0A, the master regulator of the sporulation process, whereas the expression of spo0A itself was not altered in the presence or absence of DCA. The phosphorylation of Spo0A was enhanced in the presence of DCA. Collectively, these results demonstrated that DCA induced sporulation, at least partially, by facilitating the phosphorylation of Spo0A and activating Spo0A-regulated genes in strain NCTC8239 while altering the expression of various genes. Disease caused by Clostridium perfringens type A consistently ranks among the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses in humans in developed countries. The sporulation of C. perfringens in the small intestinal tract is a key event for its pathogenesis, but the factors and underlying mechanisms by which C. perfringens sporulates in vivo currently remain unclear. Bile salts, major components of bile, which is secreted from the liver for

  4. Temporal Expression of a Master Regulator Drives Synchronous Sporulation in Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghao Chia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Yeast cells enter and undergo gametogenesis relatively asynchronously, making it technically challenging to perform stage-specific genomic and biochemical analyses. Cell-to-cell variation in the expression of the master regulator of entry into sporulation, IME1, has been implicated to be the underlying cause of asynchronous sporulation. Here, we find that timing of IME1 expression is of critical importance for inducing cells to undergo sporulation synchronously. When we force expression of IME1 from an inducible promoter in cells incubated in sporulation medium for 2 hr, the vast majority of cells exhibit synchrony during premeiotic DNA replication and meiotic divisions. Inducing IME1 expression too early or too late affects the synchrony of sporulation. Surprisingly, our approach for synchronous sporulation does not require growth in acetate-containing medium, but can be achieved in cells grown in rich medium until saturation. Our system requires solely IME1, because the expression of the N6-methyladenosine methyltransferase IME4, another key regulator of early sporulation, is controlled by IME1 itself. The approach described here can be combined easily with other stage-specific synchronization methods, and thereby applied to study specific stages of sporulation, or the complete sporulation program.

  5. Reducing activity, glucose metabolism and acid tolerance response of Bacillus cereus grown at various pH and oxydo-reduction potential levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Lay, Julien; Bahloul, Halim; Sérino, Sylvie; Jobin, Michel; Schmitt, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is a major foodborne bacterial pathogen able to survive a large number of physical-chemical stresses. B. cereus encounters different pH and redox potential (Eh7) levels during its passage through the gastrointestinal tract. Analysis of the combined influence of pH and redox stresses on B. cereus F4430/73 physiology found that B. cereus F4430/73 growth at pH 7.0 at 37 °C had strong reducing capacities, with a total change of 315 mV from an initial redox value of +214 ± 17 mV. The combination of low Eh7 and low pH led to a drastic reduction of growth parameters compared to oxidative Eh7 and neutral pH. Metabolic analysis showed that low pH significantly modifies glucose fermentative metabolism, with changes including decreased production of acid metabolite (acetate, lactate, formate) and increased production of 2,3-butanediol. Low Eh7 slightly enhanced the acid-tolerance response of B. cereus whereas low pH pre-adaptation led to thermal stress cross-protection. These results highlight new mechanisms that bring fresh insight into B. cereus pH and redox stress adaptations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The putative drug efflux systems of the Bacillus cereus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Karl A; Fagerlund, Annette; Elbourne, Liam D H; Vörös, Aniko; Kroeger, Jasmin K; Simm, Roger; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Finke, Sarah; Henderson, Peter J F; Økstad, Ole Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2017-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group of bacteria includes seven closely related species, three of which, B. anthracis, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, are pathogens of humans, animals and/or insects. Preliminary investigations into the transport capabilities of different bacterial lineages suggested that genes encoding putative efflux systems were unusually abundant in the B. cereus group compared to other bacteria. To explore the drug efflux potential of the B. cereus group all putative efflux systems were identified in the genomes of prototypical strains of B. cereus, B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis using our Transporter Automated Annotation Pipeline. More than 90 putative drug efflux systems were found within each of these strains, accounting for up to 2.7% of their protein coding potential. Comparative analyses demonstrated that the efflux systems are highly conserved between these species; 70-80% of the putative efflux pumps were shared between all three strains studied. Furthermore, 82% of the putative efflux system proteins encoded by the prototypical B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 (type strain) were found to be conserved in at least 80% of 169 B. cereus group strains that have high quality genome sequences available. However, only a handful of these efflux pumps have been functionally characterized. Deletion of individual efflux pump genes from B. cereus typically had little impact to drug resistance phenotypes or the general fitness of the strains, possibly because of the large numbers of alternative efflux systems that may have overlapping substrate specificities. Therefore, to gain insight into the possible transport functions of efflux systems in B. cereus, we undertook large-scale qRT-PCR analyses of efflux pump gene expression following drug shocks and other stress treatments. Clustering of gene expression changes identified several groups of similarly regulated systems that may have overlapping drug resistance functions. In this article we review current

  7. Transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways, alternative respiration and enterotoxin genes in anaerobic growth of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, M; Abee, T

    2009-09-01

    To assess genes specifically activated during anaerobic growth that are involved in metabolism and pathogenesis of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus. Growth under anaerobic conditions in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth revealed a reduced growth rate and lower yield as compared to growth under aerobic conditions. Subsequently, comparative transcriptome analysis showed specific genes induced under anaerobic conditions. These included novel genes identified for anaerobic growth of B. cereus, encoding metabolic pathways, such as the arginine deiminase pathway (ArcABDC), formate dehydrogenase (FdhF) and pyruvate formate lyase (Pfl), and alternative respiratory proteins, such as arsenate reductases. Notably, haemolytic enzyme encoding genes were induced during anaerobic growth, and enterotoxin genes were induced in high cell density transition and stationary phases of aerobic cultures. These data point to induction of stress adaptation and pathogenicity factors and rearrangements of expression of metabolic pathways in response to oxygen limitations in B. cereus. The reported changes in gene expression show that the foodborne pathogen B. cereus can adjust to anaerobic conditions, such as encountered in the human GI-tract.

  8. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of Clostridium perfringens SM101 during sporulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Yinghua; Hijum, van Sacha A.; Abee, Tjakko; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we focus on the identification of new genes tentatively involved in sporulation and those that influence properties of spores and their ability to germinate. To this end, the sporulation stages of C. perfringens enterotoxic strain SM101 were characterized based on morphological

  9. Persistence strategies of Bacillus cereus spores isolated from dairy silo tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Ranad; Svensson, Birgitta; Andersson, Maria A; Christiansson, Anders; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2010-05-01

    Survival of Bacillus cereus spores of dairy silo tank origin was investigated under conditions simulating those in operational dairy silos. Twenty-three strains were selected to represent all B. cereus isolates (n = 457) with genotypes (RAPD-PCR) that frequently colonised the silo tanks of at least two of the sampled eight dairies. The spores were studied for survival when immersed in liquids used for cleaning-in-place (1.0% sodium hydroxide at pH 13.1, 75 degrees C; 0.9% nitric acid at pH 0.8, 65 degrees C), for adhesion onto nonliving surfaces at 4 degrees C and for germination and biofilm formation in milk. Four groups with different strategies for survival were identified. First, high survival (log 15 min kill hot-alkaline wash liquid. Second, efficient adherence of the spores to stainless steel from cold water. Third, a cereulide producing group with spores characterised by slow germination in rich medium and well preserved viability when exposed to heating at 90 degrees C. Fourth, spores capable of germinating at 8 degrees C and possessing the cspA gene. There were indications that spores highly resistant to hot 1% sodium hydroxide may be effectively inactivated by hot 0.9% nitric acid. Eight out of the 14 dairy silo tank isolates possessing hot-alkali resistant spores were capable of germinating and forming biofilm in whole milk, not previously reported for B. cereus. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Caractérisation, identification et étude de la thermorésistance de souches de Bacillus cereus isolées de semoule de couscous

    OpenAIRE

    Ziane, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus cereus est une bactérie sporulée impliquée dans les toxi-infections alimentaires collectives (TIAC). En Algérie, cette bactérie n’est pas recherchée dans le couscous largement consommé en Algérie et troisième aliment incriminé dans les TIAC. Dans ce cadre, cette thèse vise à rechercher ce pathogène, caractériser sa thermorésistance, vérifier sa capacité à se développer dans le couscous pour la prévision du niveau de contamination. Une contamination moyenne de 20 ufc/g a é...

  11. Bacillus cereus in Brazilian Ultra High Temperature milk Bacillus cereus em leite UHT brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana de Paula Pacheco-Sanchez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian Ultra High Temperature (UHT milk consumption has increased during the last decade from 187 to 4,200 million liters. In the continuous UHT process, milk is submitted for 2-4 s to 130-150ºC, in a continuous flow system with immediate refrigeration and aseptical packing in hermetic packages. This research had the purpose to verify the incidence of B. cereus species from the B. cereus group, in UHT milk. In 1998 high indexes of these organisms were reported, reaching 34.14% of the analyzed samples. Beyond this fact, there was the need to establish methods and processes adjusted for correct identification of B. cereus. Thus, commercial sterility tests of 6,500 UHT milk packages were investigated in two assays, after ten days incubation at 37ºC and 7ºC to germinate all possible spores and/or to recuperate injured vegetative cells followed by pH measurement. Samples (1,300 packages each from five Brazilian UHT plants of whole UHT milk processed by direct steam injection, packaged in carton were investigated for the presence of Bacillus cereus through phenotypic and genetic (PCR tests. Values of pH were different for the samples, ranging between 6.57 and 6.73. After storage of the samples, only four packages with pH measurement below the lower limit of 6.5 were found and analyzed for the presence of B. cereus. This organism was not detected in any of the samples indicating that the five Brazilian UHT milk processors control pathogenic microorganisms and it can be said that the consumption of UHT milk does not present safety problems to consumers. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and PCR tests were efficient and must be adopted to confirm the biochemical series for B. cereus.O consumo de leite ultra-alta temperatura (UHT brasileiro aumentou, durante a última década, de 187 milhões de litros para 4,200 milhões de litros. No processo contínuo de leite UHT o leite é submetido por 2-4 seg a 130-150ºC, em sistemas de

  12. Proteomic signatures differentiating Bacillus anthracis Sterne sporulation on soil relative to laboratory media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunschel, David S.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Kaiser, Brooke LD; Merkley, Eric D.; Hess, Becky M.; Lin, Andy; Warner, Marvin G.

    2018-01-02

    The process of sporulation is vital for the stability and infectious cycle of Bacillus anthracis and the form of the organism relevant to biodefense. While the morphological and molecular events occurring during sporulation have been well studied, the influence of growth medium and temperature on the proteins expressed in sporulated cultures is not well understood. Understanding the features of B. anthracis sporulation specific to natural vs. laboratory production will address an important question in microbial forensics. In an effort to bridge this knowledge gap, a system for sporulation on two types of agar-immobilized soils was used for comparison to cultures sporulated on two common types of solid laboratory media, and one liquid sporulation medium. The total number of proteins identified and their identity differed between samples generated in each medium and growth temperature, demonstrating that sporulation environment significantly impacts the protein content of the resulting spore. In addition, a subset of proteins common in all of the soil-cultivated samples was distinct from the expression profiles in laboratory medium (and vice versa). These differences included proteins involved in thiamine and phosphate metabolism in the spores produced on soils with a notable increase in expression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters of phosphate and antimicrobial peptides. A distinct set of ABC transporters for amino acids, sugars and oligopeptides were found in cultures produced on laboratory media as well as differences in carbon and amino acid metabolism-related proteins indicative of the nutrient-rich environment. These protein expression changes indicate that the sporulation environment impacts the protein profiles in specific ways that are reflected in the metabolic and membrane transporter proteins present in sporulated cultures.

  13. Inhibition of Bacillus cereus in milk fermented with kefir grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakisu, Emiliano J; Abraham, Analía G; Pérez, Pablo F; De Antoni, Graciela L

    2007-11-01

    The effects of kefir-fermented milk were tested against a toxigenic strain of Bacillus cereus. The incubation of milk with B. cereus spores plus 5% kefir grains prevented spore germination and growth of vegetative forms. In contrast, when 1% kefir grains was used, no effects were observed. The presence of metabolically active kefir grains diminished titers of nonhemolytic enterotoxin A, as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. During fermentation, kefir microorganisms produce extracellular metabolites such as organic acids, which could play a role in the inhibition of spore germination and growth of B. cereus, although the effect of other factors cannot be ruled out. Results of the present study show that kefir-fermented milk is able to antagonize key mechanisms involved in the growth of B. cereus as well as interfere with the biological activity of this microorganism.

  14. Virulence of Bacillus cereus as natural facultative pathogen of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The organisms were sensitive to recommended doses of kanamycin, gatifloxacin, gentamycin, levofloxacin, doxycyclin, tetracyclin, streptomycin, rifampicin, vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, but found resistant to ampicillin. Key words: Bacillus cereus, fatty acid methyl ester analysis, scanning electron micrograph, biochemical

  15. [B. cereus count in meat and dairy food products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitkov, M

    1978-01-01

    Studies were carried out to establish the contamination of some meat and dairy food products with B. cereus. A total of 48 heat-treated sausages (32 perishable and 16 durable) and 64 batches of pasteurized milk were sampled. It was found that 25 per cent of investigated sausage samples contained B. cereus. Perishables proved to a considerable extent more frequently contaminated (33.3 per cent). The count of B. cereus in such products ranged from 10(1) to 10(3) per g. However, pasteurized milk was shown to be still more frequently and to a higher degree contaminated. A suggestion is made to introduce norms concerning the maximum admissible amounts of B. cereus as well as to specify methods for its determination.

  16. Adaptation in Bacillus cereus: From Stress to Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duport, Catherine; Jobin, Michel; Schmitt, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a food-borne pathogen that causes diarrheal disease in humans. After ingestion, B. cereus experiences in the human gastro-intestinal tract abiotic physical variables encountered in food, such as acidic pH in the stomach and changing oxygen conditions in the human intestine. B. cereus responds to environmental changing conditions (stress) by reversibly adjusting its physiology to maximize resource utilization while maintaining structural and genetic integrity by repairing and minimizing damage to cellular infrastructure. As reviewed in this article, B. cereus adapts to acidic pH and changing oxygen conditions through diverse regulatory mechanisms and then exploits its metabolic flexibility to grow and produce enterotoxins. We then focus on the intricate link between metabolism, redox homeostasis, and enterotoxins, which are recognized as important contributors of food-borne disease. PMID:27757102

  17. Mutants of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS genes CCZ1 and YPT7 are blocked in different stages of sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarska, Iga; Kucharczyk, Roza; Mickowska, Barbara; Rytka, Joanna; Rempola, Bozenna

    2010-11-01

    The CCZ1 gene is a member of the class B VPS (vacuolar protein sorting) genes and it is engaged in the last stage of delivery of multiple kinds of cargo to the yeast vacuole. In the process of fusion of the multivesicular body (MVB) with the vacuole, Ccz1p forms a complex with Ypt7p. Both genes are non-essential for vegetative growth, but their deletions cause a complete block in spore formation. The results of this study indicate that ccz1Δ cells initiate the meiotic program, properly proceed through premeiotic DNA replication and through the pairing of homologous chromosomes, but fail to progress through the first meiotic divisions and arrest in prophase I with a single nucleus. The mutant cells are defective in spindle formation as well as in duplication and/or separation of the SPBs. ypt7Δ cells, on the other hand, cannot execute DNA synthesis. We also show that expression of a mutated variant of the YPT7 gene suppresses the sporulation and autophagy defects of ccz1Δ cells to a quantitatively similar level, suggesting that restoration of autophagy in the ccz1Δ strain is sufficient to enable its sporulation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja K Warda

    Full Text Available We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with 11 additional B. cereus reference genomes to provide an overview of the different types of carbohydrate transporters and utilization systems found in B. cereus strains. The combined application of API tests, defined growth media experiments and comparative genomics enabled us to link the carbohydrate utilisation capacity of 22 B. cereus strains with their genome content and in some cases to the panC phylogenetic grouping. A core set of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, trehalose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and ribose could be used by all strains, whereas utilisation of other carbohydrates like xylose, galactose, and lactose, and typical host-derived carbohydrates such as fucose, mannose, N-acetyl-galactosamine and inositol is limited to a subset of strains. Finally, the roles of selected carbohydrate transporters and utilisation systems in specific niches such as soil, foods and the human host are discussed.

  19. Heat-resistance of psychrotolerant Bacillus cereus vegetative cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Alizée; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Clavel, Thierry; Broussolle, Véronique; Nguyen-The, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    Spores of psychrotolerant strains of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus can multiply during storage of cooked or pasteurized, refrigerated foods and can represent a risk if these cells are not eliminated during reheating of food product before consumption. We determined the heat-resistance of psychrotolerant B. cereus vegetative cells at different heating temperatures in laboratory medium and compared it with that of thermotolerant B. cereus vegetative cells. The z values, based on times for a 3 log10 reduction, of the vegetative cells of the three psychrotolerant phylogenetic groups of B. cereus varied between 3.02 °C and 4.84 °C. The temperature at which a 3 log10 reduction was achieved in 10 min varied between 47.6 °C and 49.2 °C for psychrotolerant vegetative cells and it was around 54.8 °C for thermotolerant vegetative cells. Moreover, 0.4 min at 60 °C would be sufficient for a 6 log10 CFU/ml reduction of the most heat resistant psychrotolerant B. cereus vegetative cells. These data clearly showed that psychrotolerant B. cereus vegetative cells can be rapidly eliminated by a mild heat treatment such as food reheating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Linking Bacillus cereus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warda, Alicja K; Siezen, Roland J; Boekhorst, Jos; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Nierop Groot, Masja N; Abee, Tjakko

    2016-01-01

    We characterised carbohydrate utilisation of 20 newly sequenced Bacillus cereus strains isolated from food products and food processing environments and two laboratory strains, B. cereus ATCC 10987 and B. cereus ATCC 14579. Subsequently, genome sequences of these strains were analysed together with 11 additional B. cereus reference genomes to provide an overview of the different types of carbohydrate transporters and utilization systems found in B. cereus strains. The combined application of API tests, defined growth media experiments and comparative genomics enabled us to link the carbohydrate utilisation capacity of 22 B. cereus strains with their genome content and in some cases to the panC phylogenetic grouping. A core set of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, trehalose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and ribose could be used by all strains, whereas utilisation of other carbohydrates like xylose, galactose, and lactose, and typical host-derived carbohydrates such as fucose, mannose, N-acetyl-galactosamine and inositol is limited to a subset of strains. Finally, the roles of selected carbohydrate transporters and utilisation systems in specific niches such as soil, foods and the human host are discussed.

  1. Selection of G1 Phase Yeast Cells for Synchronous Meiosis and Sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, David T

    2017-01-01

    Centrifugal elutriation is a procedure that allows the fractionation of cell populations based upon their size and shape. This allows cells in distinct cell cycle stages can be captured from an asynchronous population. The technique is particularly helpful when performing an experiment to monitor the progression of cells through the cell cycle or meiosis. Yeast sporulation like gametogenesis in other eukaryotes initiates from the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Conveniently, S. cerevisiae arrest in G1 phase when starved for nutrients and so withdrawal of nitrogen and glucose allows cells to abandon vegetative growth in G1 phase before initiating the sporulation program. This simple starvation protocol yields a partial synchronization that has been used extensively in studies of progression through meiosis and sporulation. By using centrifugal elutriation it is possible to isolate a homogeneous population of G1 phase cells and induce them to sporulate synchronously, which is beneficial for investigating progression through meiosis and sporulation. An additionally benefit of this protocol is that cell populations can be isolated based upon size and both large and small cell populations can be tested for progression through meiosis and sporulation. Here we present a protocol for purification of G1 phase diploid cells for examining synchronous progression through meiosis and sporulation.

  2. EXAFS investigation of uranium(VI) complexes formed at Bacillus cereus and Bacillus sphaericus surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, C.; Panak, P.J.; Reich, T.; Rossberg, A.; Raff, J.; Selenska-Pobell, S.; Bernhard, G.; Nitsche, H. [Inst. of Radiochemistry, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Matz, W. [Inst. of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Bucher, J.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Uranium(VI) complex formation at vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus sphaericus was studied using uranium L{sub II}-edge and L{sub III}-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. A comparison of the measured equatorial U-O distances and other EXAFS structural parameters of uranyl species formed at the Bacillus strains with those of the uranyl structure family indicates that the uranium is predominantly bound as uranyl complexes with phosphoryl residues. (orig.)

  3. The role of pili in Bacillus cereus intraocular infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegan, Michelle C; Parkunan, Salai Madhumathi; Randall, C Blake; Coburn, Phillip S; Miller, Frederick C; LaGrow, Austin L; Astley, Roger A; Land, Craig; Oh, So-Young; Schneewind, Olaf

    2017-06-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis is a potentially blinding intraocular infection. The bacterium Bacillus cereus causes a devastating form of this disease which progresses rapidly, resulting in significant inflammation and loss of vision within a few days. The outer surface of B. cereus incites the intraocular inflammatory response, likely through interactions with innate immune receptors such as TLRs. This study analyzed the role of B. cereus pili, adhesion appendages located on the bacterial surface, in experimental endophthalmitis. To test the hypothesis that the presence of pili contributed to intraocular inflammation and virulence, we analyzed the progress of experimental endophthalmitis in mouse eyes infected with wild type B. cereus (ATCC 14579) or its isogenic pilus-deficient mutant (ΔbcpA-srtD-bcpB or ΔPil). One hundred CFU were injected into the mid-vitreous of one eye of each mouse. Infections were analyzed by quantifying intraocular bacilli and retinal function loss, and by histology from 0 to 12 h postinfection. In vitro growth and hemolytic phenotypes of the infecting strains were also compared. There was no difference in hemolytic activity (1:8 titer), motility, or in vitro growth (p > 0.05, every 2 h, 0-18 h) between wild type B. cereus and the ΔPil mutant. However, infected eyes contained greater numbers of wild type B. cereus than ΔPil during the infection course (p ≤ 0.05, 3-12 h). Eyes infected with wild type B. cereus experienced greater losses in retinal function than eyes infected with the ΔPil mutant, but the differences were not always significant. Eyes infected with ΔPil or wild type B. cereus achieved similar degrees of severe inflammation. The results indicated that the intraocular growth of pilus-deficient B. cereus may have been better controlled, leading to a trend of greater retinal function in eyes infected with the pilus-deficient strain. Although this difference was not enough to significantly alter the severity

  4. Oxidative Activation of Bacillus cereus Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Stuart A.; Ordal, Z. John

    1973-01-01

    A study was made of the activation of Bacillus cereus strain T spores by using the oxidizing agent sodium perborate. The degree of activation was measured with constant germination conditions by using L-alanine, inosine, adenosine, and L-alanine plus adenosine as germination stimulants. The germinal response following the various treatments was compared with the responses obtained with heat activation. It was concluded that the optimal time for activation with 30 mM sodium perborate at room temperature was about 4 hr. If the exposure time was greatly extended, the spores would germinate spontaneously. When the perborate treatment followed heat activation, the germinal response to L-alanine was stimulated, to inosine retarded and without apparent effect for adenosine or L-alanine plus adenosine. Results of experiments designed to demonstrate deactivation by slow oxidation showed that spores activated with sodium perborate were not deactivated by slow oxidation, whereas those activated by heat were. A deactivation study using mercaptoethanol as the deactivation agent showed that both methods of activation could be deactivated after a 24-hr exposure, but this deactivation was reversible by extending the exposure to mercaptoethanol. The results of heat-sensitivity studies revealed that about 70% of the sodium perborate-activated spores were heat sensitive after 60 min in a germination menstruum of L-alanine plus adenosine, whereas similarly treated heat-activated and nonactivated spores were about 99.99% heat sensitive, respectively. PMID:4632848

  5. Influence of substrates, light, filter paper and pH on the sporulation of Cercospora sojina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gómez, Diana Erica; Reis, Erlei Melo

    2013-01-01

    .... In experiments conducted in the laboratory, the influence of substrates, light, filter paper and pH on the sporulation of Cercospora sojina conidia, the causal agent of soybean frogeye leaf spot, was assessed...

  6. Bacillus cereus: characteristics, behaviour in the gastro-intestinal tract, and interaction with Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands LM; Dufrenne JB; Leusden FM van; MGB

    2006-01-01

    The consumption of food contaminated with the bacterium Bacillus cereus may lead to diarrhoea. Investigation of characteristics of the bacterium and the pathogenesis increased knowledge regarding the onset of disease. Strains of Bacillus cereus were categorised according to

  7. Bacillus cereus in personal care products: risk to consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, T L; McClure, J; Parker, M D; Amézquita, A; McClure, P J

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is ubiquitous in nature and thus occurs naturally in a wide range of raw materials and foodstuffs. B. cereus spores are resistant to desiccation and heat and able to survive dry storage and cooking. Vegetative cells produce several toxins which on ingestion in sufficient numbers can cause vomiting and/or diarrhoea depending on the toxins produced. Gastrointestinal disease is commonly associated with reheated or inadequately cooked foods. In addition to being a rare cause of several acute infections (e.g. pneumonia and septicaemia), B. cereus can also cause localized infection of post-surgical or trauma wounds and is a rare but significant pathogen of the eye where it may result in severe endophthalmitis often leading to loss of vision. Key risk factors in such cases are trauma to the eye and retained contaminated intraocular foreign bodies. In addition, rare cases of B. cereus-associated keratitis (inflammation of the cornea) have been linked to contact lens use. Bacillus cereus is therefore a microbial contaminant that could adversely affect product safety of cosmetic and facial toiletries and pose a threat to the user if other key risk factors are also present. The infective dose in the human eye is unknown, but as few as 100 cfu has been reported to initiate infection in a susceptible animal model. However, we are not aware of any reports in the literature of B. cereus infections in any body site linked with use of personal care products. Low levels of B. cereus spores may on occasion be present in near-eye cosmetics, and these products have been used by consumers for many years. In addition, exposure to B. cereus is more likely to occur through other routes (e.g. dustborne contamination) due to its ubiquity and resistance properties of spores. The organism has been recovered from the eyes of healthy individuals. Therefore, although there may be a perceived hazard, the risk of severe eye infections as a consequence of exposure through

  8. [Influence of different adhesive composition on sporulation and protein synthesis by Bacillus thuringiensis collection strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krut', V V; Dankevych, L A; Votselko, S K; Patyka, V P

    2014-01-01

    The influence of different sticky-gene composition on sporulation and protein synthesis by B. thuringiensis collection strains has been investigated. It has been detemined that the most effective according this characteristics were B. thuringiensis collection strains 0293 and 98. It has been shown that the best on protein synthesis processes and sporulation by investigated B. thuringiensis strains influences adding to the culture medium sticky-gene compositions A and E in a concentration of from 10 to 15%.

  9. Reconsidering the sporulation characteristics of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile BI/NAP1/027.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Burns

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and a major burden to healthcare services worldwide. In recent years, C. difficile strains belonging to the BI/NAP1/027 type have become highly represented among clinical isolates. These so-called 'hypervirulent' strains are associated with outbreaks of increased disease severity, higher relapse rates and an expanded repertoire of antibiotic resistance. Spores, formed during sporulation, play a pivotal role in disease transmission and it has been suggested that BI/NAP1/027 strains are more prolific in terms of sporulation in vitro than 'non-epidemic' C. difficile types. Work in our laboratory has since provided credible evidence to the contrary suggesting that the strain-to-strain variation in C. difficile sporulation characteristics is not type-associated. However, the BI/NAP1/027 type is still widely stated to have an increased rate of sporulation. In this study, we analysed the sporulation rates of 53 C. difficile strains, the largest sample size used to-date in such a study, including 28 BI/NAP1/027 isolates. Our data confirm that significant variation exists in the rate at which different C. difficile strains form spores. However, we clearly show that the sporulation rate of the BI/NAP1/027 type was no higher than that of non-BI/NAP1/027 strains. In addition, we observed substantial variation in sporulation characteristics within the BI/NAP1/027 type. This work highlights the danger of assuming that all strains of one type behave similarly without studying adequate sample sizes. Furthermore, we stress the need for more rigorous experimental procedures in order to quantify C. difficile sporulation more accurately in the future.

  10. Metagenomic analysis of buffalo rumen microbiome: Effect of roughage diet on Dormancy and Sporulation genes

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, K.M.; Reddy, B; Patel, A K; H. Panchasara; Parmar, N.; Patel, A.B.; T.M. Shah; V.D. Bhatt; Joshi, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Buffalo rumen microbiome experiences a variety of diet stress and represents reservoir of Dormancy and Sporulation genes. However, the information on genomic responses to such conditions is very limited. The Ion Torrent PGM next generation sequencing technology was used to characterize general microbial diversity and the repertoire of microbial genes present, including genes associated with Dormancy and Sporulation in Mehsani buffalo rumen metagenome. The research findings revealed the abunda...

  11. σK of Clostridium acetobutylicum is the first known sporulation-specific sigma factor with two developmentally separated roles, one early and one late in sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2014-01-01

    Sporulation in the model endospore-forming organism Bacillus subtilis proceeds via the sequential and stage-specific activation of the sporulation-specific sigma factors, σ(H) (early), σ(F), σ(E), σ(G), and σ(K) (late). Here we show that the Clostridium acetobutylicum σ(K) acts both early, prior to Spo0A expression, and late, past σ(G) activation, thus departing from the B. subtilis model. The C. acetobutylicum sigK deletion (ΔsigK) mutant was unable to sporulate, and solventogenesis, the characteristic stationary-phase phenomenon for this organism, was severely diminished. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the ΔsigK mutant does not develop an asymmetric septum and produces no granulose. Complementation of sigK restored sporulation and solventogenesis to wild-type levels. Spo0A and σ(G) proteins were not detectable by Western analysis, while σ(F) protein levels were significantly reduced in the ΔsigK mutant. spo0A, sigF, sigE, sigG, spoIIE, and adhE1 transcript levels were all downregulated in the ΔsigK mutant, while those of the sigH transcript were unaffected during the exponential and transitional phases of culture. These data show that σ(K) is necessary for sporulation prior to spo0A expression. Plasmid-based expression of spo0A in the ΔsigK mutant from a nonnative promoter restored solventogenesis and the production of Spo0A, σ(F), σ(E), and σ(G), but not sporulation, which was blocked past the σ(G) stage of development, thus demonstrating that σ(K) is also necessary in late sporulation. sigK is expressed very early at low levels in exponential phase but is strongly upregulated during the middle to late stationary phase. This is the first sporulation-specific sigma factor shown to have two developmentally separated roles.

  12. Kefiran antagonizes cytopathic effects of Bacillus cereus extracellular factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Micaela; Pérez, Pablo Fernando; Abraham, Analía Graciela

    2008-02-29

    Kefiran, the polysaccharide produced by microorganisms present in kefir grains, is a water-soluble branched glucogalactan containing equal amounts of D-glucose and D-galactose. In this study, the effect of kefiran on the biological activity of Bacillus cereus strain B10502 extracellular factors was assessed by using cultured human enterocytes (Caco-2 cells) and human erythrocytes. In the presence of kefiran concentrations ranging from 300 to 1000 mg/L, the ability of B. cereus B10502 spent culture supernatants to detach and damage cultured human enterocytes was significantly abrogated. In addition, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity was higher when kefiran was present during the cell toxicity assays. Protection was also demonstrated in hemolysis and apoptosis/necrosis assays. Scanning electron microscopy showed the protective effect of kefiran against structural cell damages produced by factors synthesized by B. cereus strain B10502. Protective effect of kefiran depended on strain of B. cereus. Our findings demonstrate the ability of kefiran to antagonize key events of B. cereus B10502 virulence. This property, although strain-specific, gives new perspectives for the role of bacterial exopolysaccharides in functional foods.

  13. Two-component signal transduction in Bacillus cereus and closely related bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, de M.W.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive pathogen that is recognised as an important cause of food-borne disease worldwide. Within the genus Bacillus, B. cereus and its closest relatives form a homogeneous subdivision that has been termed the B. cereus group. This group includes B. anthracis, a pathogen

  14. Fine tuning of the Bacillus cereus stress respons: role of transcriptional regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, van der M.

    2008-01-01

    The bacterium Bacillus cereus is able to survive and grow in a high diversity of environments, including foods, such as milk and pasta. Consequently, B. cereus can cause foodborne illnesses and food spoilage. During its time in food B. cereus encounters many changes in its environment, as the food

  15. Genomic study of the cereolysin A and B genes in Bacillus cereus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacillus cereus spores are expanded in the nature and they can be separated from different foods. Cytotoxin is one of the most important poisons which is produced by Bacillus cereus, and it is highly resistant to heat and leads to diarrhea, nausea and vomiting syndrome. Hence study about existence of Bacillus cereus in ...

  16. Roles of the DYRK kinase Pom2 in cytokinesis, mitochondrial morphology, and sporulation in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Wu

    Full Text Available Pom2 is predicted to be a dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase (DYRK related to Pom1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. DYRKs share a kinase domain capable of catalyzing autophosphorylation on tyrosine and exogenous phosphorylation on serine/threonine residues. Here we show that Pom2 is functionally different from the well-characterized Pom1, although they share 55% identity in the kinase domain and the Pom2 kinase domain functionally complements that of Pom1. Pom2 localizes to mitochondria throughout the cell cycle and to the contractile ring during late stages of cytokinesis. Overexpression but not deletion of pom2 results in severe defects in cytokinesis, indicating that Pom2 might share an overlapping function with other proteins in regulating cytokinesis. Gain and loss of function analyses reveal that Pom2 is required for maintaining mitochondrial morphology independently of microtubules. Intriguingly, most meiotic pom2Δ cells form aberrant asci with meiotic and/or forespore membrane formation defects. Taken together, Pom2 is a novel DYRK kinase involved in regulating cytokinesis, mitochondrial morphology, meiosis, and sporulation in fission yeast.

  17. [Incidence of Bacillus cereus in powdered dehydrated food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacona, V A; Simonetta, A; Basílico, J C

    1987-01-01

    Bacillus cereus incidence on dehydrated powdered foods on sale in supermarkets of Santa Fe city was studied. Two hundred and fifty samples of five different foods: desserts, soups, mousses, pre-cooked "polenta" and mashed potatoes, were examined. Toxinogenic activity of strains confirmed as B. cereus by means of the test of lethality in rats, was analyzed. The ratio between contaminated samples and total analyzed samples was always greater than 6% (Table 1). Besides, none of the analyzed foods exceeded acceptability maximum limit (10(5) UFC/g), established by I.C.M.S.F. (Table 2). It was checked in all cases that no simple lineal correlation existed between B. cereus and total aerobic bacteria enumerations. On the other hand, the percentage of strains with lethal effects was in all cases greater than 42.8% (Table 3).

  18. The Bacillus cereus spoIIS programmed cell death system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eMelnicakova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death in bacteria is generally associated with two¬ component toxin antitoxin systems. The SpoIIS toxin-antitoxin system, consisting of a membrane bound SpoIISA toxin and a small, cytosolic antitoxin SpoIISB, was originally identified in Bacillus subtilis. In this work we describe the Bacillus cereus SpoIIS system which is a three-component system, harbouring an additional gene spoIISC. Its protein product serves as an antitoxin, and similarly as SpoIISB, is able to bind SpoIISA and abolish its toxic effect. Our results indicate that SpoIISC seems to be present not only in B. cereus but also in other Bacilli containing a SpoIIS toxin antitoxin system. In addition, we show that B. cereus SpoIISA can form higher oligomers and we discuss the possible role of this multimerization for the protein’s toxic function.

  19. Food – bacteria interplay: Pathometabolism of emetic Bacillus cereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika eEhling-Schulz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a gram-positive endospore forming bacterium known for its wide spectrum of phenotypic traits, enabling it to occupy diverse ecological niches. Although the population structure of B. cereus is highly dynamic and rather panmictic, production of the emetic B. cereus toxin cereulide is restricted to strains with specific genotypic traits, associated with distinct environmental habitats. Cereulide is an ionophoric dodecadepsipeptide that is produced non-ribosomally by an enzyme complex with an unusual modular structure, named cereulide synthetase (Ces NRPS. The ces gene locus is encoded on a mega virulence plasmid related to the Bacillus anthracis toxin plasmid pXO1. Cereulide, a highly thermo- and pH- resistant molecule, is preformed in food, evokes vomiting a few hours after ingestion and was shown to be the direct cause of gastroenteritis symptoms; occasionally it is implicated in severe clinical manifestations including acute liver failures. Control of toxin gene expression in emetic Bacillus cereus involves central transcriptional regulators, such as CodY and AbrB, thereby inextricably linking toxin gene expression to life cycle phases and specific conditions, such as the nutrient supply encountered in food matrices. While in recent years considerable progress has been made in the molecular and biochemical characterization of cereulide toxin synthesis, far less is known about the embedment of toxin synthesis in the life cycle of B. cereus. Information about signals acting on toxin production in the food environment is literally lacking. We summarize the data available on the complex regulatory network controlling cereulide toxin synthesis, discuss the role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors acting on toxin biosynthesis in emetic B. cereus and stress how unraveling these processes can lead to the development of novel effective strategies to prevent toxin synthesis in the food production and processing chain.

  20. Food–bacteria interplay: pathometabolism of emetic Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Frenzel, Elrike; Gohar, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive endospore forming bacterium known for its wide spectrum of phenotypic traits, enabling it to occupy diverse ecological niches. Although the population structure of B. cereus is highly dynamic and rather panmictic, production of the emetic B. cereus toxin cereulide is restricted to strains with specific genotypic traits, associated with distinct environmental habitats. Cereulide is an ionophoric dodecadepsipeptide that is produced non-ribosomally by an enzyme complex with an unusual modular structure, named cereulide synthetase (Ces non-ribosomal peptide synthetase). The ces gene locus is encoded on a mega virulence plasmid related to the B. anthracis toxin plasmid pXO1. Cereulide, a highly thermo- and pH- resistant molecule, is preformed in food, evokes vomiting a few hours after ingestion, and was shown to be the direct cause of gastroenteritis symptoms; occasionally it is implicated in severe clinical manifestations including acute liver failures. Control of toxin gene expression in emetic B. cereus involves central transcriptional regulators, such as CodY and AbrB, thereby inextricably linking toxin gene expression to life cycle phases and specific conditions, such as the nutrient supply encountered in food matrices. While in recent years considerable progress has been made in the molecular and biochemical characterization of cereulide toxin synthesis, far less is known about the embedment of toxin synthesis in the life cycle of B. cereus. Information about signals acting on toxin production in the food environment is lacking. We summarize the data available on the complex regulatory network controlling cereulide toxin synthesis, discuss the role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors acting on toxin biosynthesis in emetic B. cereus and stress how unraveling these processes can lead to the development of novel effective strategies to prevent toxin synthesis in the food production and processing chain. PMID:26236290

  1. Cloning and expression of vgb gene in Bacillus cereus, improve phenol and p-nitrophenol biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Lee, Angel Eduardo; Cordova-Lozano, Felipe; Bandala, Erick R.; Sanchez-Salas, Jose Luis

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the vgb gene from Vitrocilla stercoraria was used to genetically modify a Bacillus cereus strain isolated from pulp and paper wastewater effluent. The gene was cloned in a multicopy plasmid (pUB110) or uni-copy gene using a chromosome integrative vector (pTrpBG1). B. cereus and its recombinant strains were used for phenol and p-nitrophenol biodegradation using aerobic or micro-aerobic conditions and two different temperatures (i.e. 37 and 25 °C). Complete (100%) phenol degradation was obtained for the strain where the multicopy of vgb gene was present, 98% for the strain where uni-copy gene was present and 45% for wild type strain for the same experimental conditions (i.e. 37 °C and aerobic condition). For p-nitrophenol degradation at the same conditions, the strain with the multi-copy vgb gene was capable to achieve 50% of biodegradation, ˜100% biodegradation was obtained using the uni-copy strain and ˜24% for wild type strain. When the micro-aerobic condition was tested, the biodegradation yield showed a significant decreased. The biodegradation trend observed for aerobic was similar for micro-aerobic assessments: the modified strains showed higher degradation rates when compared with wild type strain. For all experimental conditions, the highest p-nitrophenol degradation was observed using the strain with uni-copy of vgb gene. Besides the increase of biodegradative capability of the strain, insertion of the vgb gene was observed able to modify other morphological characteristics such as avoiding the typical flake formation in the B. cereus culture. In both cases, the modification seems to be related with the enhancement of oxygen supply to the cells generated by the vgb gene insertion. The application of the genetically modified microorganism (GMM) to the biodegradation of pollutants in contaminated water possesses high potential as an environmentally friendly technology to facing this emergent problem.

  2. [Can industrial laundry remove Bacillus cereus from hospital linen?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoh, Myonsun; Matsuyama, Junko; Shime, Akiko; Okayama, Kana; Sakamoto, Rei; Honda, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    Contaminated hospital linen has caused some cases of Bacillus cereus bacteremia in Japan. We analyzed the disinfection efficacy of industrial washing of hospital towels and sheets by counting the number of B. cereus on linen before and after washing. That before washing averaged 7.6 cells/cm2 on unwashed sheets, decreasing to 1.2 cells/cm2 after washing. That on unwashed towels, however, averaged 10(6) cells/cm2 before washing and 1096 cells/cm2 after washing, which was very high and suggested the possibility of causing nosocomial infection.

  3. An Optical Biosensor for Bacillus Cereus Spore Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengquan; Tom, Harry W. K.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate a new transduction scheme for optical biosensing. Bacillus cereus is a pathogen that may be found in food and dairy products and is able to produce toxins and cause food poisoning. It is related to Bacillus anthracis (anthrax). A CCD array covered with micro-structured glass coverslip is used to detect the optical resonant shift due to the binding of the antigen (bacillus cereus spore) to the antibody (polyclonal antibody). This novel optical biosensor scheme has the potential for detecting 10˜100 bioagents in a single device as well as the potential to test for antigens with multiple antibody tests to avoid ``false positives.''

  4. Increasing the alkaline protease activity of Bacillus cereus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-09

    May 9, 2011 ... These examinations showed that, the production of alkaline protease started with the beginning of the log phase in the ... sporulation phase of the two bacteria and were measured at 383 and 418 u/ml, respectively. The next ..... building blocks of specific spore proteins, peptides and amino acids, from.

  5. Myb transcription factors and light regulate sporulation in the oomycete Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Qijun; Judelson, Howard S

    2014-01-01

    Life cycle progression in eukaryotic microbes is often influenced by environment. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, which causes late blight on potato and tomato, sporangia have been reported to form mostly at night. By growing P. infestans under different light regimes at constant temperature and humidity, we show that light contributes to the natural pattern of sporulation by delaying sporulation until the following dark period. However, illumination does not permanently block sporulation or strongly affect the total number of sporangia that ultimately form. Based on measurements of sporulation-induced genes such as those encoding protein kinase Pks1 and Myb transcription factors Myb2R1 and Myb2R3, it appears that most spore-associated transcripts start to rise four to eight hours before sporangia appear. Their mRNA levels oscillate with the light/dark cycle and increase with the amount of sporangia. An exception to this pattern of expression is Myb2R4, which is induced several hours before the other genes and declines after cultures start to sporulate. Transformants over-expressing Myb2R4 produce twice the number of sporangia and ten-fold higher levels of Myb2R1 mRNA than wild-type, and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Myb2R4 binds the Myb2R1 promoter in vivo. Myb2R4 thus appears to be an early regulator of sporulation. We attempted to silence eight Myb genes by DNA-directed RNAi, but succeeded only with Myb2R3, which resulted in suppressed sporulation. Ectopic expression studies of seven Myb genes revealed that over-expression frequently impaired vegetative growth, and in the case of Myb3R6 interfered with sporangia dormancy. We observed that the degree of silencing induced by a hairpin construct was correlated with its copy number, and ectopic expression was often unstable due to epigenetic silencing and transgene excision.

  6. Myb transcription factors and light regulate sporulation in the oomycete Phytophthora infestans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijun Xiang

    Full Text Available Life cycle progression in eukaryotic microbes is often influenced by environment. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, which causes late blight on potato and tomato, sporangia have been reported to form mostly at night. By growing P. infestans under different light regimes at constant temperature and humidity, we show that light contributes to the natural pattern of sporulation by delaying sporulation until the following dark period. However, illumination does not permanently block sporulation or strongly affect the total number of sporangia that ultimately form. Based on measurements of sporulation-induced genes such as those encoding protein kinase Pks1 and Myb transcription factors Myb2R1 and Myb2R3, it appears that most spore-associated transcripts start to rise four to eight hours before sporangia appear. Their mRNA levels oscillate with the light/dark cycle and increase with the amount of sporangia. An exception to this pattern of expression is Myb2R4, which is induced several hours before the other genes and declines after cultures start to sporulate. Transformants over-expressing Myb2R4 produce twice the number of sporangia and ten-fold higher levels of Myb2R1 mRNA than wild-type, and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Myb2R4 binds the Myb2R1 promoter in vivo. Myb2R4 thus appears to be an early regulator of sporulation. We attempted to silence eight Myb genes by DNA-directed RNAi, but succeeded only with Myb2R3, which resulted in suppressed sporulation. Ectopic expression studies of seven Myb genes revealed that over-expression frequently impaired vegetative growth, and in the case of Myb3R6 interfered with sporangia dormancy. We observed that the degree of silencing induced by a hairpin construct was correlated with its copy number, and ectopic expression was often unstable due to epigenetic silencing and transgene excision.

  7. Clonostachys rosea reduces spot blotch in barley by inhibiting prepenetration growth and sporulation of Bipolaris sorokiniana without inducing resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birgit; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen; Jørgensen, Hans J.L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several diseases threaten cereal production and fungicides are therefore widely used. Biological control is an environmentally friendly alternative and the fungus Clonostachys rosea is a versatile antagonist, effective against several plant diseases. We studied the ability of C. rosea...... to control barley leaf pathogens and the mechanisms behind the inhibition emphasising induced resistance. RESULTS: Under controlled conditions, spray application of C. rosea isolate IK726 to barley leaves reduced Bipolaris sorokiniana severity up to 70% when applied 24 h before or simultaneously...... as the pathogen, whereas application 24 h after the pathogen had no effect. IK726 also reduced the sporulation capacity of B. sorokiniana. Microscopy of B. sorokiniana infection revealed that IK726 primarily inhibited conidial germination and appressorium formation while further pathogen development and host...

  8. Growth of Bacillus cereus isolated from some traditional condiments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the B. cereus isolates had their highest growth at 10% concentration of monosodium glutamate and the lowest at 40% but their growth pattern in NaCl is strain dependent with optimum growth between 7 and 9% NaCl concentration, and as the time of exposure to ultraviolet light increased the growth decreased.

  9. Characterization of germination receptors of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornstra, L.M.; Vries, de Y.P.; Wells-Bennik, M.H.J.; Vos, de W.M.; Abee, T.

    2006-01-01

    Specific amino acids, purine ribonucleosides, or a combination of the two is required for efficient germination of endospores of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. A survey including 20 different amino acids showed that L-alanine, L-cysteine, L-threonine, and L-glutamine are capable of initiating the

  10. The fate of Bacillus cereus in the gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pielaat A; Wijnands LM; Takumi K; Nauta MJ; van Leusden FM; MGB

    2006-01-01

    Dit rapport presenteert een wiskundig dynamisch model waarmee het gedrag van Bacillus cereus in het maag-darmkanaal beschreven wordt. Microbiologische processen en processen in het maag/darmkanaal vormen samen de basis voor dit mechanistische model. Variabiliteit in groeikarakteristieken en

  11. Antimicrobial activity of carvacrol toward Bacillus cereus on rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, A.; Slump, R.A.; Steging, G.; Smid, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of carvacrol, a compound present in the essential oil fraction of oreganum and thyme, toward the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus on rice was studied. Carvacrol showed a dose-related inhibition of growth of the pathogen. Concentrations of 0.15 mg/g and higher inhibited

  12. Bioenergetic consequences of nisin combined with carvacrol towards Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, I.E.; Krommer, J.; Smid, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of a combination of nisin and carvacrol on the membrane potential, the pH gradient and the intracellular ATP pools of vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus. Both the membrane potential and the pH gradient were dissipated by nisin and carvacrol. The intracellular ATP

  13. Germination of Bacillus cereus spores : the role of germination receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornstra, L.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group forms a highly homogeneous subdivision of the genus Bacillus and comprises several species that are relevant for humans. Notorious is Bacillus anthracis, the cause of the often-lethal disease anthrax, while the insect pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis is of

  14. Induction of natural competence in Bacillus cereus ATCC14579

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mironczuk, Aleksandra M.; Kovács, Ákos T.; Kuipers, O.P.

    Natural competence is the ability of certain microbes to take up exogenous DNA from the environment and integrate it in their genome. Competence development has been described for a variety of bacteria, but has so far not been shown to occur in Bacillus cereus. However, orthologues of most proteins

  15. Growth of Bacillus cereus isolated from some traditional condiments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... Majority of the isolates fermented glucose, inulin and fructose while most of the isolates fermented mannitol. All the isolates that were later identified as B. cereus did not ferment mannitol and arabinose (Table 1). The frequency and occurrence of Bacillus species isolated from condiments are shown in ...

  16. Purification and characterization of protease from Bacillus cereus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifteen strains of bacteria were isolated from oyster S. cucullata and screened for secretion of protease on casein agar plates. Among them, SU12 isolate was selected due to its high enzyme production capacity and was identified as B. cereus SU12 on the basis of its morphological, biochemical and 16S rDNA properties.

