WorldWideScience

Sample records for ceres integral benchmarks

  1. SINBAD: Shielding integral benchmark archive and database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SINBAD is a new electronic database developed to store a variety of radiation shielding benchmark data so that users can easily retrieve and incorporate the data into their calculations. SINBAD is an excellent data source for users who require the quality assurance necessary in developing cross-section libraries or radiation transport codes. The future needs of the scientific community are best served by the electronic database format of SINBAD and its user-friendly interface, combined with its data accuracy and integrity

  2. Developing integrated benchmarks for DOE performance measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, Jr. H.C.

    1992-09-30

    The objectives of this task were to describe and evaluate selected existing sources of information on occupational safety and health with emphasis on hazard and exposure assessment, abatement, training, reporting, and control identifying for exposure and outcome in preparation for developing DOE performance benchmarks. Existing resources and methodologies were assessed for their potential use as practical performance benchmarks. Strengths and limitations of current data resources were identified. Guidelines were outlined for developing new or improved performance factors, which then could become the basis for selecting performance benchmarks. Data bases for non-DOE comparison populations were identified so that DOE performance could be assessed relative to non-DOE occupational and industrial groups. Systems approaches were described which can be used to link hazards and exposure, event occurrence, and adverse outcome factors, as needed to generate valid, reliable, and predictive performance benchmarks. Data bases were identified which contain information relevant to one or more performance assessment categories . A list of 72 potential performance benchmarks was prepared to illustrate the kinds of information that can be produced through a benchmark development program. Current information resources which may be used to develop potential performance benchmarks are limited. There is need to develop an occupational safety and health information and data system in DOE, which is capable of incorporating demonstrated and documented performance benchmarks prior to, or concurrent with the development of hardware and software. A key to the success of this systems approach is rigorous development and demonstration of performance benchmark equivalents to users of such data before system hardware and software commitments are institutionalized.

  3. Benchmark analyses of sodium convection in the upper plenum of the MONJU reactor vessel - Comparison between plant system analysis code CERES and CFD code -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the CRP of IAEA, the data of the upper plenum geometry of the prototype FBR“MONJU” and the boundary conditions of the plant trip test were provided by JAEA. A plant system analysis code CERES for FBRs was developed by CRIEPI. To verify the CERES code, analyses had been performed for the system test of the MONJU, the results of which showed good agreement with the test. However, the difficulty of accurately reproducing the temperature variation arising from a complex flow in the upper plenum was identified. By using the general-purpose analysis code STAR-CCM+, detailed analysis in the upper plenum was enabled. Based on comparison between analyses of the CERES and STAR-CCM+ codes, parameters that had to be considered to simulate the flow pattern appropriately for plant system analysis codes were discussed. And, the analysis capability of CERES code with appropriate parameter was able to be confirmed. (author)

  4. Melcor benchmarking against integral severe fuel damage tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated computer code that models all phases of the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants, and is being developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has a program with the NRC to provide independent assessment of MELCOR, and a very important part of this program is to benchmark MELCOR against experimental data from integral severe fuel damage tests and predictions of that data from more mechanistic codes such as SCDAP or SCDAP/RELAP5. Benchmarking analyses with MELCOR have been carried out at BNL for five integral severe fuel damage tests, namely, PBF SFD 1-1, SFD 14, and NRU FLHT-2, analyses, and their role in identifying areas of modeling strengths and weaknesses in MELCOR.

  5. Supply chain integration scales validation and benchmark values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Marin-Garcia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The clarification of the constructs of the supply chain integration (clients, suppliers, external and internal, the creation of a measurement instrument based on a list of items taken from earlier papers, the validation of these scales and a preliminary benchmark to interpret the scales by percentiles based on a set of control variables (size of the plant, country, sector and degree of vertical integration. Design/methodology/approach: Our empirical analysis is based on the HPM project database (2005-2007 timeframe. The international sample is made up of 266 plants across ten countries: Austria, Canada, Finland, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Spain, Sweden and the USA. In each country. We analized the descriptive statistics, internal consistency testing to purify the items (inter-item correlations, Cronbach’s alpha, squared multiple correlation, corrected item-total correlation, exploratory factor analysis, and finally, a confirmatory factor analysis to check the convergent and discriminant validity of the scales. The analyses will be done with the SPSS and EQS programme using the maximum likelihood parameter estimation method. Findings: The four proposed scales show excellent psychometric properties. Research limitations/implications: with a clearer and more concise designation of the supply chain integration measurement scales more reliable and accurate data could be taken to analyse the relations between these constructs with other variables of interest to the academic l fields. Practical implications: providing scales that are valid as a diagnostic tool for best practices, as well as providing a benchmark with which to compare the score for each individual plant against a collection of industrial companies from the machinery, electronics and transportation sectors. Originality/value: supply chain integration may be a major factor in explaining the performance of companies. The results are nevertheless inconclusive, the vast range

  6. 'Wasteaware' benchmark indicators for integrated sustainable waste management in cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David C; Rodic, Ljiljana; Cowing, Michael J; Velis, Costas A; Whiteman, Andrew D; Scheinberg, Anne; Vilches, Recaredo; Masterson, Darragh; Stretz, Joachim; Oelz, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses a major problem in international solid waste management, which is twofold: a lack of data, and a lack of consistent data to allow comparison between cities. The paper presents an indicator set for integrated sustainable waste management (ISWM) in cities both North and South, to allow benchmarking of a city's performance, comparing cities and monitoring developments over time. It builds on pioneering work for UN-Habitat's solid waste management in the World's cities. The comprehensive analytical framework of a city's solid waste management system is divided into two overlapping 'triangles' - one comprising the three physical components, i.e. collection, recycling, and disposal, and the other comprising three governance aspects, i.e. inclusivity; financial sustainability; and sound institutions and proactive policies. The indicator set includes essential quantitative indicators as well as qualitative composite indicators. This updated and revised 'Wasteaware' set of ISWM benchmark indicators is the cumulative result of testing various prototypes in more than 50 cities around the world. This experience confirms the utility of indicators in allowing comprehensive performance measurement and comparison of both 'hard' physical components and 'soft' governance aspects; and in prioritising 'next steps' in developing a city's solid waste management system, by identifying both local strengths that can be built on and weak points to be addressed. The Wasteaware ISWM indicators are applicable to a broad range of cities with very different levels of income and solid waste management practices. Their wide application as a standard methodology will help to fill the historical data gap.

  7. CERES progress report: Phases 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Ambrosiano, J.; Kercher, J.; Penner, J.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Emanuel, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-05-27

    The CERES project represents a long-term commitment of LLNL`s Global Climate Research Division to the EPA. The goal is to build an Earth System Model (ESM) with the ability in the near future to assist EPA in carrying out its responsibilities in the environmental policy and assessment arena, with particular emphasis on the terrestrial ecosystem components of the Earth system. There are two complementary aspects of the CERES development plan. The first is to provide a computational framework and modeling infrastructure for ESM development. The goal is to create an ``open architecture`` enabling submodels from different research groups studying terrestrial ecosystems to become part of a fully-coupled model of the Earth`s climate system. The second goal is to contribute fundamentally to understanding of the terrestrial component of the Earth system by developing advanced models. During this first phase of the CERES project, these two activities have been somewhat separate; the software engineering and framework building activity having been done in parallel with terrestrial model development. These two activities are merging as the framework becomes more mature, with robust software tools, and with a growing complement of tuned and benchmarked submodels and as the ecosystem models become fully incorporated into the ESM modeling framework. Two appendices contain the following papers: (1) ``Research Recommendations to the EPA in Support of Earth System Modeling Activities,`` LLNL CERES project report; and (2) ``Progress Report on Terrestrial Model Development: Research in Support of the CERES Earth System Modeling Project,`` LLNL CERES project report.

  8. RECENT ADDITIONS OF CRITICALITY SAFETY RELATED INTEGRAL BENCHMARK DATA TO THE ICSBEP AND IRPHEP HANDBOOKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Sartori

    2009-09-01

    High-quality integral benchmark experiments have always been a priority for criticality safety. However, interest in integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of future criticality safety needs to support next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The importance of drawing upon existing benchmark data is becoming more apparent because of dwindling availability of critical facilities worldwide and the high cost of performing new experiments. Integral benchmark data from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and the International Handbook of Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments are widely used. Benchmark data have been added to these two handbooks since the last Nuclear Criticality Safety Division Topical Meeting in Knoxville, Tennessee (September 2005). This paper highlights these additions.

  9. Benchmarking Benchmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Blitz (David)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBenchmarking benchmarks is a bundle of six studies that are inspired by the prevalence of benchmarking in academic finance research as well as in investment practice. Three studies examine if current benchmark asset pricing models adequately describe the cross-section of stock returns. W

  10. INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

    2008-09-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR’06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed.

  11. Review of recent benchmark experiments on integral test for high energy nuclear data evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Konno, Chikara; Fukahori, Tokio; Hayashi, Katsumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    A survey work of recent benchmark experiments on an integral test for high energy nuclear data evaluation was carried out as one of the work of the Task Force on JENDL High Energy File Integral Evaluation (JHEFIE). In this paper the results are compiled and the status of recent benchmark experiments is described. (author)

  12. Integral Benchmark Data for Nuclear Data Testing Through the ICSBEP & IRPhEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

    2013-10-01

    The status of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was last discussed directly with the nuclear data community at ND2007. Since ND2007, integral benchmark data that are available for nuclear data testing have increased significantly. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPhEP is discussed and selected benchmark configurations that have been added to the ICSBEP and IRPhEP Handbooks since ND2007 are highlighted.

  13. INTEGRAL BENCHMARK DATA FOR NUCLEAR DATA TESTING THROUGH THE ICSBEP AND THE NEWLY ORGANIZED IRPHEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-04-01

    The status of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was last reported in a nuclear data conference at the International Conference on Nuclear Data for Science and Technology, ND-2004, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Since that time the number and type of integral benchmarks have increased significantly. Included in the ICSBEP Handbook are criticality-alarm / shielding and fundamental physic benchmarks in addition to the traditional critical / subcritical benchmark data. Since ND 2004, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. The IRPhEP is patterned after the ICSBEP, but focuses on other integral measurements, such as buckling, spectral characteristics, reactivity effects, reactivity coefficients, kinetics measurements, reaction-rate and power distributions, nuclide compositions, and other miscellaneous-type measurements in addition to the critical configuration. The status of these two projects is discussed and selected benchmarks highlighted in this paper.

  14. An integrated data envelopment analysis-artificial neural network approach for benchmarking of bank branches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahpour, Elsa; Hosseinzadeh Lotfi, Farhad; Zandieh, Mostafa

    2016-02-01

    Efficiency and quality of services are crucial to today's banking industries. The competition in this section has become increasingly intense, as a result of fast improvements in Technology. Therefore, performance analysis of the banking sectors attracts more attention these days. Even though data envelopment analysis (DEA) is a pioneer approach in the literature as of an efficiency measurement tool and finding benchmarks, it is on the other hand unable to demonstrate the possible future benchmarks. The drawback to it could be that the benchmarks it provides us with, may still be less efficient compared to the more advanced future benchmarks. To cover for this weakness, artificial neural network is integrated with DEA in this paper to calculate the relative efficiency and more reliable benchmarks of one of the Iranian commercial bank branches. Therefore, each branch could have a strategy to improve the efficiency and eliminate the cause of inefficiencies based on a 5-year time forecast.

  15. Planetary science: Salty Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Anomalously bright spots are seen on the dark cratered surface of the dwarf planet Ceres. The Dawn spacecraft's detection of sodium carbonates in bright areas is consistent with aqueous activity in an ice-poor and salty regolith.

  16. Integrated manufacturing approach to attain benchmark team performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shau-Ron; Nguyen, Andrew; Naguib, Hussein

    1994-09-01

    A Self-Directed Work Team (SDWT) was developed to transfer a polyimide process module from the research laboratory to our wafer fab facility for applications in IC specialty devices. The SDWT implemented processes and tools based on the integration of five manufacturing strategies for continuous improvement. These were: Leadership Through Quality (LTQ), Total Productive Maintenance (TMP), Cycle Time Management (CTM), Activity-Based Costing (ABC), and Total Employee Involvement (TEI). Utilizing these management techniques simultaneously, the team achieved six sigma control of all critical parameters, increased Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) from 20% to 90%, reduced cycle time by 95%, cut polyimide manufacturing cost by 70%, and improved its overall team member skill level by 33%.

  17. Visualization and Quality Control Web Tools for CERES Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrescu, C.; Doelling, D.; Chu, C.; Rutan, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The CERES project continues to provide the scientific community a wide variety of satellite-derived data products such as observed TOA broadband shortwave and longwave observed fluxes, computed TOA and Surface fluxes, as well as cloud, aerosol, and other atmospheric parameters. These datasets encompass a wide range of temporal and spatial resolutions, suited to specific applications. Now in its 15-year, CERES products are mostly used by climate modeling communities that focus on global mean energetics, meridianal heat transport, and climate trend studies. However, CERES products are now beginning to be used by an even broader audience, like the green energy, health and environmental agencies. With its well-established web-oriented Ordering and Visualization Tool (OVT), CERES products are now much more assessable to users of all communities. The OVT Team introduced a series of specialized functions such as 1- and 2-D histogram, anomaly, deseasonalization, temporal and spatial averaging, side-by-side parameter comparison, and others that made the process of Quality Control far easier and faster. Over time increasingly higher order temporal and spatial resolution products are being made available to the public through the CERES OVT's web-pages. Moreover, ground site observed surface fluxes are being integrated into the OVT to facilitate the CERES project to QC the CERES computed surface fluxes. These features will give users the opportunity to perform their own comparisons of the CERES computed surface fluxes and observed ground site fluxes. An overview of the CERES OVT basic functions and its QC capabilities, new developments, as well as future steps in expanding its capabilities will be presented at the meeting.

  18. Dawn at Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplis, Michael J.; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Dawn Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Dawn arrived at Ceres in 2015, after a 7.5-year journey. It had orbited and mapped the basaltic asteroid Vesta before arriving at its final target, the innermost dwarf planet [1]. Dawn found a very dark, cratered surface punctuated by small extremely bright spots, including the large bright area in the Occator crater. Ceres' surface has many craters but it is missing the largest expected craters and it is gravitationally relaxed at lowest orders, implying a mechanically strong thick crust with a weaker deep interior [2-4]. Ceres' surface composition is dominated by dark carbon-rich minerals, phyllosilicates, ammoniated clays, and carbonates [5]. The distribution of the observed species across the surface indicates that Ceres underwent widespread aqueous alteration [6]. Water ice has also been observed in fresh craters [7] and elemental composition is consistent with an increasing H content toward high latitudes [8], indicating an increasing content of water ice in the immediate subsurface towards the poles. The composition of the bright area in Occator is mostly consistent with a large amount of carbonate, implying recent hydrothermal activity [9]. Several lines of morphological evidence, like flat crater floors, flows of material across the surface and isolated mountains, point to the importance of volatile-driven activity on Ceres that may involve brine-driven cryovolcanism. References[1] Russell, et al., ISBN: 978-1-4614-4902-7, 2011.[2] Russell, et al., Science, 2016.[3] Marchi et al., Nat Comm., 2016 [4] Park et al. Nature, 2016. [5] De Sanctis et al., Nature, 2015, [6] Ammannito et al., Science, 2016.[7] Combe et al., Science 2016. [8] Prettyman et al., this meeting [9] De Sanctis et al., Nature, 2016

  19. Integral Data Benchmark of HENDL2.0/MG Compared with Neutronics Shielding Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jieqiong; XU Dezheng; ZHENG Shanliang; HE Zhaozhong; HU Yanglin; LI Jingjing; ZOU Jun; ZENG Qin; CHEN Mingliang; WANG Minghuang

    2009-01-01

    HENDL2.0,the latest version of the hybrid evaluated nuclear data library,was developed based upon some evaluated data from FENDL2.1 and ENDF/B-VII.To qualify and validate the working library,an integral test for the neutron production data of HENDL2.0 was performed with a series of existing spherical shell benchmark experiments (such as V,Be,Fe,Pb,Cr,Mn,Cu,Al,Si,Co,Zr,Nb,Mo,W and Ti).These experiments were simulated numerically using HENDL2.0/MG and a home-developed code VisualBUS.Calculations were conducted with both FENDL2.1/MG and FENDL2.1/MC,which are based on a continuous-energy Monte Carlo Code MCNP/4C.By comparison and analysis of the neutron leakage spectra and the integral test,benchmark results of neutron production data are presented in this paper.

  20. Dilepton Measurements with CERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin,A.; Rehak, P. et al.

    2007-07-09

    We report on dilepton measurements for central Pb on Au collisions at the top CERN SPS energy with the upgraded CERES experiment. The dilepton mass spectrum of 2000 data with improved mass resolution shows an enhancement over the expectation from hadron decays that is well described by a model including a strong broadening of the {rho} spectral function. The measured excess yield excludes the dropping mass scenario. We also report on the {phi} meson measured simultaneously both in the K{sup +}K{sup -} and in the dilepton decay channel for the first time in high energy heavy-ion collisions. An excellent agreement is found between the rapidity densities and the shape of the measured transverse momentum spectrum. The data rule out a possible enhancement of the {phi} yield in the leptonic over hadronic channel by a factor larger than 1.6 at 95% CL. CERES results are in agreement with NA49 results.

  1. Dilepton measurements with CERES

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, A; Agakichiev, G; Andronic, A; Antonczyk, D; Appelshäuser, H; Bielcíkováe, V; Biel, J; Braun-Munzinger, P; Busch, O; Cherlin, A; Damjanovic, S; Dietel, T; Dietrich, L; Drees, A; Esumi, S I; Filimonov, K; Fomenko, K; Fraenkel, Zeev; Garabatos, C; Glässel, P; Hering, G; Holeczek, J; Kalisky, M; Kniege, S; Kushpil, V; Ludolphs, W; Maas, A; Milosevic, J; Miskowiec, D; Ortega, R; Panebratsev, Yu A; Petchenova, O; Petracek, V; Ploskon, M; Radomski, S; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Rehak, P; Sako, H; Schmitz, W; Schuchmann, S; Sedykh, S; Shimansky, S; Soualah, R; Stachel, J; Sumbera, M; Tilsner, H; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsiledakis, G; Wessels, J P; Wienold, T; Wurm, J P; Yurevich, S; Yurevich, V

    2008-01-01

    We report on dilepton measurements for central Pb on Au collisions at the top CERN SPS energy with the upgraded CERES experiment. The dilepton mass spectrum of 2000 data with improved mass resolution shows an enhancement over the expectation from hadron decays that is well described by a model including a strong broadening of the $\\rho$ spectral function. The measured excess yield excludes the dropping mass scenario. We also report on the $\\phi$ meson measured simultaneously both in the $K^+K^-$ and in the dilepton decay channel for the first time in high energy heavy-ion collisions. An excellent agreement is found between the rapidity densities and the shape of the measured tranverse momentum spectrum. The data rule out a possible enhancement of the $\\phi$ yield in the leptonic over hadronic channel by a factor larger than 1.6 at 95% CL. CERES results are in agreement with NA49 results.

  2. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-13 Urvara Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. A.; Sizemore, H. G.; Platz, T.; O'Brien, D. P.; Mest, S. C.; Yingst, R. A.; Crown, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Nathues, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We used geologic mapping applied to Dawn spacecraft data as a tool to understand the geologic history of the Ac-H-13 Urvara Quadrangle of dwarf planet Ceres. This region, located between 21˚S-66˚S and 180-270˚E, is dominated by the Urvara basin in the east and cratered plains in the west. The elevation of the cratered plains is intermediate between the identified "highland" and "lowland" units of Ceres. Plains in the SW corner of the quadrangle are hummocky and heavily cratered, while the NW corner is smoother and less densely cratered. Features of note include 1) the 200 km diameter Urvara basin, which includes a degraded northern rim and smooth interior and exterior material that hosts a significantly lower impact crater density than most of the rest of Ceres' surface; 2) semi-radial curvilinear structures extending to the east and west of Urvara; 3) two large-scale dome structures 10s of km in diameter exterior to Urvara; and 4) numerous small-scale domical structures (digital terrain models derived from stereo images. In Fall 2015 images from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (140 m/px) will be used to refine the mapping, followed by Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (35 m/px) images starting in December 2015. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams is acknowledged. This work is supported by grants from NASA, the Max Planck Society and from the German and Italian Space Agencies.

  3. Virtual instrument simulator for CERES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J.

    1997-12-01

    A benchtop virtual instrument simulator for CERES (clouds and the Earth's radiant energy system) has been built at NASA, Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The CERES instruments will fly on several earth orbiting platforms notably NASDA's tropical rainfall measurement mission (TRMM) and NASA's Earth observing system (EOS) satellites. CERES measures top of the atmosphere radiative fluxes using microprocessor controlled scanning radiometers. The CERES virtual instrument simulator consists of electronic circuitry identical to the flight unit's twin microprocessors and telemetry interface to the supporting spacecraft electronics and two personal computers (PC) connected to the I/O ports that control azimuth and elevation gimbals. Software consists of the unmodified TRW developed flight code and ground support software which serves as the instrument monitor and NASA/TRW developed engineering models of the scanners. The CERES instrument simulator will serve as a testbed for testing of custom instrument commands intended to solve in-flight anomalies of the instruments which could arise during the CERES mission. One of the supporting computers supports the telemetry display which monitors the simulator microprocessors during the development and testing of custom instrument commands. The CERES engineering development software models have been modified to provide a virtual instrument running on a second supporting computer linked in real time to the instrument flight microprocessor control ports. The CERES instrument simulator will be used to verify memory uploads by the CERES flight operations TEAM at NASA. Plots of the virtual scanner models match the actual instrument scan plots. A high speed logic analyzer has been used to track the performance of the flight microprocessor. The concept of using an identical but non-flight qualified microprocessor and electronics ensemble linked to a virtual instrument with identical system software affords a relatively

  4. Cryovolcanism on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesch, O.; Platz, T.; Schenk, P.; McFadden, L. A.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Quick, L. C.; Byrne, S.; Preusker, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Schmedemann, N.; Williams, D. A.; Li, J.-Y.; Bland, M. T.; Hiesinger, H.; Kneissl, T.; Neesemann, A.; Schaefer, M.; Pasckert, J. H.; Schmidt, B. E.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Sykes, M. V.; Nathues, A.; Roatsch, T.; Hoffmann, M.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    Volcanic edifices are abundant on rocky bodies of the inner solar system. In the cold outer solar system, volcanism can occur on solid bodies with a water-ice shell, but derived cryovolcanic constructs have proved elusive. We report the discovery, using Dawn Framing Camera images, of a landform on dwarf planet Ceres that we argue represents a viscous cryovolcanic dome. Parent material of the cryomagma is a mixture of secondary minerals, including salts and water ice. Absolute model ages from impact craters reveal that extrusion of the dome has occurred recently. Ceres’ evolution must have been able to sustain recent interior activity and associated surface expressions. We propose salts with low eutectic temperatures and thermal conductivities as key drivers for Ceres’ long-term internal evolution.

  5. Integrating CFD, CAA, and Experiments Towards Benchmark Datasets for Airframe Noise Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Yamamoto, Kazuomi

    2012-01-01

    Airframe noise corresponds to the acoustic radiation due to turbulent flow in the vicinity of airframe components such as high-lift devices and landing gears. The combination of geometric complexity, high Reynolds number turbulence, multiple regions of separation, and a strong coupling with adjacent physical components makes the problem of airframe noise highly challenging. Since 2010, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has organized an ongoing series of workshops devoted to Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations (BANC). The BANC workshops are aimed at enabling a systematic progress in the understanding and high-fidelity predictions of airframe noise via collaborative investigations that integrate state of the art computational fluid dynamics, computational aeroacoustics, and in depth, holistic, and multifacility measurements targeting a selected set of canonical yet realistic configurations. This paper provides a brief summary of the BANC effort, including its technical objectives, strategy, and selective outcomes thus far.

  6. Optical Polarimetric Mapping of Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Li, Jian-Yang; Kelley, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    The dwarf planet Ceres, with one quarter of its mass possibly as water, is of particular importance to understanding the origin and the evolution history of water in the inner solar system. It is also a real-life laboratory to study astrobiology. NASA's Dawn is returning detailed geological maps of Ceres until the end of this year. As a complement to the Dawn mission, using SPHERE/ZIMPOL at one of Very Large Telescopes in Chile, we obtained the optical polarimetric maps in the I and V band of the whole surface of Ceres in July and August, 2015. Polarimetric maps of Ceres are sensitive to the physical conditions (such as packing density and particle size distribution) and composition of its surface regolith. The comparative studies between our polarimetric maps and Dawn maps help us to understand the geological evolution and the space weathering processes on Ceres' surface. At the time of the ZIMPOL observations, with the best spatial resolution of about 0.02 arcsecond (equivalent to 30 km), we effectively obtained about 700 independent measurements of the surface in one polarimetric set. I will present the SPHERE observations and discuss our major findings.

  7. ‘Wasteaware’ benchmark indicators for integrated sustainable waste management in cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, David C., E-mail: waste@davidcwilson.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Rodic, Ljiljana [Education and Competence Studies, Wageningen University and Research Centre (Netherlands); Cowing, Michael J. [Independent Consultant (Saint Lucia); Velis, Costas A. [School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds (United Kingdom); Whiteman, Andrew D. [RWA Group, Sofia (Bulgaria); Scheinberg, Anne [WASTE, Gouda (Netherlands); Vilches, Recaredo; Masterson, Darragh [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Stretz, Joachim [Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH (GIZ), Cairo (Egypt); Oelz, Barbara [GIZ, Eschborn (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Solid waste management (SWM) is a key utility service, but data is often lacking. • Measuring their SWM performance helps a city establish priorities for action. • The Wasteaware benchmark indicators: measure both technical and governance aspects. • Have been developed over 5 years and tested in more than 50 cities on 6 continents. • Enable consistent comparison between cities and countries and monitoring progress. - Abstract: This paper addresses a major problem in international solid waste management, which is twofold: a lack of data, and a lack of consistent data to allow comparison between cities. The paper presents an indicator set for integrated sustainable waste management (ISWM) in cities both North and South, to allow benchmarking of a city’s performance, comparing cities and monitoring developments over time. It builds on pioneering work for UN-Habitat’s solid waste management in the World’s cities. The comprehensive analytical framework of a city’s solid waste management system is divided into two overlapping ‘triangles’ – one comprising the three physical components, i.e. collection, recycling, and disposal, and the other comprising three governance aspects, i.e. inclusivity; financial sustainability; and sound institutions and proactive policies. The indicator set includes essential quantitative indicators as well as qualitative composite indicators. This updated and revised ‘Wasteaware’ set of ISWM benchmark indicators is the cumulative result of testing various prototypes in more than 50 cities around the world. This experience confirms the utility of indicators in allowing comprehensive performance measurement and comparison of both ‘hard’ physical components and ‘soft’ governance aspects; and in prioritising ‘next steps’ in developing a city’s solid waste management system, by identifying both local strengths that can be built on and weak points to be addressed. The Wasteaware ISWM indicators

  8. ‘Wasteaware’ benchmark indicators for integrated sustainable waste management in cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Solid waste management (SWM) is a key utility service, but data is often lacking. • Measuring their SWM performance helps a city establish priorities for action. • The Wasteaware benchmark indicators: measure both technical and governance aspects. • Have been developed over 5 years and tested in more than 50 cities on 6 continents. • Enable consistent comparison between cities and countries and monitoring progress. - Abstract: This paper addresses a major problem in international solid waste management, which is twofold: a lack of data, and a lack of consistent data to allow comparison between cities. The paper presents an indicator set for integrated sustainable waste management (ISWM) in cities both North and South, to allow benchmarking of a city’s performance, comparing cities and monitoring developments over time. It builds on pioneering work for UN-Habitat’s solid waste management in the World’s cities. The comprehensive analytical framework of a city’s solid waste management system is divided into two overlapping ‘triangles’ – one comprising the three physical components, i.e. collection, recycling, and disposal, and the other comprising three governance aspects, i.e. inclusivity; financial sustainability; and sound institutions and proactive policies. The indicator set includes essential quantitative indicators as well as qualitative composite indicators. This updated and revised ‘Wasteaware’ set of ISWM benchmark indicators is the cumulative result of testing various prototypes in more than 50 cities around the world. This experience confirms the utility of indicators in allowing comprehensive performance measurement and comparison of both ‘hard’ physical components and ‘soft’ governance aspects; and in prioritising ‘next steps’ in developing a city’s solid waste management system, by identifying both local strengths that can be built on and weak points to be addressed. The Wasteaware ISWM indicators

  9. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-12 Toharu Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mest, S. C.; Williams, D. A.; Crown, D. A.; Yingst, R. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Platz, T.; Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schäfer, M.; Marchi, S.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We are using recent data from the Dawn spacecraft to map the geology of the Ac-H-12 Toharu Quadrangle (21-66°S, 90-180°E) of the dwarf planet Ceres in order to examine its surface geology and understand its geologic history. At the time of this writing, mapping was performed on Framing Camera (FC) mosaics from late Approach (1.3 km/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits, including clear filter and color images and digital terrain models derived from stereo images. Images from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (140 m/px) will be used to refine the map in Fall 2015, followed by the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (35 m/px) starting in December 2015. The quad is named after crater Toharu (87 km diameter; 49°S, 155°E). The southern rim of Kerwan basin (284 km diameter) is visible along the northern edge of the quad, which is preserved as a low-relief scarp. The quad exhibits smooth terrain in the north, and more heavily cratered terrain in the south. The smooth terrain forms nearly flat-lying plains in some areas, such as on the floor and to the southeast of Kerwan, and overlies hummocky materials in other areas. These smooth materials extend over a much broader area outside of the quad, and appear to contain some of the lowest crater densities on Ceres. Impact craters exhibit a range of coinciding sizes and preservation styles. Smaller craters ( 20 km) contain central mounds; at current FC resolution, it is difficult to discern if these are primary structures (i.e., central peaks) or secondary features. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, & Science Teams is acknowledged. This work is supported by grants from NASA, DLR and MPG.

  10. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-8 Nawish Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigeri, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Carrozzo, Giacomo; Ammannito, Eleonora; Williams, David; Mest, Scott; Buczkowski, Debra; Preusker, Frank; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Scully, Jennifer; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Herein we present the geologic mapping of the Ac-H-8 Nawish Quadrangle of dwarf planet Ceres, produced on the basis of the Dawn spacecraft data. The Ac-H-08 Nawish quadrangle is located between -22°S and 22°N and between 144°E and 216°E. At the north-east border, a polygonal, 75km-wide crater named Nawish gives the name to the whole quadrangle. An unamed, partially degraded, 100km-diameter crater is evident in the lower central sector of the quadrangle. Bright materials have been mapped and are associated with craters. For example, bright materials occur in the central peak region of Nawish crater and in the ejecta of an unnamed crater, which is located in the nearby quadrangle Ac-H-09. The topography of the area obtained from stereo-processing of imagery shows an highland in the middle of the quadrangle. Topography is lower in the northern and southern borders, with a altitude span of about 9500 meters. At the time of this writing geologic mapping was based on Framing Camera (FC) mosaics from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO, 140 m/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits, including grayscale and color images and digital terrain models derived from stereo images. The first sessions of Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO, 35 m/px) images have been received as we are writing this abstract in the first half of January 2016. LAMO images represent the maximum spatial resolution images available for Ceres from the Dawn mission. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams is acknowledged. This work is supported by grants from NASA, and from the German and Italian Space Agencies.

  11. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-1 Asari Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesch, O.; McFadden, L. A.; Hiesinger, H.; Scully, J. E. C.; Kneissl, T.; Hughson, K.; Williams, D. A.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Schmedemann, N.; Marchi, S.; Jaumann, R.; Nathues, A.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    We used geologic mapping applied to Dawn spacecraft data as a tool to understand the geologic history of the Ac-H-1 Asari quadrangle of dwarf planet Ceres. The Dawn Framing Camera observed the quadrangle (north polar area: 66°N-90°N) from an altitude of 4424 km and a clear-filter mosaic was produced at a spatial resolution of 400 m/pixel. A stereo-photogrammetric digital elevation model was calculated from images acquired during a higher altitude resulting in a spatial resolution of 1.4 km/pixel. Key characteristics of the study area are (1) a high density of impact craters and (2) moderate topographic variations. We measured a crater density of 9.8E-04 (km-2) for crater diameters >10 km, the highest on Ceres. Few isolated topographic highs (plateaus), reaching ~5 km in altitude relative to the ellipsoid, are present. Their irregular shape is often sculpted by impacts. We also note a positive relief with relatively steep slopes (~13°) and a cone-like shape centered at 85°N/8°E. Topographic lows, reaching -4 km, correspond to the floors of impact craters with diameters up to 64 km. The morphology of impact craters exhibits varying degrees of degradation. Degraded crater floors show central peaks and mass wasting deposits. The largest morphologically fresh deposit (78°N/38°E) is 20 km long, and has a lobate shape with striations on its surface. It extends from a crater rim downslope. No extensive ejecta deposits are present in the study area. In the course of the ongoing mission, we will incorporate mosaics from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (~140 m/pixel) and Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (~35 m/pixel) phases to complete the preliminary photo-geological map and stratigraphy.

  12. Ceres' hydrogen-rich regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Feldman, William C.; Lawrence, David J.; McSween, Harry Y.; Schorghofer, Norbert; Toplis, Michael J.; Forni, Olivier; Joy, Steven P.; Marchi, Simone; Platz, Thomas; Polanskey, Carol A.; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Rayman, Marc D.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    Low-altitude mapping of Ceres by Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) began in December of 2015. GRaND will continue to acquire data for at least six months in a circular-polar orbit, at an altitude of about 0.8 body radii. Close-proximity enables global mapping of the elemental composition of Ceres' regolith, with regional-scale spatial resolution, similar to that achieved at Vesta. An initial analysis of the data shows that Ceres' regolith is rich in H, consistent with the detection of ammoniated phyllosilicates by Dawn's Visible to InfraRed (VIR) spectrometer. Global maps of neutron and gamma ray counting data reveal a strong latitude variation, with suppressed counts at the poles. Lower bound estimates of the concentration of polar H exceed that found in carbonaceous chondrites, which are the best meteorite analogs for Ceres. Thermal modeling predicts that water ice is stable near the surface at high latitudes, and, given Ceres' low obliquity, water ice and other volatile species may be concentrated in permanently shadowed regions near the poles. Excess hydrogen at high latitudes is likely in the form of water ice within the decimeter depths sensed by GRaND. Changes in the hydration state of phyllosilicates and hydrated salt minerals with temperature could also contribute to observed spatial variations. Some GRaND signatures show evidence for layering of hydrogen, consistent with ice stability models. Differences in the gamma ray spectra of Ceres and Vesta indicate that Ceres' surface is primitive (closely related to carbonaceous chondrite-like compositions), in contrast to Vesta's fractionated igneous composition. Strong gamma rays are observed at 7.6 MeV (Fe), 6.1 MeV (O), and 2.2 MeV (H). With additional accumulation time, it may be possible to quantify or bound the concentration of other elements, such as Mg, Ni, and C. Elements diagnostic of hydrothermal activity (K, Cl, and S) may be detectable if they are present in high concentrations over

  13. Quo Vadis Benchmark Simulation Models? 8th IWA Symposium on Systems Analysis and Integrated Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, U.; Alex, J.; Batstone, D,;

    2011-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for WWTPs is coming towards an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to provide their insights, hi...

  14. Galsang Cering Climbs Cho Oyu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUEWENXIAN

    2004-01-01

    Gongbo is one of the three Chinese mountaineers who climbed Qomolangma, the highest peak of the world, from the northern side for the first time. Nowadays his son, Galsang Cering,last autumn successfully climbed Cho Oyu, which is the world's sixth highest peak at 8.201 meters.

  15. Asteroid secular dynamics: Ceres' fingerprint identified

    CERN Document Server

    Novaković, Bojan; Tsirvoulis, Georgios; Knezević, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Here we report on the significant role of a so far overlooked dynamical aspect, namely a secular resonance between the dwarf planet Ceres and other asteroids. We demonstrate that this type of secular resonance can be the dominant dynamical factor in certain regions of the main asteroid belt. Specifically, we performed a dynamical analysis of the asteroids belonging to the (1726) Hoffmeister family. To identify which dynamical mechanisms are actually at work in this part of the main asteroid belt, i.e. to isolate the main perturber(s), we study the evolution of this family in time. The study is accomplished using numerical integrations of test particles performed within different dynamical models. The obtained results reveal that the post-impact evolution of the Hoffmeister asteroid family is a direct consequence of the nodal secular resonance with Ceres. This leads us to the conclusion that similar effects must exist in other parts of the asteroid belt. In this respect, the obtained results shed light on an i...

  16. Neutron Cross Section Processing Methods for Improved Integral Benchmarking of Unresolved Resonance Region Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we describe the development and application of computational methods for processing neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance region (URR). These methods are integrated with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code, thereby enabling their use in high-fidelity analyses. Enhanced understanding of the effects of URR evaluation representations on calculated results is then obtained through utilization of the methods in Monte Carlo integral benchmark simulations of fast spectrum critical assemblies. First, we present a so-called on-the-fly (OTF) method for calculating and Doppler broadening URR cross sections. This method proceeds directly from ENDF-6 average unresolved resonance parameters and, thus, eliminates any need for a probability table generation pre-processing step in which tables are constructed at several energies for all desired temperatures. Significant memory reduction may be realized with the OTF method relative to a probability table treatment if many temperatures are needed. Next, we examine the effects of using a multi-level resonance formalism for resonance reconstruction in the URR. A comparison of results obtained by using the same stochastically-generated realization of resonance parameters in both the single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) and multi-level Breit-Wigner (MLBW) formalisms allows for the quantification of level-level interference effects on integrated tallies such as keff and energy group reaction rates. Though, as is well-known, cross section values at any given incident energy may differ significantly between single-level and multi-level formulations, the observed effects on integral results are minimal in this investigation. Finally, we demonstrate the calculation of true expected values, and the statistical spread of those values, through independent Monte Carlo simulations, each using an independent realization of URR cross section structure throughout. It is observed that both probability table

  17. Climate Model Evaluation using New Datasets from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Norman G.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Doelling, David R.

    2008-01-01

    . Diurnal cycles are explicitly resolved by merging geostationary satellite observations with CERES and MODIS. Atmospheric state data are provided from a frozen version of the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office- Data Assimilation System at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. In addition to improving the accuracy of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes, CERES also produces radiative fluxes at the surface and at several levels in the atmosphere using radiative transfer modeling, constrained at the TOA by CERES (ERBE was limited to the TOA). In all, CERES uses 11 instruments on 7 spacecraft all integrated to obtain climate accuracy in TOA to surface fluxes. This presentation will provide an overview of several new CERES datasets of interest to the climate community (including a new adjusted TOA flux dataset constrained by estimates of heat storage in the Earth system), show direct comparisons between CERES ad ERBE, and provide a detailed error analysis of CERES fluxes at various time and space scales. We discuss how observations can be used to reduce uncertainties in cloud feedback and climate sensitivity and strongly argue why we should NOT "call off the quest".

  18. Evaluating Surface Flux Results from CERES-FLASHFlux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, A. C.; Stackhouse, P. W.; Kratz, D. P.; Gupta, S. K.; Sawaengphokhai, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Fast Longwave and Shortwave Radiative Flux (FLASHFlux) data product was developed to provide a rapid release version of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) results, which could be made available to the research and applications communities within one week of the satellite observations by exchanging some accuracy for speed of processing. TOA and surface flux products are provided for each CERES footprint (Single Scanner Footprint - SSF) and also time integrated and spatially averaged (TISA) to provide global daily averaged quantities. Despite the use of the most recently available calibration coefficients and operational inputs that are different from CERES formal climate quality data products, FLASHFlux has been found to provide results that compare very favorably with the CERES results. The TISA results from the FLASHFlux highly parameterized models are compared to the surface fluxes from CERES-EBAF, which uses a radiative transfer model, for the time period when both products are available. The FLASHFlux surface data products also have been found to give accurate surface flux results when compared to ground measurements. We present validation of both footprint-level and time-space averaged surface fluxes against ground measurements. Validation is done for both longwave (LW) and shortwave (SW) surface fluxes. The surface radiation measurements for land and island sites are collected from multiple networks, including the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM). In the US, the NOAA SURFRAD network provides surface flux data products within a day of measurement and these are optimal for FLASHFlux validation. Ocean buoy measurements are from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI). Overall bias for the SSF downward LW flux has been found to be about 6 Wm-2. For SW the bias is about 3 Wm-2. Clear and cloudy sky conditions will be evaluated separately. Validation is also examined by surface type.

  19. Interior Evolution of Ceres Revealed by Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Carol A.; Park, Ryan S.; Konopliv, Alex S.; Bland, Michael T.; Marchi, Simone; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; McCord, Thomas B.; Jaumann, Ralf; Russell, Christopher T.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2015-11-01

    Dawn's exploration of Ceres has revealed its geophysical characteristics, informing the processes that have shaped it. Dawn has determined the average diameter of Ceres to be 940 km, smaller than the previously estimated 975 km [1]. This implies a density of 2160 kg/m3, indicating that Ceres is less differentiated than predicted [2]. The low-degree gravity field is consistent with the body being in hydrostatic equilibrium and the magnitude of J2 implies some central condensation. Ceres' entire surface is cratered, implying the lack of a thick (10's of km) water ice layer at the surface. Variability in Ceres' crater morphology indicates that the near-surface layer has variable strength and rheology, likely due to heterogeneity in the near-surface mixture of rock, ice and salt. The lack of a number of expected large impact basins on Ceres can be interpreted to be the result of viscous relaxation, resurfacing or a combination of both. These data provide insights into Ceres' thermal evolution and mechanical properties, which appear to be unique to this warm, icy body.[1] Thomas, P. C., et al., Differentiation of the asteroid Ceres as revealed by its shape, Nature, 437, 224-226, 2005; [2] McCord et al., Ceres: Its Origin, Evolution and Structure and Dawn's Potential Contribution, Space Sci Rev DOI 10.1007/s11214-010-9729-9, 2011.

  20. CERES FLASHFlux: CERES Data Products for Science and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaengphokhai, P.; Stackhouse, P. W.; Kratz, D. P.; Gupta, S. K.; Wilber, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Fast Longwave And SHortwave Radiative Fluxes (FLASHFlux) data products were introduced at the NASA Langley Research Center to address the needs of the science community for global surface and top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes on a near real-time basis. This has been accomplished by enhancing the speed of CERES processing using simplified calibration and averaging techniques to produce daily TOA fluxes and fast radiation parameterizations to produce daily surface fluxes within a week of satellite observation. While the resulting products are not considered to be sufficiently accurate for studying long-term climate trends, they satisfy the needs for many near real-time scientific data analyses and industrial applications. Currently, FLASHFlux produces daily Level-2 Single Scanner Footprint (SSF) and Level-3 Temporally Interpolated and Spatially Averaged (TISA) data products. The SSF products are derived for the cross-track CERES instrument on Terra and Aqua separately. The TISA data products are derived using measurements from the CERES instruments from Terra and Aqua together. TOA fluxes from SSF have been used to validate flux products from CloudSat and Megha-Tropiques and are available within about 4 days of real-time.. Additionally, we show the usefulness of the FLASHFlux TISA top-of-atmosphere data products for near real term application such as extending the CERES Energy Balance And Filled (EBAF) data to assess Earth's radiation budget variability as presented in the State of the Climate 2012. The FLASHFlux SSF and TISA employ the Langley Parameterize Shortwave Algorithm (LPSA) and Langley Parameterize Longwave Algorithm (LPLA) to derive daily surface flux estimates within about 6-7 days of satellite observation. Preliminary surface validation of the FLASHFlux Version3A shows underestimation less than 5 Wm-2 for downward longwave flux and less than 20 Wm-2 for downward shortwave flux. Improvement in

  1. A Brief History of Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Available observations and thermal simulations suggest that Ceres is a warm icy body differentiated in a rocky core and icy shell. This model is supported by recent detection of a cloud of water vapor sourced from a couple of regions at the surface of the asteroid (Kueppers et al. (2014) Nature 505, 525). Combining geophysical tools developed for icy satellite modeling and hydrogeochemistry modeling, we derive interior and geological evolution scenarios for a variety of assumptions on the asteroid's accretional environment. Key events include (1) the early differentiation of a rocky core accompanied by a phase of intensive hydration in high pH environment. These conditions are favorable to the production of brucite and carbonates, as well as the redistribution of certain elements, e.g., potassium, from the rock to the aqueous phase; (2) an episode of partial dehydration of the core accompanied by a major heat pulse and further rock leaching; (3) efficient convection, including a phase in the mobile-lid regime that could have been responsible for the recent emplacement of Ceres' surface. It is important to keep in mind that Ceres is a small object whose main heat source is limited to long-lived radioisotope decay. Hence it is unlikely, from a basic thermal standpoint, that this object could maintain cryovolcanic activity at present. However, we will also report on a scenario in which potassium-40 has been extensively leached from the rock and is now concentrated in thick salt cumulates at the interface between the rocky core and shell, as was proposed for Europa (Prieto-Ballesteros and Kargel (2005) Icarus 173, 212). Low salt thermal conductivity combined with potassium-40 abundance may lead to partial melting. Whether or not this warm layer at the base of the icy shell can promote a late phase of cryovolcanism will be evaluated and presented at the meeting. We will compare the implications of these models against other models for the emplacement of Ceres' surface

  2. CERES AuTomAted job Loading SYSTem (CATALYST): An automated workflow manager for satellite data production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, J. L.; Hillyer, T. N.; Wilkins, J.

    2012-12-01

    The CERES Science Team integrates data from 5 CERES instruments onboard the Terra, Aqua and NPP missions. The processing chain fuses CERES observations with data from 19 other unique sources. The addition of CERES Flight Model 5 (FM5) onboard NPP, coupled with ground processing system upgrades further emphasizes the need for an automated job-submission utility to manage multiple processing streams concurrently. The operator-driven, legacy-processing approach relied on manually staging data from magnetic tape to limited spinning disk attached to a shared memory architecture system. The migration of CERES production code to a distributed, cluster computing environment with approximately one petabyte of spinning disk containing all precursor input data products facilitates the development of a CERES-specific, automated workflow manager. In the cluster environment, I/O is the primary system resource in contention across jobs. Therefore, system load can be maximized with a throttling workload manager. This poster discusses a Java and Perl implementation of an automated job management tool tailored for CERES processing.

  3. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Yang; Nathues, Andreas; Corre, Lucille Le; Izawa, Matthew R M; Clouts, Edward A; Sykes, Mark V; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E; Williams, David A; Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Konopliv, Alexander S; Park, Ryan S; Raymond, Carol A; Russell, Christopher T

    2016-01-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active but possibly sporadic water outgassing, and possibly varying spectral characteristics in a time scale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, and the newly acquired images by Dawn Framing Camera to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, in both a global scale and local regions, particularly the bright spots inside Occator crater, over time scales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over various time scales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun-Ceres-Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km$^2...

  4. Regional Heterogenity In Ceres' Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Carol A.; Marchi, Simone; Bland, Michael T.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Park, Ryan S.; Russell, Christopher T.; Hughson, Kynan G.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn mission arrived at Ceres in March 2015 to find a body different than expected. Dawn found that Ceres was slightly smaller (avg radius of 470 versus 476.2 km), flatter and denser than the previous estimates, raising the question of how completely Ceres had differentiated. Dawn's gravity measurements indicate that Ceres is close to hydrostatic equilibrium and there is some degree of central condensation, suggesting a gradient in the content of volatiles within the interior. The surface is heavily cratered indicating that the outer shell is not dominated by ice, as would be expected for a differentiated body. Crater preservation at all scales, absent those larger than ~300 km, and complex morphology of the surface indicate a strong outer shell comprising no more than 40% ice by volume. The global, near-hydrostatic shape is consistent with a warmer, weaker interior beneath the strong outer shell. While the lack of evidence for an ice-dominated layer near the surface could indicate that it never formed, and thus Ceres only partially differentiated, an alternate explanation is that the volatile-rich outermost shell was lost as a result of im-pacts and to mixing of the ice with the silicate-rich briny layer that formed at the base of the former frozen ocean. Understanding the composition and rheology of the outer shell is a key part of solving the interior evolution puzzle. Thus far, we see evidence in the crater record for a viscosity several orders of magnitude higher than pure water ice; however, the crater preservation state varies considerably over the surface. There is no striking latitude dependence to the variation in crater preservation state, rather there are regional and local variations that juxtapose smooth, ap-parently relaxed or resurfaced areas next to areas of well-defined impacts and tectonic features. The largest craters Kerwan and Yalode are associated with surronding smoother, more sparsely cratered terrains, and show smooth inte-riors with

  5. Cloud Properties of CERES-MODIS Edition 4 and CERES-VIIRS Edition 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun-Mack, Sunny; Minnis, Patrick; Chang, Fu-Lung; Hong, Gang; Arduini, Robert; Chen, Yan; Trepte, Qing; Yost, Chris; Smith, Rita; Brown, Ricky; Chu, Churngwei; Heckert, Elizabeth; Gibson, Sharon; Heck, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) analyzes MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) to derive cloud properties that are combine with aerosol and CERES broadband flux data to create a multi-parameter data set for climate study. CERES has produced over 15 years of data from Terra and over 13 years of data from Aqua using the CERES-MODIS Edition-2 cloud retrieval algorithm. A recently revised algorithm, CERESMODIS Edition 4, has been developed and is now generating enhanced cloud data for climate research (over 10 years for Terra and 8 years for Aqua). New multispectral retrievals of properties are included along with a multilayer cloud retrieval system. Cloud microphysical properties are reported at 3 wavelengths, 0.65, 1.24, and 2.1 microns to enable better estimates of the vertical profiles of cloud water contents. Cloud properties over snow are retrieved using the 1.24-micron channel. A new CERES-VIIRS cloud retrieval package was developed for the VIIRS spectral complement and is currently producing the CERES-VIIRS Edition 1 cloud dataset. The results from CERES-MODIS Edition 4 and CERES-VIIRS Edition 1 are presented and compared with each other and other datasets, including CALIPSO, CloudSat and the CERES-MODIS Edition-2 results.

  6. Constraining Ceres' interior from its Rotational Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Rambaux, Nicolas; Dehant, Véronique; Kuchynka, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Context. Ceres is the most massive body of the asteroid belt and contains about 25 wt.% (weight percent) of water. Understanding its thermal evolution and assessing its current state are major goals of the Dawn Mission. Constraints on internal structure can be inferred from various observations. Especially, detailed knowledge of the rotational motion can help constrain the mass distribution inside the body, which in turn can lead to information on its geophysical history. Aims. We investigate the signature of the interior on the rotational motion of Ceres and discuss possible future measurements performed by the spacecraft Dawn that will help to constrain Ceres' internal structure. Methods. We compute the polar motion, precession-nutation, and length-of-day variations. We estimate the amplitudes of the rigid and non-rigid response for these various motions for models of Ceres interior constrained by recent shape data and surface properties. Results. As a general result, the amplitudes of oscillations in the r...

  7. The missing large impact craters on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, S.; Ermakov, A. I.; Raymond, C. A.; Fu, R. R.; O'Brien, D. P.; Bland, M. T.; Ammannito, E.; de Sanctis, M. C.; Bowling, T.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Williams, D. A.; Hiesinger, H.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-07-01

    Asteroids provide fundamental clues to the formation and evolution of planetesimals. Collisional models based on the depletion of the primordial main belt of asteroids predict 10-15 craters >400 km should have formed on Ceres, the largest object between Mars and Jupiter, over the last 4.55 Gyr. Likewise, an extrapolation from the asteroid Vesta would require at least 6-7 such basins. However, Ceres' surface appears devoid of impact craters >~280 km. Here, we show a significant depletion of cerean craters down to 100-150 km in diameter. The overall scarcity of recognizable large craters is incompatible with collisional models, even in the case of a late implantation of Ceres in the main belt, a possibility raised by the presence of ammoniated phyllosilicates. Our results indicate that a significant population of large craters has been obliterated, implying that long-wavelength topography viscously relaxed or that Ceres experienced protracted widespread resurfacing.

  8. Ceres interaction with the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Mats; Lindkvist, Jesper

    2016-10-01

    The solar wind interaction with Ceres is studied for a high water vapor release from its surface using a hybrid model including photoionization. We use a water vapor production rate thought to be due to subsurface sublimation, corresponding to a detection on 6 March 2013 by the Herschel Space Observatory. We present the general morphology of the plasma interactions, both close to Ceres and on a larger scale. Mass-loading of water ions causes a magnetic pile-up region in-front of Ceres, where the solar wind deflects and slows down. The large body makes an obstacle to the solar wind and creates an asymmetric wake downstream. On a global scale, Ceres has a comet-like interaction with the solar wind with observable perturbations far downstream of the body.

  9. SURFACE ALBEDO AND SPECTRAL VARIABILITY OF CERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Sykes, Mark V.; Prettyman, Thomas H. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E. Ft. Lowell Road, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen (Germany); Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A. [University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Carsenty, Uri; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Schröder, Stefan E. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Planetary Research, Berlin (Germany); Castillo-Rogez, Julie C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Schenk, Paul [Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Williams, David A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Smith, David E. [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zuber, Maria T. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); and others

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun–Ceres–Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km{sup 2}, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  10. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathues, A; Hoffmann, M; Schaefer, M; Le Corre, L; Reddy, V; Platz, T; Cloutis, E A; Christensen, U; Kneissl, T; Li, J-Y; Mengel, K; Schmedemann, N; Schaefer, T; Russell, C T; Applin, D M; Buczkowski, D L; Izawa, M R M; Keller, H U; O'Brien, D P; Pieters, C M; Raymond, C A; Ripken, J; Schenk, P M; Schmidt, B E; Sierks, H; Sykes, M V; Thangjam, G S; Vincent, J-B

    2015-12-10

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5-7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the 'snow line', which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense. PMID:26659183

  11. CERES model application for increasing preparedness to climate variability in agricultural planning - calibration and validation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Zornitsa; Kercheva, Milena

    The procedure of stepwise calibration and validation of CERES-maize and CERES-wheat models was used for models adjustment in two fields under contrastive soil conditions (Chromic Luvisol and Vertisol) in Sofia region. Both models reflected well the phenomenon of water/nitrogen extraction and retention in the root zone after the calibration. Adjusted CERES wheat was validated over a range of soils, varieties, climate, and management conditions and proved acceptable reliability of model predictions in most of the tested situations. The highest degrees of association ( R2 > 0.85%) was established between observed and simulated series of potentially extractable soil water (PESW) on fertilised Vertisol and Chromic Luvisol when the error (RMSE) ranged from 8.9 to13.3 mm in moderately wet, moderate and dry wheat vegetation seasons. Detailed observations of the vulnerable “Chromic Luvisol-maize” agroecosystem in lysimeters, including water and nitrogen fluxes at the bottom boundary, enabled to validate integrally the prediction capacity of calibrated CERES-maize model. Simulation outputs after calibration about PESW, water uptake, drainage, soil nitrogen storage, nitrogen leaching and crop dry weights, proved to be accurate enough over a comparatively long period (1.05.1997-1.10.1999). Graphical and statistical test of CERES-maize output characterised the performance of the model as acceptable over the specific conditions of validation lysimeter trial.

  12. Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a key component of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program. The CERES instruments provide radiometric...

  13. Analytical Web Tool for CERES Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrescu, C.; Chu, C.; Doelling, D.

    2012-12-01

    The CERES project provides the community climate quality observed TOA fluxes, consistent cloud properties, and computed profile and surface fluxes. The 11-year long data set proves invaluable for remote sensing and climate modeling communities for annual global mean energy, meridianal heat transport, consistent cloud and fluxes and climate trends studies. Moreover, a broader audience interested in Earth's radiative properties such as green energy, health and environmental companies have showed their interest in CERES derived products. A few years ago, the CERES team start developing a new web-based Ordering Tool tailored for this wide diversity of users. Recognizing the potential that web-2.0 technologies can offer to both Quality Control (QC) and scientific data visualization and manipulation, the CERES team began introducing a series of specialized functions that addresses the above. As such, displaying an attractive, easy to use modern web-based format, the Ordering Tool added the following analytical functions: i) 1-D Histograms to display the distribution of the data field to identify outliers that are useful for QC purposes; ii) an "Anomaly" map that shows the regional differences between the current month and the climatological monthly mean; iii) a 2-D Histogram that can identify either potential problems with the data (i.e. QC function) or provides a global view of trends and/or correlations between various CERES flux, cloud, aerosol, and atmospheric properties. The large volume and diversity of data, together with the on-the-fly execution were the main challenges that had to be tackle with. Depending on the application, the execution was done on either the browser side or the server side with the help of auxiliary files. Additional challenges came from the use of various open source applications, the multitude of CERES products and the seamless transition from previous development. For the future, we plan on expanding the analytical capabilities of the

  14. 华北地区不同灌溉条件下CERES-Wheat模型模拟效果的系统分析%Integrative analysis on the simulated results of CERES-Wheat model under different water regimes in North China Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丽丽; 刘克; 赵雪; 赵茜; 廖树华; 周顺利

    2016-01-01

    以冬小麦石家庄8号为材料,对华北平原不同灌溉处理下应用CERES-Wheat模型模拟节水栽培冬小麦生育时期、产量与产量构成因素、生物量、土壤水分含量、土壤硝态氮含量和地上部吸氮量的效果进行了系统分析.结果表明:在节水及不灌溉条件下,CERES-Wheat模型对冬小麦生育时期、产量、生物量的模拟效果良好;在高水分灌溉条件下,模型对生育时期的模拟效果良好,对其他性状的模拟效果不够理想,并且模型过高估计了灌溉对产量的贡献率.该模型可以模拟不同灌溉处理土壤水分动态变化基本特征,但稳定性有待提高.模型对不同灌溉处理2 m土体土壤硝态氮含量的模拟效果较好,对吸氮量的模拟效果较差.要提高模型的系统性精度,需要在模型机制上进一步改进.

  15. The Very Special Small World Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Carle; Russell, C. T.; Nathues, Andreas; Raymond, Carol; Jaumann, Ralf; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina

    2016-07-01

    The long-lived Dawn spacecraft is now exploring the mysterious dwarf planet Ceres from an orbit only 360 km above the surface. Ceres is the largest planetary body located between Mars and Jupiter and represents a unique transition from rocky bodies of the inner solar system to icy bodies of the outer solar system. The surface, once predicted to be smooth with an ice shell, exhibits abundant craters, several with unfamiliar erosion-like characteristics across ejecta deposits. Although the surface of Ceres is very dark, ray systems around the youngest large craters are extensive, principally seen in high contrast color displays. The uppermost surface is hydrated and shown to contain ammoniated phyllosilicates with a small amount of carbonates but no water ice exposed on the surface (with possibly one exception). The special spectral features diagnostic of Ceres mineralogy are observed globally, but are not found in any meteorite measured in Earth-based laboratories. Unlike Vesta and its HEDs, Ceres has no meteorite sample to guide our understanding of its evolution. Morphologic features found on the surface include a possible (cryo-) volcanic construct, a wide array of tectonic lineaments, smooth deposits of fluidized material associated with several large craters, clusters of pit craters suggesting volatile release, and one remarkable large crater with floor fractures and an array of localized deposits up to 5x brighter than surroundings. Although key data are still being acquired and analyzed to characterize this small hydrated world, Ceres is certain to be a member of the newly recognized category of diverse solar system bodies known as "ocean worlds".

  16. Benchmark selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    2002-01-01

    Within a production theoretic framework, this paper considers an axiomatic approach to benchmark selection. It is shown that two simple and weak axioms; efficiency and comprehensive monotonicity characterize a natural family of benchmarks which typically becomes unique. Further axioms are added...

  17. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  18. Ceres' Geophysical Evolution Inferred from Dawn Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Bowling, Timothy; Ermakov, Anton I.; Fu, Roger; Park, Ryan; Raymond, Carol; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Y McSween, Harry; Toplis, Michael J.; Russell, Christopher T.; Dawn Team

    2016-10-01

    If Ceres formed as an ice-rich body, as suggested by its low density and the detection of ammoniated phyllosilicates [1], then it should have differentiated an ice-dominated shell, analogous to large icy satellites [2]. Instead, Dawn observations revealed an enrichment of Ceres' shell in strong materials, either a rocky component and/or salts and gas hydrates [3, 4, 5, 6]. We have explored several scenarios for the emplacement of Ceres' surface. Endogenic processes cannot account for its overall homogeneity. Instead we suggest that Ceres differentiated an icy shell upon freezing of its early ocean that was removed as a consequence of frequent exposure by impacting after the dwarf planet migrated from a cold accretional environment to the warmer outer main belt (or when the solar nebula dissipated, if Ceres formed in situ). This scenario implies that Ceres' current surface represents the interface between the original ice shell and the top of the frozen ocean, a region that is extremely rich chemistry-wise, as illustrated by the mineralogical observations returned by Dawn [7]. Thermal modeling shows that the shell could remain warm over the long term and offer a setting for the generation of brines that may be responsible for the emplacement of Ahuna Mons [8] and Occator's bright spots [7] on an otherwise homogeneous surface [9]. An important implication is that Ceres' surface offers an analog for better understanding the deep interior and chemical evolution of large ice-rich bodies.References: [1] De Sanctis et al., Nature, 2015; [2] McCord and Sotin, Journal of Geophysical Research, 2005; [3] Park et al., Nature, 2016 (in press); [4] Hiesinger et al., Science (submitted); [5] Bland et al., Nature Geoscience, 2016 (in press); [6] Fu et al., AGU Fall Meeting, 2015 [7] De Sanctis et al., Nature, 2016 (in press); [8] Ruesch et al., Science, in revision; [9] Ammannito et al., Science, 2016 (accepted).Acknowledgements: Part of this work is being carried out at the Jet

  19. Chemical Mapping of Vesta and Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Yamashita, N.; McSween, H. Y.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; Beck, A. W.; McCoy, T. J.; Toplis, M. J.; Mizzon, H.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-12-01

    Following successful science operations at Vesta, the Dawn spacecraft is headed for an encounter with Ceres in 2015. What have we learned at Vesta? And, what do we expect to learn by comparing Vesta and Ceres? We will address these questions from the standpoint of geochemistry. Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) is sensitive to the elemental composition of surface materials to depths of a few decimeters [1]. Gamma rays and neutrons, produced by the steady bombardment of galactic cosmic rays and by the decay of naturally-occurring radioisotopes (K, Th, U), provide a chemical fingerprint of the regolith. Analysis of planetary radiation emissions enables mapping of specific elements (such as Fe, Mg, Si, Cl, and H) and compositional parameters (such as average atomic mass), which provide information about processes that shaped the planet's surface and interior. Dawn has exceeded operational goals for GRaND at Vesta, accumulating an abundance of nadir-pointed data during five months in a 210 km, low altitude mapping orbit around Vesta (265-km mean radius). Chemical information from gamma ray and neutron measurements was used to test the connection between Vesta and the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites [2]. Additionally, GRaND searched for evolved, igneous lithologies [3], mantle and upper crustal materials exposed in large impact basins, mesosiderite compositions, and hydrogen in Vesta's bulk regolith. Results of our analyses and their implications for thermal evolution and regolith-processes will be presented. The possibility of a subcrustal ocean [4, 5] and lack of cerean meteorites makes water-rich Ceres a compelling target of exploration [6]. If Ceres underwent aqueous differentiation, then crustal overturn or gas driven volcanism may have significantly modified its primitive surface; and products of aqueous alteration (e.g. [7]) would detectable by GRaND [1]. For example, the presence of Cl in salts, associated with liquid

  20. Vesta and Ceres as Seen by Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Nathues, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Prettyman, T. H.; Konopliv, A. S.; Park, R. S.; Jaumann, R.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Raymond, C. A.; Pieters, C. M.; McCord, T. B.; Marchi, S.; Schenk, P.; Buczkowski, D.

    2015-12-01

    Ceres and Vesta are the most massive bodies in the main asteroid belt. They have witnessed 4.6 Ga of solar system history. Dawn's objective is to interview these two witnesses. These bodies are relatively simple protoplanets, with a modest amount of thermal evolution and geochemical alteration. They are our best archetypes of the early building blocks of the terrestrial planets. In particular siderophile elements in the Earth's core were probably first segregated in Vesta-like bodies, and its water was likely first condensed in Ceres-like bodies. Vesta has provided copious meteorites for geochemical analysis. This knowledge was used to infer the constitution of the parent body. Dawn verified that Vesta was consistent with being that body, confirming the geochemical inferences from these samples on the formation and evolution of the solar system. Ceres has not revealed itself with a meteoritic record nor an asteroid family. While the surface is scarred with craters, it is probable that the ejecta from the crater-forming events created little competent material from the icy crust and any such ejected material that reached Earth might have disintegrated upon entry into the Earth's atmosphere. Ceres' surface differs greatly from Vesta's. Plastic or fluidized mass wasting is apparent as are many irregularly shaped craters, including many polygonal crater forms. There are many central-pit craters possibly caused by volatilization of the crust in the center of the impact. There are many central-peak craters but are these due to rebound or pingo-like formation processes? Bright spots, possibly salt deposits, dot the landscape, evidence of fluvial processes beneath the crust. Observations of the largest region of bright spots may suggest sublimation from the surface of the bright area, consistent with Herschel water vapor observations. Ceres is not only the most massive body in the asteroid belt but also possibly the most active occupant of the main belt.

  1. Modelling anaerobic co-digestion in Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2: Parameter estimation, substrate characterisation and plant-wide integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnell, Magnus; Astals, Sergi; Åmand, Linda; Batstone, Damien J; Jensen, Paul D; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion is an emerging practice at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to improve the energy balance and integrate waste management. Modelling of co-digestion in a plant-wide WWTP model is a powerful tool to assess the impact of co-substrate selection and dose strategy on digester performance and plant-wide effects. A feasible procedure to characterise and fractionate co-substrates COD for the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2) was developed. This procedure is also applicable for the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). Long chain fatty acid inhibition was included in the ADM1 model to allow for realistic modelling of lipid rich co-substrates. Sensitivity analysis revealed that, apart from the biodegradable fraction of COD, protein and lipid fractions are the most important fractions for methane production and digester stability, with at least two major failure modes identified through principal component analysis (PCA). The model and procedure were tested on bio-methane potential (BMP) tests on three substrates, each rich on carbohydrates, proteins or lipids with good predictive capability in all three cases. This model was then applied to a plant-wide simulation study which confirmed the positive effects of co-digestion on methane production and total operational cost. Simulations also revealed the importance of limiting the protein load to the anaerobic digester to avoid ammonia inhibition in the digester and overloading of the nitrogen removal processes in the water train. In contrast, the digester can treat relatively high loads of lipid rich substrates without prolonged disturbances. PMID:27088248

  2. Validation of CENDL and JEFF evaluated nuclear data files for TRIGA calculations through the analysis of integral parameters of TRX and BAPL benchmark lattices of thermal reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M.N. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Sarker, M.M. [Reactor Physics and Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Savar, GPO Box 3787, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Khan, M.J.H. [Reactor Physics and Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Savar, GPO Box 3787, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: jahirulkhan@yahoo.com; Islam, S.M.A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this paper is to present the validation of evaluated nuclear data files CENDL-2.2 and JEFF-3.1.1 through the analysis of the integral parameters of TRX and BAPL benchmark lattices of thermal reactors for neutronics analysis of TRIGA Mark-II Research Reactor at AERE, Bangladesh. In this process, the 69-group cross-section library for lattice code WIMS was generated using the basic evaluated nuclear data files CENDL-2.2 and JEFF-3.1.1 with the help of nuclear data processing code NJOY99.0. Integral measurements on the thermal reactor lattices TRX-1, TRX-2, BAPL-UO{sub 2}-1, BAPL-UO{sub 2}-2 and BAPL-UO{sub 2}-3 served as standard benchmarks for testing nuclear data files and have also been selected for this analysis. The integral parameters of the said lattices were calculated using the lattice transport code WIMSD-5B based on the generated 69-group cross-section library. The calculated integral parameters were compared to the measured values as well as the results of Monte Carlo Code MCNP. It was found that in most cases, the values of integral parameters show a good agreement with the experiment and MCNP results. Besides, the group constants in WIMS format for the isotopes U-235 and U-238 between two data files have been compared using WIMS library utility code WILLIE and it was found that the group constants are identical with very insignificant difference. Therefore, this analysis reflects the validation of evaluated nuclear data files CENDL-2.2 and JEFF-3.1.1 through benchmarking the integral parameters of TRX and BAPL lattices and can also be essential to implement further neutronic analysis of TRIGA Mark-II research reactor at AERE, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

  3. Chemical Mapping of Vesta and Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Yamashita, Naoyuki; McSween, Harry Y.; Feldman, William C.; Lawrence, David J.; Beck, Andrew W.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Toplis, Michael J.; Mizzon, Hugau; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2012-01-01

    Following successful science operations at Vesta, the Dawn spacecraft is headed for an encounter with Ceres in 2015. What have we learned at Vesta? And, what do we expect to learn by comparing Vesta and Ceres? We will address these questions from the standpoint of geochemistry. Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) is sensitive to the elemental composition of surface materials to depths of a few decimeters [1]. Gamma rays and neutrons, produced by the steady bombardment of galactic cosmic rays and by the decay of naturally ]occurring radioisotopes (K, Th, U), provide a chemical fingerprint of the regolith. Analysis of planetary radiation emissions enables mapping of specific elements (such as Fe, Mg, Si, Cl, and H) and compositional parameters (such as average atomic mass), which provide information about processes that shaped the planet1s surface and interior. Dawn has exceeded operational goals for GRaND at Vesta, accumulating an abundance of nadir-pointed data during five months in a 210 km, low altitude mapping orbit around Vesta (265-km mean radius). Chemical information from gamma ray and neutron measurements was used to test the connection between Vesta and the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites [2]. Additionally, GRaND searched for evolved, igneous lithologies [3], mantle and upper crustal materials exposed in large impact basins, mesosiderite compositions, and hydrogen in Vesta1s bulk regolith. Results of our analyses and their implications for thermal evolution and regolith-processes will be presented. The possibility of a subcrustal ocean [4, 5] and lack of cerean meteorites makes water-rich Ceres a compelling target of exploration [6]. If Ceres underwent aqueous differentiation, then crustal overturn or gas driven volcanism may have significantly modified its primitive surface; and products of aqueous alteration (e.g. [7]) would detectable by GRaND [1]. For example, the presence of Cl in salts, associated with liquid

  4. Modeling of TOA radiance measured by CERES and SCIAMACHY over the East Antarctic Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radkevich, A.; Kato, S.; Lukashin, C.

    2015-12-01

    CERES and SCIAMACHY are satellite borne remote sensing instruments measuring solar-reflected and Earth-emitted radiation at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA). CERES instruments are designed to monitor the Earth's radiation budget by measuring radiation in 3 broad bands. SCIAMACHY sensor measured earth reflected radiation in the spectral range 0.24 to 2.38 um with fine spectral and coarse spatial resolutions. In this work we evaluate CERES shortwave (SW) TOA radiance over permanent clear sky snow in the East Antarctic Plateau to test consistency between modeled and observed radiances. We use SCIAMACHY observations to validate spectral performance of our radiative transfer (RT) model. We revisiting the issue reported by Hudson et al (2010) with another radiative transfer model and using instantaneous atmospheric profiles. That paper reported some overestimation of TOA albedo by their model in comparison with CERES observed SW radiances. As pointed out by Hudson et al., that comparison involves some uncertainties including errors in the modeled surface albedo and atmospheric properties. We use RT model based on DISORT coupled with a k-distribution approach (Kato et al 1999). We use the same approach for the lower boundary condition as in Hudson et al. (2010) with a modification related to modeling surface albedo. In this work we create atmospheric profiles for the individual CERES and SCIAMACHY observations from GEOS-4 reanalysis. A comparison between modeling and actual observations was performed for data from the CERES sensors onboard EOS Terra and Aqua, and Suomi-NPP. Similar to the study by Hudson et al. (2010), the model overestimates the TOA radiance. Modeled radiances are greater than observed ones from the CERES Single Satellite Footprint data by 4.6% for FM-1, 2, and FM-4, and by 3.6% for FM-5. Modeled and observed radiance correlates well: coefficient of determination R2 > 0.999. We compare modeled radiances SCIAMACHY radiances by spectrally integrating over the

  5. Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES), a Review: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. L.; Priestley, K. J.; Loeb, N. G.; Wielicki, B. A.; Charlock, T. P.; Minnis, P.; Doelling, D. R.; Rutan, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    and ultraviolet radiation (total, UVA and UVB) are computed. The CERES instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua spacecraft have served well past their design life times. A CERES instrument has been integrated onto the NPP platform and is ready for launch in 2011. Another CERES instrument is being built for launch in 2014, and plans are being made for a series of follow-on missions.

  6. Secular resonances with Ceres and Vesta

    CERN Document Server

    Tsirvoulis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In this work we explore dynamical perturbations induced by the massive asteroids Ceres and Vesta on main-belt asteroids through secular resonances. First we determine the location of the linear secular resonances with Ceres and Vesta in the main belt, using a purely numerical technique. Then we use a set of numerical simulations of fictitious asteroids to investigate the importance of these secular resonances in the orbital evolution of main-belt asteroids. We found, evaluating the magnitude of the perturbations in the proper elements of the test particles, that in some cases the strength of these secular resonances is comparable to that of known non-linear secular resonances with the giant planets. Finally we explore the asteroid families that are crossed by the secular resonances we studied, and identified several cases where the latter seem to play an important role in their post-impact evolution.

  7. The Rediscovery of Ceres in 1801

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosche, P.

    After the discovery by Piazzi, the first known asteroid disappeared in February 1801 at the day sky. Its rediscovery was the result of the combined efforts of a theoretician (Gauß) and a practitioner (Zach). The factual rediscovery took place at the end of 1801: Zach got first sight of Ceres on December 7 and gained the insight of its planetary nature on December 31. He was succeeded by Olbers, whose corresponding dates were January 1 and 2 of 1802.

  8. Asteroid secular dynamics: Ceres' fingerprint identified

    OpenAIRE

    Novaković, Bojan; Maurel, Clara; Tsirvoulis, Georgios; Knezević, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Here we report on the significant role of a so far overlooked dynamical aspect, namely a secular resonance between the dwarf planet Ceres and other asteroids. We demonstrate that this type of secular resonance can be the dominant dynamical factor in certain regions of the main asteroid belt. Specifically, we performed a dynamical analysis of the asteroids belonging to the (1726) Hoffmeister family. To identify which dynamical mechanisms are actually at work in this part of the main asteroid b...

  9. Gauss, Ceres og mindste kvadraters metode

    OpenAIRE

    Fundal, Magnus; Jørgensen, Simon; Lykkelund, Claus

    2016-01-01

    On the first of january, 1801, a new celestial object was discovered by Giuseppe Piazzi. The perceived new planet, Ceres, was observed until the start of february, at which point it disappeared behind the halo of the sun. It was rediscovered due to the orbital computations of the German mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss, which greatly contributed to his later fame as a mathematician. Several sources (such as Anton (2010)) indicate that the computations by Gauss involved the method of le...

  10. The Geology of Ceres: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, R.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Hiesinger, H.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Nathues, A.; Preusker, F.; Roatsch, T.; Ammannito, E.; Otto, K.; Krohn, K.; Stephan, K.; Matz, K. D.; Elgner, S.; Kersten, E.; Wagner, R. J.; Schroeder, S.; Schulzeck, F.; von der Gathen, I.; Schmedemann, N.; Kneissl, T.; Nessemann, A.; Scully, J. E. C.; Mest, S. C.; Marchi, S.; Schenk, P.; McCord, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Ceres exhibits geological features indicating significant resurfacing due to impact cratering, tectonic stress, relaxation, mass displacement, upwelling, doming and possible cryo-volcanic and/or cryo-glacial processes. Ceres' surface is characterized by a smooth and rugged topography ranging from about -7.5km to 7.5km relative to a best-fit ellipsoidal shape with 482x482x446km. Ceres' topography has a much greater range in elevation relative to its ellipsoidal dimensions (3.2%) than the Moon and Mars (1% and 0.9%) or Earth (0.3%) but is lower compared to Vesta (15%). Its topography is comparable to the icy satellite Iapetus (3.6%) but significantly higher than that of other icy satellites (depression infills and distinctive bright spots characterize Ceres' surface. Impact craters range from pristine to highly degraded, comparable to that of various icy satellites, the Moon and Vesta, indicating an intensive cratering history over the age of the solar system as indicated by surface units with different crater densities. Some craters show upwelling dome-like structures on the floor. Bright spots with higher albedo than the surrounding terrain occur at different locations correlated with impact structures and tectonic crustal stress. These spots indicate material differences and possible time-variable effects related to cryo-processes either volcanic and/or glacial. Trough-like features and polygonal impact crater rims indicate crustal stress that compensates by tectonic processes. According to the relatively high topography to radius ratio, steep slopes, mass wasting, and flow processes are expected and observed. We thank the Dawn Science and Operations Team for their support.

  11. Ceres Revealed in a Grain of Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Bodnar, R. J.; Chan, Q. H.-S.; Hagiya, K.; Komatsu, M.; Steele, A.; Fries, M.; Kebukawa, Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Ohsumi, K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Zag and Monahans (1998) are H chondrite regolith breccias containing 4.5 giga-year-old halite crystals which contain abundant inclusions of aqueous fluids, solids and organics. These all originated on a cryo-volcanically-active C class asteroid, probably 1 Ceres; the halite was transported to the regolith of the H chondrite parent asteroid, potentially 6 Hebe. Detailed analysis of these solids will thus potentially reveal the mineralogy of Ceres. Mineralogy of solids in the Monahans Halite Solid grains are present in the halites, which were entrained within the mother brines during eruption, including material from the interior and surface of the erupting body. The solids include abundant, widely variable organics that could not have been significantly heated (which would have resulted in the loss of fluids from the halite). Our analyses by Raman microprobe, SEM/EDX, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, UPLC-FD/QToF-MS, C-XANES and TEM reveal that these trapped grains include macromolecular carbon (MMC) similar in structure to CV3 chondrite matrix carbon, aliphatic carbon compounds, olivine (Fo99-59), high- and low-Ca pyroxene, feldspars, phyllosilicates, magnetite, sulfides, metal, lepidocrocite, carbonates, diamond, apatite and zeolites. Conclusions: The halite in Monahans and Zag derive from a water and carbon-rich object that was cryo-volcanically active in the early solar system, probably Ceres. The Dawn spacecraft found that Ceres includes C chondrite materials. Our samples include both protolith and aqueously-altered samples of the body, permitting understanding of alteration conditions. Whatever the halite parent body, it was rich in a wide variety of organics and warm, liquid water at the solar system's dawn.

  12. Interior Evolution of Ceres and Vesta Revealed by Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Bland, M. T.; Castillo, J. C.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ermakov, A.; Jaumann, R.; Konopliv, A. S.; Marchi, S.; McCord, T. B.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Nathues, A.; Park, R. S.; Prettyman, T. H.; Toplis, M. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Dawn's exploration of Vesta and Ceres has revealed their geophysical characteristics, informing the processes that shaped the bodies. Dawn has determined the average diameter of Ceres to be 940 km, smaller than the previously estimated 975 km [1]. This implies a density of 2160 kg/m3, indicating that Ceres is less differentiated than predicted [2]. Ceres' entire surface is cratered, implying the lack of a thick (10's of km) water ice layer at the surface. Variability in Ceres' crater morphology indicates that the near-surface layer has variable strength and rheology, likely due to heterogeneity in the near-surface mixture of rock, ice and salt. These observations may indicate that Ceres lost a significant amount of an original surface ice layer due to impact erosion. The lack of large impact basins on Ceres can be interpreted to be the result of viscous relaxation. These data provide insights into Ceres' thermal evolution and mechanical properties, which appear to be unique to this warm, icy body. In contrast to Ceres, Vesta formed very early and hot, resulting in a fully differentiated body. Dawn's exploration revealed geophysical and geochemical evidence for an iron-rich core and basaltic crust. However, unlike the pre-Dawn paradigm of Vesta's evolution, Dawn found that the crust and mantle of Vesta are less distinct than predicted by classical differentiation models. [1] Thomas, P. C., et al., Differentiation of the asteroid Ceres as revealed by its shape, Nature, 437, 224-226, 2005; [2] McCord et al., Ceres: Its Origin, Evolution and Structure and Dawn's Potential Contribution, Space Sci Rev
DOI 10.1007/s11214-010-9729-9, 2011.

  13. Footprints of a possible Ceres asteroid paleo-family

    CERN Document Server

    Carruba, V; Marchi, S; Aljbaae, S

    2016-01-01

    Ceres is the largest and most massive body in the asteroid main belt. Observational data from the Dawn spacecraft reveal the presence of at least two impact craters about 280~km in diameter on the Ceres surface, that could have expelled a significant number of fragments. Yet, standard techniques for identifying dynamical asteroid families have not detected any Ceres family. In this work, we argue that linear secular resonances with Ceres deplete the population of objects near Ceres. Also, because of the high escape velocity from Ceres, family members are expected to be very dispersed, with a considerable fraction of km-sized fragments that should be able to reach the pristine region of the main belt, the area between the 5J:-2A and 7J:-3A mean-motion resonances, where the observed number of asteroids is low. Rather than looking for possible Ceres family members near Ceres, here we propose to search in the pristine region. We identified 156 asteroids whose taxonomy, colors, albedo could be compatible with bein...

  14. The remarkable surface homogeneity of the Dawn mission target (1) Ceres

    CERN Document Server

    Carry, Benoit; Dumas, Christophe; Merline, William J; Mousis, Olivier; Rousselot, Philippe; Jehin, Emmanuel; Manfroid, Jean; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Zucconi, Jean-Marc

    2011-01-01

    Dwarf-planet (1) Ceres is one of the two targets, along with (4) Vesta, that will be studied by the NASA Dawn spacecraft via imaging, visible and near-infrared spectroscopy, and gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy. While Ceres' visible and near-infrared disk-integrated spectra have been well characterized, little has been done about quantifying spectral variations over the surface. Any spectral variation would give us insights on the geographical variation of the composition and/or the surface age. The only work so far was that of Rivkin & Volquardsen (2010, Icarus 206, 327) who reported rotationally-resolved spectroscopic (disk-integrated) observations in the 2.2-4.0 {\\mu}m range; their observations showed evidence for a relatively uniform surface. Here, we report disk-resolved observations of Ceres with SINFONI (ESO VLT) in the 1.17-1.32 {\\mu}m and 1.45-2.35 {\\mu}m wavelength ranges. The observations were made under excellent seeing conditions (0.6"), allowing us to reach a spatial resolution of ~75 km o...

  15. Characteristics of Polygonal Craters on (1) Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Katharina A.; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Buczkowski, Debra L.; von der Gathen, Isabel; Kersten, Elke; Mest, Scott C.; Naß, Andrea; Neesemann, Adrian; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; Schröder, Stefan E.; Schulzeck, Fanziska; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland; Williams, David A.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Chistopher T.

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn spacecraft arrived at Ceres in March 2015. There, the on-board Framing Camera (FC) collects image data with a resolution of up to 35 m/pixel, which reveal a large variety of impact crater morphologies including polygonal craters. Polygonal craters show straight rim sections aligned to form an angular shape. They are commonly associated with fractures in the target material, which may be preserved as linear structures on Ceres [3, 4]. On Ceres, we find polygonal craters with a size ranging between 5 km and 280 km in diameter. However, the majority of polygonal craters have diameters ranging between 10 km and 50 km diameter. A preferential hexagonal shape is observed and some polygonal craters exhibit central peaks or relaxed crater floors. On average there are eight to ten polygonal craters per 100,000 km², however the northern latitudes have a slightly higher and the southern latitudes a slightly lower polygonal crater density. This may hint at an older and younger age of the northern (> 60° N) and southern regions (> 60° S) compared to the mid latitudes, respectively. Alternatively, the relaxation of craters may be advanced in the mid latitudes which are generally warmer than the poles and thus support the relaxation of depressions. Also, the southern region harbors relatively large craters which may have altered or destroyed preexisting structures in the crust which are necessary for the formation of polygonal craters. Most polygonal craters have six or seven straight rim sections; however, there is a tendency for fewer edges with decreasing crater size. Although this observation may be biased due to the map resolution, it is also possible that the impactor creating a relatively small polygonal crater embeds less energy and thus forms the straight rim sections during the excavation stage. This may result in fewer straight rim sections compared to more energetic impactors which form their polygonal shape during the modification stage. Straight rim

  16. Validation study of SRAC2006 code system based on evaluated nuclear data libraries for TRIGA calculations by benchmarking integral parameters of TRX and BAPL lattices of thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► To validate the SRAC2006 code system for TRIGA neutronics calculations. ► TRX and BAPL lattices are treated as standard benchmarks for this purpose. ► To compare the calculated results with experiment as well as MCNP values in this study. ► The study demonstrates a good agreement with the experiment and the MCNP results. ► Thus, this analysis reflects the validation study of the SRAC2006 code system. - Abstract: The goal of this study is to present the validation study of the SRAC2006 code system based on evaluated nuclear data libraries ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 for neutronics analysis of TRIGA Mark-II Research Reactor at AERE, Bangladesh. This study is achieved through the analysis of integral parameters of TRX and BAPL benchmark lattices of thermal reactors. In integral measurements, the thermal reactor lattices TRX-1, TRX-2, BAPL-UO2-1, BAPL-UO2-2 and BAPL-UO2-3 are treated as standard benchmarks for validating/testing the SRAC2006 code system as well as nuclear data libraries. The integral parameters of the said lattices are calculated using the collision probability transport code PIJ of the SRAC2006 code system at room temperature 20 °C based on the above libraries. The calculated integral parameters are compared to the measured values as well as the MCNP values based on the Chinese evaluated nuclear data library CENDL-3.0. It was found that in most cases, the values of integral parameters demonstrate a good agreement with the experiment and the MCNP results. In addition, the group constants in SRAC format for TRX and BAPL lattices in fast and thermal energy range respectively are compared between the above libraries and it was found that the group constants are identical with very insignificant difference. Therefore, this analysis reflects the validation study of the SRAC2006 code system based on evaluated nuclear data libraries JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VII.0 and can also be essential to implement further neutronics calculations of

  17. Benchmarking & European Sustainable Transport Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, H.

    2003-01-01

    , Benchmarking is one of the management tools that have recently been introduced in the transport sector. It is rapidly being applied to a wide range of transport operations, services and policies. This paper is a contribution to the discussion of the role of benchmarking in the future efforts...... to support Sustainable European Transport Policies. The key message is that transport benchmarking has not yet been developed to cope with the challenges of this task. Rather than backing down completely, the paper suggests some critical conditions for applying and adopting benchmarking for this purpose. One...... way forward is to ensure a higher level of environmental integration in transport policy benchmarking. To this effect the paper will discuss the possible role of the socalled Transport and Environment Reporting Mechanism developed by the European Environment Agency. The paper provides an independent...

  18. Comparative tectonic features on Ceres and other planetary bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatsch, T.; von der Gathen, I.; Jaumann, R.; Krohn, K.; Otto, K.; Schulzeck, F.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Elgner, S.; Kersten, E.; Matz, K. D.; Naß, A.; Preusker, F.; Schenk, P.; Schroeder, S.; Stephan, K.; Wagner, R. J.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Dawn Framing Camera images of Ceres' surface indicate that tectonic processes have played an important role in the surface formation history and alterations. We study structures expected to be the result of tectonic deformation and crustal stresses, which may enable us to reconstruct the formation process of the surface and the topographic signature. Tectonic features on Ceres such as troughs, ridges, scarps, fractures, depressions and domes are analogous to those on other planetary bodies like Enceladus, Ganymede, Europa and Mercury. Comparing these surface features will provide additional information about possible scenarios of crustal formation on Ceres. First investigations show that craters, like Urvara (46°S and 249°E), display sets of trenches radiating from the craters interior. They were likely formed by extensional tectonics linked to the impact. Similar features were also found on Mercury's surface. It is expected that other tectonic deformations on Ceres also influence the appearance of craters and crater walls. Comparatively small scale fissures on Ceres' surface, frequently arranged subparallel, seem to appear in terrain that looks smooth in the images. Fractures, cracks and scarps on Ceres can be found on Enceladus, Europa and Mercury in similar patterns. The "tiger stripes" on Enceladus are possible large scale analogous. Ridges on Europa, Enceladus and Ganymede are lineaments that dominate their entire surface. Those on Ceres' however, are more irregularly shaped and less distinct. On Ceres surface troughs seem to be relatively rare. However, they show similarities to troughs on Enceladus and Mercury, and could also be related to those on Europa and Ganymede. Domes are distributed over Ceres' entire surface and have a relatively regular shape. Analogous exist on Europa (relatively irregular or with halos) and Ganymede in the crater interiors.

  19. A population of main belt asteroids co-orbiting with Ceres and Vesta

    CERN Document Server

    Christou, Apostolos A

    2011-01-01

    We have carried out a search for Main Belt Asteroids (MBAs) co-orbiting with the large MBA Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. Through improving the search criteria used in (Christou, 2000b) and numerical integrations of candidate coorbitals, we have identified approximately 51 (44) objects currently in co-orbital libration with Ceres (Vesta). We show that these form part of a larger population of transient coorbitals; 129 (94) MBAs undergo episodes of co-orbital libration with Ceres (Vesta) within a 2 Myr interval centred on the present. The lifetime in the resonance is typically a few times 10^5 yr butcan exceed 2*10^6 yr. The variational properties of the orbits of several co-orbitals were examined. It was found that their present states with respect to the secondary are well determined but knowledge of it is lost typically after ~2*10^5 years. Objects initially deeper into the coorbital region maintain their coorbital state for longer. Using the model of Namouni et al. (1999) we show that their dynamics are...

  20. Dawn at Ceres reveals an ammoniated surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Carle M.; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Raponi, Andrea; Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Thomas B.; McSween, Harry; McFadden, Lucy A.; Marchi, Simone; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Capria, Maria Teresa; Carrozzo, Giacomo; Ciarniello, Mauro; Longobardo, Andrea; Fonte, Sergio; Formisano, Michelangelo; Frigeri, Alessandro; Giardino, Marco; Magni, Gianfranco; Palomba, Enersto; Tosi, Federico; Turrini, Diego; Zambon, Francesca; Jaumann, Ralf; Feldman, William; Prettyman, Thomas; Toplis, Michael; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2015-11-01

    The Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) on board the Dawn spacecraft has observed Ceres’ surface and acquired spectra (0.5 to 5 µm) since January 2015. Here we report the average Ceres spectrum, including the important spectral range (2.6-2.9 µm) previously precluded from (telescopic) measurements due to telluric atmospheric absorptions. The VIR data confirm that the surface is very dark with an average albedo of 0.090 ±0.006 at 0.55 µm, consistent with Hubble Space Telescope data (Li et al., Icarus, 2006) and contains no prominent absorption features in the visible and near-Infrared at wavelengths less than 2.5 µm. Ceres’ average spectrum, however, is characterized by a prominent diagnostic absorption band at 2.7 µm along with weaker absorption bands observed between 3.05-3.1, 3.3-3.4 and 3.9-4 µm. We modeled the new VIR spectra of Ceres with various ices, meteorites, silicates, carbonates, and hydrates using Hapke theory. Results of the spectral modeling indicate that extensive water ice is not present in spectra representing the typical surface acquired to date at relatively low spatial resolution (Agency-ASI and was developed under the leadership of INAF, Rome-Italy. The instrument was built by Selex-Galileo, Florence-Italy. The analyses are supported by ASI, NASA, and the German Space Agency. Enabling contributions from the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams are gratefully acknowledged.

  1. A MATLAB/Simulink based GUI for the CERES Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Luis H.

    1995-01-01

    The Clouds and The Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) simulator will allow flight operational familiarity with the CERES instrument prior to launch. It will provide a CERES instrument simulation facility for NASA Langley Research Center. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and TRW. One of the objectives of building this simulator would be for use as a testbed for functionality checking of atypical memory uploads and for anomaly investigation. For instance, instrument malfunction due to memory damage requires troubleshooting on a simulator to determine the nature of the problem and to find a solution.

  2. The rediscovery of Ceres in 1801. (German Title: Die Wiederauffindung der Ceres im Jahre 1801)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosche, Peter

    After the discovery by Piazzi, the first known asteroid disappeared in February 1801 in the daylight sky. Its rediscovery was the result of the combined efforts of a theoretician (Gauß) and a practitioner (Zach). The factual rediscovery took place at the end of 1801: Zach got the first sight of Ceres on December 7 and gained the insight of its planetary nature on December 31. He was succeeded by Olbers, whose corresponding dates were January 1 and 2 of 1802.

  3. PageRank Pipeline Benchmark: Proposal for a Holistic System Benchmark for Big-Data Platforms

    CERN Document Server

    Dreher, Patrick; Hill, Chris; Gadepally, Vijay; Kuszmaul, Bradley; Kepner, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The rise of big data systems has created a need for benchmarks to measure and compare the capabilities of these systems. Big data benchmarks present unique scalability challenges. The supercomputing community has wrestled with these challenges for decades and developed methodologies for creating rigorous scalable benchmarks (e.g., HPC Challenge). The proposed PageRank pipeline benchmark employs supercomputing benchmarking methodologies to create a scalable benchmark that is reflective of many real-world big data processing systems. The PageRank pipeline benchmark builds on existing prior scalable benchmarks (Graph500, Sort, and PageRank) to create a holistic benchmark with multiple integrated kernels that can be run together or independently. Each kernel is well defined mathematically and can be implemented in any programming environment. The linear algebraic nature of PageRank makes it well suited to being implemented using the GraphBLAS standard. The computations are simple enough that performance predictio...

  4. On the possible origin of the asteroid (1) Ceres

    CERN Document Server

    Rogozin, Yury I

    2014-01-01

    The last three decades the asteroid (1) Ceres is an object of the intensive ground-and space-based observations. A new unusual contributing to these studies represents the recent detection of localized sources of water vapour releasing from its surface at a rate about 6 kg s-1 (K\\"uppers et al 2014). A drastic distinction between asteroid (1) Ceres and nearest the large asteroid (4) Vesta in terms of their composition and appearance emphasizes an urgent state of a problem of the possible origin of Ceres in the main asteroid belt. By analogy with the early assumptions of some well-known astronomers of Mercury and Mars as the escaped satellites of their host planets we have put forward and semi-empirically have justified a hypothesis for the plausible origin of Ceres as the satellite of a disrupted planet in the past orbited the Sun of ~ 5 AU. The orbital location of this host of Ceres beyond the snow line of the Solar System explains a formation the icy mantle of Ceres, which appears may be a water vapour sour...

  5. Kvantitativ benchmark - Produktionsvirksomheder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole H.; Andersen, Vibeke

    Rapport med resultatet af kvantitativ benchmark over produktionsvirksomhederne i VIPS projektet.......Rapport med resultatet af kvantitativ benchmark over produktionsvirksomhederne i VIPS projektet....

  6. The PRISM Benchmark Suite

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiatkowsa, Marta; Norman, Gethin; Parker, David

    2012-01-01

    We present the PRISM benchmark suite: a collection of probabilistic models and property specifications, designed to facilitate testing, benchmarking and comparisons of probabilistic verification tools and implementations.

  7. Comparison of the Cratering Records of Ceres and Rhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedemann, N.; Wagner, R. J.; Michael, G.; Kneissl, T.; Hiesinger, H.; Ivanov, B.; Denk, T.; Jaumann, R.; Neesemann, A.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C.

    2015-12-01

    Comparing the cratering records of dwarf planet Ceres and the Saturnian satellite Rhea, offers a great opportunity in comparative planetology to fill the gaps of understanding of the cratering history of the two bodies. Both bodies show strong indications for a water-ice rich crust. For Ceres, the amount of ice in the crust is indeterminate. Early Dawn imaging data shows complex craters on Ceres which are smaller than those on the basaltic asteroid Vesta. The smallest complex craters on Ceres are similar in size (~10-15 km) to those on Rhea, which might indicate a rather high water-ice content in Ceres' crust. The surface gravity on both bodies is almost equal, differing by only ~4%. Thus, regardless of their absolute values many variables required to relate projectile and crater size should be very similar on both bodies (surface gravity, strength to gravity transition, simple to complex transition, target density). The remaining variables such as projectile density and impact velocity are comparatively well known for Ceres but still in discussion for the Saturnian satellites. If the crater size-frequency distributions for craters >5 km from Rhea and Ceres are plotted together and are corrected for different projectile flux and exposure time, both records plot nearly on top of each other. This could indicate a common projectile population that impacted both bodies at nearly the same velocity. However, if the impacting projectile populations are very different, the impact velocity would have to compensate for such differences. Different ice temperatures may also play some role. Reducing the degrees of freedom increases the chance of understanding the projectile source and dynamics in the Saturnian system. We acknowledge the support of the Dawn and Cassini Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR), grants 50OW1101, 50OH1102 and 50OH0305.

  8. Ammonia Bearing Species on Ceres: Implication on Origin and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Raponi, A.; Marchi, S.; Ciarniello, M.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; McCord, T. B.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Carrorro, F. G.; Longobardo, A.; Tosi, F.; Fonte, S.; Giardino, M.; Palomba, E.; Magni, G.; Zambon, F.; Pieters, C. M.; McFadden, L. A.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) on board the Dawn spacecraft observed Ceres' surface acquiring spectra since January 2015. Here we report the average Ceres spectrum, including the spectral range previously precluded from telescopic measurements due to telluric atmospheric absorptions. The data indicate that the surface is very dark: average albedo of 0.090 ±0.006 at 0.55 µm, consistent with HST data (Li et al., 2006). Ceres' average spectrum is characterized by a prominent absorption band at 2.7 micron. Weaker absorption bands are observed between 3.05-3.1, 3.3-3.4 and 3.9-4 micron; the visible and near-IR ranges lack prominent bands. We modelled the spectra of Ceres using Hapke theory. Results of the spectral modelling indicate that extensive water ice is not present in surface spectra acquired so far. The best fit is obtained with a mixture of ammoniated phyllosilicates mixed with other clays, Mg-carbonates, and dark material, like magnetite (De Sanctis et al. 2015, submitted). The presence of ammonia bearing materials across the surface has implications for the origin of Ceres and its internal structure and evolution. Higher spatial resolution spectra are being acquired to address the small scale mineralogy across this dwarf planet. References: Li, et al., Photometric analysis of 1 Ceres and surface mapping from HST observations. Icarus 182, 143-160 (2006). De Sanctis et al., Ammoniated phyllosilicates on dwarf planet Ceres reveal an outer solar system origin, Nature submitted, (2015). This work is supported the Italian Space Agencies, NASA, and from the German Space Agency. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams is acknowledged.

  9. CERES: A Set of Automated Reduction Routines for Echelle Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Brahm, Rafael; Espinoza, Néstor

    2016-01-01

    We present the Collection of Extraction Routines for Echelle Spectra (CERES). These routines were developed for the construction of automated pipelines for the reduction, extraction and analysis of spectra acquired with different instruments, allowing the obtention of homogeneous and standardised results. This modular code includes tools for handling the different steps of the processing: CCD reductions, tracing of the echelle orders, optimal and simple extraction, computation of the wavelength solution, estimation of radial velocities, and rough and fast estimation of the atmospheric parameters. Currently, CERES has been used to develop automated pipelines for eleven different spectrographs, namely CORALIE, FEROS, HARPS, PUCHEROS, FIDEOS, CAFE, DuPont/Echelle, Magellan/Mike, Keck/HIRES, Magellan/PFS and APO/ARCES, but the routines can be easily used in order to deal with data coming from other spectrographs. We show the high precision in radial velocity that CERES achieves for some of these instruments and w...

  10. CERES: Collection of Extraction Routines for Echelle Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahm, Rafael; Jordán, Andrés; Espinoza, Néstor

    2016-10-01

    The Collection of Extraction Routines for Echelle Spectra (CERES) constructs automated pipelines for the reduction, extraction, and analysis of echelle spectrograph data. This modular code includes tools for handling the different steps of the processing: CCD reductions, tracing of the echelle orders, optimal and simple extraction, computation of the wave-length solution, estimation of radial velocities, and rough and fast estimation of the atmospheric parameters. The standard output of pipelines constructed with CERES is a FITS cube with the optimally extracted, wavelength calibrated and instrumental drift-corrected spectrum for each of the science images. Additionally, CERES includes routines for the computation of precise radial velocities and bisector spans via the cross-correlation method, and an automated algorithm to obtain an estimate of the atmospheric parameters of the observed star.

  11. Bright Stuff on Ceres = Sulfates and Carbonates on CI Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Chan, Queenie H. S.; Gounelle, Matthieu; Fries, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of the DAWN spacecraft's observations of the surface of Ceres indicate that there are bright areas, which can be explained by large amounts of the Mg sulfate hexahydrate (MgSO4•6(H2O)), although the identification appears tenuous. There are preliminary indications that water is being evolved from these bright areas, and some have inferred that these might be sites of contemporary hydro-volcanism. A heat source for such modern activity is not obvious, given the small size of Ceres, lack of any tidal forces from nearby giant planets, probable age and presumed bulk composition. We contend that observations of chondritic materials in the lab shed light on the nature of the bright spots on Ceres

  12. New integral experiments for large angle scattering cross section data benchmarking with DT neutron beam at JAEA/FNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Seiki, E-mail: ohnishi@nmri.go.jp [National Maritime Research Institute, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Keitaro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Azuma, Tetsushi [Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka (Japan); Sato, Satoshi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Takakura, Kosuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Murata, Isao [Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Konno, Chikara [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We constructed a deuteron-triton fusion neutron beam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large SS316 cylinder assembly was irradiated by the neutron beam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction rates of activation foil were measured inside it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The C/Es became smaller with the distance from the beam axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The large angle scattering cross section around 90 Degree-Sign affects that. - Abstract: A new integral experiment with a deuteron-triton fusion (DT) neutron beam started in order to validate scattering cross section data. First the DT neutron beam was constructed with a collimator. The performance of the collimator system and the characteristics of the DT neutron beam were measured. Second a new integral experiment for type 316 stainless steel (SS316) was carried out with this DT neutron beam. The DT neutron beam of 3.5 cm in diameter was injected to the front surface center of an SS316 cylindrical assembly. Reaction rates of the {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92m}Nb reaction in the assembly were measured with the activation foil method and were calculated with the Monte Carlo transport calculation code. The measurement points were located at three positions, on the center of the beam axis and at 15 cm and 30 cm apart from the axis. The ratio of calculation to experiment of the {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92m}Nb reaction rate became smaller than 1 with the distance from the beam axis. Then, the dependency of each reaction rate on scattering angle was calculated. It was proved that at off-axis positions, where C/E is smaller than 1, 90 Degree-Sign scattering contribute relatively larger than at on-axis positions and backward scattering made little contribution to the results in this experiment. The reasons of the discrepancy between the measured and calculated data will be investigated.