  17. [Bacillus cereus endocarditis and a probable cutaneous gateway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudet, S; Becquart, C; Dezoteux, F; Faure, K; Staumont-Salle, D; Delaporte, E

    2017-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous telluric organism. B. cereus endocarditis is a rare condition seen mostly in prosthetic heart valves and among intravenous drug users. We report a new case of a patient without risk factors and with a good clinical outcome not requiring valve replacement. In October 2014, a 50-year-old woman was referred to the dermatology department of Lille University Hospital for lower-limb wounds developing 6 months earlier. She presented fever without clinical signs of infection, except for the lower-limbs wounds. Blood cultures revealed the presence of B. cereus. Transesophageal echocardiography was performed and revealed two foci of aortic valve vegetation with a diameter of 5mm. After bacterial sensitivity testing, rifampicin and levofloxacin treatment was given for six weeks, with complete remission. A skin graft was performed and good improvement was seen. Nineteen cases of B. cereus endocarditis have been described previously, only one of which was without risk factors. We described a case of complete remission after a 6-week course of antibiotics. Our case demonstrates that BC should not be considered as a blood culture contamination, and that treatment may be complex due to antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of Environmental Factors on Conidial Germination, Sporulation and Growth of Trichoderma harzianum In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Wibowo

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to study the influence of temperature, pH of media, and length of radiaton on conidial germination, sporulation and growth of Trichoderma harzianum on PDA (Potato Dextrose Agar. It was conducted in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD with 3 replications. The results indicated that the highest conidial germination occurred at 30°C, and so the sporulation and the growth of T. harzianum. Length of radiation did not significantly affect conidial germination. However sporulation was enhanced by 12 hrs light-12 hrs dark treatment and colony diameter of T. harzianum was significantly greater at dark. Acidity influenced mainly the conidial germination and the sporulation of T. harzianum. The greatest of conidial germination occurred at pH 8, whereas the smallest occurred at pH 5. Sporulation was also enhanced by higher pH. The influence of acidity on the growth of T. harzianum occurred at pH 9 which its diameter colony was significantly smaller compared to the other treatments.

  19. In vitro activity of natural and chemical products on sporulation of Eimeria species oocysts of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelhaq, Sahar M; Arafa, Waleed M; Abolhadid, Shawky M

    2018-02-15

    This study was designed to investigate the ability of two herbal extracts and different chemical substances to inhibit or disrupt sporulation of Eimeria species oocysts of the chickens. The two herbal extracts were Allium sativum (garlic) and Moringa olifiera while the chemical substances included commercial disinfectants and diclazuril. Field isolates of Eimeria oocysts were propagated in chickens to obtain a continuous source of oocysts. The collected unsporulated oocysts (10 5 oocysts/5 ml) were dispensed into 5 cm Petri dish. Three replicates were used for each treatment. The treated oocysts were incubated for 48 h at 25-29 °C and 80% relative humidity. The results showed that herbal extracts, the commercial recommended dose of Dettol, TH4, Phenol, Virkon ® S, and Diclazuril 20% have no effect on the sporulation. While Sodium hypochlorite showed a significant degree of sporulation inhibition reached to 49.67%. Moreover, 70% ethanol, and 10% formalin showed 100% sporulation inhibition. It was concluded that 70% ethanol and 10% formalin are the most effective methods to inhibit Eimeria species sporulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin of Bacillus cereus induces apoptosis in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoye; Ding, Shuangyang; Shi, Peijie; Dietrich, Richard; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Zhu, Kui

    2017-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic pathogen that often causes foodborne infectious diseases and food poisoning. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe) is the major toxin found in almost all enteropathogenic B. cereus and B. thuringiensis isolates. However, little is known about the cellular response after Nhe triggered pore formation on cell membrane. Here, we demonstrate that Nhe induced cell cycle arrest at G 0 /G 1 phase and provoked apoptosis in Vero cells, most likely associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and death receptor pathways. The influx of extracellular calcium ions and increased level of reactive oxygen species in cytoplasm were sensed by apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and p38 MAPK. Extrinsic death receptor Fas could also promote the activation of p38 MAPK. Subsequently, ASK1 and p38 MAPK triggered downstream caspase-8 and 3 to initiate apoptosis. Our results clearly demonstrate that ASK1, and Fas-p38 MAPK-mediated caspase-8 dependent pathways are involved in apoptotic cell death provoked by the pore-forming enterotoxin Nhe. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. YwdL in Bacillus cereus: its role in germination and exosporium structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra Terry

    Full Text Available In members of the Bacillus cereus group the outermost layer of the spore is the exosporium, which interacts with hosts and the environment. Efforts have been made to identify proteins of the exosporium but only a few have so far been characterised and their role in determining spore architecture and spore function is still poorly understood. We have characterised the exosporium protein, YwdL. ΔywdL spores have a more fragile exosporium, subject to damage on repeated freeze-thawing, although there is no evidence of altered resistance properties, and coats appear intact. Immunogold labelling and Western blotting with anti-YwdL antibodies identified YwdL to be located exclusively on the inner surface of the exosporium of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. We conclude that YwdL is important for formation of a robust exosporium but is not required to maintain the crystalline assembly within the basal layer or for attachment of the hairy nap structure. ΔywdL spores are unable to germinate in response to CaDPA, and have altered germination properties, a phenotype that confirms the expected defect in localization of the cortex lytic enzyme CwlJ in the coat.

  2. Pan-genome and phylogeny of Bacillus cereus sensu lato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazinet, Adam L

    2017-08-02

    Bacillus cereus sensu lato (s. l.) is an ecologically diverse bacterial group of medical and agricultural significance. In this study, I use publicly available genomes and novel bioinformatic workflows to characterize the B. cereus s. l. pan-genome and perform the largest phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of this group to date in terms of the number of genes and taxa included. With these fundamental data in hand, I identify genes associated with particular phenotypic traits (i.e., "pan-GWAS" analysis), and quantify the degree to which taxa sharing common attributes are phylogenetically clustered. A rapid k-mer based approach (Mash) was used to create reduced representations of selected Bacillus genomes, and a fast distance-based phylogenetic analysis of this data (FastME) was performed to determine which species should be included in B. cereus s. l. The complete genomes of eight B. cereus s. l. species were annotated de novo with Prokka, and these annotations were used by Roary to produce the B. cereus s. l. pan-genome. Scoary was used to associate gene presence and absence patterns with various phenotypes. The orthologous protein sequence clusters produced by Roary were filtered and used to build HaMStR databases of gene models that were used in turn to construct phylogenetic data matrices. Phylogenetic analyses used RAxML, DendroPy, ClonalFrameML, PAUP*, and SplitsTree. Bayesian model-based population genetic analysis assigned taxa to clusters using hierBAPS. The genealogical sorting index was used to quantify the phylogenetic clustering of taxa sharing common attributes. The B. cereus s. l. pan-genome currently consists of ≈60,000 genes, ≈600 of which are "core" (common to at least 99% of taxa sampled). Pan-GWAS analysis revealed genes associated with phenotypes such as isolation source, oxygen requirement, and ability to cause diseases such as anthrax or food poisoning. Extensive phylogenetic analyses using an unprecedented amount of data

  3. Subcellular localization of a sporulation membrane protein is achieved through a network of interactions along and across the septum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Thierry; Marquis, Kathleen A; Rudner, David Z

    2005-03-01

    During the process of spore formation in Bacillus subtilis many membrane proteins localize to the sporulation septum where they play key roles in morphogenesis and cell-cell signalling. However, the mechanism by which these proteins are anchored at this site is not understood. In this report we have defined the localization requirements for the mother-cell membrane protein SpoIVFA, which anchors a signalling complex in the septal membrane on the mother cell side. We have identified five proteins (SpoIID, SpoIIP, SpoIIM, BofA and SpoIIIAH) synthesized in the mother cell under the control of sigma(E) and one protein (SpoIIQ) synthesized in the forespore under the control of sigma(F) that are all required for the proper localization of SpoIVFA. Surprisingly, these proteins appear to have complementary and overlapping anchoring roles suggesting that SpoIVFA is localized in the septal membrane through a web of protein interactions. Furthermore, we demonstrate a direct biochemical interaction between the extracellular domains of two of the proteins required to anchor SpoIVFA: the forespore protein SpoIIQ and the mother-cell protein SpoIIIAH. This result supports the idea that the web of interactions that anchors SpoIVFA is itself held in the septal membrane through a zipper-like interaction across the sporulation septum. Importantly, our results suggest that a second mechanism independent of forespore proteins participates in anchoring SpoIVFA. Finally, we show that the dynamic localization of SpoIIQ in the forespore is impaired in the absence of SpoIVFA but not SpoIIIAH. Thus, a complex web of interactions among mother cell and forespore proteins is responsible for static and dynamic protein localization in both compartments of the sporangium. We envision that this proposed network is involved in anchoring other sporulation proteins in the septum and that protein networks with overlapping anchoring capacity is a feature of protein localization in all bacteria.

  4. Growth, sporulation, delta-endotoxins synthesis, and toxicity during culture of bacillus thuringiensis H14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafzadeh, Mohammad H; Guiraud, Joseph P; Lagneau, Christophe; Gaven, Bruno; Carron, Alexandre; Navarro, Jean-Marie

    2005-08-01

    Growth, sporulation, synthesis of delta-endotoxins, and toxicity against the larvae of Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens were studied during fermentation of Bacillus thuringiensis H14 in a 20-L fermentor. Measurements of optical density and dielectric permittivity for biomass determination suggest a highly promising technique for on-line evaluation of sporulation. The synthesis of 65-, 25- and 130-kDa proteins started at 16, 18, and 23 h, respectively. These proteins were enriched in different ways until the end of culture (48 h). Toxicity in the course of sporulation was significantly different for the larvae of both mosquito species. Maximal activity against Ae. aegypti was obtained at the end of culture, whereas for Cx. pipiens, the sample at 38 h was the most active.

  5. Sporulation of Bacillus spp. within biofilms: a potential source of contamination in food processing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faille, C; Bénézech, T; Midelet-Bourdin, G; Lequette, Y; Clarisse, M; Ronse, G; Ronse, A; Slomianny, C

    2014-06-01

    Bacillus strains are often isolated from biofilms in the food industries. Previous works have demonstrated that sporulation could occur in biofilms, suggesting that biofilms would be a significant source of food contamination with spores. In this study, we investigated the properties of mono-species and mixed Bacillus biofilms and the ability of Bacillus strains to sporulate inside biofilms. Bacillus strains were able to form mono-species biofilms on stainless steel coupons, with up to 90% spores after a 48 h-incubation. These spores were highly resistant to cleaning but were easily transferred to agar, mimicking the cross-contamination of food, thereby suggesting that biofilms would be of particular concern due to a potential for Bacillus spore food contamination. This hypothesis was strengthened by the fact that Bacillus strains were able to form mixed biofilms with resident strains and that sporulation still occurred easily in these complex structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus.

  7. Corrosion effect of Bacillus cereus on X80 pipeline steel in a Beijing soil environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hongxia; Song, Dongdong; Zhang, Dawei; Du, Cuiwei; Xu, Dake; Liu, Zhiyong; Ding, De; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-12-24

    The corrosion of X80 pipeline steel in the presence of Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) was studied through electrochemical and surface analyses and live/dead staining. Scanning electron microscopy and live/dead straining results showed that a number of B. cereus adhered to the X80 steel. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that B. cereus could accelerate the corrosion of X80 steel. In addition, surface morphology observations indicated that B. cereus could accelerate pitting corrosion in X80 steel. The depth of the largest pits due to B. cereus was approximately 11.23μm. Many pits were found on the U-shaped bents and cracks formed under stress after 60days of immersion in the presence of B. cereus. These indicate that pitting corrosion can be accelerated by B. cereus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results revealed that NH 4 + existed on the surface of X80 steel. B. cereus is a type of nitrate-reducing bacteria and hence the corrosion mechanism of B. cereus may involve nitrate reduction on the X80 steel. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of growth and sporulation of Penicillium expansum by extracts of selected Basidiomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Florianowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A screening of antifungal activity of 33 Basidiomycetes strains was realized with their extracts. The influence of aqueous extracts of fruit-bodies of the testeded fungi after addition of spores or hyphae of Penicillium expansum on growth and sporulation of the fitopathogen in vitro was estimated. The species: Hydnum repandum L.: Fr., Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr. Kummer, Coprinus comatus (Műll Fr. S.F. Gray, Coprinus atramentarius (Bull: Fr. Fr. and Lactarius turpis (Weinm. Fr. reduced the mycelial growth and inhibited sporulation of this pathogen.

  9. Polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of Bacillus cereus group cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Leser, Thomas D.; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse

    2001-01-01

    of the B. cereus group in food and in the environment. Using 16S rDNA as target, a PCR assay for the detection of B. cereus group cells has been developed. Primers specific for the 16S rDNA of the B. cereus group bacteria were selected and used in combination with consensus primers for 165 rDNA as internal...... PCR procedure control. The PCR procedure was optimized with respect to annealing temperature. When DNA from the B. cereus group bacteria was present, the PCR assay yielded a B. cereus specific fragment, while when non-B. cereus prokaryotic DNA was present, the consensus 165 rDNA primers directed...

  10. Naphthalene degradation and biosurfactant activity by Bacillus cereus 28BN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuleva, B.; Christova, N. [Inst. of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Jordanov, B.; Nikolova-Damyanova, B. [Inst. of Organic Chemistry, Sofia (Bulgaria); Petrov, P. [National Center of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2005-08-01

    Biosurfactant activity and naphthalene degradation by a new strain identified as Bacillus cereus 28BN were studied. The strain grew well and produced effective biosurfactants in the presence of n-alkanes, naphthalene, crude oil and vegetable oils. The biosurfactants were detected by the surface tension lowering of the medium, thin layer chromatography and infrared spectra analysis. With (2%) naphthalene as the sole carbon source, high levels of rhamnolipids at a concentration of 2.3 g l{sup -1} were determined in the stationary growth. After 20 d of incubation 72 {+-} 4% of the initial naphthalene was degraded. This is the first report for a Bacillus cereus rhamnolipid producing strain that utilized naphthalene under aerobic conditions. The strain looks promising for application in environmental technologies. (orig.)

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a phosphopentomutase from Bacillus cereus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panosian, Timothy D.; Nannemann, David P.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, T.M. (Vanderbilt)

    2013-09-18

    Phosphopentomutases (PPMs) interconvert D-ribose 5-phosphate and {alpha}-D-ribose 1-phosphate to link glucose and nucleotide metabolism. PPM from Bacillus cereus was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized. Bacterial PPMs are predicted to contain a di-metal reaction center, but the catalytically relevant metal has not previously been identified. Sparse-matrix crystallization screening was performed in the presence or absence of 50 mM MnCl{sub 2}. This strategy resulted in the formation of two crystal forms from two chemically distinct conditions. The crystals that formed with 50 mM MnCl{sub 2} were more easily manipulated and diffracted to higher resolution. These results suggest that even if the catalytically relevant metal is not known, the crystallization of putative metalloproteins may still benefit from supplementation of the crystallization screens with potential catalytic metals.

  12. Regulation of cellulase expression, sporulation, and morphogenesis by velvet family proteins in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuimei; Dong, Yanmei; Wang, Fangzhong; Jiang, Baojie; Wang, Mingyu; Fang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Homologs of the velvet protein family are encoded by the ve1, vel2, and vel3 genes in Trichoderma reesei. To test their regulatory functions, the velvet protein-coding genes were disrupted, generating Δve1, Δvel2, and Δvel3 strains. The phenotypic features of these strains were examined to identify their functions in morphogenesis, sporulation, and cellulase expression. The three velvet-deficient strains produced more hyphal branches, indicating that velvet family proteins participate in the morphogenesis in T. reesei. Deletion of ve1 and vel3 did not affect biomass accumulation, while deletion of vel2 led to a significantly hampered growth when cellulose was used as the sole carbon source in the medium. The deletion of either ve1 or vel2 led to the sharp decrease of sporulation as well as a global downregulation of cellulase-coding genes. In contrast, although the expression of cellulase-coding genes of the ∆vel3 strain was downregulated in the dark, their expression in light condition was unaffected. Sporulation was hampered in the ∆vel3 strain. These results suggest that Ve1 and Vel2 play major roles, whereas Vel3 plays a minor role in sporulation, morphogenesis, and cellulase expression.

  13. Effect of plant sterols and tannins on Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel A. Stong; Eli Kolodny; Rick G. Kelsey; M.P. Gonzalez-Hernandez; Jorge M. Vivanco; Daniel K. Manter

    2013-01-01

    Elicitin-mediated acquisition of plant sterols is required for growth and sporulation of Phytophthora spp. This study examined the interactions between elicitins, sterols, and tannins. Ground leaf tissue, sterols, and tannin-enriched extracts were obtained from three different plant species (California bay laurel, California black oak, and Oregon...

  14. Sporulation and Germination patterns - hedging a bet on long term microbial survivability in dry soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, N.; Or, D.

    2012-04-01

    Soil hosts unparalleled diversity of microbial life that is constantly challenged by the vagaries of fluctuating ambient conditions. Desiccation stresses play a key role not only by directly affecting individual bacterial cells, but also by shaping diffusion pathways and cell dispersion. The gradual thinning and fragmentation of the aqueous environment during drying have led to different survival mechanisms including dormancy and sporulation, resulting in a highly resistive state capable of surviving extreme and prolonged environmental stresses until conditions improve in the future. Our aim is to investigate how temporal changes in hydration status shape microbial communities over time, based on simple survival strategy rules for each individual bacterium. The two survival strategies considered are dormancy and sporulation. Dormancy is the state in which bacterial cells significantly reduce their metabolism with minor morphological adaptations. The required energy and time for attaining this state are low relative to sporulation costs. Sporulation involves several morphological and biochemical changes that result in a resistive capsule that endures extreme stresses over long periods of time. The working hypothesis is that different micro-ecological conditions and community compositions would result from temporal patterns and magnitude of desiccation stresses. An Individual Based Model (IBM) considering habitats on rough soil surfaces and local effects of micro-hydrological conditions on dispersion and nutrient diffusion would enable systematic study of emerging communities over extended periods. Different population compositions are expected to emerge based on low and high frequency, duration and amplitudes of wetting-drying cycles reflecting relative success or failure of survival strategy.

  15. SporeWeb : an interactive journey through the complete sporulation cycle of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijlander, Robyn T.; Jong, Anne de; Krawczyk, Antonina O.; Holsappel, Siger; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial spores are a continuous problem for both food-based and health-related industries. Decades of scientific research dedicated towards understanding molecular and gene regulatory aspects of sporulation, spore germination and spore properties have resulted in a wealth of data and information.

  16. Caractérisation morpho-culturale et sporulation chez une population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    culturale des isolats de ce pathogène. Cette étude a ... Mots clés : Maroc, blé, Septoria tritici, milieu de culture, sporulation, caractérisation, polymorphisme. .... L'incubation des cultures est réalisée sur agitateur orbital. (120r/min) 7 ...

  17. Influence of substrates, light, filter paper and pH on the sporulation of Cercospora sojina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Erica Gómez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungi require special substrates for their isolation, vegetative growth and sporulation. In experiments conducted in the laboratory, the influence of substrates, light, filter paper and pH on the sporulation of Cercospora sojina conidia, the causal agent of soybean frogeye leaf spot, was assessed. The media potato sucrose agar, V-8 agar, tomato extract agar, soybean leaf extract agar, soybean seed extract agar, soybean meal agar, soybean flour agar and wheat flour agar were tested, added on the surface, with and without filter paper and under two light regimes, with 12 h light at 25°± 2°C and in the dark. A triple factorial 8x2x2 (substrates x light/dark x with/without filter paper design with four replicates was used. V-8 agar medium was employed and the pH was adjusted with HCl 0.1N or NaOH 0.1N before autoclaving to the values: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8, and the pH of V-8 agar medium is 6.7. The evaluation was done on the seventh day of incubation. Data underwent regression analysis. Sporulation was maximized on the agar media V-8, seed extract, oat flour, tomato extract, and potato sucrose in the presence of filter paper and 12h light. On V-8 medium, maximal sporulation was obtained with pH 6.7.

  18. Temperature exerts control of Bacillus cereus emetic toxin production on post-transcriptional levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Kranzler

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the emetic toxin cereulide, produced by Bacillus cereus, has gained high relevance in food production and food safety. Cereulide is synthesized nonribosomal by the multi-enzyme complex Ces-NRPS, which is encoded on a megaplasmid that shares its backbone with the Bacillus anthracis pX01 toxin plasmid. Due to its resistance against heat, proteolysis and extreme pH conditions, the formation of this highly potent depsipeptide toxin is of serious concern in food processing procedures including slow cooling procedures and /or storage of intermediate products at ambient temperatures. So far, systematic data on the effect of extrinsic factors on cereulide synthesis has been lacking. Thus, we investigated the influence of temperature, a central extrinsic parameter in food processing, on the regulation of cereulide synthesis on transcriptional, translational and post-translational levels over the growth temperature range of emetic B. cereus. Bacteria were grown in 3°C interval steps from 12°C to 46°C and cereulide synthesis was followed from ces gene transcription to cereulide toxin production. This systematic study revealed that temperature is a cardinal parameter, which primarily impacts cereulide synthesis on post-transcriptional levels, thereby altering the composition of cereulide isoforms. Our work also highlights that the risk of cereulide production could not be predicted from growth parameters or sole cell numbers. Furthermore, for the first time we could show that the formation of the recently identified cereulide isoforms is highly temperature dependent, which may have great importance in terms of food safety and predictive microbiology. Notably the production of isocereulide A, which is about 10-fold more cytotoxic than cereulide, was specifically supported at low temperatures.

  19. SpoIIE is necessary for asymmetric division, sporulation, and expression of sigmaF, sigmaE, and sigmaG but does not control solvent production in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Changhao; Jones, Shawn W; Hess, Daniel R; Tracy, Bryan P; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2011-10-01

    In order to better characterize the initial stages of sporulation past Spo0A activation and the associated solventogenesis in the important industrial and model organism Clostridium acetobutylicum, the spoIIE gene was successfully disrupted and its expression was silenced. By silencing spoIIE, sporulation was blocked prior to asymmetric division, and no mature spores or any distinguishable morphogenetic changes developed. Upon plasmid-based complementation of spoIIE, sporulation was restored, although the number of spores formed was below that of the plasmid control strain. To investigate the impact of silencing spoIIE on the regulation of sporulation, transcript levels of sigF, sigE, and sigG were examined by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and the corresponding σF, σE, and σG protein levels were determined by Western analysis. Expression of sigF was significantly reduced in the inactivation strain, and this resulted in very low σF protein levels. Expression of sigE was barely detected, and no sigG transcript was detected at all; consequently, no σE or σG proteins were detected. These data suggest an autostimulatory role for σF in C. acetobutylicum, in contrast to the model organism for endospore formation, Bacillus subtilis, and confirm that high-level expression of σF is required for expression of σE and σG. Unlike the σF and σE inactivation strains, the SpoIIE inactivation strain did not exhibit inoculum-dependent solvent formation and produced good levels of solvents from both exponential- and stationary-phase inocula. Thus, we concluded that SpoIIE does not control solvent formation.

  20. Production of Alpha Amylase by Bacillus cereus in Submerged Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen H. Raplong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have the ability to secrete enzymes when they are grown in the presence of certain substrates. Amylases are among the most important industrial enzymes and are of great significance in biotechnological studies. Bacteria belonging to the genus Bacillus were isolated using mannitol egg yolk polymyxin B (MYP agar a highly selective media for Bacillus cereus isolation. The isolates were tested for α-amylase production on nutrient agar supplemented with starch and in submerged fermentation. The bacteria isolated and identified (using the Microgen Bacillus identification kit were all Bacillus cereus and SB2 had the largest zone of hydrolysis of 12mm on nutrient agar supplemented with starch as well as the highest enzyme activity of 1.62U/ml. Amylase activity of 2.56U/ml was obtained after 24 hours incubation in submerged fermentation. When amylase enzyme production parameters where optimized, maximum amylase activity was obtained at a pH of 6.5, temperature of 350C, incubation time of 24 hours and 4% inoculums concentration. Bacillus cereus SB2 is a potential isolate for alpha-amylase production with soluble starch as the sole carbon source in submerged fermentation.

  1. The Pore-Forming Haemolysins of Bacillus Cereus: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Sanchis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group contains diverse Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal diseases and severe eye infections in humans. They have also been incriminated in a multitude of other severe, and frequently fatal, clinical infections, such as osteomyelitis, septicaemia, pneumonia, liver abscess and meningitis, particularly in immuno-compromised patients and preterm neonates. The pathogenic properties of this organism are mediated by the synergistic effects of a number of virulence products that promote intestinal cell destruction and/or resistance to the host immune system. This review focuses on the pore-forming haemolysins produced by B. cereus: haemolysin I (cereolysin O, haemolysin II, haemolysin III and haemolysin IV (CytK. Haemolysin I belongs to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC family whose best known members are listeriolysin O and perfringolysin O, produced by L. monocytogenes and C. perfringens respectively. HlyII and CytK are oligomeric ß-barrel pore-forming toxins related to the α-toxin of S. aureus or the ß-toxin of C. perfringens. The structure of haemolysin III, the least characterized haemolytic toxin from the B. cereus, group has not yet been determined.

  2. The Pore-Forming Haemolysins of Bacillus Cereus: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramarao, Nalini; Sanchis, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group contains diverse Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal diseases and severe eye infections in humans. They have also been incriminated in a multitude of other severe, and frequently fatal, clinical infections, such as osteomyelitis, septicaemia, pneumonia, liver abscess and meningitis, particularly in immuno-compromised patients and preterm neonates. The pathogenic properties of this organism are mediated by the synergistic effects of a number of virulence products that promote intestinal cell destruction and/or resistance to the host immune system. This review focuses on the pore-forming haemolysins produced by B. cereus: haemolysin I (cereolysin O), haemolysin II, haemolysin III and haemolysin IV (CytK). Haemolysin I belongs to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) family whose best known members are listeriolysin O and perfringolysin O, produced by L. monocytogenes and C. perfringens respectively. HlyII and CytK are oligomeric ß-barrel pore-forming toxins related to the α-toxin of S. aureus or the ß-toxin of C. perfringens. The structure of haemolysin III, the least characterized haemolytic toxin from the B. cereus, group has not yet been determined. PMID:23748204

  3. A Mutation in the Bacillus subtilis rsbU Gene That Limits RNA Synthesis during Sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, David M; Lazinski, David; Osburne, Marcia S; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2017-07-15

    Mutants of Bacillis subtilis that are temperature sensitive for RNA synthesis during sporulation were isolated after selection with a 32 P suicide agent. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that two of the mutants carried an identical lesion in the rsbU gene, which encodes a phosphatase that indirectly activates SigB, the stress-responsive RNA polymerase sigma factor. The mutation appeared to cause RsbU to be hyperactive, because the mutants were more resistant than the parent strain to ethanol stress. In support of this hypothesis, pseudorevertants that regained wild-type levels of sporulation at high temperature had secondary mutations that prevented expression of the mutant rsbU gene. The properties of these RsbU mutants support the idea that activation of SigB diminishes the bacterium's ability to sporulate. IMPORTANCE Most bacterial species encode multiple RNA polymerase promoter recognition subunits (sigma factors). Each sigma factor directs RNA polymerase to different sets of genes; each gene set typically encodes proteins important for responses to specific environmental conditions, such as changes in temperature, salt concentration, and nutrient availability. A selection for mutants of Bacillus subtilis that are temperature sensitive for RNA synthesis during sporulation unexpectedly yielded strains with a point mutation in rsbU , a gene that encodes a protein that normally activates sigma factor B (SigB) under conditions of salt stress. The mutation appears to cause RsbU, and therefore SigB, to be active inappropriately, thereby inhibiting, directly or indirectly, the ability of the cells to transcribe sporulation genes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Adhesion and removal kinetics of Bacillus cereus biofilms on Ni-PTFE modified stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kang; McLandsborough, Lynne A; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm control remains a challenge to food safety. A well-studied non-fouling coating involves codeposition of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) during electroless plating. This coating has been reported to reduce foulant build-up during pasteurization, but opportunities remain in demonstrating its efficacy in inhibiting biofilm formation. Herein, the initial adhesion, biofilm formation, and removal kinetics of Bacillus cereus on Ni-PTFE-modified stainless steel (SS) are characterized. Coatings lowered the surface energy of SS and reduced biofilm formation by > 2 log CFU cm(-2). Characterization of the kinetics of biofilm removal during cleaning demonstrated improved cleanability on the Ni-PTFE coated steel. There was no evidence of biofilm after cleaning by either solution on the Ni-PTFE coated steel, whereas more than 3 log and 1 log CFU cm(-2) of bacteria remained on the native steel after cleaning with water and an alkaline cleaner, respectively. This work demonstrates the potential application of Ni-PTFE non-fouling coatings on SS to improve food safety by reducing biofilm formation and improving the cleaning efficiency of food processing equipment.

  5. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  6. Quantitative proteome analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor Nonsporulating liquid cultures demonstrates a complex differentiation process comparable to that occurring in sporulating solid cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteca, Angel; Jung, Hye R; Schwämmle, Veit; Jensen, Ole N; Sanchez, Jesus

    2010-09-03

    Streptomyces species produce many clinically important secondary metabolites and present a complex developmental cycle that includes programmed cell death (PCD) phenomena and sporulation. Industrial fermentations are usually performed in liquid cultures, conditions in which Streptomyces strains generally do not sporulate, and it was traditionally assumed that no differentiation took place. Recently, the existence of an early compartmentalized mycelium (MI) and a later multinucleated mycelium (MII) were described in solid and liquid cultures. The aim of this work was to compare the proteomes of the different developmental stages in liquid and solid S. coelicolor cultures, in order to give new insights in Streptomyces biology, and improve industrial fermentations. Using iTRAQ labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis of peptides, we demonstrate that differentiation in S. coelicolor liquid cultures is comparable to solid cultures. Eighty-three percent of all the identified proteins showed similar abundance values in MI and MII from liquid and solid cultures. Proteins involved in secondary metabolism (actinorhodin and type II polyketide biosynthesis, beta-lactamases, epimerases) were up-regulated in MII. Proteins involved in primary metabolism (ribosome, Krebs cycle, and energy production) were detected in greater abundance in MI. The most remarkable protein abundance differences between MII from solid and liquid cultures were associated with the final stages of hyphae compartmentalization and spore formation.

  7. Characteristics and phylogeny of Bacillus cereus strains isolated from Maari, a traditional West African food condiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Line; Kando, Christine Kere; Sawadogo, Hagrétou

    2015-01-01

    light on the succession and pathogenic potential of B. cereus species in traditional West African food condiment and clarifies their phylogenetic relatedness to B. cereus biovar anthracis. Future implementation of GMP and HACCP and development of starter cultures for controlled Maari fermentations...

  8. The alternative sigma factor sigmaB and the stress response of Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaik, van W.

    2005-01-01

    cum laude graduation (with distinction) The bacterium Bacillus cereus is responsible for a large number of cases of foodborne illness across the world. It is also an important cause of spoilage of food, in particular of milk and dairy-products. The growth and survival of B. cereus in food or during

  9. Competitive exclusion as a mode of action of a novel Bacillus cereus aquaculture biological agent

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lalloo, R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available B. cereus aquaculture biological agent by nutrient supplementation. Appl Microbiol 22 Biotechnol 83, 59–66. 23 Mode of action B. cereus 17 1 Meza, R.A., Monroy, A.F., Mercado, M., Poutou, R.A., Rodriguez, P. and Pedroza, A.P. (2004) 2 Study...

  10. Adaptation of the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus to carvacrol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, A.; Kets, E.P.W.; Alberda, M.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Smid, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    Carvacrol, a natural antimicrobial compound present in the essential oil fraction of oregano and thyme, is bactericidal towards Bacillus cereus. A decrease of the sensitivity of B. cereus towards carvacrol was observed after growth in the presence of non-lethal carvacrol concentrations. A decrease

  11. Growth and survival of Bacillus cereus in mageu, a sour maize beverage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Byaruhanga, YB

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available .f.u./ml after 12 h. The decrease in E-h seemed to have no inhibitory effect on the growth and survival of B. cereus. No strains of lactic acid bacteria were found to produce bacteriocins antagonistic to Bacillus cereus. Low pH and acidity were found...

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Group Phage TsarBomba

    OpenAIRE

    Erill, Ivan; Caruso, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group bacteriophage TsarBomba, a double-stranded DNA Myoviridae, was isolated from soil collected in Saratov, Russia. TsarBomba was found to be similar to Bacillus phages BCP78 and BCU4, and to have a wide host range among Bacillus cereus group species.

  13. Influence of carvacrol on growth and toxin production by Bacillus cereus. International

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, A.; Smid, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    The natural antimicrobial compound carvacrol was investigated for its effect on diarrheal toxin production by Bacillus cereus. Carvacrol (0-0.06 mg/ml) reduced the viable count and the maximal specific growth rate (μmax) of B. cereus in BHI broth. The total amount of protein was not affected by

  14. Germinant receptor diversity and germination responses of four strains of the Bacillus cereus group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, van der M.; Garcia, D.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.

    2010-01-01

    Four strains of the Bacillus cereus group were compared for their germinant receptor composition and spore germination capacity. Phylogenetic analysis of the germinant receptor encoding operons of the enterotoxic strains B. cereus ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987, the emetic strain AH187, and the

  15. Physiological and transcriptional response of Bacillus cereus treated with low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Aims - This study was conducted to investigate the inactivation kinetics of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells upon exposure to low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma and to reveal the mode of inactivation by transcriptome profiling. Methods and Results - Exponentially growing B. cereus cells were

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage Deep-Blue Infecting Emetic Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Louise; Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2016-06-16

    The Bacillus cereus emetic pathotype is responsible for important food-borne intoxications. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence of bacteriophage Deep-Blue, which is able to infect emetic strains of B. cereus Deep-Blue is a 159-kb myophage of the Bastille-like group within the Spounavirinae. Copyright © 2016 Hock et al.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage Deep-Blue Infecting Emetic Bacillus cereus

    OpenAIRE

    Hock, Louise; Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus emetic pathotype is responsible for important food-borne intoxications. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence of bacteriophage Deep-Blue, which is able to infect emetic strains of B.?cereus. Deep-Blue is a 159-kb myophage of the Bastille-like group within the Spounavirinae.

  18. Plant compounds enhance assay sensitivity for detection of active bacillus cereus toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacillus cereus is an important food pathogen, producing emetic and diarrheal syndromes, the latter mediated by enterotoxins. It has been estimated that there are 84,000 cases of B. cereus food poisoning in the US each year, with an annual cost of USD 36 million. The ability to sensitively trace and...

  19. Prevalence, genetic diversity, and antibiotic resistance of Bacillus cereus isolated from Korean fermented soybean products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Seung-Hak; Kang, Suk-Ho; Park, Yong-Bae; Yoon, Mi-Hye; Lee, Jong-Bok; No, Wan-Seob; Kim, Jung-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus contamination is a major food safety problem for Korean fermented soybean products, but few studies have assessed its potential to cause foodborne illness. The objectives of this study were to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of B. cereus isolated from Korean fermented soybean products. B. cereus was detected in 110 of 162 (67.9%) samples. The highest B. cereus frequency was observed in deonjang (68 of 93 samples, 73.1%) and cheonggukjang (18 of 25, 72.0%); however, nonhemolytic enterotoxin was detected only in 22 of 162 samples (13.6%). Although the tested B. cereus isolates showed diverse pulsotypes according to repetitive sequence-PCR banding patterns, they displayed similar antibiotic sensitivity spectra. The low frequency of enterotoxin detection suggests that the potential risk of B. cereus foodborne illness associated with Korean fermented soybean products is lower than generally presumed. However, considering the prevalence of B. cereus and the high content of fermented soybean products in the Korean diet, it is necessary to constantly monitor the level of contamination with B. cereus and its toxins in such Korean food products. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Modelling the number of viable vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus passing through the stomach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, L.M.; Pielaat, A.; Dufrenne, J.B.; Zwietering, M.H.; Leusden, van F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Model the number of viable vegetative cells of B. cereus surviving the gastric passage after experiments in simulated gastric conditions. Materials and Methods: The inactivation of stationary and exponential phase vegetative cells of twelve different strains of Bacillus cereus, both mesophilic

  1. Cloning, Purification and Characterization of the Collagenase ColA Expressed by Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abfalter, Carmen M; Schönauer, Esther; Ponnuraj, Karthe; Huemer, Markus; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Regl, Christof; Briza, Peter; Ferreira, Fatima; Huber, Christian G; Brandstetter, Hans; Posselt, Gernot; Wessler, Silja

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial collagenases differ considerably in their structure and functions. The collagenases ColH and ColG from Clostridium histolyticum and ColA expressed by Clostridium perfringens are well-characterized collagenases that cleave triple-helical collagen, which were therefore termed as ´true´ collagenases. ColA from Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) has been added to the collection of true collagenases. However, the molecular characteristics of B. cereus ColA are less understood. In this study, we identified ColA as a secreted true collagenase from B. cereus ATCC 14579, which is transcriptionally controlled by the regulon phospholipase C regulator (PlcR). B. cereus ATCC 14579 ColA was cloned to express recombinant wildtype ColA (ColAwt) and mutated to a proteolytically inactive (ColAE501A) version. Recombinant ColAwt was tested for gelatinolytic and collagenolytic activities and ColAE501A was used for the production of a polyclonal anti-ColA antibody. Comparison of ColAwt activity with homologous proteases in additional strains of B. cereus sensu lato (B. cereus s.l.) and related clostridial collagenases revealed that B. cereus ATCC 14579 ColA is a highly active peptidolytic and collagenolytic protease. These findings could lead to a deeper insight into the function and mechanism of bacterial collagenases which are used in medical and biotechnological applications.

  2. Soya bean tempe extracts show antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus cells and spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P.J.; Dalmas, E.; Nout, M.J.R.; Abee, T.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Tempe, a Rhizopus ssp.-fermented soya bean food product, was investigated for bacteriostatic and/or bactericidal effects against cells and spores of the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus. Methods and results: Tempe extract showed a high antibacterial activity against B. cereus ATCC 14579

  3. 40 CFR 180.1181 - Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1181 Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the Bacillus cereus...

  4. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Pathway and Modified Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Activity During Growth and Sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, John N.; Borris, David P.; Doerner, Jeffrey F.; Akers, Evelyn

    1975-01-01

    Enzymatic analyses of Bacillus thuringiensis extracts suggested that a modified Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle (without α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase) can operate during sporulation in conjunction with the glyoxylic acid cycle and the γ-aminobutyric acid pathway. PMID:1180554

  5. The PlcR virulence regulon of Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Gohar

    Full Text Available PlcR is a Bacillus cereus transcriptional regulator, which activates gene expression by binding to a nucleotidic sequence called the 'PlcR box'. To build a list of all genes included in the PlcR regulon, a consensus sequence was identified by directed mutagenesis. The reference strain ATCC14579 sequenced genome was searched for occurrences of this consensus sequence to produce a virtual regulon. PlcR control of these genes was confirmed by comparing gene expression in the reference strain and its isogenic Delta-plcR strain using DNA microarrays, lacZ fusions and proteomics methods. The resulting list included 45 genes controlled by 28 PlcR boxes. Forty of the PlcR controlled proteins were exported, of which 22 were secreted in the extracellular medium and 18 were bound or attached to cell wall structures (membrane or peptidoglycan layer. The functions of these proteins were related to food supply (phospholipases, proteases, toxins, cell protection (bacteriocins, toxins, transporters, cell wall biogenesis and environment-sensing (two-component sensors, chemotaxis proteins, GGDEF family regulators. Four genes coded for cytoplasmic regulators. The PlcR regulon appears to integrate a large range of environmental signals, including food deprivation and self cell-density, and regulate the transcription of genes designed to overcome obstacles that hinder B. cereus growth within the host: food supply, host barriers, host immune defenses, and competition with other bacterial species. PlcR appears to be a key component in the efficient adaptation of B. cereus to its host environment.

  6. Is Cytotoxin K from Bacillus cereus a bona fide enterotoxin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiaux, Virginie; Liu, Xiaojin; Delbrassinne, Laurence; Mahillon, Jacques

    2015-10-15

    Cytotoxin K (CytK) produced by Bacillus cereus s.l. has generally been considered to be associated with the foodborne diarrhoeal syndrome. Two distinct variants of CytK have been reported: CytK-1 from Bacillus cytotoxicus and CytK-2 from B. cereus. In order to determine whether CytK plays a significant role in the diarrhoeal disease, the occurrence of cytK genes was assessed among 390 B. cereus isolates with different origins including clinical and food poisoning samples and was found to be 46%. Interestingly, the cytK occurrence was slightly lower in food poisoning and clinical isolates than in environmental samples. Seventy cytK-2 positive strains (including 28 isolates from foodborne outbreaks) were then selected in order to assess their genetic diversity. A genetic dendrogram based on the cytK-2 sequences of these 70 strains and on two cytK-1 sequences from strains NVH 391-98 and 883-00 showed an important diversity. However, no strain clustering according to the origin or source of isolation was observed. These observations were confirmed by Multi-Locus Sequences Typing (MLST) based on five different loci of housekeeping genes (ccpA, recF, sucC, purF and gdpD) for which no grouping of foodborne outbreak strains could be identified. Therefore, the choice of cytK as virulence factor for the diarrhoeal pathotype does not seem to be relevant per se, even though the involvement of CytK in the diarrhoeal syndrome cannot be fully excluded. Potential synergistic effects between CytK and other virulence factors, together with their potential variable expression levels should be further investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Pathogenomic Sequence Analysis of B. cereus and B. Thuringiensis isolates closely related to Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, C S; Xie, G; Challacombe, J F; Altherr, M R; Bhotika, S S; Bruce, D; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Chen, J; Chertkov, O; Cleland, C; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Doggett, N A; Fawcett, J J; Glavina, T; Goodwin, L A; Hill, K K; Hitchcock, P; Jackson, P J; Keim, P; Kewalramani, A R; Longmire, J; Lucas, S; Malfatti, S; McMurry, K; Meincke, L J; Misra, M; Moseman, B L; Mundt, M; Munk, A C; Okinaka, R T; Parson-Quintana, B; Reilly, L P; Richardson, P; Robinson, D L; Rubin, E; Saunders, E; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Ticknor, L O; Wills, P L; Gilna, P; Brettin, T S

    2005-10-12

    The sequencing and analysis of two close relatives of Bacillus anthracis are reported. AFLP analysis of over 300 isolates of B. cereus, B. thuringiensis and B. anthracis identified two isolates as being very closely related to B. anthracis. One, a B. cereus, BcE33L, was isolated from a zebra carcass in Nambia; the second, a B. thuringiensis, 97-27, was isolated from a necrotic human wound. The B. cereus appears to be the closest anthracis relative sequenced to date. A core genome of over 3,900 genes was compiled for the Bacillus cereus group, including B anthracis. Comparative analysis of these two genomes with other members of the B. cereus group provides insight into the evolutionary relationships among these organisms. Evidence is presented that differential regulation modulates virulence, rather than simple acquisition of virulence factors. These genome sequences provide insight into the molecular mechanisms contributing to the host range and virulence of this group of organisms.

  8. Comparison of 3 selective media for enumeration of Bacillus cereus in several food matrixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Song, Kwang-Young; Kim, Hyunsook; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we compared the inclusivity, exclusivity, recoverability, and selectivity of the 3 selective agars (mannitol yolk polymyxin B agar [MYPA], polymyxin pyruvate egg yolk mannitol bromothymol blue agar [PEMBA], and Brillance Bacillus cereus agar [BBC agar]) for Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) from pure culture and several food samples. BBC agar showed greater exclusivity and selectivity in pure culture and in foods with high background flora, respectively; however, all the tested media showed similar recoverability (P > 0.05) of B. cereus in pure culture and in most foods. Our results suggest that BBC agar could be useful to enumerate B. cereus from, in particular, food matrixes with high background competing micro flora. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Antimicrobial Effect of Nisin against Bacillus cereus in Beef Jerky during Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Kim, Hyoun Wook; Lee, Joo Yeon; Ahn, Dong Uk; Kim, Cheon-Jei; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The microbial distribution of raw materials and beef jerky, and the effect of nisin on the growth of Bacillus cereus inoculated in beef jerky during storage, were studied. Five strains of pathogenic B. cereus were detected in beef jerky, and identified with 99.8% agreement using API CHB 50 kit. To evaluate the effect of nisin, beef jerky was inoculated with approximately 3 Log CFU/g of B. cereus mixed culture and nisin (100 IU/g and 500 IU/g). During the storage of beef jerky without nisin, the number of mesophilic bacteria and B. cereus increased unlikely for beef jerky with nisin. B. cereus started to grow after 3 d in 100 IU nisin/g treatment, and after 21 d in 500 IU nisin/g treatment. The results suggest that nisin could be an effective approach to extend the shelf-life, and improve the microbial safety of beef jerky, during storage. PMID:26761838

  10. Radiosensitization of Bacillus cereus spores in minced meat treated with cinnamaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayari, S.; Dussault, D.; Jerbi, T.; Hamdi, M.; Lacroix, M.

    2012-08-01

    Minced meat beef inoculated with Bacillus cereus spores was treated with four essential oil constituents. The active compounds were sprayed separately onto the meat in order to determine the concentration needed to reduce by 1 log the population of B. cereus spores. Cinnamaldehyde was the best antimicrobial compound selected. It was mixed with ascorbic acid and/or sodium pyrophosphate decahydrate and tested for its efficiency to increase the relative radiation sensitivity (RRS) of B. cereus spores in minced meat packed under air. Results demonstrated that the radiation treatment in presence of the cinnamaldehyde and sodium phosphate decahydrate increased the RRS of B. cereus spores by two fold. The study revealed also that the irradiation of raw beef meat pre-treated with cinnamaldehyde produced an inhibition of the growth of B. cereus count during refrigerated storage. This technology seems to be compatible with industrial meat processing.

  11. Antimicrobial Effect of Nisin against Bacillus cereus in Beef Jerky during Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Kim, Hyoun Wook; Lee, Joo Yeon; Ahn, Dong Uk; Kim, Cheon-Jei; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The microbial distribution of raw materials and beef jerky, and the effect of nisin on the growth of Bacillus cereus inoculated in beef jerky during storage, were studied. Five strains of pathogenic B. cereus were detected in beef jerky, and identified with 99.8% agreement using API CHB 50 kit. To evaluate the effect of nisin, beef jerky was inoculated with approximately 3 Log CFU/g of B. cereus mixed culture and nisin (100 IU/g and 500 IU/g). During the storage of beef jerky without nisin, the number of mesophilic bacteria and B. cereus increased unlikely for beef jerky with nisin. B. cereus started to grow after 3 d in 100 IU nisin/g treatment, and after 21 d in 500 IU nisin/g treatment. The results suggest that nisin could be an effective approach to extend the shelf-life, and improve the microbial safety of beef jerky, during storage.

  12. Bacillus cereus un patógeno importante en el control microbiológico de los alimentos / Bacillus cereus an important pathogen the microbiological control of food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Sánchez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Bacillus cereus es una bacteria genéticamente diversa que se encuentra comúnmente en el ambiente. Contamina los alimentos afectando la salud humana, al ingerir el microorganismo y/o sus toxinas, la emética o las enterotoxinas. En Colombia son escasos los reportes de intoxicación por B. cereus y se estima que hay un gran subregistro. Por lo anterior, se recomienda aumentar la vigilancia de este patógeno y realizar estudios sobre aspectos relevantes que permitan aplicar medidas de control para disminuir las intoxicaciones por B. cereus. El objetivo de esta revisión bibliográfica es presentar información actualizada sobre B. cereus, que incluye aspectos de su biología, taxonomía, toxinas, alimentos que contamina y metodologías para detectar, prevenir y controlar este microorganismo. La información presentada es de utilidad para el público en general, especialmente personas vinculadas al sector de alimentos, inocuidad alimentaria y control de procesos. / Abstract Bacillus cereus is a genetically diverse bacterium commonly found in the environment. It contaminates food, thus affecting human health upon ingestion of the microorganism and/or its toxins, the emetic or enterotoxins. In Colombia, reports of intoxication by B. cereus are scarce and under-registration is presumed. Because of this, it is recommended to increase surveillance of this pathogen and to develop studies on relevant aspects that allow the application of control measures to reduce intoxications by B. cereus. The aim of this review is to present current information on B. cereus, including aspects of its biology, taxonomy, toxins, food that it contaminates and methodologies for the detection, prevention and control of this microorganism. This information is useful for the general public, especially people involved with the food sector, food safety and process control.

  13. Isolation of Bacillus Cereus from wounds and burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzadiannejhad Gh

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The culture results of 203 cases with different wounds were studies; 150 of the latter were burn cases (mainly second and third degree burns, and 53 were of other types (surgical, traumatic, ect. Four subtypes of Bacillus cereus were isolated upon culture, and the different toxins produced in DHT broth with 0.1% glucose were assessed. The lethal toxin was injected intravenously to Syrian rats, none of whom died. VPR factor was assessed in the 4 subtypes. Three subtypes produced VPR in significant amounts.

  14. DNA complexed structure of the key transcription factor initiating development in sporulating bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Msadek, Tarek; Zapf, James; Madhusudan; Hoch, James A; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2002-08-01

    Sporulation in Bacillus species, the ultimate bacterial adaptive response, requires the precisely coordinated expression of a complex genetic pathway, and is initiated through the accumulation of the phosphorylated form of Spo0A, a pleiotropic response regulator transcription factor. Spo0A controls the transcription of several hundred genes in all spore-forming Bacilli including genes for sporulation and toxin regulation in pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis. The crystal structure of the effector domain of Spo0A from Bacillus subtilis in complex with its DNA target was determined. In the crystal lattice, two molecules form a tandem dimer upon binding to adjacent sites on DNA. The protein:protein and protein:DNA interfaces revealed in the crystal provide a basis for interpreting the transcription activation process and for the design of drugs to counter infections by these bacteria.

  15. Growth and sporulation of Metarhizium flavoviride var. Flavoviride on culture media and lighting regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onofre Sideney Becker

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic fungi from the genus Metarhizium are largely used for the biological control of agricultural pests by conidia spreading on the field. Although conidia production is well studied in M. anisopliae, only few research studies were done in M. flavoviride. The present work was carried out alming to evaluate the Mycelial growth and sporulation of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium flavoviride var. flavoviride growing at 27 ± 2°C on Potato-dextrose-agar (PDA, Czapek-agar (CZP and a complete agar medium (CM under three lighting regimes, (continuous illumination, light/dark cycle and an black light/dark cycle were investigated. A completely randomized 3 × 3 (culture media × lighting regime factorial design with four replicates was used. The best mycelial growth and sporulation occurred on the PDA and CM media under continuous illumination (P <= 0,05.