  13. Icing in the Cake: Evidence for Ground Ice in Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Britney E.; Chilton, Heather; Hughson, Kynan Horace; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Sizemore, Hanna G.; Nathues, Andreas; Platz, Thomas; Byrne, Shane; Bland, Michael T.; Schorghofer, Norbert; O'Brien, David P.; Marchi, Simone; Hiesinger, Harald; Jaumann, Ralf; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol; Dawn Science and Operations Team

    2016-10-01

    Without surface deposits of ice readily visible and few spectral detections of ice, the task of understanding ice on Ceres falls to other investigations. Several decades of thermal models suggest that subsurface ice on Ceres is stable for the lifetime of the solar system. Here, we report geomorphological evidence of silicate-ice mixtures, which we refer to as "ground ice", from careful analysis of the behavior of surface features on Ceres. In particular, we have focused on trends in mass wasting features. Mass wasting on Ceres is pervasive--in over 20% of craters above 10km in size, often with provocative rounded termini. We have identified three "endmember" classes of lobate mass wasting morphologies: tongue-shaped, furrowed flows hundreds of meters thick on steep slopes, tens of meter thick spatulate-sheeted flows on shallow slopes, and cuspate-sheeted flows, also tens of meters thick, but with morphology that indicates fluidization. These features on Ceres are distinct from those on dry Vesta, which shares a similar impactor population and velocity distribution due to their similar locations in the main belt. Thus, differing material properties are implied between the two bodies. Morphologically, each of these feature types possess an analog found in glaciated regions on Earth and Mars or on the surfaces of the icy satellites that help describe how down slope mass motion may be created. In particular, we identify several spectacular features that share commonatlity with rock glaciers and lahars. Moreover, these abundant features increase in number and aerial coverage towards the poles, and show progressively more fluidization towards the low latitudes. We conclude that the geomorphology of these features are evidence that Ceres' subsurface contains significant ground ice and that the ice is most abundant near the poles.

  14. El grabado del Cándalo, Garciaz (Cáceres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel RUBIO ANDRADA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: Se presenta un nuevo grabado de la época del Bronce en el término de Garciaz, Cáceres. Grabados semejantes se conocían sobre todo en la comarca de Hurdes y norte de Portugal. De su estudio se deduce una relación armamentista con el mundo astral.ABSTRACT: A new engraving from Bronze age, has been found in Garciaz boundary (Cáceres. Similar engraving were already known in "Las Hurdes" district and in Portugal (norther áreas. It has been deduced from its research a relation between the arms woeld and the cosmisc one.

  15. Results of a Hubble Space Telescope Search for Natural Satellites of Dwarf Planet 1 Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMario, Benjamin; Schmidt, Britney E.; Mutchler, Maximilian J.; Li, Jian-Yang; McFadden, Lucy Ann; McLean, Brian; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    In order to prepare for the arrival of the Dawn spacecraft at Ceres, a search for satellites was undertaken by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to enhance the mission science return and to ensure spacecraft safety. Previous satellite searches from ground-based telescopes have detected no satellites within Ceres' Hill sphere down to a size of 3 km (Gehrels et al. 1987) and early HST investigations searched to a limit of 1-2 km (Bieryla et al. 2011). The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the HST was used to image Ceres between 14 April - 28 April 2014. These images cover approximately the inner third of Ceres' Hill sphere, where the Hill sphere is the region surrounding Ceres where stable satellite orbits are possible. We performed a deep search for possible companions orbiting Ceres. No natural companions were located down to a diameter of 48 meters, over most of the Hill sphere to a distance of 205,000 km (434 Ceres radii) from the surface of Ceres. It was impossible to search all the way to the surface of Ceres because of scattered light, but at a distance of 2865 km (five Ceres radii), the search limit was determined to be 925 meters. The absence of a satellite around Ceres could, in the future, support more refined theories about satellite formation or capture mechanisms in the solar system.

  16. Implementation of Benchmarking Transportation Logistics Practices and Future Benchmarking Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) Logistics Benchmarking Project is to identify established government and industry practices for the safe transportation of hazardous materials which can serve as a yardstick for design and operation of OCRWM's national transportation system for shipping spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The project will present logistics and transportation practices and develop implementation recommendations for adaptation by the national transportation system. This paper will describe the process used to perform the initial benchmarking study, highlight interim findings, and explain how these findings are being implemented. It will also provide an overview of the next phase of benchmarking studies. The benchmarking effort will remain a high-priority activity throughout the planning and operational phases of the transportation system. The initial phase of the project focused on government transportation programs to identify those practices which are most clearly applicable to OCRWM. These Federal programs have decades of safe transportation experience, strive for excellence in operations, and implement effective stakeholder involvement, all of which parallel OCRWM's transportation mission and vision. The initial benchmarking project focused on four business processes that are critical to OCRWM's mission success, and can be incorporated into OCRWM planning and preparation in the near term. The processes examined were: transportation business model, contract management/out-sourcing, stakeholder relations, and contingency planning. More recently, OCRWM examined logistics operations of AREVA NC's Business Unit Logistics in France. The next phase of benchmarking will focus on integrated domestic and international commercial radioactive logistic operations. The prospective companies represent large scale shippers and have vast experience in

  17. Benchmarking concentrating photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, Fabian; Muthirayan, Buvaneshwari; Meuret, Youri; Thienpont, Hugo

    2010-08-01

    Integral to photovoltaics is the need to provide improved economic viability. To achieve this goal, photovoltaic technology has to be able to harness more light at less cost. A large variety of concentrating photovoltaic concepts has provided cause for pursuit. To obtain a detailed profitability analysis, a flexible evaluation is crucial for benchmarking the cost-performance of this variety of concentrating photovoltaic concepts. To save time and capital, a way to estimate the cost-performance of a complete solar energy system is to use computer aided modeling. In this work a benchmark tool is introduced based on a modular programming concept. The overall implementation is done in MATLAB whereas Advanced Systems Analysis Program (ASAP) is used for ray tracing calculations. This allows for a flexible and extendable structuring of all important modules, namely an advanced source modeling including time and local dependence, and an advanced optical system analysis of various optical designs to obtain an evaluation of the figure of merit. An important figure of merit: the energy yield for a given photovoltaic system at a geographical position over a specific period, can be calculated.

  18. FAT3D- An OECD/NEA benchmark on thermal fatigue in fluid mixing areas - CSNI integrity and ageing working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal cycling is a widespread and recurring problem in nuclear power plants worldwide. Several incidents with leakage of primary water inside the containment challenged the integrity of nuclear power plants although no release outside of containment occurred. Thermal cycling was not taken into account at the design stage. Regulatory bodies, utilities and researchers have to address it for their operating plants. Thermal fatigue in a fluid mixing area is a well-known phenomenon that has already been studied in the past. Generally, this phenomenon is linked to turbulent mixing of two fluids at two different temperatures and creates 'elephant skin' type damage at the inner surface of the component and some cracks, which remain relatively small, compared to the thickness of the structure. However, this kind of fatigue damage can create cracks that propagate through the entire wall thickness. Some experts consider that 3D thermo-mechanical loading is a major factor influencing crack propagation through the thickness. This factor is linked to the complex thermal hydraulic loading and has an impact on the stress distribution in the structure and the damage or crack propagation estimates. For this reason an R and D program, based on a test and numerical interpretations, was launched by IRSN and conducted by CEA to quantify experimentally the influence of the 3D aspects on crack initiation and propagation. The main objective was to work on a configuration with a 3D thermal load easy enough to reproduce using numerical simulations, so that accurate mechanical studies could be carried out and assessment methodologies be validated or modified. Under the auspices of the OECD/NEA Committee for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and its Working Group on Integrity of Components and Structures (IAGE), a benchmark was launched in 2002. Seven organisations from four countries contributed to this effort aiming at comparing different approaches used for mechanical assessment

  19. Aquatic Life Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Aquatic Life Benchmarks is an EPA-developed set of criteria for freshwater species. These benchmarks are based on toxicity values reviewed by EPA and used in...

  20. High resolution Ceres HAMO atlas derived from Dawn FC images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Jaumann, Ralf; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Chris T.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered the orbit of dwarf planet Ceres in March 2015, and will characterize the geology, elemental and mineralogical composition, topography, shape, and internal structure of Ceres. One of the major goals of the mission is a global mapping of Ceres. Data: The Dawn mission was mapping Ceres in HAMO (High Altitude Mapping Orbit, 1475 km altitude) between August and October 2015. The framing camera took about 2,600 clear filter images with a resolution of about 140 m/pixel during these cycles. The images were taken with different viewing angles and different illumination conditions. We selected images from one cycle (cycle #1) for the mosaicking process to have similar viewing and illumination conditions. Very minor gaps in the coverage were filled with a few images from cycle #2. Data Processing: The first step of the processing chain towards the cartographic products is to ortho-rectify the images to the proper scale and map projec-tion type. This process requires detailed information of the Dawn orbit and attitude data and of the topography of the targets. Both, improved orientation and a high-resolution shape model, are provided by stereo processing (bundle block adjustment) of the HAMO stereo image dataset [3]. Ceres's HAMO shape model was used for the calculation of the ray intersection points while the map projection itself was done onto the reference sphere of Ceres with a radius of 470 km. The final step is the controlled mosaicking) of all images to a global mosaic of Ceres, the so-called basemap. Ceres map tiles: The Ceres atlas was produced in a scale of 1:750,000 and consists of 15 tiles that conform to the quadrangle scheme proposed by Greeley and Batson [4]. A map scale of 1:750,000 guarantees a mapping at the highest available Dawn resolution in HAMO. The individual tiles were extracted from the global mosaic and reprojected. Nomenclature: The Dawn team proposed 81 names for geological features. By international

  1. Benchmarking semantic web technology

    CERN Document Server

    García-Castro, R

    2009-01-01

    This book addresses the problem of benchmarking Semantic Web Technologies; first, from a methodological point of view, proposing a general methodology to follow in benchmarking activities over Semantic Web Technologies and, second, from a practical point of view, presenting two international benchmarking activities that involved benchmarking the interoperability of Semantic Web technologies using RDF(S) as the interchange language in one activity and OWL in the other.The book presents in detail how the different resources needed for these interoperability benchmarking activities were defined:

  2. Benchmarking in University Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kuźmicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the face of global competition and rising challenges that higher education institutions (HEIs meet, it is imperative to increase innovativeness and efficiency of their management. Benchmarking can be the appropriate tool to search for a point of reference necessary to assess institution’s competitive position and learn from the best in order to improve. The primary purpose of the paper is to present in-depth analysis of benchmarking application in HEIs worldwide. The study involves indicating premises of using benchmarking in HEIs. It also contains detailed examination of types, approaches and scope of benchmarking initiatives. The thorough insight of benchmarking applications enabled developing classification of benchmarking undertakings in HEIs. The paper includes review of the most recent benchmarking projects and relating them to the classification according to the elaborated criteria (geographical range, scope, type of data, subject, support and continuity. The presented examples were chosen in order to exemplify different approaches to benchmarking in higher education setting. The study was performed on the basis of the published reports from benchmarking projects, scientific literature and the experience of the author from the active participation in benchmarking projects. The paper concludes with recommendations for university managers undertaking benchmarking, derived on the basis of the conducted analysis.

  3. Ceres' deformational surface features compared to other planetary bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Gathen, Isabel; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Elgner, Stephan; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Nass, Andrea; Otto, Katharina; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; Schröder, Stefanus E.; Schulzeck, Franziska; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland; De Sanctis, Maria C.; Schenk, Paul; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Williams, Dave A.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2016-04-01

    On March 2015, NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived at the dwarf planet Ceres and has been providing images of its surface. Based on High Altitude Mapping Orbiter (HAMO) clear filter images (140 m/px res.), a Survey mosaic (~400 m/px) and a series of Low Altitude Mapping Orbiter (LAMO) clear filter images (35 m/px) of the Dawn mission [1], deformational features are identified on the surface of Ceres. In order to further our knowledge about the nature and origin of these features, we start a comparative analysis of similar features on different planetary bodies, like Enceladus, Ganymede and the Moon, based on images provided by the Cassini, Galileo and Lunar Orbiter mission. This study focuses on the small scale fractures, mostly located on Ceres' crater floors, in comparison with crater fractures on the planetary bodies named above. The fractures were analyzed concerning the morphology and shape, the distribution, orientation and possible building mechanisms. On Ceres, two different groups of fractures are distinct. The first one includes fractures, normally arranged in subparallel pattern, which are usually located on crater floors, but also on crater rims. Their sense of direction is relatively uniform but in some cases they get deformed by shearing. The second group consists of joint systems, which spread out of one single location, sometimes arranged concentric to the crater rim. They were likely formed by cooling-melting processes linked to the impact process or up doming material. Fractures located on crater floors are also common on the icy satellite Enceladus [3]. While Enceladus' fractures don't seem to have a lot in common compared to those on Ceres, we assume that similar fracture patterns and therefore similar building mechanism can be found e.g. on Ganymede and especially on the Moon [2]. Further work will include the comparison of the fractures with additional planetary bodies and the trial to explain why fracturing e.g. on Enceladus differs from that on

  4. Benchmarking: A tool to enhance performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munro, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kristal, J. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, Washington, DC (United States); Thompson, G.; Johnson, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Office of Environmental Management is bringing Headquarters and the Field together to implement process improvements throughout the Complex through a systematic process of organizational learning called benchmarking. Simply stated, benchmarking is a process of continuously comparing and measuring practices, processes, or methodologies with those of other private and public organizations. The EM benchmarking program, which began as the result of a recommendation from Xerox Corporation, is building trust and removing barriers to performance enhancement across the DOE organization. The EM benchmarking program is designed to be field-centered with Headquarters providing facilitatory and integrative functions on an ``as needed`` basis. One of the main goals of the program is to assist Field Offices and their associated M&O/M&I contractors develop the capabilities to do benchmarking for themselves. In this regard, a central precept is that in order to realize tangible performance benefits, program managers and staff -- the ones closest to the work - must take ownership of the studies. This avoids the ``check the box`` mentality associated with some third party studies. This workshop will provide participants with a basic level of understanding why the EM benchmarking team was developed and the nature and scope of its mission. Participants will also begin to understand the types of study levels and the particular methodology the EM benchmarking team is using to conduct studies. The EM benchmarking team will also encourage discussion on ways that DOE (both Headquarters and the Field) can team with its M&O/M&I contractors to conduct additional benchmarking studies. This ``introduction to benchmarking`` is intended to create a desire to know more and a greater appreciation of how benchmarking processes could be creatively employed to enhance performance.

  5. An Effective Approach for Benchmarking Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Deros

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The purpose of this study is to present a benchmarking guideline, conceptual framework and computerized mini program to assists companies achieve better performance in terms of quality, cost, delivery, supply chain and eventually increase their competitiveness in the market. The study begins with literature review on benchmarking definition, barriers and advantages from the implementation and the study of benchmarking framework. Approach: Thirty respondents were involved in the case study. They comprise of industrial practitioners, which had assessed usability and practicability of the guideline, conceptual framework and computerized mini program. Results: A guideline and template were proposed to simplify the adoption of benchmarking techniques. A conceptual framework was proposed by integrating the Deming’s PDCA and Six Sigma DMAIC theory. It was provided a step-by-step method to simplify the implementation and to optimize the benchmarking results. A computerized mini program was suggested to assist the users in adopting the technique as part of improvement project. As the result from the assessment test, the respondents found that the implementation method provided an idea for company to initiate benchmarking implementation and it guides them to achieve the desired goal as set in a benchmarking project. Conclusion: The result obtained and discussed in this study can be applied in implementing benchmarking in a more systematic way for ensuring its success.

  6. Benchmarking foreign electronics technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostian, C.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Leachman, R.C.; Sheridan, T.B.; Tsang, W.T.; White, R.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report has been drafted in response to a request from the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center`s (JTEC) Panel on Benchmarking Select Technologies. Since April 1991, the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) Program at the University of California at Berkeley has been engaged in a detailed study of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in semiconductor manufacturing worldwide. The program is a joint activity of the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, under sponsorship of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and with the cooperation of semiconductor producers from Asia, Europe and the United States. Professors David A. Hodges and Robert C. Leachman are the project`s Co-Directors. The present report for JTEC is primarily based on data and analysis drawn from that continuing program. The CSM program is being conducted by faculty, graduate students and research staff from UC Berkeley`s Schools of Engineering and Business, and Department of Economics. Many of the participating firms are represented on the program`s Industry Advisory Board. The Board played an important role in defining the research agenda. A pilot study was conducted in 1991 with the cooperation of three semiconductor plants. The research plan and survey documents were thereby refined. The main phase of the CSM benchmarking study began in mid-1992 and will continue at least through 1997. reports are presented on the manufacture of integrated circuits; data storage; wireless technology; human-machine interfaces; and optoelectronics. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. C. Venema

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative. The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide trend was added.

    Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii the error in linear trend estimates and (iii traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve

  8. Special Operations of CERES for Radiation Experiment Tests (SOCRATES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Z. Peter

    The Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System project flew a scanning radiometer (PFM) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission TRMM satellite, and two each aboard the Terra (FM1 FM2) and Aqua spacecraft (FM3 FM4). The primary objectives of the pairs of in-struments were for one to scan cross-track to map the geographical distribution of reflected solar radiation and Earth-emitted radiation and for the other to scan in azimuth as well as in elevation angle to provide data from which to develop models to describe the directionally-dependent dis-tribution of reflected solar radiance and Earth-emitted radiance. The Programmable Azimuth Plane Scan (PAPS) feature of the CERES instrument is a variant of the latter, and enables a scanner to target ground stations, or to match other satellite instruments viewing geometry to generate data sets for various scientific investigations. This paper presents special operations of CERES using the PAPS mode with the objective to collect data for comparison at the radiance level with other Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) instruments, and also shows numerical results of such comparisons. The following campaigns are covered in the paper: (i) In 1998, the CERES instrument (PFM) was rotated in azimuth so its scan plane coincided with the cross-track scan plane of the ScaRAB-2 instrument when the orbits of their spacecraft intersected. In this data set, both instruments viewed the same scenes from the same directions within a few minutes of each other, so the radiance measured by both instruments could be compared. (ii) In March of 2000, the scan plane of CERES Terra (FM1 and FM2) was rotated to coincide with the cross-track scan of the PFM aboard TRMM satellite. Data collected over up to 10 orbital crossings per day are used to compare radiance measurements of PFM and FM1 or FM2. (iii) In July of 2002, radiance measurements of scanners on Terra and Aqua satellites are compared. Since both satellites are in a polar orbit, the scan planes

  9. First observations of Ceres by VIR on Dawn mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, M. Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Fonte, Sergio; Magni, Gianfranco; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Capria, M. Teresa; Raymond, Carol. A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2015-04-01

    The Dawn spacecraft [1] is now approaching Ceres, the second of its targets. Ceres represents the key to understand some important points relative to the role of the protoplanet size and the water content in the evolution of these bodies. Ceres is thought to be differentiated, and hydrated minerals were proposed to exist on its surface [2,3,4]. Its low density [3] associated with the presence of transient water vapour, suggests a high content of ice inside the body and on its surface. Ceres seems to have been subject to differentiation and hydrothermal activity, and might host a liquid subsurface layer even today. Dawn is equipped with a Visible and InfraRed Mapping Spectrometer (VIR-MS) [5]. VIR-MS is an imaging spectrometer coupling high spectral and spatial resolution in the VIS (0.25-1 micron) and IR (0.95-5 micron) spectral ranges. The surface composition of Ceres is poorly understood through its nearly featureless visible spectrum. Its visible reflectance spectrum has a steep UV absorption edge that begins at a relatively short wavelength, around 0.4 micron, unlike many C-type asteroids where the UV drop-off begins around 0.6 to 0.7 micron[6]. The near-IR spectrum has a strong absorption band centered at about 3-micron. The absorption features in the 3-micron region were attributed to structural water in clay minerals [7,8] but could also be ammoniated clays [9]. [10] reported the discovery of carbonates and iron-rich clays from measurements of weak 3-micron features, and the results are consistent with the mid-IR spectra of clay minerals. On approach to Ceres, Dawn will obtain images and hyperspectral . VIR data, with resolution larger than Hubble images will reveal the first details of the Ceres' surface composition. Here we report about the first data obtained by VIR during its approach to Ceres. Acknowledgments VIR is funded by the Italian Space Agency-ASI and was developed under the leadership of INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Rome

  10. Cratering on Ceres: Implications for its crust and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesinger, H.; Marchi, S.; Schmedemann, N.; Schenk, P.; Pasckert, J. H.; Neesemann, A.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kneissl, T.; Ermakov, A. I.; Fu, R. R.; Bland, M. T.; Nathues, A.; Platz, T.; Williams, D. A.; Jaumann, R.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Ruesch, O.; Schmidt, B.; Park, R. S.; Preusker, F.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2016-09-01

    Thermochemical models have predicted that Ceres, is to some extent, differentiated and should have an icy crust with few or no impact craters. We present observations by the Dawn spacecraft that reveal a heavily cratered surface, a heterogeneous crater distribution, and an apparent absence of large craters. The morphology of some impact craters is consistent with ice in the subsurface, which might have favored relaxation, yet large unrelaxed craters are also present. Numerous craters exhibit polygonal shapes, terraces, flowlike features, slumping, smooth deposits, and bright spots. Crater morphology and simple-to-complex crater transition diameters indicate that the crust of Ceres is neither purely icy nor rocky. By dating a smooth region associated with the Kerwan crater, we determined absolute model ages (AMAs) of 550 million and 720 million years, depending on the applied chronology model.

  11. Ceres' evolution before and after Dawn: Where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Thomas B.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2016-10-01

    Observations of Ceres before Dawn indicated that it contains ~25 wt% water, and thermodynamic modeling indicated Ceres probably had experienced the same process of differentiation due to melting of the original ice after accretion as experienced by large icy moons. Consistent with that was a surface of altered mineralogy like clays suggesting aqueous alteration of the original chondritic silicates. Dawn has revealed some concentration of mass toward the center, specific aqueously altered mineralogies, a stiff surface with weaker material beneath, and extrusions and protrusions suggesting recent subsurface activity, including exposures of water ice that must be very recent. This wealth of new information from Dawn enables selection of more specific evolution models that best match the vastly improved Dawn observations. In this new study we propose one possibility is that Ceres accreted as an ice and silicate mixture after short-lived radionuclides in CAIs had significantly decayed, i.e. nearer 5 my after CAIs, and thus differentiated less completely than for hotter models. On the other hand, the presence of heavily aqueously altered mineralogies, including probably salts, suggests extensive mixing of water and silicates, which might normally be associated with more complete differentiation. Geologically recent activity, perhaps even to the present time, seems evident from several young landforms, including protrusions consistent with diapirism and recent exposures of water ice. This suggests recent flexing of the subsurface and rising of less dense interior material, including salts and ice. The presence of ammoniated minerals and what appear to be salt deposits suggest a major lowering of subsurface water ice melting temperature, enhancing the duration of water-silicate contact, and perhaps accelerating the mineralization processes and slowing or halting differentiation of water and silicates. Thus, Ceres is becoming known as the first body outward from the Sun

  12. The collisional history of dwarf planet Ceres revealed by Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, S.; Williams, D. A.; Mest, S. C.; Schenk, P.; O'Brien, D. P.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ermakov, A.; Castillo, J. C.; Jaumann, R.; Neesemann, A.; Hiesinger, H.; Park, R. S.; Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Impact craters are a ubiquitous feature of solid surfaces of celestial objects. Craters are oftentimes used to constrain the past evolution of their host objects, as well as to assess their crustal structures. The Dawn spacecraft, currently in orbit around the dwarf planet Ceres, has revealed a surface peppered with impact craters. Two important facts emerge from their global spatial distribution: i) significant longitudinal and latitudinal asymmetries in the crater areal density, ii) and the lack of well-preserved craters larger than 400 km in imaging data. Interestingly, most of the low crater density terrains are found in the vicinity of the three largest, well-preserved impact craters ranging from ~160 to ~290 km in diameter. These low crater areal density terrains expand over a greater distance than observed for large craters on rocky bodies and icy satellites, which typically are confined within one crater radius from the rim. To assess the collisional history of Ceres we developed a Monte Carlo model that tracks the timing, size and number of collisions throughout the history of the solar system. The model shows that Ceres' collisional evolution should have resulted typically in a factor of 10 more craters than observed, with some ~10 craters larger than 400 km expected to have formed over the last 4.5 Gyr ago. While small craters may have reached an equilibrium level, which does not allow then to further increase in number, the lack of evident large craters is a puzzle. A possibility is that the scars of large craters have been obliterated by topography relaxation due to an ice-rich crust. Here we will present an overview of the Ceres' crater spatial distribution and compare it to other siblings (such as the asteroid Vesta), and collisional evolution models. We will also discuss how these results pose important constraints on the internal structure of the dwarf planet in conjunction with surface composition and gravity data acquired by Dawn.

  13. The Conic Benchmark Format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Henrik A.

    This document constitutes the technical reference manual of the Conic Benchmark Format with le extension: .cbf or .CBF. It unies linear, second-order cone (also known as conic quadratic) and semidenite optimization with mixed-integer variables. The format has been designed with benchmark libraries...... in mind, and therefore focuses on compact and easily parsable representations. The problem structure is separated from the problem data, and the format moreover facilitate benchmarking of hotstart capability through sequences of changes....

  14. Aeroelastic Benchmark Experiments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M4 Engineering proposes to conduct canonical aeroelastic benchmark experiments. These experiments will augment existing sources for aeroelastic data in the...

  15. Progress and Prospects of Studies on CERES-Rice Models%水稻生长模型CERES-Rice的研究进展及展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗霄; 李忠武; 叶芳毅; 黄金权

    2009-01-01

    简单介绍了CERES-Rice模型的基本原理、主要参数和相关功能,重点阐述了该模型在国内外的研究和应用进展,总结了CERES-Rice模型研究中存在的问题,并在加强模型的机理研究、数据的可获得性、与信息技术的结合和界面友好化等4个方面对CERES-Rice模型研究的趋势进行了展望.

  16. Photometric correction of VIR high space resolution data of Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardo, Andrea; Palomba, Ernesto; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ciarniello, Mauro; Tosi, Federico; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Capria, Maria Teresa; Zambon, Francesca; Raponi, Andrea; Ammannito, Eleonora; Zinzi, Angelo; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.; VIR-Dawn Team

    2016-10-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft [1] has been orbiting Ceres since early 2015. The mission is divided into five stages, characterized by different spacecraft altitudes corresponding to different space resolutions, i.e. Approach (CSA), Rotational Characterization (CSR), Survey (CSS), High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO), and Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO).Ceres is a dark body (i.e. average albedo at 1.2 um is 0.08 [2]), hence photometric correction is much more important than for brighter asteroids (e.g. S-type and achondritric). Indeed, the negligible role of multiple scattering increases the reflectance dependence on phase angle.A photometric correction of VIR data at low spatial resolution (i.e. CSA, CSR, CSS) has already been applied with different methodologies (e.g. [2], [3]), These techniques highlight a reflectance and band depths dependency on the phase angle which is homogeneous on the entire surface in agreement with C-type taxonomy.However, with increasing spatial resolution (i.e. HAMO and LAMO data), the retrieval of a unique set of parameters for the photometric correction is no longer sufficient to obtain reliable albedo/band depth maps. In this work, a new photometric correction is obtained and applied to all the high resolution VIR data of Ceres, taking into account the reflectance variations observed at small scales. The developed algorithm will be implemented on the MATISSE tool [4] in order to be visualized on the Ceres shape model.Finally, an interpretation of the obtained phase functions is given in terms of optical and physical properties of the Ceres regolith.AcknowledgementsVIR was funded and coordinated by the Italian Space Agency, and built by SELEX ES, with the scientific leadership of IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, and is operated by IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy. Support of the Dawn Science, Instrument, and Operation Teams is gratefully acknowledged.References[1] Russell, C. T. et al., 2012, Science 336, 686[2] Longobardo A., et al., 2016, LPSC, 2239

  17. Vesta and Ceres by the light of Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher T.

    2015-11-01

    Ceres and Vesta are the most massive bodies in the main asteroid belt. They both appear to be intact protoplanets whose growth may have been drastically altered by the concomitant formation of Jupiter.. These two bodies have witnessed 4.6 Ga of solar system history, much, but not all, of which has been recorded in their surfaces. Dawn’s objective is to interview these two witnesses to learn as much as possible about the early epoch. These bodies are protoplanets, our best archetypes of the early building blocks of the terrestrial planets. In particular, siderophile elements in the Earth’s core were probably first segregated in Vesta-like bodies, and its water was likely first condensed in Ceres-like bodies.Many of the basaltic achondrites originated from a common parent body. Dawn verified that Vesta was consistent with that parent body. hence strengthening geochemical inferences from these samples on the formation and evolution of the solar system and supporting hypotheses for their delivery from Vesta to Earth. Ceres has not revealed itself with a meteoritic record. While the surface is scarred with craters, it is probable that the ejecta from the crater-forming event created little competent material from the icy crust and any such ejected projectiles that reached Earth might have disintegrated upon entry into the Earth’s atmosphere.Ceres’ surface differs greatly from Vesta’s. Plastic or fluidized mass wasting is apparent, as are many irregularly shaped craters, including many polygonal crater forms. There are many central-pit craters possibly caused by volatilization of the crust in the center of the impact. There are also many central-peak craters, which were made by rebound or pingo-like formation processes. Bright deposits dot the landscape, which are possibly salt-rich, suggesting fluvial activity beneath the crust. Observations of the brightest spots on Ceres could suggest sublimation from the surface of the bright area, which may be water vapor

  18. Internet based benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the design of interactive, internet based benchmarking using parametric (statistical) as well as nonparametric (DEA) models. The user receives benchmarks and improvement potentials. The user is also given the possibility to search different efficiency frontiers and hereby to explore...

  19. Handleiding benchmark VO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, j.l.t.

    2008-01-01

    OnderzoeksrapportenArchiefTechniek, Bestuur en Management> Over faculteit> Afdelingen> Innovation Systems> IPSE> Onderzoek> Publicaties> Onderzoeksrapporten> Handleiding benchmark VO Handleiding benchmark VO 25 november 2008 door IPSE Studies Door J.L.T. Blank. Handleiding voor het lezen van de i

  20. Benchmark af erhvervsuddannelserne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Wittrup, Jesper

    I dette arbejdspapir diskuterer vi, hvorledes de danske erhvervsskoler kan benchmarkes, og vi præsenterer resultaterne af en række beregningsmodeller. Det er begrebsmæssigt kompliceret at benchmarke erhvervsskolerne. Skolerne udbyder en lang række forskellige uddannelser. Det gør det vanskeligt...

  1. The CERES Suite of the ISCCP-like Cloud and Flux Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M.; Doelling, D.; Nguyen, L. T.; Raju, R.; Fan, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project now has about 15 years accurately observed top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) flux record for climate monitoring and diagnostic studies. CERES provides the climate community the following parameters: coincident CERES observed TOA fluxes, computed profile and surface fluxes, as well as MODIS cloud and aerosol retrievals. As part of its suite of products, CERES has packaged its MODIS derived cloud properties in the ISCCP-D2 monthly format that can be compared against climate model diagnostics with ISCCP simulators. There are 4 CERES ISCCP-D2 like products: ISCCP-D2like-MODIS, ISCCP-D2like-geo, ISCCP-D2like-merge, and flux-by-cloud-type product. The flux product combines for the first time CERES measured TOA fluxes along with the associated MODIS cloud properties, which links radiative flux directly to a specific cloud type. This was achieved by dividing the measured flux for a footprint into clear-sky portion and two cloud layer parts of the 20-km CERES footprint. The fluxes from each cloud layer in a CERES footprint were estimated using MODIS radiances for both shortwave and longwave. The spatially distributed cloud properties within the footprint were retrieved from 2-km MODIS pixels. This presentation has three parts: algorithm, validation, and multi-year results.

  2. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of

  3. Photometric Properties of Ceres from Telescopic Observations using Dawn Framing Camera Color Filters

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Gary, Bruce L; Sanchez, Juan A; Stephens, Robert D; Megna, Ralph; Coley, Daniel; Nathues, Andreas; Corre, Lucille Le; Hoffmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The dwarf planet Ceres is likely differentiated similar to the terrestrial planets but with a water/ice dominated mantle and an aqueously altered crust. Detailed modeling of Ceres' phase function has never been performed to understand its surface properties. The Dawn spacecraft began orbital science operations at the dwarf planet in April 2015. We observed Ceres with flight spares of the seven Dawn Framing Camera color filters mounted on ground-based telescopes over the course of three years to model its phase function versus wavelength. Our analysis shows that the modeled geometric albedos derived from both the IAU HG model and the Hapke model are consistent with a flat and featureless spectrum of Ceres, although the values are ~10% higher than previous measurements. Our models also suggest a wavelength dependence of Ceres' phase function. The IAU G-parameter and the Hapke single-particle phase function parameter, g, are both consistent with decreasing (shallower) phase slope with increasing wavelength. Such...

  4. Research on Bench-marking Analysis Model of Competitive Intelligence Integrated Text Automatic Classification%融合文本自动分类的竞争情报定标比超分析模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉峰; 黄姮

    2011-01-01

    本文分析了传统定标比超方法的思想和缺陷,提出将传统情报分析方法与智能分析技术相结合,构建了融合文本自动分类的竞争情报定标比超分析模型。本文提出构建定标比超内容层次指标体系,将其作为文本自动分类的分类体系。两种方法相辅相成、相互优化,实现竞争情报的良性循环型、科学的智能分析。进而,深入研究了该模型的功能任务和情报分析过程与算法。最后,从科学性、时效性、全面性、准确性和动态性方面对该模型进行了性能评价。%This paper analyses the theories and defects of traditional bench-marking and proposes a bench-marking analysis model of competitive intelligence integrated text automatic classification,which integrates traditional intelligence analytical method and inte

  5. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red

  6. Mineralogy of crater Haulani on dwarf planet Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Federico; Zambon, Francesca; Raponi, Andrea; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Capria, Maia Teresa; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Ciarniello, Mauro; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Formisano, Michelangelo; Hoffmann, Martin; Krohn, Katrin; Longobardo, Andrea; McFadden, Lucy Ann; Y McSween, Harry; Nathues, Andreas; Palomba, Ernesto; Pieters, Carle; Stephan, Katrin; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol; Dawn/VIR Team

    2016-10-01

    On dwarf planet Ceres, several high-albedo units are visible at the local scale. Haulani crater, located in the equatorial quadrangle having the same name, is one of the notable bright units highlighted by the Dawn spacecraft since its first approach to Ceres in early 2015. Due to the images obtained by the Dawn Framing Camera, it was possible to reveal that Haulani's bright material displays a very small or even negative ("blue") spectral slope in the range from the visible to the near infrared light, which is a peculiar occurrence compared to the average surface of Ceres.Hyperspectral images returned by the Visible and InfraRed mapping spectrometer (VIR) onboard Dawn enabled a detailed mineralogical analysis of the Haulani crater area. Already at the spatial resolution of the Survey phase (~1.1 km/px), and even more so during HAMO (~0.38 km/px) and LAMO (~0.10 km/px) mission phases, Haulani crater shows considerable spectral variability. The spectral features centered at 2.7 and 3.06 µm, respectively indicative of the presence of hydrous minerals and ammoniated phyllosilicates, show a decrease of band depth in the floor and in the bright ejecta corresponding to the blue spectral slope. Spectral signatures at 3.4 and ~4 µm, indicative of carbonates, also show a moderate variability. Finally, Haulani shows the highest thermal contrast over the entire surface of Ceres, which may be linked to the albedo and texture of the material excavated by the impact, combined with its compactness in specific areas such as pitted terrain.The application of a spectral unmixing model on VIR data acquired in Survey and HAMO suggests that the observed spectral variations might be due to substantial differences in grain size, rather than to significant variations in composition. However, a comprehensive analysis shall include LAMO data acquired at higher pixel resolution.AcknowledgementsThis work is supported by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). VIR was funded and coordinated by the

  7. The CERES/NA45 Radial Drift Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Adamova, D; Antonczyk, D; Appelshäuser, H; Belaga, V; Bielcikova, J; Braun-Munzinger, P; Campagnolo, R; Cherlin, A; Damjanovic, S; Dietel, T; Dietrich, L; Drees, A; Dubitzky, W; Esumi, S I; Filimonov, K; Fraenkel, Zeev; Garabatos, C; Glässel, P; Hering, G; Holeczek, J; Kushpil, V; Marin, A; Milosevic, J; Milov, A; Mikowiec, D; Musa, L; Panebratsev, Yu A; Pechenova, O; Petretracek, V; Pfeiffer, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Richter, M; Sako, H; Schäfer, E; Schmitz, W; Schükraft, J; Seipp, W; Sharma, A; Shimansky, S; Stachel, J; Sumbera, M; Tilsner, H; Tserruya, Itzhak; Wessels, J P; Wienoldh, T; Windelband, B; Wurm, J P; Xie, W; Yurevich, S; Yurevich, V

    2008-01-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of the first radial drift Time Projection Chamber (TPC) are presented. The TPC was built and installed at the CERES/NA45 experiment at the CERN SPS in the late nineties, with the objective to improve the momentum resolution of the spectrometer. The upgraded experiment took data twice, in 1999 and in 2000. After a detailed study of residual distortions a spatial resolution of 340 um in the azimuthal and 640 um in the radial direction was achieved, corresponding to a momentum resolution of Dp/p = sqrt{(1% * p/GeV)^2 + (2%)^2}.

  8. GeodeticBenchmark_GEOMON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The GeodeticBenchmark_GEOMON data layer consists of geodetic control monuments (points) that have a known position or spatial reference. The locations of these...

  9. NASA Software Engineering Benchmarking Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Sally; Rarick, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Benchmarking was very interesting and provided a wealth of information (1) We did see potential solutions to some of our "top 10" issues (2) We have an assessment of where NASA stands with relation to other aerospace/defense groups We formed new contacts and potential collaborations (1) Several organizations sent us examples of their templates, processes (2) Many of the organizations were interested in future collaboration: sharing of training, metrics, Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) appraisers, instructors, etc. We received feedback from some of our contractors/ partners (1) Desires to participate in our training; provide feedback on procedures (2) Welcomed opportunity to provide feedback on working with NASA

  10. How Activists Use Benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Wigan, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Non-governmental organisations use benchmarks as a form of symbolic violence to place political pressure on firms, states, and international organisations. The development of benchmarks requires three elements: (1) salience, that the community of concern is aware of the issue and views it as impo...... interests and challenge established politico-economic norms. Differentiating these cycles provides insights into how activists work through organisations and with expert networks, as well as how campaigns on complex economic issues can be mounted and sustained....

  11. The KMAT: Benchmarking Knowledge Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Martha

    Provides an overview of knowledge management and benchmarking, including the benefits and methods of benchmarking (e.g., competitive, cooperative, collaborative, and internal benchmarking). Arthur Andersen's KMAT (Knowledge Management Assessment Tool) is described. The KMAT is a collaborative benchmarking tool, designed to help organizations make…

  12. Thermal stability of water ice in Ceres' crater Oxo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, Michelangelo; Federico, Costanzo; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Frigeri, Alessandro; Magni, Gianfranco; Tosi, Federico

    2016-10-01

    Dwarf planet Ceres, target of the NASA Dawn mission, exhibits evidences of ammoniated phyllosilicates on its surface [1], compatible with a likely outer Solar System origin. Considerable amounts of water ice have recently been detected in some craters by the Visible InfraRed mapping spectrometer (VIR) onboard Dawn in some small fresh crater, such as Oxo, located at about 40° N. The exposure mechanism of water ice is unknown: cryovolcanism, cometary type sublimation/recondensation [2]or impacts with other bodies are likely mechanisms. The evaluation of the time stability of the water ice is crucial to understand the plausible mechanism for its existence. For this purpose, we developed a 3D finite-elements model (FEM) by using the topography given by the shape model of Ceres derived on the basis of images acquired by the Framing Camera in the Survey mission phase. The illumination conditions are provided by the SPICE toolkit. We performed several simulations by analyzing the effect of thermal inertia and albedo on the temperature and rate of ice sublimation. The results of the simulations about the stability of water ice will be presented.[1] De Sanctis et al. NATURE, doi:10.1038/nature16172[2] Formisano et al. MNRAS, doi: 10.1093/mnras/stv2344

  13. Constraints on Ceres internal strcuture from the Dawn gravity and shape data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, A.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Fu, R. R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Park, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Ceres is the largest body in the asteroid belt with a radius of approximately 470 km. It is large enough to attain a shape much closer to hydrostatic equilibrium than major asteroids. Pre-Dawn shape models of Ceres (e.g. Thomas et al., 2005; Carry et al., 2008) revealed that its shape is consistent with a hydrostatic ellipsoid. After the arrival of the Dawn spacecraft in Ceres orbit in March 2015, Framing Camera images were used to construct shape models of Ceres. Meanwhile, radio-tracking data are being used to develop gravity models. We use the Dawn-derived shape and gravity models to constrain Ceres' internal structure. These data for the first time allow estimation of the degree to which Ceres is hydrostatic. Observed non-hydrostatic effects include a 2.1 km triaxiality (difference between the two equatorial axes) as well as an 660-m center-of-mass - center-of-figure offset. The Dawn gravity data from the Survey orbit shows that Ceres has a central density concentration. Second-degree sectorial gravity coefficients are negatively correlated with topography indicating a peculiar interior structure. We compute the relative crustal thickness based on the observed Bouguer anomaly. Hydrostatic models show that Ceres appears more differentiated based on its gravity than on its shape. We expand the Ceres shape in spherical harmonics, observing that the power spectrum of topography deviates from the power law at low degrees (Fig. 1). We interpret the decrease of power at low degrees to be due to viscous relaxation. We suggest that relaxation happens on Ceres but, unlike modeled in Bland (2013), it is important only at the lowest degrees that correspond to scales of several hundreds of km. There are only a few features on Ceres of that size and at least one of them (an impact basin provisionally named Kerwan) appears relaxed. The simplest explanation is that Ceres's outer shell is not pure ice or pure rock but an ice-rock mixture that allows some relaxation at the

  14. Benchmarking the Netherlands. Benchmarking for growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fourth edition of the Ministry of Economic Affairs' publication 'Benchmarking the Netherlands', which aims to assess the competitiveness of the Dutch economy. The methodology and objective of the benchmarking remain the same. The basic conditions for economic activity (institutions, regulation, etc.) in a number of benchmark countries are compared in order to learn from the solutions found by other countries for common economic problems. This publication is devoted entirely to the potential output of the Dutch economy. In other words, its ability to achieve sustainable growth and create work over a longer period without capacity becoming an obstacle. This is important because economic growth is needed to increase prosperity in the broad sense and meeting social needs. Prosperity in both a material (per capita GDP) and immaterial (living environment, environment, health, etc) sense, in other words. The economy's potential output is determined by two structural factors: the growth of potential employment and the structural increase in labour productivity. Analysis by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) shows that in recent years the increase in the capacity for economic growth has been realised mainly by increasing the supply of labour and reducing the equilibrium unemployment rate. In view of the ageing of the population in the coming years and decades the supply of labour is unlikely to continue growing at the pace we have become accustomed to in recent years. According to a number of recent studies, to achieve a respectable rate of sustainable economic growth the aim will therefore have to be to increase labour productivity. To realise this we have to focus on for six pillars of economic policy: (1) human capital, (2) functioning of markets, (3) entrepreneurship, (4) spatial planning, (5) innovation, and (6) sustainability. These six pillars determine the course for economic policy aiming at higher productivity growth. Throughout

  15. O RGANIZATION OF WORK OF NURSING IN FAMILY HEALTH STRATEGIES OF THE CITY OF CÁCERES - MT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Maria Barbosa Cunha

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary care team should be able to plan, organize, develop and evaluate actions that respondto community needs and articulate the various sectors involved in health promotion. Knowing theprofile of these professionals can take steps towards their qualification and performance, for a moreadequate assistance and quality of the population.Objective:Learn to Work OrganizationStrategies in Nursing Family Health Cáceres-MT.Methodology:This is a quantitative andqualitative research.Data collection occurred through questionnaires given to professional nursesand nursing technicians FHT the city of Cáceres, between the months of September and October2011.Result:We found that the relationship between professional community and currently is aprocess that is weakened. They state that almost always feel satisfied with their freedom andautonomy at work. Indicate the main impediments that hinder the work, such as inadequate physicalinfrastructure, lack of financial resources, materials, procedures, drug shortages, low pay.Conclusion:Work organization means not only reflect the way work is designed and ordered, butthink of all that makes up thiscontext and their social integration

  16. Benchmarking in Mobarakeh Steel Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Ghasemi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is considered as one of the most effective ways of improving performance incompanies. Although benchmarking in business organizations is a relatively new concept and practice, ithas rapidly gained acceptance worldwide. This paper introduces the benchmarking project conducted in Esfahan’s Mobarakeh Steel Company, as the first systematic benchmarking project conducted in Iran. It aimsto share the process deployed for the benchmarking project in this company and illustrate how the projectsystematic implementation led to succes.

  17. Operational benchmarking of Japanese and Danish hopsitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Andreas; Itoh, Kenji; Jacobsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This benchmarking model is designed as an integration of three organizational dimensions suited for the healthcare sector. The model incorporates posterior operational indicators, and evaluates upon aggregation of performance. The model is tested upon seven cases from Japan and Denmark. Japanese...

  18. Benchmarking for plant maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komonen, K.; Ahonen, T.; Kunttu, S. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland))

    2010-05-15

    The product of the project, e-Famemain, is a new kind of tool for benchmarking, which is based on many years' research efforts within Finnish industry. It helps to evaluate plants' performance in operations and maintenance by making industrial plants comparable with the aid of statistical methods. The system is updated continually and automatically. It carries out automatically multivariate statistical analysis when data is entered into system, and many other statistical operations. Many studies within Finnish industry during the last ten years have revealed clear causalities between various performance indicators. In addition, these causalities should be taken into account when utilising benchmarking or forecasting indicator values e.g. for new investments. The benchmarking system consists of five sections: data input section, positioning section, locating differences section, best practices and planning section and finally statistical tables. (orig.)

  19. Deviating From the Benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Van Praag, Mirjam; Carneiro, Anabela

    This paper studies three related questions: To what extent otherwise similar startups employ different quantities and qualities of human capital at the moment of entry? How persistent are initial human capital choices over time? And how does deviating from human capital benchmarks influence firm......, founders human capital, and the ownership structure of startups (solo entrepreneurs versus entrepreneurial teams). We then study the survival implications of exogenous deviations from these benchmarks, based on spline models for survival data. Our results indicate that (especially negative) deviations from...... the benchmark can be substantial, are persistent over time, and hinder the survival of firms. The implications may, however, vary according to the sector and the ownership structure at entry. Given the stickiness of initial choices, wrong human capital decisions at entry turn out to be a close to irreversible...

  20. CeREs, A Compact Radiation Belt Explorer to study charged particle dynamics in geospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Summerlin, E. J.; Christian, E. R.; Crum, G.; Desai, M. I.; Evans, A.; Dumonthier, J.; Jamison, T.; Jones, A. D.; Livi, S. A.; Ogasawara, K.; Paschalidis, N.; Suarez, G.; Patel, D.

    2015-12-01

    The CeREs 3U CubeSat, set to be launched in mid-2016, will study the physics of the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, particularly loss due to electron microbursts. CeRES will also observe solar electrons and protons entering the magnetosphere via the open field-line polar caps. CeREs is expected to be in a low earth high inclination orbit and carries onboard the Miniaturized Electron pRoton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT instrument measures electrons and protons ranging in energy from 5 keV to >10 MeV with high time resolution of ~5ms in multiple differential energy channels. MERiT is particle telescope using a stack of solid-state detectors and space-facing avalanche photo diodes.We will describe the CeRES spacecraft, science goals and the MERiT instrument.

  1. Benchmarking for Best Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Zairi, Mohamed

    1998-01-01

    Benchmarking for Best Practice uses up-to-the-minute case-studies of individual companies and industry-wide quality schemes to show how and why implementation has succeeded. For any practitioner wanting to establish best practice in a wide variety of business areas, this book makes essential reading. .It is also an ideal textbook on the applications of TQM since it describes concepts, covers definitions and illustrates the applications with first-hand examples. Professor Mohamed Zairi is an international expert and leading figure in the field of benchmarking. His pioneering work in this area l

  2. Compositional differences among Bright Spots on the Ceres surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Ernesto; Longobardo, Andrea; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Stein, Nathaniel; Ehlmann, Bethany; Ammannito, Eleonora; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Raponi, Andrea; Ciarniello, Mauro; Frigeri, Alessandro; Capria, Maria Teresa; Tosi, Federico; Zambon, Francesca; Fonte, Sergio; Giardino, Marco; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.; VIR-Dawn Team

    2016-10-01

    The Dawn mission detected areas of a relatively higher albedo defined as "bright spots" (BS) on the Ceres surface. The most important member of this family is represented by the Occator crater and more precisely by the two very high albedo areas located on the crater floor.In this work we identified BS on Ceres by using the hyperspectral data produced by the VIR instrument [1]. We used an approach similar to the one used for Vesta [2], identifying 38 BS. More than 80% of BS's are related to features generated by impacts. The remaining cases concern diffused material, spots, a scarp and the Ahuna Mons.The absolute value of the albedo at 1.2 um of BS is approximately 40% larger than the average Ceres albedo, with the two Occator bright areas being by far the brightest on the entire surface.The general spectral behavior with respect to surroundings includes increased band depths at 2.7, 3.4 and 4.0 um. This is clear especially for the Occator region [3], but is a common behavior also for other BS. This strongly supports that carbonates, producing the 3.4 and 4.0 um absorption band, are the main brightening agent in these regions [3]. Another common trend is the shallowing of the 3.05 um band [4], related to ammonia.Increase of the two carbonate band depths is always evident in BS; this is not always true for the 2.7 um band. Six BS show a 2.7 um band depth decrease with respect to the surroundings. These six BS correspond to impact features; therefore, a possible interpretation is a dehydration due to the impact.Four other BS show instead a 3.05 um band deepening, contrarily to the common BS behavior. The interpretation of this observation is in progress.AcknowledgementsVIR was funded and coordinated by ASI, and built by SELEX ES, with the scientific leadership of IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, and is operated by IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy. Support of the Dawn Teams is gratefully acknowledged.References[1] De Sanctis, M.C. et al., 2011, SSR, 163, 329[2] Palomba, E., et al. 2014

  3. Age-dependent morphological and compositional variations on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Extended smooth plains cover the interior of a number of craters on Ceres. Smooth plains appear on different topographic levels associated with pits and flow-like features that overrun crater rims. The material forming these plains also ponds in depressions and smaller craters and cover the pre-existing surface creating distinct geological boundaries. Ikapati crater shows smooth plains on different topographic levels associated with pits and flow-like features that overrun crater rims. The material forming these plains, ponds in depressions and smaller craters and cover the pre-existing surface creating a distinct geological boundary. The interior of Occator also exhibits extended plains of ponded material, multiple flows originating from the center overwhelming the mass wasting deposits from the rim, dome-like features, vents cracks and fissures. Furthermore, crater densities on Occator's floor are lower than those on the ejecta blanket indicating a post-impact formation age of the flows. The flows to the northeast appear to originate from the central region and move slightly uphill. This indicates either a feeding zone that pushes the flows forward by supplying low-viscosity material or a depression of the crater center, possibly after discharging a subsurface reservoir. The plains and flows as well as some areas surrounding the craters appear spectrally blue. Both plains and flow material are characterized in camera and spectrometer visible spectra by a slightly negative slope with a gradual drop off up to 10% in reflectance from 0.5μm to 1μm. Although the spectral variations in the visible are subtle, they are clearly expressed in the color ratio composite. The crater densities of 20 locations across the surface of Ceres with different spectral behavior were analyzed in order to investigate the age dependence of spectral surface features. The results indicate that bluish material is mainly associated with the youngest impact craters on Ceres ( 1 Ga

  4. Ammoniated phyllosilicates with a likely outer Solar System origin on (1) Ceres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, M C; Ammannito, E; Raponi, A; Marchi, S; McCord, T B; McSween, H Y; Capaccioni, F; Capria, M T; Carrozzo, F G; Ciarniello, M; Longobardo, A; Tosi, F; Fonte, S; Formisano, M; Frigeri, A; Giardino, M; Magni, G; Palomba, E; Turrini, D; Zambon, F; Combe, J-P; Feldman, W; Jaumann, R; McFadden, L A; Pieters, C M; Prettyman, T; Toplis, M; Raymond, C A; Russell, C T

    2015-12-10

    Studies of the dwarf planet (1) Ceres using ground-based and orbiting telescopes have concluded that its closest meteoritic analogues are the volatile-rich CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. Water in clay minerals, ammoniated phyllosilicates, or a mixture of Mg(OH)2 (brucite), Mg2CO3 and iron-rich serpentine have all been proposed to exist on the surface. In particular, brucite has been suggested from analysis of the mid-infrared spectrum of Ceres. But the lack of spectral data across telluric absorption bands in the wavelength region 2.5 to 2.9 micrometres--where the OH stretching vibration and the H2O bending overtone are found--has precluded definitive identifications. In addition, water vapour around Ceres has recently been reported, possibly originating from localized sources. Here we report spectra of Ceres from 0.4 to 5 micrometres acquired at distances from ~82,000 to 4,300 kilometres from the surface. Our measurements indicate widespread ammoniated phyllosilicates across the surface, but no detectable water ice. Ammonia, accreted either as organic matter or as ice, may have reacted with phyllosilicates on Ceres during differentiation. This suggests that material from the outer Solar System was incorporated into Ceres, either during its formation at great heliocentric distance or by incorporation of material transported into the main asteroid belt.