  16. Unusual forms of immature sporulating Coccidioides immitis diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yong; Smith, Corey W; Salaru, Gratian; Joho, Kim L; Deen, Malik F

    2006-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is an endemic infection acquired by inhalation of the spores (arthroconidia) of the thermally dimorphic fungus, Coccidioides immitis. The arthroconidia transform into spherical cells called mature spherules in the lung. Immature spherules and other atypical forms of immature C immitis have rarely been found in vivo. We report on a case that presented unusual forms of immature sporulating C immitis in a fine-needle aspiration specimen. A 36-year-old Chinese woman, living in New Jersey for the past 10 years, presented with fever, night sweats, hemoptysis, and an abnormal chest radiograph approximately 9 months after a brief vacation trip to the Grand Canyon in Arizona. She was treated with antibiotics for 4 weeks without improvement. Subsequent chest computed tomography showed a 3-cm cavitary lesion in the right lower lobe of the lung. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy revealed diverse morphologic forms of a fungus that was confirmed by culture as immature sporulating C immitis.

  17. Assessment of pheromone production and response in fission yeast by a halo test of induced sporulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, R; Willer, M; Kjaerulff, S

    1994-01-01

    We describe a rapid, sensitive and semi-quantitative plate assay for monitoring pheromone activity in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. It is based on the observation that meiosis requires stimulation by pheromone and exploits diploid strains that will only sporulate after addition...... of exogenous pheromone. The tester strains are heterozygous for mating type, are non-switching, and are mutated in one of the early subfunctions (either mat1-Mc or mat1-Pc), so that meiosis is only induced after exposure to exogenous pheromone (M-factor or P-factor, respectively). Pheromone activity...... is assessed as an iodine-positive halo of sporulation surrounding the pheromone source, and the width of the halo is related to the amount of pheromone being produced. The assay is sufficiently sensitive to monitor the low amount of M-factor produced by an M mam1 strain, and its sensitivity towards P...

  18. Effect of eradicative activity of strobilurin fungicides and difenconazole on mycelium and sporulation of Venturia inaequalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Broniarek-Niemiec

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The eradicative effect of two strobilurin fungicides (kresoxim-methyl and trifloxystrobin and difenoconazole on activity of apple scab spots was studied in greenhouse and field conditions. The reaction of mycelium and sporulation of Venturia inaequalis after fungicides applications were observed in light and scanning electron microscope. Mixture of strobilurin fungicide and difenoconazole applied twice, in 5 days interval, gave the best eradicative effect. The inhibition of sporulation was long lasting and it was observed even 3 and 5 weeks after treatments. The conidiophores, conidia and mycelium were damaged. Also difenoconazole showed good eradicative activity, in field condition up to 5 weeks after application. Trifloxystrobin significantly reduced the number of active scab lesions and the effect was visible even 3 weeks after treatment. Kresoxim-methyl in both tested doses (0,2 and 0,3 kg/ha was slightly less effective.

  19. [Influence of different sticky-gene composition on sporulation and protein synthesis by Bacillus thuringiensis collection strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The influence of different sticky-gene composition on sporulation and protein synthesis by B. thuringiensis collection strains has been investigated. It has been detemined that the most effective according this characteristics were B. thuringiensis collection strains 0293 and 98. It has been shown that the best on protein synthesis processes and sporulation by investigated B. thuringiensis strains influences adding to the culture medium sticky-gene compositions A and E in a concentration of from 10 to 15%.

  20. Sporulation of Metarhizium anisopliae var. Acridum and Beauveria bassiana on Rhammatocerus schistocercoides under humid and dry conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães Bonifácio Peixoto; Goettel Mark Stanislaw; Frazão Heloisa da Silva

    2000-01-01

    The sporulation of the fungi Metarhizium anisopliae var. acridum and Beauveria bassiana in cadavers of the grasshopper Rhammatocerus schistocercoides was studied in dry and humid environments. Both fungi were equally virulent against R. schistocercoides. However, internally, M. anisopliae produced more conidia than B. bassiana at 53% and 75% relative humidity. Externally, there was no sporulation at 53% and 75% RH, and M. anisopliae produced more conidia than B. bassiana at 100% RH.A esporula...

  1. Enhanced extracellular production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli by co-expression with Bacillus cereus phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lingqia; Jiang, Qi; Yu, Lingang; Wu, Jing

    2017-02-08

    Our laboratory has reported a strategy for improving the extracellular production of recombinant proteins through co-expression with Thermobifida fusca cutinase, which increases membrane permeability via its phospholipid hydrolysis activity. However, the foam generated by the lysophospholipid product makes the fermentation process difficult to control in a fermentor. Phospholipase C (PLC) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids to produce sn1,2-diacylglycerides and organic phosphate, which do not induce foam formation. Therefore, co-expression with Bacillus cereus PLC was investigated as a method to improve the extracellular production of recombinant proteins. When B. cereus PLC was expressed in Escherichia coli without its signal peptide, 95.3% of the total PLC activity was detected in the culture supernatant. PLC expression enhanced membrane permeability without obvious cell lysis. Then, six test enzymes, three secretory and three cytosolic, were co-expressed with B. cereus PLC. The enhancement of extracellular production correlated strongly with the molecular mass of the test enzyme. Extracellular production of Streptomyces sp. FA1 xylanase (43 kDa), which had the lowest molecular mass among the secretory enzymes, was 4.0-fold that of its individual expression control. Extracellular production of glutamate decarboxylase (51 kDa), which had the lowest molecular mass among the cytosolic enzymes, reached 26.7 U/mL; 88.3% of the total activity produced. This strategy was effectively scaled up using a 3-L fermentor. No obvious foam was generated during this fermentation process. This is the first study to detail the enhanced extracellular production of recombinant proteins through co-expression with PLC. This new strategy, which is especially appropriate for lower molecular mass proteins, allows large-scale protein production in an easily controlled fermentation process.

  2. Detection of presumptive Bacillus cereus in the Irish dairy farm environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Connell A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to isolate potential Bacillus cereus sensu lato (B. cereus s.l. from a range of farm environments. Samples of tap water, milking equipment rinse water, milk sediment filter, grass, soil and bulk tank milk were collected from 63 farms. In addition, milk liners were swabbed at the start and the end of milking, and swabs were taken from cows’ teats prior to milking. The samples were plated on mannitol egg yolk polymyxin agar (MYP and presumptive B. cereus s.l. colonies were isolated and stored in nutrient broth with 20% glycerol and frozen at -80 °C. These isolates were then plated on chromogenic medium (BACARA and colonies identified as presumptive B. cereus s.l. on this medium were subjected to 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA sequencing. Of the 507 isolates presumed to be B. cereus s.l. on the basis of growth on MYP, only 177 showed growth typical of B. cereus s.l. on BACARA agar. The use of 16S rRNA sequencing to identify isolates that grew on BACARA confirmed that the majority of isolates belonged to B. cereus s.l. A total of 81 of the 98 isolates sequenced were tentatively identified as presumptive B. cereus s.l. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was carried out on milk and soil isolates from seven farms that were identified as having presumptive B. cereus s.l. No pulsotype was shared by isolates from soil and milk on the same farm. Presumptive B. cereus s.l. was widely distributed within the dairy farm environment.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Sporulation in the Filamentous Fungus Ashbya gossypii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wasserstrom, Lisa

    , which is regulated by the pheromone response pathway. Most ascomycetes have been reported to produce meiotic spores, however, a sexual cycle has not yet been identified in the filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii. The main focus of my doctoral thesis has therefore been to understand the mechanisms behind...... suggesting that other proteins generate DSBs in this fungus. In summary, this work has led to better understanding of the components regulating sporulation in A. gossypii and their hierarchical organization....

  4. [Electron microscope study of "Bacillus thuringiensis" var. "Israelensis" sporulation and crystal biogenesis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, J F; de Barjac, H

    1982-01-01

    The sporulation and crystal development of Bacillus thuringiensis serotype H-14 was described for a wild spore- and crystal-forming strain and for a mutant crystal but non spore-forming strain. The special nature of the israelensis var. consisted in the composite structure of the crystal, made of a number of components differing in size, shape and electron density. The components were formed in a single inclusion or sometimes separately inside the same bacterial cell.

  5. Polyphosphate Storage during Sporulation in the Gram-Negative Bacterium Acetonema longum

    OpenAIRE

    Tocheva, Elitza I.; Dekas, Anne E.; McGlynn, Shawn E.; Morris, Dylan; Victoria J. Orphan; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    Using electron cryotomography, we show that the Gram-negative sporulating bacterium Acetonema longum synthesizes high-density storage granules at the leading edges of engulfing membranes. The granules appear in the prespore and increase in size and number as engulfment proceeds. Typically, a cluster of 8 to 12 storage granules closely associates with the inner spore membrane and ultimately accounts for ∼7% of the total volume in mature spores. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analys...

  6. Comparison of the pathogenicity, growth, sporulation and morphology of Pezicula alba Guthrie (Gloeosporium album Osterw.)

    OpenAIRE

    H. Borecka; H. Bryk

    2013-01-01

    Sixteen isolates of Pezicula alba Guthr. were examined. The intensity of growth on various media, pathogenicity to apple fruits and twigs, colour of cultures and size of conidia were measured. Some isolates are pathogenic to fruits, some others to twigs; one isolate (only no. 19) is pathogenic to both twigs and fruits; many isolates are not - pathogenic at all. Culture growth, sporulation and size of conidia are not correlated with the pathogenicity of the isolate. The mean size of conidia is...

  7. EFFECT OF PLANT EXTRACTS ON SPORULATION AND SPORE GERMINATION OF STORED MELON SEED FUNGI

    OpenAIRE

    Amadi J.E.; Adeleke E.E.; Olahan G.; Garuba T.; Adebola M.O.

    2017-01-01

    Frequently, stored melon seeds fail to preserve to their time of use. Storage fungi invade these seeds and cause their deterioration. A study was, therefore, carried out to determine the effect of guava (Psidium guajava L.) leaf and ginger (Zingiber officinale) rhizome extracts on the sporulation and spore germination of the invading seed fungi. Dried leaves and rhizomes were ground in sterile mortar, filtered through a wire sieve and then extracted using three different solvents. Results rev...

  8. The evolution of cell-to-cell communication in a sporulating bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi van Gestel

    Full Text Available Traditionally microorganisms were considered to be autonomous organisms that could be studied in isolation. However, over the last decades cell-to-cell communication has been found to be ubiquitous. By secreting molecular signals in the extracellular environment microorganisms can indirectly assess the cell density and respond in accordance. In one of the best-studied microorganisms, Bacillus subtilis, the differentiation processes into a number of distinct cell types have been shown to depend on cell-to-cell communication. One of these cell types is the spore. Spores are metabolically inactive cells that are highly resistant against environmental stress. The onset of sporulation is dependent on cell-to-cell communication, as well as on a number of other environmental cues. By using individual-based simulations we examine when cell-to-cell communication that is involved in the onset of sporulation can evolve. We show that it evolves when three basic premises are satisfied. First, the population of cells has to affect the nutrient conditions. Second, there should be a time-lag between the moment that a cell decides to sporulate and the moment that it turns into a mature spore. Third, there has to be environmental variation. Cell-to-cell communication is a strategy to cope with environmental variation, by allowing cells to predict future environmental conditions. As a consequence, cells can anticipate environmental stress by initiating sporulation. Furthermore, signal production could be considered a cooperative trait and therefore evolves when it is not too costly to produce signal and when there are recurrent colony bottlenecks, which facilitate assortment. Finally, we also show that cell-to-cell communication can drive ecological diversification. Different ecotypes can evolve and be maintained due to frequency-dependent selection.

  9. Inhibitory effects of polyphosphates on Clostridium perfringens growth, sporulation and spore outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saeed; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2008-09-01

    This study evaluated the effects of various polyphosphates (SPP, STPP, SAPP and TSPP) on growth, sporulation and spore germination of Clostridium perfringens, and germination and outgrowth of C. perfrinegns spores in poultry meat. We have found that the requirements of polyP (0.8-1.0%) to inhibit C. perfringens bacterial growth were higher than those reported for other bacteria. Sub-lethal concentrations of polyP significantly (pperfringens by reducing sporulating cells (heat-resistant cells) approximately 5-6 log(10). While C. perfringens spores were able to germinate in the presence of 1% STPP, their outgrowth was significantly (pperfringens was observed when meat samples contaminated with a cocktail of spores of C. perfringens isolates carrying enterotoxin gene on the chromosome were treated with 1% STPP. Collectively, this study demonstrated the inhibitory effects of polyP on growth, sporulation and spore outgrowth of C. perfringens, and suggests that polyP can be used not only as an enhancer of the functional properties of meat products, but also as a promising C. perfringens antimicrobial agent.

  10. Two distinct pathways lead Bacillus thuringiensis to commit to sporulation in biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplaetse, Emilie; Slamti, Leyla; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier

    2017-05-01

    The spore-forming bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis is an efficient biofilm producer, responsible for persistent contamination of industrial food processing systems. B. thuringiensis biofilms are highly heterogeneous bacterial structures in which three distinct cell types controlled by quorum sensing regulators were identified: PlcR-controlled virulent cells, NprR-dependent necrotrophic cells and cells committed to sporulation, a differentiation process controlled by Rap phosphatases and Spo0A-P. Interestingly, a cell lineage study revealed that, in LB medium or in insect larvae, only necrotrophic cells became spores. Here we analyzed cellular differentiation undertaken by cells growing in biofilm in a medium optimized for sporulation. No virulent cells were identified; surprisingly, two distinct routes could lead to differentiation as a spore in this growth condition: the NprR-dependent route, followed by the majority of cells, and the newly identified NprR-independent route, which is followed by 20% of sporulating cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Noise in a phosphorelay drives stochastic entry into sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jonathan R; Cabeen, Matthew T; Wiggins, Paul A; Paulsson, Johan; Losick, Richard

    2017-10-02

    Entry into sporulation in Bacillus subtilis is governed by a phosphorelay in which phosphoryl groups from a histidine kinase are successively transferred via relay proteins to the response regulator Spo0A. Spo0A~P, in turn, sets in motion events that lead to asymmetric division and activation of the cell-specific transcription factor σF, a hallmark for entry into sporulation. Here, we have used a microfluidics-based platform to investigate the activation of Spo0A and σF in individual cells held under constant, sporulation-inducing conditions. The principal conclusions were that: (i) activation of σF occurs with an approximately constant probability after adaptation to conditions of nutrient limitation; (ii) activation of σF is tightly correlated with, and preceded by, Spo0A~P reaching a high threshold level; (iii) activation of Spo0A takes place abruptly just prior to asymmetric division; and (iv) the primary source of noise in the activation of Spo0A is the phosphorelay. We propose that cells exhibit a constant probability of attaining a high threshold level of Spo0A~P due to fluctuations in the flux of phosphoryl groups through the phosphorelay. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Assessment of hydrophobicity and roughness of stainless steel adhered by an isolate of Bacillus cereus from a dairy plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Campos Bernardes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between the surface of stainless steel and Bacillus cereus was studied in terms of the characteristics of interfacial interaction determined from the measurement of the contact angle of the surface of B. cereus and stainless steel in the presence or absence of B. cereus adherence. The microtopographies and the roughness of the surface of stainless steel and stainless steel adhered by B. cereus were evaluated with the help of atomic force microscopy and perfilometry. The strain of B. cereus studied was considered hydrophilic, whereas the stainless steel was considered hydrophobic. The adhesion was not thermodynamically favorable (ΔGadhesion > 0 between the stainless steel and the strain of B. cereus studied. Thus, the interaction between them was not favored by the thermodynamic aspect of adhesion. There was no difference (p > 0.05 in the roughness of the surfaces of stainless steel adhered by B. cereus when analyzed by atomic force microscope and perfilometry.

  13. Probiotic Bacillus cereus strains, a potential risk for public health in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui eZhu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is an important cause of foodborne infectious disease and food poisoning. However, B. cereus has also been used as a probiotic in human medicine and livestock production, with low standards of safety assessment. In this study, we evaluated the safety of 15 commercial probiotic B. cereus preparations from China in terms of mislabeling, toxin production, and transferable antimicrobial resistance. Most preparations were incorrectly labeled, as they contained additional bacterial species; one product did not contain viable B. cereus at all. In total, 18 B. cereus group strains – specifically B. cereus and B. thuringiensis – were isolated. Enterotoxin genes nhe, hbl, and cytK1, as well as the ces-gene were assessed by PCR. Enterotoxin production and cytotoxicity were confirmed by ELISA and cell culture assays, respectively. All isolated B. cereus group strains produced the enterotoxin Nhe; 15 strains additionally produced Hbl. Antimicrobial resistance was assessed by microdilution; resistance genes were detected by PCR and further characterized by sequencing, transformation and conjugation assays. Nearly half of the strains harbored the antimicrobial resistance gene tet(45. In one strain, tet(45 was situated on a mobile genetic element – encoding a site specific recombination mechanism – and was transferable to Staphylococcus aureus and B. subtilis by electro-transformation. In view of the wide and uncontrolled use of these products, stricter regulations for safety assessment, including determination of virulence factors and transferable antimicrobial resistance genes, are urgently needed.

  14. Occurrence of Toxigenic Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in Doenjang, a Korean Fermented Soybean Paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Min; Kim, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Moon Cheol; Koo, Minseon

    2016-04-01

    This study determined the prevalence and toxin profile of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in doenjang, a fermented soybean food, made using both traditional and commercial methods. The 51 doenjang samples tested were broadly contaminated with B. cereus; in contrast, only one sample was positive for B. thuringiensis. All B. cereus isolates from doenjang were positive for diarrheal toxin genes. The frequencies of nheABC and hblACD in traditional samples were 22.7 and 0%, respectively, whereas 5.1 and 5.1% of B. cereus isolates from commercial samples possessed nheABC and hblACD, respectively. The detection rate of ces gene was 10.8%. The predominant toxin profile among isolates from enterotoxigenic B. cereus in doenjang was profile 4 (entFM-bceT-cytK). The major enterotoxin genes in emetic B. cereus were cytK, entFM, and nheA genes. The B. thuringiensis isolate was of the diarrheagenic type. These results provide a better understanding of the epidemiology of the enterotoxigenic and emetic B. cereus groups in Korean fermented soybean products.

  15. Disinfection of Preexisting Contamination of BACILLUS CEREUS on Stainless Steel when Using Glycoconjugate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Casey; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Stainless steel is ubiquitous in our modern world, however it can become contaminated. This can endanger our health. The aim of our study is to disinfect stainless steel using Bacillus cereus as a model organism. Bacillus cereus is a microbe that is ubiquitous in nature, specifically soil. B. cereus is known to cause illness in humans. To prevent this, we propose to use a glycoconjugate solution (GS) for disinfection of stainless steel after it is contamination by B. cereus spores. In this study, two GS (9, 10) were tested for disinfection effectiveness on B. cereus spores on the surface of stainless steel foil (AISI-Series 200/300/400, THERMA-FOIL, Dayville, CT 0241). The disinfection rate of each GS was assessed by exposing the steel surface to B. cereus spores first and allowing them to settle for 24 hours. GS was used to treat the contaminated surface. The steel is washed and the resulting solution is plated on tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The GS with the fewest colony forming unit (CFU) formed on TSA is determined to be the most efficient during disinfection. Results show that both GS demonstrate a strong ability to disinfect B. cereus spores. Between the two, GS 9 shows the highest disinfection efficacy by killing approximately 99.5% of spores. This is a drastic improvement over the 0-20% disinfection of the control. Based on this we find that studied GS do have the capacity to act as a disinfectant on stainless steel.

  16. The effect of selected factors on the survival of Bacillus cereus in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold-Pluta, Anna; Pluta, Antoni; Garbowska, Monika

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive bacterium widely distributed in soil and vegetation. This bacterial species can also contaminate raw or processed foods. Pathogenic B. cereus strains can cause a range of infections in humans, as well as food poisoning of an emetic (intoxication) or diarrheal type (toxico-infection). Toxico-infections are due to the action of the Hbl toxin, Nhe toxin, and cytotoxin K produced by the microorganism in the gastrointestinal tract. This occurs once the spores or vegetative B. cereus cells survive the pH barrier of the stomach and reach the small intestine where they produce toxins in sufficient amounts. This article discusses the effect of various factors on the survival of B. cereus in the gastrointestinal tract, including low pH and the presence of digestive enzymes in the stomach, bile salts in the small intestine, and indigenous microflora in the lower parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Additional aspects also reported to affect B. cereus survival and virulence in the gastrointestinal tract include the interaction of the spores and vegetative cells with enterocytes. In vitro studies revealed that both vegetative B. cereus and spores can survive in the gastrointestinal tract suggesting that the biological form of the microorganism may have less influence on the occurrence of the symptoms of infection than was once believed. It is most likely the interaction between the pathogen and enterocytes that is necessary for the diarrheal form of B. cereus food poisoning to develop. The adhesion of B. cereus to the intestinal epithelium allows the bacterium to grow and produce enterotoxins in the proximity of the epithelium. Recent studies suggest that the human intestinal microbiota inhibits the growth of vegetative B. cereus cells considerably. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic diversity of clinical isolates of Bacillus cereus using multilocus sequence typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruckler James M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus cereus is most commonly associated with foodborne illness (diarrheal and emetic but is also an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe and fatal infections. Several multilocus sequence typing (MLST schemes have recently been developed to genotype B. cereus and analysis has suggested a clonal or weakly clonal population structure for B. cereus and its close relatives B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis. In this study we used MLST to determine if B. cereus isolates associated with illnesses of varying severity (e.g., severe, systemic vs. gastrointestinal (GI illness were clonal or formed clonal complexes. Results A retrospective analysis of 55 clinical B. cereus isolates submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention between 1954 and 2004 was conducted. Clinical isolates from severe infections (n = 27, gastrointestinal (GI illness (n = 18, and associated isolates from food (n = 10 were selected for analysis using MLST. The 55 isolates were diverse and comprised 38 sequence types (ST in two distinct clades. Of the 27 isolates associated with serious illness, 13 clustered in clade 1 while 14 were in clade 2. Isolates associated with GI illness were also found throughout clades 1 and 2, while no isolates in this study belonged to clade 3. All the isolates from this study belonging to the clade 1/cereus III lineage were associated with severe disease while isolates belonging to clade1/cereus II contained isolates primarily associated with severe disease and emetic illness. Only three STs were observed more than once for epidemiologically distinct isolates. Conclusion STs of clinical B. cereus isolates were phylogenetically diverse and distributed among two of three previously described clades. Greater numbers of strains will need to be analyzed to confirm if specific lineages or clonal complexes are more likely to contain clinical isolates or be associated with specific illness, similar to B. anthracis and

  18. Bacteriophage PBC1 and its endolysin as an antimicrobial agent against Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Minsuk; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic human pathogen responsible for food poisoning and other, nongastrointestinal infections. Due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant B. cereus strains, the demand for alternative therapeutic options is increasing. To address these problems, we isolated and characterized a Siphoviridae virulent phage, PBC1, and its lytic enzymes. PBC1 showed a very narrow host range, infecting only 1 of 22 B. cereus strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the major capsid protein revealed that PBC1 is more closely related to the Bacillus clarkii phage BCJA1c and phages of lactic acid bacteria than to the phages infecting B. cereus. Whole-genome comparison showed that the late-gene region, including the terminase gene, structural genes, and holin gene of PBC1, is similar to that from B. cereus temperate phage 250, whereas their endolysins are different. Compared to the extreme host specificity of PBC1, its endolysin, LysPBC1, showed a much broader lytic spectrum, albeit limited to the genus Bacillus. The catalytic domain of LysPBC1 when expressed alone also showed Bacillus-specific lytic activity, which was lower against the B. cereus group but higher against the Bacillus subtilis group than the full-length protein. Taken together, these results suggest that the virulent phage PBC1 is a useful component of a phage cocktail to control B. cereus, even with its exceptionally narrow host range, as it can kill a strain of B. cereus that is not killed by other phages, and that LysPBC1 is an alternative biocontrol agent against B. cereus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Genetic diversity of clinical isolates of Bacillus cereus using multilocus sequence typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmaster, Alex R; Novak, Ryan T; Marston, Chung K; Gee, Jay E; Helsel, Leta; Pruckler, James M; Wilkins, Patricia P

    2008-01-01

    Background Bacillus cereus is most commonly associated with foodborne illness (diarrheal and emetic) but is also an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe and fatal infections. Several multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes have recently been developed to genotype B. cereus and analysis has suggested a clonal or weakly clonal population structure for B. cereus and its close relatives B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis. In this study we used MLST to determine if B. cereus isolates associated with illnesses of varying severity (e.g., severe, systemic vs. gastrointestinal (GI) illness) were clonal or formed clonal complexes. Results A retrospective analysis of 55 clinical B. cereus isolates submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention between 1954 and 2004 was conducted. Clinical isolates from severe infections (n = 27), gastrointestinal (GI) illness (n = 18), and associated isolates from food (n = 10) were selected for analysis using MLST. The 55 isolates were diverse and comprised 38 sequence types (ST) in two distinct clades. Of the 27 isolates associated with serious illness, 13 clustered in clade 1 while 14 were in clade 2. Isolates associated with GI illness were also found throughout clades 1 and 2, while no isolates in this study belonged to clade 3. All the isolates from this study belonging to the clade 1/cereus III lineage were associated with severe disease while isolates belonging to clade1/cereus II contained isolates primarily associated with severe disease and emetic illness. Only three STs were observed more than once for epidemiologically distinct isolates. Conclusion STs of clinical B. cereus isolates were phylogenetically diverse and distributed among two of three previously described clades. Greater numbers of strains will need to be analyzed to confirm if specific lineages or clonal complexes are more likely to contain clinical isolates or be associated with specific illness, similar to B. anthracis and emetic B. cereus

  20. Antimicrobial Effect of Nisin against Bacillus cereus in Beef Jerky during Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Kim, Hyoun Wook; Lee, Joo Yeon; Ahn, Dong Uk; Kim, Cheon-Jei; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The microbial distribution of raw materials and beef jerky, and the effect of nisin on the growth of Bacillus cereus inoculated in beef jerky during storage, were studied. Five strains of pathogenic B. cereus were detected in beef jerky, and identified with 99.8% agreement using API CHB 50 kit. To evaluate the effect of nisin, beef jerky was inoculated with approximately 3 Log CFU/g of B. cereus mixed culture and nisin (100 IU/g and 500 IU/g). During the storage of beef jerky without nisin, t...

  1. Characterization of arabinogalactan-rich mucilage from Cereus triangularis cladodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petera, B; Delattre, C; Pierre, G; Wadouachi, A; Elboutachfaiti, R; Engel, E; Poughon, L; Michaud, P; Fenoradosoa, T A

    2015-01-01

    Cereus triangularis (Cactaceae) is a cactus used in food decoction as a traditional medicine in the North region of Madagascar to reduce stomach ache and intestinal diseases. Hydrocolloids were sequentially extracted from its cladodes with a yield of 24% (240 mg/g based on dried cladodes powder). Structural analyses has revealed that this polysaccharide with a molecular mass of 8430,000g/mol was mainly composed of a galactan backbone of a (1 → 4) linked β-d-Galp residues probably substituted at position 3 by L-arabinofuranosyl residues. In vitro antioxidant activity of this arabinogalactan-rich fraction was detected and quantified by radical DPPH scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging, radical anion superoxide scavenging and reducing power method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cereus peruvianus (Koubo new cactus fruit for the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Mizrahi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Several different species of the columnar cacti of the genera Stenocereus and Pachycereus, were introduced into different semi-arid ecozones in Israel and most of these efforts were of disappointing outcomes, the only exception being the Cereus peruvianus (L. Miller,which bore plenty of fruits, some of them of good taste. The original seeds of this plant were obtained from the late Mr. Amram (Ron Kodish, who collected seeds from various private gardens in Southern California which bore fruits of reasonable qualities. The initial success of this species led us to initiate an intensive research study, and today it is already fruit-crop, marketed mainly in Israel under the name " Koubo" . This paper will describe our work of domestication of this new cactus fruit crop in Israel.

  3. Δ(1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate/glutamate biogenesis is required for fungal virulence and sporulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziting Yao

    Full Text Available Proline dehydrogenase (Prodh and Δ(1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5Cdh are two key enzymes in the cellular biogenesis of glutamate. Recombinant Prodh and P5Cdh proteins of the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica were investigated and showed activity in in vitro assays. Additionally, the C. parasitica Prodh and P5Cdh genes were able to complement the Saccharomyces cerevisiae put1 and put2 null mutants, respectively, to allow these proline auxotrophic yeast mutants to grow on media with proline as the sole source of nitrogen. Deletion of the Prodh gene in C. parasitica resulted in hypovirulence and a lower level of sporulation, whereas deletion of P5Cdh resulted in hypovirulence though no effect on sporulation; both Δprodh and Δp5cdh mutants were unable to grow on minimal medium with proline as the sole nitrogen source. In a wild-type strain, the intracellular level of proline and the activity of Prodh and P5Cdh increased after supplementation of exogenous proline, though the intracellular Δ(1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C content remained unchanged. Prodh and P5Cdh were both transcriptionally down-regulated in cells infected with hypovirus. The disruption of other genes with products involved in the conversion of arginine to ornithine, ornithine and glutamate to P5C, and P5C to proline in the cytosol did not appear to affect virulence; however, asexual sporulation was reduced in the Δpro1 and Δpro2 mutants. Taken together, our results showed that Prodh, P5Cdh and related mitochondrial functions are essential for virulence and that proline/glutamate pathway components may represent down-stream targets of hypovirus regulation in C. parasitica.

  4. Comparative analysis of antimicrobial activities of valinomycin and cereulide, the Bacillus cereus emetic toxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tempelaars, M.H.; Rodrigues, S.; Abee, T.

    2011-01-01

    Cereulide and valinomycin are highly similar cyclic dodecadepsipeptides with potassium ionophoric properties. Cereulide, produced by members of the Bacillus cereus group, is known mostly as emetic toxin, and no ecological function has been assigned. A comparative analysis of the antimicrobial

  5. Fate of pathogenic Bacillus cereus spores after ingestion by protist grazers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winding, Anne; Santos, Susana; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse

    to be digested (Manasherob et al 1998 AEM 64:1750-). Here we report how diverse protist grazers grow on both vegetative cells and spores of B. cereus and how the bacteria survive ingestion and digestion, and even proliferate inside the digestive vacuoles of ciliated protists. The survival ability of B. cereus......The aim of this study is to understand the symbiosis between bacterivorous protists and pathogenic bacterial spores, in order to gain insight on survival and dispersal of pathogenic bacteria in the environment. It is generally accepted that resistance to grazing by protists has contributed...... to the evolution of Bacillus cereus group bacteria (e.g. B. cereus, B. anthracis, B. thuringiensis) as a pathogen. It has been hypothesized that the spore stage protects against digestion by predating protists. Indeed, B. thuringiensis spores have been shown to be readily ingested by ciliated protists but failed...

  6. A case of intoxication due to a highly cytotoxic Bacillus cereus strain isolated from cooked chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Ana C; Minnaard, Jessica; Pérez, Pablo F; Alippi, Adriana M

    2015-04-01

    Outbreaks of Bacillus cereus infection/intoxication are not commonly reported because symptoms are often mild, and the disease is self-limiting. However, hypervirulent strains increase health risks. We report a case, which occurred in Argentina, of severe food poisoning illness on a healthy adult woman associated to B. cereus strain MVL2011. The studied strain was highly cytotoxic, showed high ability to detach Caco-2 cells and was positive for the hblA, hblB, and hblC genes of the hbl complex, bceT, entS and ces. As it is considered that B. cereus emetic cluster evolved from a panmictic population of diarrheal strains, B. cereus MVL2011 could constitute an intermediate strain between diarrheal and emetic strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Relapsing peritonitis with Bacillus cereus in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Eyð Tausen; Vang, Amanda Gratton; á Steig, Torkil; Gaini, Shahin

    2016-04-26

    We present a case where Bacillus cereus was determined to be the causative agent of relapsing peritonitis in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The patient, a 70-year-old man from the Faroe Islands, was admitted with relapsing peritonitis four times over a 3-month period. Peritoneal cultures were positive for growth of B. cereus, a rare bacterial cause of peritonitis. The cultures demonstrated susceptibility to vancomycin, and therefore the patient was treated with intraperitoneal vancomycin, intraperitoneal gentamycin and oral ciprofloxacin. As a result of the relapsing B. cereus peritonitis diagnosis and a CT scan showing contraction of the peritoneum after longstanding inflammation, the peritoneal catheter was removed and the patient converted to haemodialysis. To date, the patient has not been readmitted due to peritonitis. A lack of proper hygiene when changing the dialysis bag was the suspected source of infection with B. cereus. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Identification of Anthrax Toxin Genes in a Bacillus cereus Associated With An Illness Resembling Inhalation Anthrax

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffmaster, Alex R; Ravel, Jacques; Rasko, David A; Chapman, Gail D; Chute, Michael D; Marston, CHung K; De, Barun K; Sacchi, Claudio T; Fitzgerald, Collette

    2004-01-01

    .... It was thought to differ from Bacillus cereus, an opportunistic pathogen and cause of food poisoning, by the presence of plasmids pXO1 and pXO2, which encode the lethal toxin complex and the poly- -D...

  9. Influence of some physical factors on the growth and sporulation of entomopathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Piątkowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to examine, how some physical factors and inoculation techniques affect the growth and sporulation of three insecticidal fungal strains, Hirsutella tompsonii, Paecilomyces sp., and Pandora sp. Although the methods of inoculation, as well as such physical parameters as temperature, the osmotic value of the habitat and UV radiation, exerted an influence on the above-mentioned features of the fungi, their contribution varied from one strain to another. Some of the effects, however (e.g., the production of filamentous structures by Pandora, or the lethal action of glycerol on Pandora, require a close examination.

  10. Comparison of the pathogenicity, growth, sporulation and morphology of Pezicula alba Guthrie (Gloeosporium album Osterw.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Borecka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen isolates of Pezicula alba Guthr. were examined. The intensity of growth on various media, pathogenicity to apple fruits and twigs, colour of cultures and size of conidia were measured. Some isolates are pathogenic to fruits, some others to twigs; one isolate (only no. 19 is pathogenic to both twigs and fruits; many isolates are not - pathogenic at all. Culture growth, sporulation and size of conidia are not correlated with the pathogenicity of the isolate. The mean size of conidia is 21.29µm x 3.48µm.

  11. PENGARUH EKSTRAK ANDALIMAN (Zanthoxyium acanthopodium DC TERHADAP PERMEABILITAS DAN HIDROFOBISITAS Bacillus cereus [Effect of Andaliman (Zanthoxylum acanthopodium DC Extracts upon Permeability and Hidrophobicity of Bacillus cereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedarnawati Yasni2

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Andaliman spice is usually added as one of main spices in cooked fish and meat. Andaliman seeds were extracted using maceration method with nonpolar, semipolar and polar solvents. The result showed that the three kinds of andaliman extract had antibacterial activity on Bacillus cereus, especially during exponential phase (8 hour incubation period. Ethyl-acetate extract of Andaliman showed the highest antibacterial activity toward B. cereus with MIC and MBC values being 0.2% and 0.8% respectively. The permeability of B. cereus was observed at the dose of 2.5 MIC and 60.30% hydrophobicity leakage was obtained at 6% andaliman extracted by ethyl-acetate.

  12. Surface architecture of endospores of the Bacillus cereus/anthracis/thuringiensis family at the subnanometer scale

    OpenAIRE

    Kailas, Lekshmi; Terry, Cassandra; Abbott, Nicholas; Taylor, Robert; Mullin, Nic; Tzokov, Svetomir B.; Todd, Sarah J.; Wallace, B. A.; Hobbs, Jamie K.; Moir, Anne; Bullough, Per A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria of the Bacillus cereus family form highly resistant spores, which in the case of the pathogen B. anthracis act as the agents of infection. The outermost layer, the exosporium, enveloping spores of the B. cereus family as well as a number of Clostridia, plays roles in spore adhesion, dissemination, targeting, and germination control. We have analyzed two naturally crystalline layers associated with the exosporium, one representing the “basal” layer to which the outermost spore layer (...

  13. Whole-Genome Sequences of 94 Environmental Isolates of Bacillus cereus Sensu Lato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Auwera, Géraldine A; Feldgarden, Michael; Kolter, Roberto; Mahillon, Jacques

    2013-10-03

    Bacillus cereus sensu lato is a species complex that includes the anthrax pathogen Bacillus anthracis and other bacterial species of medical, industrial, and ecological importance. Their phenotypes of interest are typically linked to large plasmids that are closely related to the anthrax plasmids pXO1 and pXO2. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of 94 isolates of B. cereus sensu lato, which were chosen for their plasmid content and environmental origins.

  14. Partial Characterisation of Bacteriocins Produced by Bacillus cereus Isolates from Milk and Milk Products

    OpenAIRE

    Bojana Bogović Matijašić; Karmen Godič Torkar

    2003-01-01

    Thirty one (19.2 %) out of 161 Bacillus cereus isolates from raw milk and milk products were found to produce proteinaceous substances which inhibit the growth of other B. cereus isolates. The detection of antibacterial activity depended on medium and method used. Bactericidal activity was detected in 23 (14 %) or 19 (12 %) of the tested strains on the triptic soya agar and brain-heart infusion with glucose, respectively, while 11 (7 %) of the strains produced bactericidal substances on both ...

  15. Occurrence and significance of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in ready-to-eat food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenquist, Hanne; Ørum-Smidt, Lasse; Andersen, Sigrid R

    2005-01-01

    Among 48,901 samples of ready-to-eat food products at the Danish retail market, 0.5% had counts of Bacillus cereus-like bacteria above 10(4) cfu g(-1). The high counts were most frequently found in starchy, cooked products, but also in fresh cucumbers and tomatoes. Forty randomly selected strains....../or content of cry genes. Thus, a large proportion of the B. cereus-like organisms present in food may belong to B. thuringiensis....

  16. Exoproteome analysis of a novel strain of Bacillus cereus implicated in disease resembling cutaneous anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Neha; Goel, Ajay Kumar; Alam, Syed Imteyaz

    2014-03-01

    Bacillus cereus belongs to B. cereus sensu lato group, shared by six other related species including Bacillus anthracis. B. anthracis is the causative agent for serious illness affecting a wide range of animals as well as humans and is a category A Biological and Toxin Warfare (BTW) agent. Recent studies indicate that a Bacillus species other than B. anthracis can cause anthrax-like disease and role of anthrax virulence plasmids (pXO1 and pXO2) on the pathogenicity of B. cereus has been documented. B. cereus strain TF5 was isolated from the tissue fluid of cutaneous anthrax-like skin lesions of a human patient from an anthrax endemic area in India. The strain harboured a PA gene, however, presence of pXO1 or pXO2-like plasmids could not be ascertained using reported primers. Abundant exoproteome of the strain in the early stationary phase was elucidated using a 2-DE MS approach and compared with that from a reference B. cereus strain. Analysis of proteins showing qualitative and quantitative differences between the two strains indicated an altered regulatory mechanism and putative role of S-layer protein and sphingomyelinase in the pathogenesis of strain TF5. Phylogenetic analysis of the S-layer protein indicated close affiliation of the strain with anthracis-like B. cereus strains such as B. cereus var. anthracis strain CI; whereas sphingomyelinase exhibited specific relationship with all the strains of B. anthracis apart from that with anthracis-like B. cereus strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Proteomic evidences for rex regulation of metabolism in toxin-producing Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

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    Sabrina Laouami

    Full Text Available The facultative anaerobe, Bacillus cereus, causes diarrheal diseases in humans. Its ability to deal with oxygen availability is recognized to be critical for pathogenesis. The B. cereus genome comprises a gene encoding a protein with high similarities to the redox regulator, Rex, which is a central regulator of anaerobic metabolism in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria. Here, we showed that B. cereus rex is monocistronic and down-regulated in the absence of oxygen. The protein encoded by rex is an authentic Rex transcriptional factor since its DNA binding activity depends on the NADH/NAD+ ratio. Rex deletion compromised the ability of B. cereus to cope with external oxidative stress under anaerobiosis while increasing B. cereus resistance against such stress under aerobiosis. The deletion of rex affects anaerobic fermentative and aerobic respiratory metabolism of B. cereus by decreasing and increasing, respectively, the carbon flux through the NADH-recycling lactate pathway. We compared both the cellular proteome and exoproteome of the wild-type and Δrex cells using a high throughput shotgun label-free quantitation approach and identified proteins that are under control of Rex-mediated regulation. Proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000886. The data suggest that Rex regulates both the cross-talk between metabolic pathways that produce NADH and NADPH and toxinogenesis, especially in oxic conditions.

  18. Direct detection of toxigenic Bacillus cereus in dietary complement for children and cassava starch

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    Jnnifer A. Sánchez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a food contaminant and a known human pathogen that can cause emetic and diarrheal syndromes. In this study we evaluated the presence of toxigenic B. cereus by multiplex PCR directly in dietary complement for children and cassava starch samples collected on Medellin, Colombia. Of 75 dietary complement for children samples evaluated, 70.7% were contaminated with toxigenic B. cereus and four different toxigenic consortia were detected: I: nheA, hblC, cytK (9.8%, II: nheA, hblC (2%, III: hblC, cytK (41.2%, IV: hblC (47%. Of 75 cassava starch samples, 44% were contaminated with toxigenic B. cereus and four different toxigenic consortia were determined: I: nheA, hblC, cytK (48.5%, II: nheA, hblC, cytK, cesB (3%, III: hblC, cytK (30.3%, IV: hblC (18.2%. In general, in dietary complement for children only enterotoxigenic consortia were detected while in cassava starch the enterotoxigenic consortia predominated over the emetic. Multiplex PCR was useful to detect toxigenic B. cereus contamination allowing direct and imultaneous detection of all toxin genes in foods. This study is the first in Colombia to evaluate toxigenic B. cereus, providing information of importance for microbiological risk evaluation in dried foods.

  19. Metabolomic analysis of cooperative adaptation between co-cultured Bacillus cereus and Ketogulonicigenium vulgare.

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    Ming-Zhu Ding

    Full Text Available The cooperative adaptation of subcultivated Bacillus cereus and Ketogulonicigenium vulgare significantly increased the productivity of 2-keto-L-gulonic acid, the precursor of vitamin C. The mechanism of cooperative adaptation of the serial subcultivated B. cereus and K. vulgare was investigated in this study by culturing the two strains orthogonally on agar plates. It was found that the swarming distance of B. cereus along the trace of K. vulgare on the plate decreased after 150 days' subcultivation. Metabolomic analysis on these co-cultured B. cereus and K. vulgare strains showed that their cooperative adaptation was accomplished by three key events: (i the ability of nutrients (e.g., amino acids and purines searching and intaking, and proteins biosynthesis is increased in the evolved B. cereus; (ii the capability of protein degradation and amino acids transportation is enhanced in evolved K. vulgare; (iii the evolved B. cereus was found to provide more nutrients (mostly amino acids and purines to K. vulgare, thus strengthening the oxidation and energy generation of K. vulgare. Our results provided novel insights into the systems-level understanding of the cooperative adaptation between strains in synergistic consortium.

  20. Functional characterization and phylogenetic analysis of acquired and intrinsic macrolide phosphotransferases in the Bacillus cereus group.

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    Wang, Chao; Sui, Zhihai; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Zhang, Gang; Zhao, Meilin; Chen, Weiqi; Feng, Jie

    2015-05-01

    The Bacillus cereus group is composed of Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria of clinical and ecological importance. More than 200 B. cereus group isolates have been sequenced. However, there are few reports of B. cereus group antibiotic resistance genes. This study identified two functional classes of macrolide phosphotransferases (Mphs) in the B. cereus group. Cluster A Mphs inactivate 14- and 15-membered macrolides while Cluster B Mphs inactivate 14-, 15- and 16-membered compounds. The genomic region surrounding the Cluster B Mph gene is related to various plasmid sequences, suggesting that this gene is an acquired resistance gene. In contrast, the Cluster A Mph gene is located in a chromosomal region conserved among all B. cereus group isolates, and data indicated that it was acquired early in the evolution of the group. Therefore, the Cluster A gene can be considered an intrinsic resistance gene. However, the gene itself is not present in all strains and our comparative genomics analyses showed that it is exchanged among strains of the B. cereus group by the mean of homologous recombination. These results provide an alternative mechanism to intrinsic resistance. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Differentiation of strains from the Bacillus cereus group by RFLP-PFGE genomic fingerprinting.

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    Otlewska, Anna; Oltuszak-Walczak, Elzbieta; Walczak, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus pseudomycoides, Bacillus weihenstephanensis, Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus cereus belong to the B. cereus group. The last three species are characterized by different phenotype features and pathogenicity spectrum, but it has been shown that these species are genetically closely related. The macrorestriction analysis of the genomic DNA with the NotI enzyme was used to generate polymorphism of restriction profiles for 39 food-borne isolates (B. cereus, B. mycoides) and seven reference strains (B. mycoides, B. thuringiensis, B. weihenstephanensis, and B. cereus). The PFGE method was applied to differentiate the examined strains of the B. cereus group. On the basis of the unweighted pair group method with the arithmetic mean method and Dice coefficient, the strains were divided into five clusters (types A-E), and the most numerous group was group A (25 strains). A total of 21 distinct pulsotypes were observed. The RFLP-PFGE analysis was successfully used for the differentiation and characterization of B. cereus and B. mycoides strains isolated from different food products. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Vaccine Protection against Bacillus cereus-Mediated Respiratory Anthrax-Like Disease in Mice

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    Oh, So-Young; Maier, Hannah; Schroeder, Jay; Richter, G. Stefan; Elli, Derek; Musser, James M.; Quenee, Lauriane E.; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus strains harboring a pXO1-like virulence plasmid cause respiratory anthrax-like disease in humans, particularly in welders. We developed mouse models for intraperitoneal as well as aerosol challenge with spores of B. cereus G9241, harboring pBCXO1 and pBC218 virulence plasmids. Compared to wild-type B. cereus G9241, spores with a deletion of the pBCXO1-carried protective antigen gene (pagA1) were severely attenuated, whereas spores with a deletion of the pBC218-carried protective antigen homologue (pagA2) were not. Anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) immunization raised antibodies that bound and neutralized the pagA1-encoded protective antigen (PA1) but not the PA2 orthologue encoded by pagA2. AVA immunization protected mice against a lethal challenge with spores from B. cereus G9241 or B. cereus Elc4, a strain that had been isolated from a fatal case of anthrax-like disease. As the pathogenesis of B. cereus anthrax-like disease in mice is dependent on pagA1 and PA-neutralizing antibodies provide protection, AVA immunization may also protect humans from respiratory anthrax-like death. PMID:23319564

  3. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Bacillus cereus isolated from beef products in Egypt

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    Reyad Shawish

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Foodborne pathogens have the main concern in public health and food safety. Bacillus cereus food poisoning is one of the most important foodborne pathogens worldwide. In the present study, a total of 200 random beef product samples were collected from different supermarkets located at Menofia and Cairo governorates were examined for the presence of B. cereus. In addition, the presence of some virulence encoding genes was evaluated using Multiplex PCR. Finally, the antibiogram testing was conveyed to illustrate the resistance pattern of the confirmed B. cereus. The data showed that B. cereus was recovered from 22.5%, 30%, 25%, 37.5% and 15% of the minced meat, burger, sausage, kofta, and luncheon respectively. Among the 20 examined isolates 18/20 (90% were harbor hblC enterotoxin encoding gene compared with 20/20 (100 were have cytK enterotoxin encoding gene. The isolated strains of B. cereus were resistant to penicillin G and sensitive to oxacillin, clindamycin, vancomycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and ceftriaxone. In all, the obtained data showed the importance of emerging B. cereus in disease control and prevention programs, and in regular clinical and food quality control laboratories in Egypt.

  4. Trypan blue dye enters viable cells incubated with the pore-forming toxin HlyII of Bacillus cereus.

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    Seav-Ly Tran

    Full Text Available Trypan blue is a dye that has been widely used for selective staining of dead tissues or cells. Here, we show that the pore-forming toxin HlyII of Bacillus cereus allows trypan blue staining of macrophage cells, despite the cells remaining viable and metabolically active. These findings suggest that the dye enters viable cells through the pores. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that trypan blue may enter viable cells. Consequently, the use of trypan blue staining as a marker of vital status should be interpreted with caution. The blue coloration does not necessarily indicate cell lysis, but may rather indicate pore formation in the cell membranes and more generally increased membrane permeability.

  5. EVALUATION OF SUBSTRATES AND AMF SPORULATION IN THE PRODUCTION OF SEEDLINGS OF NATIVE FOREST SPECIES

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    Luciana de Moura Gonzaga

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate organic substrates in the production of canafistula (Peltophorum dubium (Spreng. Taub, cutieira (Joannesiaprinceps Vell., jatoba (Hymenaea courbaril L. and rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis M. Arg. seedlings, native trees with potential use in forest restoration programs. The design was completely randomized with 10 substrate formulations with 4 repetitions of 3 plants for the four species. The evaluated substrates consisted of soil, bovine manure (BM, poultry manure (PM, chemical fertilizer (CF and sand, in different proportions. The experiment was concluded at the end of 180 days for canafistula, cutieira and rubber and 210 days for jatoba. At the end of these periods, the root (RDM, shoot (SDM and total (TDM the dry matters of the seedlings were determined. Quantification of AMF spores and normalization between samples through SPORES/RDM correction were also performed. The Scott-Knott test at 5% probability was applied. Regarding biomass production, only canafistula had significant difference among the tested substrates. In relation to sporulation, the highest values were observed in cutieira and rubber tree in substrate containing PM. The substrates composed of 40 or 50% soil + 20% sand + 30% or 40 PM for canafistula; 50% soil + 20% sand + 30% PM for cutieira; and for jatoba and rubber tree 60% soil + 20% sand + 20% PM, enabled the best results in terms of biomass production in seedlings and AMF sporulation.

  6. C. difficile 630Δerm Spo0A regulates sporulation, but does not contribute to toxin production, by direct high-affinity binding to target DNA.

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    Katharina E Rosenbusch

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that can form highly resistant endospores. The bacterium is the causative agent of C. difficile infection (CDI, for which the symptoms can range from a mild diarrhea to potentially fatal pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. Endospore formation in Firmicutes, including C. difficile, is governed by the key regulator for sporulation, Spo0A. In Bacillus subtilis, this transcription factor is also directly or indirectly involved in various other cellular processes. Here, we report that C. difficile Spo0A shows a high degree of similarity to the well characterized B. subtilis protein and recognizes a similar binding sequence. We find that the laboratory strain C. difficile 630Δerm contains an 18bp-duplication near the DNA-binding domain compared to its ancestral strain 630. In vitro binding assays using purified C-terminal DNA binding domain of the C. difficile Spo0A protein demonstrate direct binding to DNA upstream of spo0A and sigH, early sporulation genes and several other putative targets. In vitro binding assays suggest that the gene encoding the major clostridial toxin TcdB may be a direct target of Spo0A, but supernatant derived from a spo0A negative strain was no less toxic towards Vero cells than that obtained from a wild type strain, in contrast to previous reports. These results identify for the first time direct (putative targets of the Spo0A protein in C. difficile and make a positive effect of Spo0A on production of the large clostridial toxins unlikely.

  7. Generation of mariner-based transposon insertion mutant library of Bacillus sphaericus 2297 and investigation of genes involved in sporulation and mosquito-larvicidal crystal protein synthesis.

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    Wu, Yiming; Hu, Xiaomin; Ge, Yong; Zheng, Dasheng; Yuan, Zhiming

    2012-05-01

    Bacillus sphaericus has been used with great success in mosquito control programs worldwide. Under conditions of nutrient limitation, it undergoes sporulation via a series of well defined morphological stages. However, only a small number of genes involved in sporulation have been identified. To identify genes associated with sporulation, and to understand the relationship between sporulation and crystal protein synthesis, a random mariner-based transposon insertion mutant library of B. sphaericus strain 2297 was constructed and seven sporulation-defective mutants were selected. Sequencing of the DNA flanking of the transposon insertion identified several genes involved in sporulation. The morphologies of mutants were determined by electron microscopy and synthesis of crystal proteins was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Four mutants blocked at early stages of sporulation failed to produce crystal proteins and had lower larvicidal activity. However, the other three mutants were blocked at later stages and were able to form crystal proteins, and the larvicidal activity was similar to wild type. These results indicated that crystal protein synthesis in B. sphaericus is dependent on sporulation initiation. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Toxin production ability of Bacillus cereus strains from food product of Ukraine

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    I. Pylypenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Potential pathogens of foodborne toxic infections – bacterial contaminants Bacillus cereus isolated from plant raw materials and food products from the Ukrainian region were investigated. When determining of the proportion of isolated bacilli from the plant samples, it was established that the epidemiologically significant microorganisms of Bacillus cereus as agents of food poisoning are the second largest. The average value of contaminated samples of Ukrainian plant raw materials and processed products with Bacillus cereus is 36,2 %. The ability of Bacillus cereus strains identified by a complex of morphological, tinctorial, cultural and biochemical properties, to produce specific emetic and enterotoxins was studied. Molecular genetic diagnosis and detection of the toxin-producing ability of isolated 42 Bacillus cereus strains showed both the possibility of their rapid identification and the presence of specific toxicity genes. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR was carried out with specific primers to detect toxicity determined of various bacilli genes: nheA, hblD, cytK, cesВ. The distribution of toxigenic genes is significantly different among the Bacillus cereus isolates from various sources. The nheA, hblD and cytK enterotoxin genes were detected in 100, 83,3 and 61,9 % of the investigated strains of Bacillus cereus, respectively. The cesB gene encoding emetic toxin was detected in 4,8 % of  strains. Molecular-genetic PCR-method confirmed that all the isolated strains belong to the Bacillus cereus group, and the ability to produce toxins can be attributed to five groups. The main toxins that produce the investigated Bacillus cereus strains were nhe and hbl enterotoxins encoded by the corresponding genes of nheA and hblD. The enterotoxic type of Bacillus cereus was predominant in Ukrainian region.  Studies of domestic plant food raw materials and products have confirmed the need to improve microbiological control of product safety

  9. Global transcriptome analysis of spore formation in Myxococcus xanthus reveals a locus necessary for cell differentiation

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    Treuner-Lange Anke

    2010-04-01

    . Conclusions These results suggest that microarray analysis of chemical-induced spore formation is an excellent system to specifically identify genes necessary for the core sporulation process of a Gram negative model organism for differentiation.

  10. Proposal of nine novel species of the Bacillus cereus group.

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    Liu, Yang; Du, Juan; Lai, Qiliang; Zeng, Runying; Ye, Dezan; Xu, Jun; Shao, Zongze

    2017-08-01

    Nine novel Gram-stain-positive bacteria were investigated by a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Based on the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, these strains belonged to the Bacillus cereus group, sharing over 97 % similarity with the known species of this group, and less than 95 % similarity with other species of the genus Bacillus. Multilocus sequence typing analysis showed that they formed nine robust and well-separated branches from the known species. The digital DNA-DNA hybridization (dDDH) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) values between the nine strains were, respectively, below the 70 and 96 % threshold values for species definition, and between each strain and the known type strains of this group were also below the two threshold values. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, along with low dDDH and ANI values among these strains, these bacteria are assigned to the following nine novel species of the B. cereus group: Bacillus paranthracis sp. nov., type strain Mn5T (=MCCC 1A00395T=KCTC 33714T=LMG 28873T); Bacillus pacificus sp. nov., type strain EB422T (=MCCC 1A06182T=KCTC 33858T); Bacillus tropicus sp. nov., type strain N24T (=MCCC 1A01406T=KCTC 33711T=LMG 28874T); Bacillus albus sp. nov., type strain N35-10-2T (=MCCC 1A02146T=KCTC 33710T=LMG 28875T); Bacillus mobilis sp. nov., type strain 0711P9-1T (=MCCC 1A05942T=KCTC 33717T=LMG 28877T); Bacillus luti sp. nov., type strain TD41T (=MCCC 1A00359T=KCTC 33716T=LMG 28872T); Bacillus proteolyticus sp. nov., type strain TD42T (=MCCC 1A00365T=KCTC 33715T=LMG 28870T); Bacillus nitratireducens sp. nov., type strain 4049T (=MCCC 1A00732T=KCTC 33713T=LMG 28871T); and Bacillus paramycoides sp. nov., type strain NH24A2T (=MCCC 1A04098T=KCTC 33709T=LMG 28876T).

  11. Bacillus weihenstephanensis characteristics are present in Bacillus cereus and Bacillus mycoides strains.

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    Soufiane, Brahim; Côté, Jean-Charles

    2013-04-01

    The Bacillus cereus group comprises seven bacterial species: Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus pseudomycoides, Bacillus cytotoxicus, and Bacillus weihenstephanensis. Bacillus weihenstephanensis is distinguished based on its capability to grow at 7 °C but not at 43 °C, and the presence of specific signature sequences in the 16S rRNA and cspA genes and in several housekeeping genes: glpF, gmK, purH, and tpi. Bacillus weihenstephanensis-specific signature sequences were found in some B. cereus and B. mycoides strains suggesting psychrotolerance. This was confirmed by growth at 7 °C but not at 43 °C. The other B. cereus and B. mycoides strains and all B. anthracis, B. thuringiensis, and B. pseudomycoides harbored the mesophilic signature sequences. The strains tested grew at 43 °C but did not grow at 7 °C. A maximum-likelihood phylogenetic tree was inferred from comparisons of the concatenated nucleotide sequences. Three groups and one branch were revealed. Group I, II, and III comprised the mesophilic B. cereus, some mesophilic B. mycoides, and all B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis strains; the psychrotolerant B. cereus and B. mycoides, and all B. weihenstephanensis strains; and some mesophilic B. mycoides and all B. pseudomycoides strains, respectively. The branch corresponds to the single B. cytotoxicus strain. Based on psychrotolerance and multilocus sequence analysis, further confirmed by comparisons of amino acid sequences, we show that some B. cereus and B. mycoides strains should be reclassified as B. weihenstephanensis. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Purification and characterization of two polyhydroxyalcanoates from Bacillus cereus.

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    Zribi-Maaloul, Emna; Trabelsi, Imen; Elleuch, Lobna; Chouayekh, Hichem; Ben Salah, Riadh

    2013-10-01

    This work aimed to study the potential of 155 strains of Bacillus sp., isolated from a collection of Tunisian microorganisms, for polyhydroxyalcanoates production. The strains were submitted to a battery of standard tests commonly used for determining bioplastic properties. The findings revealed that two of the isolates, namely Bacillus US 163 and US 177, provided red excitations at a wavelength of approximately 543 nm. The polyhydroxyalcanoates produced by the two strains were purified. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) were used to characterize the two biopolymers. Bacillus US 163 was noted to produce a poly methyl-3-hydroxy tetradecanoic acid (P-3HTD) with an average molecular weight of 455 kDa, a completely amorphous homopolymer without crystallinity. The US 177 strain produced a homopolymer of methyl-3-hydroxy octadecanoic acid (P3-HOD) with an average molecular weight of 555 kDa. Exhibiting the highest performance, US 163 and US 177 were submitted to 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and the results revealed that they belonged to the Bacillus cereus species. Overall, the findings indicated that the Bacilli from petroleum soil have a number of promising properties that make them promising candidates for bioplastic production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Production, characterization and purification of chitosanase from Bacillus cereus

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    PIZA F. A. T.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A culture medium for a wild strain of Bacillus cereus was developed for chitosanase production by using an experimental design. The factors having the strongest influence on chitosanase production were ammonium sulfate concentration, aeration, pH and the interaction between the first two parameters. Optimal conditions for chitosan hydrolysis were pH 5.8 and 54 oC; however, hydrolysis activity drastically decreased at pH 7.0. The enzyme was purified (single-electrophoretic band by partitioning in an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS, followed by cation-exchange chromatography with a 66% yield. Chitosanase was mainly collected in the top phase (K = 129 of a 22% PEG 1,500, 13% phosphate (pH = 5.8 and 12% NaCl (w/w solution, and the main protein contaminants were evenly distributed between the phases (K = 1.07. The apparent molecular weight and the isoelectric point of the chitosanase, determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and by isoelectric focalization, were 47 kDa and 8.8, respectively.

  14. Vacuum Distillation Residue Upgrading by an Indigenous Bacillus Cereus

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    Mitra Sadat Tabatabaee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Biological processing of heavy fractions of crude oils offers less severe process conditions and higher selectivity for refining. Biochemical Processes are expected to be low demand energy processes and certainly ecofriendly.Results:A strain of biosurfactant producing bacterium was isolated from an oil contaminated soil at Tehran refinery distillation unit. Based on selected phenotypic and genotypic characteristic including morphology, biochemical proprety, and 16 SrRNA sequencing identified as a novel strain of Bacillus cereus (JQ178332. This bacterium endures a wide range of pH, salinity and temperature. This specific strain utilizes both paraffin and anthracene as samples of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The ability of this bacterium to acquire all its energy and chemical requirements from Vacuum Distillation Residue (VR, as a net sample of problematic hydrocarbons in refineries, was studied. SARA test ASTM D4124-01 revealed 65.5% decrease in asphaltenic, 22.1% in aliphatics and 30.3% in Aromatics content of the VR in MSM medium. Further results with 0.9% saline showed 55% decrease in asphaltene content and 2.1% Aromatics respectively.Conclusion:Remarkable abilities of this microorganism propose its application in an ecofriendly technology to upgrade heavy crude oils.

  15. SpoVT : From Fine-Tuning Regulator in Bacillus subtilis to Essential Sporulation Protein in Bacillus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijlander, Robyn T.; Holsappel, Siger; de Jong, Anne; Ghosh, Abhinaba; Christie, Graham; Kuipers, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Sporulation is a highly sophisticated developmental process adopted by most Bacilli as a survival strategy to withstand extreme conditions that normally do not support microbial growth. A complicated regulatory cascade, divided into various stages and taking place in two different compartments of

  16. Multiple rRNA operons are essential for efficient cell growth and sporulation as well as outgrowth in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Koichi; Wada, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Shota; Tagami, Kazumi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Shiwa, Yuh; Ishige, Taichiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Kenta; Akanuma, Genki; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Niki, Hironori; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kawamura, Fujio

    2013-11-01

    The number of copies of rRNA (rrn) operons in a bacterial genome differs greatly among bacterial species. Here we examined the phenotypic effects of variations in the number of copies of rRNA genes in the genome of Bacillus subtilis by analysis of eight mutant strains constructed to carry from two to nine copies of the rrn operon. We found that a decrease in the number of copies from ten to one increased the doubling time, and decreased the sporulation frequency and motility. The maximum levels for transformation activity were similar among the strains, although the competence development was significantly delayed in the strain with a single rrn operon. Normal sporulation only occurred if more than four copies of the rrn operon were present, although ten copies were needed for vegetative growth after germination of the spores. This behaviour was seen even though the intracellular level of ribosomes was similar among strains with four to ten copies of the rrn operon. Furthermore, ten copies of the rrn operon were needed for the highest swarming activity. We also constructed 21 strains that carried all possible combinations of two copies of the rrn operons, and found that these showed a range of growth rates and sporulation frequencies that all fell between those recorded for strains with one or three copies of the rrn operon. The results suggested that the copy number of the rrn operon has a major influence on cellular processes such as growth rate and sporulation frequency.

  17. [Deletion of spoIVF operon affects the sporulation and the production of crystal in Bacillus thuringiensis G03].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chang-po; Song, Fu-ping; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Da-fang

    2007-08-01

    The spoIVF operon exists in Bacillus universally. Two proteins encoded by the spoIVF operon are essential for the sporulation of Bacillus subtilis. In this study, a spoIVF operon disruption mutant G03 (spoIVF-), in which the spoIVF operon was deleted, was constructed by homologous recombination. The result showed that the mutant strain lost the ability of sporulation. At the same time, the expression of Insecticidal Crystal Protein (ICP) was severely reduced in G03 (spoIVF-) mutant strain and resulted in no crystals. The lacZ gene was fused with the promoter of the cry1Aa gene and expressed in mutant strain G03 (spoIVF-) and G03 wild strain. The activity of beta-galactosidase much lower in mutant G03 (spoIVF-) strain than in the wild-type strain. This further suggested that the activity of sigmaE and sigmaK factors was affected in mutant G03 (spoIVF-) strain. The ability of sporulation and production of Insecticide Crystal Protein was complemented by the expression of spoIVF operon through the vector of pSTK in the mutant strain. In all, The spoIVF operon is essential for the sporulation and the expression of cry gene controlled by sigmaE and sigmaK factors.

  18. A derepression system based on the Bacillus subtilis sporulation pathway offers dynamic control of heterologous gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, Reindert; Veening, Jan-Willem; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    By rewiring the sporulation gene-regulatory network of Bacillus subtilis, we generated a novel expression system relying on derepression. The gene of interest is placed under the control of the abrB promoter, which is active only when Spo0A is absent, and Spo0A is controlled via an IPTG

  19. Computer Vision for High-Throughput Quantitative Phenotyping: A Case Study of Grapevine Downy Mildew Sporulation and Leaf Trichomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divilov, Konstantin; Wiesner-Hanks, Tyr; Barba, Paola; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Reisch, Bruce I

    2017-09-28

    Quantitative phenotyping of downy mildew sporulation is frequently used in plant breeding and genetic studies, as well as in studies focused on pathogen biology such as chemical efficacy trials. In these scenarios, phenotyping a large number of genotypes or treatments can be advantageous but is often limited by time and cost. We present a novel computational pipeline dedicated to estimating the percent area of downy mildew sporulation from images of inoculated grapevine leaf discs in a manner that is time and cost efficient. The pipeline was tested on images from leaf disc assay experiments involving two F1 grapevine families, one that had glabrous leaves (Vitis rupestris B38 × 'Horizon' [RH]) and another that had leaf trichomes (Horizon × V. cinerea B9 [HC]). Correlations between computer vision and manual visual ratings reached 0.89 in the RH family and 0.43 in the HC family. Additionally, we were able to use the computer vision system prior to sporulation to measure the percent leaf trichome area. We estimate that an experienced rater scoring sporulation would spend at least 90% less time using the computer vision system compared with the manual visual method. This will allow more treatments to be phenotyped in order to better understand the genetic architecture of downy mildew resistance and of leaf trichome density. We anticipate that this computer vision system will find applications in other pathosystems or traits where responses can be imaged with sufficient contrast from the background.

  20. Effect of environmental conditions and lesion age on sporulation of Phytophthora ramorum on California bay laurel, rhododendron, and camellia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Tjosvold; David Chambers; Sylvia Mori

    2013-01-01

    The objective of our research was to determine the environmental conditions and lesion age favorable for Phytophthora ramorum sporulation under field conditions. For 2 years, new camellia, rhododendron, and California bay laurel (Umbellaria californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt.) nursery stock were seasonally inoculated (every 3 months) on foliage....

  1. Impact of tricyclazole and azoxystrobin on growth, sporulation and secondary infection of the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunova, Andrea; Pizzatti, Cristina; Cortesi, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Rice blast, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae B. Couch sp. nov., is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide, causing substantial yield losses every year. In Italy, its management is based mainly on the use of two fungicides, azoxystrobin and tricyclazole, that restrain the disease progress. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the inhibitory effects of the two fungicides on the growth, sporulation and secondary infection of M. oryzae. Magnaporthe oryzae mycelium growth was inhibited at low concentrations of azoxystrobin and relatively high concentrations of tricyclazole, while sporulation was more sensitive to both fungicides and was affected at similarly low doses. Furthermore, infection efficiency of conidia obtained from mycelia exposed to tricyclazole was affected to a higher extent than for conidia produced on azoxystrobin-amended media, even though germination of such conidia was reduced after azoxystrobin treatment. This study presents for the first time detailed azoxystrobin and tricyclazole growth-response curves for M. oryzae mycelium growth and sporulation. Furthermore, high efficacy of tricyclazole towards inhibition of sporulation and secondary infection indicates an additional possible mode of action of this fungicide that is different from inhibition of melanin biosynthesis. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Comparative genome analysis of Bacillus cereus group genomes withBacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain; Sorokin, Alexei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Reznik, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anamitra; Mikhailova, Natalia; Burd, Henry; Joukov, Victor; Kaznadzey, Denis; Walunas, Theresa; D' Souza, Mark; Larsen, Niels; Pusch,Gordon; Liolios, Konstantinos; Grechkin, Yuri; Lapidus, Alla; Goltsman,Eugene; Chu, Lien; Fonstein, Michael; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Overbeek, Ross; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia

    2005-09-14

    Genome features of the Bacillus cereus group genomes (representative strains of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis sub spp israelensis) were analyzed and compared with the Bacillus subtilis genome. A core set of 1,381 protein families among the four Bacillus genomes, with an additional set of 933 families common to the B. cereus group, was identified. Differences in signal transduction pathways, membrane transporters, cell surface structures, cell wall, and S-layer proteins suggesting differences in their phenotype were identified. The B. cereus group has signal transduction systems including a tyrosine kinase related to two-component system histidine kinases from B. subtilis. A model for regulation of the stress responsive sigma factor sigmaB in the B. cereus group different from the well studied regulation in B. subtilis has been proposed. Despite a high degree of chromosomal synteny among these genomes, significant differences in cell wall and spore coat proteins that contribute to the survival and adaptation in specific hosts has been identified.

  3. BACILLUS CEREUS EM PRODUTOS LÁCTEOS - UMA REVISÃO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike Taís Maziero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus é uma bactéria termodúrica, formadora de esporos, capaz de se multiplicar em temperatura de refrigeração. Pode causar dois tipos de doenças de origem alimentar: a síndrome emética e a síndrome diarréica. Além do aspecto epidemiológico, B. cereus causa defeitos tecnológicos em produtos lácteos, relacionados com a produção de lipases e proteases. A presença de B. cereus em produtos lácteos vem sendo relatada por pesquisas feitas em vários países, bem como os defeitos tecnológicos associados à contaminação dos produtos por essa bactéria. Destacam-se, na presente revisão, os principais aspectos relacionados à presença de B. cereus em produtos lácteos. Para tanto, foram selecionados trabalhos relevantes e inovadores sobre B. cereus em várias bases de dados, entre elas, Science Direct, SciELO, Scirus e Google Acadêmico.

  4. Detection of toxin genes and RAPD analysis of bacillus cereus isolates from different soil types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savic Dejana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect genes for enterotoxins (hbla, entFM and bceT and for emetic toxin (cer, to determine antibiotic resistance, and to estimate intraspecies diversity in B. cereus isolates by RAPD analysis. B. cereus was identified in 12 out of 117 indigenous Bacillus spp. using the classical microbiological methods and PCR. All isolates were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin, two to tetracyclin and four to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole. Also, all isolates produced inducible penicillinases and β-lactamase. Toxin genes were detected with PCR. EntFM and cer genes were present in all isolates, hbla in all, but two, and bceT in none. RAPD analysis was performed with four different primers, two of them designed for this study. The intraspecies diversity revealed 10 different patterns at the 90% similarity level. Two separate clusters were formed regardless of a soil type or utilization. The detection of genes encoding toxins in all B. cereus isolates indicated these bacteria as potentially pathogenic and seriously for human health. Regardless of a soil type or utilization, the RAPD analysis showed high intraspecies heterogeneity in B. cereus isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to analyse the presence of entero- and emetic toxin genes and genetic heterogeneity in B. cereus isolates from different soil types and different soil utilization in Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR37006

  5. Bacillus cereus Response to a Proanthocyanidin Trimer, a Transcriptional and Functional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Tomoko; Ozawa, Megumi; Tanaka, Naoto; Arai, Soichi; Mura, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Proanthocyanidins are abundant in peanut skin, and in this study, the antibacterial effects of a peanut skin extract (PSE) against food-borne bacteria were investigated to find its minimum inhibitory concentration. Food-borne gram-positive bacteria, and in particular Bacillus cereus, was more sensitive to PSE. In particular, the inhibitory activity of epicatechin-(4β → 6)-epicatechin-(2β → O→7, 4β → 8)-catechin (EEC), a proanthocyanidin trimer from peanut skin, against B. cereus was stronger than that of procyanidin A1, a proanthocyanidin dimer. DNA microarray analysis of B. cereus treated with EEC was carried out, with a finding that 597 genes were significantly up-regulated. Analysis of the up-regulated genes suggested that EEC disrupted the normal condition of the cell membrane and wall of B. cereus and alter its usual nutritional metabolism. Moreover, treatment of B. cereus with EEC inhibited glucose uptake, suggesting that EEC affects the cell-surface adsorption.

  6. Development of a double-antibody sandwich ELISA for rapid detection of Bacillus Cereus in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Longjiao; He, Jing; Cao, Xiaohan; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is increasingly recognized as one of the major causes of food poisoning in the industrialized world. In this paper, we describe a sensitive double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that was developed for rapid detection of B. cereus in food to minimize the risk of contamination. The polyclonal antibody (pAb) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to B. cereus were generated from rabbit antiserum and mouse ascites, respectively, using the octanoic acid/saturated ammonium sulfate precipitation method and protein A-sepharose columns. IgG-isotype mAbs were specially developed to undergo a novel peripheral multiple sites immunization for rapid gain of hybridomas and a subtractive screen was used to eliminate cross reactivity with closely related species such as Bacillus thuringiensis, B. subtilis, B. licheniformis and B. perfringens. The linear detection range of the method was approximately 1 × 104–2.8 × 106 cells/mL with a detection limit (LOD) of 0.9 × 103 cells/mL. The assay was able to detect B. cereus when the samples were prepared in meat with various pathogens. The newly developed analytical method provides a rapid method to sensitively detect B. cereus in food specimens. PMID:26976753

  7. Architecture and High-Resolution Structure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus Spore Coat Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plomp, M; Leighton, T; Wheeler, K; Malkin, A

    2005-02-18

    We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize the native surface topology and ultrastructure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus spores in water and in air. AFM was able to resolve the nanostructure of the exosporium and three distinctive classes of appendages. Removal of the exosporium exposed either a hexagonal honeycomb layer (B. thuringiensis) or a rodlet outer spore coat layer (B. cereus). Removal of the rodlet structure from B. cereus spores revealed an underlying honeycomb layer similar to that observed with B. thuringiensis spores. The periodicity of the rodlet structure on the outer spore coat of B. cereus was {approx}8 nm, and the length of the rodlets was limited to the cross-patched domain structure of this layer to {approx}200 nm. The lattice constant of the honeycomb structures was {approx}9 nm for both B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores. Both honeycomb structures were composed of multiple, disoriented domains with distinct boundaries. Our results demonstrate that variations in storage and preparation procedures result in architectural changes in individual spore surfaces, which establish AFM as a useful tool for evaluation of preparation and processing ''fingerprints'' of bacterial spores. These results establish that high-resolution AFM has the capacity to reveal species-specific assembly and nanometer scale structure of spore surfaces. These species-specific spore surface structural variations are correlated with sequence divergences in a spore core structural protein SspE.

  8. The prevalence and concentration of Bacillus cereus in retail food products in Brisbane, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglezos, Sofroni; Huang, Bixing; Dykes, Gary A; Fegan, Narelle

    2010-07-01

    Illness associated with Bacillus cereus may be underreported as very few of those affected seek medical attention owing to the mild nature and short duration of symptoms. For this reason there is little information on the prevalence and concentration of this pathogen in retail food products. A total of 1263 retail food samples were examined for B. cereus using the Australian Standard 1766.2.6 (1991): spread plate technique on polymyxin pyruvate egg yolk mannitol bromothymol blue agar, of which the limit of detection was log(10) 2.0 cfu/g. Bacillus cereus was not detected in samples of skim milk powder, sandwiches, sushi, fresh beef mince, tortillas, or shelf stable stir-fry sauces. Bacillus cereus was detected in the following food samples: uncooked pizza bases (1 of 63 samples, log(10) count of 2.0 cfu/g), cooked pizzas (8 of 175, mean log(10) 3.4 cfu/g), cooked meat pies (7 of 157, mean log(10) 2.2 cfu/g), cooked sausage rolls (5 of 153, mean log(10) 2.6 cfu/g), processed meats (1 of 350, log(10) 3.3 cfu/g), and raw diced chicken (3 of 55, mean log(10) 4.3 cfu/g). It appears that composite food products have more positive detection samples because the numerous ingredients may introduce spores into the foods. This study provides valuable data on the distribution, prevalence, and concentration of B. cereus in selected retail products.

  9. Unisexual reproduction enhances fungal competitiveness by promoting habitat exploration via hyphal growth and sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Sujal S; Feretzaki, Marianna; Heitman, Joseph

    2013-08-01

    Unisexual reproduction is a novel homothallic sexual cycle recently discovered in both ascomycetous and basidiomycetous pathogenic fungi. It is a form of selfing that induces the yeast-to-hyphal dimorphic transition in isolates of the α mating type of the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Unisexual reproduction may benefit the pathogen by facilitating sexual reproduction in the absence of the opposite a mating type and by generating infectious propagules called basidiospores. Here, we report an independent potential selective advantage of unisexual reproduction beyond genetic exchange and recombination. We competed a wild-type strain capable of undergoing unisexual reproduction with mutants defective in this developmental pathway and found that unisexual reproduction provides a considerable dispersal advantage through hyphal growth and sporulation. Our results show that unisexual reproduction may serve to facilitate access to both nutrients and potential mating partners and may provide a means to maintain the capacity for dimorphic transitions in the environment.

  10. A model of cell-wall dynamics during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Li-Wei; Endres, Robert G.

    To survive starvation, Bacillus subtilis forms durable spores. After asymmetric cell division, the septum grows around the forespore in a process called engulfment, but the mechanism of force generation is unknown. Here, we derived a novel biophysical model for the dynamics of cell-wall remodeling during engulfment based on a balancing of dissipative, active, and mechanical forces. By plotting phase diagrams, we predict that sporulation is promoted by a line tension from the attachment of the septum to the outer cell wall, as well as by an imbalance in turgor pressures in the mother-cell and forespore compartments. We also predict that significant mother-cell growth hinders engulfment. Hence, relatively simple physical principles may guide this complex biological process.

  11. Biocidal action of ozone-treated polystyrene surfaces on vegetative and sporulated bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahfoudh, Ahlem [Groupe de physique des plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada); Barbeau, Jean [Faculte de Medecine dentaire, Laboratoire de controle des infections, Universite de Montreal, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada); Moisan, Michel, E-mail: michel.moisan@umontreal.ca [Groupe de physique des plasmas, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada); Leduc, Annie; Seguin, Jacynthe [Faculte de Medecine dentaire, Laboratoire de controle des infections, Universite de Montreal, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-03-01

    Surfaces of materials can be modified to ensure specific interaction features with microorganisms. The current work discloses biocidal properties of polystyrene (PS) Petri-dish surfaces that have been exposed to a dry gaseous-ozone flow. Such treated PS surfaces are able to inactivate various species of vegetative and sporulated bacteria on a relatively short contact time. Denaturation of proteins seems likely based on a significant loss of enzymatic activity of the lysozyme protein. Characterization of these surfaces by atomic-force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals specific structural and chemical modifications as compared to untreated PS. Persistence of the biocidal properties of these treated surfaces is observed. This ozone-induced process is technically simple to achieve and does not require active precursors as in grafting.

  12. The possibility of discriminating within the Bacillus cereus group using gyrB sequencing and PCR-RFLP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gert B; Fisker, Niels; Sparsø, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Based on a combination of PCR and restriction endonuclease (RE) digestion (PCR-RE digestion), we have examined the possibility of differentiating members of the Bacillus cereus group. Fragments of the gyrB gene (362 bp) from pure cultures of 12 B. cereus, 25 B. thuringiensis, 25 B. mycoides and two...

  13. The YvfTU Two-component System is involved in plcR expression in Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brillard, Julien; Susanna, Kim; Michaud, Caroline; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Gohar, Michel; Nielsen-Leroux, Christina; Ramarao, Nalini; Kolsto, Anne-Brit; Nguyen-The, Christophe; Lereclus, Didier; Broussolle, Veronique

    2008-01-01

    Background: Most extracellular virulence factors produced by Bacillus cereus are regulated by the pleiotropic transcriptional activator PlcR. Among strains belonging to the B. cereus group, the plcR gene is always located in the vicinity of genes encoding the YvfTU two-component system. The putative

  14. Characterization and exposure assessment of emetic bacillus cereus and cereulide production in food products on the Dutch market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesta-Peters, Elisabeth G.; Dissel, Serge; Reij, Martine W.; Zwietering, Marcel H.; In't Veld, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    The emetic toxin cereulide, which can be produced by Bacillus cereus, can be the cause of food poisoning upon ingestion by the consumer. The toxin causes vomiting and is mainly produced in farinaceous food products. This article includes the prevalence of B. cereus and of cereulide in food

  15. Inhibition of Bacillus cereus Growth and Toxin Production by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens RD7-7 in Fermented Soybean Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Choi, Hye Sun

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium that has been isolated from contaminated fermented soybean food products and from the environment. B. cereus produces diarrheal and emetic toxins and has caused many outbreaks of foodborne diseases. In this study, we investigated whether B. amyloliquefaciens RD7-7, isolated from rice doenjang (Korean fermented soybean paste), a traditional Korean fermented soybean food, shows antimicrobial activity against B. cereus and regulates its toxin gene expression. B. amyloliquefaciens RD7-7 exhibited strong antibacterial activity against B. cereus and inhibited the expression of B. cereus toxin-related genes (groEL, nheA, nheC, and entFM). We also found that addition of water extracts of soybean and buckwheat soksungjang (Korean fermented soybean paste made in a short time) fermented with B. amyloliquefaciens RD7-7 significantly reduced the growth and toxin expression of B. cereus. These results indicate that B. amyloliquefaciens RD7-7 could be used to control B. cereus growth and toxin production in the fermented soybean food industry. Our findings also provide a basis for the development of candidate biological control agents against B. cereus to improve the safety of fermented soybean food products.

  16. The worldwide distribution of genetically and phylogenetically diverse Bacillus cereus isolates harbouring Bacillus anthracis-like plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, Paulina Sylwia; Yernazarova, Aliya; Drewnowska, Justyna Malgorzata; Zambrowski, Grzegorz; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2015-10-01

    Bacillus cereus is a close relative of B. anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax whose pathogenic determinants are located on pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids. Bacillus anthracis-like plasmids have been also noted among B. cereus, however, genetic features of B. cereus harbouring these elements remain largely undescribed, especially from the global perspective. Herein, we present the genetic polymorphism, population structure and phylogeny of B. cereus with pXO1-/pXO2-like plasmids originating from Argentina, Kazakhstan, Kenya and Poland. The plasmids were found in about 17% of the isolates, but their frequencies and expression of replicons differed within and between populations. In the multi-locus sequence typing, the bacteria exhibited high genetic polymorphism reflected by 116 sequencing types, including 84 singletons and 10 clonal complexes, which mainly consisted of isolates of the same origin. The phylogenetic analysis of pXO1-/pXO2-like positive B. cereus isolates revealed six independent clades; in certain clades individual populations predominated. Generally, B. cereus with pXO1-/pXO2-like plasmids did not indicate the genetic relationship with B. anthracis, and cannot be classified into an evolutionary independent anthrax line within the B. cereus group. Our report is of a crucial importance for discovering the genetic specificity and evolution of B. cereus bacilli. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Monitoring the ethanol stress response of a sigM deletion strain of B. cereus ATCC 14579.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, van der M.

    2008-01-01

    Here, the role of σM and its regulon in stress response and survival of B. cereus ATCC 14579 was assessed by comparative transciptome and phenotypic analysis of this strain and its sigM deletion strain. Exposure of B. cereus ATCC 14579 to a wide range of stresses revealed expression of sigM,

  18. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteriophages (phages) have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here. PMID:25010767

  19. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gillis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteriophages (phages have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here.

  20. IN VITRO SEED GERMINATION OF MANDACARU (Cereus jamacaru DC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAILSON MONTEIRO DO RÊGO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O mandacaru (Cereus jamacaru P. DC. é uma cactaceae nativa da caatinga, possuindo grande importância para a sustentabilidade e conservação da biodiversidade deste bioma. Objetivou-se com este trabalho desinfestar e promover a germinação de sementes de mandacaru, variando os fatores concentração de hipoclorito de sódio e concentração de sacarose. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial 5x5, com cinco repetições. Os tratamentos consistiram de cinco concentrações de hipoclorito de sódio (0,0; 0,5; 1,0; 1,5 e 2,0% de cloro ativo e cinco concentrações de sacarose (0,0; 2,5; 5,0; 7,5 e 10,0% . Foram avaliados o número de contaminações, germinações e tamanho da planta por semente cultivada. Houve interação significativa, apenas para a variável germinação, sendo a concentração de 2,5% de sacarose a mais eficiente dentro das quatro concentrações de cloro ativo. Verificou-se que a concentração de cloro ativo a partir de 0,5% é efetiva na desinfestação das sementes, sendo a concentração de 1,0% o melhor tratamento. Com relação à característica comprimento de plântula não houve diferenças significativas para os dois fatores analisados.

  1. The Pathogenomic Sequence Analysis of B. cereus and B.thuringiensis Isolates Closely Related to Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Cliff S.; Xie, Gary; Challacombe, Jean F.; Altherr, MichaelR.; Smriti, B.; Bruce, David; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Chen, Jin; Chertkov, Olga; Cleland, Cathy; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M.; Doggett, Norman A.; Fawcett, John J.; Glavina, Tijana; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Hill, Karen K.; Hitchcock, Penny; Jackson, Paul J.; Keim, Paul; Kewalramani, Avinash Ramesh; Longmire, Jon; Lucas, Susan; Malfatti,Stephanie; McMurry, Kim; Meincke, Linda J.; Misra, Monica; Moseman,Bernice L.; Mundt, Mark; Munk, A. Christine; Okinaka, Richard T.; Parson-Quintana, B.; Reilly, Lee P.; Richardson, Paul; Robinson, DonnaL.; Rubin, Eddy; Saunders, Elizabeth; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Ticknor, Lawrence O.; Wills, Patti L.; Gilna, Payl; Brettin, Thomas S.

    2005-08-18

    The sequencing and analysis of two close relatives of Bacillus anthracis are reported. AFLP analysis of over 300 isolates of B.cereus, B. thuringiensis and B. anthracis identified two isolates as being very closely related to B. anthracis. One, a B. cereus, BcE33L, was isolated from a zebra carcass in Nambia; the second, a B. thuringiensis, 97-27, was isolated from a necrotic human wound. The B. cereus appears to be the closest anthracis relative sequenced to date. A core genome of over 3,900 genes was compiled for the Bacillus cereus group, including Banthracis. Comparative analysis of these two genomes with other members of the B. cereus group provides insight into the evolutionary relationships among these organisms. Evidence is presented that differential regulation modulates virulence, rather than simple acquisition of virulence factors. These genome sequences provide insight into the molecular mechanisms contributing to the host range and virulence of this group of organisms.

  2. Discrimination of the Bacillus cereus group members by pattern analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwana, Ritsuko; Imamura, Daisuke; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Watabe, Kazuhito

    2012-06-01

    We tried to discriminate 16 strains of the Bacillus cereus group including B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. mycoides, B. pseudomycoides, and B. weihenstephanensis strains by the pattern analysis of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) -PCR. Eight oligonucleotides primers were prepared and the polymorphic patterns of the DNA of each strain were compared with those of others. The primers E and F gave different patterns of RAPD-PCR products in all strains of the B. cereus group, so these primers are effective tools for the discrimination of closely related strains. All eight primers showed different polymorphic patterns of DNA for the four strains of B. cereus isolated from the kitchen of a private home, which verifies the advantage of the RAPD-PCR analysis for the discrimination of isolated strains of B. cereus from the environment.

  3. Characterization of Bacillus cereus isolates from local dairy farms in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yifang; Liu, Xiaoye; Dietrich, Richard; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Cao, Jie; Ding, Shuangyang; Zhu, Kui

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus cereus is an important opportunistic foodborne pathogen. In the present work, a total of 306 milk and environmental samples were collected from 10 local dairy farms in Beijing, China. Of the 92 B. cereus-like isolates, 88 and 4 belonged to B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, respectively. The prevalence of B. cereus isolates in bedding, feces, feed, liquid manure and raw milk was 93.3%, 78.9%, 41.2%, 100.0% and 9.8%, respectively. Three main toxin genes nhe, hbl and ces were detected with rates of 100.0%, 78.3% and 1.1%, but no strain harbored cytK1 The production of Nhe, Hbl and cereulide could be confirmed by specific monoclonal antibodies-based enzyme immunoassays in 94.6%, 70.7% and 1.1% of all isolates, respectively. Cytotoxicity tests were used to further corroborate the results of genetic and protein-based assays; 91.3% of the isolates showed cytotoxicity to Vero cells. All isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance against 17 antibiotics. All isolates were resistant to lincomycin, retapamulin, tiamulin and valnemulin, while two strains were susceptible to ampicillin and ceftiofur. A total of 16 isolated strains were resistant to tetracycline. Since spores of B. cereus are not inactivated during manufacturing of most milk products, contamination of milk with B. cereus on the farm level may represent a potential hazard, particularly with respect to emetic toxin-producing strains. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A hospital cafeteria-related food-borne outbreak due to Bacillus cereus: unique features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddour, L M; Gaia, S M; Griffin, R; Hudson, R

    1986-09-01

    Although Bacillus cereus is a well-known cause of food-borne illness, hospital-related outbreaks of food-borne disease due to B. cereus have rarely been documented. We report a hospital employee cafeteria outbreak due to foods contaminated with B. cereus in which an outside caterer was employed to prepare the suspect meals. Data were collected from 249 of 291 employees who had eaten either of the two meals. With a mean incubation period of 12.5 hours, 64% (160 of 249) of employees manifested illness. Symptoms, which averaged 24.3 hours in duration, included diarrhea (96.3%), abdominal cramps (90%), nausea (50.6%), weakness (24.7%), and vomiting (13.8%). Eighty-seven employees sought medical attention, 84 of whom were seen in an emergency room. Although a significant difference was not demonstrated in food-specific attack rates, B. cereus was cultured from both rice and chicken items that were served at both meals. Sixty-three employees submitted stools for culture that grew no enteric pathogens, but none were examined for B. cereus. This food-borne outbreak demonstrates: the need for hospital kitchen supervisors to ensure proper handling of food when outside caterers are employed; that significant differences in food-specific attack rates may not be demonstrated in outbreaks, which may be related to several factors; and the importance of notifying microbiology laboratory personnel when B. cereus is a suspect enteric pathogen, since many laboratories do not routinely attempt to identify this organism in stool specimens.

  5. Antimicrobial efficacy of phytochemicals against Bacillus cereus in reconstituted infant rice cereal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin-Karaca, Hayriye; Newman, Melissa C

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential use of Trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and [10]-Gingerol (GI) to inhibit the growth of B. cereus in infant rice cereal reconstituted with infant formula. Samples were inoculated with either vegetative cells or spores of B. cereus (ATCC 14579), and they were treated with 500 ppm (mg/L) TC, EGCG and GI. They were stored at 7 °C, 23 °C, or 37 °C for 0, 4, 8 and 24 h to simulate advance preparation, handling and temperature abuse. At 23 °C no growth was observed with TC over 24 h. TC also showed the highest antimicrobial activity 37 °C by inhibiting the growth of B. cereus vegetative cells by 0.83 log CFU/g and B. cereus spores by 2.0 log CFU/g after 24 h. B. cereus (ATCC 14579) did not grow at 7 °C over 24 h and TC had no effect on its survival. Significant differences (P cinnamon taste, while EGCG gave a purple color to the reconstituted rice cereal. These results indicate that TC may serve as a potential natural antimicrobial in reconstituted infant rice cereal even when utilized at low concentrations, inhibiting both vegetative cells and spores of B. cereus. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Identification and genomic comparison of temperate bacteriophages derived from emetic Bacillus cereus.

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    Peiling Geng

    Full Text Available Cereulide-producing Bacillus cereus isolates can cause serious emetic (vomiting syndrome and even acute lethality. As mobile genetic elements, the exploration of prophages derived from emetic B. cereus isolates will help in our understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of these pathogens. In this study, five temperate phages derived from cereulide-producing B. cereus strains were induced, with four of them undergoing genomic sequencing. Sequencing revealed that they all belong to the Siphoviridae family, but presented in different forms in their hosts. PfNC7401 and PfIS075 have typical icosahedral heads, probably existing alone as phagemids in the host with self-replicating capability in the lysogenic state. PfEFR-4, PfEFR-5, and PfATCC7953 have elongated heads, with the genomes of the former two identified as linear dsDNA, which could be integrated into the host genome during the lysogenic state. Genomic comparison of the four phages with others also derived from emetic B. cereus isolates showed similar genome structures and core genes, thus displaying host spectrum specificity. In addition, phylogenic analysis based on the complete genome and conserved tail fiber proteins of 36 Bacillus species-derived phages confirmed that the phages derived from emetic B. cereus strains were highly similar. Furthermore, one endolysin LysPfEFR-4 was cloned and showed lytic activity against all tested emetic B. cereus strains and cross-lytic activity against some other pathogenic bacteria, implying a potential to control bacterial contamination in the food supply.

  7. Detection of toxigenic bacillus cereus strains in powdered infant formula (PIF milk by PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, use of powdered infant formula (PIF milk for neonates feed is increasing; therefore, the quality control (QC of PIF products is very important. The aim of present study was detection of toxigenic Bacillus cereus species in PIF milk using PCR assay. Methods: The cross-sectional study was carried out on 125 samples of powdered infant formula milk (PIF purchased between March 2015 and April 2016 in Department of Pathobiology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Briefly, 0.1 dilutions were prepared and inoculated on Bacillus cereus selective media (MYP and incubated at 30 °C for 24 hours. The suspicious colonies were verified using biochemical tests based on standard methods. Final confirmation of studied isolates was carried out by ITS gene detection using polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. Presence of nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE (linked to diarrhoea syndrome and emetic toxin (EM (linked to emetic syndrome virulence genes were investigated using polymerase chain reaction assay.  Results: In this study, of 125 PIF samples, 84 (67.2% were contaminated. Of various recovered bacteria from these samples, 110 bacterial isolates were suspected to be Bacillus spp. using phenotypic methods. The ITS PCR results showed that 91.8% of the isolates were B. cereus. Respectively, 53.63 and 79% of B. cereus isolates possessed NHE and EM virulence genes. Conclusion: Our data revealed that near 80% of Bacillus cereus isolates have emetic toxin (EM gene, as result virulence potency of this isolates is very high. However, the low number of this organisms in foods is very important and food safety protocols for these opportunistic toxigenic bacteria should be revised. Since the pasteurization process is ineffective on B. cereus spores; therefore, spores can remain in PIF milk and the vegetative bacterial cells can cause food poisoning in neonates. Therefore, modification of foods quality

  8. Identification and genomic comparison of temperate bacteriophages derived from emetic Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peiling; Tian, Shen; Yuan, Zhiming; Hu, Xiaomin

    2017-01-01

    Cereulide-producing Bacillus cereus isolates can cause serious emetic (vomiting) syndrome and even acute lethality. As mobile genetic elements, the exploration of prophages derived from emetic B. cereus isolates will help in our understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of these pathogens. In this study, five temperate phages derived from cereulide-producing B. cereus strains were induced, with four of them undergoing genomic sequencing. Sequencing revealed that they all belong to the Siphoviridae family, but presented in different forms in their hosts. PfNC7401 and PfIS075 have typical icosahedral heads, probably existing alone as phagemids in the host with self-replicating capability in the lysogenic state. PfEFR-4, PfEFR-5, and PfATCC7953 have elongated heads, with the genomes of the former two identified as linear dsDNA, which could be integrated into the host genome during the lysogenic state. Genomic comparison of the four phages with others also derived from emetic B. cereus isolates showed similar genome structures and core genes, thus displaying host spectrum specificity. In addition, phylogenic analysis based on the complete genome and conserved tail fiber proteins of 36 Bacillus species-derived phages confirmed that the phages derived from emetic B. cereus strains were highly similar. Furthermore, one endolysin LysPfEFR-4 was cloned and showed lytic activity against all tested emetic B. cereus strains and cross-lytic activity against some other pathogenic bacteria, implying a potential to control bacterial contamination in the food supply.

  9. Reconstitution of Bacillus cereus 5/B/6 metallo-[beta]-lactamase activity with copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilliard, N.P.; Shaw, R.W. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria become resistant to [beta]-lactam antibiotics such as penicillins and cephalosporins through the production of enzymes called [beta]-lactamases. The authors have successfully reconstituted the enzymatic activity of the metallo-[beta]-lactamase of Bacillus cereus 5/B/6 purified from an E. coli expression vector system by the addition of Cu(II) to the apoenzyme. This is the first report that copper supports catalytic activity in this enzyme. Maximal activity of the copper-reconstituted enzyme was achieved by a careful addition of a stoichiometric amount of CuSO[sub 4] to 200 [mu]M apoenzyme. Using either benzylpenicillin or cephalosporin C as the substrate, reconstitution of the activity by addition of copper to the apoenzyme resulted in the recovery of approximately 35% of the control activity of the native Zn(II) enzyme. In agreement with previous reports, in the presence of excess Cu(II), the preparation did not possess measurable catalytic activity. Electronic spectra of the copper-reconstituted enzyme displayed adsorption maxima at 394, 698 and 1,022 nm with extinction coefficients of 2,656, 55 and < 3 M[sup [minus]1]cm[sup [minus]1] respectively. Circular dichorism spectra in the ultraviolent region (UVCD) of the copper-reconstituted enzyme were identical with those of the native Zn(II) enzyme. Addition of excess cephalosporin C to the copper-reconstituted enzyme caused a decrease of about 50% of the absorbance of the 394 nm band and the formation of a new feature at 350 nm.

  10. The Bacillus cereus Hbl and Nhe Tripartite Enterotoxin Components Assemble Sequentially on the Surface of Target Cells and Are Not Interchangeable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastalla, Inka; Fattah, Rasem; Coppage, Nicole; Nandy, Poulomi; Crown, Devorah; Pomerantsev, Andrei P.; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming, Gram-positive bacterium commonly associated with outbreaks of food poisoning. It is also known as an opportunistic pathogen causing clinical infections such as bacteremia, meningitis, pneumonia, and gas gangrene-like cutaneous infections, mostly in immunocompromised patients. B. cereus secretes a plethora of toxins of which four are associated with the symptoms of food poisoning. Two of these, the non-hemolytic enterotoxin Nhe and the hemolysin BL (Hbl) toxin, are predicted to be structurally similar and are unique in that they require the combined action of three toxin proteins to induce cell lysis. Despite their dominant role in disease, the molecular mechanism of their toxic function is still poorly understood. We report here that B. cereus strain ATCC 10876 harbors not only genes encoding Nhe, but also two copies of the hbl genes. We identified Hbl as the major secreted toxin responsible for inducing rapid cell lysis both in cultured cells and in an intraperitoneal mouse toxicity model. Antibody neutralization and deletion of Hbl-encoding genes resulted in significant reductions of cytotoxic activity. Microscopy studies with Chinese Hamster Ovary cells furthermore showed that pore formation by both Hbl and Nhe occurs through a stepwise, sequential binding of toxin components to the cell surface and to each other. This begins with binding of Hbl-B or NheC to the eukaryotic membrane, and is followed by the recruitment of Hbl-L1 or NheB, respectively, followed by the corresponding third protein. Lastly, toxin component complementation studies indicate that although Hbl and Nhe can be expressed simultaneously and are predicted to be structurally similar, they are incompatible and cannot complement each other. PMID:24204713

  11. The Bacillus cereus Hbl and Nhe tripartite enterotoxin components assemble sequentially on the surface of target cells and are not interchangeable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inka Sastalla

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming, Gram-positive bacterium commonly associated with outbreaks of food poisoning. It is also known as an opportunistic pathogen causing clinical infections such as bacteremia, meningitis, pneumonia, and gas gangrene-like cutaneous infections, mostly in immunocompromised patients. B. cereus secretes a plethora of toxins of which four are associated with the symptoms of food poisoning. Two of these, the non-hemolytic enterotoxin Nhe and the hemolysin BL (Hbl toxin, are predicted to be structurally similar and are unique in that they require the combined action of three toxin proteins to induce cell lysis. Despite their dominant role in disease, the molecular mechanism of their toxic function is still poorly understood. We report here that B. cereus strain ATCC 10876 harbors not only genes encoding Nhe, but also two copies of the hbl genes. We identified Hbl as the major secreted toxin responsible for inducing rapid cell lysis both in cultured cells and in an intraperitoneal mouse toxicity model. Antibody neutralization and deletion of Hbl-encoding genes resulted in significant reductions of cytotoxic activity. Microscopy studies with Chinese Hamster Ovary cells furthermore showed that pore formation by both Hbl and Nhe occurs through a stepwise, sequential binding of toxin components to the cell surface and to each other. This begins with binding of Hbl-B or NheC to the eukaryotic membrane, and is followed by the recruitment of Hbl-L1 or NheB, respectively, followed by the corresponding third protein. Lastly, toxin component complementation studies indicate that although Hbl and Nhe can be expressed simultaneously and are predicted to be structurally similar, they are incompatible and cannot complement each other.