  5. Ammoniated phyllosilicates with a likely outer Solar System origin on (1) Ceres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, M C; Ammannito, E; Raponi, A; Marchi, S; McCord, T B; McSween, H Y; Capaccioni, F; Capria, M T; Carrozzo, F G; Ciarniello, M; Longobardo, A; Tosi, F; Fonte, S; Formisano, M; Frigeri, A; Giardino, M; Magni, G; Palomba, E; Turrini, D; Zambon, F; Combe, J-P; Feldman, W; Jaumann, R; McFadden, L A; Pieters, C M; Prettyman, T; Toplis, M; Raymond, C A; Russell, C T

    2015-12-10

    Studies of the dwarf planet (1) Ceres using ground-based and orbiting telescopes have concluded that its closest meteoritic analogues are the volatile-rich CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. Water in clay minerals, ammoniated phyllosilicates, or a mixture of Mg(OH)2 (brucite), Mg2CO3 and iron-rich serpentine have all been proposed to exist on the surface. In particular, brucite has been suggested from analysis of the mid-infrared spectrum of Ceres. But the lack of spectral data across telluric absorption bands in the wavelength region 2.5 to 2.9 micrometres--where the OH stretching vibration and the H2O bending overtone are found--has precluded definitive identifications. In addition, water vapour around Ceres has recently been reported, possibly originating from localized sources. Here we report spectra of Ceres from 0.4 to 5 micrometres acquired at distances from ~82,000 to 4,300 kilometres from the surface. Our measurements indicate widespread ammoniated phyllosilicates across the surface, but no detectable water ice. Ammonia, accreted either as organic matter or as ice, may have reacted with phyllosilicates on Ceres during differentiation. This suggests that material from the outer Solar System was incorporated into Ceres, either during its formation at great heliocentric distance or by incorporation of material transported into the main asteroid belt. PMID:26659184

  6. Intercalibration of CERES, MODIS, and MISR reflected solar radiation and its application to albedo trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yizhe; Davies, Roger

    2016-06-01

    Measurements on the Terra satellite by the Cloud and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), between 2001 and 2015 over the polar regions, are analyzed in order to investigate the intercalibration differences between these instruments. Direct comparisons of colocated near-nadir radiances from CERES, MODIS, and MISR show relative agreement within 2.4% decade-1. By comparison with the CERES shortwave broadband, MODIS Collection 6 is getting brighter, by 1.0 ± 0.7% decade-1 in the red band and 1.4 ± 0.7% decade-1 in the near infrared. MISR's red and near-infrared bands, however, show darkening trends of -1.0 ± 0.6% decade-1 and -1.1 ± 0.6% decade-1, respectively. The CERES/MODIS or CERES/MISR visible and near IR radiance ratio is shown to have a significant negative correlation with precipitable water content over the Antarctic Plateau. The intercalibration results successfully correct the differential top-of-atmosphere trends in zonal albedos between CERES and MISR.

  7. The Permanently Shadowed Regions of Dwarf Planet Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorghofer, Norbert; Mazarico, Erwan; Platz, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Schroeder, Stefan E.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Ceres has only a small spin axis tilt (4 deg), and craters near its rotational poles can experience permanent shadow and trap volatiles, as is the case on Mercury and on Earth's Moon. Topography derived from stereo imaging by the Dawn spacecraft is used to calculate direct solar irradiance that defines the extent of the permanently shadowed regions (PSRs). In the northern polar region, PSRs cover approximately 1800 sq km or 0.13% of the hemisphere, and most of the PSRs are cold enough to trap water ice over geological time periods. Based on modeling of the water exosphere, water molecules seasonally reside around the winter pole and ultimately an estimated 0.14% of molecules get trapped. Even for the lowest estimates of the amount of available water, this predicts accumulation rates in excess of loss rates, and hence, there should be fresh ice deposits in the cold traps.

  8. The permanently shadowed regions of dwarf planet Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorghofer, Norbert; Mazarico, Erwan; Platz, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Schröder, Stefan E.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-07-01

    Ceres has only a small spin axis tilt (4°), and craters near its rotational poles can experience permanent shadow and trap volatiles, as is the case on Mercury and on Earth's Moon. Topography derived from stereo imaging by the Dawn spacecraft is used to calculate direct solar irradiance that defines the extent of the permanently shadowed regions (PSRs). In the northern polar region, PSRs cover ˜1800 km2 or 0.13% of the hemisphere, and most of the PSRs are cold enough to trap water ice over geological time periods. Based on modeling of the water exosphere, water molecules seasonally reside around the winter pole and ultimately an estimated 0.14% of molecules get trapped. Even for the lowest estimates of the amount of available water, this predicts accumulation rates in excess of loss rates, and hence, there should be fresh ice deposits in the cold traps.

  9. Benchmarking Danish Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Britta; Bentzen, Eric; Aagaard Andreassen, Mette

    2003-01-01

    compatible survey. The International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS) doesbring up the question of supply chain management, but unfortunately, we did not have access to thedatabase. Data from the members of the SCOR-model, in the form of benchmarked performance data,may exist, but are nonetheless...

  10. Benchmark problem proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting of the Radiation Energy Spectra Unfolding Workshop organized by the Radiation Shielding Information Center is discussed. The plans of the unfolding code benchmarking effort to establish methods of standardization for both the few channel neutron and many channel gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy problems are presented

  11. Benchmarks: WICHE Region 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Benchmarks: WICHE Region 2012 presents information on the West's progress in improving access to, success in, and financing of higher education. The information is updated annually to monitor change over time and encourage its use as a tool for informed discussion in policy and education communities. To establish a general context for the…

  12. Surveys and Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Surveys and benchmarks continue to grow in importance for community colleges in response to several factors. One is the press for accountability, that is, for colleges to report the outcomes of their programs and services to demonstrate their quality and prudent use of resources, primarily to external constituents and governing boards at the state…

  13. Benchmarking and Performance Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TANTAU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the chosen topic is explained by the meaning of the firm efficiency concept - the firm efficiency means the revealed performance (how well the firm performs in the actual market environment given the basic characteristics of the firms and their markets that are expected to drive their profitability (firm size, market power etc.. This complex and relative performance could be due to such things as product innovation, management quality, work organization, some other factors can be a cause even if they are not directly observed by the researcher. The critical need for the management individuals/group to continuously improve their firm/company’s efficiency and effectiveness, the need for the managers to know which are the success factors and the competitiveness determinants determine consequently, what performance measures are most critical in determining their firm’s overall success. Benchmarking, when done properly, can accurately identify both successful companies and the underlying reasons for their success. Innovation and benchmarking firm level performance are critical interdependent activities. Firm level variables, used to infer performance, are often interdependent due to operational reasons. Hence, the managers need to take the dependencies among these variables into account when forecasting and benchmarking performance. This paper studies firm level performance using financial ratio and other type of profitability measures. It uses econometric models to describe and then propose a method to forecast and benchmark performance.

  14. Benchmarking Public Procurement 2016

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    Benchmarking Public Procurement 2016 Report aims to develop actionable indicators which will help countries identify and monitor policies and regulations that impact how private sector companies do business with the government. The project builds on the Doing Business methodology and was initiated at the request of the G20 Anti-Corruption Working Group.

  15. Ceres' internal structure as inferred from its large craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Simone; Raymond, Carol; Fu, Roger; Ermakov, Anton I.; O'Brien, David P.; De Sanctis, Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    The Dawn spacecraft has gathered important data about the surface composition, internal structure, and geomorphology of Ceres, revealing a cratered landscape. Digital terrain models and global mosaics have been used to derive a global catalog of impact craters larger than 10 km in diameter. A surface dichotomy appears evident: a large fraction of the northern hemisphere is heavily cratered as the result of several billion of years of collisions, while portions of the equatorial region and southern hemisphere are much less cratered. The latter are associated with the presence of the two largest (~270-280 km) impact craters, Kerwan and Yalode. The global crater count shows a severe depletion for diameters larger than 100-150 km with respect to collisional models and other large asteroids, like Vesta. This is a strong indication that a significant population of large cerean craters has been obliterated over geological time-scales. This observation is supported by the overall topographic power spectrum of Ceres, which shows that long wavelengths in topography are suppressed (that is, flatter surface) compared to short wavelengths.Viscous relaxation of topography may be a natural culprit for the observed paucity of large craters. Relaxation accommodated by the creep of water ice is expected to result in much more rapid and complete decay of topography than inferred. In contrast, we favor a strong crust composed of a mixture of silicates and salt species (depression, known as Vendimia Planitia. The overall topography of Vendimia Planitia is compatible with a partially relaxed mega impact structure. The presence of such a large scale depression bears implications for the rheology of the deeper interior, potentially implying a transition to higher viscosity/higher density materials at a depth of ~200 km. This is compatible with the presence of a central mass concentration, as inferred from gravity measurements.

  16. The Crop Evaluation Research for Environmental Strategies (CERES) Remote Sensing 2008 Project Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Joseph C.; Glaser, John A.; Copenhaver, Kenneth L.; May, George

    2009-01-01

    resistance development. The two agencies have entered into an agreement which could potentially lead to the development of next generation NASA sensors that will more specifically address the requirements of the USEPA's resistance development strategy and offer opportunities to study the ever changing ecosystem complexities. The USEPA/NASA/ITD team has developed a broad research project entitled CERES (Crop Evaluation Research for Environmental Strategies). CERES is a research effort leading to decision support system tools that are designed to integrate multi-resolution NASA remote sensing data products and USEPA geo -spatial models to monitor the potential for insect pest resistance development from the regional to the landscape and then to the field level.

  17. Economic assessment of novel amine based CO2 capture technologies integrated in power plants based on European Benchmarking Task Force methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Novel amine solvent applied to ASC and NGCC power plants. • CESAR-1 (AMP and piperazine) reduces the cost of CO2 avoided compared to MEA. • Higher cost reduction achieved for ASC power plants. • European common methodology description for economic benchmark studies in carbon capture. - Abstract: The objective of this paper is to assess the economic advantages of an innovative solvent for CO2 capture on state-of-the-art solvents. The CESAR-1 solvent, which is an aqueous solution of 2-amino-2-methyl-propanol (AMP) and piperazine (PZ), is applied both to advanced supercritical pulverised (ASC) coal and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants with post-combustion CO2 capture units. The methodology includes process model developments using commercial simulation programs, which determine the thermodynamic properties of the selected power plants and the performance of the CO2 capture units. The results show that the techno-economic benefit of CESAR-1 versus MEA is more significant for ASC than that for NGCC due to a higher concentration of CO2 in the flue gas. This follows from the fact that the switch from MEA to CESAR-1 solvents reduces the electricity cost by 4.16 €/MW h in the case of the ASC plant compared to 0.67 €/MW h in connection with the proposed NGCC plant. Based on the above figures, we can conclude that CESAR-1 reduces the cost of CO2 avoided compared to MEA by 6 €/t CO2 and 2 €/t CO2 for the selected ASC and NGCC plants respectively. In view of that, the techno-economics can be improved if the CO2 capture plant is designed to operate using the CESAR-1 absorption technology due to a reduction in the regeneration energy and the solvent recirculation rate (considering its higher CO2 net capacity). However, the variable costs of running the capture plant are higher for the CESAR-1 solvent due to the higher cost of the amines

  18. Performance of CERES-Maize in Regional Application%CERES-Maize区域应用效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊伟; 林而达

    2009-01-01

    作物区域模拟是利用有限的空间数据,尽可能反映作物生育期、产量等性状的时空变化规律.本文尝试利用CERES-Maize模型进行区域模拟,并探讨区域应用的效果.结果表明,经区域校准后的CERES-Maize模型用于区域模拟时,基本可以反映出产量的变化规律,网格模拟产量与农调队调查产量的相对均方根差(RMSE%)为29.9%,符合度0.78.全国2144个网格71.3%的RMSE%在30%以内,其中RMSE%<15%的为29.4%;就各区域而言,种植面积最大的玉米生态2区(占全国总面积的34%)效果最好,该区63.2%网格模拟的RMSE%小于15%.但区域模拟过程中还存在一系列误差,主要包括:模型本身的误差、作物品种遗传参数的误差、按一定区域范围归并的品种和管理参数引起的误差、区域划分引起的误差和空间数据的误差等,今后需要进一步校准和修正.

  19. Floor-fractured craters on Ceres and implications for interior processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, Debra; Schenk, Paul M.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Park, Ryan; Preusker, Frank; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    Several of the impact craters on Ceres have patterns of fractures on their floors. These fractures appear similar to those found within a class of lunar craters referred to as Floor-Fractured Craters (FFCs) [Schultz, 1976].Lunar FFCs are characterized by anomalously shallow floors cut by radial, concentric, and/or polygonal fractures, and have been classified into crater classes, Types 1 through 6, based on their morphometric properties [Schultz, 1976; Jozwiak et al, 2012, 2015]. Models for their formation have included both floor uplift due to magmatic intrusion below the crater or floor shallowing due to viscous relaxation. However, the observation that the depth versus diameter (d/D) relationship of the FFCs is distinctly shallower than the same association for other lunar craters supports the hypotheses that the floor fractures form due to shallow magmatic intrusion under the crater [Jozwiak et al, 2012, 2015].FFCs have also been identified on Mars [Bamberg et al., 2014]. Martian FFCs exhibit morphological characteristics similar to the lunar FFCs, and analyses suggest that the Martian FCCs also formed due to volcanic activity, although heavily influenced by interactions with groundwater and/or ice.We have cataloged the Ceres FFCs according to the classification scheme designed for the Moon. Large (>50 km) Ceres FFCs are most consistent with Type 1 lunar FFCs, having deep floors, central peaks, wall terraces, and radial and/or concentric fractures. Smaller craters on Ceres are more consistent with Type 4 lunar FFCs, having less-pronounced floor fractures and a v-shaped moats separating the wall scarp from the crater interior.An analysis of the d/D ratio for Ceres craters shows that, like lunar FFCs, the Ceres FFCs are anomalously shallow. This suggests that the fractures on the floor of Ceres FFCs may be due the intrusion of a low-density material below the craters that is uplifting their floors. While on the Moon and Mars the intrusive material is hypothesized

  20. Benchmarking i den offentlige sektor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj; Dietrichson, Lars; Sandalgaard, Niels

    2008-01-01

    I artiklen vil vi kort diskutere behovet for benchmarking i fraværet af traditionelle markedsmekanismer. Herefter vil vi nærmere redegøre for, hvad benchmarking er med udgangspunkt i fire forskellige anvendelser af benchmarking. Regulering af forsyningsvirksomheder vil blive behandlet, hvorefter...

  1. Elastic-Plastic J-Integral Solutions or Surface Cracks in Tension Using an Interpolation Methodology. Appendix C -- Finite Element Models Solution Database File, Appendix D -- Benchmark Finite Element Models Solution Database File

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wells, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    No closed form solutions exist for the elastic-plastic J-integral for surface cracks due to the nonlinear, three-dimensional nature of the problem. Traditionally, each surface crack must be analyzed with a unique and time-consuming nonlinear finite element analysis. To overcome this shortcoming, the authors have developed and analyzed an array of 600 3D nonlinear finite element models for surface cracks in flat plates under tension loading. The solution space covers a wide range of crack shapes and depths (shape: 0.2 less than or equal to a/c less than or equal to 1, depth: 0.2 less than or equal to a/B less than or equal to 0.8) and material flow properties (elastic modulus-to-yield ratio: 100 less than or equal to E/ys less than or equal to 1,000, and hardening: 3 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 20). The authors have developed a methodology for interpolating between the goemetric and material property variables that allows the user to reliably evaluate the full elastic-plastic J-integral and force versus crack mouth opening displacement solution; thus, a solution can be obtained very rapidly by users without elastic-plastic fracture mechanics modeling experience. Complete solutions for the 600 models and 25 additional benchmark models are provided in tabular format.

  2. Radiography benchmark 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, G.-R.; Deresch, A.; Bellon, C.; Schumm, A.; Lucet-Sanchez, F.; Guerin, P.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the 2014 WFNDEC RT benchmark study was to compare predictions of various models of radiographic techniques, in particular those that predict the contribution of scattered radiation. All calculations were carried out for homogenous materials and a mono-energetic X-ray point source in the energy range between 100 keV and 10 MeV. The calculations were to include the best physics approach available considering electron binding effects. Secondary effects like X-ray fluorescence and bremsstrahlung production were to be taken into account if possible. The problem to be considered had two parts. Part I examined the spectrum and the spatial distribution of radiation behind a single iron plate. Part II considered two equally sized plates, made of iron and aluminum respectively, only evaluating the spatial distribution. Here we present the results of above benchmark study, comparing them to MCNP as the assumed reference model. The possible origins of the observed deviations are discussed.

  3. The COST Benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Tiesyte, Dalia; Tradisauskas, Nerius

    2006-01-01

    An infrastructure is emerging that enables the positioning of populations of on-line, mobile service users. In step with this, research in the management of moving objects has attracted substantial attention. In particular, quite a few proposals now exist for the indexing of moving objects, and m...... of the benchmark to three spatio-temporal indexes - the TPR-, TPR*-, and Bx-trees. Representative experimental results and consequent guidelines for the usage of these indexes are reported....

  4. Ceres' Yellow Spots - Observations with Dawn Framing Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Michael; Schäfer, Tanja; Cloutis, Edward A.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Platz, Thomas; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Hoffmann, Martin; Thangjam, Guneshwar S.; Kneissl, Thomas; Nathues, Andreas; Mengel, Kurt; Williams, David A.; Kallisch, Jan; Ripken, Joachim; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    The Framing Camera (FC) onboard the Dawn spacecraft acquired several spectral data sets of (1) Ceres with increasing spatial resolution (up to 135 m/pixel with nearly global coverage). The FC is equipped with seven color filters (0.4-1.0 μm) plus one panchromatic ('clear') filter [1]. We produced spectral mosaics using photometrically corrected FC color filter images as described in [2]. Even early FC color mosaics obtained during Dawn's approach unexpectedly exhibited quite a diversity of surface materials on Ceres. Besides the ordinary cerean surface material, potentially composed of ammoniated phyllosilicates [3] or some other alteration product of carbonaceous chondrites [4], a large number of bright spots were found on Ceres [5]. These spots are substantially brighter than the average surface (exceeding its triple standard deviation), with the spots within Occator crater being the brightest and most prominent examples (reflectance more than 10 times the average of Ceres). We observed bright spots which are different by their obvious yellow color. This yellow color appears both in a 'true color' RGB display (R=0.65, G=0.55, B=0.44 μm) as well as in a false color display (R=0.97, G=0.75, B=0.44 μm) using a linear 2% stretch. Their spectra show a steep red slope between 0.44 and 0.55 μm (UV drop-off). On the contrary to these yellow spots, the vast majority of bright spots appears white in the aforementioned color displays and exhibit blue sloped spectra, except for a shallow UV drop-off. Thus, yellow spots are easily distinguishable from white spots and the remaining cerean surface by their high values in the ratio 0.55/0.44 μm. We found 8 occurrences of yellow spots on Ceres. Most of them (>70 individual spots) occur both inside and outside crater Dantu, where white spots are also found in the immediate vicinity. Besides Dantu, further occurrences with only a few yellow spots were found at craters Ikapati and Gaue. Less definite occurrences are found at 97

  5. Validating CERES Radiative Fluxes in the Arctic with Airborne Radiative Flux Measurements from the ARISE Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, J.; Bucholtz, A.; Kato, S.; Rose, F. G.; Smith, W. L., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on board NASA's Terra, Aqua, and Soumi-NPP satellites provide the only measurements of reflected solar shortwave and emitted longwave radiative flux over the Arctic. Various methods have shown the uncertainty of CERES fluxes over sea ice to be higher than other scene types. However validation against an independent radiative flux measurement has never been attempted. We present here an attempt to better quantify the uncertainty of time-and-space averaged CERES flux measurements using airborne measurements from the Arctic Radiation - IceBridge Sea Ice Experiment (ARISE). The ARISE campaign took place during September of 2014 based out of Fairbanks, Alaska, with most of the measurements taken in the vicinity of the sea ice edge between 125°W and 150°W, and 71°N to 77°N. For six of the flights, measurements were taken in a lawnmower type pattern over either 100 x 200 km box regions at a constant altitude of >6 km, or 100 x 100 km box regions at an altitude of between 200 m to 500 m. They were designed to resemble the CERES Level 3 spatial averaging grids, and were located and timed to coincide with a high number of CERES overpasses. On board the aircraft were a set of upward and downward facing shortwave and longwave broadband radiometers (BBR), along with other instruments measuring meteorological conditions and cloud properties. We have compared the broadband radiative fluxes from BBR with those from CERES for the three days where the aircraft was flying the high altitude pattern. We use the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model to account for differences in the measurement altitude between BBR and CERES. We will present results of the comparisons between the computed fluxes and the measured longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes.

  6. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.

    2009-11-15

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) are a suite of parallel computer performance benchmarks. They were originally developed at the NASA Ames Research Center in 1991 to assess high-end parallel supercomputers. Although they are no longer used as widely as they once were for comparing high-end system performance, they continue to be studied and analyzed a great deal in the high-performance computing community. The acronym 'NAS' originally stood for the Numerical Aeronautical Simulation Program at NASA Ames. The name of this organization was subsequently changed to the Numerical Aerospace Simulation Program, and more recently to the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Center, although the acronym remains 'NAS.' The developers of the original NPB suite were David H. Bailey, Eric Barszcz, John Barton, David Browning, Russell Carter, LeoDagum, Rod Fatoohi, Samuel Fineberg, Paul Frederickson, Thomas Lasinski, Rob Schreiber, Horst Simon, V. Venkatakrishnan and Sisira Weeratunga. The original NAS Parallel Benchmarks consisted of eight individual benchmark problems, each of which focused on some aspect of scientific computing. The principal focus was in computational aerophysics, although most of these benchmarks have much broader relevance, since in a much larger sense they are typical of many real-world scientific computing applications. The NPB suite grew out of the need for a more rational procedure to select new supercomputers for acquisition by NASA. The emergence of commercially available highly parallel computer systems in the late 1980s offered an attractive alternative to parallel vector supercomputers that had been the mainstay of high-end scientific computing. However, the introduction of highly parallel systems was accompanied by a regrettable level of hype, not only on the part of the commercial vendors but even, in some cases, by scientists using the systems. As a result, it was difficult to discern whether the new systems offered any fundamental

  7. The surface and interior evolution of Ceres revealed by fractures and secondary crater chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Buczkowski, Debra; Schmedemann, Nico; King, Scott; O'Brien, David P.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Raymond, Carol; Marchi, Simone; Russell, Christopher T.; Mitri, Giuseppe; Bland, Michael T.

    2016-10-01

    Dawn became the first spacecraft to visit and orbit Ceres, a dwarf planet and the largest body in the asteroid belt (radius ~470 km) (Russell et al., 2016). Before Dawn's arrival, telescopic observations and thermal evolution modeling indicated Ceres was differentiated, with an average density of 2,100 kg/m3 (e.g. McCord & Sotin, 2005; Castillo-Rogez & McCord, 2010). Moreover, pervasive viscous relaxation in a water-ice-rich outer layer was predicted to erase most features on Ceres' surface (Bland, 2013). However, a full understanding of Ceres' surface and interior evolution remained elusive. On the basis of global geologic mapping, we identify prevalent ≥1 km wide linear features that formed: 1) as the surface expression of subsurface fractures, and 2) as material ejected during impact-crater formation impacted and scoured the surface, forming secondary crater chains. The formation and preservation of these linear features indicates Ceres' outer layer is relatively strong, and is not dominated by viscous relaxation as predicted. The fractures also give us insights into Ceres' interior: their spacing indicates the fractured layer is ~30 km thick, and we interpret the fractures formed because of uplift and extension induced by an upwelling region, which is consistent with geodynamic modeling (King et al., 2016). In addition, we find that some secondary crater chains do not form radial patterns around their source impact craters, and are located in a different hemisphere from their source impact craters, because of Ceres' fast rotation (period of ~9 hours) and relatively small radius. Our results show Ceres has a surface and outer layer with characteristics that are different than predicted, and underwent complex surface and interior evolution. Our fuller understanding of Ceres, based on Dawn data, gives us important insights into the evolution of bodies in the asteroid belt, and provides unique constraints that can be used to evaluate predictions of the surface

  8. Preparing for Dawn's Mission at Ceres: Challenges and Opportunities in the Exploration of a Dwarf Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayman, Marc D.; Mase, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    After escaping from Vesta in 2012, Dawn is continuing its 2.5-year flight to dwarf planet Ceres. Investigating this second destination promises to provide a view of an intriguing world of ice and rock, likely displaying fascinating geology entirely unlike any body yet orbited by a spacecraft. Dawn spends the significant majority of the time thrusting with its ion propulsion system to deliver the 3.6 km/s required to rendezvous with Ceres. Meanwhile, the operations team has developed the sequences that will be used there. Following orbit capture in March 2015, Dawn will fly to a series of four circular polar science orbits. The orbits, ranging from about 13,500 km to 375 km in altitude, are designed to optimize the scientific observations. The overall strategy for exploring Ceres is based strongly on the extremely successful 16 months of Vesta operations, during which Dawn met or exceeded all of its objectives. Nevertheless, the loss of two of the spacecraft's four reaction wheels has necessitated some important changes. Based on a very productive hydrazine conservation campaign in the interplanetary cruise and the development of new hydrazine-efficient methods of operating at Ceres, there is good reason to expect that Dawn will be able to accomplish all of its objectives regardless of the health of the reaction wheels. This paper describes the progress in traveling to Ceres as well as the plans for exploring this giant, icy world.

  9. Exploration of a Small Volatile-Rich World: New Light on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol A.; Ammannito, Eleonora; Buczkowski, Debra L.; DeSanctis, Maria Cristina; Hiesinger, Harald; Jaumann, Ralf; McSween, Harry Y.; Nathues, Andreas; Park, Ryan S.; Pieters, Carle M.

    2016-04-01

    In March 2015, Dawn arrived at Ceres after its 7.5-year journey. It had orbited and mapped Vesta before arriving at its final target, the largest body in the main asteroid belt. There it found a dark, dry, heavily cratered surface punctuated by small bright spots. Ceres encountered a similar cratering population to that encountered by Vesta and is just as cratered at smaller sizes, but Ceres is missing the largest expected craters and is gravitationally relaxed at lowest orders. Ceres' crust consists of a thin lag deposit containing ammoniated clay of probable endogenous origin, carbonates and dark material, and exhibits bright patches of possible salt concentrations. To be consistent with the crater distribution and the gravity data, there must exist beneath this crust a strong lithosphere of water-ice and rock, containing carbonates and salt. Under this 'upper mantle' must be a lower mantle, consisting of a warmer, weaker athenosphere of similar chemical composition. In the center lies a solid core. Flat crater floors, flows of material across the surface, isolated mountains at least one of which appears to be an ice volcano, all point to the importance of volatile-driven activity on Ceres that likely involves brine-driven cryovolcanism.

  10. On the Relative Stability of CERES Reflected Shortwave and MISR and MODIS Visible Radiance Measurements During the Terra Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, J. G.; Loeb, N. G.

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen years of visible, near-infrared, and broadband shortwave radiance measurements from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on board NASA's Terra satellite are analyzed in order to assess their long-term relative stability for climate purposes. A regression-based approach between CERES, MODIS, and MISR (An camera only) reflectances is used to calculate the bias between the different reflectances relative to a reference year. When compared to the CERES shortwave broadband reflectance, relative drift between the MISR narrowbands is within 1%/decade. Compared to the CERES shortwave reflectance, the MODIS narrowband reflectances show a relative drift of less than -1.33%/decade. When compared to MISR, the MODIS reflectances show a relative drift of between -0.36%/decade and -2.66%/decade. We show that the CERES Terra SW measurements are stable over the time period relative to CERES Aqua. Using this as evidence that CERES Terra may be absolutely stable, we suggest that the CERES, MISR, and MODIS instruments meet the radiometric stability goals for climate applications set out in Ohring et al. (2005).

  11. Evaluation of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Scanner Pointing Accuracy using a Coastline Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currey, Chris; Smith, Lou; Neely, Bob

    1998-01-01

    Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) investigation to examine the role of clouds in the radiative energy flow through the Earth-atmosphere system. The first CERES scanning radiometer was launched on November 27, 1997 into a 35 inclination, 350 km altitude orbit, on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. The CERES instrument consists of a three channel scanning broadband radiometer. The spectral bands measure shortwave (0.3 - 5 microns), window (8 - 12 microns), and total (0.3 - 100 microns) radiation reflected or emitted from the Earth-atmosphere system. Each Earth viewing measurement is geolocated to the Earth fixed coordinate system using satellite ephemeris, Earth rotation and geoid, and instrument pointing data. The interactive CERES coastline detection system is used to assess the accuracy of the CERES geolocation process. By analyzing radiative flux gradients at the boundaries of ocean and land masses, the accuracy of the scanner measurement locations may be derived for the CERES/TRMM instrument/satellite system. The resulting CERES measurement location errors are within 10% of the nadir footprint size. Precise pointing knowledge of the Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) is required for convolution of cloud properties onto the CERES footprint; initial VIRS coastline results are included.

  12. 供应链整合标杆企业—利丰公司经营模式研究%Study on Operational Mode of Li&Fung, a Benchmarking Enterprise in Supply Chain Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢政谕

    2011-01-01

    对供应链整合的标杆企业利丰公司进行了案例分析,将其经营模式归纳为明确的定位与业务范围、纵向供应链布局与横向全球化布局三个方面,并且分析了支撑其经营模式的核心竞争力,包括产品知识能力、流程设计能力、增值服务能力、信息能力、供应链管理能力、组织再造能力、广大的供货商与客户网络.%The paper includes a case study of the supply chain integration benchmarking enterprise-Li&Fung company, and summarizes its business model into three key aspects: specific positioning and business scope, vertical supply chain hierarchy, and horizontal global layout. It also analyzes the core competences supporting its business model, which include product knowledge capability, process design capability, value-added services capability, information capability, supply chain management capability, organization reengineering capability, and expansive suppliers and customers networks.

  13. 2001 benchmarking guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppszallern, S

    2001-01-01

    Our fifth annual guide to benchmarking under managed care presents data that is a study in market dynamics and adaptation. New this year are financial indicators on HMOs exiting the market and those remaining. Hospital financial ratios and details on department performance are included. The physician group practice numbers show why physicians are scrutinizing capitated payments. Overall, hospitals in markets with high managed care penetration are more successful in managing labor costs and show productivity gains in imaging services, physical therapy and materials management.

  14. Phasic temperature control appraised with the Ceres-Wheat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, T; Bugbee, B; Tubiello, F

    1997-01-01

    Phasic control refers to the specification of a series of different environmental conditions during a crop's life cycle, with the goal of optimizing some aspect of productivity. Because of the enormous number of possible scenarios, phasic control is an ideal situation for modeling to provide guidance prior to experiments. Here we use the Ceres-Wheat model, modified for hydroponic growth chambers, to examine temperature effects. We first establish a baseline by running the model at constant temperatures from 10 degrees C to 30 degrees C. Grain yield per day peaks at 15 degrees C at a value that is 25% higher than the yield at the commonly used 23 degrees C. We then show results for phasic control limited to a single shift in temperature and, finally, we examine scenarios that allow each of the five phases of the life cycle to have a different temperature. Results indicate that grain yield might be increased by 15-20% over the best yield at constant temperature, primarily from a boosted harvest index, which has the additional advantage of less waste biomass. Such gains, if achievable, would help optimize food production for life support systems. Experimental work should first verify the relationship between yield and temperature, and then move to selected scenarios of phasic control, based on model predictions. PMID:11540452

  15. Quantitative consistency testing of thermal benchmark lattice experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper sets forth a general method to demonstrate the quantitative consistency (or inconsistency) of results of thermal reactor lattice experiments. The method is of particular importance in selecting standard ''benchmark'' experiments for comparison testing of lattice analysis codes and neutron cross sections. ''Benchmark'' thermal lattice experiments are currently selected by consensus, which usually means the experiment is geometrically simple, well-documented, reasonably complete, and qualitatively consistent. A literature search has not revealed any general quantitative test that has been applied to experimental results to demonstrate consistency, although some experiments must have been subjected to some form or other of quantitative test. The consistency method is based on a two-group neutron balance condition that is capable of revealing the quantitative consistency (or inconsistency) of reported thermal benchmark lattice integral parameters. This equation is used in conjunction with a second equation in the following discussion to assess the consistency (or inconsistency) of: (1) several Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) defined thermal benchmark lattices, (2) SRL experiments on the Mark 5R and Mark 15 lattices, and (3) several D2O lattices encountered as proposed thermal benchmark lattices. Nineteen thermal benchmark lattice experiments were subjected to a quantitative test of consistency between the reported experimental integral parameters. Results of this testing showed only two lattice experiments to be generally useful as ''benchmarks,'' three lattice experiments to be of limited usefulness, three lattice experiments to be potentially useful, and 11 lattice experiments to be not useful. These results are tabulated with the lattices identified

  16. General implementation of the resolution-of-the-identity and Cholesky representations of electron repulsion integrals within coupled-cluster and equation-of-motion methods: Theory and benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Zuev, Dmitry; Feng, Xintian; Khistyaev, Kirill; Shao, Yihan; Krylov, Anna I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a general implementation of the resolution-of-the-identity (RI) and Cholesky decomposition (CD) representations of electron repulsion integrals within the coupled-cluster with single and double substitutions (CCSD) and equation-of-motion (EOM) family of methods. The CCSD and EOM-CCSD equations are rewritten to eliminate the storage of the largest four-index intermediates leading to a significant reduction in disk storage requirements, reduced I/O penalties, and, as a result, improved parallel performance. In CCSD, the number of rate-determining contractions is also reduced; however, in EOM the number of operations is increased because the transformed integrals, which are computed once in the canonical implementation, need to be reassembled at each Davidson iteration. Nevertheless, for large jobs the effect of the increased number of rate-determining contractions is surpassed by the significantly reduced memory and disk usage leading to a considerable speed-up. Overall, for medium-size examples, RI/CD CCSD calculations are approximately 40% faster compared with the canonical implementation, whereas timings of EOM calculations are reduced by a factor of two. More significant speed-ups are obtained in larger bases, i.e., more than a two-fold speed-up for CCSD and almost five-fold speed-up for EOM-EE-CCSD in cc-pVTZ. Even more considerable speedups (6-7-fold) are achieved by combining RI/CD with the frozen natural orbitals approach. The numeric accuracy of RI/CD approaches is benchmarked with an emphasis on energy differences. Errors in EOM excitation, ionization, and electron-attachment energies are less than 0.001 eV with typical RI bases and with a 10-4 threshold in CD. Errors with 10-2 and 10-3 thresholds, which afford more significant computational savings, are less than 0.04 and 0.008 eV, respectively.

  17. High-resolution Ceres High Altitude Mapping Orbit atlas derived from Dawn Framing Camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatsch, Th.; Kersten, E.; Matz, K.-D.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    The Dawn spacecraft Framing Camera (FC) acquired over 2400 clear filter images of Ceres with a resolution of about 140 m/pixel during the six cycles in the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) phase between August 18 and October 21, 2015. We ortho-rectified the images from the first cycle and produced a global, high-resolution, controlled photomosaic of Ceres. This global mosaic is the basis for a high-resolution Ceres atlas that consists of 15 tiles mapped at a scale of 1:750,000. The nomenclature used in this atlas was proposed by the Dawn team and was approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The full atlas is available to the public through the Dawn Geographical Information System (GIS) web page

  18. Results of two multi-chord stellar occultations by dwarf planet (1) Ceres

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes-Júnior, A R; Braga-Ribas, F; Assafin, M; Vieira-Martins, R; Camargo, J I B; Sicardy, B; Timerson, B; George, T; Broughton, J; Blank, T; Benedetti-Rossi, G; Brooks, J; Dantowitz, R F; Dunham, D W; Dunham, J B; Ellington, C K; Emilio, M; Herpich, F R; Jacques, C; Maley, P D; Mehret, L; Mello, A J T; Milone, A C; Pimentel, E; Schoenell, W; Weber, N S

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of two multi-chord stellar occultations by the dwarf planet (1) Ceres that were observed from Brazil on 2010 August 17, and from the USA on 2013 October 25. Four positive detections were obtained for the 2010 occultation, and nine for the 2013 occultation. Elliptical models were adjusted to the observed chords to obtain Ceres' size and shape. Two limb fitting solutions were studied for each event. The first one is a nominal solution with an indeterminate polar aspect angle. The second one was constrained by the pole coordinates as given by Drummond et al. Assuming a Maclaurin spheroid, we determine an equatorial diameter of 972 $\\pm$ 6 km and an apparent oblateness of 0.08 $\\pm$ 0.03 as our best solution. These results are compared to all available size and shape determinations for Ceres made so far, and shall be confirmed by the NASA's Dawn space mission.

  19. Dawn arrives at Ceres: Exploration of a small, volatile-rich world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Ammannito, E.; Buczkowski, D. L.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Hiesinger, H.; Jaumann, R.; Konopliv, A. S.; McSween, H. Y.; Nathues, A.; Park, R. S.; Pieters, C. M.; Prettyman, T. H.; McCord, T. B.; McFadden, L. A.; Mottola, S.; Zuber, M. T.; Joy, S. P.; Polanskey, C.; Rayman, M. D.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Chi, P. J.; Combe, J. P.; Ermakov, A.; Fu, R. R.; Hoffmann, M.; Jia, Y. D.; King, S. D.; Lawrence, D. J.; Li, J.-Y.; Marchi, S.; Preusker, F.; Roatsch, T.; Ruesch, O.; Schenk, P.; Villarreal, M. N.; Yamashita, N.

    2016-09-01

    On 6 March 2015, Dawn arrived at Ceres to find a dark, desiccated surface punctuated by small, bright areas. Parts of Ceres’ surface are heavily cratered, but the largest expected craters are absent. Ceres appears gravitationally relaxed at only the longest wavelengths, implying a mechanically strong lithosphere with a weaker deep interior. Ceres’ dry exterior displays hydroxylated silicates, including ammoniated clays of endogenous origin. The possibility of abundant volatiles at depth is supported by geomorphologic features such as flat crater floors with pits, lobate flows of materials, and a singular mountain that appears to be an extrusive cryovolcanic dome. On one occasion, Ceres temporarily interacted with the solar wind, producing a bow shock accelerating electrons to energies of tens of kilovolts.

  20. Observational Constraints on Water Sublimation from 24 Themis and 1 Ceres

    CERN Document Server

    McKay, Adam J; Li, Jian-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have suggested that there is water ice present on the surfaces of 24 Themis and 1 Ceres. We present upper limits on the H$_2$O production rate on these bodies derived using a search for [OI]6300 Angstrom emission. For Themis, the water production is less than 4.5 $\\times$ 10$^{27}$ mol s$^{-1}$, while for Ceres our derived upper limit is 4.6 $\\times$ 10$^{28}$ mol s$^{-1}$. The derived limits imply a very low fraction of the surface area of each asteroid is active ($<$ 2 $\\times$ 10$^{-4}$), though this estimate varies by as much as an order of magnitude depending on thermal properties of the surface. This is much lower than seen for comets, which have active areas of 10$^{-2}$ - 10$^{-1}$. We discuss possible implications for our findings on the nature of water ice on Themis and Ceres.

  1. Benchmark Data Through The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Dr. Enrico Sartori

    2005-09-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiments Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency’s (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) in June of 2002. The IRPhEP focus is on the derivation of internationally peer reviewed benchmark models for several types of integral measurements, in addition to the critical configuration. While the benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP are of primary interest to the Reactor Physics Community, many of the benchmarks can be of significant value to the Criticality Safety and Nuclear Data Communities. Benchmarks that support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), for example, also support fuel manufacture, handling, transportation, and storage activities and could challenge current analytical methods. The IRPhEP is patterned after the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and is closely coordinated with the ICSBEP. This paper highlights the benchmarks that are currently being prepared by the IRPhEP that are also of interest to the Criticality Safety Community. The different types of measurements and associated benchmarks that can be expected in the first publication and beyond are described. The protocol for inclusion of IRPhEP benchmarks as ICSBEP benchmarks and for inclusion of ICSBEP benchmarks as IRPhEP benchmarks is detailed. The format for IRPhEP benchmark evaluations is described as an extension of the ICSBEP format. Benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP add new dimension to criticality safety benchmarking efforts and expand the collection of available integral benchmarks for nuclear data testing. The first publication of the "International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments" is scheduled for January of 2006.

  2. Dawn Mission’s Search for satellites at Ceres: Upper limits on size of orbital objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Lucy-Ann A.; Skillman, David R.; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Carsenty, Uri; Schroeder, Stefan E.; Li, Jian-Yang Y.; Rayman, Marc D.

    2015-11-01

    Hundreds of asteroids have small secondary satellites or are double, or even multiple body systems; yet dwarf planet Ceres doesn’t and isn’t. Ground-based and space-based telescopic searches have placed upper limits on the size of any secondary bodies gravitationally bound to Ceres of 1-2 km (Gehrels et al 1987, Bieryla et al. 2011). The Dawn project’s satellite working group designed and conducted a search during approach to Ceres and during high orbit concentrating its search close to Ceres’ limb where previous searches could not reach. Over 2000 images for both science and optical navigation were searched. In addition, a dedicated satellite search was conducted during two commanded off-nadir pointings. The acquired images extend 5.5° x 5.5° on either side of Ceres, at a range of ~ 145,000 km and solar phase angle at Ceres of 18°. No moving objects associated with Ceres were detected. The search extended down to Ceres’ limb (previous searches went to 500 km above the limb) and extended the upper limit for the non-detection to 30 +/- 6 and 45 +/-9 meter radius for effective exposure times of 114s and 19s respectively. An additional small search was conducted using the spacecraft's star tracker from which no objects were found. The Dawn mission’s search reduced the previous detection limit from Hubble Space Telescope images by two orders of magnitude. Why some asteroids have satellites and others don’t is a matter for dynamical speculation.

  3. More diversity for volcanism: Ceres' Ahuna Mons from Dawn's Framing Camera data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesch, Ottaviano; Platz, Thomas; Schenk, Paul M.; McFadden, Lucy Ann; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Quick, Lynnae C.; Byrne, Shane; Preusker, Frank; O'Brien, David P.; Schmedemann, Nico; Williams, David A.; Li, Jian-Yang; Bland, Michael T.; Hiesinger, Harald; Kneissl, Thomas; Neesemann, Adrian; Schaefer, Michael; Pasckert, Jan Hendrik; Schmidt, Britney E.; Buczkowski, Debra; Sykes, Mark V.; Nathues, Andreas; Roatsch, Thomas; Hoffmann, Martin; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    In the last decades, the exploration of planets and moons by spacecraft revealed a variety of volcanic expressions. The recent visit to dwarf planet Ceres by the Dawn spacecraft is shedding light on a possible new, compositionally different volcanism falling into the cryovolcanism field. The dwarf planet's properties, i.e., low bulk density, low internal temperatures and volatile-rich composition relative to terrestrial planets, would only generate melts composed of brines. On the other hand, Ceres' carbonate- and clay-rich surface mineralogy suggests a cryovolcanism different from that of water-ice dominated icy satellites.The Dawn Framing Camera (FC) provides a complete global dataset for photo-geological investigations of Ceres, including a 35 m/pixel visible coverage, a 135 m/pixel multi-spectral coverage, and a 135 m/pixel global digital elevation model from stereo-photogrammetry. Domical landforms up to a few kilometers in elevation and tens of kilometers in diameter (referred to as tholi and montes) are found scattered across Ceres' surface. Ahuna Mons is a 4-km topographic high distinct in its shape and morphology from other topographic features on Ceres. The mountain consists of two morphological units: a flank unit of unconsolidated material and a fractured (i.e., consolidated) summit unit. Steep slopes at the angle of repose characterize the flank unit, whereas the summit unit has a convex shape. The flank and summit morphologies and the morphometry of the mountain can be explained by the formation of a cryovolcanic dome, analogous to a silicic volcanic dome found on terrestrial planets. Albedo and crater size-frequency distribution measurements from FC imagery reveal geologically-recent activity on Ahuna Mons, occurring sometime within the last few hundreds Myr. The characteristics of and implications for this possible cryomagma for Ceres thermal and chemical evolution will be discussed.

  4. HPC Benchmark Suite NMx Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Automation Inc., (IAI) and University of Central Florida (UCF) propose to develop a comprehensive numerical test suite for benchmarking current and...

  5. A partially differentiated interior for (1) Ceres deduced from its gravity field and shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, R. S.; Konopliv, A. S.; Bills, B. G.; Rambaux, N.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Raymond, C. A.; Vaughan, A. T.; Ermakov, A. I.; Zuber, M. T.; Fu, R. R.; Toplis, M. J.; Russell, C. T.; Nathues, A.; Preusker, F.

    2016-09-01

    Remote observations of the asteroid (1) Ceres from ground- and space-based telescopes have provided its approximate density and shape, leading to a range of models for the interior of Ceres, from homogeneous to fully differentiated. A previously missing parameter that can place a strong constraint on the interior of Ceres is its moment of inertia, which requires the measurement of its gravitational variation together with either precession rate or a validated assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium. However, Earth-based remote observations cannot measure gravity variations and the magnitude of the precession rate is too small to be detected. Here we report gravity and shape measurements of Ceres obtained from the Dawn spacecraft, showing that it is in hydrostatic equilibrium with its inferred normalized mean moment of inertia of 0.37. These data show that Ceres is a partially differentiated body, with a rocky core overlaid by a volatile-rich shell, as predicted in some studies. Furthermore, we show that the gravity signal is strongly suppressed compared to that predicted by the topographic variation. This indicates that Ceres is isostatically compensated, such that topographic highs are supported by displacement of a denser interior. In contrast to the asteroid (4) Vesta, this strong compensation points to the presence of a lower-viscosity layer at depth, probably reflecting a thermal rather than compositional gradient. To further investigate the interior structure, we assume a two-layer model for the interior of Ceres with a core density of 2,460-2,900 kilograms per cubic metre (that is, composed of CI and CM chondrites), which yields an outer-shell thickness of 70-190 kilometres. The density of this outer shell is 1,680-1,950 kilograms per cubic metre, indicating a mixture of volatiles and denser materials such as silicates and salts. Although the gravity and shape data confirm that the interior of Ceres evolved thermally, its partially differentiated

  6. Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Visualization Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) Plot Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Julia A.

    1995-01-01

    The first Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument will be launched in 1997 to collect data on the Earth's radiation budget. The data retrieved from the satellite will be processed through twelve subsystems. The Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) plot generator software was written to assist scientists in the early stages of CERES data analysis, producing two-dimensional plots of the footprint radiation and cloud data generated by one of the subsystems. Until the satellite is launched, however, software developers need verification tools to check their code. This plot generator will aid programmers by geolocating algorithm result on a global map.