  12. Butanol production under microaerobic conditions with a symbiotic system of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pengfei; Wang, Genyu; Wang, Gehua; Børresen, Børre Tore; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan

    2016-01-14

    One major problem of ABE (acetone, butanol and ethanol) fermentation is high oxygen sensitivity of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Currently, no single strain has been isolated or genetically engineered to produce butanol effectively under aerobic conditions. In our previous work, a symbiotic system TSH06 has been developed successfully by our group, and two strains, C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and Bacillus cereus TSH2, were isolated from TSH06. Compared with single culture, TSH06 showed promotion on cell growth and solvent accumulation under microaerobic conditions. To simulate TSH06, a new symbiotic system was successfully re-constructed by adding living cells of B. cereus TSH2 into C. acetobutylicum TSH1 cultures. During the fermentation process, the function of B. cereus TSH2 was found to deplete oxygen and provide anaerobic environment for C. acetobutylicum TSH1. Furthermore, inoculation ratio of C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2 affected butanol production. In a batch fermentation with optimized inoculation ratio of 5 % C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and 0.5 % B. cereus TSH2, 11.0 g/L butanol and 18.1 g/L ABE were produced under microaerobic static condition. In contrast to the single culture of C. acetobutylicum TSH1, the symbiotic system became more aerotolerant and was able to produce 11.2 g/L butanol in a 5 L bioreactor even with continuous 0.15 L/min air sparging. In addition, qPCR assay demonstrated that the abundance of B. cereus TSH2 increased quickly at first and then decreased sharply to lower than 1 %, whereas C. acetobutylicum TSH1 accounted for more than 99 % of the whole population in solventogenic phase. The characterization of a novel symbiotic system on butanol fermentation was studied. The new symbiotic system re-constructed by co-culture of C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2 showed excellent performance on butanol production under microaerobic conditions. B. cereus TSH2 was a good partner for C. acetobutylicum TSH1 by providing an anaerobic

  13. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Deniz Aygun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia.

  14. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygun, Fatma Deniz; Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia.

  15. Relapsing peritonitis with Bacillus cereus in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Eyð Tausen; Vang, Amanda Gratton; á Steig, Torkil

    2016-01-01

    . Peritoneal cultures were positive for growth of B. cereus, a rare bacterial cause of peritonitis. The cultures demonstrated susceptibility to vancomycin, and therefore the patient was treated with intraperitoneal vancomycin, intraperitoneal gentamycin and oral ciprofloxacin. As a result of the relapsing B....... cereus peritonitis diagnosis and a CT scan showing contraction of the peritoneum after longstanding inflammation, the peritoneal catheter was removed and the patient converted to haemodialysis. To date, the patient has not been readmitted due to peritonitis. A lack of proper hygiene when changing...

  16. Characteristics and phylogeny of Bacillus cereus strains isolated from Maari, a traditional West African food condiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Line; Kando, Christine Kere; Sawadogo, Hagrétou; Larsen, Nadja; Diawara, Bréhima; Ouédraogo, Georges Anicet; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-03-02

    Maari is a spontaneously fermented food condiment made from baobab tree seeds in West African countries. This type of product is considered to be safe, being consumed by millions of people on a daily basis. However, due to the spontaneous nature of the fermentation the human pathogen Bacillus cereus occasionally occurs in Maari. This study characterizes succession patterns and pathogenic potential of B. cereus isolated from the raw materials (ash, water from a drilled well (DW) and potash), seed mash throughout fermentation (0-96h), after steam cooking and sun drying (final product) from two production sites of Maari. Aerobic mesophilic bacterial (AMB) counts in raw materials were of 10(5)cfu/ml in DW, and ranged between 6.5×10(3) and 1.2×10(4)cfu/g in potash, 10(9)-10(10)cfu/g in seed mash during fermentation and 10(7) - 10(9) after sun drying. Fifty three out of total 290 AMB isolates were identified as B. cereus sensu lato by use of ITS-PCR and grouped into 3 groups using PCR fingerprinting based on Escherichia coli phage-M13 primer (M13-PCR). As determined by panC gene sequencing, the isolates of B. cereus belonged to PanC types III and IV with potential for high cytotoxicity. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences of glpF, gmk, ilvD, pta, pur, pycA and tpi revealed that the M13-PCR group 1 isolates were related to B. cereus biovar anthracis CI, while the M13-PCR group 2 isolates were identical to cereulide (emetic toxin) producing B. cereus strains. The M13-PCR group 1 isolates harboured poly-γ-D-glutamic acid capsule biosynthesis genes capA, capB and capC showing 99-100% identity with the environmental B. cereus isolate 03BB108. Presence of cesB of the cereulide synthetase gene cluster was confirmed by PCR in M13-PCR group 2 isolates. The B. cereus harbouring the cap genes were found in potash, DW, cooking water and at 8h fermentation. The "emetic" type B. cereus were present in DW, the seed mash at 48-72h of fermentation and in the final product

  17. Comparative bioinformatics and experimental analysis of the intergenic regulatory regions of Bacillus cereus hbl and nhe enterotoxin operons and the impact of CodY on virulence heterogeneity

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    Maria-Elisabeth eBöhm

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a food contaminant with greatly varying enteropathogenic potential. Almost all known strains harbor the genes for at least one of the three enterotoxins Nhe, Hbl and CytK. While some strains show no cytotoxicity, others have caused outbreaks, in rare cases even with lethal outcome. The reason for these differences in cytotoxicity is unknown. To gain insight into the origin of enterotoxin expression heterogeneity in different strains, the architecture and role of 5’ intergenic regions (5’IGRs upstream of the nhe and hbl operons was investigated. In silico comparison of 142 strains of all seven phylogenetic groups of B. cereus sensu lato proved the presence of long 5’IGRs upstream of the nheABC and hblCDAB operons, which harbor recognition sites for several transcriptional regulators, including the virulence regulator PlcR, redox regulators ResD and Fnr, the nutrient-sensitive regulator CodY as well as the master regulator for biofilm formation SinR. By determining transcription start sites, unusually long 5’ untranslated regions (5’UTRs upstream of the nhe and hbl start codons were identified, which are not present upstream of cytK-1 and cytK-2. Promoter fusions lacking various parts of the nhe and hbl 5’UTR in B. cereus INRA C3 showed that the entire 331 bp 5’UTR of nhe is necessary for full promoter activity, while the presence of the complete 606 bp hbl 5’UTR lowers promoter activity. Repression was caused by a 268 bp sequence directly upstream of the hbl transcription start. Luciferase activity of reporter strains containing nhe and hbl 5’IGR lux fusions provided evidence that toxin gene transcription is upregulated by the depletion of free amino acids. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the branched-chain amino acid sensing regulator CodY binds to both nhe and hbl 5’UTR downstream of the promoter, potentially acting as a nutrient-responsive roadblock repressor of toxin gene transcription

  18. Comparative Bioinformatics and Experimental Analysis of the Intergenic Regulatory Regions of Bacillus cereus hbl and nhe Enterotoxin Operons and the Impact of CodY on Virulence Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Maria-Elisabeth; Krey, Viktoria M.; Jeßberger, Nadja; Frenzel, Elrike; Scherer, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a food contaminant with greatly varying enteropathogenic potential. Almost all known strains harbor the genes for at least one of the three enterotoxins Nhe, Hbl, and CytK. While some strains show no cytotoxicity, others have caused outbreaks, in rare cases even with lethal outcome. The reason for these differences in cytotoxicity is unknown. To gain insight into the origin of enterotoxin expression heterogeneity in different strains, the architecture and role of 5′ intergenic regions (5′ IGRs) upstream of the nhe and hbl operons was investigated. In silico comparison of 142 strains of all seven phylogenetic groups of B. cereus sensu lato proved the presence of long 5′ IGRs upstream of the nheABC and hblCDAB operons, which harbor recognition sites for several transcriptional regulators, including the virulence regulator PlcR, redox regulators ResD and Fnr, the nutrient-sensitive regulator CodY as well as the master regulator for biofilm formation SinR. By determining transcription start sites, unusually long 5′ untranslated regions (5′ UTRs) upstream of the nhe and hbl start codons were identified, which are not present upstream of cytK-1 and cytK-2. Promoter fusions lacking various parts of the nhe and hbl 5′ UTR in B. cereus INRA C3 showed that the entire 331 bp 5′ UTR of nhe is necessary for full promoter activity, while the presence of the complete 606 bp hbl 5′ UTR lowers promoter activity. Repression was caused by a 268 bp sequence directly upstream of the hbl transcription start. Luciferase activity of reporter strains containing nhe and hbl 5′ IGR lux fusions provided evidence that toxin gene transcription is upregulated by the depletion of free amino acids. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the branched-chain amino acid sensing regulator CodY binds to both nhe and hbl 5′ UTR downstream of the promoter, potentially acting as a nutrient-responsive roadblock repressor of toxin gene transcription. Plc

  19. The influence of sporulation conditions on the spore coat protein composition of Bacillus subtilis spores.

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    Wishwas R. Abhyankar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Spores are of high interest to the food and health sectors because of their extreme resistance to harsh conditions, especially against heat. Earlier research has shown that spores prepared on solid agar plates have a higher heat resistance than those prepared under a liquid medium condition. It has also been shown that the more mature a spore is, the higher is its heat resistance most likely mediated, at least in part, by the progressive cross-linking of coat proteins. The current study for the first time assesses, at the proteomic level, the effect of two commonly used sporulation conditions on spore protein presence. 14N spores prepared on solid SG agar plates and 15N metabolically labelled spores prepared in shake flasks containing MOPS buffered defined liquid medium differ in their coat protein composition as revealed by LC-FT-MS/MS analyses. The former condition mimics the industrial settings while the latter conditions mimic the routine laboratory environment wherein spores are developed. As seen previously in many studies, the spores prepared on the solid agar plates show a higher thermal resistance than the spores prepared under liquid culture conditions. The 14N: 15N isotopic ratio of the 1:1 mixture of the spore suspensions exposes that most of the identified inner coat and crust proteins are significantly more abundant while most of the outer coat proteins are significantly less abundant for the spores prepared on solid SG agar plates relative to the spores prepared in the liquid MOPS buffered defined medium. Sporulation condition-specific differences and variation in isotopic ratios between the tryptic peptides of expected cross-linked proteins suggest that the coat protein cross-linking may also be condition specific. Since the core dipicolinic acid content is found to be similar in both the spore populations, it appears that the difference in wet heat resistance is connected to the differences in the coat protein composition and

  20. The Influence of Sporulation Conditions on the Spore Coat Protein Composition of Bacillus subtilis Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Wishwas R.; Kamphorst, Kiki; Swarge, Bhagyashree N.; van Veen, Henk; van der Wel, Nicole N.; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G.; de Koning, Leo J.

    2016-01-01

    Spores are of high interest to the food and health sectors because of their extreme resistance to harsh conditions, especially against heat. Earlier research has shown that spores prepared on solid agar plates have a higher heat resistance than those prepared under a liquid medium condition. It has also been shown that the more mature a spore is, the higher is its heat resistance most likely mediated, at least in part, by the progressive cross-linking of coat proteins. The current study for the first time assesses, at the proteomic level, the effect of two commonly used sporulation conditions on spore protein presence. 14N spores prepared on solid Schaeffer’s-glucose (SG) agar plates and 15N metabolically labeled spores prepared in shake flasks containing 3-(N-morpholino) propane sulfonic acid (MOPS) buffered defined liquid medium differ in their coat protein composition as revealed by LC-FT-MS/MS analyses. The former condition mimics the industrial settings while the latter conditions mimic the routine laboratory environment wherein spores are developed. As seen previously in many studies, the spores prepared on the solid agar plates show a higher thermal resistance than the spores prepared under liquid culture conditions. The 14N:15N isotopic ratio of the 1:1 mixture of the spore suspensions exposes that most of the identified inner coat and crust proteins are significantly more abundant while most of the outer coat proteins are significantly less abundant for the spores prepared on solid SG agar plates relative to the spores prepared in the liquid MOPS buffered defined medium. Sporulation condition-specific differences and variation in isotopic ratios between the tryptic peptides of expected cross-linked proteins suggest that the coat protein cross-linking may also be condition specific. Since the core dipicolinic acid content is found to be similar in both the spore populations, it appears that the difference in wet heat resistance is connected to the

  1. Growth, sporulation and production of bioactive compounds by Bacillus subtilis R14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Lacerda Ulysses de Carvalho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The physiology of B. subtilis R14 was investigated in minimal medium under excess-oxygen and oxygen-limited conditions. Growth and efficient sporulation could be achieved in excess-oxygen culture on medium with readily metabolizable carbon and nitrogen sources, which allowed high growth rate and high biomass yield. A short transition phase between the exponential growth and sporulation could be attained by formulating a medium with a well-balanced C/N ratio. Under oxygen-limitation, but in the presence of essential nutrients (i.e. excess-nutrient cultivation, B. subtilis R14 produced bioactive compounds, which showed activity against several phytopathogenic bacteria. Under anaerobic condition, the organism did not grow neither through fermentation nor anaerobic respiration. However, addition of pyruvate to the medium allowed its growth through fermentation and anaerobic respiration. The knowledge acquired in this work could be relevant both for the design of a production process as well as for the formulation of an effective commercial biocontrol product.A fisiologia de B. subtilis R14 foi investigada em meio mínimo em condições de excesso e limitação de oxigênio. Crescimento e esporulação eficientes foram obtidas em culturas com excesso de oxigênio em meio contendo fontes de carbono e nitrogênio de fácil assimilação, que permitiram alta taxa de crescimento e alto rendimento em biomassa. Uma fase de transição curta, entre o crescimento exponencial e a esporulação, pode ser obtida pela formulação de um meio com razão C/N balanceada. Sob limitação de oxigênio, mas em presença de nutrientes essenciais, B. subtilis R14 produziu compostos bioativos. Os compostos apresentaram atividade contra várias bactérias fitopatogênicas. Sob condição de anaerobiose, o microrganismo não cresceu, nem através de fermentação nem de respiração anaeróbica. A adição de piruvato ao meio permitiu o crescimento, tanto através de

  2. Secondary cell wall polysaccharides of Bacillus anthracis are antigens that contain specific epitopes which cross-react with three pathogenic Bacillus cereus strains that caused severe disease, and other epitopes common to all the Bacillus cereus strains tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoff, Christine; Saile, Elke; Rauvolfova, Jana; Quinn, Conrad P; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Zhong, Wei; Mehta, Alok S; Boons, Geert-Jan; Carlson, Russell W; Kannenberg, Elmar L

    2009-01-01

    The immunoreactivities of hydrogen fluoride (HF)-released cell wall polysaccharides (HF-PSs) from selected Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus strains were compared using antisera against live and killed B. anthracis spores. These antisera bound to the HF-PSs from B. anthracis and from three clinical B. cereus isolates (G9241, 03BB87, and 03BB102) obtained from cases of severe or fatal human pneumonia but did not bind to the HF-PSs from the closely related B. cereus ATCC 10987 or from B. cereus type strain ATCC 14579. Antiserum against a keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugate of the B. anthracis HF-PS (HF-PS-KLH) also bound to HF-PSs and cell walls from B. anthracis and the three clinical B. cereus isolates, and B. anthracis spores. These results indicate that the B. anthracis HF-PS is an antigen in both B. anthracis cell walls and spores, and that it shares cross-reactive, and possibly pathogenicity-related, epitopes with three clinical B. cereus isolates that caused severe disease. The anti-HF-PS-KLH antiserum cross-reacted with the bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugates of all B. anthracis and all B. cereus HF-PSs tested, including those from nonclinical B. cereus ATCC 10987 and ATCC 14579 strains. Finally, the serum of vaccinated (anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA)) Rhesus macaques that survived inhalation anthrax contained IgG antibodies that bound the B. anthracis HF-PS-KLH conjugate. These data indicate that HF-PSs from the cell walls of the bacilli tested here are (i) antigens that contain (ii) a potentially virulence-associated carbohydrate antigen motif, and (iii) another antigenic determinant that is common to B. cereus strains. PMID:19270075

  3. Application of Two-Stage Cultivation for Exploring the Nutritional Requirements for Sporulation of Three Biocontrol Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungicide was an important part in mycopesticides, which play an important role in pest management, while their mass production and commercialization faced problem. We found that the nutrition for mycelia growth and sporulation differences a lot. So, we developed “two-step method” to define the nutrition for sporulation in this paper. The results indicated that the novel method led to a great increase of spore yields for Beauveria bassiana (IBC1201, Lecanicillium lecanii (CA-1-G, and Pochonia chlamydosporia (HSY-12-14, respectively, of about 100, 2, and 16 times and, also reduced the cycle of mass production to 1/3 compared with common time for culturing.

  4. Modeling of growth and sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis in an intermittent fed batch culture with total cell retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atehortúa, Paula; Alvarez, Hernán; Orduz, Sergio

    2007-11-01

    An extended dynamical model for growth and sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in an intermittent fed-batch culture with total cell retention is proposed. This model differs from reported models, by including dynamics for natural death of cells and substrate consumption for cell maintenance. The proposed model uses sigmoid functions to describe these kinetic parameters. Equations for time evolution of substrate, vegetative, sporulated and total cell concentration were taken from previous works. Model parameters were determined from batch experimental data obtained in pilot plant. Parameter identification was developed in two stages: (1) coarse identification using a multivariable optimization with constraints algorithm, (2) fine identification by heuristic fit of model parameters looking for a minimal model error. The proposed model estimates adequate time evolution of the process variables with a mean error of 2.6% on substrate concentration and 6.7% on biomass concentration.

  5. The key sigma factor of transition phase, SigH, controls sporulation, metabolism, and virulence factor expression in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saujet, Laure; Monot, Marc; Dupuy, Bruno; Soutourina, Olga; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle

    2011-07-01

    Toxin synthesis in Clostridium difficile increases as cells enter into stationary phase. We first compared the expression profiles of strain 630E during exponential growth and at the onset of stationary phase and showed that genes involved in sporulation, cellular division, and motility, as well as carbon and amino acid metabolism, were differentially expressed under these conditions. We inactivated the sigH gene, which encodes an alternative sigma factor involved in the transition to post-exponential phase in Bacillus subtilis. Then, we compared the expression profiles of strain 630E and the sigH mutant after 10 h of growth. About 60% of the genes that were differentially expressed between exponential and stationary phases, including genes involved in motility, sporulation, and metabolism, were regulated by SigH, which thus appears to be a key regulator of the transition phase in C. difficile. SigH positively controls several genes required for sporulation. Accordingly, sigH inactivation results in an asporogeneous phenotype. The spo0A and CD2492 genes, encoding the master regulator of sporulation and one of its associated kinases, and the spoIIA operon were transcribed from a SigH-dependent promoter. The expression of tcdA and tcdB, encoding the toxins, and of tcdR, encoding the sigma factor required for toxin production, increased in a sigH mutant. Finally, SigH regulates the expression of genes encoding surface-associated proteins, such as the Cwp66 adhesin, the S-layer precursor, and the flagellum components. Among the 286 genes positively regulated by SigH, about 40 transcriptional units presenting a SigH consensus in their promoter regions are good candidates for direct SigH targets.

  6. [Ash2, a subunit of histone H3K4 methyltransferase complex, is involved in the sporulation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenchao; Zhou, Huan; Yu, Yao; Lv, Hong

    2014-09-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes meiosis instead of mitosis under conditions of nitrogen starvation and pheromone signalling, which results in conjugation and sporulation. During this progress, the pheromone-responsive MAPK(Mitogen-activated protein kinases) pathway plays an important role in regulating the conjuation and the transcriptional activation of genes required for meiosis. Spk1, a key component of MAPK pathway, activates Ste11 through protein phosphorylation and then induced the transcriptions of several genes requied for meiosis, including mei2(+), mam2(+) and map3(+). Methylation of histone H3K4 is involved in several important biological processes, including transcriptional activation and chromatin remodeling. However, its role in the sporualtion of fission yeast is poorly understood. Ash2 is a subunit of COMPASS, a conserved H3K4 methyltransferase complex. Sequence alignment analysis revealed that Ash2 in pombe shares two conserved domain with other homologues. Ash2 is localized in nucleus and contributes to methylation of H3K4. Deletion of ash2(+) resulted in a delay of sporulation and a substantial drop of sporulation efficiency. ChIP and qPCR analysis showed that deletion of ash2(+) caused a reduction of H3K4me2 level in the coding region of spk1(+), as well as a reduction of its mRNA level. Although the mRNA level of ste11(+) kept unchanged, the levels of Ste11-targetted genes, such as mei2(+), mam2(+) and map3(+), all reduced in ash2Δ cells. The results suggest that Ash2 regulates MAPK pathway and sporulation through H3K4 methylation. This might provide a new clue to elucidate the link between meiosis and epigenetic regulation.

  7. Regulation of sporulation initiation by NprR and its signaling peptide NprRB: molecular recognition and conformational changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Rosina; Rocha, Jorge; Flores, Víctor; Vázquez-Moreno, Luz; Guarneros, Gabriel; Olmedo, Gabriela; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela; de la Torre, Mayra

    2014-11-01

    NprR belongs to the RNPP family of quorum-sensing receptors, a group of intracellular regulators activated directly by signaling oligopeptides in Gram-positive bacteria. In Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), nprR is located in a transcriptional cassette with nprRB that codes for the precursor of the signaling peptide NprRB. NprR is a transcriptional regulator activated by binding of reimported NprRB; however, several reports suggest that NprR also participates in sporulation but the mechanism is unknown. Our in silico results, based on the structural similarity between NprR from Bt and Spo0F-binding Rap proteins from Bacillus subtilis, suggested that NprR could bind Spo0F to modulate the sporulation phosphorelay in Bt. Deletion of nprR-nprRB cassette from Bt caused a delay in sporulation and defective trigger of the Spo0A∼P-activated genes spoIIA and spoIIIG. The DNA-binding domain of NprR was not necessary for this second function, since truncated NprRΔHTH together with nprRB gene was able to restore the sporulation wild type phenotype in the ΔnprR-nprRB mutant. Fluorescence assays showed direct binding between NprR and Spo0F, supporting that NprR is a bifunctional protein. To understand how the NprR activation by NprRB could result in two different functions, we studied the molecular recognition mechanism between the signaling peptide and the receptor. Using synthetic variants of NprRB, we found that SSKPDIVG displayed the highest affinity (Kd = 7.19 nM) toward the recombinant NprR and demonstrated that recognition involves conformational selection. We propose that the peptide concentration in the cell controls the oligomerization state of the NprR-NprRB complex for switching between its two functions.

  8. Development of a high-resolution melting-based approach for efficient differentiation among Bacillus cereus group isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolinos, Vera; Fernández, Pablo S; Ros-Chumillas, María; Periago, Paula M; Weiss, Julia

    2012-09-01

    Strains belonging to Bacillus cereus Group include six different species, among which are Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus weihenstephanensis, and Bacillus cereus sensu stricto, a causative agent of food poisoning. Sequence of the panC-housekeeping gene is used for B. cereus Group affiliation to seven major phylogenetic groups (I-VII) with different ecological niches and variations in thermal growth range and spore heat resistance of B. cereus Group microorganisms varies among phylogenetic groups. We assigned a selection of B. cereus sensu stricto strains related to food poisoning from the Spanish cultivar Collection (Valencia) to Group IV strains based on panC gene sequence. Thermal inactivation assays revealed variability of spore heat resistance within these Group IV strains. Adequate food sanitizing treatments therefore require fast and reliable identification of particular strains. In the present study, feasibility of genotyping via high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was examined. HRM analysis of amplified polymorphic 16S-23 intergenic spacer region (ISR) region proved to be discriminatory for B. cereus sensu stricto strain typing, while two other polymorphic regions within the bacterial rRNA operon allowed differentiation between Bacillus species, demonstrating its applicability for discrimination on the species and strain level within B. cereus Group.

  9. Bacillus subtilis HJ18-4 from traditional fermented soybean food inhibits Bacillus cereus growth and toxin-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Lee, Sun Young; Choi, Hye Sun

    2014-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis HJ18-4 isolated from buckwheat sokseongjang, a traditional Korean fermented soybean food, exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens, including Bacillus cereus. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial efficacy and regulation of toxin gene expression in B. cereus by B. subtilis HJ18-4. Expression of B. cereus toxin-related genes (groEL, nheA, nheC, and entFM) was downregulated by B. subtilis HJ18-4, which also exhibited strong antibacterial activity against B. cereus. We also found that water extracts of soy product fermented with B. subtilis HJ18-4 significantly inhibited the growth of B. cereus and toxin expression. These results indicate that B. subtilis HJ18-4 could be used as an antimicrobial agent to control B. cereus in the fermented soybean food industry. Our findings also provide an opportunity to develop an efficient biological control agent against B. cereus. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Food Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Prevalence of potentially pathogenic Bacillus cereus in food commodities in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, L.M.; Dufrenne, J.B.; Rombouts, F.M.; Veld, in 't P.H.; Leusden, van F.M.

    2006-01-01

    Randomly selected food commodities, categorized in product groups, were investigated for the presence and number of Bacillus cereus bacteria. If positive, and when possible, five separate colonies were isolated and investigated for the presence of four virulence factors: presence of genes encoding

  11. Antimicrobial resistance among Pseudomonas spp. and the Bacillus cereus group isolated from Danish agricultural soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Baloda, S.; Boye, Mette

    2001-01-01

    From four Danish pig farms, bacteria of Pseudomonas spp. and the Bacillus cereus group were isolated from soil and susceptibility towards selected antimicrobials was tested. From each farm, soil samples representing soil just before and after spread of animal waste and undisturbed agricultural soil...

  12. A probabilistic modeling approach in thermal inactivation: estimation of postprocess Bacillus cereus spore prevalence and concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Membre, J.M.; Amezquita, A.; Bassett, J.; Giavedoni, P.; Blackburn, W.; Gorris, L.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    The survival of spore-forming bacteria is linked to the safety and stability of refrigerated processed foods of extended durability (REPFEDs). A probabilistic modeling approach was used to assess the prevalence and concentration of Bacillus cereus spores surviving heat treatment for a semiliquid

  13. Extraction and characterization of cellulose nanowhiskers from Mandacaru (Cereus jamacaru DC.) spines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellulose nanowhiskers were extracted from the spines of Mandacaru (Cereus jamacaru DC.) spines, a cactus native to the Caatinga biome of in northeastern Brazil, using sulfuric acid hydrolysis preceeded by mercerization and bleaching. Nanowhisker size decreased from about 400 to 260 nm when extracti...

  14. Plant Compounds Enhance the Assay Sensitivity for Detection of Active Bacillus cereus Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuven Rasooly

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is an important food pathogen, producing emetic and diarrheal syndromes, the latter mediated by enterotoxins. The ability to sensitively trace and identify this active toxin is important for food safety. This study evaluated a nonradioactive, sensitive, in vitro cell-based assay, based on B. cereus toxin inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP synthesis in transduced monkey kidney Vero cells, combined with plant extracts or plant compounds that reduce viable count of B. cereus in food. The assay exhibited a dose dependent GFP inhibition response with ~25% inhibition at 50 ng/mL toxin evaluated in culture media or soy milk, rice milk or infant formula, products associated with food poisonings outbreak. The plant extracts of green tea or bitter almond and the plant compounds epicatechin or carvacrol were found to amplify the assay response to ~90% inhibition at the 50 ng/mL toxin concentration greatly increasing the sensitivity of this assay. Additional studies showed that the test formulations also inhibited the growth of the B. cereus bacteria, likely through cell membrane disruption. The results suggest that the improved highly sensitive assay for the toxin and the rapid inactivation of the pathogen producing the toxin have the potential to enhance food safety.

  15. Partial Characterisation of Bacteriocins Produced by Bacillus cereus Isolates from Milk and Milk Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Bogović Matijašić

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty one (19.2 % out of 161 Bacillus cereus isolates from raw milk and milk products were found to produce proteinaceous substances which inhibit the growth of other B. cereus isolates. The detection of antibacterial activity depended on medium and method used. Bactericidal activity was detected in 23 (14 % or 19 (12 % of the tested strains on the triptic soya agar and brain-heart infusion with glucose, respectively, while 11 (7 % of the strains produced bactericidal substances on both media. Nineteen percent of isolates from raw milk and 20 % of isolates from milk products were found to produce bacteriocins. Four B. cereus isolates inhibited the growth of individual test strains belonging to B. licheniformis, B. subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus helveticus and L. casei species. The bacteriocins of four B. cereus isolates were studied in more detail. The production and activity of these substances were detected in stationary- phase of bacterial culture. Two of them were stable after heating at 60 °C, while only one was stable after heating at 75 °C for 15 minutes. All of them were active over a range of pH=3–10. The apparent molecular weights of four bacteriocins detected by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis were in the range of 1 to 8 kDa.

  16. Isolation, identification and characterization of Bacillus cereus from the dairy environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giffel, te M.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis the occurrence of Bacillus cereus in the milk production and processing environment was investigated. Isolates were identified biochemically and by DNA probes based on the variable regions of 16S rRNA. Further characterization was carried out using

  17. Combined action of nisin and carvacrol on Bacillus cereus and Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, I.E.; Smid, E.J.

    1999-01-01

    Nisin, a small antimicrobial protein, was tested for its bactericidal action against Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus and a typical biphasic reduction of the viable count was observed. The reduction was most fast during the first 10 min of exposure, while the viable count remained stable

  18. Lessons learnt from a birthday party: a Bacillus cereus outbreak, Bari, Italy, January 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Martinelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Bacillus cereus, a ubiquitous bacterium, can be isolated in various starchy food items, causing both emetic and diarrhoeal disease. The real burden of B. cereus outbreaks is actually poorly known in Italy. We report a B. cereus foodborne outbreak that occurred in a pub in Bari (Italy on January 22nd 2012 during a birthday party, promptly reported by the pub owner. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 22nd and 24th 2012, we performed a retrospective cohort study among the guests of the party to identify risk factors associated with illness. Leftovers of different meals were available for microbiological analysis. Faecal specimens were collected from cases. RESULTS: A total of 12 cases among the 13 customers (attack rate: 92% were reported. All cases had consumed basmati rice and sweet and sour vegetables (aetiological fraction: 100%. B. cereus was isolated from both basmati rice served during the party and faecal specimens. DISCUSSION: The close collaboration between the pub owner and the public health officers and the possibility to test food leftovers and stool samples contributed to prevent further cases.

  19. Isolation and characterization of the solvent-tolerant Bacillus cereus strain R1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumoto, M.; Bont, de J.A.M.; Isken, S.

    2002-01-01

    Toluene-tolerant gram-positive bacteria were isolated and identified to belong to the genus Bacillus. They grew in a medium containing yeast extract and in the presence of a separate phase of toluene or other hydrocarbons, but not when aliphatic alcohols were present. The isolate Bacillus cereus R1

  20. Decolorization of azo dye reactive black B by Bacillus cereus strain HJ-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chien-Sen; Hung, Chih-Hsin; Chao, Sung-Lin

    2013-02-01

    Reactive black B (RBB) is a group of azo dyes that are widely used in the textile industry. In this study, a new microbial strain was isolated from azo dye contaminated river sediment which is capable of degrading RBB. The strain was identified as Bacillus cereus strain HJ-1 by 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis. The optimal conditions for RBB decolorization by B. cereus strain HJ-1 are: 25°C, pH 8, 1 CMC of triton X-100, 0.15 g L(-1) of added yeast extract, 0.125 g L(-1) of added glucose and static culture. Then the toxicity of RBB on the green algae Chlorella vulgaris was determined. The results showed that the median effective concentration (EC(50)) of RBB for C. vulgaris is 48 mg L(-1) and toxicity will really decrease after decolorization. In the end, B. cereus strain HJ-1 was amended into the origin river sediment and analyzed the whole microbial community structure of river sediment samples by PCR-DGGE technique. The result showed that B. cereus strain HJ-1 could survive in the river sediment after 12 d of incubation. Based on this work, we hope that these findings could provide some useful information for applying the decolorization of RBB in our environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. From genome to toxicity: a combinatory approach highlights the complexity of enterotoxin production in Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeßberger, Nadja; Krey, Viktoria M.; Rademacher, Corinna; Böhm, Maria-Elisabeth; Mohr, Ann-Katrin; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Scherer, Siegfried; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years Bacillus cereus has gained increasing importance as a food poisoning pathogen. It is the eponymous member of the B. cereus sensu lato group that consists of eight closely related species showing impressive diversity of their pathogenicity. The high variability of cytotoxicity and the complex regulatory network of enterotoxin expression have complicated efforts to predict the toxic potential of new B. cereus isolates. In this study, comprehensive analyses of enterotoxin gene sequences, transcription, toxin secretion and cytotoxicity were performed. For the first time, these parameters were compared in a whole set of B. cereus strains representing isolates of different origin (food or food poisoning outbreaks) and of different toxic potential (enteropathogenic and apathogenic) to elucidate potential starting points of strain-specific differential toxicity. While toxin gene sequences were highly conserved and did not allow for differentiation between high and low toxicity strains, comparison of nheB and hblD enterotoxin gene transcription and Nhe and Hbl protein titers revealed not only strain-specific differences but also incongruence between toxin gene transcripts and toxin protein levels. With one exception all strains showed comparable capability of protein secretion and so far, no secretion patterns specific for high and low toxicity strains were identified. These results indicate that enterotoxin expression is more complex than expected, possibly involving the orchestrated interplay of different transcriptional regulator proteins, as well as posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulatory mechanisms plus additional influences of environmental conditions. PMID:26113843

  2. Anthrax Toxin-Expressing Bacillus cereus Isolated from an Anthrax-Like Eschar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung K Marston

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus isolates have been described harboring Bacillus anthracis toxin genes, most notably B. cereus G9241, and capable of causing severe and fatal pneumonias. This report describes the characterization of a B. cereus isolate, BcFL2013, associated with a naturally occurring cutaneous lesion resembling an anthrax eschar. Similar to G9241, BcFL2013 is positive for the B. anthracis pXO1 toxin genes, has a multi-locus sequence type of 78, and a pagA sequence type of 9. Whole genome sequencing confirms the similarity to G9241. In addition to the chromosome having an average nucleotide identity of 99.98% when compared to G9241, BcFL2013 harbors three plasmids with varying homology to the G9241 plasmids (pBCXO1, pBC210 and pBFH_1. This is also the first report to include serologic testing of patient specimens associated with this type of B. cereus infection which resulted in the detection of anthrax lethal factor toxemia, a quantifiable serum antibody response to protective antigen (PA, and lethal toxin neutralization activity.

  3. Plant Compounds Enhance the Assay Sensitivity for Detection of Active Bacillus cereus Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an important food pathogen, producing emetic and diarrheal syndromes, the latter mediated by enterotoxins. The ability to sensitively trace and identify this active toxin is important for food safety. This study evaluated a nonradioactive, sensitive, in vitro cell-based assay, based on B. cereus toxin inhibition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) synthesis in transduced monkey kidney Vero cells, combined with plant extracts or plant compounds that reduce viable count of B. cereus in food. The assay exhibited a dose dependent GFP inhibition response with ~25% inhibition at 50 ng/mL toxin evaluated in culture media or soy milk, rice milk or infant formula, products associated with food poisonings outbreak. The plant extracts of green tea or bitter almond and the plant compounds epicatechin or carvacrol were found to amplify the assay response to ~90% inhibition at the 50 ng/mL toxin concentration greatly increasing the sensitivity of this assay. Additional studies showed that the test formulations also inhibited the growth of the B. cereus bacteria, likely through cell membrane disruption. The results suggest that the improved highly sensitive assay for the toxin and the rapid inactivation of the pathogen producing the toxin have the potential to enhance food safety. PMID:25767986

  4. Role of ureolytic activity in Bacillus cereus nitrogen metabolism and acid survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.; Abee, T.

    2008-01-01

    The presence and activities of urease genes were investigated in 49 clinical, food, and environmental Bacillus cereus isolates. Ten strains were shown to have urease genes, with eight of these strains showing growth on urea as the sole nitrogen source. Two of the urease-positive strains, including

  5. From genome to toxicity: A combinatory approach highlights the complexity of enterotoxin production in Bacillus cereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja eJessberger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years Bacillus cereus has gained increasing importance as a food poisoning pathogen. It is the eponymous member of the B. cereus sensu lato group that consists of eight closely related species showing impressive diversity of their pathogenicity. The high variability of cytotoxicity and the complex regulatory network of enterotoxin expression have complicated efforts to predict the toxic potential of new B. cereus isolates. In this study, comprehensive analyses of enterotoxin gene sequences, transcription, toxin secretion and cytotoxicity were performed. For the first time, these parameters were compared in a whole set of B. cereus strains representing isolates of different origin (food or food poisoning outbreaks and of different toxic potential (enteropathogenic and apathogenic to elucidate potential starting points of strain-specific differential toxicity. While toxin gene sequences were highly conserved and did not allow for differentiation between high and low toxicity strains, comparison of nheB and hblD enterotoxin gene transcription and Nhe and Hbl protein titers revealed not only strain-specific differences but also incongruence between toxin gene transcripts and toxin protein levels. With one exception all strains showed comparable capability of protein secretion and so far, no secretion patterns specific for high and low toxicity strains were identified. These results indicate that enterotoxin expression is more complex than expected, possibly involving the orchestrated interplay of different transcriptional regulator proteins, as well as posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulatory mechanisms plus additional influences of environmental conditions.

  6. Comparative transcriptomic and phenotypic analysis of the responses of Bacillus cereus to various disinfectant treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceragioli, M.; Mols, J.M.; Moezelaar, R.; Ghelardi, E.; Senesi, S.; Abee, T.

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemicals are widely applied to clean and disinfect food-contacting surfaces. However, the cellular response of bacteria to various disinfectants is unclear. In this study, the physiological and genome-wide transcriptional responses of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 exposed to four

  7. Anthrax Toxin-Expressing Bacillus cereus Isolated from an Anthrax-Like Eschar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Chung K; Ibrahim, Hisham; Lee, Philip; Churchwell, George; Gumke, Megan; Stanek, Danielle; Gee, Jay E; Boyer, Anne E; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Barr, John R; Li, Han; Boulay, Darbi; Cronin, Li; Quinn, Conrad P; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus isolates have been described harboring Bacillus anthracis toxin genes, most notably B. cereus G9241, and capable of causing severe and fatal pneumonias. This report describes the characterization of a B. cereus isolate, BcFL2013, associated with a naturally occurring cutaneous lesion resembling an anthrax eschar. Similar to G9241, BcFL2013 is positive for the B. anthracis pXO1 toxin genes, has a multi-locus sequence type of 78, and a pagA sequence type of 9. Whole genome sequencing confirms the similarity to G9241. In addition to the chromosome having an average nucleotide identity of 99.98% when compared to G9241, BcFL2013 harbors three plasmids with varying homology to the G9241 plasmids (pBCXO1, pBC210 and pBFH_1). This is also the first report to include serologic testing of patient specimens associated with this type of B. cereus infection which resulted in the detection of anthrax lethal factor toxemia, a quantifiable serum antibody response to protective antigen (PA), and lethal toxin neutralization activity.

  8. Bacillus cereus: characteristics, behaviour in the gastro-intestinal tract, and interaction with Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands LM; Dufrenne JB; van Leusden FM; MGB

    2006-01-01

    Door het eten van voedsel dat besmet is met de bacterie Bacillus cereus kan diarree ontstaan. Onderzoek naar de bacterie zelf en het ziekmakend proces hebben geleid tot meer kennis over het optreden van de ziekte. Allereerst zijn stammen van de bacterie op grond van specifieke karakteristieken

  9. PCR detection of cytK gene in Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltuszak-Walczak, Elzbieta; Walczak, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    A method for detection of the cytotoxin K cytK structural gene and its active promoter preceded by the PlcR-binding box, controlling the expression level of this enterotoxin, was developed. The method was applied for the purpose of the analysis of 47 bacterial strains belonging to the Bacillus cereus group isolated from different food products. It was found that the majority of the analyzed strains carried the fully functional cytK gene with its PlcR regulated promoter. The cytK gene was not detected in four emetic strains of Bacillus cereus carrying the cesB gene and potentially producing an emetic toxin - cereulide. The cytotoxin K gene was detected in 4 isolates classified as Bacillus mycoides and one reference strain B. mycoides PCM 2024. The promoter region and the N-terminal part of the cytK gene from two strains of B. mycoides (5D and 19E) showed similarities to the corresponding sequences of Bacillus cereus W23 and Bacillus thuringiensis HD-789, respectively. It was shown for the first time that the cytK gene promoter region from strains 5D and 19E of Bacillus mycoides had a similar arrangement to the corresponding sequence of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. The presence of the cytK gene in Bacillus mycoides shows that this species, widely recognized as nonpathogenic, may pose potential biohazard to human beings. © 2013.

  10. Analysis of Bacillus cereus toxicity using PCR, ELISA and a lateral flow device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallent, S M; Hait, J M; Bennett, R W

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of immunodetection methods and PCR analysis of enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus strains. Eighty-eight enterotoxigenic B. cereus group strains linked to food-borne outbreaks and illnesses were studied with 30 exclusivity nonenterotoxigenic strains including Bacillus amyoliquifaciens, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella and Escherichia coli for this assessment. The PCR results showed 80% agreement with immunoassays for the Nhe target and 84% for the Hbl product. All exclusivity strains were PCR and serologically negative. PCR has proven to be a valuable tool when used in conjunction with immunoassays to quickly identify enterotoxigenic B. cereus group strains. This study assessed the utility of rapid methods to characterize enterotoxigenic profiles of B. cereus group strains. The identification of enterotoxigenic bacteria and any associated toxins detected from food products is essential in food defense programs as public health officials search for methods to rapidly and accurately screen a global food supply. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Virulence Analysis of Bacillus cereus Isolated after Death of Preterm Neonates, Nice, France, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotte, Romain; Hérissé, Anne-Laure; Berrouane, Yasmina; Lotte, Laurène; Casagrande, Florence; Landraud, Luce; Herbin, Sabine; Ramarao, Nalini; Boyer, Laurent; Ruimy, Raymond

    2017-05-01

    After the deaths of 2 preterm neonates with Bacillus cereus systemic infection in the same intensive care unit, we investigated the pathogenic potential of this bacterium. Genetic and virulence analysis indicated the neonates were infected with 2 different strains with a virulence potential similar to environmental strains, indicating likely patient immune response failure.

  12. Phenotypic, genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in Bacillus cereus after a short-term space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Longxiang; Zhou, Lisha; Liu, Jinwen; Cen, Zhong; Wu, Chunyan; Wang, Tong; Zhou, Tao; Chang, De; Guo, Yinghua; Fang, Xiangqun; Wang, Junfeng; Li, Tianzhi; Yin, Sanjun; Dai, Wenkui; Zhou, Yuping; Zhao, Jiao; Fang, Chengxiang; Yang, Ruifu; Liu, Changting

    2014-01-01

    The environment in space could affect microorganisms by changing a variety of features, including proliferation rate, cell physiology, cell metabolism, biofilm production, virulence, and drug resistance. However, the relevant mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the effect of a space environment on Bacillus cereus, a strain of B. cereus was sent to space for 398 h by ShenZhou VIII from November 1, 2011 to November 17, 2011. A ground simulation with similar temperature conditions was simultaneously performed as a control. After the flight, the flight and control strains were further analyzed using phenotypic, genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic techniques to explore the divergence of B. cereus in a space environment. The flight strains exhibited a significantly slower growth rate, a significantly higher amikacin resistance level, and changes in metabolism relative to the ground control strain. After the space flight, three polymorphic loci were found in the flight strains LCT-BC25 and LCT-BC235. A combined transcriptome and proteome analysis was performed, and this analysis revealed that the flight strains had changes in genes/proteins relevant to metabolism. In addition, certain genes/proteins that are relevant to structural function, gene expression modification and translation, and virulence were also altered. Our study represents the first documented analysis of the phenotypic, genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic changes that occur in B. cereus during space flight, and our results could be beneficial to the field of space microbiology.

  13. Bacillus cereus associated food borne disease : quantitative aspects of exposure assessment and hazard characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    The consumption of food contaminated with the bacterium Bacillus cereus may lead to either symptoms of vomiting or symptoms of diarrhoea. As the symptoms are rather mild, few patients seek medical attention. Therefore, it is hard to estimate the number of cases. To improve estimation of this number

  14. Validation of Microbiological Methods. Enumeration of Bacillus cereus according to ISO 7932 (second edition, 1993)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulten SM; Lustgraaf BEB van de; Nagelkerke NJD; Veld PH in ' t.; MGB; IMA

    1998-01-01

    De Bacillus cereus methode, zoals beschreven in ISO 7932 (tweede editie, 1993), is gevalideerd in opdracht van de Europese Commissie (Standards, Measurement and Testing Program). Kaas, vlees, gedroogd aardappelpoeder en een referentiemateriaal zijn door 20 laboratoria uit 17 landen in Europa en

  15. Predictive modeling of Bacillus cereus spores in farm tank milk during grazing and housing periods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Giffel, M.C.T.; Driehuis, F.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    The shelf life of pasteurized dairy products depends partly on the concentration of Bacillus cereus spores in raw milk. Based on a translation of contamination pathways into chains of unit-operations, 2 simulation models were developed to quantitatively identify factors that have the greatest effect

  16. Genomic study of the cereolysin A and B genes in Bacillus cereus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AMAJU

    2011-01-17

    Jan 17, 2011 ... Cytotoxin is one of the most important poisons which is produced by Bacillus cereus, and it is highly resistant to heat and ... protein efficiency and structure was not changed due to the substitution of amino acids with the same properties. ... bacterium, its gram property can be changed in a stationary phase ...

  17. Analysis of germination and outgrowth of sorbic acid-stressed Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melis, van Clint; Nierop Groot, Masja; Tempelaars, Marcel; Moezelaar, Roy; Abee, Tjakko

    2010-01-01

    Sorbic acid (SA) is widely used as a preservative, but the effect of SA on spore germination and outgrowth has gained limited attention up to now. Therefore, the effect of sorbic acid on germination of spores of B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 was analyzed both at phenotype and transcriptome level.

  18. Impact of sorbic acid on germinant receptor-dependent and -independent germination pathways in Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melis, van C.C.J.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2011-01-01

    Amino acid- and inosine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores was reversibly inhibited in the presence of 3 mM undissociated sorbic acid. Exposure to high hydrostatic pressure, Ca-dipicolinic acid (DPA), and bryostatin, an activator of PrkC kinase, negated this inhibition,

  19. Impact of sorbic acid on germinant receptor-dependent and -independent germination pathways in Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Melis, C C J; Nierop Groot, M N; Abee, T

    2011-04-01

    Amino acid- and inosine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores was reversibly inhibited in the presence of 3 mM undissociated sorbic acid. Exposure to high hydrostatic pressure, Ca-dipicolinic acid (DPA), and bryostatin, an activator of PrkC kinase, negated this inhibition, pointing to specific blockage of signal transduction in germinant receptor-mediated germination.

  20. Oxygen supply in Bacillus thuringiensis fermentations: bringing new insights on their impact on sporulation and δ-endotoxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniolo, Fabrízio Siqueira; Rodrigues, Raphael Cardoso; Prata, Arnaldo Márcio Ramalho; López, Maria Luisa; Jacinto, Tânia; da Silveira, Mauricio Moura; Berbert-Molina, Marília Amorim

    2012-05-01

    The growth kinetics, sporulation, and toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis were evaluated through the analysis of batch cultures with different dissolved oxygen (DO) profiles. Firstly, DO was maintained constant at 5%, 20%, or 50% throughout fermentation in order to identify the most suitable one to improve the main process parameters. Higher biomass concentration, cell productivity, and cell yield based on glucose were obtained with 50% DO. The higher aeration level also resulted in higher spore counts and markedly improved the toxic activity of the fermentation broth, which was 9-fold greater than that obtained with 5% DO (LC(50) of 39 and 329 mg/L, respectively). Subsequently, using a two-stage oxygen supply strategy, DO was kept at 50% during the vegetative and transition phases until the maximum cell concentration was achieved. Then, DO was changed to 0%, 5%, 20%, or 100% throughout sporulation and cell lysis phases. The interruption of oxygen supply strongly reduced the spore production and thoroughly repressed the toxin synthesis. On the contrary, when DO was raised to 100% of saturation, toxic activity increased approximately four times (LC(50) of 8.2 mg/L) in comparison with the mean values reached with lower DO levels, even though spore counts were lower than that from the 50% DO assay. When pure oxygen was used instead of normal air, it was possible to obtain 70% of the total biomass concentration achieved in the air assays; however, cultures did not sporulate and the toxin synthesis was consequently suppressed.

  1. Toxin production in a rare and genetically remote cluster of strains of the Bacillus cereus group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granum Per

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three enterotoxins are implicated in diarrhoeal food poisoning due to Bacillus cereus: Haemolysin BL (Hbl, Non-haemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe, and Cytotoxin K (CytK. Toxin gene profiling and assays for detection of toxin-producing stains have been used in attempts to evaluate the enterotoxic potential of B. cereus group strains. B. cereus strain NVH 391/98, isolated from a case of fatal enteritis, was genetically remote from other B. cereus group strains. This strain lacked the genes encoding Hbl and Nhe, but contains CytK-1. The high virulence of this strain is thought to be due to the greater cytotoxic activity of CytK-1 compared to CytK-2, and to a high level of cytK expression. To date, only three strains containing cytK-1 have been identified; B. cereus strains NVH 391/98, NVH 883/00, and INRA AF2. Results A novel gene variant encoding Nhe was identified in these three strains, which had an average of 80% identity in protein sequence with previously identified Nhe toxins. While culture supernatants containing CytK and Nhe from NVH 391/98 and INRA AF2 were highly cytotoxic, NVH 883/00 expressed little or no CytK and Nhe and was non-cytotoxic. Comparative sequence and expression studies indicated that neither the PlcR/PapR quorum sensing system, nor theYvrGH and YvfTU two-component systems, were responsible for the observed difference in toxin production. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis of 13 genes showed that NVH 391/98, NVH 883/00, and INRA AF2 comprise a novel cluster of strains genetically distant from other B. cereus group strains. Conclusion Due to its divergent sequence, the novel nhe operon had previously not been detected in NVH 391/98 using PCR and several monoclonal antibodies. Thus, toxigenic profiling based on the original nhe sequence will fail to detect the toxin in this group of strains. The observation that strain NVH 883/00 carries cytK-1 but is non-cytotoxic indicates that the detection of this gene

  2. Elucidation of enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus outbreaks in Austria by complementary epidemiological and microbiological investigations, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Daniela; Rademacher, Corinna; Kanitz, Elisabeth Eva; Frenzel, Elrike; Simons, Erica; Allerberger, Franz; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2016-09-02

    Identifying Bacillus cereus as the causative agent of a foodborne outbreak still poses a challenge. We report on the epidemiological and microbiological investigation of three outbreaks of food poisoning (A, B, and C) in Austria in 2013. A total of 44% among 32 hotel guests (A), 22% among 63 employees (B) and 29% among 362 residents of a rehab clinic (C) fell sick immediately after meal consumption. B. cereus isolated from left overs or retained samples from related foods were characterized by toxin gene profiling, and molecular typing using panC sequencing and M13-PCR typing (in outbreak A and C). We identified two B. cereus strains in outbreak A, and six B. cereus strains, each in outbreak B and C; we also found Staphylococcus aureus and staphylococcal enterotoxins in outbreak A. The panC sequence based phylogenetic affiliation of the B. cereus strains, together with findings of the retrospective cohort analyses, helped determining their etiological role. Consumption of a mashed potatoes dish in outbreak A (RR: ∞), a pancake strips soup in outbreak B (RR 13.0; 95% CI 1.8-93.0) and for outbreak C of a fruit salad (RR 1.50; 95% CI 1.09-2.00), deer ragout (RR: 1.99; 95% CI 1.23-3.22) and a cranberry/pear (RR 2.46; 95% CI 1.50-4.03)were associated with increased risk of falling sick. An enterotoxigenic strain affiliated to the phylogenetic group with the highest risk of food poisoning was isolated from the crème spinach and the strawberry buttermilk, and also from the stool samples of the one B. cereus positive outbreak case-patient, who ate both. Our investigation of three food poisoning outbreaks illustrates the added value of a combined approach by using epidemiological, microbiological and genotyping methods in identifying the likely outbreak sources and the etiological B. cereus strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Spore prevalence and toxigenicity of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis isolates from U.S. retail spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariram, Upasana; Labbé, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    Recent incidents of foodborne illness associated with spices as the vehicle of transmission prompted this examination of U.S. retail spices with regard to Bacillus cereus. This study focused on the levels of aerobic-mesophilic spore-forming bacteria and B cereus spores associated with 247 retail spices purchased from five states in the United States. Samples contained a wide range of aerobic-mesophilic bacterial spore counts ( 10(7) CFU/g). Using a novel chromogenic agar, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores were isolated from 77 (31%) and 11 (4%) samples, respectively. Levels of B. cereus were thuringiensis isolates possessed at least one type of enterotoxin gene: HBL (hemolysin BL) or nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE). None of the 88 isolates obtained in this study possessed the emetic toxin gene (ces). Using commercially available immunological toxin detection kits, the toxigenicity of the isolates was confirmed. The NHE enterotoxin was expressed in 98% of B. cereus and 91% of B. thuringiensis isolates that possessed the responsible gene. HBL enterotoxin was detected in 87% of B. cereus and 100% of B. thuringiensis PCR-positive isolates. Fifty-two percent of B. cereus and 54% of B. thuringiensis isolates produced both enterotoxins. Ninety-seven percent of B. cereus isolates grew at 12°C, although only two isolates grew well at 9°C. The ability of these spice isolates to form spores, produce diarrheal toxins, and grow at moderately abusive temperatures makes retail spices an important potential vehicle for foodborne illness caused by B. cereus strains, in particular those that produce diarrheal toxins.

  4. Role of the PAS sensor domains in the Bacillus subtilis sporulation kinase KinA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnen, Brit; Anderson, Eric; Cole, James L; King, Glenn F; Rowland, Susan L

    2013-05-01

    Histidine kinases are sophisticated molecular sensors that are used by bacteria to detect and respond to a multitude of environmental signals. KinA is the major histidine kinase required for initiation of sporulation upon nutrient deprivation in Bacillus subtilis. KinA has a large N-terminal region (residues 1 to 382) that is uniquely composed of three tandem Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) domains that have been proposed to constitute a sensor module. To further enhance our understanding of this "sensor" region, we defined the boundaries that give rise to the minimal autonomously folded PAS domains and analyzed their homo- and heteroassociation properties using analytical ultracentrifugation, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and multiangle laser light scattering. We show that PAS(A) self-associates very weakly, while PAS(C) is primarily a monomer. In contrast, PAS(B) forms a stable dimer (K(d) [dissociation constant] of PAS domains revealed a critical role for PAS(B), but not PAS(A), in autophosphorylation of KinA. Our findings suggest that dimerization of PAS(B) is important for keeping the catalytic domain of KinA in a functional conformation. We use this information to propose a model for the structure of the N-terminal sensor module of KinA.

  5. Central Venous Access Device-Related Bacillus Cereus Endocarditis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus typically presents as a gastrointestinal infection, but rarely manifests as systemic disease. This report describes a case of B. cereus-related endocarditis that presented as a sickle cell crisis and bacteremia. Initial clinical suspicion was for laboratory contamination of blood cultures. The case herein described is intended to demonstrate an uncommon presentation of B. cereus infection and highlights the value of an aggressive need to further investigate and interpret unexpected blood culture findings in clinical practice, early adequate antimicrobial therapy, prompt diagnosis, and consideration to urgent surgical interventions in such cases. PMID:27231118

  6. One-day pulsed-field gel electrophoresis protocol for rapid determination of emetic Bacillus cereus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, Paulina S; Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Jankowska, Dominika; Mahillon, Jacques; Nowosad, Karol; Drewicka, Ewa; Zambrzycka, Monika; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus cereus, the Gram-positive and spore-forming ubiquitous bacterium, may cause emesis as the result of food intoxication with cereulide, a heat-stable emetic toxin. Rapid determination of cereulide-positive B. cereus isolates is of highest importance due to consequences of this intoxication for human health and life. Here we present a 1-day pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for emetic B. cereus isolates, which allows rapid and efficient determination of their genomic relatedness and helps determining the source of intoxication in case of outbreaks caused by these bacilli. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Bacillus cereus cell response upon exposure to acid environment: towards the identification of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noémie eDESRIAC

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are able to adapt to different environments and evolve rapidly, allowing them to cope with their new environments. Such adaptive response and associated protections towards other lethal stresses, is a crucial survival strategy for a wide spectrum of microorganisms, including food spoilage bacteria, pathogens and organisms used in functional food applications. The growing demand for minimal processed food yields to an increasing use of combination of hurdles or mild preservation factors in the food industry. A commonly used hurdle is low pH which allows the decrease in bacterial growth rate but also the inactivation of pathogens or spoilage microorganisms. Bacillus cereus is a well-known food-borne pathogen leading to economical and safety issues in food industry. Because survival mechanisms implemented will allow bacteria to cope with environmental changes, it is important to provide understanding of B. cereus stress response. Thus this review deals with the adaptive traits of B. cereus cells facing to acid stress conditions. The acid stress response of B. cereus could be divided into four groups (i general stress response (ii pH homeostasis, (iii metabolic modifications and alkali production and (iv secondary oxidative stress response. This current knowledge may be useful to understand how B. cereus cells may cope to acid environment such as encountered in food products and thus to find some molecular biomarkers of the bacterial behaviour. These biomarkers could be furthermore used to develop new microbial behaviour prediction tools which can provide insights into underlying molecular physiological states which govern the behaviour of microorganisms and thus opening the avenue toward the detection of stress adaptive behaviour at an early stage and the control of stress-induced resistance throughout the food chain.

  8. MALDI-TOF MS portrait of emetic and non-emetic Bacillus cereus group members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Daniluk, Tamara; Fiodor, Angelika; Drewicka, Ewa; Buczynska, Katarzyna; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Bideshi, Dennis Ken; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2016-08-01

    The number of foodborne intoxications caused by emetic Bacillus cereus isolates has increased significantly. As such, rapid and reliable methods to identify emetic strains appear to be clinically relevant. In this study, intact cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used to differentiate emetic and non-emetic bacilli. The phyloproteomic clustering of 34 B. cereus emetic and 88 non-emetic isolates classified as B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus weihenstephanensis, and Bacillus mycoides, showed (i) a clear separation of both groups at a similarity level of 43%, and (ii) a high relatedness among the emetic isolates (similarity of 78%). Specifically, 83 mass peak classes were recognized in the spectral window range between m/z 4000 and 12 000 that were tentatively assigned to 41 protein variants based on a bioinformatic approach. Mass variation between the emetic and the non-emetic subsets was recorded for 27 of them, including ten ribosomal subunit proteins, for which inter-strain polymorphism was confirmed by gene sequencing. Additional peaks were assigned to other proteins such as small acid soluble proteins, cold shock proteins and hypothetical proteins, e.g., carbohydrate kinase. Moreover, the results were supported by in silico analysis of the biomarkers in 259 members of B. cereus group, including Bacillus anthracis, based on their whole-genome sequences. In conclusion, the proteomic profiling by MALDI-TOF MS is a promising and rapid method for pre-screening B. cereus to identify medically relevant isolates and for epidemiologic purposes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. PENGARUH BERBAGAI KONDISI PREPARASI DAN PENYIMPANAN SUSU FORMULA PADA PERTUMBUHAN SPORA Bacillus cereus DAN Clostridium perfringens [The growth of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens spores under a variety of preparation and storage condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Purwanti1

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens spores to survived in different preparation temperature (25, 35, and 70C for B. cereus and 25, 45, 70ºC for C. perfringens and modified storage condition (with 50 and 75% humidity; opened, closed and opened twice a day during period of observation of powdered milk formula. The spores of B. cereus ATCC 13061 and C. perfringens CP-1 artificially contaminated to the milk formula. Results showed that B. cereus and C. perfringens spores were germinated and growth in reconstituted milk formula. Bacteria population increased ≥1 log within 3 hours at room temperature (28-29ºC. The spores of both bacteria survived from dry condition of powdered milk formula, like when aw of the formulas increased cause of storage condition.

  10. Formation of cereulide and enterotoxins by Bacillus cereus in fermented African locust beans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Line; Azokpota, Paulin; Munk Hansen, Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    genes nhe (A, B, C) were present in all 19 isolates, the hbl (A, C, D) in one (afitin), and the cytK gene in three isolates (afitin). Levels of cytotoxicity to Vero cells and NheA production in BHI-broth was within the range of known diarrheal outbreak strains. Autoclaved cooked African locust beans...

  11. Solid-state fermentation for the production of alkaline protease by Bacillus cereus 1173900 using proteinaceous tannery solid waste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    B. Ravindran; A. Ganesh Kumar; P. S. Aruna Bhavani; Ganesan Sekaran

    2011-01-01

    Animal fleshing, the major proteinaceous solid waste generated from leather industry, was used as substrate for the production of alkaline protease by Bacillus cereus 1173900 in solid-state fermentation (SSF...

  12. Identification, genetic diversity and cereulide producing ability of Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from Beninese traditional fermented food condiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Line; Azokpota, Paulin; Hansen, Bjarne Munk

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus cereus sensu lato is often detected in spontaneously fermented African foods but is rarely identified to species level. Only some of the B. cereus group species are reported to be pathogenic to humans and identification to species level is necessary to estimate the safety of these products...... which are specific to emetic toxin producers. Cereulide production of these isolates was confirmed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. This is the first report on cereulide producing B. cereus in African fermented foods. Occurrence of the opportunistic human pathogen B. cereus......, which is able to produce emetic toxin in afitin, iru and sonru, could impose a health hazard. Interestingly, no reports on food poisoning from the consumption of the fermented condiments exist....

  13. The lactic acid bacteria metabolite phenyllactic acid inhibits both radial growth and sporulation of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanström, Åsa; Boveri, Silvio; Boström, Emma; Melin, Petter

    2013-11-14

    Food spoilage caused by molds is a severe problem. In food and feed, e.g. dairy products, sourdough bread and silage, lactic acid bacteria are used as starter cultures. Besides lactic and acetic acid, some strains produce other low molecular weight compounds with antifungal activities. One of these metabolites is phenyllactic acid (PLA), well known for its antifungal effect. The inhibitory effect of PLA has only partially been investigated, and the objective of this study was to elucidate in detail the antifungal properties of PLA. We investigated the outgrowth of individual conidia from Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium roqueforti, and observed the morphologies of resulting colonies on solid media using different acid concentrations. We found that PLA inhibits molds similar to weak acid preservatives. Furthermore, it has an additional activity: at sub-inhibitory concentrations, fungal colonies displayed slower radial growth and inhibited sporulation. The L isoform of PLA is a more potent inhibitor than the D form. Increased expression of phiA was observed during PLA treatment. This gene was initially identified as being induced by Streptomyces-produced macrolide antibiotics, and is shown to be a structural protein in developed cells. This suggests that PhiA may act as a general stress protectant in fungi. From a food protection perspective, the results of this study support the usage of lactic acid bacteria strains synthesizing PLA as starter cultures in food and feed. Such starter cultures could inhibit spore synthesis, which would be beneficial as many food borne fungi are spread by airborne spores.

  14. Detection of hblA and bal Genes in Bacillus cereus Isolates From Cheese Samples Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molayi Kohneshahri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium, which causes food poisoning. Spores enable the persistence of B. cereus in the environment, and B. cereus strains can tolerate adverse environmental conditions, such as temperature and insufficient nutrients. B. cereus causes food poisoning via the production of two enterotoxins. Most isolates produce toxins leading to diarrhea (enterotoxins and vomiting (emetic forms. Diarrhea is caused by the production of three different heat-labile enterotoxins: HBL, NHE, and cytotoxin K. A heat-stable toxin, cereulide, is responsible for emesis. Objectives This study aimed to detect enterotoxigenic B. cereus isolates in cheese samples using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Materials and Methods Two-hundred pasteurized (n = 100 and nonpasteurized (n = 100 cheese samples were collected. The initial isolation was performed on PEMBA specific medium. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using several antibiotic disks, according to the guidelines of the Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute. Specific primers amplifying the hblA enterotoxin-encoding gene and bal hemolysin-encoding gene were used for the molecular detection of the toxins. Results Ten samples were positive for the presence of B. cereus, with both Gram staining and biochemical reactions. All the isolates were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin but susceptible to vancomycin, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin. Six and three isolates were resistant to tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, respectively. The hblA and bal genes were amplified in all the B. cereus isolates. Conclusions The prevalence of B. cereus among the cheese samples was low. All the isolates were positive for genes encoding the hblA enterotoxin and bal toxin.

  15. Characterization of LysB4, an endolysin from the Bacillus cereus-infecting bacteriophage B4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Bokyung; Yun, Jiae; Lim, Jeong-A; Shin, Hakdong; Heu, Sunggi; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-03-15

    Bacillus cereus is a foodborne pathogen that causes emetic or diarrheal types of food poisoning. The incidence of B. cereus food poisoning has been gradually increasing over the past few years, therefore, biocontrol agents effective against B. cereus need to be developed. Endolysins are phage-encoded bacterial peptidoglycan hydrolases and have received considerable attention as promising antibacterial agents. The endolysin from B. cereus phage B4, designated LysB4, was identified and characterized. In silico analysis revealed that this endolysin had the VanY domain at the N terminus as the catalytic domain, and the SH3_5 domain at the C terminus that appears to be the cell wall binding domain. Biochemical characterization of LysB4 enzymatic activity showed that it had optimal peptidoglycan hydrolase activity at pH 8.0-10.0 and 50°C. The lytic activity was dependent on divalent metal ions, especially Zn2+. The antimicrobial spectrum was relatively broad because LysB4 lysed Gram-positive bacteria such as B. cereus, Bacillus subtilis and Listeria monocytogenes and some Gram-negative bacteria when treated with EDTA. LC-MS analysis of the cell wall cleavage products showed that LysB4 was an L-alanoyl-D-glutamate endopeptidase, making LysB4 the first characterized endopeptidase of this type to target B. cereus. LysB4 is believed to be the first reported L-alanoyl-D-glutamate endopeptidase from B. cereus-infecting bacteriophages. The properties of LysB4 showed that this endolysin has strong lytic activity against a broad range of pathogenic bacteria, which makes LysB4 a good candidate as a biocontrol agent against B. cereus and other pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Characterization of LysB4, an endolysin from the Bacillus cereus-infecting bacteriophage B4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son Bokyung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus cereus is a foodborne pathogen that causes emetic or diarrheal types of food poisoning. The incidence of B. cereus food poisoning has been gradually increasing over the past few years, therefore, biocontrol agents effective against B. cereus need to be developed. Endolysins are phage-encoded bacterial peptidoglycan hydrolases and have received considerable attention as promising antibacterial agents. Results The endolysin from B. cereus phage B4, designated LysB4, was identified and characterized. In silico analysis revealed that this endolysin had the VanY domain at the N terminus as the catalytic domain, and the SH3_5 domain at the C terminus that appears to be the cell wall binding domain. Biochemical characterization of LysB4 enzymatic activity showed that it had optimal peptidoglycan hydrolase activity at pH 8.0-10.0 and 50°C. The lytic activity was dependent on divalent metal ions, especially Zn2+. The antimicrobial spectrum was relatively broad because LysB4 lysed Gram-positive bacteria such as B. cereus, Bacillus subtilis and Listeria monocytogenes and some Gram-negative bacteria when treated with EDTA. LC-MS analysis of the cell wall cleavage products showed that LysB4 was an L-alanoyl-D-glutamate endopeptidase, making LysB4 the first characterized endopeptidase of this type to target B. cereus. Conclusions LysB4 is believed to be the first reported L-alanoyl-D-glutamate endopeptidase from B. cereus-infecting bacteriophages. The properties of LysB4 showed that this endolysin has strong lytic activity against a broad range of pathogenic bacteria, which makes LysB4 a good candidate as a biocontrol agent against B. cereus and other pathogenic bacteria.

  17. A Study To Assess the Numbers and Prevalence of Bacillus cereus and Its Toxins in Pasteurized Fluid Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh-Lakha, Saleema; Leon-Velarde, Carlos G; Chen, Shu; Lee, Susan; Shannon, Kelly; Fabri, Martha; Downing, Gavin; Keown, Bruce

    2017-07-01

    Bacillus cereus is a pathogenic adulterant of raw milk and can persist as spores and grow in pasteurized milk. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of B. cereus and its enterotoxins in pasteurized milk at its best-before date when stored at 4, 7, and 10°C. More than 5.5% of moderately temperature-abused products (stored at 7°C) were found to contain >10(5) CFU/mL B. cereus , and about 4% of them contained enterotoxins at a level that may result in foodborne illness; in addition, more than 31% of the products contained >10(5) CFU/mL B. cereus and associated enterotoxins when stored at 10°C. Results from a growth kinetic study demonstrated that enterotoxin production by B. cereus in pasteurized milk can occur in as short as 7 to 8 days of storage at 7°C. The higher B. cereus counts were associated with products containing higher butterfat content or with those produced using the conventional high-temperature, short-time pasteurization process. Traditional indicators, aerobic colony counts and psychrotrophic counts, were found to have no correlation with level of B. cereus in milk. The characterization of 17 representative B. cereus isolates from pasteurized milk revealed five toxigenic gene patterns, with all the strains carrying genes encoding for diarrheal toxins but not for an emetic toxin, and with one strain containing all four diarrheal enterotoxin genes (nheA, entFM, hblC, and cytK). The results of this study demonstrate the risks associated even with moderately temperature-abused pasteurized milk and the necessity of a controlled cold chain throughout the shelf life of fluid milk to enhance product safety and minimize foodborne illness.

  18. Effect of endophytic Bacillus cereus ERBP inoculation into non-native host: Potentials and challenges for airborne formaldehyde removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaksar, Gholamreza; Treesubsuntorn, Chairat; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2016-10-01

    Phytoremediation could be a cost-effective, environmentally friendly approach for the treatment of indoor air. However, some drawbacks still dispute the expediency of phytotechnology. Our objectives were to investigate the competency of plant growth-promoting (PGP) endophytic Bacillus cereus ERBP (endophyte root blue pea), isolated from the root of Clitoria ternatea, to colonize and stabilize within Zamioculcas zamiifolia and Euphorbia milii as non-native hosts without causing any disease or stress symptoms. Moreover, the impact of B. cereus ERBP on the natural shoot endophytic community and for the airborne formaldehyde removal capability of non-native hosts was assessed. Non-native Z. zamiifolia was effectively inoculated with B. cereus ERBP through soil as the most efficient method of endophyte inoculation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling of the shoot endophytic community verified the colonization and stability of B. cereus ERBP within its non-native host during a 20-d fumigation period without interfering with the natural shoot endophytic diversity of Z. zamiifolia. B. cereus ERBP conferred full protection to its non-native host against formaldehyde phytotoxicity and enhanced airborne formaldehyde removal of Z. zamiifolia whereas non-inoculated plants suffered from formaldehyde phytotoxicity because their natural shoot endophytic community was detrimentally affected by formaldehyde. In contrast, B. cereus ERBP inoculation into non-native E. milii deteriorated airborne formaldehyde removal of the non-native host (compared to a non-inoculated one) as B. cereus ERBP interfered with natural shoot endophytic community of E. milii, which caused stress symptoms and stimulated ethylene biosynthesis. Non-native host inoculation with PGP B. cereus ERBP could bear potentials and challenges for airborne formaldehyde removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. ENUMERATION OF Bacillus cereus IN “FUBÁ” OF CORN (Zea mays. L. ENUMERAÇÃO DE Bacillus cereus EM FUBÁ DE MILHO (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albenones José de Mesquita

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    A hundred (100 samples of “fubá” were examined, in relation to the incidence of Bacillus cereus, obtained by different technological processes (common “fubá” and previously cooked “fubá” and sold in the retail market in Goiânia - GO. The results of the examination showed that 23% of the samples was contaminated, of this percentual, 39.1% of the contaminations occurred in samples of previously cooked “fubá” and 60.9% in samples of common “fubá”. This in relation of the two products clearly showed the more accurate technological process that the previously cooked “fubá” was brought under. It was also observed that the totality of the analyzed samples showed enumerations below the limit established by the Brazilian microbiologic standard that establishes a limit of 10³ cells of Bacillus cereus for a gram of the food.

    Foram examinadas 100 amostras de fubá de milho, em relação à incidência de Bacillus cereus, obtidas através de processamentos tecnológicos diferentes (fubá comum e fubá pré-cozido e comercializadas no mercado varejista de Goiânia - GO. Os resultados revelaram que 23% das amostras estavam contaminadas, deste percentual, 39,1% das contaminações ocorreram em amostras de fubá pré-cozido e 60,9%, em amostras de fubá comum. Esta considerável diferença, observada em termos percentuais em relação aos dois produtos evidenciou o processamento tecnológico mais rigoroso a que foi submetido o fubá pré-cozido. Observou-se, também, que a totalidade das amostras analisadas apresentou enumerações abaixo do limite estabelecido pelo padrão microbiológico brasileiro que determina um limite de 10³ células de B. cereus por gama do alimento.

  20. Bacillus cereus-type polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthetic gene cluster contains R-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Takahiro; Hiroe, Ayaka; Ishii-Hyakutake, Manami; Mizuno, Kouhei; Tsuge, Takeharu

    2017-08-01

    Bacillus cereus and Bacillus megaterium both accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) but their PHA biosynthetic gene (pha) clusters that code for proteins involved in PHA biosynthesis are different. Namely, a gene encoding MaoC-like protein exists in the B. cereus-type pha cluster but not in the B. megaterium-type pha cluster. MaoC-like protein has an R-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase (R-hydratase) activity and is referred to as PhaJ when involved in PHA metabolism. In this study, the pha cluster of B. cereus YB-4 was characterized in terms of PhaJ's function. In an in vitro assay, PhaJ from B. cereus YB-4 (PhaJYB4) exhibited hydration activity toward crotonyl-CoA. In an in vivo assay using Escherichia coli as a host for PHA accumulation, the recombinant strain expressing PhaJYB4 and PHA synthase led to increased PHA accumulation, suggesting that PhaJYB4 functioned as a monomer supplier. The monomer composition of the accumulated PHA reflected the substrate specificity of PhaJYB4, which appeared to prefer short chain-length substrates. The pha cluster from B. cereus YB-4 functioned to accumulate PHA in E. coli; however, it did not function when the phaJYB4 gene was deleted. The B. cereus-type pha cluster represents a new example of a pha cluster that contains the gene encoding PhaJ.

  1. Characterization of LysPBC4, a novel Bacillus cereus-specific endolysin of bacteriophage PBC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hongjun; Kong, Minsuk; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming, Gram-positive bacterium and is a major food-borne pathogen. A B. cereus-specific bacteriophage PBC4 was isolated from the soil of a stock farm, and its genome was analyzed. PBC4 belongs to the Siphoviridae family and has a genome consisting of 80 647-bp-long double-stranded DNA, including 123 genes and two tRNAs. LysPBC4, the endolysin of PBC4, has an enzymatically active domain (EAD) on its N-terminal region and a putative cell wall-binding domain (CBD) on its C-terminal region, respectively. Although the phage PBC4 showed a very limited host range, LysPBC4 could lyse all of the B. cereus strains tested. However, LysPBC4 did not kill other bacteria such as B. subtilis or Listeria, indicating that the endolysin has specific lytic activity against the B. cereus group species. Furthermore, LysPBC4_CBD fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) could decorate limited strains of B. cereus group, suggesting that the LysPBC4_CBD may be a promising material for specific detection of B. cereus. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Bacillus cereus NVH 0500/00 Can Adhere to Mucin but Cannot Produce Enterotoxins during Gastrointestinal Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilia, Varvara; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium could constitute an essential mechanism of Bacillus cereus pathogenesis. However, the enterocytes are protected by mucus, a secretion composed mainly of mucin glycoproteins. These may serve as nutrients and sites of adhesion for intestinal bacteria. In this study, the food poisoning bacterium B. cereus NVH 0500/00 was exposed in vitro to gastrointestinal hurdles prior to evaluation of its attachment to mucin microcosms and its ability to produce nonhemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe). The persistence of mucin-adherent B. cereus after simulated gut emptying was determined using a mucin adhesion assay. The stability of Nhe toward bile and pancreatin (intestinal components) in the presence of mucin agar was also investigated. B. cereus could grow and simultaneously adhere to mucin during in vitro ileal incubation, despite the adverse effect of prior exposure to a low pH or intestinal components. The final concentration of B. cereus in the simulated lumen at 8 h of incubation was 6.62 ± 0.87 log CFU ml−1. At that point, the percentage of adhesion was approximately 6%. No enterotoxin was detected in the ileum, due to either insufficient bacterial concentrations or Nhe degradation. Nevertheless, mucin appears to retain B. cereus and to supply it to the small intestine after simulated gut emptying. Additionally, mucin may play a role in the protection of enterotoxins from degradation by intestinal components. PMID:26497468

  3. Identification of Cereulide-Producing Bacillus cereus by Nucleic Acid Chromatography and Reverse Transcription Real-Time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Shigeko; Yamaguchi, Manami; Eguchi, Kayoko; Iwase, Miki

    2016-01-01

    RNA extracts were analyzed with a nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) - nucleic acid chromatography and a reverse transcription-quantitative PCR assay (RT-qPCR) based on the TaqMan probe for identification of cereulide-producing Bacillus cereus. All 100 emetic B. cereus strains were found to give positive results, but 50 diarrheal B. cereus strains and other bacterial species showed negative results in the NASBA-chromatography. That is, the assay could selectively identify the emetic strains among B. cereus strains. Also, the B. cereus contents of more than 10(7) cfu/ml were required for the identification of the cereulide-producing strains in this assay. In qRT-PCR assays, all 100 emetic type strains of B. cereus produced 10(2) - 10(4) copy numbers per ng of the RNA preparation, and the strains produced 10(4) copies including ones which had the high vacuolation activities of HEp-2 cells.

  4. Root exudate-induced alterations in Bacillus cereus cell wall contribute to root colonization and plant growth promotion.

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    Swarnalee Dutta

    Full Text Available The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs. We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430. There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE, compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE. In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2, in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion.

  5. Bacillus cereus AR156 induces resistance against Rhizopus rot through priming of defense responses in peach fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Xu, Feng; Wang, Jing; Jin, Peng; Zheng, Yonghua

    2013-01-15

    The biocontrol effects of Bacillus cereus AR156 on Rhizopus rot caused by Rhizopus stolonifer in postharvest peach fruit and the possible mechanisms were investigated. The results showed that fruit treated with B. cereus AR156 had significantly lower disease incidence and smaller lesion diameter than the control fruit did. B. cereus AR156 treatment remarkably enhanced activities of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, promoted accumulation of H(2)O(2), and improved total phenolic content and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity. Transcripts of four defense related genes were only significantly enhanced in fruit both treated with B. cereus AR156 and inoculated with R. stolonifer compared with those that were only treated with B. cereus AR156 or inoculated with R. stolonifer. These results suggest that B. cereus AR156 can effectively inhibit Rhizopus rot caused by R. stolonifer and enhance antioxidant activity in peach fruit through the priming of defense responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Myxobacteria Fruiting Body Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi

    2006-03-01

    Myxobacteria are social bacteria that swarm and glide on surfaces, and feed cooperatively. When starved, tens of thousands of cells change their movement pattern from outward spreading to inward concentration; they form aggregates that become fruiting bodies, inside which cells differentiate into nonmotile, environmentally resistant spores. Traditionally, cell aggregation has been considered to imply chemotaxis, a long-range cell interaction mediated by diffusing chemicals. However, myxobacteria aggregation is the consequence of direct cell-contact interactions. I will review our recent efforts in modeling the fruiting body formation of Myxobacteria, using lattice gas cellular automata models that are based on local cell-cell contact signaling. These models have reproduced the individual phases in Myxobacteria development such as the rippling, streaming, early aggregation and the final sporulation; the models can be unified to simulate the whole developmental process of Myxobacteria.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of chitinase from Bacillus cereus NCTU2

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    Kuo, Chueh-Yuan [Life Science Group, Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076,Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013,Taiwan (China); Wu, Yue-Jin [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010,Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Guan, Hong-Hsiang [Life Science Group, Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076,Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013,Taiwan (China); Tsai, Huei-Ju [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010,Taiwan (China); Lin, Yi-Hung; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Liu, Ming-Yih [Life Science Group, Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076,Taiwan (China); Li, Yaw-Kuen, E-mail: ykl@cc.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010,Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: ykl@cc.nctu.edu.tw [Life Science Group, Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076,Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013,Taiwan (China)

    2006-09-01

    The crystallization of B. cereus chitinase is reported. Chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) are found in a broad range of organisms, including bacteria, fungi and higher plants, and play different roles depending on their origin. A chitinase from Bacillus cereus NCTU2 (ChiNCTU2) capable of hydrolyzing chitin as a carbon and nitrogen nutrient has been identified as a member of the family 18 glycoside hydrolases. ChiNCTU2 of molecular weight 36 kDa has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. According to the diffraction of chitinase crystals at 1.10 Å resolution, the crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 50.79, b = 48.79, c = 66.87 Å, β = 99.31°. Preliminary analysis indicates there is one chitinase molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 43.4%.

  8. Increase of the Bacillus thuringiensis secreted toxicity against lepidopteron larvae by homologous expression of the vip3LB gene during sporulation stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellami, Sameh; Jamoussi, Kaïs; Dabbeche, Emna; Jaoua, Samir

    2011-09-01

    The Vegetative insecticidal Vip3A proteins display a wide range of insecticidal spectrum against several agricultural insect pests. The fact that the expression of vip3 genes occurs only during the vegetative growth phase of Bacillus thuringiensis is a limiting factor in term of production level. Therefore, extending the synthesis of the Vip proteins to the sporulation phase is a good alternative to reach high levels of toxin synthesis. In this study, we have demonstrated that the maximal production of the secreted Vip3LB (also called Vip3Aa16) during the growth of the wild-type strain B. thuringiensis BUPM 95 is reached at the end of the vegetative growth phase, and that the protein remains relatively stable in the culture supernatant during the late sporulation stages. The vip3LB gene was cloned and expressed under the control of the sporulation dependant promoters BtI and BtII in B. thuringiensis BUPM 106 (Vip3(-)) and BUPM 95 (Vip3(+)) strains. The examination of the culture supernatants during the sporulation phase evidenced the synthesis of Vip3LB and its toxicity against the second-instars larvae of the Lepidopteron insect Spodoptera littoralis for the recombinant BUPM 106. Moreover, there was an increase of the Vip3LB synthesis level and an enhancement of the oral toxicity for the recombinant BUPM 95 resulting from the expression of the vip3LB gene during both the vegetative and sporulation phases and the relative stability of the Vip3LB protein.

  9. An outbreak of Bacillus cereus implicating a part-time banquet caterer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulin, Colette; Viger, Yv Bonnier; Fillion, Lise

    2002-01-01

    In the aftermath of a party, 70% (25 of 36) of attendees had gastroenteritis. The objectives of this study were to identify a risk factor associated with the food during the banquet and to identify measures of control for avoiding this kind of outbreak in the future. A retrospective cohort study was used. We tried to reach by telephone all guests who had attended this banquet. A standardized questionnaire was used to provide information about identification of a risk factor, especially in relation to food. The cohort study has shown that potato salad served at the party was significantly associated with the disease. The mayonnaise used to prepare the salad was analyzed and Bacillus cereus was isolated (10(3) bacteria per gram). Bacillus microorganisms are usually found in decaying organic matter, dust, soil, vegetables and water. The bacteria has a remarkable ability to survive strong environmental stresses. There are strains of B. cereus that can cause food poisoning episodes with infective doses as low as 10(3) to 10(4) bacteria per gram. B. cereus is an infrequently reported cause of foodborne illnesses in Quebec and in North America but this may be due to underreporting of episodes. In this outbreak, bacterial multiplication was facilitated at several points in the interval between the preparation of the meal and the consumption of the banquet by the guests. Because the spores are ubiquitous and resistant to inactivation with most food grade disinfectants, temperature control should be the main focus of B. cereus outbreak prevention. The meal was prepared by a restaurateur who was inexperienced in catering services and temperature control in particular when food is served outside the restaurant. This outbreak underscores the importance of maintaining meticulous hygienic procedures in food processing. Restaurateurs who offer catering services should be familiar with the constraints that are specific to this sector of the food industry.

  10. Strategy for Identification of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis Strains Closely Related to Bacillus anthracis†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Raddadi, Noura; Merabishvili, Maya; Cherif, Ameur; Carmagnola, Lorenzo; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Rizzi, Aurora; Chanishvili, Nina; Visca, Paolo; Sharp, Richard; Borin, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus cereus strains that are genetically closely related to B. anthracis can display anthrax-like virulence traits (A. R. Hoffmaster et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101:8449-8454, 2004). Hence, approaches that rapidly identify these “near neighbors” are of great interest for the study of B. anthracis virulence mechanisms, as well as to prevent the use of such strains for B. anthracis-based bioweapon development. Here, a strategy is proposed for the identification of near neighbors of B. anthracis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (ITS) containing tRNA genes, characteristic of B. anthracis. By using restriction site insertion-PCR (RSI-PCR) the presence of two SNP typical of B. anthracis was screened in 126 B. cereus group strains of different origin. Two B. cereus strains and one B. thuringiensis strain showed RSI-PCR profiles identical to that of B. anthracis. The sequencing of the entire ITS containing tRNA genes revealed two of the strains to be identical to B. anthracis. The strict relationship with B. anthracis was confirmed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of four other independent loci: cerA, plcR, AC-390, and SG-749. The relationship to B. anthracis of the three strains described by MLST was comparable and even higher to that of four B. cereus strains associated with periodontitis in humans and previously reported as the closest known strains to B. anthracis. SNP in ITS containing tRNA genes combined with RSI-PCR provide a very efficient tool for the identification of strains closely related to B. anthracis. PMID:16461679

  11. Response of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 to challenges with sublethal concentrations of enterocin AS-48

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    Gálvez Antonio

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterocin AS-48 is produced by Enterococcus faecalis S48 to compete with other bacteria in their environment. Due to its activity against various Gram positive and some Gram negative bacteria it has clear potential for use as a food preservative. Here, we studied the effect of enterocin AS-48 challenges on vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 by use of transcriptome analysis. Results Of the 5200 genes analysed, expression of 24 genes was found to change significantly after a 30 min treatment with a subinhibitory bacteriocin concentration of 0.5 μg/ml. Most of up-regulated genes encode membrane-associated or secreted proteins with putative transmembrane segments or signal sequences, respectively. One operon involved in arginine metabolism was significantly downregulated. The BC4206-BC4207 operon was found to be the most upregulated target in our experiments. BC4206 codes for a PadR type transcriptional regulator, while BC4207 codes for a hypothetical membrane protein. The operon structure and genes are conserved in B. cereus and B. thuringiensis species, but are not present in B. anthracis and B. subtilis. Using real-time qPCR, we show that these genes are upregulated when we treated the cells with AS-48, but not upon nisin treatment. Upon overexpression of BC4207 in B. cereus, we observed an increased resistance against AS-48. Expression of BC4207 in B. subtilis 168, which lacks this operon also showed increased resistance against AS-48. Conclusion BC4207 membrane protein is involved in the resistance mechanism of B. cereus cells against AS-48.

  12. Cold plasma technology: bactericidal effects on Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus cereus microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Angela D; McCombs, Gayle B; Akan, Tamer; Hynes, Wayne; Laroussi, Mounir; Tolle, Susan L

    2009-01-01

    Cold plasma, also known as Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (LTAPP) is a novel technology consisting of neutral and charged particles, including free radicals, which can be used to destroy or inactivate microorganisms. Research has been conducted regarding the effect of cold plasma on gram-positive bacteria; however, there is limited research regarding its ability to inactivate the spore-formers Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus cereus. The purpose of this study was to determine if cold plasma inactivates G. stearothermophilus and B. cereus vegetative cells and spores. Nine hundred eighty-one samples were included in this study (762 experimental and 219 controls). Experimental samples were exposed indirectly or directly to cold plasma, before plating and incubating for 16 hours. Control samples were not exposed to cold plasma. The percentage-kill and cell number reductions were calculated from Colony Forming Units (CFU). Data were statistically analyzed at the .05 level using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal Wallis and Tukey's tests. There was a statistically significant difference in the inactivation of G. stearothermophilus vegetative cells receiving indirect and direct exposure (p=0.0001 and p=0.0013, respectively), as well as for B. cereus vegetative cells and spores (p=0.0001 for direct and indirect). There was no statistically significant difference in the inactivation of G. stearothermophilus spores receiving indirect exposure (p=0.7208) or direct exposure (p=0.0835). Results demonstrate that cold plasma exposure effectively kills G. stearothermophilus vegetative cells and B. cereus vegetative cells and spores; however, G. stearothermophilus spores were not significantly inactivated.

  13. Production of bio-inseticide Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis in semicontinuous processes combined with batch processes for sporulation

    OpenAIRE

    Millena da Silva; Agenor Furigo Junior; Sandra Aparecida Furlan; Ozair Souza

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the production of the bioinsecticide using the aerobic cultivation. Two-stage cultivation process was used: aerobic vegetative growth and end-phase of sporulation (with aeration and without aeration). The cuts of working volume evaluated were 20, 40, 60 and 80 %. The highest value of spore concentration (2.17x10(9) CFU/mL) and spore productivity (7.2x10(7) CFU/mL.h) were observed using SP60. The lethal concentration (CL50) obtained through the aeration proces...

  14. Extended genetic analysis of Brazilian isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahner, Viviane; Silva, Ana Carolina Telles de Carvalho e; de Moraes, Gabriela Pinhel; McIntosh, Douglas; de Filippis, Ivano

    2013-01-01

    Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST) was undertaken to extend the genetic characterization of 29 isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis previously characterized in terms of presence/absence of sequences encoding virulence factors and via variable number tandem repeat (VNTR). Additional analysis involved polymerase chain reaction for the presence of sequences (be, cytK, inA, pag, lef, cya and cap), encoding putative virulence factors, not investigated in the earlier study. MLST analysis ascribed novel and unique sequence types to each of the isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from a single sequence of 2,838 bp of concatenated loci sequences. The strains were not monophyletic by analysis of any specific housekeeping gene or virulence characteristic. No clear association in relation to source of isolation or to genotypic profile based on the presence or absence of putative virulence genes could be identified. Comparison of VNTR profiling with MLST data suggested a correlation between these two methods of genetic analysis. In common with the majority of previous studies, MLST was unable to provide clarification of the basis for pathogenicity among members of the B. cereus complex. Nevertheless, our application of MLST served to reinforce the notion that B. cereus and B. thuringiensis should be considered as the same species. PMID:23440117

  15. Biosurfactants production potential of native strains of Bacillus cereus and their antimicrobial, cytotoxic and antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Madiha; Rasool, Muhammad Hidayat; Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Waseem, Muhammad; Aslam, Bilal

    2018-01-01

    Present study was designed to evaluate the biosurfactant production potential by native strains of Bacillus cereus as well as determine their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. The strains isolated from garden soil were characterized as B. cereus MMIC 1, MMIC 2 and MMIC 3. Biosurfactants were extracted as grey white precipitates. Optimum conditions for biosurfactant production were 37°C, the 7th day of incubation, 0.5% NaCl, pH 7.0. Moreover, corn steep liquor was the best carbon source. Biuret test, Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), agar double diffusion and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) characterized the biosurfactants as cationic lipopeptides. Biosurfactants exhibited significant antibacterial and antifungal activity against S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, A. niger and C. albicans at 30 mg/ml. Moreover, they also possessed antiviral activity against NDV at 10 mg/ml. Cytotoxicity assay in BHK-21 cell lines revealed 63% cell survival at 10 mg/ml of biosurfactants and thus considered as safe. They also showed very good antioxidant activity by ferric-reducing activity and DPPH scavenging activity at 2 mg/ml. Consequently, the study offers an insight for the exploration of new bioactive molecules from the soil. It was concluded that lipopeptide biosurfactants produced from native strains of B. cereus may be recommended as safe antimicrobial, emulsifier and antioxidant agent.

  16. Comparison of antibacterial activity of four cultivars of olive (Olea europaea leaf extract on Bacillus cereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abbasvali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, plant extracts have been used as antimicrobial agents. One of these extracts is olive leaf extract, which has antimicrobial properties due to its phenolic compounds. In current study the leaf extract of four olive (Olea europaea cultivars (Shiraz, Zard, Roghani and Dezfool was extracted by different solvents (acetone, methanol and ethanol using microwave-assisted extraction method. Then the antibacterial activity of the extracts was assessed on Bacillus cereus. The antibacterial activity of the extracts was determined using the standard and micro broth-dilution methods. All experiments were carried out in triplicate. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of eleven extracts was estimated as 20 mg/ml, and only MIC of the methanolic extract of Roghani cultivar was 10 mg/ml. Bacterial growth curve of B. cereus in the presence of olive leaf extracts was drawn after 24 h incubation at 37 °C and the mean percentage of growth inhibition of each extract was measured after 24 hours. The results showed that in comparison with the other cultivars, the methanolic extract of Roghani cultivar with the percentage of growth inhibition of 91.3% and 87.8% (in the concentrations of 10 and 20 mg/ml, respectively, demonstrated stronger antibacterial effect on B. cereus. This study indicated that olive leaf extract from inexpensive agricultural waste might be a valuable bioactive source with antibacterial activity, and seem to be applicable as a safe food additive.

  17. Growth of Amanita caesarea in the presence of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, J M; Berrocal-Lobo, M; Domínguez-Núñez, J A

    2017-09-01

    The ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungus Amanita caesarea CECT 20127 was tested in vitro with two potentially mycorrhizal-promoting bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens CECT 844 and Bacillus cereus CECT 148. Although P. fluorescens showed spatial and temporal compatibility with A. caesarea, it did not affect growth of the fungus. Conversely, B. cereus exhibited no such compatibility and also inhibited fungal growth. The expression pattern of the A. caesarea gene AcMST-1 was analysed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) at three time points. This gene displays a high degree of homology with two genes, possible orthologues to AcMST-1, previously described in Amanita muscaria (AmMST-1) and Laccaria bicolor (LbMST-1) and encoding monosaccharide transporter proteins. The transcription levels of AcMST1 increased shortly after initial contact between A. caesarea and B. cereus, but expression of the gene was inhibited in the presence of P. fluorescens. Our results show that A. caesarea may possess orthologous genes of similar ECM fungal species that would allow it to adapt in nature to optimize sugar uptake from the environment depending on the presence of different microorganisms. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Environmental and Biofilm-dependent Changes in a Bacillus cereus Secondary Cell Wall Polysaccharide*

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    Candela, Thomas; Maes, Emmanuel; Garénaux, Estelle; Rombouts, Yoann; Krzewinski, Frédéric; Gohar, Michel; Guérardel, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial species from the Bacillus genus, including Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis, synthesize secondary cell wall polymers (SCWP) covalently associated to the peptidoglycan through a phospho-diester linkage. Although such components were observed in a wide panel of B. cereus and B. anthracis strains, the effect of culture conditions or of bacterial growth state on their synthesis has never been addressed. Herein we show that B. cereus ATCC 14579 can synthesize not only one, as previously reported, but two structurally unrelated secondary cell wall polymers (SCWP) polysaccharides. The first of these SCWP, →4)[GlcNAc(β1–3)]GlcNAc(β1–6)[Glc(β1-3)][ManNAc(α1–4)]GalNAc(α1–4)ManNAc(β1→, although presenting an original sequence, fits to the already described the canonical sequence motif of SCWP. In contrast, the second polysaccharide was made up by a totally original sequence, →6)Gal(α1–2)(2-R-hydroxyglutar-5-ylamido)Fuc2NAc4N(α1-6)GlcNAc(β1→, which no equivalent has ever been identified in the Bacillus genus. In addition, we established that the syntheses of these two polysaccharides were differently regulated. The first one is constantly expressed at the surface of the bacteria, whereas the expression of the second is tightly regulated by culture conditions and growth states, planktonic, or biofilm. PMID:21784857

  19. Extended genetic analysis of Brazilian isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis

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    Viviane Zahner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST was undertaken to extend the genetic characterization of 29 isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis previously characterized in terms of presence/absence of sequences encoding virulence factors and via variable number tandem repeat (VNTR. Additional analysis involved polymerase chain reaction for the presence of sequences (be, cytK, inA, pag, lef, cya and cap, encoding putative virulence factors, not investigated in the earlier study. MLST analysis ascribed novel and unique sequence types to each of the isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from a single sequence of 2,838 bp of concatenated loci sequences. The strains were not monophyletic by analysis of any specific housekeeping gene or virulence characteristic. No clear association in relation to source of isolation or to genotypic profile based on the presence or absence of putative virulence genes could be identified. Comparison of VNTR profiling with MLST data suggested a correlation between these two methods of genetic analysis. In common with the majority of previous studies, MLST was unable to provide clarification of the basis for pathogenicity among members of the B. cereus complex. Nevertheless, our application of MLST served to reinforce the notion that B. cereus and B. thuringiensis should be considered as the same species.

  20. Dynamic Analysis of the Evolution of Cereus peruvianus (Cactaceae Areas Attacked by Phoma sp.

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    Gyorgy FESZT

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cereus Peruvianus (night blooming Cereus, or peruvian apple is one of the sensitive species to Phoma attack. Photographic images can intercept a certain phytopathology, at a certain moment. The computerized analysis of such an image turns into a value the spread which the phytopathological process has at that moment. The purpose of this study is to assimilate the technique of achieving successions of digital photos of Cereus peruvianus f. monstruosa attacked by Phoma sp. Parallely with recording the images, with the help of Rhythm digital temperature humidity controller, were recorded data about the green house microclimate (air humidity-minimum and maximum, temperature-minimum and maximum. In the first stage of the study, the attack presents small fluctuations, reaching a high level in days with low temperatures. So, the most significant growths were recorded in the periods: 10. 02. 2005-20. 02. 2005 with an affected area of 10.97-8.82 = 2.15 and 11. 03. 2005-22. 04. 2005 with growth differences of 14.67-13.32 = 1.35. Generally, the affected areas grow in days with low minimum temperatures. The great advantage of this technique is represented by the possibility of using in situ in home areas of species or crop plants in fields. Repeated images, achieved in time, then overlapped, can provide important data on the evolution of affected areas.