  7. NASA Software Engineering Benchmarking Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rarick, Heather L.; Godfrey, Sara H.; Kelly, John C.; Crumbley, Robert T.; Wifl, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    To identify best practices for the improvement of software engineering on projects, NASA's Offices of Chief Engineer (OCE) and Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) formed a team led by Heather Rarick and Sally Godfrey to conduct this benchmarking study. The primary goals of the study are to identify best practices that: Improve the management and technical development of software intensive systems; Have a track record of successful deployment by aerospace industries, universities [including research and development (R&D) laboratories], and defense services, as well as NASA's own component Centers; and Identify candidate solutions for NASA's software issues. Beginning in the late fall of 2010, focus topics were chosen and interview questions were developed, based on the NASA top software challenges. Between February 2011 and November 2011, the Benchmark Team interviewed a total of 18 organizations, consisting of five NASA Centers, five industry organizations, four defense services organizations, and four university or university R and D laboratory organizations. A software assurance representative also participated in each of the interviews to focus on assurance and software safety best practices. Interviewees provided a wealth of information on each topic area that included: software policy, software acquisition, software assurance, testing, training, maintaining rigor in small projects, metrics, and use of the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) framework, as well as a number of special topics that came up in the discussions. NASA's software engineering practices compared favorably with the external organizations in most benchmark areas, but in every topic, there were ways in which NASA could improve its practices. Compared to defense services organizations and some of the industry organizations, one of NASA's notable weaknesses involved communication with contractors regarding its policies and requirements for acquired software. One of NASA's strengths

  8. Morphology of Cryogenic Flows and Channels on Dwarf Planet Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Otto, Katharina A.; von der Gathen, Isabel; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Williams, David A.; Pieters, Carle M.; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland J.; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2016-04-01

    Cereś surface is affected by numerous impact craters and some of them show features such as channels or multiple flow events forming a smooth, less cratered surface, indicating possible post-impact resurfacing [1,2]. Flow features occur on several craters on Ceres such as Haulani, Ikapati, Occator, Jarimba and Kondos in combination with smooth crater floors [3,4], appearing as extended plains, ponded material, lobate flow fronts and in the case of Haulani lobate flows originating from the crest of the central ridge [3] partly overwhelming the mass wasting deposits from the rim. Haulanís crater flanks are also affected by multiple flow events radiating out from the crater and partly forming breakages. Flows occur as fine-grained lobes with well-defined margins and as smooth undifferentiated streaky flows covering the adjacent surface. Thus, adjacent craters are covered by flow material. Occator also exhibits multiple flows but in contrast to Haulani, the flows originating from the center overwhelm the mass wasting deposits from the rim [4]. The flows have a "bluish" signature in the FC color filters ratio. Channels occur at relatively fresh craters. They also show the "bluish" signature like the flows and plains. Only few channels occur at older "reddish" craters. They are relatively fresh incised into flow features or crater ejecta. Most are small, narrow and have lobated lobes with predominant distinctive flow margins. The widths vary between a few tens of meters to about 3 km. The channels are found on crater flanks as well as on the crater floors. The occurrence of flow features indicates viscous material on the surface. Those features could be formed by impact melt. However, impact melt is produced during the impact, assuming similar material properties as the ejecta it is expected to have nearly the same age as the impact itself, but the flows and plains are almost free of craters, thus, they seem to be much younger than the impact itself. In addition, the

  9. Benchmarking and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    nchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The applica......nchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  10. SSI and structural benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the latest results of the ongoing program entitled, Standard Problems for Structural Computer Codes, currently being worked on at BNL for the USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. During FY 1986, efforts were focussed on three tasks, namely, (1) an investigation of ground water effects on the response of Category I structures, (2) the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop and (3) studies on structural benchmarks associated with Category I structures. The objective of the studies on ground water effects is to verify the applicability and the limitations of the SSI methods currently used by the industry in performing seismic evaluations of nuclear plants which are located at sites with high water tables. In a previous study by BNL (NUREG/CR-4588), it has been concluded that the pore water can influence significantly the soil-structure interaction process. This result, however, is based on the assumption of fully saturated soil profiles. Consequently, the work was further extended to include cases associated with variable water table depths. In this paper, results related to cut-off depths beyond which the pore water effects can be ignored in seismic calculations, are addressed. Comprehensive numerical data are given for soil configurations typical to those encountered in nuclear plant sites. These data were generated by using a modified version of the SLAM code which is capable of handling problems related to the dynamic response of saturated soils. Further, the paper presents some key aspects of the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop (NUREG/CP-0054) which was held in Bethesda, MD on June 1, 1986. Finally, recent efforts related to the task on the structural benchmarks are described

  11. Measuring NUMA effects with the STREAM benchmark

    CERN Document Server

    Bergstrom, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Modern high-end machines feature multiple processor packages, each of which contains multiple independent cores and integrated memory controllers connected directly to dedicated physical RAM. These packages are connected via a shared bus, creating a system with a heterogeneous memory hierarchy. Since this shared bus has less bandwidth than the sum of the links to memory, aggregate memory bandwidth is higher when parallel threads all access memory local to their processor package than when they access memory attached to a remote package. But, the impact of this heterogeneous memory architecture is not easily understood from vendor benchmarks. Even where these measurements are available, they provide only best-case memory throughput. This work presents a series of modifications to the well-known STREAM benchmark to measure the effects of NUMA on both a 48-core AMD Opteron machine and a 32-core Intel Xeon machine.

  12. Benchmark for Strategic Performance Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohlke, Annette

    1997-01-01

    Explains benchmarking, a total quality management tool used to measure and compare the work processes in a library with those in other libraries to increase library performance. Topics include the main groups of upper management, clients, and staff; critical success factors for each group; and benefits of benchmarking. (Author/LRW)

  13. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, U.; Alex, J; Batstone, D. J.;

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to p...

  14. Quantum benchmarks for Gaussian states

    CERN Document Server

    Chiribella, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Teleportation and storage of continuous variable states of light and atoms are essential building blocks for the realization of large scale quantum networks. Rigorous validation of these implementations require identifying, and surpassing, benchmarks set by the most effective strategies attainable without the use of quantum resources. Such benchmarks have been established for special families of input states, like coherent states and particular subclasses of squeezed states. Here we solve the longstanding problem of defining quantum benchmarks for general pure Gaussian states with arbitrary phase, displacement, and squeezing, randomly sampled according to a realistic prior distribution. As a special case, we show that the fidelity benchmark for teleporting squeezed states with totally random phase and squeezing degree is 1/2, equal to the corresponding one for coherent states. We discuss the use of entangled resources to beat the benchmarks in experiments.

  15. Discovery of the first asteroid, Ceres historical studies in asteroid research

    CERN Document Server

    Cunningham, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    Based on extensive primary sources, many never previously translated into English, this is the definitive account of the origins of Ceres as it went from being classified as a new planet to reclassification as the first of a previously unknown group of celestial objects. Cunningham opens this critical moment of astronomical discovery to full modern analysis for the first time. This book includes all the voluminous correspondence, translated into English, between the astronomers of Europe about the startling discovery of Ceres by Piazzi in 1801. It covers the period up to March 1802, at which time Pallas was discovered. Also included are Piazzi's two monographs about Ceres, and the sections of two books dealing with Ceres, one by Johann Bode, the other by Johann Schroeter. The origin of the word 'asteroid' is explained, along with several chapters on the antecedents of the story going back to ancient Greek times. The formulation of Bode's Law is given, as are the details on the efforts of Baron von Zach to org...

  16. Phase Angle Effects on 3-micron Absorption Band on Ceres: Implications for Dawn Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Takir, Driss; Sanchez, Juan A; Corre, Lucille Le; Hardersen, Paul S; Nathues, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Phase angle-induced spectral effects are important to characterize since they affect spectral band parameters such as band depth and band center, and therefore skew mineralogical interpretations of planetary bodies via reflectance spectroscopy. Dwarf planet (1) Ceres is the next target of NASA's Dawn mission, which is expected to arrive in March 2015. The visible and near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) onboard Dawn has the spatial and spectral range to characterize the surface between 0.25-5.0 microns. Ceres has an absorption feature at 3.0 microns due to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing minerals (e.g. Lebofsky et al. 1981, Rivkin et al. 2003). We analyzed phase angle-induced spectral effects on the 3-micron absorption band on Ceres using spectra measured with the long-wavelength cross-dispersed (LXD: 1.9-4.2 microns) mode of the SpeX spectrograph/imager at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Ceres LXD spectra were measured at different phase angles ranging from 0.7o to 22o. We found that the band...

  17. Dawn VIR Cal (RDR) Ceres Visible Spectra V1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, M. C.; Capria, M. T.; Giardino, M.; Ammannito, E.; Fonte, S.

    2016-05-01

    This data set contains the spectral radiance (W/(m**2*sr*micron)) data from the Dawn VIR instrument visible channel for all Ceres encounter mission phases. The data cover the time period between 2014-12-26 and 2016-06-01.

  18. Dawn VIR Cal (RDR) Ceres Infrared Spectra V1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, M. C.; Capria, M. T.; Giardino, M.; Ammannito, E.; Fonte, S.

    2016-05-01

    This data set contains the spectral radiance (W/(m**2*sr*micron)) data from the Dawn VIR instrument infrared channel for all Ceres encounter mission phases. The data cover the time period between 2014-12-26 and 2016-06-01.

  19. Benchmarking biofuels; Biobrandstoffen benchmarken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croezen, H.; Kampman, B.; Bergsma, G.

    2012-03-15

    A sustainability benchmark for transport biofuels has been developed and used to evaluate the various biofuels currently on the market. For comparison, electric vehicles, hydrogen vehicles and petrol/diesel vehicles were also included. A range of studies as well as growing insight are making it ever clearer that biomass-based transport fuels may have just as big a carbon footprint as fossil fuels like petrol or diesel, or even bigger. At the request of Greenpeace Netherlands, CE Delft has brought together current understanding on the sustainability of fossil fuels, biofuels and electric vehicles, with particular focus on the performance of the respective energy carriers on three sustainability criteria, with the first weighing the heaviest: (1) Greenhouse gas emissions; (2) Land use; and (3) Nutrient consumption [Dutch] Greenpeace Nederland heeft CE Delft gevraagd een duurzaamheidsmeetlat voor biobrandstoffen voor transport te ontwerpen en hierop de verschillende biobrandstoffen te scoren. Voor een vergelijk zijn ook elektrisch rijden, rijden op waterstof en rijden op benzine of diesel opgenomen. Door onderzoek en voortschrijdend inzicht blijkt steeds vaker dat transportbrandstoffen op basis van biomassa soms net zoveel of zelfs meer broeikasgassen veroorzaken dan fossiele brandstoffen als benzine en diesel. CE Delft heeft voor Greenpeace Nederland op een rijtje gezet wat de huidige inzichten zijn over de duurzaamheid van fossiele brandstoffen, biobrandstoffen en elektrisch rijden. Daarbij is gekeken naar de effecten van de brandstoffen op drie duurzaamheidscriteria, waarbij broeikasgasemissies het zwaarst wegen: (1) Broeikasgasemissies; (2) Landgebruik; en (3) Nutriëntengebruik.

  20. PHASE ANGLE EFFECTS ON 3 μm ABSORPTION BAND ON CERES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DAWN MISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takir, D.; Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J. A.; Corre, L. Le [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E Fort Lowell Road, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Hardersen, P. S. [Department of Space Studies, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 (United States); Nathues, A., E-mail: dtakir@psi.edu [Max-Planck-Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Phase angle-induced spectral effects are important to characterize since they affect spectral band parameters such as band depth and band center, and therefore skew mineralogical interpretations of planetary bodies via reflectance spectroscopy. Dwarf planet (1) Ceres is the next target of NASA’s Dawn mission, which is expected to arrive in 2015 March. The visible and near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) on board Dawn has the spatial and spectral range to characterize the surface between 0.25–5.0 μm. Ceres has an absorption feature at 3.0 μm due to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing minerals. We analyzed phase angle-induced spectral effects on the 3 μm absorption band on Ceres using spectra measured with the long-wavelength cross-dispersed (LXD: 1.9–4.2 μm) mode of the SpeX spectrograph/imager at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Ceres LXD spectra were measured at different phase angles ranging from 0.°7 to 22°. We found that the band center slightly increases from 3.06 μm at lower phase angles (0.°7 and 6°) to 3.07 μm at higher phase angles (11° and 22°), the band depth decreases by ∼20% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles, and the band area decreases by ∼25% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles. Our results will have implications for constraining the abundance of OH on the surface of Ceres from VIR spectral data, which will be acquired by Dawn starting spring 2015.

  1. Resolved Spectrophotometric Properties of the Ceres Surface from Dawn Framing Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Stefan; Mottola, Stefano; Carsenty, Uri; Jaumann, Ralf; Li, Jian-Yang; Palmer, Eric; Pieters, Carle; Preusker, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    We present a global spectrophotometric characterization of the Ceres surface using Dawn Framing Camera images. We identify the photometric model that yields the best results for photometrically correcting images. Corrected images acquired on approach to Ceres were assembled into global maps of albedo and color. The albedo map is dominated by a large, circular, bright basin-like feature, known from HST images, and dotted by smaller bright features mostly associated with fresh-looking craters. The dominant color variation over the surface is represented by the presence of "blue" material in and around such craters, which has a negative spectral slope when compared to average terrain. We also mapped variations of the phase curve by employing an exponential photometric model, a technique previously applied to asteroid Vesta. The surface of Ceres scatters light differently from Vesta in the sense that the ejecta of several fresh-looking craters appear to be physically smooth rather than rough. Albedo, blue color, and physical smoothness all appear to be indicators of youth. The physical smoothness of some blue terrains is consistent with an initially liquid condition, perhaps as a consequence of impact melting of subsurface water ice. We propose that the color of blue ejecta derives from an originally ice-rich condition, which implies the presence of sub-surface deposits of water ice. Space weathering may be responsible for the fading of the blue color over time. The large positive albedo feature of which the Dantu crater forms the northern part may be an ancient impact basin, or palimpsest, whose relief has mostly disappeared. Its visible color and phase curve are similar to those of Ceres average. Occator crater has several bright spots. The center spot is the brightest with a visual normal albedo of six times Ceres average and has a red color. Its scattering properties are consistent with those of a particulate surface deposit of high albedo. The less

  2. California commercial building energy benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-07-01

    Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the

  3. Benchmarking in water project analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Ronald C.

    2008-11-01

    The with/without principle of cost-benefit analysis is examined for the possible bias that it brings to water resource planning. Theory and examples for this question are established. Because benchmarking against the demonstrably low without-project hurdle can detract from economic welfare and can fail to promote efficient policy, improvement opportunities are investigated. In lieu of the traditional, without-project benchmark, a second-best-based "difference-making benchmark" is proposed. The project authorizations and modified review processes instituted by the U.S. Water Resources Development Act of 2007 may provide for renewed interest in these findings.

  4. Performance of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Flight Model 5 (FM5) instrument on NPP mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Susan; Priestley, Kory J.; Hess, Phillip C.; Wilson, Robert S.; Smith, Nathaniel P.; Timcoe, Mark G.; Shankar, Mohan; Walikainen, Dale R.

    2012-09-01

    Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument was designed to provide accurate measurements for the long-term monitoring of Earth's radiation energy budget. Flight Model 5, the sixth of the CERES instrument was launched aboard the NPP spacecraft on October 2011 and it has started the Earth-viewing measurements on January 26, 2012. The CERES instrument with the three scanning sensors measure radiances in 0.3 to 5.0 micron region with Shortwave sensor, 0.3 to elevation offset in the sensor measurement will be determined from the spacecraft pitch manuveur activity viewing the deep space. This paper covers the early-orbit checkout activities and the overall performance of the CERES-FM5 instrument. The postlaunch calibration and the validation results from the instrument are presented.

  5. Water Level Superseded Benchmark Sheets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Images of National Coast & Geodetic Survey (now NOAA's National Geodetic Survey/NGS) tidal benchmarks which have been superseded by new markers or locations....

  6. Benchmarking and Sustainable Transport Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Wyatt, Andrew; Gordon, Lucy

    2004-01-01

    Order to learn from the best. In 2000 the European Commission initiated research to explore benchmarking as a tool to promote policies for ‘sustainable transport’. This paper reports findings and recommendations on how to address this challenge. The findings suggest that benchmarking is a valuable...... tool that may indeed help to move forward the transport policy agenda. However, there are major conditions and limitations. First of all it is not always so straightforward to delimit, measure and compare transport services in order to establish a clear benchmark. Secondly ‘sustainable transport......’ evokes a broad range of concerns that are hard to address fully at the level of specific practices. Thirdly policies are not directly comparable across space and context. For these reasons attempting to benchmark ‘sustainable transport policies’ against one another would be a highly complex task, which...

  7. Spectral Characterizations of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Thermistor Bolometers using Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, K. Lee; Bitting, Herbert; Lee, Robert B., III; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) techniques are being used to characterize the relative spectral response, or sensitivity, of scanning thermistor bolometers in the infrared (IR) region (2 - >= 100-micrometers). The bolometers are being used in the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) program. The CERES measurements are designed to provide precise, long term monitoring of the Earth's atmospheric radiation energy budget. The CERES instrument houses three bolometric radiometers, a total wavelength (0.3- >= 150-micrometers) sensor, a shortwave (0.3-5-micrometers) sensor, and an atmospheric window (8-12-micrometers) sensor. Accurate spectral characterization is necessary for determining filtered radiances for longwave radiometric calibrations. The CERES bolometers spectral response's are measured in the TRW FTS Vacuum Chamber Facility (FTS - VCF), which uses a FTS as the source and a cavity pyroelectric trap detector as the reference. The CERES bolometers and the cavity detector are contained in a vacuum chamber, while the FTS source is housed in a GN2 purged chamber. Due to the thermal time constant of the CERES bolometers, the FTS must be operated in a step mode. Data are acquired in 6 IR spectral bands covering the entire longwave IR region. In this paper, the TRW spectral calibration facility design and data measurement techniques are described. Two approaches are presented which convert the total channel FTS data into the final CERES spectral characterizations, producing the same calibration coefficients (within 0.1 percent). The resulting spectral response curves are shown, along with error sources in the two procedures. Finally, the impact of each spectral response curve on CERES data validation will be examined through analysis of filtered radiance values from various typical scene types.

  8. One Year of Observations of Dawn at Ceres: Composition as seen by VIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, M. Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Ciarniello, Mauro; Raponi, Andrea; Carrozzo, F. Giacomo; Frigeri, Alessandro; Longobardo, Andrea; Palomba, Ernesto; Tosi, Federico; Zambon, Francesca; Fonte, Sergio; Formisano, Michelangelo; Giardino, Marco; Magni, Gianfranco; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Capria, M. Teresa; Marchi, Simone; Pieters, Carle M.; Ehlmann, Bethany; McCord, Tom

    2016-04-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft [1] arrived at Ceres on March 5, 2015, and has been studying the dwarf planet. The Dawn mission is observing Ceres' surface with its suite of instruments [1] including a Visible and InfraRed Mapping Spectrometer (VIR-MS) [2]. VIR-MS is an imaging spectrometer coupling high spectral and spatial resolution in the VIS (0.25-1-micron) and IR (0.95-5-micron) spectral ranges. Ceres' surface is very dark, but small localized areas exhibit unexpectedly bright materials. Since the first approach data, near infrared spectra revealed a dark surface, with a strong and complex absorption band in the spectral region around 3 microns [3]. Near-infrared spectroscopic analyses confirmed previous observation of bands at 3.1, 3.3-3.5, 3.9 micron but have clearly identified a band at 2.72 micron. This characteristic narrow feature is distinctive for OH-bearing minerals, while H2O-bearing phases, show a much broader absorption band that is a poor match for the Ceres spectrum. Water ice does not fit the observed spectrum. The 3.05-3.1 μm band is also visible in Ceres' ground-based spectra, and has been previously attributed to different phases including water ice, hydrated or NH4-bearing clays and brucite [4,5,6]. We find here that the best fit is obtained with ammoniated phyllosilicate added to a dark material (likely magnetite), antigorite and carbonate [7]. These different components, including ammoniated phases, occur everywhere across the surface although with different relative abundances [8]. Particularly interesting are the bright materials present in some craters like Occator, Haulani and Oxo that show different proportions of the components of the mixture [8]. However, the distribution of the band depths are not always linked to morphological structures. The retrieved mineralogy and composition indicates pervasive aqueous alteration of the surface, processes that are expected to be favored on large bodies like Ceres [9]. Furthermore, Ceres' low density

  9. Research on computer systems benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan Jay (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This grant addresses the topic of research on computer systems benchmarking and is more generally concerned with performance issues in computer systems. This report reviews work in those areas during the period of NASA support under this grant. The bulk of the work performed concerned benchmarking and analysis of CPUs, compilers, caches, and benchmark programs. The first part of this work concerned the issue of benchmark performance prediction. A new approach to benchmarking and machine characterization was reported, using a machine characterizer that measures the performance of a given system in terms of a Fortran abstract machine. Another report focused on analyzing compiler performance. The performance impact of optimization in the context of our methodology for CPU performance characterization was based on the abstract machine model. Benchmark programs are analyzed in another paper. A machine-independent model of program execution was developed to characterize both machine performance and program execution. By merging these machine and program characterizations, execution time can be estimated for arbitrary machine/program combinations. The work was continued into the domain of parallel and vector machines, including the issue of caches in vector processors and multiprocessors. All of the afore-mentioned accomplishments are more specifically summarized in this report, as well as those smaller in magnitude supported by this grant.

  10. Benchmarking: a method for continuous quality improvement in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettorchi-Tardy, Amina; Levif, Marie; Michel, Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Benchmarking, a management approach for implementing best practices at best cost, is a recent concept in the healthcare system. The objectives of this paper are to better understand the concept and its evolution in the healthcare sector, to propose an operational definition, and to describe some French and international experiences of benchmarking in the healthcare sector. To this end, we reviewed the literature on this approach's emergence in the industrial sector, its evolution, its fields of application and examples of how it has been used in the healthcare sector. Benchmarking is often thought to consist simply of comparing indicators and is not perceived in its entirety, that is, as a tool based on voluntary and active collaboration among several organizations to create a spirit of competition and to apply best practices. The key feature of benchmarking is its integration within a comprehensive and participatory policy of continuous quality improvement (CQI). Conditions for successful benchmarking focus essentially on careful preparation of the process, monitoring of the relevant indicators, staff involvement and inter-organizational visits. Compared to methods previously implemented in France (CQI and collaborative projects), benchmarking has specific features that set it apart as a healthcare innovation. This is especially true for healthcare or medical-social organizations, as the principle of inter-organizational visiting is not part of their culture. Thus, this approach will need to be assessed for feasibility and acceptability before it is more widely promoted. PMID:23634166

  11. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

    2011-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  12. Benchmarking of human resources management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Akinnusi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the role of human resource management (HRM which, today, plays a strategic partnership role in management. The focus of the paper is on HRM in the public sector, where much hope rests on HRM as a means of transforming the public service and achieving much needed service delivery. However, a critical evaluation of HRM practices in the public sector reveals that these services leave much to be desired. The paper suggests the adoption of benchmarking as a process to revamp HRM in the public sector so that it is able to deliver on its promises. It describes the nature and process of benchmarking and highlights the inherent difficulties in applying benchmarking in HRM. It concludes with some suggestions for a plan of action. The process of identifying “best” practices in HRM requires the best collaborative efforts of HRM practitioners and academicians. If used creatively, benchmarking has the potential to bring about radical and positive changes in HRM in the public sector. The adoption of the benchmarking process is, in itself, a litmus test of the extent to which HRM in the public sector has grown professionally.

  13. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsson, U; Alex, J; Batstone, D J; Benedetti, L; Comas, J; Copp, J B; Corominas, L; Flores-Alsina, X; Gernaey, K V; Nopens, I; Pons, M-N; Rodríguez-Roda, I; Rosen, C; Steyer, J-P; Vanrolleghem, P A; Volcke, E I P; Vrecko, D

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to provide their insights, highlighting areas where knowledge may still be deficient and where new opportunities are emerging, and to propose potential avenues for future development and application of the general benchmarking framework and its associated tools. The paper focuses on the topics of temporal and spatial extension, process modifications within the WWTP, the realism of models, control strategy extensions and the potential for new evaluation tools within the existing benchmark system. We find that there are major opportunities for application within all of these areas, either from existing work already being done within the context of the benchmarking simulation models (BSMs) or applicable work in the wider literature. Of key importance is increasing capability, usability and transparency of the BSM package while avoiding unnecessary complexity.

  14. Detection of local H2O exposed at the surface of Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Thomas B.; Tosi, Federico; Ammannito, Eleonora; Carrozzo, Filippo Giacomo; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Raponi, Andrea; Byrne, Shane; Landis, Margaret E.; Hughson, Kynan H. G.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-09-01

    The surface of dwarf planet Ceres contains hydroxyl-rich materials. Theories predict a water ice-rich mantle, and water vapor emissions have been observed, yet no water (H2O) has been previously identified. The Visible and InfraRed (VIR) mapping spectrometer onboard the Dawn spacecraft has now detected water absorption features within a low-illumination, highly reflective zone in Oxo, a 10-kilometer, geologically fresh crater, on five occasions over a period of 1 month. Candidate materials are H2O ice and mineral hydrates. Exposed H2O ice would become optically undetectable within tens of years under current Ceres temperatures; consequently, only a relatively recent exposure or formation of H2O would explain Dawn’s findings. Some mineral hydrates are stable on geological time scales, but their formation would imply extended contact with ice or liquid H2O.

  15. Heathlands, fire and grazing. A palaeoenvironmental view of Las Hurdes (Cáceres, Spain history during the last 1200 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Abel-Schaad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study. The diachronic study of vegetation change through palynological analysis of sedimentary deposits is an essential tool both to design sound strategies on landscape  management and to understand its anthropogenic dynamics.Area of study. La Meseguera mire (Ladrillar, Cáceres, Spain is located in the Hurdes region in the western part of Iberian Central System and started to develop at the beginning of the Islamic period (ca. 770 cal AD, in an area widely dominated by heathland.  Material and methods. Pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs and charcoal accumulation rate (CHAR combined with historical data are useful indicators to assess the increasing role of human influence on vegetation.Main results. The use of fire and livestock husbandry represents the main drivers of landscape change in the course of the history. The establishment of forest afforestation plans, from the middle of 20th century, changed substantially the regional features. The sporadic presence of beech pollen is detected until 16th century, which implies the most western location in the Iberian Central Mountain System.Research highlights. The integration of pollen analysis and historical data is an essential tool when studying the changes in Holocene vegetation. These changes have been mainly driven by anthropogenic disturbances, more specifically by fire and livestock husbandry.Key Words: Anthropogenic dynamics; Central Mountain System; microcharcoals; non-pollen palynomorphs.  

  16. FINANCIAL AND RISK ANALYSIS OF MAIZE TECHNOLOGY IN ETHIOPIA, BASED ON CERES-MAIZE MODEL RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Eric W.; Howard, Julie A.; Kelly, Valerie A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a financial and risk analysis of improved versus traditional maize production technology in Ethiopia, based on yields simulated with the CERES-Maize crop growth model (Schulthess and Ward, 2000). The purpose is to analyze the potential performance of the SG2000/Ministry of Agriculture program technology under less favorable meteorological conditions (rainfall level and distribution), and in areas with lower agroecological potential than those covered by the SG2000/MOA prog...

  17. Performance Targets and External Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ivar; Hansen, Allan; Vámosi, Tamás S.

    Research on relative performance measures, transfer pricing, beyond budgeting initiatives, target costing, piece rates systems and value based management has for decades underlined the importance of external benchmarking in performance management. Research conceptualises external benchmarking...... of the ‘inside’ costs of the sub-component, technical specifications of the product, opportunistic behavior from the suppliers and cognitive limitation. These are all aspects that easily can dismantle the market mechanism and make it counter-productive in the organization. Thus, by directing more attention...... as a market mechanism that can be brought inside the firm to provide incentives for continuous improvement and the development of competitive advances. However, whereas extant research primarily has focused on the importance and effects of using external benchmarks, less attention has been directed towards...

  18. Daily variability of Ceres' Albedo detected by means of radial velocities changes of the reflected sunlight

    CERN Document Server

    Molaro, P; Monaco, L; Tosi, F; Curto, G Lo; Fulle, M; Pasquini, L

    2016-01-01

    Bright features have been recently discovered by Dawn on Ceres, which extend previous photometric and Space Telescope observations. These features should produce distortions of the line profiles of the reflected solar spectrum and therefore an apparent radial velocity variation modulated by the rotation of the dwarf planet. Here we report on two sequences of observations of Ceres performed in the nights of 31 July, 26-27 August 2015 by means of the high-precision HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6-m La Silla ESO telescope. The observations revealed a quite complex behaviour which likely combines a radial velocity modulation due to the rotation with an amplitude of approx +/- 6 m/s and an unexpected diurnal effect. The latter changes imply changes in the albedo of Occator's bright features due to the blaze produced by the exposure to solar radiation. The short-term variability of Ceres' albedo is on timescales ranging from hours to months and can both be confirmed and followed by means of dedicated radial velocity ...

  19. Spectrophotometric properties of dwarf planet Ceres from VIR onboard Dawn mission

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarniello, M; Ammannito, E; Raponi, A; Longobardo, A; Palomba, E; Carrozzo, F G; Tosi, F; Li, J -Y; Schröder, S; Zambon, F; Frigeri, A; Fonte, S; Giardino, M; Pieters, C M; Raymond, C A; Russell, C T

    2016-01-01

    We study the spectrophotometric properties of dwarf planet Ceres in the VIS-IR spectral range by means of hyper-spectral images acquired by the VIR instrument onboard NASA Dawn mission. Observations with phase angle within the $7.3^{\\circ}<\\alpha<131^{\\circ}$ interval have been used to characterize Ceres' phase curve in the 0.465-4.05 $\\mu m$ spectral range. Hapke's model has been applied to perform the photometric correction of the dataset, allowing us to produce albedo and color maps of the surface. The $V$ band magnitude phase function of Ceres has been fitted with both the classical linear model and HG formalism. The single scattering albedo and the asymmetry parameter at 0.55 $\\mu m$ are respectively $w=0.14 \\pm 0.02$ and $\\xi=-0.11 \\pm0.08$ (two lobes Henyey-Greenstein phase function); the modeled geometric albedo is $0.094\\pm0.007$; the roughness parameter is $\\bar{\\theta}=29^{\\circ} \\pm 6^{\\circ}$. Albedo maps indicate small variability at global scale with average reflectance $0.034 \\pm 0.003$....

  20. Distribution and Validation of CERES Irradiance Global Data Products Via Web Based Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutan, David; Mitrescu, Cristian; Doelling, David; Kato, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    The CERES SYN1deg product provides climate quality 3-hourly globally gridded and temporally complete maps of top of atmosphere, in atmosphere, and surface fluxes. This product requires efficient release to the public and validation to maintain quality assurance. The CERES team developed web-tools for the distribution of both the global gridded products and grid boxes that contain long term validation sites that maintain high quality flux observations at the Earth's surface. These are found at: http://ceres.larc.nasa.gov/order_data.php. In this poster we explore the various tools available to users to sub-set, download, and validate using surface observations the SYN1Deg and Surface-EBAF products. We also analyze differences found in long-term records from well-maintained land surface sites such as the ARM central facility and high quality buoy radiometers, which due to their isolated nature cannot be maintained in a similar manner to their land based counterparts.

  1. Early investigations of Ceres and the discovery of Pallas historical studies in asteroid research

    CERN Document Server

    Cunningham, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    An asteroid scholar, Cunningham in this book picks up where his Discovery of the First Asteroid, Ceres left off in telling the story of the impact created by the discovery of this new class of object in the early 1800s. The best and brightest minds of mathematics, science, and philosophy were fascinated by Ceres, and figures as diverse as Gauss, Herschel, Brougham, Kant, and Laplace all contributed something to the conversation. The first few chapters deal with the mathematical and philosophical aspects of the discovery, and the rivalry between Germany and France that so affected science and astronomy of that era. The jockeying for glory over the discovery of Ceres by both Piazzi and Bode is examined in detail, as is the reception given to Herschel’s use of the word 'asteroid.' Archival research that reveals the creator of the word 'asteroid' is presented in this book. Astronomy was a truly cosmopolitan field at the time, spanning across various disciplines, and the discovery of Pallas, a story completely t...

  2. Bright carbonate deposits as evidence of aqueous alteration on (1) Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanctis, M. C.; Raponi, A.; Ammannito, E.; Ciarniello, M.; Toplis, M. J.; McSween, H. Y.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Marchi, S.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Fonte, S.; Formisano, M.; Frigeri, A.; Giardino, M.; Longobardo, A.; Magni, G.; Palomba, E.; McFadden, L. A.; Pieters, C. M.; Jaumann, R.; Schenk, P.; Mugnuolo, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-08-01

    The typically dark surface of the dwarf planet Ceres is punctuated by areas of much higher albedo, most prominently in the Occator crater. These small bright areas have been tentatively interpreted as containing a large amount of hydrated magnesium sulfate, in contrast to the average surface, which is a mixture of low-albedo materials and magnesium phyllosilicates, ammoniated phyllosilicates and carbonates. Here we report high spatial and spectral resolution near-infrared observations of the bright areas in the Occator crater on Ceres. Spectra of these bright areas are consistent with a large amount of sodium carbonate, constituting the most concentrated known extraterrestrial occurrence of carbonate on kilometre-wide scales in the Solar System. The carbonates are mixed with a dark component and small amounts of phyllosilicates, as well as ammonium carbonate or ammonium chloride. Some of these compounds have also been detected in the plume of Saturn’s sixth-largest moon Enceladus. The compounds are endogenous and we propose that they are the solid residue of crystallization of brines and entrained altered solids that reached the surface from below. The heat source may have been transient (triggered by impact heating). Alternatively, internal temperatures may be above the eutectic temperature of subsurface brines, in which case fluids may exist at depth on Ceres today.

  3. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for

  4. Perceptual hashing algorithms benchmark suite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hui; Schmucker Martin; Niu Xiamu

    2007-01-01

    Numerous perceptual hashing algorithms have been developed for identification and verification of multimedia objects in recent years. Many application schemes have been adopted for various commercial objects. Developers and users are looking for a benchmark tool to compare and evaluate their current algorithms or technologies. In this paper, a novel benchmark platform is presented. PHABS provides an open framework and lets its users define their own test strategy, perform tests, collect and analyze test data. With PHABS, various performance parameters of algorithms can be tested, and different algorithms or algorithms with different parameters can be evaluated and compared easily.

  5. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-7 Kerwan Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA Dawn Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Mest, Scott; Kneissl, Thomas; Hendrik Pasckert, Jan; Hiesinger, Harald; Neesemann, Adrian; Schmedemann, Nico; Buczkowski, Debra; Scully, Jennifer; Marchi, Simone; Schenk, Paul; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Nathues, Andreas; Schaefer, Michael; Hoffmann, Martin; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    NASA's Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres similar to that done for Vesta [1,2], including a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. Ac-H-7 Kerwan Quadrangle is located between 22°S-22°N and 72-144°E, and hosts several primary features and terrains: 1) The 280 km diameter impact basin Kerwan occur in the center and SE corner of the quad-rangle. Kerwan's rim is very degraded and there is no obvious ejecta field, indicating it is one of the oldest visible large impact basins on Ceres. Kerwan's interior is filled with a 'smooth terrain' that also extends beyond the rim to the east and west. This smooth terrain hosts a significantly lower impact crater density than most of the rest of Ceres' surface. Preliminary crater counts of the Kerwan smooth terrain derive cratering model ages of ~3 Ga using the lunar-derived chronology and ~600-800 Ma using the asteroid flux-derived chronology (H. Hiesinger, pers. comm., 2016). Our working interpretation is that the Kerwan impact occurred when Ceres' crust had a greater proportion of ice than at present, and that impact heating melted crustal material resulting in resurfacing of the Kerwan region by an icy impact melt, or possibly initiated cryovolcanic flows. There are hints of possible flow margins on the Kerwan floor in HAMO images, that have to be confirmed or denied by study of LAMO images. 2) Part of the 126 km diameter crater Dantu and its ejecta field covers the NE corner of the quadrangle. FC color data show both bright and dark materials in the ejecta field, suggesting ex-cavation of terrains of different compositions. Alternatively, because Dantu is one of two longitudes on Ceres where water vapor release has been detected [3], another interpretation is that the bright and/or dark deposits in the Dantu region could result from explosive cryovolcanism. Further study of LAMO data is required to investigate these hypotheses. 3) Other features include the

  6. The topography of Ceres and implications for the formation of linear surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, D.; Otto, K.; Ruesch, O.; Scully, J. E. C.; Williams, D. A.; Mest, S. C.; Schenk, P.; Jaumann, R.; Nathues, A.; Preusker, F.; Park, R. S.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft began orbiting the dwarf planet Ceres in April 2015. Framing Camera data from the Approach (1.3 km/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits include digital terrain models derived from processing stereo images. These models have supported various scientific studies of the surface. The eastern hemisphere of Ceres is topographically higher than the western hemisphere. Some of linear structures on Ceres (which include grooves, pit crater chains, fractures and troughs) appear to be radial to the large basins Urvara and Yalode, and most likely formed due to impact processes. However, set of regional linear structures (RLS) that do not have any obvious relationship to impact craters are found on the eastern hemisphere topographic high region. Many of the longer RLS are comprised of smaller structures that have linked together, suggestive of en echelon fractures. Polygonal craters, theorized to form when pervasive subsurface fracturing affects crater formation [1], are widespread on Ceres [2], and those proximal to the RLS have straight crater rims aligned with the grooves and troughs, suggesting that the RLS are fracture systems. A cross-section of one RLS is displayed in FC images of the Occator crater wall. Comparing these images to the digital terrain models show 1) that the structure dips ~60º and 2) there is downward motion on the hanging wall, implying normal faulting. The digital terrain models also reveal the presence of numerous positive relief features with sub-circular shapes. These dome-like features have been tentatively interpreted as volcanic/magmatic features [3]; other possibilities include salt domes. Analog models of domal uplift in areas of regional extension [4] predict patterns of linear structures similar to those observed in the RLS near Occator. Utilizing topography data provided by the Ceres digital terrain models, we assess the relationship between the RLS and nearby domes and topographic high regions to determine the mechanism

  7. Regional and Local Temperature Maps of Dwarf Planet Ceres from Dawn/VIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Capria, M. T.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Ciarniello, M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Longobardo, A.; Raponi, A.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J. P.; Hiesinger, H.; Li, J. Y.; McFadden, L. A.; Schorghofer, N.; Schroeder, S.; Stephan, K.; Rayman, M.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Since the beginning of 2015, the Visible InfraRed (VIR) mapping spectrometer onboard the NASA Dawn mission has obtained hyperspectral images of Ceres, with improving spatial resolution. VIR operates in the overall spectral range 0.25-5.1 μm, with the main goal of inferring the surface composition of the target in its uppermost layer, as thick as tens of microns. Taking advantage of the wavelength range longward of 3 μm, VIR can be used as a thermal mapper, i.e. as a tool to derive thermal images and spatially-resolved temperature maps. To do this, the VIR team uses a Bayesian approach to nonlinear inversion that was extensively applied to the Vesta dataset earlier. Already in February 2015, VIR had the chance to acquire data with a spatial resolution of ~11 km/px. Those temperature images revealed that a spot of high-albedo (bright) material, highlighted by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) earlier and recently associated with the crater Haulani, was cooler than sorrounding regions seen under similar solar illumination, whereas the brightest spots on Ceres, in the crater Occator, did not display any thermal contrast. The following Survey phase yielded hyperspectral coverage of Ceres at ~1.3 km/px, and the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) phase starting in mid-August 2015 is expected to provide VIR data with a resolution of ~0.4 km/px. These datasets allow derivation of regional and local temperature maps as well as the study of thermal anomalies at those spatial scales. Due to the low overall thermal inertia of Ceres, the surface temperature is essentially dominated by the instantaneous value of the solar incidence angle. Small values of this angle result in high surface temperatures, and, unlike Vesta, the low obliquity of Ceres (~4°) does not result in observable seasonal effects for a given location on the surface. However, different responses to insolation as observed at the local scale may be indicative of differences in density/porosity and thermal

  8. Nominal GDP: Target or Benchmark?

    OpenAIRE

    Hetzel, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Some observers have argued that the Federal Reserve would best fulfill its mandate by adopting a target for nominal gross domestic product (GDP). Insights from the monetarist tradition suggest that nominal GDP targeting could be destabilizing. However, adopting benchmarks for both nominal and real GDP could offer useful information about when monetary policy is too tight or too loose.

  9. Benchmark calculations for EGS5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past few years, EGS4 has undergone an extensive upgrade to EGS5, in particularly in the areas of low-energy electron physics, low-energy photon physics, PEGS cross section generation, and the coding from Mortran to Fortran programming. Benchmark calculations have been made to assure the accuracy, reliability and high quality of the EGS5 code system. This study reports three benchmark examples that show the successful upgrade from EGS4 to EGS5 based on the excellent agreements among EGS4, EGS5 and measurements. The first benchmark example is the 1969 Crannell Experiment to measure the three-dimensional distribution of energy deposition for 1-GeV electrons shower in water and aluminum tanks. The second example is the 1995 Compton-scattered spectra measurements for 20-40 keV, linearly polarized photon by Namito et. al., in KEK, which was a main part of the low-energy photon expansion work for both EGS4 and EGS5. The third example is the 1986 heterogeneity benchmark experiment by Shortt et. al., who used a monoenergetic 20-MeV electron beam to hit the front face of a water tank containing both air and aluminum cylinders and measured spatial depth dose distribution using a small solid-state detector. (author)

  10. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  11. Benchmarking biodiversity performances of farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoo, de G.R.; Lokhorst, A.M.; Dijk, van J.; Staats, H.; Musters, C.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Farmers are the key players when it comes to the enhancement of farmland biodiversity. In this study, a benchmark system that focuses on improving farmers’ nature conservation was developed and tested among Dutch arable farmers in different social settings. The results show that especially tailored

  12. Benchmarked Library Websites Comparative Study

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an analysis of services provided by the benchmarked library websites. The exploratory study includes comparison of these websites against a list of criterion and presents a list of services that are most commonly deployed by the selected websites. In addition to that, the investigators proposed a list of services that could be provided via the KAUST library website.

  13. Benchmarking Universiteitsvastgoed: Managementinformatie bij vastgoedbeslissingen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Heijer, A.C.; De Vries, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Voor u ligt het eindrapport van het onderzoek "Benchmarking universiteitsvastgoed". Dit rapport is de samenvoeging van twee deel producten: het theorierapport (verschenen in december 2003) en het praktijkrapport (verschenen in januari 2004). Onderwerpen in het theoriedeel zijn de analyse van andere

  14. Exploring medium gravity icy planetary bodies: an opportunity in the Inner System by landing at Ceres high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncy, J.; Grasset, O.; Martinot, V.; Tobie, G.

    2009-04-01

    With potentially up to 25% of its mass as H2O and current indications of a differentiated morphology, 950km-wide "dwarf planet" Ceres is holding the promise to be our closest significant icy planetary body. Ceres is within easier reach than the icy moons, allowing for the use of solar arrays and not lying inside the deep gravity well of a giant planet. As such, it would represent an ideal step stone for future in-situ exploration of other airless icy bodies of major interest such as Europa or Enceladus. But when NASA's Dawn orbits Ceres and maps it in 2015, will we be ready to undertake the next logical step: landing? Ceres' gravity at its poles, at about one fifth of the Moon's gravity, is too large for rendezvous-like asteroid landing techniques to apply. Instead, we are there fully in the application domain of soft precision landing techniques such as the ones being developed for ESA's MoonNext mission. These latter require a spacecraft architecture akin to robotic lunar Landers or NASA's Phoenix, and differing from missions to comets and asteroids. If Dawn confirms the icy nature of Ceres under its regolith-covered surface, the potential presence of some ice spots on the surface would call for specific attention. Such spots would indeed be highly interesting landing sites. They are more likely to lie close to the poles of Ceres where cold temperatures should prevent exposed ice from sublimating and/or may limit the thickness of the regolith layer. Also the science and instruments suite should be fitted to study a large body that has probably been or may still be geologically active: its non-negligible gravity field combined with its high volatile mass fraction would then bring Ceres closer in morphology and history to an "Enceladus" or a frozen or near-frozen "Europa" than to a rubble-pile-structured asteroid or a comet nucleus. Thales Alenia Space and the "Laboratoire de Planétologie et Géodynamique" of the University of Nantes have carried out a preliminary

  15. 42 CFR 440.385 - Delivery of benchmark and benchmark-equivalent coverage through managed care entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delivery of benchmark and benchmark-equivalent...: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.385 Delivery of benchmark and benchmark-equivalent coverage through managed care entities. In implementing benchmark or...

  16. Swiss electricity grid - Benchmarking pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is a short version of the ENET number 210369. This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes a benchmarking pilot project carried out as a second phase in the development of a formula for the regulation of an open electricity market in Switzerland. It follows on from an initial phase involving the definition of a 'blue print' and a basic concept. The aims of the pilot project - to check out the practicability of the concept - are discussed. The collection of anonymised data for the benchmarking model from over 30 electricity utilities operating on all 7 Swiss grid levels and their integration in the three areas 'Technology', 'Grid Costs' and 'Capital Invested' are discussed in detail. In particular, confidentiality and data protection aspects are looked at. The methods used in the analysis of the data are described and the results of an efficiency analysis of various utilities are presented. The report is concluded with a listing of questions concerning data collection and analysis as well as operational and capital costs that are still to be answered

  17. Tourism Destination Benchmarking: Evaluation and Selection of the Benchmarking Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luštický Martin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tourism development has an irreplaceable role in regional policy of almost all countries. This is due to its undeniable benefits for the local population with regards to the economic, social and environmental sphere. Tourist destinations compete for visitors at tourism market and subsequently get into a relatively sharp competitive struggle. The main goal of regional governments and destination management institutions is to succeed in this struggle by increasing the competitiveness of their destination. The quality of strategic planning and final strategies is a key factor of competitiveness. Even though the tourism sector is not the typical field where the benchmarking methods are widely used, such approaches could be successfully applied. The paper focuses on key phases of the benchmarking process which lies in the search for suitable referencing partners. The partners are consequently selected to meet general requirements to ensure the quality if strategies. Following from this, some specific characteristics are developed according to the SMART approach. The paper tests this procedure with an expert evaluation of eight selected regional tourism strategies of regions in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Great Britain. In this way it validates the selected criteria in the frame of the international environment. Hence, it makes it possible to find strengths and weaknesses of selected strategies and at the same time facilitates the discovery of suitable benchmarking partners.

  18. The LDBC Social Network Benchmark: Interactive Workload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erling, O.; Averbuch, A.; Larriba-Pey, J.; Chafi, H.; Gubichev, A.; Prat, A.; Pham, M.D.; Boncz, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The Linked Data Benchmark Council (LDBC) is now two years underway and has gathered strong industrial participation for its mission to establish benchmarks, and benchmarking practices for evaluating graph data management systems. The LDBC introduced a new choke-point driven methodology for developin

  19. Toxicological Benchmarks for Screening Potential Contaminants of Concern for Effects on Sediment-Associated Biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    A hazardous waste site may contain hundreds of chemicals; therefore, it is important to screen contaminants of potential concern for the ecological risk assessment. Often this screening is done as part of a screening assessment, the purpose of which is to evaluate the available data, identify data gaps, and screen contaminants of potential concern. Screening may be accomplished by using a set of toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks are helpful in determining whether contaminants warrant further assessment or are at a level that requires no further attention. If a chemical concentration or the reported detection limit exceeds a proposed lower benchmark, further analysis is needed to determine the hazards posed by that chemical. If, however, the chemical concentration falls below the lower benchmark value, the chemical may be eliminated from further study. The use of multiple benchmarks is recommended for screening chemicals of concern in sediments. Integrative benchmarks developed for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection are included for inorganic and organic chemicals. Equilibrium partitioning benchmarks are included for screening nonionic organic chemicals. Freshwater sediment effect concentrations developed as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediment Project are included for inorganic and organic chemicals (EPA 1996). Field survey benchmarks developed for the Ontario Ministry of the Environment are included for inorganic and organic chemicals. In addition, EPA-proposed sediment quality criteria are included along with screening values from EPA Region IV and Ecotox Threshold values from the EPA Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. Pore water analysis is recommended for ionic organic compounds; comparisons are then made against water quality benchmarks. This report is an update of three prior reports

  20. A biosegmentation benchmark for evaluation of bioimage analysis methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvilekval Kristian

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a biosegmentation benchmark that includes infrastructure, datasets with associated ground truth, and validation methods for biological image analysis. The primary motivation for creating this resource comes from the fact that it is very difficult, if not impossible, for an end-user to choose from a wide range of segmentation methods available in the literature for a particular bioimaging problem. No single algorithm is likely to be equally effective on diverse set of images and each method has its own strengths and limitations. We hope that our benchmark resource would be of considerable help to both the bioimaging researchers looking for novel image processing methods and image processing researchers exploring application of their methods to biology. Results Our benchmark consists of different classes of images and ground truth data, ranging in scale from subcellular, cellular to tissue level, each of which pose their own set of challenges to image analysis. The associated ground truth data can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of different methods, to improve methods and to compare results. Standard evaluation methods and some analysis tools are integrated into a database framework that is available online at http://bioimage.ucsb.edu/biosegmentation/. Conclusion This online benchmark will facilitate integration and comparison of image analysis methods for bioimages. While the primary focus is on biological images, we believe that the dataset and infrastructure will be of interest to researchers and developers working with biological image analysis, image segmentation and object tracking in general.

  1. Geothermal Heat Pump Benchmarking Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-01-17

    A benchmarking study was conducted on behalf of the Department of Energy to determine the critical factors in successful utility geothermal heat pump programs. A Successful program is one that has achieved significant market penetration. Successfully marketing geothermal heat pumps has presented some major challenges to the utility industry. However, select utilities have developed programs that generate significant GHP sales. This benchmarking study concludes that there are three factors critical to the success of utility GHP marking programs: (1) Top management marketing commitment; (2) An understanding of the fundamentals of marketing and business development; and (3) An aggressive competitive posture. To generate significant GHP sales, competitive market forces must by used. However, because utilities have functioned only in a regulated arena, these companies and their leaders are unschooled in competitive business practices. Therefore, a lack of experience coupled with an intrinsically non-competitive culture yields an industry environment that impedes the generation of significant GHP sales in many, but not all, utilities.

  2. Methodology for Benchmarking IPsec Gateways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Tisovský

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses forwarding performance of IPsec gateway over the rage of offered loads. It focuses on the forwarding rate and packet loss particularly at the gateway’s performance peak and at the state of gateway’s overload. It explains possible performance degradation when the gateway is overloaded by excessive offered load. The paper further evaluates different approaches for obtaining forwarding performance parameters – a widely used throughput described in RFC 1242, maximum forwarding rate with zero packet loss and us proposed equilibrium throughput. According to our observations equilibrium throughput might be the most universal parameter for benchmarking security gateways as the others may be dependent on the duration of test trials. Employing equilibrium throughput would also greatly shorten the time required for benchmarking. Lastly, the paper presents methodology and a hybrid step/binary search algorithm for obtaining value of equilibrium throughput.

  3. 基于WheatGrow和CERES模型的区域小麦生育期预测与评价%Regional Prediction and Evaluation of Wheat Phenology Based on the WheatGrow and CERES Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕尊富; 刘小军; 汤亮; 刘蕾蕾; 曹卫星; 朱艳

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] The objectives of this study are to investigate the key techniques of wheat phenological model for regional application,and to evaluate the validity of regional application techniques through analyzing the simulated phenology results of WheatGrow and CERES-Wheat at regional scale.[Method] First,the daily meteorological data at different weather stations were interpolated using the method of Thin Plate Spline (TPS),and the gridded daily meteorological surface data was generated.Then,the historical sowing dates of wheat at different stations were interpolated using TPS method,and the multi-year average values of interpolated results were generated as regional sowing date surface data.In addition,by integrating the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method with the above two wheat models,the region-specific cultivar parameters were estimated with the measured phenology data from 1998 to 2003,and were taken as the typical cultivar parameters of each province.Finally,the regional daily meteorological data,sowing surface data and region-specific cultivar parameters were input into the above two models,which took grid as basic unit to simulate regional wheat phenology.Meanwhile,the simulated results were evaluated with observed data and the uncertainty coming from cultivar parameters was quantified at site and regional scales.[Result] The estimated values from the above two models agreed well with the observed values at regional scale.R2 between estimated and observed values of jointing date,heading date and maturity date were 0.85,0.87 and 0.86 (WheatGrow),0.87,0.85 and 0.82 (CERES),respectively.RMSE between the estimated and observed values of jointing date,heading date and maturity date were 9.6,7.2 and 6.3 d (WheatGrow),9.4,7.8 and 6.6 d (CERES),respectively.By analyzing the simulated results of the two models at regional scale,the WheatGrow model had higher prediction accuracy than CERES-Wheat,while the uncertainty came from crop parameters were also higher

  4. Restaurant Energy Use Benchmarking Guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedrick, R.; Smith, V.; Field, K.

    2011-07-01

    A significant operational challenge for food service operators is defining energy use benchmark metrics to compare against the performance of individual stores. Without metrics, multiunit operators and managers have difficulty identifying which stores in their portfolios require extra attention to bring their energy performance in line with expectations. This report presents a method whereby multiunit operators may use their own utility data to create suitable metrics for evaluating their operations.