  1. Detection and quantification of Bacillus cereus group in milk by droplet digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcellato, Davide; Narvhus, Judith; Skeie, Siv Borghild

    2016-08-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) is one of the newest and most promising methods for the detection and quantification of molecular targets by PCR. Here, we optimized and used a new ddPCR assay for the detection and quantification of the Bacillus cereus group in milk. We also compared the ddPCR to a standard qPCR assay. The new ddPCR assay showed a similar coefficient of determination and a better limit of detection compared to the qPCR assay during quantification of the target molecules in the samples. However, the ddPCR assay has a limitation during quantification of a high number of target molecules. This new assay was then tested for the quantification of the B. cereus group in 90 milk samples obtained over three months from two different dairies and the milk was stored at different temperatures before sampling. The ddPCR assay showed good agreement with the qPCR assay for the quantification of the B. cereus group in milk, and due to its lower detection limit more samples were detected as positive. The new ddPCR assay is a promising method for the quantification of target bacteria in low concentration in milk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Whole-genome resequencing of Bacillus cereus and expression of genes functioning in sodium chloride stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenbo; Xie, Jinhong; Liu, Junyan; Ji, Lili; Soteyome, Thanapop; Peters, Brian M; Chen, Dingqiang; Li, Bing; Li, Lin; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2017-03-01

    Bacillus cereus is one of the most common opportunistic pathogens responsible for various foodborn diseases. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of B. cereus under high osmotic pressure, two B. cereus strains B25 and B26 were isolated from the industrial soy sauce residue containing high-salt concentration. Resequencing was performed by Illumina/Solexa platform and 13,646 SNPs and 434 InDels were identified as common variants between B25 and B26 against reference genome, followed by COG, GO, and KEGG enrichment analysis. Furthermore, 49 key genes involving in Na(+)/H(+),K(+) transporter, dipeptide or tripeptide transporter, stress response were selected and classified into 27 groups. Further validation was performed by qRT-PCR, and 4 candidate genes were found most associated with osmotic response. Gene expression of the 4 candidate genes was then analyzed accordingly, and down regulation was obtained for gene BC0669 and BC0754 associated with K(+) transport system. However, dramatic up regulation was detected for gene BC2114 involving in glutathione peroxidase, indicating the activation of antioxidant responses by osmotic stress via genetic regulation. As concluded, bioinformatic analysis and gene expression profile represented the basis of further investigation on the genetic and regulatory mechanism of bacterial salt tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Arsenic release by indigenous bacteria Bacillus cereus from aquifer sediments at Datong Basin, northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zuoming; Wang, Yanxin; Duan, Mengyu; Xie, Xianjun; Su, Chunli

    2011-03-01

    Endemic arsenic poisoning due to long-term drinking of high arsenic groundwater has been reported in Datong Basin, northern China. To investigate the effects of microbial activities on arsenic mobilization in contaminated aquifers, Bacillus cereus ( B. cereus) isolated from high arsenic aquifer sediments of the basin was used in our microcosm experiments. The arsenic concentration in the treatment with both bacteria and sodium citrate or glucose had a rapid increase in the first 18 d, and then, it declined. Supplemented with bacteria only, the concentration could increase on the second day. By contrast, the arsenic concentration in the treatment supplemented with sodium citrate or glucose was kept very low. These results indicate that bacterial activities promoted the release of arsenic in the sediments. Bacterial activities also influenced other geochemical parameters of the aqueous phase, such as pH, Eh, and the concentrations of dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al that are important controls on arsenic release. The removal of Fe, Mn, and Al from sediment samples was observed with the presence of B. cereus. The effects of microbial activities on Fe, Mn, and Al release were nearly the same as those on As mobilization. The pH values of the treatments inoculated with bacteria were lower than those without bacteria, still at alkaline levels. With the decrease of Eh values in treatments inoculated with bacteria, the microcosms became more reducing and are thus favorable for arsenic release.

  4. Modeling the influence of electron beam irradiation on the heat resistance of Bacillus cereus spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, M; Sarrías, J A; Alvarez, D; Salmerón, M C

    2006-06-01

    The effect of electron beam irradiation (EBI) on Bacillus cereus spore heat resistance was investigated. Irradiation with accelerated electrons had an important heat-sensitizing effect on distilled-water spore suspensions. After irradiation doses of 1.3, 3.1, or 5.7 kGy followed by heating at 90 degrees C, calculated D(90)-values for strains Escuela Politécnica Superior de Orihuela (EPSO)-41WR and EPSO-50UR were reduced more than 1.3, 2.4, and 4.6 times, respectively. Plots of calculated log D(T)-values versus irradiation doses (1.3, 3.1, and 5.7 kGy) yielded straight parallel lines for the 85-100 degrees C heating temperature range, which made it possible to develop an equation to predict the changes in heat sensitivity of B. cereus spores that occurred with changing irradiation dose. Radiation-induced heat-sensitivity was characterized by a z(EBI)-value which was determined as the irradiation dose that should be required to reduce the decimal reduction time (D(T)) by one log(10) cycle when log(10)D(T) was plotted against irradiation treatment. A model is proposed to describe the influence of a pre-irradiation treatment with electron beams followed by heating on the heat resistance of B. cereus spores. This study also suggests the potential use of EBI followed by heating for food preservation.

  5. Time dynamics of the Bacillus cereus exoproteome are shaped by cellular oxidation

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    Jean-Paul eMadeira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available At low density, Bacillus cereus cells release a large variety of proteins into the extracellular medium when cultivated in pH-regulated, glucose-containing minimal medium, either in the presence or absence of oxygen. The majority of these exoproteins are putative virulence factors, including toxin-related proteins. Here, B. cereus exoproteome time courses were monitored by nanoLC-MS/MS under low-oxidoreduction potential (ORP anaerobiosis, high-ORP anaerobiosis, and aerobiosis, with a specific focus on oxidative-induced post-translational modifications of methionine residues. Principal component analysis (PCA of the exoproteome dynamics indicated that toxin-related proteins were the most representative of the exoproteome changes, both in terms of protein abundance and their methionine sulfoxide (Met(O content. PCA also revealed an interesting interconnection between toxin-, metabolism-, and oxidative stress–related proteins, suggesting that the abundance level of toxin-related proteins, and their Met(O content in the B. cereus exoproteome, reflected the cellular oxidation under both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  6. Behavior of pythium Torulosum zoospores during their interaction with tobacco roots and Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, H; Chen, J; Handelsman, J; Goodman, R M

    1999-04-01

    Bacillus cereus UW85 suppresses seedling damping-off diseases caused by Oomycetes and produces antibiotics that inhibit development of Oomycetes in culture. The goal of this study was to determine how UW85 and its antibiotics affected the behavior of an Oomycete, Pythium torulosum, in its interaction with plant roots. We studied tobacco seedlings inoculated with zoospores of P. torulosum and UW85 culture, culture filtrate, washed cells, antibiotics (zwittermicin A or kanosamine), purified from cultures of UW85, and UW030, a mutant of UW85 that does not suppress disease and does not produce the antibiotics. Microscopic observation revealed that all of the treatments inhibited zoospore activity around roots and encystment on roots. Treatment with UW85 culture, culture filtrate, zwittermicin A, or kanosamine delayed cyst germination and the elongation rate of germ tubes, whereas treatment with UW030 or washed UW85 cells did not. In an in vitro seedling bioassay of disease suppression, the antibiotics, zwittermicin A and kanosamine, suppressed disease singly or together, although UW85 culture suppressed disease more effectively than did the antibiotics. The results show that B. cereus cultures affect zoospore behavior in the presence of roots, and B. cereus-produced antibiotics, zwittermicin A and kanosamine, contribute to disease suppression and inhibition of germ tube elongation in the presence of the plant root.

  7. Production of hemolysin BL by Bacillus cereus group isolates of dairy origin is associated with whole-genome phylogenetic clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Jasna; Miller, Rachel A; Carroll, Laura M; Kent, David J; Jian, Jiahui; Beno, Sarah M; Wiedmann, Martin

    2016-08-09

    Bacillus cereus group isolates that produce diarrheal or emetic toxins are frequently isolated from raw milk and, in spore form, can survive pasteurization. Several species within the B. cereus group are closely related and cannot be reliably differentiated by established taxonomical criteria. While B. cereus is traditionally recognized as the principal causative agent of foodborne disease in this group, there is a need to better understand the distribution and expression of different toxin and virulence genes among B. cereus group food isolates to facilitate reliable characterization that allows for assessment of the likelihood of a given isolate to cause a foodborne disease. We performed whole genome sequencing of 22 B. cereus group dairy isolates, which represented considerable genetic diversity not covered by other isolates characterized to date. Maximum likelihood analysis of these genomes along with 47 reference genomes representing eight validly published species revealed nine phylogenetic clades. Three of these clades were represented by a single species (B. toyonensis -clade V, B. weihenstephanensis - clade VI, B. cytotoxicus - VII), one by two dairy-associated isolates (clade II; representing a putative new species), one by two species (B. mycoides, B. pseudomycoides - clade I) and four by three species (B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. anthracis - clades III-a, b, c and IV). Homologues of genes encoding a principal diarrheal enterotoxin (hemolysin BL) were distributed across all, except the B. cytotoxicus clade. Using a lateral flow immunoassay, hemolysin BL was detected in 13 out of 18 isolates that carried hblACD genes. Isolates from clade III-c (which included B. cereus and B. thuringiensis) consistently did not carry hblACD and did not produce hemolysin BL. Isolates from clade IV (B. cereus, B. thuringiensis) consistently carried hblACD and produced hemolysin BL. Compared to others, clade IV was significantly (p = 0.0001) more likely to produce

  8. Capsules, toxins and AtxA as virulence factors of emerging Bacillus cereus biovar anthracis.

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    Christophe Brézillon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Emerging B. cereus strains that cause anthrax-like disease have been isolated in Cameroon (CA strain and Côte d'Ivoire (CI strain. These strains are unusual, because their genomic characterisation shows that they belong to the B. cereus species, although they harbour two plasmids, pBCXO1 and pBCXO2, that are highly similar to the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids of B. anthracis that encode the toxins and the polyglutamate capsule respectively. The virulence factors implicated in the pathogenicity of these B. cereus bv anthracis strains remain to be characterised. We tested their virulence by cutaneous and intranasal delivery in mice and guinea pigs; they were as virulent as wild-type B. anthracis. Unlike as described for pXO2-cured B. anthracis, the CA strain cured of the pBCXO2 plasmid was still highly virulent, showing the existence of other virulence factors. Indeed, these strains concomitantly expressed a hyaluronic acid (HA capsule and the B. anthracis polyglutamate (PDGA capsule. The HA capsule was encoded by the hasACB operon on pBCXO1, and its expression was regulated by the global transcription regulator AtxA, which controls anthrax toxins and PDGA capsule in B. anthracis. Thus, the HA and PDGA capsules and toxins were co-regulated by AtxA. We explored the respective effect of the virulence factors on colonisation and dissemination of CA within its host by constructing bioluminescent mutants. Expression of the HA capsule by itself led to local multiplication and, during intranasal infection, to local dissemination to the adjacent brain tissue. Co-expression of either toxins or PDGA capsule with HA capsule enabled systemic dissemination, thus providing a clear evolutionary advantage. Protection against infection by B. cereus bv anthracis required the same vaccination formulation as that used against B. anthracis. Thus, these strains, at the frontier between B. anthracis and B. cereus, provide insight into how the monomorphic B. anthracis may have

  9. Assessment of CcpA-mediated catabolite control of gene expression in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579

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    Buist Girbe

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The catabolite control protein CcpA is a transcriptional regulator conserved in many Gram-positives, controlling the efficiency of glucose metabolism. Here we studied the role of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 CcpA in regulation of metabolic pathways and expression of enterotoxin genes by comparative transcriptome analysis of the wild-type and a ccpA-deletion strain. Results Comparative analysis revealed the growth performance and glucose consumption rates to be lower in the B. cereus ATCC 14579 ccpA deletion strain than in the wild-type. In exponentially grown cells, the expression of glycolytic genes, including a non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that mediates conversion of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to 3-phospho-D-glycerate in one single step, was down-regulated and expression of gluconeogenic genes and genes encoding the citric acid cycle was up-regulated in the B. cereus ccpA deletion strain. Furthermore, putative CRE-sites, that act as binding sites for CcpA, were identified to be present for these genes. These results indicate CcpA to be involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism, thereby optimizing the efficiency of glucose catabolism. Other genes of which the expression was affected by ccpA deletion and for which putative CRE-sites could be identified, included genes with an annotated function in the catabolism of ribose, histidine and possibly fucose/arabinose and aspartate. Notably, expression of the operons encoding non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe and hemolytic enterotoxin (Hbl was affected by ccpA deletion, and putative CRE-sites were identified, which suggests catabolite repression of the enterotoxin operons to be CcpA-dependent. Conclusion The catabolite control protein CcpA in B. cereus ATCC 14579 is involved in optimizing the catabolism of glucose with concomitant repression of gluconeogenesis and alternative metabolic pathways. Furthermore, the results point to metabolic control

  10. Capsules, Toxins and AtxA as Virulence Factors of Emerging Bacillus cereus Biovar anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corre, Jean-Philippe; Lander, Angelika; Franz, Tatjana; Monot, Marc; Couture-Tosi, Evelyne; Jouvion, Gregory; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Grunow, Roland; Mock, Michèle E.; Klee, Silke R.; Goossens, Pierre L.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging B. cereus strains that cause anthrax-like disease have been isolated in Cameroon (CA strain) and Côte d’Ivoire (CI strain). These strains are unusual, because their genomic characterisation shows that they belong to the B. cereus species, although they harbour two plasmids, pBCXO1 and pBCXO2, that are highly similar to the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids of B. anthracis that encode the toxins and the polyglutamate capsule respectively. The virulence factors implicated in the pathogenicity of these B. cereus bv anthracis strains remain to be characterised. We tested their virulence by cutaneous and intranasal delivery in mice and guinea pigs; they were as virulent as wild-type B. anthracis. Unlike as described for pXO2-cured B. anthracis, the CA strain cured of the pBCXO2 plasmid was still highly virulent, showing the existence of other virulence factors. Indeed, these strains concomitantly expressed a hyaluronic acid (HA) capsule and the B. anthracis polyglutamate (PDGA) capsule. The HA capsule was encoded by the hasACB operon on pBCXO1, and its expression was regulated by the global transcription regulator AtxA, which controls anthrax toxins and PDGA capsule in B. anthracis. Thus, the HA and PDGA capsules and toxins were co-regulated by AtxA. We explored the respective effect of the virulence factors on colonisation and dissemination of CA within its host by constructing bioluminescent mutants. Expression of the HA capsule by itself led to local multiplication and, during intranasal infection, to local dissemination to the adjacent brain tissue. Co-expression of either toxins or PDGA capsule with HA capsule enabled systemic dissemination, thus providing a clear evolutionary advantage. Protection against infection by B. cereus bv anthracis required the same vaccination formulation as that used against B. anthracis. Thus, these strains, at the frontier between B. anthracis and B. cereus, provide insight into how the monomorphic B. anthracis may have emerged. PMID

  11. Capsules, toxins and AtxA as virulence factors of emerging Bacillus cereus biovar anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brézillon, Christophe; Haustant, Michel; Dupke, Susann; Corre, Jean-Philippe; Lander, Angelika; Franz, Tatjana; Monot, Marc; Couture-Tosi, Evelyne; Jouvion, Gregory; Leendertz, Fabian H; Grunow, Roland; Mock, Michèle E; Klee, Silke R; Goossens, Pierre L

    2015-04-01

    Emerging B. cereus strains that cause anthrax-like disease have been isolated in Cameroon (CA strain) and Côte d'Ivoire (CI strain). These strains are unusual, because their genomic characterisation shows that they belong to the B. cereus species, although they harbour two plasmids, pBCXO1 and pBCXO2, that are highly similar to the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids of B. anthracis that encode the toxins and the polyglutamate capsule respectively. The virulence factors implicated in the pathogenicity of these B. cereus bv anthracis strains remain to be characterised. We tested their virulence by cutaneous and intranasal delivery in mice and guinea pigs; they were as virulent as wild-type B. anthracis. Unlike as described for pXO2-cured B. anthracis, the CA strain cured of the pBCXO2 plasmid was still highly virulent, showing the existence of other virulence factors. Indeed, these strains concomitantly expressed a hyaluronic acid (HA) capsule and the B. anthracis polyglutamate (PDGA) capsule. The HA capsule was encoded by the hasACB operon on pBCXO1, and its expression was regulated by the global transcription regulator AtxA, which controls anthrax toxins and PDGA capsule in B. anthracis. Thus, the HA and PDGA capsules and toxins were co-regulated by AtxA. We explored the respective effect of the virulence factors on colonisation and dissemination of CA within its host by constructing bioluminescent mutants. Expression of the HA capsule by itself led to local multiplication and, during intranasal infection, to local dissemination to the adjacent brain tissue. Co-expression of either toxins or PDGA capsule with HA capsule enabled systemic dissemination, thus providing a clear evolutionary advantage. Protection against infection by B. cereus bv anthracis required the same vaccination formulation as that used against B. anthracis. Thus, these strains, at the frontier between B. anthracis and B. cereus, provide insight into how the monomorphic B. anthracis may have emerged.

  12. Characterization and Exposure Assessment of Emetic Bacillus cereus and Cereulide Production in Food Products on the Dutch Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesta-Peters, Elisabeth G; Dissel, Serge; Reij, Martine W; Zwietering, Marcel H; in't Veld, Paul H

    2016-02-01

    The emetic toxin cereulide, which can be produced by Bacillus cereus, can be the cause of food poisoning upon ingestion by the consumer. The toxin causes vomiting and is mainly produced in farinaceous food products. This article includes the prevalence of B. cereus and of cereulide in food products in The Netherlands, a characterization of B. cereus isolates obtained, cereulide production conditions, and a comparison of consumer exposure estimates with those of a previous exposure assessment. Food samples (n = 1,489) were tested for the presence of B. cereus; 5.4% of the samples contained detectable levels (>10(2) CFU/g), and 0.7% contained levels above 10(5) CFU/g. Samples (n = 3,008) also were tested for the presence of cereulide. Two samples (0.067%) contained detectable levels of cereulide at 3.2 and 5.4 μg/kg of food product. Of the 481 tested isolates, 81 produced cereulide and/or contained the ces gene. None of the starch-positive and hbl-containing isolates possessed the ces gene, whereas all strains contained the nhe genes. Culture of emetic B. cereus under nonoptimal conditions revealed a delay in onset of cereulide production compared with culture under optimal conditions, and cereulide was produced in all cases when B. cereus cells had been in the stationary phase for some time. The prevalence of cereulide-contaminated food approached the prevalence of contaminated products estimated in an exposure assessment. The main food safety focus associated with this pathogen should be to prevent germination and growth of any B. cereus present in food products and thus prevent cereulide production in foods.

  13. Incidence, Antibiotic Susceptibility, and Toxin Profiles of Bacillus cereus sensu lato Isolated from Korean Fermented Soybean Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Kwang-Yeop; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Hong-Seok; Choi, Da-Som; Choi, In-Soo; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Korean fermented soybean products, such as doenjang, kochujang, ssamjang, and cho-kochujang, can harbor foodborne pathogens such as Bacillus cereus sensu lato (B. cereus sensu lato). The aim of this study was to characterize the toxin gene profiles, biochemical characteristics, and antibiotic resistance patterns of B. cereus sensu lato strains isolated from Korean fermented soybean products. Eighty-eight samples of Korean fermented soybean products purchased from retails in Seoul were tested. Thirteen of 26 doenjang samples, 13 of 23 kochujang samples, 16 of 30 ssamjang samples, and 5 of 9 cho-kochujang samples were positive for B. cereus sensu lato strains. The contamination level of all positive samples did not exceed 4 log CFU/g of food (maximum levels of Korea Food Code). Eighty-seven B. cereus sensu lato strains were isolated from 47 positive samples, and all isolates carried at least one enterotoxin gene. The detection rates of hblCDA, nheABC, cytK, and entFM enterotoxin genes among all isolates were 34.5%, 98.9%, 57.5%, and 100%, respectively. Fifteen strains (17.2%) harbored the emetic toxin gene. Most strains tested positive for salicin fermentation (62.1%), starch hydrolysis (66.7%), hemolysis (98.9%), motility test (100%), and lecithinase production (96.6%). The B. cereus sensu lato strains were highly resistant to β-lactam antibiotics such as ampicillin, penicillin, cefepime, imipenem, and oxacillin. Although B. cereus sensu lato levels in Korean fermented soybean products did not exceed the maximum levels permitted in South Korea (<10(4) CFU/g), these results indicate that the bacterial isolates have the potential to cause diarrheal or emetic gastrointestinal diseases. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Comparative transcriptional profiling of Bacillus cereus sensu lato strains during growth in CO2-bicarbonate and aerobic atmospheres.

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    Karla D Passalacqua

    Full Text Available Bacillus species are spore-forming bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and display a range of virulent and avirulent phenotypes. This range is particularly evident in the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group; where closely related strains cause anthrax, food-borne illnesses, and pneumonia, but can also be non-pathogenic. Although much of this phenotypic range can be attributed to the presence or absence of a few key virulence factors, there are other virulence-associated loci that are conserved throughout the B. cereus group, and we hypothesized that these genes may be regulated differently in pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains.Here we report transcriptional profiles of three closely related but phenotypically unique members of the Bacillus cereus group--a pneumonia-causing B. cereus strain (G9241, an attenuated strain of B. anthracis (Sterne 34F(2, and an avirulent B. cereus strain (10987--during exponential growth in two distinct atmospheric environments: 14% CO(2/bicarbonate and ambient air. We show that the disease-causing Bacillus strains undergo more distinctive transcriptional changes between the two environments, and that the expression of plasmid-encoded virulence genes was increased exclusively in the CO(2 environment. We observed a core of conserved metabolic genes that were differentially expressed in all three strains in both conditions. Additionally, the expression profiles of putative virulence genes in G9241 suggest that this strain, unlike Bacillus anthracis, may regulate gene expression with both PlcR and AtxA transcriptional regulators, each acting in a different environment.We have shown that homologous and even identical genes within the genomes of three closely related members of the B. cereus sensu lato group are in some instances regulated very differently, and that these differences can have important implications for virulence. This study provides insights into the evolution of the B. cereus group, and

  15. Rapid, High-Throughput Identification of Anthrax-Causing and Emetic Bacillus cereus Group Genome Assemblies via BTyper, a Computational Tool for Virulence-Based Classification of Bacillus cereus Group Isolates by Using Nucleotide Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Laura M.; Miller, Rachel A.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Bacillus cereus group comprises nine species, several of which are pathogenic. Differentiating between isolates that may cause disease and those that do not is a matter of public health and economic importance, but it can be particularly challenging due to the high genomic similarity within the group. To this end, we have developed BTyper, a computational tool that employs a combination of (i) virulence gene-based typing, (ii) multilocus sequence typing (MLST), (iii) panC clade typing, and (iv) rpoB allelic typing to rapidly classify B. cereus group isolates using nucleotide sequencing data. BTyper was applied to a set of 662 B. cereus group genome assemblies to (i) identify anthrax-associated genes in non-B. anthracis members of the B. cereus group, and (ii) identify assemblies from B. cereus group strains with emetic potential. With BTyper, the anthrax toxin genes cya, lef, and pagA were detected in 8 genomes classified by the NCBI as B. cereus that clustered into two distinct groups using k-medoids clustering, while either the B. anthracis poly-γ-d-glutamate capsule biosynthesis genes capABCDE or the hyaluronic acid capsule hasA gene was detected in an additional 16 assemblies classified as either B. cereus or Bacillus thuringiensis isolated from clinical, environmental, and food sources. The emetic toxin genes cesABCD were detected in 24 assemblies belonging to panC clades III and VI that had been isolated from food, clinical, and environmental settings. The command line version of BTyper is available at https://github.com/lmc297/BTyper. In addition, BMiner, a companion application for analyzing multiple BTyper output files in aggregate, can be found at https://github.com/lmc297/BMiner. IMPORTANCE Bacillus cereus is a foodborne pathogen that is estimated to cause tens of thousands of illnesses each year in the United States alone. Even with molecular methods, it can be difficult to distinguish nonpathogenic B. cereus group isolates from their

  16. Antimicrobial copper alloy surfaces are effective against vegetative but not sporulated cells of gram-positive Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San, Kaungmyat; Long, Janet; Michels, Corinne A; Gadura, Nidhi

    2015-10-01

    This study explores the role of membrane phospholipid peroxidation in the copper alloy mediated contact killing of Bacillus subtilis, a spore-forming gram-positive bacterial species. We found that B. subtilis endospores exhibited significant resistance to copper alloy surface killing but vegetative cells were highly sensitive to copper surface exposure. Cell death and lipid peroxidation occurred in B. subtilis upon copper alloy surface exposure. In a sporulation-defective strain carrying a deletion of almost the entire SpoIIA operon, lipid peroxidation directly correlated with cell death. Moreover, killing and lipid peroxidation initiated immediately and at a constant rate upon exposure to the copper surface without the delay observed previously in E. coli. These findings support the hypothesis that membrane lipid peroxidation is the initiating event causing copper surface induced cell death of B. subtilis vegetative cells. The findings suggest that the observed differences in the kinetics of copper-induced killing compared to E. coli result from differences in cell envelop structure. As demonstrated in E. coli, DNA degradation was shown to be a secondary effect of copper exposure in a B. subtilis sporulation-defective strain. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The L-type Ca(2+) Channel Blocker Nifedipine Inhibits Mycelial Growth, Sporulation, and Virulence of Phytophthora capsici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peiqing; Gong, Jie; Ding, Xueling; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Guoliang; Li, Benjin; Weng, Qiyong; Chen, Qinghe

    2016-01-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici causes significant losses of important vegetable crops worldwide. Calcium and other plant nutrients have been used in disease management of oomycete pathogens. Calcium homeostasis and signaling is essential for numerous biological processes, and Ca(2+) channel blockers prevent excessive Ca(2+) influx into the fungal cell. However, it is not known whether voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blockers improve control over oomycete pathogens. In the present study, we compared the inhibitory effects of CaCl2 and the extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EDTA on mycelial growth and found that calcium assimilation plays a key role in P. capsici mycelial growth. Next, we involved the voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil (VP) and nifedipine (NFD) to analyze the effect of Ca(2+) channel blockers on mycelial growth and sporulation; the results suggested that NFD, but not VP, caused significant inhibition. Ion rescue in an NFD-induced inhibition assay suggested that NFD-induced inhibition is calcium-dependent. In addition, NFD increased P. capsici sensitivity to H2O2 in a calcium-dependent manner, and extracellular calcium rescued it. Furthermore, NFD inhibited the virulence and gene expression related to its pathogenicity. These results suggest that NFD inhibits mycelial growth, sporulation, and virulence of P. capsici.

  18. Sporulation, storage and infectivity of obligate aphid pathogen Pandora nouryi grown on novel granules of broomcorn millet and polymer gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Feng, M-G

    2009-12-01

    Producing granular cultures of obligate aphid pathogen Pandora nouryi for improved sporulation and storage. Small millet-gel granules were made of the mixtures of 80-95% millet powder with 5-20% polymer gel (polyacrylamide, polyacrylate or acrylate-acrylamide copolymer) and inoculated with mycelia at 30 mg biomass g(-1) dry granules plus 87.5% water, followed by static incubation at 20 degrees C for 4-12 days. The fungus grew well on 12 preparations but best on that including 10% copolymer. An 8-day culture of this preparation discharged maximally 58.5 x 10(4) conidia mg(-1) granule at 100% RH and was capable of ejecting conidia at the nonsaturated regimes of 86-97% RH. During storage at 6 degrees C, granular cultures with >85% water content had twofold longevity (120 days) and half-decline period (34-36 days) of those stored at room temperature. The steadily high water content preserved the cultures better than that decreasing at 6 degrees C. However, conidia from 70-day-stored granules were less infective to Myzus persicae nymphs than those from fresh ones based on their LC(50)s. The millet-gel granules had higher sporulation capacity than reported Pandora cultures and a capability of spore discharge at nonsaturated humidity. The granular cultures are more useful for aphid control.

  19. THE EFFECT OF GROWTH PARAMETERS ON THE ANTIBIOTIC ACTIVITY AND SPORULATION IN BACILLUS SPP. ISOLATED FROM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Usta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-two Bacillus strains, which were isolated from different soil samples, were screened for antibiotic properties. The Bacillus strains were checked for antibacterial properties by the cross-streak method against 5 test pathogens, and 25 Bacillus strains had an effect on the test microorganisms. One strain of Bacillus, which exhibited the largest inhibition zone (25 mm against Shigella sonnei, was named Bacillus sp. EA62. The antibacterial activity from Bacillus sp. EA62 was tested in six different culture media against Shigella sonnei using the agar well diffusion method. The best activity medium was selected and used for further studies. The influence of the incubation period, pH, and different glucose and nitrogen concentrations on the antibacterial activity was studied. The optimal conditions for the strongest antibiotic activity were found to be 72 hours (18 mm, pH 7.5 (23 mm, 3% glucose (25 mm, and 0.3% nitrogen concentration (23 mm. Additionally, the relationship between the antibiotic activity and sporulation was investigated. Accordingly, it was determined that the increase of the activity paralleled sporulation.

  20. Alternative Sigma Factors SigF, SigE, and SigG Are Essential for Sporulation in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502

    OpenAIRE

    Kirk, David G.; Zhang, Zhen; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindström, Miia

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces heat-resistant endospores that may germinate and outgrow into neurotoxic cultures in foods. Sporulation is regulated by the transcription factor Spo0A and the alternative sigma factors SigF, SigE, SigG, and SigK in most spore formers studied to date. We constructed mutants of sigF, sigE, and sigG in C. botulinum ATCC 3502 and used quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and electron microscopy to assess their expression of the sporulation pathway on transcription...

  1. Milk-originated Bacillus cereus sensu lato strains harbouring Bacillus anthracis-like plasmids are genetically and phenotypically diverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoszewicz, Marek; Marjańska, Paulina Sylwia

    2017-10-01

    Bacillus cereus sensu lato is widely distributed in food products, including raw and processed milk. Plasmids often determine bacterial virulence and toxicity, but their role in the evolution of B. cereus sensu lato is only partly known. Here, we observed that nearly 8% of B. cereus sensu lato isolates were positive for pXO1-like plasmids and 12% for pXO2-like plasmids in raw and ultra-heat-treated (UHT) milk from one dairy plant. However, pXO1-like plasmids were significantly more frequent in raw milk, while pXO2-like plasmids were more frequent in processed milk. Strains from raw and UHT milk were enterotoxigenic, with up to one-fifth of the isolates being psychrotolerant. Phylogenetic assessment using multi-locus sequence typing revealed a polyphyletic structure for these bacilli, with distinct groups of cold-adapted isolates and pathogenic strains (including emetic B. cereus). Populations corresponding to both sampling sites exhibited significant linkage disequilibrium and the presence of purifying selection. The far-from-clonal population structure indicated the presence of sequence types or ecotypes adapted to specific conditions in the dairy industry. A high recombination-to-mutation ratio suggested an important role for horizontal gene transfer among B. cereus sensu lato isolates in milk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High Occurrence Rate and Contamination Level of Bacillus cereus in Organic Vegetables on Sale in Retail Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ji; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kim, Kwang-Yeop; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2016-12-01

    Organic foods have risen in popularity recently. However, the increased risk of bacterial contamination of organic foods has not been fully evaluated. In this study, 100 samples each of organic and conventional fresh vegetables (55 lettuce samples and 45 sprout samples) sold in South Korea were analyzed for aerobic bacteria, coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus cereus. Although the aerobic bacteria and coliform counts were not significantly different between the two farming types (p > 0.05), the occurrence rate of B. cereus was higher in organically cultivated vegetables compared with those grown conventionally (70% vs. 30%, respectively). The mean contamination level of B. cereus-positive organic samples was also significantly higher (1.86 log colony-forming unit [CFU]/g vs. 0.69 log CFU/g, respectively) (p < 0.05). In addition, six samples of organic vegetables were found to be contaminated with B. cereus at over 4 log CFU/g categorized as unsatisfactory according to Health Protection Agency guideline. The relatively higher occurrence rate of B. cereus in organic vegetables emphasizes the importance of implementing control measures in organic vegetable production and postharvest processing to reduce the risk of food poisoning.

  3. Evaluation of the Toxicity and Toxicokinetics of Cereulide from an Emetic Bacillus cereus Strain of Milk Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifang Cui

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic foodborne agent causing food poisoning and many infectious diseases. The heat-stable emetic toxin cereulide is one of the most prevalent toxins produced by pathogenic B. cereus, resulting in symptoms such as emesis and liver failure. In the present work, the toxicity and toxicokinetics of cereulide from an emetic B. cereus isolate (CAU45 of raw milk were evaluated. The production of cereulide was tested by a cytotoxicity test and enzyme immunoassay, and confirmed by the presence of the ces (cereulide synthetase gene and the ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS method. All results showed that the amount and toxicity of cereulide produced by CAU45 was 7 to 15.3 folds higher than the reference emetic B. cereus DSMZ 4312. Cereulide in plasma was collected at different time points after a single intravenous injection to evaluate its toxicokinetics in rabbits. The maximum concentration of cereulide was achieved in 2.6 ± 3.4 h after administration, with the elimination half-life of 10.8 ± 9.1 h, which expands our understanding of the toxic effects of cereulide. Together, it suggests that urgent sanitary practices are needed to eliminate emetic toxins and emetic B. cereus in raw milk.

  4. A procedure for estimating Bacillus cereus spores in soil and stream-sediment samples - A potential exploration technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of bacterial spores of the Bacillus cereus group in soils and stream sediments appears to be a sensitive indicator of several types of concealed mineral deposits, including vein-type gold deposits. The B. cereus assay is rapid, inexpensive, and inherently reproducible. The test, currently under investigation for its potential in mineral exploration, is recommended for use on a research basis. Among the aerobic spore-forming bacilli, only B. cereus and closely related strains produce an opaque zone in egg-yolk emulsion agar. This characteristic, also known as the Nagler of lecitho-vitellin reaction, has long been used to rapidly indentify and estimate presumptive B. cereus. The test is here adapted to permit rapid estimation of B. cereus spores in soil and stream-sediment samples. Relative standard deviation was 10.3% on counts obtained from two 40-replicate pour-plate determinations. As many as 40 samples per day can be processed. Enough procedural detail is included to permit investigation of the test in conventional geochemical laboratories using standard microbiological safety precautions. ?? 1985.

  5. Bacillus wiedmannii sp. nov., a psychrotolerant and cytotoxic Bacillus cereus group species isolated from dairy foods and dairy environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rachel A; Beno, Sarah M; Kent, David J; Carroll, Laura M; Martin, Nicole H; Boor, Kathryn J; Kovac, Jasna

    2016-11-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, spore-forming Bacillus strain, FSL W8-0169T, collected from raw milk stored in a silo at a dairy powder processing plant in the north-eastern USA was initially identified as a Bacillus cereus group species based on a partial sequence of the rpoB gene and 16S rRNA gene sequence. Analysis of core genome single nucleotide polymorphisms clustered this strain separately from known B. cereus group species. Pairwise average nucleotide identity blast values obtained for FSL W8-0169T compared to the type strains of existing B. cereus group species were cereus group species. We characterized 10 additional strains with the same or closely related rpoB allelic type, by whole genome sequencing and phenotypic analyses. Phenotypic characterization identified a higher content of iso-C16 : 0 fatty acid and the combined inability to ferment sucrose or to hydrolyse arginine as the key characteristics differentiating FSL W8-0169T from other B. cereus group species. FSL W8-0169T is psychrotolerant, produces haemolysin BL and non-haemolytic enterotoxin, and is cytotoxic in a HeLa cell model. The name Bacillus wiedmannii sp. nov. is proposed for the novel species represented by the type strain FSL W8-0169T (=DSM 102050T=LMG 29269T).

  6. Bacillus cereus Biovar Anthracis Causing Anthrax in Sub-Saharan Africa—Chromosomal Monophyly and Broad Geographic Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabon, Philip; Zimmermann, Fee; Lankester, Felix; Peller, Tianna; Feistner, Anna; Todd, Angelique; Herbinger, Ilka; de Nys, Hélène M.; Muyembe-Tamfun, Jean-Jacques; Karhemere, Stomy; Wittig, Roman M.; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Grunow, Roland; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Corbett, Cindi R.; Klee, Silke R.; Leendertz, Fabian H.

    2016-01-01

    Through full genome analyses of four atypical Bacillus cereus isolates, designated B. cereus biovar anthracis, we describe a distinct clade within the B. cereus group that presents with anthrax-like disease, carrying virulence plasmids similar to those of classic Bacillus anthracis. We have isolated members of this clade from different mammals (wild chimpanzees, gorillas, an elephant and goats) in West and Central Africa (Côte d’Ivoire, Cameroon, Central African Republic and Democratic Republic of Congo). The isolates shared several phenotypic features of both B. anthracis and B. cereus, but differed amongst each other in motility and their resistance or sensitivity to penicillin. They all possessed the same mutation in the regulator gene plcR, different from the one found in B. anthracis, and in addition, carry genes which enable them to produce a second capsule composed of hyaluronic acid. Our findings show the existence of a discrete clade of the B. cereus group capable of causing anthrax-like disease, found in areas of high biodiversity, which are possibly also the origin of the worldwide distributed B. anthracis. Establishing the impact of these pathogenic bacteria on threatened wildlife species will require systematic investigation. Furthermore, the consumption of wildlife found dead by the local population and presence in a domestic animal reveal potential sources of exposure to humans. PMID:27607836

  7. Diversity of Bacillus cereus group strains is reflected in their broad range of pathogenicity and diverse ecological lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceuppens, Siele; Boon, Nico; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-06-01

    Bacillus cereus comprises a highly versatile group of bacteria, which are of particular interest because of their capacity to cause disease. Emetic food poisoning is caused by the toxin cereulide produced during the growth of emetic B. cereus in food, while diarrhoeal food poisoning is the result of enterotoxin production by viable vegetative B. cereus cells in the small intestine, probably in the mucus layer and/or attached to the host's intestinal epithelium. The numbers of B. cereus causing disease are highly variable, depending on diverse factors linked to the host (age, diet, physiology and immunology), bacteria (cellular form, toxin genes and expression) and food (nutritional composition and meal characteristics). Bacillus cereus group strains show impressive ecological diversity, ranging from their saprophytic life cycle in soil to symbiotic (commensal and mutualistic) lifestyles near plant roots and in guts of insects and mammals to various pathogenic ones in diverse insect and mammalian hosts. During all these different ecological lifestyles, their toxins play important roles ranging from providing competitive advantages within microbial communities to inhibition of specific pathogenic organisms for their host and accomplishment of infections by damaging their host's tissues. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bacillus cereus Biovar Anthracis Causing Anthrax in Sub-Saharan Africa-Chromosomal Monophyly and Broad Geographic Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonation, Kym S; Grützmacher, Kim; Dupke, Susann; Mabon, Philip; Zimmermann, Fee; Lankester, Felix; Peller, Tianna; Feistner, Anna; Todd, Angelique; Herbinger, Ilka; de Nys, Hélène M; Muyembe-Tamfun, Jean-Jacques; Karhemere, Stomy; Wittig, Roman M; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Grunow, Roland; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Corbett, Cindi R; Klee, Silke R; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2016-09-01

    Through full genome analyses of four atypical Bacillus cereus isolates, designated B. cereus biovar anthracis, we describe a distinct clade within the B. cereus group that presents with anthrax-like disease, carrying virulence plasmids similar to those of classic Bacillus anthracis. We have isolated members of this clade from different mammals (wild chimpanzees, gorillas, an elephant and goats) in West and Central Africa (Côte d'Ivoire, Cameroon, Central African Republic and Democratic Republic of Congo). The isolates shared several phenotypic features of both B. anthracis and B. cereus, but differed amongst each other in motility and their resistance or sensitivity to penicillin. They all possessed the same mutation in the regulator gene plcR, different from the one found in B. anthracis, and in addition, carry genes which enable them to produce a second capsule composed of hyaluronic acid. Our findings show the existence of a discrete clade of the B. cereus group capable of causing anthrax-like disease, found in areas of high biodiversity, which are possibly also the origin of the worldwide distributed B. anthracis. Establishing the impact of these pathogenic bacteria on threatened wildlife species will require systematic investigation. Furthermore, the consumption of wildlife found dead by the local population and presence in a domestic animal reveal potential sources of exposure to humans.

  9. Expression profile and regulation of spore and parasporal crystal formation-associated genes in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieping; Mei, Han; Qian, Hongliang; Tang, Qing; Liu, Xiaocui; Yu, Ziniu; He, Jin

    2013-12-06

    Bacillus thuringiensis, a Gram-positive endospore-forming bacterium, is characterized by the formation of parasporal crystals consisting of insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) during sporulation. We reveal gene expression profiles and regulatory mechanisms associated with spore and parasporal crystal formation based on transcriptomics and proteomics data of B. thuringiensis strain CT-43. During sporulation, five ICP genes encoded by CT-43 were specifically transcribed; moreover, most of the spore structure-, assembly-, and maturation-associated genes were specifically expressed or significantly up-regulated, with significant characteristics of temporal regulation. These findings suggest that it is essential for the cell to maintain efficient operation of transcriptional and translational machinery during sporulation. Our results indicate that the RNA polymerase complex δ and ω subunits, cold shock proteins, sigma factors, and transcriptional factors as well as the E2 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex could cooperatively participate in transcriptional regulation via different mechanisms. In particular, differences in processing and modification of ribosomal proteins, rRNA, and tRNA combined with derepression of translational inhibition could boost the rate of ribosome recycling and assembly as well as translation initiation, elongation, and termination efficiency, thereby compensating for the reduction in ribosomal levels. The efficient operation of translational machineries and powerful protein-quality controlling systems would thus ensure biosyntheses of a large quantity of proteins with normal biological functions during sporulation.

  10. Mécanismes d’adaptation aux basses températures de croissance de la bactérie pathogène B. cereus : rôle des hélicases à ARN

    OpenAIRE

    Pandiani, Franck

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a widespread bacteria, thus contaminating all raw materials in contact with soil. In France, B. cereus is considered as the fourth causative agent of foodborne illness. To be pathogenic, B. cereus should multiply during the various stages of food processing and particularly during preservation at low temperature. The aim of this study was to study molecular mechanisms of the adaptive response at low temperature and more precisely the involvement of the B. cereus ATCC 14579 ...

  11. Bacillus cereus Fnr binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster and forms a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esbelin Julia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus cereus is a facultative anaerobe that causes diarrheal disease in humans. Diarrheal syndrome may result from the secretion of various virulence factors including hemolysin BL and nonhemolytic enterotoxin Nhe. Expression of genes encoding Hbl and Nhe is regulated by the two redox systems, ResDE and Fnr, and the virulence regulator PlcR. B. cereus Fnr is a member of the Crp/Fnr family of iron-sulfur (Fe-S proteins. Only its apo-form has so far been studied. A major goal in deciphering the Fnr-dependent regulation of enterotoxin genes is thus to obtain and characterize holoFnr. Results Fnr has been subjected to in vitro Fe-S cluster reconstitution under anoxic conditions. UV-visible and EPR spectroscopic analyses together with the chemical estimation of the iron content indicated that Fnr binds one [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster per monomer. Atmospheric O2 causes disassembly of the Fe-S cluster, which exhibited a half-life of 15 min in air. Holo- and apoFnr have similar affinities for the nhe and hbl promoter regions, while holoFnr has a higher affinity for fnr promoter region than apoFnr. Both the apo- and holo-form of Fnr interact with ResD and PlcR to form a ternary complex. Conclusions Overall, this work shows that incorporation of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster is not required for DNA binding of Fnr to promoter regions of hbl and nhe enterotoxin genes or for the formation of a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR. This points to some new unusual properties of Fnr that may have physiological relevance in the redox regulation of enterotoxin gene regulation.

  12. Survival of foodborne pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes) and Bacillus cereus spores in fermented alcoholic beverages (beer and refined rice wine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S A; Kim, N H; Lee, S H; Hwang, I G; Rhee, M S

    2014-03-01

    Only limited information is available on the microbiological safety of fermented alcoholic beverages because it is still a common belief that such beverages do not provide a favorable environment for bacterial growth and survival. Thus, in this study, we examined the survival of major foodborne pathogens and spores in fermented alcoholic beverages. Foodborne pathogens (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) and B. cereus spores (initial population, 3 to 4 log CFU/ml) were inoculated separately into three types of beer and refined rice wine, which were then stored at 5 and 22°C. Bacterial counts were assayed periodically for up to 28 days. Vegetative B. cereus counts decreased rapidly, whereas B. cereus spore counts remained constant (P > 0.05) for a long period of time in all beverages. Vegetative B. cereus cells formed spores in beer at 5 and 22°C, and the spores survived for long periods. Among vegetative cells, E. coli O157:H7 had the highest survival (only 1.49 to 1.56 log reduction during 28 days in beer at 5°C). Beer and refined rice wine supported microbial survival from several days to several weeks. Our results appear to contradict the common belief that pathogens cannot survive in alcoholic beverages. Long-term survival of pathogens (especially B. cereus and E. coli O157:H7) in beer and refined rice wine should be taken into consideration by the manufacturers of these beverages. This study provides basic information that should help further research into microbial survival in alcoholic beverages and increase the microbiological safety regulation of fermented alcoholic beverages.

  13. Influence of multi-year Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis on the abundance of B. cereus group populations in Swedish riparian wetland soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Schneider, Salome; Tajrin, Tania

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is a soil-born bacterium affiliated to the B. cereus group (Bcg, a group including the pathogens B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. anthracis) and used in biocontrol products against nematoceran larvae. However, knowledge is limited on how long...

  14. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis spores in Korean rice: prevalence and toxin production as affected by production area and degree of milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Booyoung; Bang, Jihyun; Kim, Hoikyung; Kim, Yoonsook; Kim, Byeong-Sam; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    We determined the prevalence of and toxin production by Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in Korean rice as affected by production area and degree of milling. Rough rice was collected from 64 farms in 22 agricultural areas and polished to produce brown and white rice. In total, rice samples were broadly contaminated with B. cereus spores, with no effect of production area. The prevalence and counts of B. cereus spores declined as milling progressed. Frequencies of hemolysin BL (HBL) production by isolates were significantly (P ≤ 0.01) reduced as milling progressed. This pattern corresponded with the presence of genes encoding the diarrheal enterotoxins. The frequency of B. cereus isolates positive for hblC, hblD, or nheB genes decreased as milling progressed. Because most B. cereus isolates from rice samples contained six enterotoxin genes, we concluded that B. cereus in rice produced in Korea is predominantly of the diarrheagenic type. The prevalence of B. thuringiensis in rice was significantly lower than that of B. cereus and not correlated with production area. All B. thuringiensis isolates were of the diarrheagenic type. This study provides information useful for predicting safety risks associated with B. cereus and B. thuringiensis in rough and processed Korean rice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel marine algal toxicity bioassay based on sporulation inhibition in the green macroalga Ulva pertusa (Chlorophyta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Taejun [Division of Biology and Chemistry, University of Incheon, Incheon 402-749 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: hanalgae@incheon.ac.kr; Choi, Gye-Woon [Department of Civil and Environmental System Engineering, University of Incheon, Incheon 402-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-10

    A 5-day aquatic toxicity test based on sporulation inhibition of the green macroalga Ulva pertusa Kjellman has been developed. Optimal test conditions determined for photon irradiance, salinity and temperature were 60-200 {mu}mol photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, 25-35%o and 15-20 deg C, respectively. Tests were conducted by exposing U. pertusa thallus disks to a reference toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), metals (Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}) and elutriates of sludge collected from nine different locations. The EC{sub 50} values for SDS was 5.35 mg L{sup -1}. When four heavy metals were assayed, the NOECs were highest for lead (0.625 mg L{sup -1}) and lowest for copper (0.031 mg L{sup -1}). The EC{sub 50} values showed the following toxicity rankings: Cu{sup 2+} (0.061 mg L{sup -1}) > Cd{sup 2+} (0.326 mg L{sup -1}) > Zn{sup 2+} (0.738 mg L{sup -1}) > Pb{sup 2+} (0.877 mg L{sup -1}). The bioassay indicated also that the sporulation endpoint could be a sensitive indicator of toxicity effects of elutriates of sludge as reflected from the NOEC values equal to or lower than the lowest concentration employed (6.25%). Sporulation was significantly inhibitied in all elutriates with the greatest and least effects observed in elutriates of sludge from industrial waste (EC{sub 50} 6.78%) and filtration bed (EC{sub 50} 15.0%), respectively. The results of the Spearman rank correlation analysis for EC{sub 50} data versus the concentrations of toxicants in the sludge presented a significant correlation between toxicity and four heavy metals (Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}). Introduction of the concept of toxicity unit (TU) showed that these metals were the main cause of toxicity in elutriates of at least four out of nine sludge samples. Members of the order Ulvales show a wide geographic distribution and have similar reproductive characteristics, thus making it possible to apply the present test method to other algae of this taxa, elsewhere

  16. Biocatalytic Resolution of Rac-α-Ethyl-2-Oxo-Pyrrolidineacetic Acid Methyl Ester by Immobilized Recombinant Bacillus cereus Esterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian-Yong; Liu, Yin-Yan; Luo, Wei-Feng; Zheng, Ren-Chao; Ying, Xiang-Xian; Wang, Zhao

    2016-04-01

    A new esterase-producing strain (Bacillus cereus WZZ001) which exhibiting high hydrolytic activity and excellent enantioselectivity on rac-α-ethyl-2-oxo-pyrrolidineacetic acid methyl ester (R, S-1) has been isolated from soil sample by our laboratory. In this study, the stereoselective hydrolysis of (R, S-1) was performed using the recombinant Bacillus cereus esterase which expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Under the optimized conditions of pH 8.0, 35 °C, and concentration of substrate 400 mM, a successful enzymatic resolution was achieved with an e.e. s of 99.5 % and conversion of 49 %. Immobilization considerably increased the reusability of the recombinant esterase; the immobilized enzyme showed excellent reusability during 6 cycles of repeated 2 h reactions at 35 °C. Thereby, it makes the recombinant B. cereus esterase a usable biocatalyst for industrial application.

  17. An antibiotic, heavy metal resistant and halotolerant Bacillus cereus SIU1 and its thermoalkaline protease

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    Vikram Surendra

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many workers have reported halotolerant bacteria from saline conditions capable of protease production. However, antibiotic resistance and heavy metal tolerance pattern of such organisms is not documented very well. Similarly, only a few researchers have reported the pattern of pH change of fermentation medium during the course of protease production. In this study, we have isolated a halotolerant Bacillus cereus SIU1 strain from a non-saline environment and studied its antibiotic and heavy metal resistance pattern. The isolate produces a thermoalkaline protease and changes the medium pH during the course of fermentation. Thermostability of protease was also studied for 30 min. Results Seventy bacterial strains isolated from the soils of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, India were screened for protease production. All of them exhibited protease activity. However, 40% bacterial isolates were found good protease producers as observed by caseinolytic zones on milk agar plates. Among them, culture S-4 was adjudged as the best protease producer, and was identified as Bacillus cereus by morphological, biochemical and 16 S rDNA sequence analyses. The isolate was resistant to heavy metals (As2+, Pb2+, Cs1+ and antibiotics (penicillin, lincomycin, cloxacillin, pefloxacin. Its growth behavior and protease production was studied at 45°C and pH 9.0. The protease units of 88 ml-1 were noted in unoptimized modified glucose yeast extract (GYE medium during early stationary phase at 20 h incubation period. The enzyme was stable in the temperature range of 35°-55°C. Conclusions An antibiotic and heavy metal resistant, halotolerant Bacillus cereus isolate is capable of producing thermoalkaline protease, which is active and stable at pH 9.0 and 35°-55°C. This isolate may be useful in several industrial applications owing to its halotolerance and antibiotic and heavy metal resistance characteristics.

  18. Toxigenic genes, spoilage potential, and antimicrobial resistance of Bacillus cereus group strains from ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Seza; Eyi, Ayla; Küçüksarı, Rümeysa

    2014-02-01

    Bacillus spp. can be recovered from almost every environment. It is also found readily in foods, where it may cause food spoilage and/or food poisoning due to its toxigenic and pathogenic nature, and extracellular enzymes. In this study, 29 Bacillus cereus group strains from ice cream were examined for the presence of following virulence genes hblC, nheA, cytK and ces genes, and tested for a range of the extracellular enzymes, and antimicrobial susceptibility. The strains were found to produce extracellular enzymes: proteolytic and lipolytic activity, gelatin hydrolysis and lecithinase production (100%), DNase production (93.1%) and amylase activity (93.1%). Of 29 strains examined, 24 (82.8%) showed hemolytic activity on blood agar. Beta-lactamase enzyme was only produced by 20.7% of B. cereus group. Among 29 B. cereus group from ice cream, nheA was the most common virulence gene detected in 44.8% of the strains, followed by hblC gene with 17.2%. Four (13.8%) of the 29 strains were positive for both hblC gene and nheA gene. Contrarily, cytK and ces genes were not detected in any of the strains. Antimicrobial susceptibility of ice cream isolates was tested to 14 different antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. We detected resistance to penicillin and ampicillin with the same rate of 89.7%. Thirty-one percent of the strains were multiresistant to three or more antibiotics. This study emphasizes that the presence of natural isolates of Bacillus spp. harboring one or more enterotoxin genes, producing extracellular enzymes which may cause spoilage and acquiring antibiotic resistance might hold crucial importance in the food safety and quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Conducting polymer based DNA biosensor for the detection of the Bacillus cereus group species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Arshak, Khalil; Korostynska, Olga; Oliwa, Kamila; Adley, Catherine

    2009-05-01

    Biosensor designs are emerging at a significant rate and play an increasingly important role in foodborne pathogen detection. Conducting polymers are excellent tools for the fabrication of biosensors and polypyrrole has been used in the detection of biomolecules due to its unique properties. The prime intention of this paper was to pioneer the design and fabrication of a single-strand (ss) DNA biosensor for the detection of the Bacillus cereus (B.cereus) group species. Growth of B. cereus, results in production of several highly active toxins. Therefore, consumption of food containing >106 bacteria/gm may results in emetic and diarrhoeal syndromes. The most common source of this bacterium is found in liquid food products, milk powder, mixed food products and is of particular concern in the baby formula industry. The electrochemical deposition technique, such as cyclic voltammetry, was used to develop and test a model DNA-based biosensor on a gold electrode electropolymerized with polypyrrole. The electrically conducting polymer, polypyrrole is used as a platform for immobilizing DNA (1μg) on the gold electrode surface, since it can be more easily deposited from neutral pH aqueous solutions of pyrrolemonomers. The average current peak during the electrodeposition event is 288μA. There is a clear change in the current after hybridization of the complementary oligonucleotide (6.35μA) and for the noncomplementary oligonucleotide (5.77μA). The drop in current after each event was clearly noticeable and it proved to be effective.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility and β-lactamase production in Bacillus cereus isolates from stool of patients, food and environment samples

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    Savić Dejana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Bacillus cereus (B. cereus usually ingested by food can cause two types of diseases: vomiting due to the presence of emetic toxin and diarrheal syndrome, due to the presence of diarrheal toxins. Systemic manifestations can also occur. The severe forms of disease demand antibiotic treatmant. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in antibiotic susceptibility and β-lactamase activity of B. cereus isolates from stools of humans, food and environment. Methods. Identification of B. cereus was performed with selective medium, classical biochemical test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR with primers specific for bal gene. Thirty isolates from each group were analysed for antibiotic susceptibility using the disk-diffusion assay. Production of β-lactamase was determined by cefinase test, and double-disc method. Results. All strains identified as B. cereus using classical biochemical test, yielded 533 bp fragment with PCR. Isolates from all the three groups were susceptible to imipenem, vancomycin, and erythromycin. All isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin but one from the environment. A statistically significant difference between the groups was confirmed to tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole sensitivity. A total of 28/30 (93.33% samples from the foods and 25/30 (83.33% samples from environment were approved sensitive to tetracycline, while 10/30 (33.33% isolates from stools were sensitive. Opposite to this result, high susceptibility to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole was shown in samples from stools (100%, while isolates from foods (63.33% and from environment (70% had low susceptibility. All samples produced β-lactamases. Conclusion. The strains of B. cereus from all the three groups showed high rate of sensitivity to most tested antibiotics, except to tetracycline in samples from human stool and to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole in samples from food and environment. The production of

  1. Destruction of Bacillus cereus spores in a thick soy bean paste (doenjang) by continuous ohmic heating with five sequential electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryang, J H; Kim, N H; Lee, B S; Kim, C T; Rhee, M S

    2016-07-01

    This study selected spores from Bacillus cereus FSP-2 strain (the isolate from a commercial doenjang processing line) as the test strain which showed significantly higher thermal resistance (P cereus reference strain (ATCC 27348). The spores in doenjang were subjected to ohmic heating (OH) at 95, 105, 115 and 125°C for 30, 60 or 90 s using a five sequential electrode system (electrical field: 26·7 V cm(-1) ; alternating current frequency: 25 kHz). OH at 105°C for 30-90 s reduced the B. cereus spore count in doenjang samples to 1·5 National Bureau of Standards units), treatment at 105°C for 60 s was selected and applied on a large scale (500 kg of product). Reliable and reproducible destruction of B. cereus spores occurred; the reductions achieved (to cereus spores to ensure the microbiological quality and safety of a thick, highly viscous sauce. This study shows that an ohmic heating (OH) using a five sequential electrode system can effectively destroy highly heat-resistant Bacillus cereus spores which have been frequently found in a commercial doenjang processing line without perceivable quality change in the product. In addition, it may demonstrate high potential of the unique OH system used in this study that will further contribute to ensure microbiological quality and safety of crude sauces containing high levels of electrolyte other than doenjang as well. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Continuous Cultivation for Apparent Optimization of Defined Media for Cellulomonas sp. and Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R. J.; Boudreaux, D. P.; Srinivasan, V. R.

    1979-01-01

    Steady-state continuous culture was used to optimize lean chemically defined media for a Cellulomonas sp. and Bacillus cereus strain T. Both organisms were extremely sensitive to variations in trace-metal concentrations. However, medium optimization by this technique proved rapid, and multifactor screening was easily conducted by using a minimum of instrumentation. The optimized media supported critical dilution rates of 0.571 and 0.467 h−1 for Cellulomonas and Bacillus, respectively. These values approximated maximum growth rate values observed in batch culture. PMID:16345417

  3. Characterization and genomic analysis of chromate resistant and reducing Bacillus cereus strain SJ1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr(VI) and Cr(III). Chromate [Cr(VI)] is carcinogenic, mutational, and teratogenic due to its strong oxidizing nature. Biotransformation of Cr(VI) to less-toxic Cr(III) by chromate-resistant and reducing bacteria has offered an ecological and economical option for chromate detoxification and bioremediation. However, knowledge of the genetic determinants for chromate resistance and reduction has been limited so far. Our main aim was to investigate chromate resistance and reduction by Bacillus cereus SJ1, and to further study the underlying mechanisms at the molecular level using the obtained genome sequence. Results Bacillus cereus SJ1 isolated from chromium-contaminated wastewater of a metal electroplating factory displayed high Cr(VI) resistance with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 30 mM when induced with Cr(VI). A complete bacterial reduction of 1 mM Cr(VI) was achieved within 57 h. By genome sequence analysis, a putative chromate transport operon, chrIA1, and two additional chrA genes encoding putative chromate transporters that likely confer chromate resistance were identified. Furthermore, we also found an azoreductase gene azoR and four nitroreductase genes nitR possibly involved in chromate reduction. Using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) technology, it was shown that expression of adjacent genes chrA1 and chrI was induced in response to Cr(VI) but expression of the other two chromate transporter genes chrA2 and chrA3 was constitutive. In contrast, chromate reduction was constitutive in both phenotypic and gene expression analyses. The presence of a resolvase gene upstream of chrIA1, an arsenic resistance operon and a gene encoding Tn7-like transposition proteins ABBCCCD downstream of chrIA1 in B. cereus SJ1 implied the possibility of recent horizontal gene transfer. Conclusion Our results indicate that expression of the chromate transporter gene chrA1

  4. Characterization and genomic analysis of chromate resistant and reducing Bacillus cereus strain SJ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Minyan; Li, Xiangyang; Guo, Liang; Miller, Susan J; Rensing, Christopher; Wang, Gejiao

    2010-08-19

    Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr(VI) and Cr(III). Chromate [Cr(VI)] is carcinogenic, mutational, and teratogenic due to its strong oxidizing nature. Biotransformation of Cr(VI) to less-toxic Cr(III) by chromate-resistant and reducing bacteria has offered an ecological and economical option for chromate detoxification and bioremediation. However, knowledge of the genetic determinants for chromate resistance and reduction has been limited so far. Our main aim was to investigate chromate resistance and reduction by Bacillus cereus SJ1, and to further study the underlying mechanisms at the molecular level using the obtained genome sequence. Bacillus cereus SJ1 isolated from chromium-contaminated wastewater of a metal electroplating factory displayed high Cr(VI) resistance with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 30 mM when induced with Cr(VI). A complete bacterial reduction of 1 mM Cr(VI) was achieved within 57 h. By genome sequence analysis, a putative chromate transport operon, chrIA1, and two additional chrA genes encoding putative chromate transporters that likely confer chromate resistance were identified. Furthermore, we also found an azoreductase gene azoR and four nitroreductase genes nitR possibly involved in chromate reduction. Using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) technology, it was shown that expression of adjacent genes chrA1 and chrI was induced in response to Cr(VI) but expression of the other two chromate transporter genes chrA2 and chrA3 was constitutive. In contrast, chromate reduction was constitutive in both phenotypic and gene expression analyses. The presence of a resolvase gene upstream of chrIA1, an arsenic resistance operon and a gene encoding Tn7-like transposition proteins ABBCCCD downstream of chrIA1 in B. cereus SJ1 implied the possibility of recent horizontal gene transfer. Our results indicate that expression of the chromate transporter gene chrA1 was inducible by Cr(VI) and

  5. Osteomyelitis due to Bacillus cereus in an adolescent: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schricker, M E; Thompson, G H; Schreiber, J R

    1994-06-01

    Non-anthracis Bacillus species associated with clinical infections are usually dismissed as contaminants or nonpathogens. As opportunists, however, Bacillus organisms can cause significant systemic infections including bacteremia, endophthalmitis, and pneumonia. Osteomyelitis with non-anthracis Bacillus organisms has been described in adults, although to our knowledge it has been described only once in a child. We report a case of chronic osteomyelitis due to Staphylococcus aureus and superinfection with Bacillus cereus in a 13-year-old adolescent. A Bacillus isolate should be considered a true pathogen in children with chronic osteomyelitis who have a poor clinical response to antistaphylococcal therapy.

  6. Characterization and genomic analysis of chromate resistant and reducing Bacillus cereus strain SJ1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Minyan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr(VI and Cr(III. Chromate [Cr(VI] is carcinogenic, mutational, and teratogenic due to its strong oxidizing nature. Biotransformation of Cr(VI to less-toxic Cr(III by chromate-resistant and reducing bacteria has offered an ecological and economical option for chromate detoxification and bioremediation. However, knowledge of the genetic determinants for chromate resistance and reduction has been limited so far. Our main aim was to investigate chromate resistance and reduction by Bacillus cereus SJ1, and to further study the underlying mechanisms at the molecular level using the obtained genome sequence. Results Bacillus cereus SJ1 isolated from chromium-contaminated wastewater of a metal electroplating factory displayed high Cr(VI resistance with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of 30 mM when induced with Cr(VI. A complete bacterial reduction of 1 mM Cr(VI was achieved within 57 h. By genome sequence analysis, a putative chromate transport operon, chrIA1, and two additional chrA genes encoding putative chromate transporters that likely confer chromate resistance were identified. Furthermore, we also found an azoreductase gene azoR and four nitroreductase genes nitR possibly involved in chromate reduction. Using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR technology, it was shown that expression of adjacent genes chrA1 and chrI was induced in response to Cr(VI but expression of the other two chromate transporter genes chrA2 and chrA3 was constitutive. In contrast, chromate reduction was constitutive in both phenotypic and gene expression analyses. The presence of a resolvase gene upstream of chrIA1, an arsenic resistance operon and a gene encoding Tn7-like transposition proteins ABBCCCD downstream of chrIA1 in B. cereus SJ1 implied the possibility of recent horizontal gene transfer. Conclusion Our results indicate that expression of the chromate

  7. The Mutation Glu151Asp in the B-Component of the Bacillus cereus Non-Hemolytic Enterotoxin (Nhe) Leads to a Diverging Reactivity in Antibody-Based Detection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Andrea; Jeßberger, Nadja; Krey, Victoria; Dietrich, Richard; Scherer, Siegfried; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Bacillus cereus to cause foodborne toxicoinfections leads to increasing concerns regarding consumer protection. For the diarrhea-associated enterotoxins, the assessment of the non-hemolytic enterotoxin B (NheB) titer determined by a sandwich enzyme immunoassay (EIA) correlates best with in vitro cytotoxicity. In general, the regulation of enterotoxin expression of B. cereus is a coordinately-regulated process influenced by environmental, and probably also by host factors. As long as these factors are not completely understood, the currently-applied diagnostic procedures are based on indirect approaches to assess the potential virulence of an isolate. To date, sandwich EIA results serve as a surrogate marker to categorize isolates as either potentially low or highly toxic. Here, we report on a single amino acid exchange in the NheB sequence leading to an underestimation of the cytotoxic potential in a limited number of strains. During the screening of a large panel of B. cereus isolates, six showed uncommon features with low sandwich EIA titers despite high cytotoxicity. Sequence analysis revealed the point-mutation Glu151Asp in the potential binding region of the capture antibody. Application of this antibody also results in low titers in an indirect EIA format and shows variable detection intensities in Western-immunoblots. A commercially-available assay based on a lateral flow device detects all strains correctly as NheB producers in a qualitative manner. In conclusion, isolates showing low NheB titers should additionally be assayed in an indirect EIA or for their in vitro cytotoxicity to ensure a correct classification as either low or highly toxic. PMID:26569304

  8. The Mutation Glu151Asp in the B-Component of the Bacillus cereus Non-Hemolytic Enterotoxin (Nhe Leads to a Diverging Reactivity in Antibody-Based Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Didier

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Bacillus cereus to cause foodborne toxicoinfections leads to increasing concerns regarding consumer protection. For the diarrhea-associated enterotoxins, the assessment of the non-hemolytic enterotoxin B (NheB titer determined by a sandwich enzyme immunoassay (EIA correlates best with in vitro cytotoxicity. In general, the regulation of enterotoxin expression of B. cereus is a coordinately-regulated process influenced by environmental, and probably also by host factors. As long as these factors are not completely understood, the currently-applied diagnostic procedures are based on indirect approaches to assess the potential virulence of an isolate. To date, sandwich EIA results serve as a surrogate marker to categorize isolates as either potentially low or highly toxic. Here, we report on a single amino acid exchange in the NheB sequence leading to an underestimation of the cytotoxic potential in a limited number of strains. During the screening of a large panel of B. cereus isolates, six showed uncommon features with low sandwich EIA titers despite high cytotoxicity. Sequence analysis revealed the point-mutation Glu151Asp in the potential binding region of the capture antibody. Application of this antibody also results in low titers in an indirect EIA format and shows variable detection intensities in Western-immunoblots. A commercially-available assay based on a lateral flow device detects all strains correctly as NheB producers in a qualitative manner. In conclusion, isolates showing low NheB titers should additionally be assayed in an indirect EIA or for their in vitro cytotoxicity to ensure a correct classification as either low or highly toxic.

  9. Host cell cytotoxicity and cytoskeleton disruption by CerADPr, an ADP-ribosyltransferase of Bacillus cereus G9241

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Nathan C.; Vergis, James M.; Ebrahimi, Avesta V.; Ventura, Christy L.; O’Brien, Alison D.; Barbieri, Joseph T.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus G9241 was isolated from a welder suffering from an anthrax-like inhalation illness. B. cereus G9241 encodes two megaplasmids, pBCXO1 and pBC210, which are analogous to the toxin- and capsule-encoding virulence plasmids of B. anthracis. Protein modeling predicted that the pBC210 LF homolog contained an ADP-ribosyltransferase (ADPr) domain. This putative bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase domain was denoted CerADPr. Iterative modeling showed that CerADPr possessed several conserve...

  10. Molecular and toxigenic characterization of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis strains isolated from commercial ground roasted coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Jeane Quintanilha; Cavados, Clara de Fátima Gomes; Vivoni, Adriana Marcos

    2012-03-01

    Thirty samples of roasted ground coffee beans from 10 different commercial brands were analyzed to investigate the occurrence and levels of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis strains. Strains were evaluated for their genetic diversity by repetitive element sequence polymorphism PCR (Rep-PCR) and for their toxigenic profiles, i.e., the presence of hblA, hblC, hblD, nheA, nheB, nheC, cytK, ces, and entFM. Survival and multiplication of B. cereus sensu lato in the ready-to-drink coffee was determined to evaluate this beverage as a possible vehicle for B. cereus infection. B. cereus was detected in 17 (56.7%) of the 30 samples, and B. thuringiensis was detected in 8 (26.7%) of the 30 samples. Five samples did not produce any characteristic growth. The most common gene, entFM, was detected in 23 strains (92%). The NHE complex (nheA, nheB, and nheC genes) was found in 19 strains (76%). The HBL complex (hblA, hblC, and hblD) was found in 16 strains (64%). All strains were negative for ces. The cytK gene was found in 16 strains (64%). The computer-assisted cluster analysis of Rep-PCR profiles using a clustering criterion of 80% similarity revealed four main clusters. Cluster 1 was the predominant and comprised three B. thuringiensis strains with 100% similarity, cluster 2 comprised two B. cereus strains (100% similarity), cluster 3 comprised two B. thuringiensis strains (90% similarity), and cluster 4 comprised one B. thuringiensis strain and one B. cereus strain (85% similarity). The cluster analysis of fingerprints generated by Rep-PCR revealed a high genetic diversity among the B. cereus strains, suggesting that the contamination could have originated from different sources. In our experiments, when sugar was added and the beverage was kept in thermic bottles there was a significant increase in B. cereus sensu lato levels, which may increase the risk of food poisoning. These results highlight the need for additional studies on this subject to better evaluate

  11. The Genetically Remote Pathogenic Strain NVH391-98 of the Bacillus cereus Group Represents the Cluster of Thermophilic Strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, Sandrine; Galleron, Nathalie; Bidnenko, Elena; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Lapidus, Alla; Sorokin, Alexei

    2007-10-02

    Bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group are known to cause food poisoning. A rare phylogenetically remote strain, NVH391-98, was recently characterized to encode a particularly efficient cytotoxin K presumably responsible for food poisoning. This pathogenic strain and its close relatives can be phenotypically distinguished from other strains of the B. cereus group by the inability to grow at temperatures below 17 degrees C and by the ability to grow at temperatures from 48 to 53 degrees C. A temperate phage, phBC391A2, residing in the genome of NVH391-98 allows us to distinguish the three known members of this thermophilic strain cluster.

  12. Production of bio-inseticide Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis in semicontinuous processes combined with batch processes for sporulation

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    Millena da Silva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the production of the bioinsecticide using the aerobic cultivation. Two-stage cultivation process was used: aerobic vegetative growth and end-phase of sporulation (with aeration and without aeration. The cuts of working volume evaluated were 20, 40, 60 and 80 %. The highest value of spore concentration (2.17x10(9 CFU/mL and spore productivity (7.2x10(7 CFU/mL.h were observed using SP60. The lethal concentration (CL50 obtained through the aeration process and non-aeration process were 0.21 and 0.05 mg/L, respectively. The specific potential of the bioinsecticide produced without aeration (0.025 mg/10-12 CFU was two times higher than that obtained with aeration (0.05 mg/10-12 CFU.

  13. Fluorescence study on ligand induced conformational changes of glutamine synthetase from Bacillus brevis Bb G1 under sporulating conditions

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    SUJA ABRAHAM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase, an important enzyme of nitrogen metabolism, was purified under sporulating conditions (GSala. The effect of ligands on the tryptophan fluorescence of the purified enzyme GSala was investigated. With increasing concentrations of L-glutamine in GSala, a blue shift in emission maximum with an increase in fluorescence intensity and decrease in life times were observed compared to the emission maximum, fluorescence intensity and life times of GSala. With increasing concentrations of glycine in GSala, a shift in emission maximum, change in fluorescence intensity and change in lifetimes were observed compared to the emission maximum, fluorescence intensity and life times of GSala. These observations strongly support the possibility that GSala undergoes a conformational change on binding with ligands and each ligand produced different conformational changes in GSala. Also, different concentrations of each ligand produced different protein conformations in the enzyme GSala.

  14. Germination, growth, and sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in excreted food vacuoles of the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasherob, R; Ben-Dov, E; Zaritsky, A; Barak, Z

    1998-05-01

    Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and their toxic crystals are bioencapsulated in the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis, in which the toxin remains stable. Each T. pyriformis cell concentrates the spores and crystals in its food vacuoles, thus delivering them to mosquito larvae, which rapidly die. Vacuoles containing undigested material are later excreted from the cells. The fate of spores and toxin inside the food vacuoles was determined at various times after excretion by phase-contrast and electron microscopy as well as by viable-cell counting. Excreted food vacuoles gradually aggregated, and vegetative growth of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis was observed after 7 h as filaments that stemmed from the aggregates. The outgrown cells sporulated between 27 and 42 h. The spore multiplication values in this system are low compared to those obtained in carcasses of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis-killed larvae and pupae, but this bioencapsulation represents a new possible mode of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis recycling in nontarget organisms.

  15. pH-induced gene regulation of solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture: parameter estimation and sporulation modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Graeme J; King, John R; Jabbari, Sara

    2013-02-01

    The acetone-butanol (AB) fermentation process in the anaerobic endospore-forming Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum is useful as a producer of biofuels, particularly butanol. Recent work has concentrated on trying to improve the efficiency of the fermentation method, either through changes in the environmental conditions or by modifying the genome to selectively favour the production of one particular solvent over others. Fermentation of glucose by C. acetobutylicum occurs in two stages: initially the acids acetate and butyrate are produced and excreted and then, as the external pH falls, acetate and butyrate are ingested and further metabolised into the solvents acetone, butanol and ethanol. In order to optimise butanol production, it is important to understand how pH affects the enzyme-controlled reactions in the metabolism process. We adapt an ordinary differential equation model of the metabolic network with regulation at the genetic level for the required enzymes; parametrising the model using experimental data generated from continuous culture, we improve on previous point predictions (S. Haus, S. Jabbari, T. Millat, H. Janssen, R.-J. Fisher, H. Bahl, J. R. King, O. Wolkenhauer, A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture, BMC Systems Biology 5 (2011)) [1] both by using a different optimisation approach and by computing confidence intervals and correlation coefficients. We find in particular that the parameters are ill-determined from the data and that two separate clusters of parameters appear correlated, reflecting the importance of two metabolic intermediates. We extend the model further to include another aspect of the clostridial survival mechanism, sporulation, and by computation of the Akaike Information Criterion values find that the there is some evidence for the presence of sporulation during the shift. Copyright © 2012

  16. Effect of Bacillus cereus Enzymes on Milk Quality following Ultra High Temperature Processing

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    B. Janštová

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a model case of contamination of long-life semi-skimmed milk with the spores of six B. cereus strains, isolated from the farm environment and raw milk, proteolysis was monitored by measuring changes in protein content by infra-red spectroscopy; free tyrosine was measured by the Lowry method according to Juffs, and the reduction in casein fractions by SDS-PAGE. Lipolysis was monitored by the dilution extractive method. At a storage temperature of 4 °C for 4 months no enzyme processes were observed, whereas at a storage temperature of 24 °C a marked enzyme activity was found during maximum 3 weeks as well as sensory changes of UHT milk. After three weeks of storage, a reduction in protein content from 34.55 g l-1 milk to 29.46 ± 2.00 g l-1 milk, and a reduction in the free tyrosine from 0.65 to 2.13 ± 0.28 mg ml-1 was found, as well as increased molar contents of free fatty acids (FFA from 41.97 to 1617.22 ± 68.17 mmol kg-1 milk fat. After six days of storage, α-casein, β-casein and κ-casein dropped to 69 ± 10%, 56 ± 16% and 43 ± 10%, respectively. Majority of changes in UHT milk depended on the B. cereus strain used, initial microbial counts and the method of heat inactivation of spores.

  17. Simultaneous Detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytegenes and Bacillus cereus by Oligonucleotide Microarray

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    Meysam Sarshar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditional laboratory methods to detect pathogenic bacteria are time consuming and laborious. Therefore, it is essential to use powerful and reliable molecular methods for quick and simultaneous detection of microbial pathogens. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the capability and efficiency of 23S rDNA sequence for rapid and simultaneous detection of four important food-borne pathogens by an oligonucleotide microarray technique. Materials and Methods: The 23S rDNA sequences of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus were obtained from GenBank databases and used to design the oligonucleotide probes and primers by Vector NTI software. Oligonucleotide probes were placed on a nylon membrane and hybridization was performed between probes and 23S rDNA digoxigenin-labeled polymerase chain reaction (PCR products. Hybridization signals were visualized by NBT/BCIP color development. Results: Positive hybridization color was produced for Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus. The oligonucleotide microarray detected all bacterial strains in a single reaction in less than five hours. The sensitivity of the performed microarray assay was 103 cfu/mL for each species of pathogen. No cross reaction was found between the tested bacterial species. Conclusions: The obtained results indicated that amplification of 23S rDNA gene followed by oligonucleotide microarray hybridization is a rapid and reliable method to identify and discriminate foodborne pathogens tested under the study.

  18. Surface architecture of endospores of the Bacillus cereus/anthracis/thuringiensis family at the subnanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailas, Lekshmi; Terry, Cassandra; Abbott, Nicholas; Taylor, Robert; Mullin, Nic; Tzokov, Svetomir B; Todd, Sarah J; Wallace, B A; Hobbs, Jamie K; Moir, Anne; Bullough, Per A

    2011-09-20

    Bacteria of the Bacillus cereus family form highly resistant spores, which in the case of the pathogen B. anthracis act as the agents of infection. The outermost layer, the exosporium, enveloping spores of the B. cereus family as well as a number of Clostridia, plays roles in spore adhesion, dissemination, targeting, and germination control. We have analyzed two naturally crystalline layers associated with the exosporium, one representing the "basal" layer to which the outermost spore layer ("hairy nap") is attached, and the other likely representing a subsurface ("parasporal") layer. We have used electron cryomicroscopy at a resolution of 0.8-0.6 nm and circular dichroism spectroscopic measurements to reveal a highly α-helical structure for both layers. The helices are assembled into 2D arrays of "cups" or "crowns." High-resolution atomic force microscopy of the outermost layer showed that the open ends of these cups face the external environment and the highly immunogenic collagen-like fibrils of the hairy nap (BclA) are attached to this surface. Based on our findings, we present a molecular model for the spore surface and propose how this surface can act as a semipermeable barrier and a matrix for binding of molecules involved in defense, germination control, and other interactions of the spore with the environment.

  19. Biogenesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles using the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from Garcinia xanthochymus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkar, Swetha; Nachiyar, C Valli

    2012-01-01

    Objective To synthesize the ecofriendly nanoparticles, which is viewed as an alternative to the chemical method which initiated the use of microbes like bacteria and fungi in their synthesis. Methods The current study uses the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from the Garcinia xanthochymus to synthesize the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNPs were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate solution by the endophytic bacterium after incubation for 3-5 d at room temperature. The synthesis was initially observed by colour change from pale white to brown which was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The AgNPs were further characterized using FTIR, SEM-EDX and TEM analyses. Results The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be spherical with the size in the range of 20-40 nm which showed a slight aggregation. The energy-dispersive spectra of the nanoparticle dispersion confirmed the presence of elemental silver. The AgNPs were found to have antibacterial activity against a few pathogenic bacteria like Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusions The endophytic bacteria identified as Bacillus cereus was able to synthesize silver nanoparticles with potential antibacterial activity. PMID:23593575

  20. Characterization of an endolysin, LysBPS13, from a Bacillus cereus bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeeun; Yun, Jiae; Lim, Jeong-A; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-07-01

    Use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents is a promising tool for controlling pathogenic bacteria including antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Not only bacteriophages but also endolysins, the peptidoglycan hydrolyzing enzymes encoded by bacteriophages, have high potential for applications as biocontrol agents against food-borne pathogens. In this study, a putative endolysin gene was identified in the genome of the bacteriophage BPS13, which infects Bacillus cereus. In silico analysis of this endolysin, designated LysBPS13, showed that it consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain (PGRP domain) and a C-terminal cell wall binding domain (SH3_5 domain). Further characterization of the purified LysBPS13 revealed that this endolysin is an N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase, the activity of which was not influenced by addition of EDTA. In addition, LysBPS13 demonstrated remarkable thermostability in the presence of glycerol, and it retained its lytic activity even after incubation at 100 °C for 30 min. Taken together, these results indicate that LysBPS13 can be considered a favorable candidate for a new antimicrobial agent to control B. cereus. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Extractive bioconversion of cyclodextrins by Bacillus cereus cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase in aqueous two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Hui Suan; Ooi, Chien Wei; Mokhtar, Mohd Noriznan; Show, Pau Loke; Ariff, Arbakariya; Tan, Joo Shun; Ng, Eng-Poh; Ling, Tau Chuan

    2013-08-01

    An extractive bioconversion with Bacillus cereus cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase, EC 2.4.1.19) in aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) was investigated for the synthesis and recovery of cyclodextrins (CDs). Optimum condition for the extractive bioconversion of CDs was achieved in ATPS consisted of 7.7% (w/w) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 20,000 and 10.3% (w/w) dextran T500 with volume ratio (VR) of 4.0. Enzymatic conversion of starch occurred mainly in dextran-rich bottom phase whereas the product, CDs was transferred to top phase and a higher partition coefficient of CDs was achieved. Repetitive batch of CDs synthesis was employed by replenishment of the top phase components and addition of starch every 8h. An average total CDs concentration of 13.7 mg/mL, (4.77 mg/mLα-CD, 5.02 mg/mLβ-CD and 3.91 mg/mLγ-CD) was recovered in the top phase of PEG 20,000/dextran T500 ATPS. This study showed the effectiveness of ATPS application in extractive bioconversion of CDs synthesis with B. cereus CGTase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Depsipeptide Intermediates Interrogate Proposed Biosynthesis of Cereulide, the Emetic Toxin of Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marxen, Sandra; Stark, Timo D.; Rütschle, Andrea; Lücking, Genia; Frenzel, Elrike; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Hofmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cereulide and isocereulides A-G are biosynthesized as emetic toxins by Bacillus cereus via a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) called Ces. Although a thiotemplate mechanisms involving cyclo-trimerization of ready-made D-O-Leu-D-Ala-L-O-Val-L-Val via a thioesterase (TE) domain is proposed for cereulide biosynthesis, the exact mechanism is far from being understood. UPLC-TOF MS analysis of B. cereus strains in combination with 13C-labeling experiments now revealed tetra-, octa-, and dodecapeptides of a different sequence, namely (L-O-Val-L-Val-D-O-Leu-D-Ala)1-3, as intermediates of cereulide biosynthesis. Surprisingly, also di-, hexa-, and decadepsipeptides were identified which, together with the structures of the previously reported isocereulides E, F, and G, do not correlate to the currently proposed mechanism for cereulide biosynthesis and violate the canonical NRPS biosynthetic logic. UPLC-TOF MS metabolite analysis and bioinformatic gene cluster analysis highlighted dipeptides rather than single amino or hydroxy acids as the basic modules in tetradepsipeptide assembly and proposed the CesA C-terminal C* domain and the CesB C-terminal TE domain to function as a cooperative esterification and depsipeptide elongation center repeatedly recruiting the action of the C* domain to oligomerize tetradepsipeptides prior to the release of cereulide from the TE domain by macrocyclization. PMID:26013201

  3. Multilocus sequence type profiles of Bacillus cereus isolates from infant formula in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Yu, Xiaofeng; Zhan, Li; Chen, Jiancai; Zhang, Yunyi; Zhang, Junyan; Chen, Honghu; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yanjun; Lu, Yiyu; Mei, Lingling

    2017-04-01

    Bacillus cereus sensu stricto is an opportunistic foodborne pathogen. The multilocus sequence type (MLST) of 74 B. cereus isolated from 513 non-random infant formula in China was analyzed. Of 64 sequence types (STs) detected, 50 STs and 6 alleles were newly found in PubMLST database. All isolates except for one singleton (ST-1049), were classified into 7 clonal complexes (CC) by BURST (n-4), in which CC1 with core ancestral clone ST-26 was the largest group including 86% isolates, and CC2, 3, 9, 10 and 13 were first reported in China. MLST profiles of the isolates from 8 infant formula brands were compared. It was found the brands might be potentially tracked by the variety of STs, such as ST-1049 of singleton and ST-1062 of isolate from goat milk source, though they could not be easily tracked just by clonal complex types of the isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Conformational changes induced by cloxacillin in class a beta-lactamase from Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Burgos, A; Martínez-Oyanedel, J; Bunster, M

    2003-09-01

    Class A beta-lactamases are enzymes that hydrolyse beta-lactam antibiotics such as penicillins and cephalosporins. They also hydrolyse substrate analogues such as oxacillin and cloxacillin, with a biphasic kinetic as it has been reported for Bacillus cereus beta-lactamase. A molecular model of Bacillus cereus beta-lactamase was built and the conformational changes that the substrates benzylpenicillin and cloxacilline produced in the conformation of selected regions of the protein were analyzed. This study was performed using the docking of the substrates, their tetrahedral intermediates and the corresponding acids on the active site, followed by molecular dynamic and subsequent optimisation procedures. The most important changes were produced on Tyr105 and Tyr273, when the tetrahedral intermediate of cloxacillin was docked at the active site, these amino acids are partially responsible for the stabilisation of the substrates at the active site. These changes may explain the kinetic differences observed during the hydrolysis of substrates type S and type A by beta-lactamases class A.

  5. Effects of Copaifera duckei Dwyer oleoresin on the cell wall and cell division of Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Dos Santos, Elizabeth Cristina; Donnici, Claudio Luis; Camargos, Elizabeth Ribeiro da Silva; Augusto de Rezende, Adriana; Andrade, Eloisa Helena de Aguiar; Soares, Luiz Alberto Lira; Farias, Luiz de Macêdo; Roque de Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora; Almeida, Maria das Graças

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of Copaifera duckei oleoresin and to determine its possible mechanism of action against bacteria of clinical and food interest. The antibacterial activity was determined by agar diffusion and dilution methods; the mechanism of action by transmission electron microscopy and by SDS-PAGE; the bioactive compounds by bioautography; and the chemical analysis by GC/MS. Oleoresin showed activity against nine of the 11 strains of bacteria tested. Bacillus cereus was the most sensitive, with a MIC corresponding to 0.03125 mg ml(-1) and with a bactericidal action. Oleoresin acted on the bacterial cell wall, removing proteins and the S-layer, and interfering with the cell-division process. This activity probably can be attributed to the action of terpenic compounds, among them the bisabolene compound. Gram-negative bacteria tested were not inhibited. C. duckei oleoresin is a potential antibacterial, suggesting that this oil could be used as a therapeutic alternative, mainly against B. cereus.

  6. Production and characterization of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate from Bacillus cereus PS 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Bajaj, Bijender Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Usage of renewable raw materials for production of fully degradable bioplastics (bacterial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate, PHB) has gained immense research impetus considering recalcitrant nature of petroleum based plastics, dwindling fossil fuel feed stocks, and associated green house gas emissions. However, high production cost of PHB is the major bottleneck for its wide range industrial applications. In current study, Bacillus cereus PS 10, a recent isolate, efficiently utilized molasses, an abundantly available by-product from sugar industries as sole carbon source for growth and PHB production. Most influential bioprocess variables i.e. molasses, pH and NH4Cl were identified based on Plackett-Burman-designed experiments. Design of experiment approach (response surface methodology) was further employed for optimization of these bioprocess variables, and an enhanced PHB yield (57.5%) was obtained. PHB produced by Bacillus cereus PS 10 was investigated using various physico-chemical approaches viz. thermogravimetric analysis, proton and carbon NMR ((1)H and (13)C) spectroscopy, melting point, elemental analysis and polarimetry for its detail characterization, and assessment for industrial application potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Isolation and Characterisation of a Reserve Protein from the Seeds of Cereus jamacaru (Cactaceae

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    Itayguara Ribeiro da Costa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe here the isolation and characterisation of a major reserve protein from the seeds of Cereus jamacaru. (Cactaceae. This protein has a molecular mass of 5319 kDa and was isolated by a combination of gel filtration chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. The amino acid composition of the protein was determined and it was shown to have similarities with the amino acid composition of several proteins from the 2S albumin storage protein family. The usefulness of this protein as a molecular marker in the Cactaceae is also discussed.A proteína de reserva mais abundante das sementes de Cereus jamacaru (Cactaceae foi isolada e caracterizada. Esta proteína tem uma massa molecular de 5319 kDa e foi isolada através de uma combinação de técnicas de filtração em gel e HPLC de fase reversa. A composição de aminoácidos da proteína foi determinada e possui similaridade com a composição de aminoácidos de diversas proteínas de reserva de sementes que pertencem à família das albuminas. A utilidade desta proteína como um marcador molecular para as cactáceas é também discutida.

  8. Infrared decontamination of oregano: effects on Bacillus cereus spores, water activity, color, and volatile compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Lovisa; Libander, Patrik; Lövenklev, Maria; Isaksson, Sven; Ahrné, Lilia

    2014-12-01

    Infrared (IR) heating, a novel technology for decontaminating oregano, was evaluated by investigating the reduction of inoculated Bacillus cereus spores and the effect on water activity (a(w)), color, and headspace volatile compounds after exposure to IR treatment. Conditioned oregano (a(w) 0.88) was IR-treated in a closed heating unit at 90 and 100 °C for holding times of 2 and 10 min, respectively. The most successful reduction in B. cereus spore numbers (5.6 log units) was achieved after a holding time of 10 min at 90 °C, while treatment at 100 °C for the same time resulted in a lower reduction efficiency (4.7 log units). The lower reduction at 100 °C was probably due to a reduced aw (aw 0.76) during IR treatment or possibly to the alteration or loss of volatile compounds possessing antimicrobial properties. The green color of oregano was only slightly affected, while the composition of volatile compounds was clearly altered by IR heating. However, two of the key aroma compounds, carvacrol and thymol, were only slightly affected, compared to the effect on the other studied compounds, indicating that the typical oregano aroma can likely be preserved. In conclusion, IR heating shows potential for the successful decontamination of oregano without severe alteration of its color or the key aroma compounds, carvacrol and thymol. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Evaluation of B. cereus MTCC 25641 for the Treatment of Dairy Waste Effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawai, Kunal; Mogha, Kanchan; Prajapati, Jashbhai

    2017-05-01

      Dairy is one of the industries producing wastewater rich in organic matter and thus leading to creation of odorous and high COD containing effluent. Biotreatment leading to bioconversion of the waste materials is probably the most cost-effective technique for managing and utilizing waste. A pilot-scale aerobic treatment plant showing air pressure of 6 kg/cm3 was designed keeping all the conditions similar to the main aerobic plant of any dairy plant. The COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) of the control effluent i.e., without aeration, decreased from 588.5 mg/L on the first day to 147.75 mg/L on the seventh day while the effluent inoculated with B. cereus MTCC 25641 decreased the COD load from 588.5 mg/L on the first day to 38.75 mg/L on the seventh day, which shows that a pilot plant B. cereus MTCC 25641 showed excellent results as 50.68% COD and 44.07% BOD (Biochemical Oxygen Demand) reduction, while pH increased from 6.7 to 8.54 along with 44.06% increase in TDS (Total Dissolved solids) was seen after 24h of aeration.

  10. Effects of dietary Bacillus cereus G19, B. cereus BC-01, and Paracoccus marcusii DB11 supplementation on the growth, immune response, and expression of immune-related genes in coelomocytes and intestine of the sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus Selenka).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin; Peng, Mo; Wang, Dongdong

    2015-08-01

    Probiotics have positive effects on the nutrient digestibility and absorption, immune responses, and growth of aquatic animals, including the sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus Selenka). A 60-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of Bacillus cereus G19, B. cereus BC-01 and Paracoccus marcusii DB11 supplementation on the growth, immune response, and expression level of four immune-related genes (Aj-p105, Aj-p50, Aj-rel, and Aj-lys) in coelomocytes and the intestine of juvenile sea cucumbers. One group was fed the basal diet (control group), while three other groups were fed the basal diet supplemented with B. cereus G19 (G19 group), B. cereus BC-01 (BC group), or P. marcusii DB11 (PM group). The growth rate of sea cucumbers fed diets with probiotics supplementation was significantly higher than that of the control group (P marcusii DB11 supplementation could have a positive effect on the growth performance and immune response in coelomocytes and the intestine of sea cucumbers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sporeless mutants of Bacillus thuringiensis. III. The process of crystal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, M S; Nishiitsutsuji-Uwo, J

    1980-01-01

    In order to investigate the formation of the parasporal crystal of B. thuringiensis with special reference to the spore, sequential ultrastructural analysis of sporulation was performed using a sporeless mutant strain (sp-) as well as its parent wild strain (sp+). From the logarithmic growth to the end of forespore formation, the same sequential process of sporulation proceeded in both strains and a forespore with double membranes appeared. Thereafter, subsequent sporulation in the sp- strain was either partly or completely arrested and finally spore (mainly the forespore) became deformed. On the other hand, crystal formation took place throughout by the same processes both in sp+ and sp- strains. During the forespore formation, a primordial crystal and an ovoid inclusion appeared and after this stage, the crystal displayed a characteristic diamond-shaped body with lattice fringes increasing its size. No regularity was found in the position of the crystal with respect to the spore. As far as the present ultrastructural observations were concerned, the crystal developed without any special association with the membranes of the spore. However, without the formation of the forespore (including the incipient forespore), no crystal formtion was observed.

  12. Screening of Cytotoxic B. cereus on Differentiated Caco-2 Cells and in Co-Culture with Mucus-Secreting (HT29-MTX Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Castiaux

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available B. cereus is an opportunistic foodborne pathogen able to cause diarrhoea. However, the diarrhoeal potential of a B. cereus strain remains difficult to predict, because no simple correlation has yet been identified between the symptoms and a unique or a specific combination of virulence factors. In this study, 70 B. cereus strains with different origins (food poisonings, foods and environment have been selected to assess their enterotoxicity. The B. cereus cell-free supernatants have been tested for their toxicity in vitro, on differentiated (21 day-old Caco-2 cells, using their ATP content, LDH release and NR accumulation. The genetic determinants of the main potential enterotoxins and virulence factors (ces, cytK, entFM, entS, hbl, nhe, nprA, piplC and sph have also been screened by PCR. This analysis showed that none of these genes was able to fully explain the enterotoxicity of B. cereus strains. Additionally, in order to assess a possible effect of the mucus layer in vitro, a cytotoxicity comparison between a monoculture (Caco-2 cells and a co-culture (Caco-2 and HT29-MTX mucus-secreting cells model has been performed with selected B. cereus supernatants. It appeared that, in these conditions, the mucus layer had no notable influence on the cytotoxicity of B. cereus supernatants.

  13. To Determine the Frequency of Bacillus cereus in Powdered Milk Infant Formula Consuming in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU in Tehran Hospitals in 2013-14

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    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, changing the infant feeding methods and the growing trend of use powdered infant formula (PIF has raised concern about quality and health assessment among them. These products are contaminated with various pathogenic bacteria such as Bacillus cereus which the presence of this bacteria in PIF is important because of consumer age group and virulence of this bacteria in PIF. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of Bacillus cereus in powdered milk infant formula consuming in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU in Tehran hospitals in 2013-14. Material and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 125 samples of powdered infant formula milk which were used in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU were surveyed during 8 month in 2014. Isolation and identification of microorganisms (including Bacillus cereus were carried out according to FDA standard protocol (FDA method on B. cereus selective agar (MYP Agar.   Results: The results of present study showed that of 125 samples from of consumable powdered infant formula milk, 84 (67.2% samples were contaminated with B.cereus and also 18 (14.4% samples were contaminated by more than one B.cereus species. Conclusion: As regards pasteurization process is not effective on the spore of B.cereus., The spores of these bacteria can remain in PIF and can cause food poisoning in infants. For this purpose, more attention to quality control of production units and imported powder milk is recommended in Iranian infant foods.

  14. Antagonistics against pathogenic Bacillus cereus in milk fermentation by Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 and its anti-adhesion effect on Caco-2 cells against pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Tao, Xueying; Shah, Nagendra P; Wei, Hua

    2016-04-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 is a potential probiotic isolated from fermented bean acid. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of this organism against Bacillus cereus in milk fermentation, the antiadhesion ability on intestinal epithelial cells, as well as its ability to abrogate the cytotoxic effect and expression levels of genes. We found no antimicrobial activity produced by L. plantarum once the pH was adjusted to 6.0 and 7.0. The pH decreased continuously when L. plantarum and B. cereus were co-incubated during milk fermentation, which caused a decrease in the B. cereus counts. Antiadhesion assays showed that L. plantarum can significantly inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxin-producing B. cereus ATCC14579 and pathogenic B. cereus HN001 by inhibition, competition, and displacement. The supernatants of B. cereus, either alone or in conjunction with L. plantarum, caused damage to the membrane integrity of Caco-2 cells to release lactate dehydrogenase. In addition, L. plantarum tended to attenuate proinflammatory cytokine and oxidative stress gene expression on Caco-2 cells, inducing with B. cereus HN001 supernatants. This study provided systematic insights into the antagonistic effect of L. plantarum ZDY2013, and the information may be helpful to explore potential control measures for preventing food poisoning by lactic acid bacteria. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The YvfTU Two-component System is involved in plcR expression in Bacillus cereus

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    Nguyen-the Christophe

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most extracellular virulence factors produced by Bacillus cereus are regulated by the pleiotropic transcriptional activator PlcR. Among strains belonging to the B. cereus group, the plcR gene is always located in the vicinity of genes encoding the YvfTU two-component system. The putative role of YvfTU in the expression of the PlcR regulon was therefore investigated. Results Expression of the plcR gene was monitored using a transcriptional fusion with a lacZ reporter gene in a yvfTU mutant and in its B. cereus ATCC 14579 parental strain. Two hours after the onset of the stationary phase, a stage at which the PlcR regulon is highly expressed, the plcR expression in the yvfTU mutant was only 50% of that of its parental strain. In addition to the reduced plcR expression in the yvfTU mutant, a few members of the PlcR regulon showed a differential expression, as revealed by transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. The virulence of the yvfTU mutant in a Galleria mellonella insect model was slightly lower than that of the parental strain. Conclusion The YvfTU two-component system is not required for the expression of most of the virulence factors belonging to the PlcR regulon. However, YvfTU is involved in expression of plcR, a major regulator of virulence in B. cereus.

  16. Quantification of the impact of single and multiple mild stresses on outgrowth heterogeneity of Bacillus cereus spores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melis, van C.C.J.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2014-01-01

    Outgrowth heterogeneity of bacterial spore populations complicates both prediction and efficient control of spore outgrowth. In this study, the impact of mild preservation stresses on outgrowth of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores was quantified during the first stages of outgrowth. Heterogeneity in

  17. Comparative analysis of two-component signal transduction systems of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, de M.W.H.J.; Francke, C.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group are ubiquitously present in the environment and can adapt to a wide range of environmental fluctuations. In bacteria, these adaptive responses are generally mediated by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), which consist of a histidine kinase (HK) and

  18. A probability model for enterotoxin production of Bacillus cereus as a function of pH and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacillus cereus is frequently isolated from a variety of foods including vegetables, dairy products, meat, and other raw and processed foods. The bacterium is capable of producing enterotoxin and emetic toxin that can cause severe nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. The objectives of this study were to a...

  19. Enhanced transformation efficiency of recalcitrant Bacillus cereus and Bacillus weihenstephanensis isolates upon in vitro methylation of plasmid DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop Groot, M.N.; Nieboer, F.; Abee, T.

    2008-01-01

    Digestion patterns of chromosomal DNAs of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus weihenstephanensis strains suggest that Sau3AI-type restriction modification systems are widely present among the isolates tested. In vitro methylation of plasmid DNA was used to enhance poor plasmid transfer upon electroporation

  20. Transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways, alternative respiration and enterotoxin genes in anaerobic growth of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, van der M.; Abee, T.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To assess genes specifically activated during anaerobic growth that are involved in metabolism and pathogenesis of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus. Methods and Results: Growth under anaerobic conditions in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth revealed a reduced growth rate and lower yield