  5. TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results of pulse parameters and control rod worth measurements at TRIGA Mark 2 reactor in Ljubljana are presented. The measurements were performed with a completely fresh, uniform, and compact core. Only standard fuel elements with 12 wt% uranium were used. Special efforts were made to get reliable and accurate results at well-defined experimental conditions, and it is proposed to use the results as a benchmark test case for TRIGA reactors

  6. RISKIND verification and benchmark comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents verification calculations and benchmark comparisons for RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. Spreadsheet calculations were performed to verify the proper operation of the major options and calculational steps in RISKIND. The program is unique in that it combines a variety of well-established models into a comprehensive treatment for assessing risks from the transportation of radioactive materials. Benchmark comparisons with other validated codes that incorporate similar models were also performed. For instance, the external gamma and neutron dose rate curves for a shipping package estimated by RISKIND were compared with those estimated by using the RADTRAN 4 code and NUREG-0170 methodology. Atmospheric dispersion of released material and dose estimates from the GENII and CAP88-PC codes. Verification results have shown the program to be performing its intended function correctly. The benchmark results indicate that the predictions made by RISKIND are within acceptable limits when compared with predictions from similar existing models

  7. Thermal Performance Benchmarking: Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Gilbert

    2016-04-08

    The goal for this project is to thoroughly characterize the performance of state-of-the-art (SOA) automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Information obtained from these studies will be used to: Evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management strategies; establish baseline metrics for the thermal management systems; identify methods of improvement to advance the SOA; increase the publicly available information related to automotive traction-drive thermal management systems; help guide future electric drive technologies (EDT) research and development (R&D) efforts. The performance results combined with component efficiency and heat generation information obtained by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) may then be used to determine the operating temperatures for the EDT components under drive-cycle conditions. In FY15, the 2012 Nissan LEAF power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems were benchmarked. Testing of the 2014 Honda Accord Hybrid power electronics thermal management system started in FY15; however, due to time constraints it was not possible to include results for this system in this report. The focus of this project is to benchmark the thermal aspects of the systems. ORNL's benchmarking of electric and hybrid electric vehicle technology reports provide detailed descriptions of the electrical and packaging aspects of these automotive systems.

  8. Adapting benchmarking to project management : an analysis of project management processes, metrics, and benchmarking process models

    OpenAIRE

    Emhjellen, Kjetil

    1997-01-01

    Since the first publication on benchmarking in 1989 by Robert C. Camp of “Benchmarking: The search for Industry Best Practices that Lead to Superior Performance”, the improvement technique benchmarking has been established as an important tool in the process focused manufacturing or production environment. The use of benchmarking has expanded to other types of industry. Benchmarking has past the doorstep and is now in early trials in the project and construction environment....

  9. HS06 Benchmark for an ARM Server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    We benchmarked an ARM cortex-A9 based server system with a four-core CPU running at 1.1 GHz. The system used Ubuntu 12.04 as operating system and the HEPSPEC 2006 (HS06) benchmarking suite was compiled natively with gcc-4.4 on the system. The benchmark was run for various settings of the relevant gcc compiler options. We did not find significant influence from the compiler options on the benchmark result. The final HS06 benchmark result is 10.4.

  10. HS06 Benchmark for an ARM Server

    CERN Document Server

    Kluth, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We benchmarked an ARM cortex-A9 based server system with a four-core CPU running at 1.1 GHz. The system used Ubuntu 12.04 as operating system and the HEPSPEC 2006 (HS06) benchmarking suite was compiled natively with gcc-4.4 on the system. The benchmark was run for various settings of the relevant gcc compiler options. We did not find significant influence from the compiler options on the benchmark result. The final HS06 benchmark result is 10.4.

  11. Central Pit and Dome Formation as Seen in Occator Crater, Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Paul M.; Buczkowski, Debra; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Schmidt, Britney E.; O'Brien, David P.; Hiesinger, Harald; Sizemore, Hanna G.; Ammannito, Eleonora; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.; Dawn Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Dawn mapping of Ceres revealed that central depressions (or pits) are common in craters >75 km. The best preserved of these is Occator (D~92 km), where the pit is associated with a major bright deposit dominated by carbonates. The pit is ~9 km wide, 600-800 m deep and flanked by asymmetric massifs 0.7 to 1.3 km high. The pit is partially filled by a fractured central dome ~3 km wide and 700 m high. Fracturing could have been due to dome inflation by "magma" or by subsurface freezing of ice. Within the bright material, two color units are mapped, including a paler surface unit and a more yellowish to reddish unit exposed within the most fractured parts of the dome surface and at small bright spots, at least some of which could be post-Occator small craters. Some bright materials form as discrete small spots midslope along the pit wall and others avoid small hills, suggesting partial topographic control. Stratigraphic relations are ambiguous but suggest formation of a smooth carapace some meters thick that was subsequently disrupted by fractures crossing the floor of Occator, and by uplift of the dome surface. Pit and dome morphologies, including dome fracturing are potentially analogous to central pits and domes in many craters on Ganymede and Callisto, suggesting some commonality in formation processes. The absence of center pits or domes on Saturnian satellites could be related to much lower temperatures on those bodies. The prominence of central pits and domes on Ceres confirms the importance of volatile materials, mostly likely water ice, in the outer layers of Ceres, especially as compared to Vesta.

  12. Argonne Code Center: Benchmark problem book.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1977-06-01

    This book is an outgrowth of activities of the Computational Benchmark Problems Committee of the Mathematics and Computation Division of the American Nuclear Society. This is the second supplement of the original benchmark book which was first published in February, 1968 and contained computational benchmark problems in four different areas. Supplement No. 1, which was published in December, 1972, contained corrections to the original benchmark book plus additional problems in three new areas. The current supplement. Supplement No. 2, contains problems in eight additional new areas. The objectives of computational benchmark work and the procedures used by the committee in pursuing the objectives are outlined in the original edition of the benchmark book (ANL-7416, February, 1968). The members of the committee who have made contributions to Supplement No. 2 are listed below followed by the contributors to the earlier editions of the benchmark book.

  13. Annual ryegrass toxicity in Thoroughbred horses in Ceres in the Western Cape Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Grewar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of annual ryegrass toxicity occurred on a Thoroughbred stud in Ceres in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. This is the 1st report of annual ryegrass toxicity in horses in South Africa, although the condition has been reported in cattle and sheep populations in the past. Annual ryegrass toxicity is characterised by a variety of neurological signs including tremors, convulsions, recumbency and in many cases death. The description of the outbreak includes the history, clinical presentation and treatment protocol administered during the outbreak. Various epidemiological variables and their influence in the outbreak are also considered.

  14. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-11 Sintana Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulzeck, Franziska; Krohn, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Williams, David A.; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Mest, Scott C.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Gathen, Isabel v. d.; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Naß, Andrea; Otto, Katharina; Pieters, Carle M.; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; De Sanctis, Maria C.; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefanus; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland

    2016-04-01

    In December 2015, the Dawn spacecraft delivered the first images of the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) of the dwarf planet Ceres at a resolution of 35 m/pixel. This data will be used to finish the geological mapping of Ceres' surface in order to identify composition and surface forming processes. Mapping was already done using Survey Orbit and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) data. With the new images, an updated map will be presented. To this point, the data material consists of a HAMO clear-filter mosaic (140 m/pixel) [1], a digital elevation model (DTM) [2] derived from Survey orbit (415 m/pixel) data, color-filter ratios and photometrically corrected images. Ceres' surface has been divided into 15 mapping quadrangles. The Ac-H-11 Sintana quadrangle is located in the southern hemisphere of Ceres between 21 66°S and 0 90°E. Geological units identified so far are cratered terrain, which covers most of the area, and a younger unit of relatively smooth material. The latter is characterized by a low crater density. Material of the same unit was found in adjacent quadrangles as well. Interest is taken in the diversity of crater shapes. Many craters show different forms of asymmetries. One and the same crater for instance displays different stages of rim degradation and some crater walls are partly terraced and their slopes' steepness is varying alongside the crater rim. Several mass wasting features, which partly cause the observed asymmetries, have been identified. Next to the multiple collapsed rims, landslides due to later cratering on the primary crater rim are observed. Whereas collapse structures are mostly blocky, single landslides are characterized by lobate margins. Occurrence and type of mass wasting feature might hint to subsurface differences. Further, there is a diversity of inner crater structures, like relaxed crater floors, ridges, central peaks, mounds and smooth plains. Processes like mass wasting and relaxation have modified many craters

  15. Benchmark analysis of the DeCART MOC code with the VENUS-2 critical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational benchmarks based on well-defined problems with a complete set of input and a unique solution are often used as a means of verifying the reliability of numerical solutions. VENUS is a widely used MOX benchmark problem for the validation of numerical methods and nuclear data set. In this paper, the results of benchmarking the DeCART (Deterministic Core Analysis based on Ray Tracing) integral transport code is reported using the OECD/NEA VENUS-2 MOX benchmark problem. Both 2-D and 3-D DeCART calculations were performed and comparisons are reported with measured data, as well as with the results of other benchmark participants. In general the DeCART results agree well with both the experimental data as well as those of other participants. (authors)

  16. Re-evaluation and continued development of shielding benchmark database SINBAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Expert Group on Radiation Transport and Shielding was started at the OECD/NEA in June 2011 with the mandate to, among others, monitor, steer and support the continued development of the Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD), in cooperation with RSICC. The present status of this database is presented, which grew since its beginnings in the 1990’s to an international reference database containing at present 100 benchmarks relevant for fission, fusion and accelerator shielding applications. As part of its activities a thorough revision of 45 benchmark experiments was completed recently in order to verify in details the completeness and consistency of the benchmark information, in particular concerning the evaluation of the experimental sources of uncertainty. This review process is expected to provide users with a proper choice and help them make better use of the experimental information and is planned to be extended to other available benchmarks. (author)

  17. Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  18. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...

  19. Gaia FGK benchmark stars: Metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofré, P.; Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Worley, C. C.; Pancino, E.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Magrini, L.; Bergemann, M.; González Hernández, J. I.; Hill, V.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Lind, K.; Masseron, T.; Montes, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Nordlander, T.; Recio Blanco, A.; Sobeck, J.; Sordo, R.; Sousa, S. G.; Tabernero, H.; Vallenari, A.; Van Eck, S.

    2014-04-01

    Context. To calibrate automatic pipelines that determine atmospheric parameters of stars, one needs a sample of stars, or "benchmark stars", with well-defined parameters to be used as a reference. Aims: We provide detailed documentation of the iron abundance determination of the 34 FGK-type benchmark stars that are selected to be the pillars for calibration of the one billion Gaia stars. They cover a wide range of temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities. Methods: Up to seven different methods were used to analyze an observed spectral library of high resolutions and high signal-to-noise ratios. The metallicity was determined by assuming a value of effective temperature and surface gravity obtained from fundamental relations; that is, these parameters were known a priori and independently from the spectra. Results: We present a set of metallicity values obtained in a homogeneous way for our sample of benchmark stars. In addition to this value, we provide detailed documentation of the associated uncertainties. Finally, we report a value of the metallicity of the cool giant ψ Phe for the first time. Based on NARVAL and HARPS data obtained within the Gaia DPAC (Data Processing and Analysis Consortium) and coordinated by the GBOG (Ground-Based Observations for Gaia) working group and on data retrieved from the ESO-ADP database.Tables 6-76 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/564/A133

  20. Benchmarking of human resources management

    OpenAIRE

    David M. Akinnusi

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of human resource management (HRM) which, today, plays a strategic partnership role in management. The focus of the paper is on HRM in the public sector, where much hope rests on HRM as a means of transforming the public service and achieving much needed service delivery. However, a critical evaluation of HRM practices in the public sector reveals that these services leave much to be desired. The paper suggests the adoption of benchmarking as a process to revamp HR...

  1. NFS Tricks and Benchmarking Traps

    OpenAIRE

    Seltzer, Margo; Ellard, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    We describe two modi cations to the FreeBSD 4.6 NFS server to increase read throughput by improving the read-ahead heuristic to deal with reordered requests and stride access patterns. We show that for some stride access patterns, our new heuristics improve end-to-end NFS throughput by nearly a factor of two. We also show that benchmarking and experimenting with changes to an NFS server can be a subtle and challenging task, and that it is often difficult to distinguish the impact of a new ...

  2. TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental results of startup tests after reconstruction and modification of the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana are presented. The experiments were performed with a completely fresh, compact, and uniform core. The operating conditions were well defined and controlled, so that the results can be used as a benchmark test case for TRIGA reactor calculations. Both steady-state and pulse mode operation were tested. In this paper, the following steady-state experiments are treated: critical core and excess reactivity, control rod worths, fuel element reactivity worth distribution, fuel temperature distribution, and fuel temperature reactivity coefficient

  3. Las joyas orientalizantes de Villanueva de la Vera (Cáceres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Cordero, Antonio

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we tackle the study of a series of pieces made of gold and which belong to the Orientalising period. They have recently been found in Villanueva de la Vera (Cáceres. Their original shape, style, technique and quality, related to the environment of this interesting find shows the local development of the craftsmanship in precious metals, which previously only seemed to take place in centres of deep colonial roots.

    En este trabajo abordamos el estudio de una serie de piezas fabricadas en oro inscritas en la temática orientalizante, descubiertas recientemente en Villanueva de la Vera (Cáceres. Su original configuración, estilo, técnica y cualidad, puesta en relación con el entorno del hallazgo, muestran hasta qué punto existen desarrollos locales de la orfebrería que hasta ahora sólo parecía que podía tener lugar en núcleos de profundo enraizamiento colonial.

  4. First Spectral Coverage of two regions on Ceres in the far-UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Vilas, Faith; Li, Jian-Yang

    2015-11-01

    We present the first spectral observations of Ceres in the far-ultraviolet, along with new measurements in the near-UV and visible, as measured by HST/STIS as part of Cycle 22, in August-September, 2015. The observations are motivated by early broad-band UV observations [1][2][3] suggesting a UV absorption centered near 260 nm along with a very strong increase in UV reflectance into the far-UV (~160 nm). We have observed two central longitudes of Ceres - near 0°W and 120°W (this latter area one of the regions in which Herschel detected water vapor) - using the G140L (~120-172 nm), G230L (~170-310 nm) and G430L (~300-570 nm) detectors. We use the data to test a prediction of graphitized carbon on the surface, and we look for signatures of water ice and/or water vapor.[1] Parker, J. W., S. A. Stern, P. C. Thomas, M. C. Festou, W. J. Merline, E. F. Young, R. P Binzel, L. A. Lebofsky (2002). Astron J. 123, 549[2] Li et al. (2006). Icarus 182: 143-160.[3] Rivkin, A. S., J.-Y. Li, R. E. Milliken, L. F. Lim, A. J. Lovell, B. E. Schmidt, L. A. McFadden, B. A. Cohen (2011). Space Sci Rev 163, 95.

  5. Composition and structure of the shallow subsurface of Ceres revealed by crater morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michael T.; Raymond, Carol A.; Schenk, Paul M.; Fu, Roger R.; Kneissl, Thomas; Pasckert, Jan Hendrik; Hiesinger, Harry; Preusker, Frank; Park, Ryan S.; Marchi, Simone; King, Scott D.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-07-01

    Before NASA’s Dawn mission, the dwarf planet Ceres was widely believed to contain a substantial ice-rich layer below its rocky surface. The existence of such a layer has significant implications for Ceres’s formation, evolution, and astrobiological potential. Ceres is warmer than icy worlds in the outer Solar System and, if its shallow subsurface is ice-rich, large impact craters are expected to be erased by viscous flow on short geologic timescales. Here we use digital terrain models derived from Dawn Framing Camera images to show that most of Ceres’s largest craters are several kilometres deep, and are therefore inconsistent with the existence of an ice-rich subsurface. We further show from numerical simulations that the absence of viscous relaxation over billion-year timescales implies a subsurface viscosity that is at least one thousand times greater than that of pure water ice. We conclude that Ceres’s shallow subsurface is no more than 30% to 40% ice by volume, with a mixture of rock, salts and/or clathrates accounting for the other 60% to 70%. However, several anomalously shallow craters are consistent with limited viscous relaxation and may indicate spatial variations in subsurface ice content.

  6. Explaining Earths Energy Budget: CERES-Based NASA Resources for K-12 Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. H.; Bethea, K.; Marvel, M. T.; Ruhlman, K.; LaPan, J.; Lewis, P.; Madigan, J.; Oostra, D.; Taylor, J.

    2014-01-01

    Among atmospheric scientists, the importance of the Earth radiation budget concept is well understood. Papers have addressed the topic for over 100 years, and the large Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) science team (among others), with its multiple on-orbit instruments, is working hard to quantify the details of its various parts. In education, Earth's energy budget is a concept that generally appears in middle school and Earth science curricula, but its treatment in textbooks leaves much to be desired. Students and the public hold many misconceptions, and very few people have an appreciation for the importance of this energy balance to the conditions on Earth. More importantly, few have a correct mental model that allows them to make predictions and understand the effect of changes such as increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. As an outreach element of the core CERES team at NASA Langley, a multi-disciplinary group of scientists, educators, graphic artists, writers, and web developers has been developing and refining graphics and resources to explain the Earth's Energy budget over the last few decades. Resources have developed through an iterative process involving ongoing use in front of a variety of audiences, including students and teachers from 3rd to 12th grade as well as public audiences.

  7. Composition and structure of the shallow subsurface of Ceres revealed by crater morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michael; Carol A. Raymond,; Paul Schenk,; Roger R. Fu,; Thomas Kneisl,; Jan Hendrick Pasckert,; Harold Hiesinger,; Frank Preusker,; Ryan S. Park,; Simone Marchi,; Scott King,; Julie C. Castillo-Rogez,; Christopher T. Russell,

    2016-01-01

    Before NASA’s Dawn mission, the dwarf planet Ceres was widely believed to contain a substantial ice-rich layer below its rocky surface. The existence of such a layer has significant implications for Ceres’s formation, evolution, and astrobiological potential. Ceres is warmer than icy worlds in the outer Solar System and, if its shallow subsurface is ice-rich, large impact craters are expected to be erased by viscous flow on short geologic timescales. Here we use digital terrain models derived from Dawn Framing Camera images to show that most of Ceres’s largest craters are several kilometres deep, and are therefore inconsistent with the existence of an ice-rich subsurface. We further show from numerical simulations that the absence of viscous relaxation over billion-year timescales implies a subsurface viscosity that is at least one thousand times greater than that of pure water ice. We conclude that Ceres’s shallow subsurface is no more than 30% to 40% ice by volume, with a mixture of rock, salts and/or clathrates accounting for the other 60% to 70%. However, several anomalously shallow craters are consistent with limited viscous relaxation and may indicate spatial variations in subsurface ice content.

  8. The appearance of Carbonaceous Chondrites on (1) Ceres from observations by the Dawn Framing Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Tanja; Schäfer, Michael; Mengel, Kurt; Cloutis, Edward A.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Thangjam, Guneshwar; Hoffmann, Martin; Platz, Thomas; Nathues, Andreas; Kallisch, Jan; Ripken, Joachim; Russel, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft reached dwarf planet Ceres in March 2015 and started data acquisition using three different instruments. These are the Framing Camera (FC; [1]), the Visible & Infrared Spectrometer (VIR; [2]), and the Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND; [3]). In our work we focus on the potential appearance of carbonaceous chondritic (CC) material on the cerean surface using Dawn FC color mosaics covering the VIS/NIR wavelength region. In preparation of the Dawn arrival at Ceres, a discrimination scheme for CC groups using FC color ratios was developed by [4] and is based on 121 CC laboratory spectra compiled from RELAB. As the cerean surface material mainly differs by its spectral slope over the whole FC wavelength range (0.44-0.97 μm), we classified the color mosaics by this parameter. We applied the CC discrimination scheme only to those regions on the cerean surface (more than 90 %) which exhibit spectral slopes ≥ -1 % reflectance per μm to exclude the strongly negative sloped regions of large young craters such as Occator, Haulani, and Oxo. These are not likely to be similar to pure CC material as can be seen by their brightness and their bluish spectral slope [5]. We found that the surface material of Ceres is, among the suite of CCs, most similar to Ivuna samples artificially heated to 200 and 300°C [6] and unusual CCs, which naturally experienced heating. The latter ones comprise Dhofar 225, Y-86789 and Y-82162, which have been determined to have undergone aqueous alteration and subsequent thermal metamorphism (e.g. [7,8]).Our comparison with VIR data shows, that the spectra of Ivuna heated to 200°C and 300°C match well the OH-absorption at 2.7 μm but do not show the smaller 3.05-3.1 μm absorption observed on Ceres [9,10,11]. Nevertheless, the remarkably flat UV drop-off detected on the cerean surface may, at least spectrally, correspond to highly aqueously altered and subsequently thermally metamorphosed CC material. Further alteration of

  9. Benchmarking homogenization algorithms for monthly data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. C. Venema

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology Action ES0601: advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative. The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random independent break-type inhomogeneities with normally distributed breakpoint sizes were added to the simulated datasets. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide trend was added.

    Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study. After the deadline at which details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed, 22 additional solutions were submitted. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii the error in linear trend estimates and (iii traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve

  10. Benchmarking and testing the "Sea Level Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, G.; Barletta, V. R.; Klemann, V.; van der Wal, W.; James, T. S.; Simon, K.; Riva, R. E. M.; Martinec, Z.; Gasperini, P.; Lund, B.; Wolf, D.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.; King, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    The study of the process of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) and of the consequent sea level variations is gaining an increasingly important role within the geophysical community. Understanding the response of the Earth to the waxing and waning ice sheets is crucial in various contexts, ranging from the interpretation of modern satellite geodetic measurements to the projections of future sea level trends in response to climate change. All the processes accompanying GIA can be described solving the so-called Sea Level Equation (SLE), an integral equation that accounts for the interactions between the ice sheets, the solid Earth, and the oceans. Modern approaches to the SLE are based on various techniques that range from purely analytical formulations to fully numerical methods. Despite various teams independently investigating GIA, we do not have a suitably large set of agreed numerical results through which the methods may be validated. Following the example of the mantle convection community and our recent successful Benchmark for Post Glacial Rebound codes (Spada et al., 2011, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.04952.x), here we present the results of a benchmark study of independently developed codes designed to solve the SLE. This study has taken place within a collaboration facilitated through the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action ES0701. The tests involve predictions of past and current sea level variations, and 3D deformations of the Earth surface. In spite of the signi?cant differences in the numerical methods employed, the test computations performed so far show a satisfactory agreement between the results provided by the participants. The differences found, which can be often attributed to the different numerical algorithms employed within the community, help to constrain the intrinsic errors in model predictions. These are of fundamental importance for a correct interpretation of the geodetic variations observed today, and

  11. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-9 Occator Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA Dawn Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, Debra; Williams, David; Scully, Jennifer; Mest, Scott; Crown, David; Aileen Yingst, R.; Schenk, Paul; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Platz, Thomas; Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael; Marchi, Simone; De Sanctis, M. Cristina; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Chris

    2016-04-01

    As was done at Vesta [1], the Dawn Science Team is conducting a geological mapping cam-paign at Ceres during the nominal mission, including iterative mapping using data obtained dur-ing each orbital phase. We are using geological mapping as a method to identify the geologic processes that have modified the surface of dwarf planet Ceres. We here present the geology of the Ac-H-9 Occator quadrangle, located between 22°S-22°N and 216-288°E. The Ac-H-9 map area is completely within the topographically high region on Ceres named Erntedank Planum. It is one of two longitudinally distinct regions where ESA Herschel space telescope data suggested a release of water vapor [2]. The quadrangle includes several other notable features, including those discussed below. Occator is the 92 km diameter crater that hosts the "Bright Spot 5" that was identified in Hubble Space Telescope data [3], which is actually comprised of multiple bright spots on the crater floor. The floor of Occator is cut by linear fractures, while circumferential fractures are found in the ejecta and on the crater walls. The bright spots are noticeably associated with the floor fractures, although the brightest spot is associated with a central pit [4]. Multiple lobate flows are observed on the crater floor; these appear to be sourced from the center of the crater. The crater has a scalloped rim that is cut by regional linear structures, displaying a cross-section of one structure in the crater wall. Color data show that the Occator ejecta have multiple colors, generally related to changes in morphology. Azacca is a 50 km diameter crater that has a central peak and bright spots on its floor and within its ejecta. Like Occator, Azacca has both floor fractures and circumferential fractures in its ejecta and crater walls. Also like Occator, the Azacca ejecta is multi-colored with variable morphology. Linear structures - including grooves, pit crater chains, fractures and troughs - cross much of the eastern

  12. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-4 Ezinu Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Misssion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Raymond, Carol A.; Williams, David A.; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Mest, Scott C.; Hughson, Kynan H. G.; Russell, Christopher T.; Kneissl, Thomas; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Frigeri, Alessandro; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Platz, Thomas; Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael; Park, Ryan

    2016-04-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft is currently orbiting Ceres, a dwarf planet and the largest object in the asteroid belt (diameter of ~940 km). Ceres science data are primarily acquired during three orbits of decreasing altitude: Survey, High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO). The Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres similar to that undertaken at Vesta [1]. Thus, Ceres' surface is divided into fifteen quadrangles to facilitate systematic HAMO-based and LAMO-based geological mapping. Here we present the LAMO-based geologic map of Ezinu quadrangle (21-66 °N, 180-270 °E). Acquisition of Survey and HAMO data was completed by the submission of this abstract, along with the collection of initial LAMO data. Thus, the current geologic map is based on HAMO (~140 m/pixel) and Survey (~400 m/pixel) mosaics of clear filter Framing Camera images [2]. Framing Camera color images and topography data, derived from the Framing Camera images, are also used to inform the geologic mapping. Updated mapping will be undertaken before the conference, using ~35 m/pixel LAMO Framing Camera mosaics. The key geologic features in Ezinu quadrangle are: linear features, Occator crater, Ezinu crater, Datan and Geshtin craters, and Erntedank Planum. We propose that linear features radial to impact craters (e.g. Occator) are ejecta ray systems, which commonly form as secondary material is ejected during impact crater formation. There is also a prominent set of grooves and chains of pits/craters that are centered near Erntedank Planum (topographically high region) and are cross-cut by ejecta from Occator crater. We interpret these grooves and chains of pits/craters as the surface expression of sub-surface fractures [3, 4]. Occator is a geologically fresh impact crater, and contains the brightest bright spots on Ceres [5], along with bright lobate material, undivided lobate material, hummocky crater floor material, smooth material and smooth

  13. An historic discovery around the corner from school: Ceres, a solar system object with an uncertain identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stira, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Ceres is the largest object in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, and it was discovered on January 1, 1801, by the Italian astronomer Giuseppe Piazzi. The study of Ceres is especially relevant to my students because this celestial body was discovered in Palermo, in the astronomic observatory located in the UNESCO world heritage site "Palazzo dei Normanni", around 500 meters away from the institute where I teach, and because Ceres was considered the patron goddess of Sicily. Moreover, it received scientists and media attention recently because it was explored by the NASA Dawn spacecraft in 2015. The categorization of Ceres has changed more than once and has been the subject of some disagreement. It was originally considered a planet, but was reclassified as an asteroid in the 1850s when many other objects in similar orbits were discovered. Its status changed again in 2006 when it was promoted to dwarf planet, a classification it shares with Pluto and other Kuiper belt objects. The study of this celestial body has a notable educational value, since the uncertain identity of Ceres constitutes an occasion to reflect on the criterions of classification of the natural objects. The history of its discovery allows the students to understand as the scientific method doesn't always consist in the verification of hypothesis through experiments but it sometimes asks for the forecast of facts through mathematical calculations, repeated and methodic observations, the collaboration between scientists of different sectors and nationality. Furthermore, it is a particularly suitable topic for interdisciplinary connections, as regards both scientific and humanistic matters. In order to promote the scientific competences of my first class students, I have developed a learning unit on Ceres, thanks to good cooperation with the Palermo Observatory scientists, particularly active in the astronomic dissemination towards the schools and the citizens. The most meaningful activities

  14. Comparative Assessment of Satellite-Retrieved Surface Net Radiation: An Examination on CERES and SRB Datasets in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Pan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface net radiation plays an important role in land–atmosphere interactions. The net radiation can be retrieved from satellite radiative products, yet its accuracy needs comprehensive assessment. This study evaluates monthly surface net radiation generated from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES and the Surface Radiation Budget project (SRB products, respectively, with quality-controlled radiation data from 50 meteorological stations in China for the period from March 2000 to December 2007. Our results show that surface net radiation is generally overestimated for CERES (SRB, with a bias of 26.52 W/m2 (18.57 W/m2 and a root mean square error of 34.58 W/m2 (29.49 W/m2. Spatially, the satellite-retrieved monthly mean of surface net radiation has relatively small errors for both CERES and SRB at inland sites in south China. Substantial errors are found at northeastern sites for two datasets, in addition to coastal sites for CERES. Temporally, multi-year averaged monthly mean errors are large at sites in western China in spring and summer, and in northeastern China in spring and winter. The annual mean error fluctuates for SRB, but decreases for CERES between 2000 and 2007. For CERES, 56% of net radiation errors come from net shortwave (NSW radiation and 44% from net longwave (NLW radiation. The errors are attributable to environmental parameters including surface albedo, surface water vapor pressure, land surface temperature, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI of land surface proxy, and visibility for CERES. For SRB, 65% of the errors come from NSW and 35% from NLW radiation. The major influencing factors in a descending order are surface water vapor pressure, surface albedo, land surface temperature, NDVI, and visibility. Our findings offer an insight into error patterns in satellite-retrieved surface net radiation and should be valuable to improving retrieval accuracy of surface net radiation. Moreover, our

  15. Pynamic: the Python Dynamic Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, G L; Ahn, D H; de Supinksi, B R; Gyllenhaal, J C; Miller, P J

    2007-07-10

    Python is widely used in scientific computing to facilitate application development and to support features such as computational steering. Making full use of some of Python's popular features, which improve programmer productivity, leads to applications that access extremely high numbers of dynamically linked libraries (DLLs). As a result, some important Python-based applications severely stress a system's dynamic linking and loading capabilities and also cause significant difficulties for most development environment tools, such as debuggers. Furthermore, using the Python paradigm for large scale MPI-based applications can create significant file IO and further stress tools and operating systems. In this paper, we present Pynamic, the first benchmark program to support configurable emulation of a wide-range of the DLL usage of Python-based applications for large scale systems. Pynamic has already accurately reproduced system software and tool issues encountered by important large Python-based scientific applications on our supercomputers. Pynamic provided insight for our system software and tool vendors, and our application developers, into the impact of several design decisions. As we describe the Pynamic benchmark, we will highlight some of the issues discovered in our large scale system software and tools using Pynamic.

  16. Rethinking benchmark dates in international relations

    OpenAIRE

    Buzan, Barry; Lawson, George

    2014-01-01

    International Relations (IR) has an ‘orthodox set’ of benchmark dates by which much of its research and teaching is organized: 1500, 1648, 1919, 1945 and 1989. This article argues that IR scholars need to question the ways in which these orthodox dates serve as internal and external points of reference, think more critically about how benchmark dates are established, and generate a revised set of benchmark dates that better reflects macro-historical international dynamics. The first part of t...

  17. Benchmarking for Excellence and the Nursing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleboda, Claire

    1999-01-01

    Nursing is a service profession. The services provided are essential to life and welfare. Therefore, setting the benchmark for high quality care is fundamental. Exploring the definition of a benchmark value will help to determine a best practice approach. A benchmark is the descriptive statement of a desired level of performance against which quality can be judged. It must be sufficiently well understood by managers and personnel in order that it may serve as a standard against which to measure value.

  18. Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 101 NIST Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database is a collection of experimental and ab initio thermochemical properties for a selected set of molecules. The goals are to provide a benchmark set of molecules for the evaluation of ab initio computational methods and allow the comparison between different ab initio computational methods for the prediction of thermochemical properties.

  19. Method and system for benchmarking computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, John L.

    1993-09-14

    A testing system and method for benchmarking computer systems. The system includes a store containing a scalable set of tasks to be performed to produce a solution in ever-increasing degrees of resolution as a larger number of the tasks are performed. A timing and control module allots to each computer a fixed benchmarking interval in which to perform the stored tasks. Means are provided for determining, after completion of the benchmarking interval, the degree of progress through the scalable set of tasks and for producing a benchmarking rating relating to the degree of progress for each computer.

  20. Benchmarking for controllere: Metoder, teknikker og muligheder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj; Sandalgaard, Niels; Dietrichson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Der vil i artiklen blive stillet skarpt på begrebet benchmarking ved at præsentere og diskutere forskellige facetter af det. Der vil blive redegjort for fire forskellige anvendelser af benchmarking for at vise begrebets bredde og væsentligheden af at klarlægge formålet med et benchmarkingprojekt......, inden man går i gang. Forskellen på resultatbenchmarking og procesbenchmarking vil blive behandlet, hvorefter brugen af intern hhv. ekstern benchmarking vil blive diskuteret. Endelig introduceres brugen af benchmarking i budgetlægning og budgetopfølgning....

  1. 粒子滤波同化方法在CERES-Wheat作物模型估产中的应用%Estimation of crop yield using CERES-Wheat model based on particle filter data assimilation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜志伟; 陈仲新; 任建强; 周清波

    2012-01-01

    In order to validate the feasibility of particle filter algorithm for crop yield estimation using crop growth model as well as accuracy, the data assimilation system of CERES-Wheat (crop environment resource synthesis for wheat) model was integrated. The ground observation was employed to perform an experiment to test the capability of data assimilation system for crop yield estimation. The effect of particle dimension and perturbed variance on accuracy and efficiency was also discussed. The results showed that CERES-Wheat data assimilation system based on particle filter could correctly adjust the trajectory of model states and significantly improve the precision of forecasted crop yield. The coefficient of determination R2 between simulated and observed winter wheat yields before and after performing PF assimilation scheme increased from 0.68 to 0.83, normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) from 4.93% to 3.40%, and relative error (RE) from 4.15% to 2.93%. For the trials of perturbed particle size and variance, there were no significant improvement when particle size increased from 50 to 250, but the computation time increased by 5 times. As perturbed variance of particles increased, NRMSE and RE increased by 0.32% and 0.26%, respectively. Therefore, the disturbed dimensions and variance of particles should be determined based on a compromised consideration of both the simulated precision and computed cost. This study provides a valuable reference for monitoring crop growth and yield estimation on regional scale using multi-sources remote sensing data.%为验证粒子滤波同化算法在作物模型估产应用中的可行性和精度,应用该算法构建了CERES-Wheat(cropenvironmentresourcesynthesis for wheat)作物模型同化系统,并应用地面观测数据研究了同化系统的估产能力以及粒子扰动维数和方差对同化结果和效率的影响.研究结果表明,构建的作物模型同化系统能够利用作物关键生育期内观测LAI

  2. Data Assimilation of Benchmark Experiments for Homogenous Thermal / Epithermal Uranium Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation reports on the data assimilation of benchmark experiments for homogeneous thermal and epithermal uranium systems. The assimilation method is based on Kalman filters using integral parameters and sensitivity coefficients calculated with MONK9 and ENDF/B-VII data. The assimilation process results in an overall improvement of the calculation-benchmark agreement, and may help in the selection of nuclear data after analysis of adjustment trends

  3. The Zoo, Benchmarks & You: How To Reach the Oregon State Benchmarks with Zoo Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This document aligns Oregon state educational benchmarks and standards with Oregon Zoo resources. Benchmark areas examined include English, mathematics, science, social studies, and career and life roles. Brief descriptions of the programs offered by the zoo are presented. (SOE)

  4. Benchmarking Implementations of Functional Languages with ``Pseudoknot'', a Float-Intensive Benchmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, P.H.; Feeley, M.; Alt, M.; Augustsson, L.

    1996-01-01

    Over 25 implementations of different functional languages are benchmarked using the same program, a floatingpoint intensive application taken from molecular biology. The principal aspects studied are compile time and execution time for the various implementations that were benchmarked. An important

  5. SARNET benchmark on QUENCH-11. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    computational results can be defined. Larger discrepancies are seen in the hydrogen production and the related oxide scale thickness. Analysis shows that the agreement between calculated and experimental data is determined by both, limitations of severe accident codes and of the experiment. Severe accident codes are intended and developed to analyze typical accident situations in nuclear reactors. Special features of the experimental set-up of integral tests like QUENCH-11 as the presence of a shroud and electrode materials for the electric heating are irrelevant for reactors and cannot be simulated in the desirable detail. User effects add to the problems. However, a limited bandwidth of some calculated mainstream results, including hydrogen production, is a good outcome of the code benchmark. Taking in view other experiments, a further demand for an improvement concerning the oxidation of severe damaged structures during a reflood scenario is seen. Additionally, the benchmark proved to be valuable for a number of participants to become acquainted with the physical problems and with the application of large severe accident codes. For the transfer of knowledge and experience to younger scientists and engineers, this is an important issue to maintain the standard of nuclear safety. (orig.)

  6. SARNET benchmark on QUENCH-11. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanova, A. [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy; Drath, T. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Energy Systems and Energy Economics; Duspiva, J. [Nuclear Research Inst., Rez (CZ). Dept. of Reactor Technology] (and others)

    2008-03-15

    computational results can be defined. Larger discrepancies are seen in the hydrogen production and the related oxide scale thickness. Analysis shows that the agreement between calculated and experimental data is determined by both, limitations of severe accident codes and of the experiment. Severe accident codes are intended and developed to analyze typical accident situations in nuclear reactors. Special features of the experimental set-up of integral tests like QUENCH-11 as the presence of a shroud and electrode materials for the electric heating are irrelevant for reactors and cannot be simulated in the desirable detail. User effects add to the problems. However, a limited bandwidth of some calculated mainstream results, including hydrogen production, is a good outcome of the code benchmark. Taking in view other experiments, a further demand for an improvement concerning the oxidation of severe damaged structures during a reflood scenario is seen. Additionally, the benchmark proved to be valuable for a number of participants to become acquainted with the physical problems and with the application of large severe accident codes. For the transfer of knowledge and experience to younger scientists and engineers, this is an important issue to maintain the standard of nuclear safety. (orig.)

  7. The 1.7- to 4.2-micron spectrum of asteroid 1 Ceres - Evidence for structural water in clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Feierberg, M. A.; Larson, H. P.; Johnson, J. R.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    A high-resolution Fourier spectrum (1.7-3.5 microns) and medium-resolution spectrophotometry (2.7-4.2 microns) were obtained for Asteroid 1 Ceres. The presence of the 3-micron absorption feature due to water of hydration was confirmed. The 3-micron feature is compared with the 3-micron bands due to water of hydration in clays and salts. It is concluded that the spectrum of Ceres shows a strong absorption at 2.7-2.8 microns due to structural OH groups in clay minerals. The dominant minerals on the surface of Ceres are therefore hydrated clay minerals structurally similar to terrestrial montmorillonites. There is also a narrow absorption feature at 3.1 microns which is attributable to a very small amount of water ice on Ceres. This is the first evidence for ice on the surface of an asteroid.

  8. A study regarding the stability of the primordial crust of asteroid Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, Michelangelo; Federico, Costanzo; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; De Angelis, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Ceres is a particular object of the solar system, since it is a "transition body" between the icy satellites of the outer solar system and the rocky bodies of the inner part. Probably it is differentiated [1,2], i.e. it has a core made of "rock" (silicates) with a weak presence of metals, a large icy mantle and a rocky crust. In particular, it has been proposed the existence on the surface of the ammoniated phyllosilicates, compatible with an outer solar system origin [3]. Also water in clay minerals, brucite, and iron-rich serpentine have been proposed to exist on the surface [4]. Ice directly on the surface regolith seems to be very unstable: numerical simulations of [5] indicate that it can last for very few orbits. A crust made of a mixture of ice and rock is potentially unstable. In the solar system, for example, Callisto has such a crust but its surface temperature is below the critical temperature for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability [6]: this seems not to be the case of Ceres. In this work, we verify the stability of the primordial crust, by assuming a certain initial composition (ice and rock) and thickness. We assume a post-differentiation Ceres, made of three layers (rocky core, icy mantle and crust). The key role is played by the viscosity of the layers, which influenced the survival or not of the primordial crust. We applied the method of the parametrized thermal convection widely diffused in literature. [1] McCord, T.B. and Sotin, C., 2005, JGR 110 [2] Castillo-Rogez, J.C., and McCord, T.B., 2010, Icarus 205, 443-459 [3] De Sanctis, M.C. et al., 2015, doi:10.1038/nature16172 [4] Rivkin, A.S., et al., 2014, Space Sci Rev, 95-116, 163, doi 10.1007/s11214-010-9677-4 [5] Formisano, M., et al., 2016, MRAS 455, 1892-1904 [6] Shoji, D. and Kurita, K., 2014, doi:10.1002/2014JE004695.

  9. Spectral modeling of Ceres VIR data from Dawn: Method and Result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raponi, Andrea; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ciarniello, M.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Frigeri, A.; Fonte, S.; Giardino, M.; Longobardo, A.; Magni, G.; Marchi, S.; Palomba, E.; Pieters, C. M.; Tosi, F.; Turrini, D.; Zambon, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-11-01

    The Dawn spacecraft [1] is at Ceres, the closest of the IAU-defined dwarf planets to the Sun. This work focuses on the interpretation of Ceres’ surface composition based on the data from the VIR instrument [2] onboard Dawn. The Visible InfraRed (VIR) mapping spectrometer combines high spectral and spatial resolution in the VIS (0.25-1mm) and IR (1-5mm) spectral ranges. VIR will provide a very good coverage of the surface during its orbital mission at Ceres.In order to model the measured spectra, we have utilized Hapke's radiative transfer model [3], which allows estimation of the mineral composition, the relative abundances of the spectral end-members, and the grain size. Optical constants of the spectral end-members are approximated by applying the methodology described in [4] to IR spectra reflectance obtained from the RELAB database.The observed spectra of Ceres surface are affected by a thermal emission component that prevents direct comparison with laboratory data at longer wavelengths. Thus to model the whole wavelength range measured by VIR, the thermal emission is modeled together with the reflectance. Calibrated spectra are first cleaned by removing artefacts. A best fit is obtained with a least square optimization algorithm. For further details on the method, see reference [5].The range 2.5 - 2.9 μm is severely hindered by Earth's atmosphere, but it contains a strong absorption band that dominates the IR Ceres’ spectrum. Thanks to the VIR instrument we can obtain a compositional model for the whole IR range [6]. We used several different combinations of materials hypothesized to be representative of the Ceres’ surface including phyllosilicates, ices, carbonaceous chondrites and salts. The results will be discussed.Acknowledgements This work is supported by the Italian Space Agencies and NASA. Enabling contributions from the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams are gratefully acknowledged.Reference[1] Russell et al., Space Sci. Rev., 163

  10. General benchmarks for quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Using a technique based on quantum teleportation, we simplify the most general adaptive protocols for key distribution, entanglement distillation and quantum communication over a wide class of quantum channels in arbitrary dimension. Thanks to this method, we bound the ultimate rates for secret key generation and quantum communication through single-mode Gaussian channels and several discrete-variable channels. In particular, we derive exact formulas for the two-way assisted capacities of the bosonic quantum-limited amplifier and the dephasing channel in arbitrary dimension, as well as the secret key capacity of the qubit erasure channel. Our results establish the limits of quantum communication with arbitrary systems and set the most general and precise benchmarks for testing quantum repeaters in both discrete- and continuous-variable settings.

  11. Benchmarking Asteroid-Deflection Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Tane; Bruck Syal, Megan; Owen, John Michael; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-10-01

    An asteroid impacting Earth could have devastating consequences. In preparation to deflect or disrupt one before it reaches Earth, it is imperative to have modeling capabilities that adequately simulate the deflection actions. Code validation is key to ensuring full confidence in simulation results used in an asteroid-mitigation plan. We are benchmarking well-known impact experiments using Spheral, an adaptive smoothed-particle hydrodynamics code, to validate our modeling of asteroid deflection. We describe our simulation results, compare them with experimental data, and discuss what we have learned from our work. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-695540

  12. Benchmark scenarios for the NMSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Djouadi, A; Ellwanger, U; Godbole, R; Hugonie, C; King, S F; Lehti, S; Moretti, S; Nikitenko, A; Rottlander, I; Schumacher, M; Teixeira, A

    2008-01-01

    We discuss constrained and semi--constrained versions of the next--to--minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (NMSSM) in which a singlet Higgs superfield is added to the two doublet superfields that are present in the minimal extension (MSSM). This leads to a richer Higgs and neutralino spectrum and allows for many interesting phenomena that are not present in the MSSM. In particular, light Higgs particles are still allowed by current constraints and could appear as decay products of the heavier Higgs states, rendering their search rather difficult at the LHC. We propose benchmark scenarios which address the new phenomenological features, consistent with present constraints from colliders and with the dark matter relic density, and with (semi--)universal soft terms at the GUT scale. We present the corresponding spectra for the Higgs particles, their couplings to gauge bosons and fermions and their most important decay branching ratios. A brief survey of the search strategies for these states a...

  13. Human factors reliability Benchmark exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission has organized a Human Factors Reliability Benchmark Exercise (HF-RBE) with the aim of assessing the state of the art in human reliability modelling and assessment. Fifteen teams from eleven countries, representing industry, utilities, licensing organisations and research institutes, participated in the HF-RBE. The HF-RBE was organized around two study cases: (1) analysis of routine functional Test and Maintenance (T and M) procedures: with the aim of assessing the probability of test induced failures, the probability of failures to remain unrevealed and the potential to initiate transients because of errors performed in the test; (2) analysis of human actions during an operational transient: with the aim of assessing the probability that the operators will correctly diagnose the malfunctions and take proper corrective action. This report contains the final summary reports produced by the participants in the exercise

  14. HPC Analytics Support. Requirements for Uncertainty Quantification Benchmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, Patrick R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Purohit, Sumit [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rodriguez, Luke R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report outlines techniques for extending benchmark generation products so they support uncertainty quantification by benchmarked systems. We describe how uncertainty quantification requirements can be presented to candidate analytical tools supporting SPARQL. We describe benchmark data sets for evaluating uncertainty quantification, as well as an approach for using our benchmark generator to produce data sets for generating benchmark data sets.

  15. 42 CFR 440.330 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 440.330 Section... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.330 Benchmark health benefits coverage. Benchmark coverage is...

  16. Using Web-Based Peer Benchmarking to Manage the Client-Based Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raska, David; Keller, Eileen Weisenbach; Shaw, Doris

    2013-01-01

    The complexities of integrating client-based projects into marketing courses provide challenges for the instructor but produce richness of context and active learning for the student. This paper explains the integration of Web-based peer benchmarking as a means of improving student performance on client-based projects within a single semester in…

  17. Benchmarking the Multi-dimensional Stellar Implicit Code MUSIC

    CERN Document Server

    Goffrey, T; Viallet, M; Baraffe, I; Popov, M V; Walder, R; Folini, D; Geroux, C; Constantino, T

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a numerical benchmark study for the MUlti-dimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC) based on widely applicable two- and three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics problems relevant to stellar interiors. MUSIC is an implicit large eddy simulation code that uses implicit time integration, implemented as a Jacobian-free Newton Krylov method. A physics based preconditioning technique which can be adjusted to target varying physics is used to improve the performance of the solver. The problems used for this benchmark study include the Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, and the decay of the Taylor-Green vortex. Additionally we show a test of hydrostatic equilibrium, in a stellar environment which is dominated by radiative effects. In this setting the flexibility of the preconditioning technique is demonstrated. This work aims to bridge the gap between the hydrodynamic test problems typically used during development of numerical methods and the complex flows of stellar in...

  18. A benchmark for fault tolerant flight control evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaili, H.; Breeman, J.; Lombaerts, T.; Stroosma, O.

    2013-12-01

    A large transport aircraft simulation benchmark (REconfigurable COntrol for Vehicle Emergency Return - RECOVER) has been developed within the GARTEUR (Group for Aeronautical Research and Technology in Europe) Flight Mechanics Action Group 16 (FM-AG(16)) on Fault Tolerant Control (2004 2008) for the integrated evaluation of fault detection and identification (FDI) and reconfigurable flight control strategies. The benchmark includes a suitable set of assessment criteria and failure cases, based on reconstructed accident scenarios, to assess the potential of new adaptive control strategies to improve aircraft survivability. The application of reconstruction and modeling techniques, based on accident flight data, has resulted in high-fidelity nonlinear aircraft and fault models to evaluate new Fault Tolerant Flight Control (FTFC) concepts and their real-time performance to accommodate in-flight failures.

  19. Synergetic effect of benchmarking competitive advantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.P. Tkachova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It is analyzed the essence of synergistic competitive benchmarking. The classification of types of synergies is developed. It is determined the sources of synergies in conducting benchmarking of competitive advantages. It is proposed methodological framework definition of synergy in the formation of competitive advantage.

  20. The role of benchmarking for yardstick competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increasing interest in yardstick regulation, there is a need to understand the most appropriate method for realigning tariffs at the outset. Benchmarking is the tool used for such realignment and is therefore a necessary first-step in the implementation of yardstick competition. A number of concerns have been raised about the application of benchmarking, making some practitioners reluctant to move towards yardstick based regimes. We assess five of the key concerns often discussed and find that, in general, these are not as great as perceived. The assessment is based on economic principles and experiences with applying benchmarking to regulated sectors, e.g. in the electricity and water industries in the UK, The Netherlands, Austria and Germany in recent years. The aim is to demonstrate that clarity on the role of benchmarking reduces the concern about its application in different regulatory regimes. We find that benchmarking can be used in regulatory settlements, although the range of possible benchmarking approaches that are appropriate will be small for any individual regulatory question. Benchmarking is feasible as total cost measures and environmental factors are better defined in practice than is commonly appreciated and collusion is unlikely to occur in environments with more than 2 or 3 firms (where shareholders have a role in monitoring and rewarding performance). Furthermore, any concern about companies under-recovering costs is a matter to be determined through the regulatory settlement and does not affect the case for using benchmarking as part of that settlement. (author)

  1. Evaluating software verification systems: benchmarks and competitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, Dirk; Huisman, Marieke; Klebanov, Vladimir; Monahan, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the program and the outcomes of Dagstuhl Seminar 14171 “Evaluating Software Verification Systems: Benchmarks and Competitions”. The seminar brought together a large group of current and future competition organizers and participants, benchmark maintainers, as well as practition

  2. Benchmark Assessment for Improved Learning. AACC Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Joan L.; Osmundson, Ellen; Dietel, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the purposes of benchmark assessments and provides recommendations for selecting and using benchmark assessments--addressing validity, alignment, reliability, fairness and bias and accessibility, instructional sensitivity, utility, and reporting issues. We also present recommendations on building capacity to support schools'…

  3. The Linked Data Benchmark Council Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boncz, P.A.; Fundulaki, I.; Gubichev, A.; Larriba-Pey, J.; Neumann, T.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fast growth and increasing popularity, the broad field of RDF and Graph database systems lacks an independent authority for developing benchmarks, and for neutrally assessing benchmark results through industry-strength auditing which would allow to quantify and compare the performance of

  4. Benchmarking implementations of lazy functional languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, P.H.; Langendoen, K.G.

    1993-01-01

    Five implementations of different lazy functional languages are compared using a common benchmark of a dozen medium size programs. The benchmarking procedure has been designed such that one set of programs can be translated automatically into different languages, thus allowing a fair comparison of t

  5. Benchmark Two-Good Utility Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jaegher, K.

    2007-01-01

    Benchmark two-good utility functions involving a good with zero income elasticity and unit income elasticity are well known. This paper derives utility functions for the additional benchmark cases where one good has zero cross-price elasticity, unit own-price elasticity, and zero own price elasticit

  6. A Seafloor Benchmark for 3-dimensional Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Webb, S. C.; Nooner, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed an inexpensive, permanent seafloor benchmark to increase the longevity of seafloor geodetic measurements. The benchmark provides a physical tie to the sea floor lasting for decades (perhaps longer) on which geodetic sensors can be repeatedly placed and removed with millimeter resolution. Global coordinates estimated with seafloor geodetic techniques will remain attached to the benchmark allowing for the interchange of sensors as they fail or become obsolete, or for the sensors to be removed and used elsewhere, all the while maintaining a coherent series of positions referenced to the benchmark. The benchmark has been designed to free fall from the sea surface with transponders attached. The transponder can be recalled via an acoustic command sent from the surface to release from the benchmark and freely float to the sea surface for recovery. The duration of the sensor attachment to the benchmark will last from a few days to a few years depending on the specific needs of the experiment. The recovered sensors are then available to be reused at other locations, or again at the same site in the future. Three pins on the sensor frame mate precisely and unambiguously with three grooves on the benchmark. To reoccupy a benchmark a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) uses its manipulator arm to place the sensor pins into the benchmark grooves. In June 2014 we deployed four benchmarks offshore central Oregon. We used the ROV Jason to successfully demonstrate the removal and replacement of packages onto the benchmark. We will show the benchmark design and its operational capabilities. Presently models of megathrust slip within the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) are mostly constrained by the sub-aerial GPS vectors from the Plate Boundary Observatory, a part of Earthscope. More long-lived seafloor geodetic measures are needed to better understand the earthquake and tsunami risk associated with a large rupture of the thrust fault within the Cascadia subduction zone

  7. Benchmark 1 - Nonlinear strain path forming limit of a reverse draw: Part A: Benchmark description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchmark-1 Committee

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this benchmark is to demonstrate the predictability of forming limits under nonlinear strain paths for a draw panel with a non-axisymmetric reversed dome-shape at the center. It is important to recognize that treating strain forming limits as though they were static during the deformation process may not lead to successful predictions of this benchmark, due to the nonlinearity of the strain paths involved in this benchmark. The benchmark tool is designed to enable a two-stage draw/reverse draw continuous forming process. Three typical sheet materials, AA5182-O Aluminum, and DP600 and TRIP780 Steels, are selected for this benchmark study.

  8. Benchmarking in healthcare using aggregated indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Andreas; Jacobsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Benchmarking has become a fundamental part of modern health care systems, but unfortunately, no benchmarking framework is unanimously accepted for assessing both quality and performance. The aim of this paper is to present a benchmarking model that is able to take different stakeholder perspectives...... into account. By presenting performance as a function of a patient perspective, an operations management perspective, and an employee perspective a more holistic approach to benchmarking is proposed. By collecting statistical information from several national and regional agencies and internal databases......, the model is constructed as a comprehensive hierarchy of indicators. By aggregating the outcome of each indicator, the model is able to benchmark healthcare providing units. By assessing performance deeper in the hierarchy, a more detailed view of performance is obtained. The validity test of the model...

  9. BRCA1 Exon 11, a CERES (Composite Regulatory Element of Splicing Element Involved in Splice Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tammaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Unclassified variants (UV of BRCA1 can affect normal pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we investigate the UV c.693G>A, a “silent” change in BRCA1 exon 11, which we have found induces aberrant splicing in patient carriers and in vitro. Using a minigene assay, we show that the UV c.693G>A has a strong effect on the splicing isoform ratio of BRCA1. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the area surrounding the nucleotide position c.693G>A induced variable changes in the level of exon 11 inclusion/exclusion in the mRNA, pointing to the presence of a complex regulatory element with overlapping enhancer and silencer functions. Accordingly, protein binding analysis in the region detected several splicing regulatory factors involved, including SRSF1, SRSF6 and SRSF9, suggesting that this sequence represents a composite regulatory element of splicing (CERES.

  10. Long Term Cloud Property Datasets From MODIS and AVHRR Using the CERES Cloud Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnis, Patrick; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Doelling, David R.; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Yost, Christopher R.; Trepte, Qing Z.; Bedka, Sarah T.; Palikonda, Rabindra; Scarino, Benjamin R.; Chen, Yan; Hong, Gang; Bhatt, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Cloud properties play a critical role in climate change. Monitoring cloud properties over long time periods is needed to detect changes and to validate and constrain models. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project has developed several cloud datasets from Aqua and Terra MODIS data to better interpret broadband radiation measurements and improve understanding of the role of clouds in the radiation budget. The algorithms applied to MODIS data have been adapted to utilize various combinations of channels on the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the long-term time series of NOAA and MetOp satellites to provide a new cloud climate data record. These datasets can be useful for a variety of studies. This paper presents results of the MODIS and AVHRR analyses covering the period from 1980-2014. Validation and comparisons with other datasets are also given.

  11. Seasonal variability of cloud optical depth over northwestern China derived from CERES/MODIS satellite measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonghang Chen; Hongtao Bai; Jianping Huang; Hua Zhang; Jinming Ge; Xiaodan Guan; Xiaoqin Mao

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal variability of cloud optical depth over northwestern China derived from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Single Scanner Footprint (SSF) Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Edition 1B data from July 2002 to June 2004 is presented. The regions of interest are those with Asia monsoon influence, the Tianshan and Qilian Mountains, and the Taklimakan Desert. The results show that the instantaneous measurements presented here are much higher than the previous results derived from International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) D2 monthly mean data. Generally the measurements of cloud optical depth are the highest in summer and the lowest in winter, however, Taklimakan Desert has the lowest measurements in autumn. The regional variation is quite significant over northwestern China.

  12. National Plan for Research - Development and Innovation, CERES Programme. Annual Scientific Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CERES Programme is a research program organized in the frame of Institut of Atomic Physics, Bucharest, Romania. The annual scientific session held in Bucharest on December 2-3, 2002 covered the following 9 sections (projects): Mathematics (2); Physics (85); Chemistry (14); Engineering (2); Earth Sciences (13); Life Sciences (8); Economics and Social Studies (4); Culture (4); Works received after the deadline. The most numerous contributions within the INIS scope addressed subjects from the fields: theoretical and experimental nuclear physics, seismic survey and prognoses, high energy physics and quantum field theory, physical properties of materials, nuclear spectroscopic instrumentation, nuclear methods in isotopic analysis. The contributors presented their results obtained under research contracts supported by the Romanian Ministry of Education and Research in the period October 15, 2001 - October 15, 2002. Many of the reported research works were done in collaborations with international organizations or institutes from abroad

  13. The CERES/ARM/GEWEX Experiment (CAGEX) for the Retrieval of Radiative Fluxes with Satellite Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlock, Thomas P.; Alberta, Timothy L.

    1996-11-01

    Results from a temporally intensive, limited area, radiative transfer model experiment are on-line for investigating the vertical profile of shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The CERES/ARM/GEWEX Experiment (CAGEX) Version 1 provides a record of fluxes that have been computed with a radiative transfer code; the atmospheric sounding, aerosol, and satellite-retrieved cloud data on which the computations have been based; and surface-based measurements of radiative fluxes and cloud properties from ARM for comparison.The computed broadband fluxes at TOA show considerable scatter when compared with fluxes that are inferred empirically from narrowband operational satellite data. At the surface, LW fluxes computed with an alternate sounding dataset compare well with pyrgeometer measurements. In agreement with earlier work, the authors find that the calculated SW surface insulation is larger than the measurements for clear-sky and total-sky conditions.This experiment has been developed to test retrievals of radiative fluxes and the associated forcings by clouds, aerosols, surface properties, and water vapor. Collaboration is sought; the goal is to extend the domain of meteorological conditions for which such retrievals can be done accurately. CAGEX Version 1 covers April 1994. Subsequent versions will (a) at first span the same limited geographical area with data from October 1995, (b) then expand to cover a significant fraction of the GEWEX Continental-Scale International Project region for April 1996 through September 1996, and (c) eventually be used in a more advanced form to validate CERES.

  14. The Role of the Icy Shell in the Thermal Evolution of Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Ceres shape and crater morphology are consistent with a layer of low-density material that appears to be more dense and viscous than pure water ice, over an even more dense and viscous core. In order to understand the evolution of Ceres, we conduct a series of numerical experiments designed to understand the evolution of temperature and flow within a spherical body with a soft outer shell over a nearly rigid core using 3D spherical code CitcomS. In these experiments the sphere is heated from within using chondritic abundances of radiogenic elements. We study the impact of surface temperature, outer shell thickness, as well as the density and rheology of the softer outer shell and stiffer core on the thermal and dynamical evolution of the interior of the body, including both the soft shell and stiff core. For the outer shells with a thickness less than 10% of the radius of the body and a surface temperature at or below 90 K, the entire body remains in a conductive state and the temperature of the soft outer shell never exceeds the melting temperature of pure water ice throughout the history of the solar system. However for a range of outer shell thickness and surface temperatures, we find that within the first Gyr of evolution a degree-1 (i.e. single hemisphere) mode of convection encompassing both the stiff core and soft outer shell overtakes shorter-wavelength convective flow occurring in the softer outer shell. When this happens the body dramatically cools over a time interval of less than 100 Myrs and the internal temperature remains asymmetric throughout the subsequent evolution of the body.

  15. Validation of neutron-transport calculations in benchmark facilities for improved damage-fluence predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate determination of damage fluence accumulated by reactor pressure vessels (RPV) as a function of time is essential in order to evaluate the vessel integrity for both pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transients and end-of-life considerations. The desired accuracy for neutron exposure parameters such as displacements per atom or fluence (E > 1 MeV) is of the order of 20 to 30%. However, these types of accuracies can only be obtained realistically by validation of nuclear data and calculational methods in benchmark facilities. The purposes of this paper are to review the needs and requirements for benchmark experiments, to discuss the status of current benchmark experiments, to summarize results and conclusions obtained so far, and to suggest areas where further benchmarking is needed

  16. Framework for benchmarking online retailing performance using fuzzy AHP and TOPSIS method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ahsan Akhtar Hasin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing penetration of internet connectivity, on-line retail is growing from the pioneer phase to increasing integration within people's lives and companies' normal business practices. In the increasingly competitive environment, on-line retail service providers require systematic and structured approach to have cutting edge over the rival. Thus, the use of benchmarking has become indispensable to accomplish superior performance to support the on-line retail service providers. This paper uses the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP approach to support a generic on-line retail benchmarking process. Critical success factors for on-line retail service have been identified from a structured questionnaire and literature and prioritized using fuzzy AHP. Using these critical success factors, performance levels of the ORENET an on-line retail service provider is benchmarked along with four other on-line service providers using TOPSIS method. Based on the benchmark, their relative ranking has also been illustrated.

  17. 'Integration'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2011-01-01

    , while the countries have adopted disparate policies and ideologies, differences in the actual treatment and attitudes towards immigrants and refugees in everyday life are less clear, due to parallel integration programmes based on strong similarities in the welfare systems and in cultural notions of...

  18. An Application and Analysis of CERES-Rice on Rice Nitrogen Fertilization Management%CERES-Rice在水稻氮肥管理中的应用与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石春林; 金之庆; 高亮之; 葛道阔; 魏秀芳

    2003-01-01

    利用CERES-Rice做模拟试验,分析了施氮量和氮肥运筹对水稻产量形成的影响.结果表明:当施氮水平较低时,CERES-Rice能较好地模拟施氮量对水稻产量形成的影响,但在施氮水平较高的情况下,CERES-Rice的模拟结果不太理想.模型能反映不同N肥运筹下模拟水稻产量的差异,但不能反映高产栽培的施氮特征.结合试验资料进一步分析认为,误差产生的原因是模型中仅用氮素丰缺因子对光合效率进行订正,而没有考虑氮素对物质分配和转移的作用.

  19. Human factors reliability benchmark exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission has organised a Human Factors Reliability Benchmark Exercise (HF-RBE) with the aim of assessing the state of the art in human reliability modelling and assessment. Fifteen teams from eleven countries, representing industry, utilities, licensing organisations and research institutes, participated in the HF-RBE. The HF-RBE was organised around two study cases: (1) analysis of routine functional Test and Maintenance (TPM) procedures: with the aim of assessing the probability of test induced failures, the probability of failures to remain unrevealed and the potential to initiate transients because of errors performed in the test; (2) analysis of human actions during an operational transient: with the aim of assessing the probability that the operators will correctly diagnose the malfunctions and take proper corrective action. This report summarises the contributions received from the participants and analyses these contributions on a comparative basis. The aim of this analysis was to compare the procedures, modelling techniques and quantification methods used, to obtain insight in the causes and magnitude of the variability observed in the results, to try to identify preferred human reliability assessment approaches and to get an understanding of the current state of the art in the field identifying the limitations that are still inherent to the different approaches

  20. Benchmarking Measures of Network Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramson, Aaron; Vandermarliere, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying key agents for the transmission of diseases (ideas, technology, etc.) across social networks has predominantly relied on measures of centrality on a static base network or a temporally flattened graph of agent interactions. Various measures have been proposed as the best trackers of influence, such as degree centrality, betweenness, and k-shell, depending on the structure of the connectivity. We consider SIR and SIS propagation dynamics on a temporally-extruded network of observed interactions and measure the conditional marginal spread as the change in the magnitude of the infection given the removal of each agent at each time: its temporal knockout (TKO) score. We argue that this TKO score is an effective benchmark measure for evaluating the accuracy of other, often more practical, measures of influence. We find that none of the network measures applied to the induced flat graphs are accurate predictors of network propagation influence on the systems studied; however, temporal networks and the TKO measure provide the requisite targets for the search for effective predictive measures. PMID:27670635

  1. Nueva interpretación de una inscripción votiva de Monroy (Cáceres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivares Pedreño, Juan Carlos

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper offers a new interpretation about the votive altar found in the Monroy castle (Cáceres three decades ago. We consider that the theonym cited in the inscription is Bandi with an unknown apellative.El presente trabajo tiene por objetivo la revisión de lectura de una inscripción que fue hallada durante las excavaciones que se realizaron a finales de la década de los setenta en el foso del castillo de Monroy (Cáceres. Según nuestra interpretación, el teónimo no es un hapax, sino el ya conocido Bandi con un nuevo apelativo.

  2. Progress report on terrestrial model development (TERRA and HABITAT): Research in support of the CERES earth system modeling project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercher, J.R.; Axelrod, M.C.; Amthor, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chambers, J.Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1994-05-01

    Although there is only a developing understanding of the many processes affecting and coupling the atmosphere, oceans, and land systems of the earth, we are embarked on an effort to construct a prototype model (CERES) of the full Earth system. As part of this effort, we have proposed to the EPA to construct an Earth System Framework for the CERES model that supports flexible, modular development, coupling, and replacement of Earth System submodel components. This project has two specific areas of study. These areas are (1) the terrestrial contribution to the biogeochemical cycling and (2) the interactions of climate and the land ecosystems. The objectives of these two areas of study are: development of a globally distributed model of terrestrial ecosystem productivity, linking model to the submodels, using coupled system to explore biogeochemical cycles, exploration of greenhouse effect, development of models of surface, and the study of the dynamics of climate change and vegetation response.

  3. Lesson learned from the SARNET wall condensation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The results of the benchmarking activity on wall condensation are reported. • The work was performed in the frame of SARNET. • General modelling techniques for condensation are discussed. • Results of University of Pisa and of other benchmark participants are discussed. • The lesson learned is drawn. - Abstract: The prediction of condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases has received continuing attention in the frame of the Severe Accident Research Network of Excellence, both in the first (2004–2008) and in the second (2009–2013) EC integrated projects. Among the different reasons for considering so relevant this basic phenomenon, coped with by classical treatments dated in the first decades of the last century, there is the interest for developing updated CFD models for reactor containment analysis, requiring validating at a different level the available modelling techniques. In the frame of SARNET, benchmarking activities were undertaken taking advantage of the work performed at different institutions in setting up and developing models for steam condensation in conditions of interest for nuclear reactor containment. Four steps were performed in the activity, involving: (1) an idealized problem freely inspired at the actual conditions occurring in an experimental facility, CONAN, installed at the University of Pisa; (2) a first comparison with experimental data purposely collected by the CONAN facility; (3) a second comparison with data available from experimental campaigns performed in the same apparatus before the inclusion of the activities in SARNET; (4) a third exercise involving data obtained at lower mixture velocity than in previous campaigns, aimed at providing conditions closer to those addressed in reactor containment analyses. The last step of the benchmarking activity required to change the configuration of the experimental apparatus to achieve the lower flow rates involved in the new test specifications. The

  4. Earnings Benchmarks in International hotel firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Parte Esteban

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on earnings management around earnings benchmarks (avoiding losses and earnings decreases hypothesis in international firms and non international firms belonging to the Spanish hotel industry. First, frequency histograms are used to determine the existence of a discontinuity in earnings in both segments. Second, the use of discretionary accruals as a tool to meet earnings benchmarks is analysed in international and non international firms. Empirical evidence shows that international and non international firms meet earnings benchmarks. It is also noted different behaviour between international and non international firms.

  5. LAPUR-K BWR stability benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper documents the stability benchmark of the LAPUR-K code using the measurements taken at the Ringhals Unit 1 plant over four cycles of operation. This benchmark was undertaken to demonstrate the ability of LAPUR-K to calculate the decay ratios for both core-wide and regional mode oscillations. This benchmark contributes significantly to assuring that LAPUR-K can be used to define the exclusion region for the Monticello Plant in response to recent US Nuclear Regulatory Commission notices concerning oscillation observed at Boiling Water Reactor plants. Stability is part of Northern States Power Reload Safety Evaluation of the Monticello Plant

  6. Next-generation angular distribution models for top-of-atmosphere radiative flux calculation from CERES instruments: methodology

    OpenAIRE

    W. Su; Corbett, J; Z. Eitzen; L. Liang

    2015-01-01

    The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes are critical components to advancing our understanding of the Earth's radiative energy balance, radiative effects of clouds and aerosols, and climate feedback. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments provide broadband shortwave and longwave radiance measurements. These radiances are converted to fluxes by using scene-type-dependent angular distribution models (ADMs). This paper describes the next-gener...

  7. Benchmarking Gas Path Diagnostic Methods: A Public Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Donald L.; Bird, Jeff; Davison, Craig; Volponi, Al; Iverson, R. Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of engine health management (EHM) technology. The need is two-fold: technology developers require relevant data and problems to design and validate new algorithms and techniques while engine system integrators and operators need practical tools to direct development and then evaluate the effectiveness of proposed solutions. This paper presents a publicly available gas path diagnostic benchmark problem that has been developed by the Propulsion and Power Systems Panel of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) to help address these needs. The problem is coded in MATLAB (The MathWorks, Inc.) and coupled with a non-linear turbofan engine simulation to produce "snap-shot" measurements, with relevant noise levels, as if collected from a fleet of engines over their lifetime of use. Each engine within the fleet will experience unique operating and deterioration profiles, and may encounter randomly occurring relevant gas path faults including sensor, actuator and component faults. The challenge to the EHM community is to develop gas path diagnostic algorithms to reliably perform fault detection and isolation. An example solution to the benchmark problem is provided along with associated evaluation metrics. A plan is presented to disseminate this benchmark problem to the engine health management technical community and invite technology solutions.

  8. Analytical Radiation Transport Benchmarks for The Next Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verification of large-scale computational algorithms used in nuclear engineering and radiological applications is an essential element of reliable code performance. For this reason, the development of a suite of multidimensional semi-analytical benchmarks has been undertaken to provide independent verification of proper operation of codes dealing with the transport of neutral particles. The benchmarks considered cover several one-dimensional, multidimensional, monoenergetic and multigroup, fixed source and critical transport scenarios. The first approach, called the Green's Function. In slab geometry, the Green's function is incorporated into a set of integral equations for the boundary fluxes. Through a numerical Fourier transform inversion and subsequent matrix inversion for the boundary fluxes, a semi-analytical benchmark emerges. Multidimensional solutions in a variety of infinite media are also based on the slab Green's function. In a second approach, a new converged SN method is developed. In this method, the SN solution is ''minded'' to bring out hidden high quality solutions. For this case multigroup fixed source and criticality transport problems are considered. Remarkably accurate solutions can be obtained with this new method called the Multigroup Converged SN (MGCSN) method as will be demonstrated

  9. Next-generation angular distribution models for top-of-atmosphere radiative flux calculation from the CERES instruments: methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Su

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The top-of-atmosphere (TOA radiative fluxes are critical components to advancing our understanding of the Earth's radiative energy balance, radiative effects of clouds and aerosols, and climate feedback. The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES instruments provide broadband shortwave and longwave radiance measurements. These radiances are converted to fluxes by using scene type dependent Angular Distribution Models (ADMs. This paper describes the next-generation ADMs that are developed for Terra and Aqua using all available CERES rotating azimuth plane radiance measurements. Coincident cloud and aerosol retrievals, and radiance measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, and meteorological parameters from Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS data assimilation version 5.4.1 are used to define scene type. CERES radiance measurements are stratified by scene type and by other parameters that are important for determining the anisotropy of the given scene type. Anisotropic factors are then defined either for discrete intervals of relevant parameters or as a continuous functions of combined parameters, depending on the scene type. Compared to the existing ADMs, the new ADMs change the monthly mean instantaneous fluxes by up to 5 W m−2 on a regional scale of 1° latitude × 1° longitude, but the flux changes are less than 0.5 W m−2 on a global scale.

  10. Simulação de florescimento e da produção de milho através do modelo CERES: maize Mayze yeld and flowering date simulation by using CERES: Maize Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Maurício Paglis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A utilização dos computadores na agricultura tem trazido inúmeros benefícios ao empresário rural. Entre tais benefícios, a utilização de programas de computador para simular o crescimento e desenvolvimento de plantas; bem como o seu uso na otimização de práticas culturais, tem se mostrado como uma opção. Objetivou-se, neste trabalho, avaliar o programa CERES-Maize na simulação do florescimento e produção de milho (Zea mays L., em diferentes cenários de investimento. Os resultados das simulações com o programa CERES-Maize mostraram que as diferenças entre as produções simuladas, comparadas com os dados obtidos em campo, estão entre os limites de 5% a 8% de erro, aceitáveis pelo programa. A mesma tendência foi verificada entre os valores observados e simulados para os dias de florescimento, em todos os cenarios. O programa CERES-Maize mostrou-se bastante robusto e eficiente nas simulações efetuadas. O uso desse programa pode ser visto como uma ferramenta adicional ao produtor no processo decisório, durante o planejamento da implantação da cultura.The use of computers in agriculture has brought several benefits to the farmers. Among these benefits, the use of crop models to simulate plant growth and development, as well as a tool for optimization process and decision support aid, has been an option. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of Ceres-Maize model to simulate maize flowering date and yield at different investment scenarios. Simulation results showed that the difference between simulated and observed yield data were in the 5% and 8% error range, acceptable for the program. The same tendency was observed when comparing flowering dates in all scenarios. The model was very efficient and suitable for all of the simulations performed. Without any doubt CERES-Maize may be used as a tool, by farmers, in the crop planning process.

  11. Medicare Contracting - Redacted Benchmark Metric Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has compiled aggregate national benchmark cost and workload metrics using data submitted to CMS by the AB MACs and...

  12. DOE Commercial Building Benchmark Models: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torcelini, P.; Deru, M.; Griffith, B.; Benne, K.; Halverson, M.; Winiarski, D.; Crawley, D. B.

    2008-07-01

    To provide a consistent baseline of comparison and save time conducting such simulations, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a set of standard benchmark building models. This paper will provide an executive summary overview of these benchmark buildings, and how they can save building analysts valuable time. Fully documented and implemented to use with the EnergyPlus energy simulation program, the benchmark models are publicly available and new versions will be created to maintain compatibility with new releases of EnergyPlus. The benchmark buildings will form the basis for research on specific building technologies, energy code development, appliance standards, and measurement of progress toward DOE energy goals. Having a common starting point allows us to better share and compare research results and move forward to make more energy efficient buildings.

  13. Benchmarking carbon emissions performance in supply chains

    OpenAIRE

    Acquaye, Adolf; Genovese, Andrea; Barrett, John W.; Koh, Lenny

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The paper aims to develop a benchmarking framework to address issues such as supply chain complexity and visibility, geographical differences and non-standardized data, ensuring that the entire supply chain environmental impact (in terms of carbon) and resource use for all tiers, including domestic and import flows, are evaluated. Benchmarking has become an important issue in supply chain management practice. However, challenges such as supply chain complexity and visibility, geogra...

  14. MPI Benchmarking Revisited: Experimental Design and Reproducibility

    OpenAIRE

    Hunold, Sascha; Carpen-Amarie, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is the prevalent programming model used on today's supercomputers. Therefore, MPI library developers are looking for the best possible performance (shortest run-time) of individual MPI functions across many different supercomputer architectures. Several MPI benchmark suites have been developed to assess the performance of MPI implementations. Unfortunately, the outcome of these benchmarks is often neither reproducible nor statistically sound. To overcome th...

  15. Benchmark Two-Good Utility Functions

    OpenAIRE

    de Jaegher, K.

    2007-01-01

    Benchmark two-good utility functions involving a good with zero income elasticity and unit income elasticity are well known. This paper derives utility functions for the additional benchmark cases where one good has zero cross-price elasticity, unit own-price elasticity, and zero own price elasticity. It is shown how each of these utility functions arises from a simple graphical construction based on a single given indifference curve. Also, it is shown that possessors of such utility function...

  16. The MCNP6 Analytic Criticality Benchmark Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Monte Carlo Codes Group

    2016-06-16

    Analytical benchmarks provide an invaluable tool for verifying computer codes used to simulate neutron transport. Several collections of analytical benchmark problems [1-4] are used routinely in the verification of production Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP® [5,6]. Verification of a computer code is a necessary prerequisite to the more complex validation process. The verification process confirms that a code performs its intended functions correctly. The validation process involves determining the absolute accuracy of code results vs. nature. In typical validations, results are computed for a set of benchmark experiments using a particular methodology (code, cross-section data with uncertainties, and modeling) and compared to the measured results from the set of benchmark experiments. The validation process determines bias, bias uncertainty, and possibly additional margins. Verification is generally performed by the code developers, while validation is generally performed by code users for a particular application space. The VERIFICATION_KEFF suite of criticality problems [1,2] was originally a set of 75 criticality problems found in the literature for which exact analytical solutions are available. Even though the spatial and energy detail is necessarily limited in analytical benchmarks, typically to a few regions or energy groups, the exact solutions obtained can be used to verify that the basic algorithms, mathematics, and methods used in complex production codes perform correctly. The present work has focused on revisiting this benchmark suite. A thorough review of the problems resulted in discarding some of them as not suitable for MCNP benchmarking. For the remaining problems, many of them were reformulated to permit execution in either multigroup mode or in the normal continuous-energy mode for MCNP. Execution of the benchmarks in continuous-energy mode provides a significant advance to MCNP verification methods.

  17. Under Pressure Benchmark for DDBMS Availability

    OpenAIRE

    Fior, Alessandro Gustavo; Meira, Jorge Augusto; Cunha De Almeida, Eduardo; Coelho, Ricardo Gonçalves; Didonet Del Fabro, Marcos; Le Traon, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The availability of Distributed Database Management Systems (DDBMS) is related to the probability of being up and running at a given point in time, and managing failures. One well-known and widely used mechanism to ensure availability is replication, which includes performance impact on maintaining data replicas across the DDBMS's machine nodes. Benchmarking can be used to measure such impact. In this article, we present a benchmark that evaluates the performance of DDBMS, considering availab...

  18. Benchmarking implementations of lazy functional languages

    OpenAIRE

    Hartel, P.H.; Langendoen, K. G.

    1993-01-01

    Five implementations of different lazy functional languages are compared using a common benchmark of a dozen medium size programs. The benchmarking procedure has been designed such that one set of programs can be translated automatically into different languages, thus allowing a fair comparison of the quality of compilers for different lazy functional languages. Aspects studied include compile time, execution time, ease of programmingdetermined by the availability of certain key features

  19. Simple Benchmark Specifications for Space Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleterry, Robert C. Jr.; Aghara, Sukesh K.

    2013-01-01

    This report defines space radiation benchmark specifications. This specification starts with simple, monoenergetic, mono-directional particles on slabs and progresses to human models in spacecraft. This report specifies the models and sources needed to what the team performing the benchmark needs to produce in a report. Also included are brief descriptions of how OLTARIS, the NASA Langley website for space radiation analysis, performs its analysis.

  20. A framework for benchmarking land models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Q. Luo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1 targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2 a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3 metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4 model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1 a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2 a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties

  1. Aerodynamic Benchmarking of the Deepwind Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bedona, Gabriele; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Aagaard Madsen, Helge;

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic benchmarking for the DeepWind rotor is conducted comparing different rotor geometries and solutions and keeping the comparison as fair as possible. The objective for the benchmarking is to find the most suitable configuration in order to maximize the power production and minimize...... NACA airfoil family. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license...

  2. CREATION AND EXPANSION OF A CLUSTER: THE CASE OF THE CERES CLUSTER, GO ABSTRACT PROCESO DE FORMACIÓN Y EXPANSIÓN DE CLUSTER: EL CASO DEL AGLOMERADO DE CERES, GO PROCESSO DE FORMAÇÃO E EXPANSÃO DE CLUSTER: O CASO DO AGLOMERADO DE CERES, GO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Manoel Coelho Borges Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the factors that favored creation and expansion of the health organization cluster in the city of Ceres, Goiás. Despite the small population of some 19,000 inhabitants, Ceres is recognized as a center for health services. This article investigates the creation and expansion of the health cluster in Ceres from two perspectives. The  first considers the existence of so-called economic factors such as demand, infrastructure, presence of specialized skills, government policies, invitation to specialized professionals by businessmen and location on an important access route. The second takes into account sociological factors, highlighting social networks, professional and family ties, trust, values, rules and traditions as responsible for the multiplication of companies in the same sector in this location. Through an exploratory study based on interviews with 20 of the 65 physicians in the city, it is concluded that in the case of Ceres, great demand for health services, government actions to populate Brazil’s Mid-West and the activities of pioneers incentivating the entrepreneurial spirit of physicians were determining factors in the creation and expansion of this health cluster.Este trabajo discute los factores que favorecieron la formación y la expansión de la aglomeración de organizaciones de salud en el  municipio de Ceres, en el estado brasileño de Goiás. A pesar  de su pequeña población, cerca de 19.000 habitantes, Ceres es reconocida como una ciudad modelo en lo que se refiere a la  prestación de servicios de salud. En este trabajo, analizamos la formación y expansión del  cluster de salud de Ceres bajo dos perspectivas. La primera considera la existencia de los llamados factores económicos, como la demanda, la infraestructura, la presencia de mano de obra especializada, las políticas gubernamentales, la invitación de empresarios a profesionales especializados y la dependencia de la

  3. Benchmarking for Cost Improvement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) conducted the Benchmarking for Cost Improvement initiative with three objectives: Pilot test benchmarking as an EM cost improvement tool; identify areas for cost improvement and recommend actions to address these areas; provide a framework for future cost improvement. The benchmarking initiative featured the use of four principal methods (program classification, nationwide cost improvement survey, paired cost comparison and component benchmarking). Interested parties contributed during both the design and execution phases. The benchmarking initiative was conducted on an accelerated basis. Of necessity, it considered only a limited set of data that may not be fully representative of the diverse and complex conditions found at the many DOE installations. The initiative generated preliminary data about cost differences and it found a high degree of convergence on several issues. Based on this convergence, the report recommends cost improvement strategies and actions. This report describes the steps taken as part of the benchmarking initiative and discusses the findings and recommended actions for achieving cost improvement. The results and summary recommendations, reported below, are organized by the study objectives.

  4. Clinically meaningful performance benchmarks in MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Robert W.; Scagnelli, John; Pula, John H.; Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Cadavid, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Identify and validate clinically meaningful Timed 25-Foot Walk (T25FW) performance benchmarks in individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Cross-sectional study of 159 MS patients first identified candidate T25FW benchmarks. To characterize the clinical meaningfulness of T25FW benchmarks, we ascertained their relationships to real-life anchors, functional independence, and physiologic measurements of gait and disease progression. Candidate T25FW benchmarks were then prospectively validated in 95 subjects using 13 measures of ambulation and cognition, patient-reported outcomes, and optical coherence tomography. Results: T25FW of 6 to 7.99 seconds was associated with a change in occupation due to MS, occupational disability, walking with a cane, and needing “some help” with instrumental activities of daily living; T25FW ≥8 seconds was associated with collecting Supplemental Security Income and government health care, walking with a walker, and inability to do instrumental activities of daily living. During prospective benchmark validation, we trichotomized data by T25FW benchmarks (10 seconds) ranges of performance. PMID:24174581

  5. Action-Oriented Benchmarking: Concepts and Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    California Energy Commission; Mathew, Paul; Mills, Evan; Mathew, Paul; Piette, Mary Ann; Bourassa, Norman; Brook, Martha

    2008-02-13

    Most energy benchmarking tools provide static feedback on how one building compares to a larger set of loosely similar buildings, without providing information at the end-use level or on what can be done to reduce consumption, cost, or emissions. In this article--Part 1 of a two-part series--we describe an 'action-oriented benchmarking' approach, which extends whole-building energy benchmarking to include analysis of system and component energy use metrics and features. Action-oriented benchmarking thereby allows users to generate more meaningful metrics and to identify, screen and prioritize potential efficiency improvements. This opportunity assessment process can then be used to inform and optimize a full-scale audit or commissioning process. We introduce a new web-based action-oriented benchmarking system and associated software tool-EnergyIQ. The benchmarking methods, visualizations, and user interface design are informed by an end-user needs assessment survey and best-practice guidelines from ASHRAE.

  6. CERES Top-of-Atmosphere Earth Radiation Budget Climate Data Record: Accounting for in-Orbit Changes in Instrument Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman G. Loeb

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES project provides observations of Earth’s radiation budget using measurements from CERES instruments onboard the Terra, Aqua and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP satellites. As the objective is to create a long-term climate data record, it is necessary to periodically reprocess the data in order to incorporate the latest calibration changes and algorithm improvements. Here, we focus on the improvements and validation of CERES Terra and Aqua radiances in Edition 4, which are used to generate higher-level climate data products. Onboard sources indicate that the total (TOT channel response to longwave (LW radiation has increased relative to the start of the missions by 0.4% to 1%. In the shortwave (SW, the sensor response change ranges from −0.4% to 0.6%. To account for in-orbit changes in SW spectral response function (SRF, direct nadir radiance comparisons between instrument pairs on the same satellite are made and an improved wavelength dependent degradation model is used to adjust the SRF of the instrument operating in a rotating azimuth plane scan mode. After applying SRF corrections independently to CERES Terra and Aqua, monthly variations amongst these instruments are highly correlated and the standard deviation in the difference of monthly anomalies is 0.2 Wm−2 for ocean and 0.3 Wm−2 for land/desert. Additionally, trends in CERES Terra and Aqua monthly anomalies are consistent to 0.21 Wm−2 per decade for ocean and 0.31 Wm−2 per decade for land/desert. In the LW, adjustments to the TOT channel SRF are made to ensure that removal of the contribution from the SW portion of the TOT channel with SW channel radiance measurements during daytime is consistent throughout the mission. Accordingly, anomalies in day–night LW difference in Edition 4 are more consistent compared to Edition 3, particularly for the Aqua land/desert case.

  7. Benchmarking the QUAD4/TRIA3 element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitrof, Stephen M.; Venkayya, Vipperla B.

    1993-09-01

    The QUAD4 and TRIA3 elements are the primary plate/shell elements in NASTRAN. These elements enable the user to analyze thin plate/shell structures for membrane, bending and shear phenomena. They are also very new elements in the NASTRAN library. These elements are extremely versatile and constitute a substantially enhanced analysis capability in NASTRAN. However, with the versatility comes the burden of understanding a myriad of modeling implications and their effect on accuracy and analysis quality. The validity of many aspects of these elements were established through a series of benchmark problem results and comparison with those available in the literature and obtained from other programs like MSC/NASTRAN and CSAR/NASTRAN. Never-the-less such a comparison is never complete because of the new and creative use of these elements in complex modeling situations. One of the important features of QUAD4 and TRIA3 elements is the offset capability which allows the midsurface of the plate to be noncoincident with the surface of the grid points. None of the previous elements, with the exception of bar (beam), has this capability. The offset capability played a crucial role in the design of QUAD4 and TRIA3 elements. It allowed modeling layered composites, laminated plates and sandwich plates with the metal and composite face sheets. Even though the basic implementation of the offset capability is found to be sound in the previous applications, there is some uncertainty in relatively simple applications. The main purpose of this paper is to test the integrity of the offset capability and provide guidelines for its effective use. For the purpose of simplicity, references in this paper to the QUAD4 element will also include the TRIA3 element.

  8. Isprs Benchmark for Multi-Platform Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nex, F.; Gerke, M.; Remondino, F.; Przybilla, H.-J.; Bäumker, M.; Zurhorst, A.

    2015-03-01

    Airborne high resolution oblique imagery systems and RPAS/UAVs are very promising technologies that will keep on influencing the development of geomatics in the future years closing the gap between terrestrial and classical aerial acquisitions. These two platforms are also a promising solution for National Mapping and Cartographic Agencies (NMCA) as they allow deriving complementary mapping information. Although the interest for the registration and integration of aerial and terrestrial data is constantly increasing, only limited work has been truly performed on this topic. Several investigations still need to be undertaken concerning algorithms ability for automatic co-registration, accurate point cloud generation and feature extraction from multiplatform image data. One of the biggest obstacles is the non-availability of reliable and free datasets to test and compare new algorithms and procedures. The Scientific Initiative "ISPRS benchmark for multi-platform photogrammetry", run in collaboration with EuroSDR, aims at collecting and sharing state-of-the-art multi-sensor data (oblique airborne, UAV-based and terrestrial images) over an urban area. These datasets are used to assess different algorithms and methodologies for image orientation and dense matching. As ground truth, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS) as well as topographic networks and GNSS points were acquired to compare 3D coordinates on check points (CPs) and evaluate cross sections and residuals on generated point cloud surfaces. In this paper, the acquired data, the pre-processing steps, the evaluation procedures as well as some preliminary results achieved with commercial software will be presented.

  9. Large-scale heterogeneity in Ceres' subsurface: Clues to internal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Carol; Ammannito, Eleonora; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Jaumann, Ralf; Y McSween, Harry; Marchi, Simone; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Russell, Christopher T.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Dawn Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Dawn's observations at Ceres indicate it is volatile-rich body that has undergone ice-rock differentiation and harbored a past subsurface ocean [1]. Gravity data indicate a volatile-rich shell (crust) overlying a denser core of hydrated silicates [2]. Ubiquitous ammoniated phyllosilicates [3] and carbonates [4] on the surface point towards pervasive hydrothermal alteration. The absence of an ice-dominated layer in the subsurface (from ocean freezing) may indicate partial loss of the ice shell by impact-induced sublimation [5], and mixing with the salts and silicate rich material present near the ancient seafloor. Although the surface shows compositional homogeneity, there are variations present, such as bluer material associated with several young craters, and a broad region of brighter material surrounding Dantu and Kerwan craters that is relatively ammonia-rich [6]. This compositionally-distinct region resides in a ~4 km deep basin – Vendemia Planitia – which has been proposed as a cryptic mega impact basin [7]. The smooth morphology and dearth of impact craters in this area, and the lack of large (>400 km) craters on Ceres in general points to an erasure process that could be the result of resurfacing, possibly in combination with viscous relaxation [7]. A similarly bright and smooth crater-free region surrounding the large impact craters Urvara and Yalode also appears spectrally-distinct, again with a relatively ammonia-rich composition. These areas contrast with the Hanami planum highland, which displays rougher topography and hosts localized regions of ammonia-poor composition associated with the brightest surface material. The surface morphology and composition likely reflect instrinsic subsurface heterogeneity due to convective processes, as well as modification by impact processes.[1] Russell et al., Science, 2016 [2] Park et al., Nature, 2016 [3] De Sanctis et al., 2015 10.1038/nature18290 [4] De Sanctis et al., Nature, 2016 [5] Castillo-Rogez et al

  10. Nuevos datos sobre la construcción del puente de Almaraz (Cáceres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Santamaría, Ana

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The Almaraz bridge (Cáceres is one of the most interesting of the XVIth century in Spain. Nevertheless, its constructive history was scarcely known. Through several lawsuits located in the Archives of Simancas and the Chancillería of Valladolid, it has been possible to reconstruct its biography, from the end of the XVth century until the definitive campaign retaken in the fourth decade of the XVIth century, by initiative of the Concejo de la Mesta and under the direction of Juan de Álava and his technical assintant Martín de la Ordieta. At first, the bridge was thought to have three arches and its layout was not straight. In 1539, Diego de Vergara took control of the piecework and fundamental changes took place, mainly the reduction of the number of arches to two. However, in 1542 when the informations ended, they had not managed to finish the first of the two arches, fundamentally because of economic problems derived from the corruption that affected the management at all levels.

    El puente de Almaraz (Cáceres es uno de los más interesantes del siglo XVI español y, sin embargo, poco se conocía de su historia constructiva. A través de varios pleitos localizados en los Archivos de Simancas y de la Chancillería de Valladolid se ha podido recomponer su biografía, desde finales del siglo XV hasta ser definitivamente retomado en los años 30 del siglo XVI, por iniciativa de la Mesta y bajo la maestría de Juan de Álava y Martín de la Ordieta como aparejador. El puente entonces iba a tener tres arcos y su trazado no era recto. En 1539 se hizo con los destajos Diego de Vergara y se producen cambios fundamentales, sobre todo la reducción del número de arcos a dos. No obstante, en 1542 en que cesan las informaciones, no se había logrado siquiera acabar el primero de los dos arcos, fundamentalmente por problemas económicos derivados de la corrupción que afectó a la gestión a todos los niveles.

  11. Bright Spots on Ceres and Implications for Subsurface Composition and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Nathaniel; Ehlmann, Bethany; Ammannito, Eleonora; Palomba, Ernesto; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Jaumann, Ralf; Nathues, Andreas; Raymond, Carol; Hiesinger, Harald; Schenk, Paul M.; Longobardo, Andrea; Dawn Team

    2016-10-01

    Images from the Dawn spacecraft show anomalously bright spots dotting Ceres' surface. Here we perform global mapping with FC data and find the spots can be classified into three geologic settings: 1) large crater floors, 2) rims/walls of craters of all sizes, or 3) the unique surface feature Ahuna Mons. There are at least 300 bright spots in total, over 200 of which are located on crater rims and walls. We examine controls on (1) and (2) as a function of crater diameter (D) and depth (d).Floor bright spots occur only in D>15 km craters, and bright spots associated with the central pit and peak complex are restricted to D>30 km. 7 of 9 craters with d>4 km (D: 70-165 km) host floor bright spots, though 30 craters with D>75 km do not contain floor bright spots, thus indicating that diameter is a weaker control on bright spot occurrence than depth. Craters with bright spots have a high d/D for their size bin, and rim/wall bright spots in craters of all sizes occur preferentially in and around the largest craters. The chief control on crater depth is presumed to be age, with shallowing due to relaxation. Thus, data suggest that previously emplaced bright materials may be removed or obscured over time via relaxation-driven burial, impact-driven lateral mixing, sublimation, or space weathering. Analyses from Dawn's VIR instrument show that some large floor bright spots are comprised of materials enriched in carbonates and other salts [e.g., 1]. The presence of bright material in many deep craters is consistent with their formation via impact-induced subsurface processes, though formation via endogenous, heterogeneously distributed subsurface processes cannot be excluded [1, 2].Here we use the Ceres production function [3] to construct a simple model in which only large (D>75 km) craters form central bright spots. These materials are then modified by later impacts. Initial results indicate that the excavation of previously emplaced bright material could explain the current

  12. Geophysics and geochemistry intertwined: Modeling the internal evolution of Ceres, Pluto, and Charon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Marc; Desch, Steven J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2015-11-01

    Liquid water likely shaped dwarf planet evolution: observations [1,2] and models [3-5] suggest aqueous alteration of silicates or volatiles accreted by these worlds. Driven by thermo-physical settings, aqueous alteration also feeds back on dwarf planet evolution in unconstrained ways. Can rocky dwarf planet cores crack, increasing the water-rock interface? Might radionuclides be leached into fluids, changing the distribution of this chief heat source? What is the fate of antifreezes, on which may hinge long-term liquid persistence? Is volcanism favored or impeded? What are predicted cryomagma compositions?We have modeled silicate core fracturing [6], geochemical equilibria between chondritic rock and aqueous fluids [7], and prerequisites for cryovolcanism [8]. These models, coupled to an evolution code [3], allow us to study geophysics/chemistry feedbacks inside dwarf planets.Ice-rock differentiation, even partial [9,10], yields a rocky, brittle core cracked by thermal stresses; liquid circulation through core cracks transports heat into the ice mantle, yielding runaway melting that quickly ceases once convection cools the mantle to its freezing point [6]. Hot fluids can leach radionuclides at high water:rock ratios (W:R); NH3 antifreeze can turn into NH4-minerals at low W:R [7]. Volatile (chiefly CO) exsolution enables explosive cryovolcanism [8]; this may explain Pluto’s young, CO-rich Tombaugh Regio.Applied to Ceres, such models are consistent with pre-Dawn and Dawn data [11] provided Ceres partially differentiated into a rocky core and muddy mantle [10]. They suggest Ceres’ hydrated surface [2] was emplaced during a 26Al-fueled active phase, and predict its bright spots result from cryovolcanic fluids squeezed by mantle refreezing and effusing through pre-existing subsurface cracks [11].[1] Cook et al. 2007 ApJ 663:1406[2] Milliken & Rivkin 2009 Nat Geosc 2:258[3] Desch et al. 2009 Icarus 202:694[4] Castillo-Rogez et al. 2010 Icarus 205:443[5] Robuchon

  13. Hydrothermal venting on carbonaceous chondritic elevations on 1 Ceres and 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Martin; Nathues, Andreas; Platz, Thomas; Thangjam, Guneshwar

    2016-04-01

    Framing Camera images of the Dawn spacecraft [1] led to the discovery of recent geologic activity on Ceres, including deposition of salts, formation of near surface haze [2], and impact associated spectral diversity. More detailed analyses revealed widespread flow features, partly composed of granular material, but also indicating sites of fluidized areas of the surface and sub-surface. The unexpected discovery of deposits of carbonaceous chondritic material on Vesta associated with indications of considerable amounts of volatiles at large impact structures hint at similar processes [3, 4]. Near large crater walls on both proto-/dwarf-planets, montes and domes appear to be associated with uplift and even release of water-driven material including salts and clays [5, 6]. We report morphologic and color band spectroscopic characteristics of selected key features on 1 Ceres and 4 Vesta which demonstrate this context. A first analysis indicates compositional differences of the proportion of the content of salts and phyllosilicates, e. g. on the different elevations of the primary and secondary spots in Occator and some flow features. The distribution and diversity of these color features is further characterized by a comparison with more widespread properties on the whole surface. During this investigation, not only the link between salt deposits and different types of materials at the centers of activity could be described, but we also offer an intriguing new interpretation of one of the most prominent surface features of Vesta: Lucaria Tholus. Several analogies with similar features and properties of Mars [7] further support the view of a related origin. References: [1] Sierks, H. et al., Space Sci. Rev., 163, 263-327, 2011. [2] Nathues, A. et al., Nature 528, 237-240, 2015. [3] Reddy, V. et al. Icarus, 221, 544-559, 2012. [4] Scully, J. E. C. et al., EPSC Abstracts 8, 2013-242-2, 2013. [5] Platz, T. et al. LPSC 2016 [6] Ruesch, O. et al. LPSC 2016 [7] Platz, T. et

  14. Benchmark problems on thermal striping evaluation of FAENA and TIFFSS sodium experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasahara, Naoto [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Lejeail, Yves [CEA-Cadarache DER/SERSI/LECC (France)

    2000-06-01

    Since thermal striping is a coupled thermohydraulic and thermomechanical phenomenon, sodium mock-up tests were usually required to confirm structural integrity. CEA and JNC have developed evaluation procedures of thermal striping to establish design-by-analysis methodology for this phenomenon. Attenuation of temperature and stress amplitude was one of the most important factors in the integrity assessment. Since this attenuation depends on frequencies of temperature fluctuation, benchmark problems based on frequency control tests were planned to confirm above procedures. One of benchmarks provided by CEA is temperature and fatigue evaluation of tubes and plates due to channel flows. Another problem from JNC is the same evaluation of plates subjected to vertical jets. This report explains details of both experiments and defines the benchmark problems. (author)

  15. Benchmarking von Krankenhausinformationssystemen – eine vergleichende Analyse deutschsprachiger Benchmarkingcluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahn, Franziska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is a method of strategic information management used by many hospitals today. During the last years, several benchmarking clusters have been established within the German-speaking countries. They support hospitals in comparing and positioning their information system’s and information management’s costs, performance and efficiency against other hospitals. In order to differentiate between these benchmarking clusters and to provide decision support in selecting an appropriate benchmarking cluster, a classification scheme is developed. The classification scheme observes both general conditions and examined contents of the benchmarking clusters. It is applied to seven benchmarking clusters which have been active in the German-speaking countries within the last years. Currently, performance benchmarking is the most frequent benchmarking type, whereas the observed benchmarking clusters differ in the number of benchmarking partners and their cooperation forms. The benchmarking clusters also deal with different benchmarking subjects. Assessing costs and quality application systems, physical data processing systems, organizational structures of information management and IT services processes are the most frequent benchmarking subjects. There is still potential for further activities within the benchmarking clusters to measure strategic and tactical information management, IT governance and quality of data and data-processing processes. Based on the classification scheme and the comparison of the benchmarking clusters, we derive general recommendations for benchmarking of hospital information systems.

  16. Benchmarking – A tool for judgment or improvement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Grane Mikael Gregaard

    2010-01-01

    Change in construction is high on the agenda for the Danish government and a comprehensive effort is done in improving quality and efficiency. This has led to an initiated governmental effort in bringing benchmarking into the Danish construction sector. This paper is an appraisal of benchmarking...... perceptions of benchmarking will be presented; public benchmarking and best practice benchmarking. These two types of benchmarking are used to characterize and discuss the Danish benchmarking system and to enhance which effects, possibilities and challenges that follow in the wake of using this kind...

  17. Storage-Intensive Supercomputing Benchmark Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, J; Dossa, D; Gokhale, M; Hysom, D; May, J; Pearce, R; Yoo, A

    2007-10-30

    Critical data science applications requiring frequent access to storage perform poorly on today's computing architectures. This project addresses efficient computation of data-intensive problems in national security and basic science by exploring, advancing, and applying a new form of computing called storage-intensive supercomputing (SISC). Our goal is to enable applications that simply cannot run on current systems, and, for a broad range of data-intensive problems, to deliver an order of magnitude improvement in price/performance over today's data-intensive architectures. This technical report documents much of the work done under LDRD 07-ERD-063 Storage Intensive Supercomputing during the period 05/07-09/07. The following chapters describe: (1) a new file I/O monitoring tool iotrace developed to capture the dynamic I/O profiles of Linux processes; (2) an out-of-core graph benchmark for level-set expansion of scale-free graphs; (3) an entity extraction benchmark consisting of a pipeline of eight components; and (4) an image resampling benchmark drawn from the SWarp program in the LSST data processing pipeline. The performance of the graph and entity extraction benchmarks was measured in three different scenarios: data sets residing on the NFS file server and accessed over the network; data sets stored on local disk; and data sets stored on the Fusion I/O parallel NAND Flash array. The image resampling benchmark compared performance of software-only to GPU-accelerated. In addition to the work reported here, an additional text processing application was developed that used an FPGA to accelerate n-gram profiling for language classification. The n-gram application will be presented at SC07 at the High Performance Reconfigurable Computing Technologies and Applications Workshop. The graph and entity extraction benchmarks were run on a Supermicro server housing the NAND Flash 40GB parallel disk array, the Fusion-io. The Fusion system specs are as follows

  18. Full sphere hydrodynamic and dynamo benchmarks

    KAUST Repository

    Marti, P.

    2014-01-26

    Convection in planetary cores can generate fluid flow and magnetic fields, and a number of sophisticated codes exist to simulate the dynamic behaviour of such systems. We report on the first community activity to compare numerical results of computer codes designed to calculate fluid flow within a whole sphere. The flows are incompressible and rapidly rotating and the forcing of the flow is either due to thermal convection or due to moving boundaries. All problems defined have solutions that alloweasy comparison, since they are either steady, slowly drifting or perfectly periodic. The first two benchmarks are defined based on uniform internal heating within the sphere under the Boussinesq approximation with boundary conditions that are uniform in temperature and stress-free for the flow. Benchmark 1 is purely hydrodynamic, and has a drifting solution. Benchmark 2 is a magnetohydrodynamic benchmark that can generate oscillatory, purely periodic, flows and magnetic fields. In contrast, Benchmark 3 is a hydrodynamic rotating bubble benchmark using no slip boundary conditions that has a stationary solution. Results from a variety of types of code are reported, including codes that are fully spectral (based on spherical harmonic expansions in angular coordinates and polynomial expansions in radius), mixed spectral and finite difference, finite volume, finite element and also a mixed Fourier-finite element code. There is good agreement between codes. It is found that in Benchmarks 1 and 2, the approximation of a whole sphere problem by a domain that is a spherical shell (a sphere possessing an inner core) does not represent an adequate approximation to the system, since the results differ from whole sphere results. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society.

  19. Organizational and economic aspects of benchmarking innovative products at the automobile industry enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Taraniuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to determine the nature and characteristics of the use of benchmarking in the activity of domestic enterprises of automobile industry under current economic conditions. The results of the analysis. The article identified the concept of benchmarking, examining the stages of benchmarking, determination the efficiency of benchmarking in work automakers. It is considered the historical aspects of the emergence of benchmarking method in world economics. It is determined the economic aspects of the benchmarking in the work of enterprise automobile industry. The analysis on the stages of benchmarking of innovative products in the modern development of the productive forces and the impact of market factors on the economic activities of companies, including in the enterprise of automobile industry. The attention is focused on the specifics of implementing benchmarking at companies of automobile industry. It is considered statistics number of owners of electric vehicles worldwide. The authors researched market of electric vehicles in Ukraine. Also, it is considered the need of benchmarking using to improve the competitiveness of the national automobile industry especially CJSC “Zaporizhia Automobile Building Plant”. Authors suggested reasonable steps for its improvement. The authors improved methodical approach to assessing the selection of vehicles with the best technical parameters based on benchmarking, which, unlike the existing ones, based on the calculation of the integral factor of technical specifications of vehicles in order to establish better competitive products of companies automobile industry among evaluated. The main indicators of the national production of electric vehicles are shown. Attention is paid to the development of important ways of CJSC “Zaporizhia Automobile Building Plant”, where authors established the aspects that need to pay attention in the management of the

  20. Test Nationally, Benchmark Locally: Using Local DIBELS Benchmarks to Predict Performance on the Pssa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferchalk, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) benchmarks are frequently used to make important decision regarding student performance. More information, however, is needed to understand if the nationally-derived benchmarks created by the DIBELS system provide the most accurate criterion for evaluating reading proficiency. The…

  1. Benchmark 2 - Springback of a draw / re-draw panel: Part C: Benchmark analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsley, John E.; Xia, Cedric; Yang, Lianxiang; Stoughton, Thomas B.; Xu, Siguang; Hartfield-Wünsch, Susan E.; Li, Jingjing

    2013-12-01

    Benchmark analysis is summarized for DP600 and AA 5182-O. Nine simulation results submitted for this benchmark study are compared to the physical measurement results. The details on the codes, friction parameters, mesh technology, CPU, and material models are also summarized at the end of this report with the participant information details.

  2. Benchmarking local healthcare-associated infections: available benchmarks and interpretation challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Saed, Aiman; Balkhy, Hanan H; Weber, David J

    2013-10-01

    Growing numbers of healthcare facilities are routinely collecting standardized data on healthcare-associated infection (HAI), which can be used not only to track internal performance but also to compare local data to national and international benchmarks. Benchmarking overall (crude) HAI surveillance metrics without accounting or adjusting for potential confounders can result in misleading conclusions. Methods commonly used to provide risk-adjusted metrics include multivariate logistic regression analysis, stratification, indirect standardization, and restrictions. The characteristics of recognized benchmarks worldwide, including the advantages and limitations are described. The choice of the right benchmark for the data from the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states is challenging. The chosen benchmark should have similar data collection and presentation methods. Additionally, differences in surveillance environments including regulations should be taken into consideration when considering such a benchmark. The GCC center for infection control took some steps to unify HAI surveillance systems in the region. GCC hospitals still need to overcome legislative and logistic difficulties in sharing data to create their own benchmark. The availability of a regional GCC benchmark may better enable health care workers and researchers to obtain more accurate and realistic comparisons.

  3. Sensitivity of CERES-Maize yield simulation to the selected weather data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity analysis of selected weather data runs after successful parametrization and validation of the CERES-Maize simulation model. Estimation of the potential yield has been carried out during the long term experiment (1980-1997) as well as the estimation of influence of meteorological parameters on the simulation results for the water-limited yield. 10 % under and over stimulation of global radiation and precipitation as well as increasing and decreasing temperature by 1 deg C on simulated potential and water-limited yield have been done. In most of the years, air temperature underestimation resulted in a higher simulated grain yield and overstimulation shown a lower yield for water limited level. Overestimation of precipitation during wet days in growing period of the maize leads to an increase of amount of water available for the plant and to increase the yield. Underestimation of global radiation by 10 % resulted in a decline in simulated grain yield from -8.8 to -9.9 %. The overestimation caused increase of the yield from 7.8 to 10 %. Overestimation by 10 % resulted in a slight underestimation of the yield in low yielding years and underestimation of global radiation by 10 % in overestimation of the yield. The effect was opposite in high yielding years

  4. Radiative Effects of African Dust and Smoke Observed from CERES and CALIOP Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Rodier, S. D.; Hlavka, D. L.; Vaughan, M. A.; Hu, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Cloud and aerosol effects have a significant impact on the atmospheric radiation budget in the Tropical Atlantic because of the spatial and temporal extent of desert dust and smoke from biomass burning in the atmosphere. The influences of African dust and smoke aerosols on cloud radiative properties over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean were analyzed for the month of July for three years (2006-2008) using collocated data collected by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on the CALIPSO and Aqua satellites. On average, clouds below 5 km had a daytime instantaneous shortwave (SW) radiative flux of about 270 W/m2 and thin cirrus clouds had a SW radiative flux of about 208 W/m2. When dust and smoke aerosols interacted with clouds below 5 km, as determined from CALIPSO, the SW radiative flux decreased to as low as roughly 205 W/m2. These decreases in SW radiative flux were likely attributed to the aerosol layer height and changes in cloud microphysics (semi- direct effect). CALIOP lidar observations, which more accurately identify aerosol layer height than passive instruments, appear essential for better understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions, a major uncertainty in predicting the climate system.

  5. A CIDADE DE CÁCERES NAS PROPAGANDAS ELEITORAIS 2012: DISPUTA DE SENTIDOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucineia Seraglio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is part of the reflection that I developed in my Master's degree research in Linguistics under the bias of the Semantic of the Event, discipline developed in Brazil by Guimarães (2002. In view that the event of saying makes the operation of the language affected by the sayable, we propose to analyze how the city of Cáceres-MT is said and meant in the texts that make up the slogans and other advertising materials of the campaigns of candidates for the municipal government in the 2012 election, or even how each political party interprets the city in their various aspects and transform them into advertising materials. We take as the official corpus documents such as the electoral law number 9.504 / 97, advertisements and materials as magazines, pamphlets, cards, stickers, fold ers disclosed during political advertisements. We noticed that advertisements, exposed to external aspects, configure a symbolic game for the dispute of meanings, evoking statements already said in addition to design new statements / and or interpretations

  6. Features and technology of enterprise internal benchmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Dubodelova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to generalize characteristics, objectives, advantages of internal benchmarking. The stages sequence of internal benchmarking technology is formed. It is focused on continuous improvement of process of the enterprise by implementing existing best practices.The results of the analysis. Business activity of domestic enterprises in crisis business environment has to focus on the best success factors of their structural units by using standard research assessment of their performance and their innovative experience in practice. Modern method of those needs satisfying is internal benchmarking. According to Bain & Co internal benchmarking is one the three most common methods of business management.The features and benefits of benchmarking are defined in the article. The sequence and methodology of implementation of individual stages of benchmarking technology projects are formulated.The authors define benchmarking as a strategic orientation on the best achievement by comparing performance and working methods with the standard. It covers the processes of researching, organization of production and distribution, management and marketing methods to reference objects to identify innovative practices and its implementation in a particular business.Benchmarking development at domestic enterprises requires analysis of theoretical bases and practical experience. Choice best of experience helps to develop recommendations for their application in practice.Also it is essential to classificate species, identify characteristics, study appropriate areas of use and development methodology of implementation. The structure of internal benchmarking objectives includes: promoting research and establishment of minimum acceptable levels of efficiency processes and activities which are available at the enterprise; identification of current problems and areas that need improvement without involvement of foreign experience

  7. Shielding experimental benchmark storage, retrieval, and display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete description of an integral shielding benchmark experiment includes the radiation source, materials, physical geometry, and measurement data. This information is not usually contained in a single document, but must be gathered from several sources, including personal contact with the experimentalists. A comprehensive database of the experimental details is extremely useful and cost-effective in present day computations. Further, experimental data are vulnerable to being lost or destroyed as a result of facility closures, retirement of experimental personnel, and ignorance. A standard set of experiments, used globally, establishes a framework to validate and verify models in computer codes and guarantee comparative analyses between different computational systems. SINBAD is a database that was conceived in 1992 to store, retrieve, and display the measurements from international experiments for the past 50 years in nuclear shielding. Based at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center (RSICC) SINBAD has a collection of integral benchmark experiments from around the world. SINBAD is shared with the Office of Economic and Cooperative Development Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, which provides contributions from Europe, Russia, and Japan. (author)

  8. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report.

  9. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report

  10. Implementing ADM1 for plant-wide benchmark simulations in Matlab/Simulink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosen, Christian; Vrecko, Darko; Gernaey, Krist;

    2006-01-01

    , in particular if the ADM1 is to be included in dynamic simulations of plant-wide or even integrated systems. In this paper, the experiences gained from a Matlab/Simulink implementation of ADM1 into the extended COST/IWA Benchmark Simulation Model (BSM2) are presented. Aspects related to system stiffness, model...

  11. Studies of thermal-reactor benchmark-data interpretation: experimental corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental values of integral parameters of the lattices studied in this report, i.e., the MIT(D2O) and TRX benchmark lattices have been re-examined and revised. The revisions correct several systematic errors that have been previously ignored or considered insignificant. These systematic errors are discussed in detail. The final corrected values are presented

  12. BENCHMARKING FOR THE ROMANIAN HEAVY COMMERCIAL VEHICLES MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Nicolae Alexandru

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The globalization has led to a better integration of international markets of goods, services and capital markets, fact which leads to a significant increase of investments in those regions with low labor cost and with access to commercial routes. The development of international trade has imposed a continuous growth of the volumes of transported goods and the development of a transport system, able to stand against the new pressure exercised by cost, time and space. The solution to efficient transport is the intermodal transportation relying on state-of-the-art technological platforms, which integrates the advantages specific to each means of transportation: flexibility for road transportation, high capacity for railway, low costs for sea, and speed for air transportation. Romania’s integration in the pan-European transport system alongside with the EU’s enlargement towards the east will change Romania’s positioning into a central one. The integrated governmental program of improving the intermodal infrastructure will ensure fast railway, road and air connections. For the Danube harbors and for the sea ports, EU grants and allowances will be used thus increasing Romania’s importance in its capacity as one of Europe’s logistical hubs. The present paper intends to use benchmarking, the management and strategic marketing tool, in order to realize an evaluation of the Romanian heavy commercial vehicles market, within European context. Benchmarking encourages change in a complex and dynamic context where a permanent solution cannot be found. The different results stimulate the use of benchmarking as a solution to reduce gaps. MAN’s case study shows the dynamics of the players on the Romanian market for heavy commercial vehicles, when considering the strong growth of Romanian exported goods but with a modest internal demand, a limited but developing road infrastructure, and an unfavorable international economical context together with

  13. CERES-Rice模型中宜香3728水稻遗传特性参数调试与校验%Adjustment and Validation for Genetic Parameters of Yixiang 3728 in CERES-Rice Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋; 石建初; 金欣欣; 马雯雯; 陶玥玥; 左强

    2015-01-01

    利用在湖北省房县所开展的两年(2012、2013年)田间试验,对水稻品种宜香3728在CERES-Rice模型中的遗传特性参数进行了调试与校验.首先,根据2013年田间实测数据,如关键生育期及其叶面积指数、地上部干物质量和产量等,采用“GLUE+试差法”对宜香3728的遗传特性参数进行了调试.当达到设定的误差控制标准时(10%以内),停止调试,并将此时模型中的遗传特性参数作为调试结果.然后,再应用2012年实测数据对此组遗传特性参数进行校验.模型模拟值与田间实测值之间的对比关系表明此组遗传特性参数基本准确,可用于表征宜香3728水稻品种在房县的遗传特性.研究成果为利用CERES-Rice模型在房县及周边同类地区开展相关研究工作奠定了基础,同时也可为CERES-Rice模型在其他地区的本地化应用提供借鉴.

  14. SP2Bench: A SPARQL Performance Benchmark

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Michael; Lausen, Georg; Pinkel, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the SPARQL query language for RDF has reached the W3C recommendation status. In response to this emerging standard, the database community is currently exploring efficient storage techniques for RDF data and evaluation strategies for SPARQL queries. A meaningful analysis and comparison of these approaches necessitates a comprehensive and universal benchmark platform. To this end, we have developed SP$^2$Bench, a publicly available, language-specific SPARQL performance benchmark. SP$^2$Bench is settled in the DBLP scenario and comprises both a data generator for creating arbitrarily large DBLP-like documents and a set of carefully designed benchmark queries. The generated documents mirror key characteristics and social-world distributions encountered in the original DBLP data set, while the queries implement meaningful requests on top of this data, covering a variety of SPARQL operator constellations and RDF access patterns. As a proof of concept, we apply SP$^2$Bench to existing engines and discuss ...

  15. Analysis of ANS LWR physics benchmark problems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taiwo, T. A.

    1998-07-29

    Various Monte Carlo and deterministic solutions to the three PWR Lattice Benchmark Problems recently defined by the ANS Ad Hoc Committee on Reactor Physics Benchmarks are presented. These solutions were obtained using the VIM continuous-energy Monte Carlo code and the DIF3D/WIMS-D4M code package implemented at the Argonne National Laboratory. The code results for the K{sub eff} and relative pin power distribution are compared to measured values. Additionally, code results for the three benchmark-prescribed infinite lattice configurations are also intercompared. The results demonstrate that the codes produce very good estimates of both the K{sub eff} and power distribution for the critical core and the lattice parameters of the infinite lattice configuration.

  16. Standardized benchmarking in the quest for orthologs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenhoff, Adrian M; Boeckmann, Brigitte; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador;

    2016-01-01

    Achieving high accuracy in orthology inference is essential for many comparative, evolutionary and functional genomic analyses, yet the true evolutionary history of genes is generally unknown and orthologs are used for very different applications across phyla, requiring different precision......-recall trade-offs. As a result, it is difficult to assess the performance of orthology inference methods. Here, we present a community effort to establish standards and an automated web-based service to facilitate orthology benchmarking. Using this service, we characterize 15 well-established inference methods...... and resources on a battery of 20 different benchmarks. Standardized benchmarking provides a way for users to identify the most effective methods for the problem at hand, sets a minimum requirement for new tools and resources, and guides the development of more accurate orthology inference methods....

  17. Energy benchmarking of South Australian WWTPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampe, J

    2013-01-01

    Optimising the energy consumption and energy generation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is a topic with increasing importance for water utilities in times of rising energy costs and pressures to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Assessing the energy efficiency and energy optimisation of a WWTP are difficult tasks as most plants vary greatly in size, process layout and other influencing factors. To overcome these limits it is necessary to compare energy efficiency with a statistically relevant base to identify shortfalls and optimisation potential. Such energy benchmarks have been successfully developed and used in central Europe over the last two decades. This paper demonstrates how the latest available energy benchmarks from Germany have been applied to 24 WWTPs in South Australia. It shows how energy benchmarking can be used to identify shortfalls in current performance, prioritise detailed energy assessments and help inform decisions on capital investment.

  18. Standardized benchmarking in the quest for orthologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenhoff, Adrian M; Boeckmann, Brigitte; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Dalquen, Daniel A; DeLuca, Todd; Forslund, Kristoffer; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Linard, Benjamin; Pereira, Cécile; Pryszcz, Leszek P; Schreiber, Fabian; da Silva, Alan Sousa; Szklarczyk, Damian; Train, Clément-Marie; Bork, Peer; Lecompte, Odile; von Mering, Christian; Xenarios, Ioannis; Sjölander, Kimmen; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Martin, Maria J; Muffato, Matthieu; Gabaldón, Toni; Lewis, Suzanna E; Thomas, Paul D; Sonnhammer, Erik; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Achieving high accuracy in orthology inference is essential for many comparative, evolutionary and functional genomic analyses, yet the true evolutionary history of genes is generally unknown and orthologs are used for very different applications across phyla, requiring different precision-recall trade-offs. As a result, it is difficult to assess the performance of orthology inference methods. Here, we present a community effort to establish standards and an automated web-based service to facilitate orthology benchmarking. Using this service, we characterize 15 well-established inference methods and resources on a battery of 20 different benchmarks. Standardized benchmarking provides a way for users to identify the most effective methods for the problem at hand, sets a minimum requirement for new tools and resources, and guides the development of more accurate orthology inference methods. PMID:27043882

  19. Benchmarking optimization solvers for structural topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas Labanda, Susana; Stolpe, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to benchmark different optimization solvers when applied to various finite element based structural topology optimization problems. An extensive and representative library of minimum compliance, minimum volume, and mechanism design problem instances for different...... sizes is developed for this benchmarking. The problems are based on a material interpolation scheme combined with a density filter. Different optimization solvers including Optimality Criteria (OC), the Method of Moving Asymptotes (MMA) and its globally convergent version GCMMA, the interior point...... profiles conclude that general solvers are as efficient and reliable as classical structural topology optimization solvers. Moreover, the use of the exact Hessians in SAND formulations, generally produce designs with better objective function values. However, with the benchmarked implementations solving...

  20. CERES-Wheat模型在我国小麦区的应用效果及误差来源%The Performance of CERES-Wheat Model in Wheat Planting Areas and Its Uncertainties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊伟

    2009-01-01

    气候模型与作物模型耦合是评价未来气候变化对作物生产影响的常用方法之一,但当两者结合时,存在着空间和时间尺度差异问题.将作物模型升尺度到区域是解决该差异的一种方法.将CERES-Wheat模型升尺度进行区域模拟,利用区域校准后的CERES-Wheat模型,模拟了1981-2000年全国各网格小麦产量,与同期农调队调查产量相比较,以探讨CERES-Wheat模型在我国小麦区的模拟效果及误差来源.结果表明:全国小麦产量的区域模拟值与农调队调查产量的相对均方根误差为27.9%,符合度为0.75,全国59.2%的模拟网格相对均方根误差在30%以内,其中相对均方根误差小于15%的占26.3%;各区的效果不同,种植面积最大的小麦种植生态2区,模拟效果最好.总体来说,CERES-Wheat的区域模拟,可以反映产量变化规律,能为宏观决策提供相应信息,尤其是在主产区;但区域模拟中还存在一系列误差,今后还需进一步研究.

  1. Poaia [Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot.) Stoves]: aspectos da memória cultural dos poaieiros de Cáceres - Mato Grosso, Brasil Ipecac [Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot.) Stoves]: aspects of cultural memory of "poaieiros" in Cáceres - Mato Grosso, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    V.A. Teixeira; M.F.B. Coelho; L.C. Ming

    2012-01-01

    O Brasil está entre os principais exportadores de poaia [Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot.) Stoves] seguido do Panamá e Costa Rica. A poaia brasileira apresenta alto valor farmacológico das raízes devido aos teores de emetina e cefalina. Este trabalho teve como objetivo descrever como as famílias de poaieiros mantém a memória cultural sobre a Psychotria ipecacuanha (Brot.) Stoves. As informações foram coletadas no município de Cáceres, Mato Grosso, através de entrevista estruturada e observação p...

  2. A Benchmarking System for Domestic Water Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexter V. L. Hunt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The national demand for water in the UK is predicted to increase, exacerbated by a growing UK population, and home-grown demands for energy and food. When set against the context of overstretched existing supply sources vulnerable to droughts, particularly in increasingly dense city centres, the delicate balance of matching minimal demands with resource secure supplies becomes critical. When making changes to "internal" demands the role of technological efficiency and user behaviour cannot be ignored, yet existing benchmarking systems traditionally do not consider the latter. This paper investigates the practicalities of adopting a domestic benchmarking system (using a band rating that allows individual users to assess their current water use performance against what is possible. The benchmarking system allows users to achieve higher benchmarks through any approach that reduces water consumption. The sensitivity of water use benchmarks are investigated by making changes to user behaviour and technology. The impact of adopting localised supplies (i.e., Rainwater harvesting—RWH and Grey water—GW and including "external" gardening demands are investigated. This includes the impacts (in isolation and combination of the following: occupancy rates (1 to 4; roof size (12.5 m2 to 100 m2; garden size (25 m2 to 100 m2 and geographical location (North West, Midlands and South East, UK with yearly temporal effects (i.e., rainfall and temperature. Lessons learnt from analysis of the proposed benchmarking system are made throughout this paper, in particular its compatibility with the existing Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH accreditation system. Conclusions are subsequently drawn for the robustness of the proposed system.

  3. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1996 Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E.; Opresko, D.M.; Suter, G.W., II

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of certain chemicals on mammalian and avian wildlife species. Publication of this document meets a milestone for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Risk Assessment Program. This document provides the ER Program with toxicological benchmarks that may be used as comparative tools in screening assessments as well as lines of evidence to support or refute the presence of ecological effects in ecological risk assessments. The chemicals considered in this report are some that occur at US DOE waste sites, and the wildlife species evaluated herein were chosen because they represent a range of body sizes and diets.

  4. International Benchmarking of Electricity Transmission System Operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2014-01-01

    TSO operating in each jurisdiction. The solution for European regulators has been found in international regulatory benchmarking, organized in collaboration with the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) in 2008 and 2012 for 22 and 23 TSOs, respectively. The frontier study provides static cost...... efficiency estimates for each TSO, as well as dynamic results in terms of technological improvement rate and efficiency catch-up speed. In this paper, we provide the methodology for the benchmarking, using non-parametric DEA under weight restrictions, as well as an analysis of the static cost efficiency...

  5. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1996 Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to present toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of certain chemicals on mammalian and avian wildlife species. Publication of this document meets a milestone for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Risk Assessment Program. This document provides the ER Program with toxicological benchmarks that may be used as comparative tools in screening assessments as well as lines of evidence to support or refute the presence of ecological effects in ecological risk assessments. The chemicals considered in this report are some that occur at US DOE waste sites, and the wildlife species evaluated herein were chosen because they represent a range of body sizes and diets

  6. Benchmark calculations for fusion blanket development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchmark problems representing the leading fusion blanket concepts are presented. Benchmark calculations for self-cooled Li17Pb83 and helium-cooled blankets were performed. Multigroup data libraries generated from ENDF/B-IV and V files using the NJOY and AMPX processing codes with different weighting functions were used. The sensitivity of the tritium breeding ratio to group structure and weighting spectrum increases as the thickness and Li enrichment decrease with up to 20% discrepancies for thin natural Li17Pb83 blankets. (author)

  7. Surface radiation budget in the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) effort and in the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlock, Thomas P.; Smith, G. L.; Rose, Fred G.

    1990-01-01

    The surface radiation budget (SRB) and the atmospheric radiative flux divergence (ARD) are vital components of the weather and climate system. The importance of radiation in a complex international scientific endeavor, the GEWEX of the World Climate Research Programme is explained. The radiative transfer techniques and satellite instrumentation that will be used to retrieve the SRB and ARD later in this decade with the CERES are discussed; CERES is a component of the Earth Observing System satellite program. Examples of consistent SRB and ARD retrievals made with Nimbus-7 and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data from July 1983 are presented.

  8. Analytical benchmarks for precision particle tracking in electric and magnetic rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metodiev, E.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Harvard College, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, IBS, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); D' Silva, I.M.; Fandaros, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Gaisser, M. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, IBS, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hacıömeroğlu, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, IBS, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey); Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Huang, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Huang, K.L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Harvard College, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Patil, A.; Prodromou, R.; Semertzidis, O.A.; Sharma, D.; Stamatakis, A.N. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Orlov, Y.F. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Semertzidis, Y.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, IBS, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-11

    To determine the accuracy of tracking programs for precision storage ring experiments, analytical estimates of particle and spin dynamics in electric and magnetic rings were developed and compared to the numerical results of a tracking program based on Runge–Kutta/Predictor–Corrector integration. Initial discrepancies in the comparisons indicated the need to improve several of the analytical estimates. In the end, this rather slow program passed all benchmarks, often agreeing with the analytical estimates to the part-per-billion level. Thus, it can in turn be used to benchmark faster tracking programs for accuracy.

  9. Benchmarking Declarative Approximate Selection Predicates

    CERN Document Server

    Hassanzadeh, Oktie

    2009-01-01

    Declarative data quality has been an active research topic. The fundamental principle behind a declarative approach to data quality is the use of declarative statements to realize data quality primitives on top of any relational data source. A primary advantage of such an approach is the ease of use and integration with existing applications. Several similarity predicates have been proposed in the past for common quality primitives (approximate selections, joins, etc.) and have been fully expressed using declarative SQL statements. In this thesis, new similarity predicates are proposed along with their declarative realization, based on notions of probabilistic information retrieval. Then, full declarative specifications of previously proposed similarity predicates in the literature are presented, grouped into classes according to their primary characteristics. Finally, a thorough performance and accuracy study comparing a large number of similarity predicates for data cleaning operations is performed.

  10. Status of the international criticality safety benchmark evaluation project (ICSBEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since ICNC'99, four new editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments have been published. The number of benchmark specifications in the Handbook has grown from 2157 in 1999 to 3073 in 2003, an increase of nearly 1000 specifications. These benchmarks are used to validate neutronics codes and nuclear cross-section data. Twenty evaluations representing 192 benchmark specifications were added to the Handbook in 2003. The status of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) is provided in this paper along with a summary of the newly added benchmark specifications that appear in the 2003 Edition of the Handbook. (author)

  11. Revaluering benchmarking - A topical theme for the construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Grane Mikael Gregaard

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, benchmarking has increasingly gained foothold in the construction industry. The predominant research, perceptions and uses of benchmarking are valued so strongly and uniformly, that what may seem valuable, is actually abstaining researchers and practitioners from studying...... the perception of benchmarking systems as secondary and derivative and instead studying benchmarking as constitutive of social relations and as irredeemably social phenomena. I have attempted to do so in this paper by treating benchmarking using a calculative practice perspective, and describing how...... organizational relations, behaviors and actions. In closing it is briefly considered how to study the calculative practices of benchmarking....

  12. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-12 Toharu Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA Dawn Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mest, Scott; Williams, David; Crown, David; Yingst, Aileen; Buczkowski, Debra; Scully, Jennifer; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Nathues, Andres; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres similar to that done for Vesta [1,2], including production of a Survey- and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO)-based global map and a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. In this abstract we discuss the surface geology and geologic evolution of the Ac-H-12 Toharu Quadrangle (21-66°S, 90-180°E). At the time of this writing LAMO images (35 m/pixel) are just becoming available. The current geologic map of Ac-H-12 was produced using ArcGIS software, and is based on HAMO images (140 m/pixel) and Survey (400 m/pixel) digital terrain models (for topographic information). Dawn Framing Camera (FC) color images were also used to provide context for map unit identification. The map (to be presented as a poster) will be updated from analyses of LAMO images. The Toharu Quadrangle is named after crater Toharu (86 km diameter; 48.3°S, 156°E), and is dominated by smooth terrain in the north, and more heavily cratered terrain in the south. The quad exhibits ~9 km of relief, with the highest elevations (~3.5-4.6 km) found among the western plateau and eastern crater rims, and the lowest elevation found on the floor of crater Chaminuka. Preliminary geologic mapping has defined three regional units (smooth material, smooth Kerwan floor material, and cratered terrain) that dominate the quadrangle, as well as a series of impact crater material units. Smooth materials form nearly flat-lying plains in the northwest part of the quad, and overlies hummocky materials in some areas. These smooth materials extend over a much broader area outside of the quad, and appear to contain some of the lowest crater densities on Ceres. Cratered terrain forms much of the map area and contains rugged surfaces formed largely by the structures and deposits of impact features. In addition to geologic units, a number of geologic features - including crater rims, furrows, scarps, troughs, and impact

  13. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-14 Yalode Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, David; Yingst, Aileen; Mest, Scott; Platz, Thomas; Sizemore, Hanna; Berman, Daniel; Williams, David; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Nathues, Andreas; Hoffman, Martin; Schäfer, Michael; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres that includes production of a Survey- and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO)-based global map and a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. In this abstract we discuss the surface geology and geologic evolution of the Ac-H-14 Yalode Quadrangle (21-66°S, 270-360°E). The current geologic map was produced using ArcGIS software based on HAMO images (140 m/pixel) for surface morphology and stratigraphic relationships, Survey (400 m/pixel) digital terrain models for topographic information, and Dawn Framing Camera (FC) color images as context for map unit identification. The map will be updated through analysis of LAMO images (35 m/pixel) that are just becoming available. The Yalode Quadrangle is dominated by the 260-km diameter impact basin Yalode (42.3°S, 293.6°E) and includes rugged and smooth terrains to the east. Preliminary geologic mapping defined two regional units (cratered terrain and smooth material), which dominate the quadrangle, as well as a series of impact crater material units. Mapped geologic features include crater rims, graben, ridges, troughs, scarp, lineaments, and impact crater chains. Geologic contacts are typically not distinct in Survey and HAMO images. Impact craters in Yalode Quadrangle display a range of preservation states. Degraded features, including Yalode basin and numerous smaller craters, exhibit subdued rims, lack discrete ejecta deposits, and have infilled interiors. More pristine features (including Mondamin, Besua, Lono and craters on the Yalode basin floor) have well-defined, quasi-circular forms with prominent rims and in some cases discernible ejecta. Some of these craters have bowl-shaped interiors, and others contain hills or mounds on their floors that are interpreted as central peaks. Yalode basin has a variably preserved rim, which is continuous and sharply defined to the north/northwest and is irregular or degraded

  14. Installation and Benchmark Tests of CINDER'90 Activation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kum, Oyeon; Heo, Seung Uk; Oh, Sunju [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    For the reactor community, CINDER'90 is now integrated directly into MCNPX so that the transmutation processes can be considered in an integrated manner with the particle transport by using the 'BURN' option card. However, the much smaller accelerator community cannot take advantage of these improvements because the BURN option card of MCNPX is only accessible in eigenvalue calculations of radioactive systems. In this study, we introduce preliminary results in activation calculations with the CINDER'90 code by using previously approved benchmarking problems. Transmutation computing code, CINDER'90, which is widely used in the USA and European national laboratories, was successfully installed and benchmarked. Basic theory of atomic transmutation is introduced and three typical benchmark test problems are solved. The code works with MCNPX and is easy to use with the Perl script. The results are well summarized in a tabular format by using a post processing code, TABCODE. The cross benchmark tests with FLUKA are underway and the results will be presented in the near future. On the other hand, creating a new integrated activation code (MCNPX + CINDER) is now considered seriously for the more successful activation analysis.

  15. Origin Hypotheses for Kilometer-Scale Mounds on Dwarf Planet Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Hanna G.; Platz, Thomas; Schmidt, Britney E.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Russell, Christopher T.; Mest, Scott C.; Crown, David A.; Sykes, Mark V.; Hughson, Kynan H. G.; Chilton, Heather T.; Williams, David A.; Pieters, Carle M.; Marchi, Simone; Travis, Bryan; Raymond, Carol A.

    2015-11-01

    The Dawn Framing Camera has revealed numerous domical to conical features on Ceres, which may have relevance to the presence and history of near-surface ice. These features fall into two broad classes, large domes 10s to >100 km in diameter exhibiting 1-5 km of positive relief, and small mounds : Kilometer and sub-kilometer scale albedo variations; sub-kilometer flow features on individual mounds; localized vents; conical or domical shape. Challenge: Features are smaller than convective plumes expected from thermal evolution modeling.Hypothesis 2: Kilometer-scale mounds are analogous to terrestrial and martian pingos, which grow by drawing liquid water through a silicate matrix as a freezing front propagates downward. Observational tests: Mounds occurring on smooth material that floods or embays large-scale features; little or no local albedo variation; no small flows associated with individual mounds; domical or ring-shape; concentric or radial fractures on dome, or central depression. Challenge: Small Cerean mounds observed thus far are an order of magnitude larger than terrestrial or martian pingos.Hypothesis 3: Kilometer-scale mounds are rootless cones analogous to features observed on the surface of volcanic flows in volatile-rich regions of Earth and Mars. Rootless cones are produced when layers of fluid material inundate a region; localized devolatilization of a layer mobilizes clasts to form cone-shaped deposits. Observational tests: Mounds on smooth material that floods or embays large-scale features; conical, not domical, profile; large central depressions; cones in organized spatial patterns; no small-scale flows. Challenge: Low gravity environment and/or cryolava composition may be incompatible with this process.In addition to morphological observations, VIR data will help distinguish between these hypotheses.

  16. A Benchmark for Virtual Camera Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    solutions to the problem have been proposed so far including, for instance, evolutionary techniques, swarm intelligence or ad hoc solutions. However, the large diversity of the solutions and the lack of a common benchmark, made any comparative analysis of the different solutions extremely difficult...

  17. Benchmark Generation and Simulation at Extreme Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagadapati, Mahesh [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Mueller, Frank [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The path to extreme scale high-performance computing (HPC) poses several challenges related to power, performance, resilience, productivity, programmability, data movement, and data management. Investigating the performance of parallel applications at scale on future architectures and the performance impact of different architectural choices is an important component of HPC hardware/software co-design. Simulations using models of future HPC systems and communication traces from applications running on existing HPC systems can offer an insight into the performance of future architectures. This work targets technology developed for scalable application tracing of communication events. It focuses on extreme-scale simulation of HPC applications and their communication behavior via lightweight parallel discrete event simulation for performance estimation and evaluation. Instead of simply replaying a trace within a simulator, this work promotes the generation of a benchmark from traces. This benchmark is subsequently exposed to simulation using models to reflect the performance characteristics of future-generation HPC systems. This technique provides a number of benefits, such as eliminating the data intensive trace replay and enabling simulations at different scales. The presented work features novel software co-design aspects, combining the ScalaTrace tool to generate scalable trace files, the ScalaBenchGen tool to generate the benchmark, and the xSim tool to assess the benchmark characteristics within a simulator.

  18. First CSNI numerical benchmark problem: comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to be able to make valid statements about a model's ability to describe a certain physical situation, it is indispensable that the numerical errors are much smaller than the modelling errors; otherwise, numerical errors could compensate or over pronounce model errors in an uncontrollable way. Therefore, knowledge about the numerical errors dependence on discretization parameters (e.g. size of spatial and temporal mesh) is required. In recognition of this need, numerical benchmark problems have been introduced. In the area of transient two-phase flow, numerical benchmarks are rather new. In June 1978, the CSNI Working Group on Emergency Core Cooling of Water Reactors has proposed to ICD /CSNI to sponsor a First CSNI Numerical Benchmark exercise. By the end of October 1979, results of the computation had been received from 10 organisations in 10 different countries. Based on these contributions, a preliminary comparison report has been prepared and distributed to the members of the CSNI Working Group on Emergency Core Cooling of Water Reactors, and to the contributors to the benchmark exercise. Comments on the preliminary comparison report by some contributors have subsequently been received. They have been considered in writing this final comparison report

  19. Algorithm and Architecture Independent Benchmarking with SEAK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallent, Nathan R.; Manzano Franco, Joseph B.; Gawande, Nitin A.; Kang, Seung-Hwa; Kerbyson, Darren J.; Hoisie, Adolfy; Cross, Joseph

    2016-05-23

    Many applications of high performance embedded computing are limited by performance or power bottlenecks. We have designed the Suite for Embedded Applications & Kernels (SEAK), a new benchmark suite, (a) to capture these bottlenecks in a way that encourages creative solutions; and (b) to facilitate rigorous, objective, end-user evaluation for their solutions. To avoid biasing solutions toward existing algorithms, SEAK benchmarks use a mission-centric (abstracted from a particular algorithm) and goal-oriented (functional) specification. To encourage solutions that are any combination of software or hardware, we use an end-user black-box evaluation that can capture tradeoffs between performance, power, accuracy, size, and weight. The tradeoffs are especially informative for procurement decisions. We call our benchmarks future proof because each mission-centric interface and evaluation remains useful despite shifting algorithmic preferences. It is challenging to create both concise and precise goal-oriented specifications for mission-centric problems. This paper describes the SEAK benchmark suite and presents an evaluation of sample solutions that highlights power and performance tradeoffs.

  20. A protein–DNA docking benchmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present a protein–DNA docking benchmark containing 47 unbound–unbound test cases of which 13 are classified as easy, 22 as intermediate and 12 as difficult cases. The latter shows considerable structural rearrangement upon complex formation. DNA-specific modifications such as flipped out bases an

  1. FinPar: A Parallel Financial Benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreetta, Christian; Begot, Vivien; Berthold, Jost;

    2016-01-01

    sensitive to the input dataset and therefore requires multiple code versions that are optimized differently, which also raises maintainability problems. This article presents three array-based applications from the financial domain that are suitable for gpgpu execution. Common benchmark-design practice has...

  2. Simple benchmark for complex dose finding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ying Kuen

    2014-06-01

    While a general goal of early phase clinical studies is to identify an acceptable dose for further investigation, modern dose finding studies and designs are highly specific to individual clinical settings. In addition, as outcome-adaptive dose finding methods often involve complex algorithms, it is crucial to have diagnostic tools to evaluate the plausibility of a method's simulated performance and the adequacy of the algorithm. In this article, we propose a simple technique that provides an upper limit, or a benchmark, of accuracy for dose finding methods for a given design objective. The proposed benchmark is nonparametric optimal in the sense of O'Quigley et al. (2002, Biostatistics 3, 51-56), and is demonstrated by examples to be a practical accuracy upper bound for model-based dose finding methods. We illustrate the implementation of the technique in the context of phase I trials that consider multiple toxicities and phase I/II trials where dosing decisions are based on both toxicity and efficacy, and apply the benchmark to several clinical examples considered in the literature. By comparing the operating characteristics of a dose finding method to that of the benchmark, we can form quick initial assessments of whether the method is adequately calibrated and evaluate its sensitivity to the dose-outcome relationships.

  3. Cleanroom Energy Efficiency: Metrics and Benchmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    International SEMATECH Manufacturing Initiative; Mathew, Paul A.; Tschudi, William; Sartor, Dale; Beasley, James

    2010-07-07

    Cleanrooms are among the most energy-intensive types of facilities. This is primarily due to the cleanliness requirements that result in high airflow rates and system static pressures, as well as process requirements that result in high cooling loads. Various studies have shown that there is a wide range of cleanroom energy efficiencies and that facility managers may not be aware of how energy efficient their cleanroom facility can be relative to other cleanroom facilities with the same cleanliness requirements. Metrics and benchmarks are an effective way to compare one facility to another and to track the performance of a given facility over time. This article presents the key metrics and benchmarks that facility managers can use to assess, track, and manage their cleanroom energy efficiency or to set energy efficiency targets for new construction. These include system-level metrics such as air change rates, air handling W/cfm, and filter pressure drops. Operational data are presented from over 20 different cleanrooms that were benchmarked with these metrics and that are part of the cleanroom benchmark dataset maintained by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Overall production efficiency metrics for cleanrooms in 28 semiconductor manufacturing facilities in the United States and recorded in the Fabs21 database are also presented.

  4. Benchmarking Linked Open Data Management Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angles Rojas, R.; Pham, M.D.; Boncz, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    With inherent support for storing and analysing highly interconnected data, graph and RDF databases appear as natural solutions for developing Linked Open Data applications. However, current benchmarks for these database technologies do not fully attain the desirable characteristics in industrial-st

  5. Benchmarking in radiation protection in pharmaceutical industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A benchmarking on radiation protection in seven pharmaceutical companies in Germany and Switzerland was carried out. As the result relevant parameters describing the performance and costs of radiation protection were acquired and compiled and subsequently depicted in figures in order to make these data comparable. (orig.)

  6. Alberta K-12 ESL Proficiency Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Kathy; Ettrich, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The Alberta K-12 ESL Proficiency Benchmarks are organized by division: kindergarten, grades 1-3, grades 4-6, grades 7-9, and grades 10-12. They are descriptors of language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The descriptors are arranged in a continuum of seven language competences across five proficiency levels. Several…

  7. Benchmarking of photon and coupled neutron and photon process of SuperMC 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Super Monte Carlo Calculation Program for Nuclear and Radiation Process (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team in China, is a multi-functional simulation program mainly based on Monte Carlo (MC) method and advanced computer technology. This paper focuses on the benchmarking of physical process of photon and coupled neutron-photon of SuperMC2.0. Integral leakage rate of photon in the spherical and hemispherical shell experiment was tested to verify the physical process of photon and coupled neutron and photon transport. Vanadium assembly experiment and ADS benchmark were given as comprehensive benchmarks. The correctness was preliminarily verified by comparing calculation results of SuperMC with experimental results and MCNP calculation results. (author)

  8. Analytical Benchmarking, Precision Particle Tracking, Electric and Magnetic Storage Rings, Runge-Kutta, Predictor-Corrector

    CERN Document Server

    Metodiev, E M; Fandaros, M; Haciomeroglu, S; Huang, D; Huang, K L; Patil, A; Prodromou, R; Semertzidis, O A; Sharma, D; Stamatakis, A N; Orlov, Y F; Semertzidis, Y K

    2015-01-01

    A set of analytical benchmarks for tracking programs are required for precision storage ring experiments. To determine the accuracy of precision tracking programs in electric and magnetic rings, a variety of analytical estimates of particle and spin dynamics in the rings are developed and compared to the numerical results of tracking simulations. Initial discrepancies in the comparisons indicated the need for improvement of several of the analytical estimates. As an example, we find that the fourth order Runge-Kutta/Predictor-Corrector method was accurate but slow, and that it passed all the benchmarks it was tested against, often to the sub-part per billion level. Thus high precision analytical estimates and tracking programs based on fourth order Runge-Kutta/Predictor-Corrector integration can be used to benchmark faster tracking programs for accuracy.

  9. 基于GLUE和PEST的CERES-Maize模型调参与验证研究%Parameter Estimation and Verification of CERES-Maize Model with GLUE and PEST Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋利兵; 陈上; 姚宁; 冯浩; 张体彬; 何建强

    2015-01-01

    作物模型已逐渐成为干旱和半干旱地区优化农田水肥管理和实施节水灌溉的有力决策支持工具.为了探讨CERES-Maize模型模拟不同生育期受旱情况下夏玉米的生长发育、产量形成和土壤水分状况的模拟精度,进行了2013和2014年连续两季夏玉米田间分段受旱试验.试验将夏玉米整个生育期划分为苗期、拔节、抽雄和灌浆4个主要生长阶段,采用单个生育期受旱其他生育期灌水的方式,形成4个不同的受旱时段水平(D1 ~ D4),又根据夏玉米多年生育期降雨量,设置了70和110 mm两个灌水水平(I1和I2),共形成8个处理,每个处理3次重复,在遮雨棚内按照裂区试验布设,此外设置1个各生育期均灌水110 mm的对照处理(CK).利用两年试验数据,采用DSSAT-GLUE和PEST两种不同的模型参数估计工具,对CERES-Maize模型的遗传参数进行估计,并对该模型的模拟精度和可靠性进行验证,此外还使用交叉验证法对CERES-Maize模型的整体模拟精度进行评估.结果表明,GLUE和PEST两种调参工具所得的模型参数均有较好的稳定性和收敛性,但PEST调参工具耗时较少,效率较高;CERES-Maize模型能较好地模拟充分灌水条件下夏玉米的生长发育、产量和土壤水分变化,绝对相对误差(ARE)和相对均方根误差(RRMSE)均在6% ~8%之间;但是现有CERES-Maize模型无法模拟由于不同生育期受旱造成的夏玉米物候期的差异.此外,交叉验证结果发现夏玉米生长前期(特别是拔节期)受旱处理的数据参与模型校正时,模型的总体平均模拟误差较大,精度较低.CERES-Maize模型模拟前期受旱对玉米籽粒产量的影响时结果不够准确,这可能是由于该模型低估了早期水分胁迫条件下的LAI值,进而使得ET模拟不准确所造成的.总之,CERES-Maize模型对生育期前期(特别是拔节期)受旱条件下夏玉米生长发育、产量形成和土壤水分变化的

  10. Study on Establishing Maize Variety Parameters in the CERES-Maize Simulation Model%CERES-Maize模型中遗传参数确定方法的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉兰; 陈晓光; 肖云清; 亢艳莉; 郭晓雷

    2007-01-01

    以正交设计方法为基础,根据CERES-Maize模型品种参数的实际意义和气象资料、品种特性,确定了各遗传参数的取值范围,利用正交表设计了不同参数组合的正交试验,以模拟产量、发育期的准确率为参考指标进行方差分析,从单因素统计结果中选择平均值最大的水平为最优方案,确定出每个样本的遗传参数,根据不同品种熟性分为晚熟品种、中熟品种、早熟品种3类,选择各类遗传参数中出现频率较多的参数组合成能代表不同熟性品种的遗传参数.利用实测资料进行验证,CERES-Maize对产量、开花期和发育期的模拟效果较好,大多数年份的误差在±10%以内,个别年份在±10%~20%,模拟结果比较合理.

  11. Utilizing benchmark data from the ANL-ZPR diagnostic cores program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The support of the criticality safety community is allowing the production of benchmark descriptions of several assemblies from the ZPR Diagnostic Cores Program. The assemblies have high sensitivities to nuclear data for a few isotopes. This can highlight limitations in nuclear data for selected nuclides or in standard methods used to treat these data. The present work extends the use of the simplified model of the U9 benchmark assembly beyond the validation of keff. Further simplifications have been made to produce a data testing benchmark in the style of the standard CSEWG benchmark specifications. Calculations for this data testing benchmark are compared to results obtained with more detailed models and methods to determine their biases. These biases or corrections factors can then be applied in the use of the less refined methods and models. Data testing results using Versions IV, V, and VI of the ENDF/B nuclear data are presented for keff, f28/f25, c28/f25, and βeff. These limited results demonstrate the importance of studying other integral parameters in addition to keff in trying to improve nuclear data and methods and the importance of accounting for methods and/or modeling biases when using data testing results to infer the quality of the nuclear data files

  12. Alternative industrial carbon emissions benchmark based on input-output analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mengyao; Ji, Xi

    2016-05-01

    Some problems exist in the current carbon emissions benchmark setting systems. The primary consideration for industrial carbon emissions standards highly relate to direct carbon emissions (power-related emissions) and only a portion of indirect emissions are considered in the current carbon emissions accounting processes. This practice is insufficient and may cause double counting to some extent due to mixed emission sources. To better integrate and quantify direct and indirect carbon emissions, an embodied industrial carbon emissions benchmark setting method is proposed to guide the establishment of carbon emissions benchmarks based on input-output analysis. This method attempts to link direct carbon emissions with inter-industrial economic exchanges and systematically quantifies carbon emissions embodied in total product delivery chains. The purpose of this study is to design a practical new set of embodied intensity-based benchmarks for both direct and indirect carbon emissions. Beijing, at the first level of carbon emissions trading pilot schemes in China, plays a significant role in the establishment of these schemes and is chosen as an example in this study. The newly proposed method tends to relate emissions directly to each responsibility in a practical way through the measurement of complex production and supply chains and reduce carbon emissions from their original sources. This method is expected to be developed under uncertain internal and external contexts and is further expected to be generalized to guide the establishment of industrial benchmarks for carbon emissions trading schemes in China and other countries.

  13. Toxicological benchmarks for screening potential contaminants of concern for effects on sediment-associated biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because a hazardous waste site may contain hundreds of chemicals, it is important to screen contaminants of concern for the ecological risk assessment. Often this screening is done as part of a Screening Assessment, the purpose of which is to evaluate the available data, identify data gaps, and screen potential contaminants of concern. Screening may be accomplished by using a set of toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks are helpful in determining whether contaminants warrant further assessment or are at a level that requires no further attention. If a chemical concentration or the reported detection limit exceeds a proposed lower benchmark, more analysis is needed to determine the hazards posed by that chemical. If, however, the chemical concentration falls below the lower benchmark value, the chemical may be eliminated from further study. This report briefly describes three categories of approaches to the development of sediment quality benchmarks. These approaches are based on analytical chemistry, toxicity test results, and field survey data. A fourth integrative approach incorporates all three types of data

  14. Electricity consumption in school buildings - benchmark and web tools; Elforbrug i skoler - benchmark og webvaerktoej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this project has been to produce benchmarks for electricity consumption in Danish schools in order to encourage electricity conservation. An internet programme has been developed with the aim of facilitating schools' access to benchmarks and to evaluate energy consumption. The overall purpose is to create increased attention to the electricity consumption of each separate school by publishing benchmarks which take the schools' age and number of pupils as well as after school activities into account. Benchmarks can be used to make green accounts and work as markers in e.g. energy conservation campaigns, energy management and for educational purposes. The internet tool can be found on www.energiguiden.dk. (BA)

  15. A Programming Model Performance Study Using the NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhang Shan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the power of multicore platforms is challenging due to the additional levels of parallelism present. In this paper we use the NAS Parallel Benchmarks to study three programming models, MPI, OpenMP and PGAS to understand their performance and memory usage characteristics on current multicore architectures. To understand these characteristics we use the Integrated Performance Monitoring tool and other ways to measure communication versus computation time, as well as the fraction of the run time spent in OpenMP. The benchmarks are run on two different Cray XT5 systems and an Infiniband cluster. Our results show that in general the three programming models exhibit very similar performance characteristics. In a few cases, OpenMP is significantly faster because it explicitly avoids communication. For these particular cases, we were able to re-write the UPC versions and achieve equal performance to OpenMP. Using OpenMP was also the most advantageous in terms of memory usage. Also we compare performance differences between the two Cray systems, which have quad-core and hex-core processors. We show that at scale the performance is almost always slower on the hex-core system because of increased contention for network resources.

  16. CFD validation in OECD/NEA t-junction benchmark.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obabko, A. V.; Fischer, P. F.; Tautges, T. J.; Karabasov, S.; Goloviznin, V. M.; Zaytsev, M. A.; Chudanov, V. V.; Pervichko, V. A.; Aksenova, A. E. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Cambridge Univ.); (Moscow Institute of Nuclar Energy Safety)

    2011-08-23

    and benchmark data. The numerical scheme has a very small scheme diffusion and is the second and the first order accurate in space and time, correspondingly. We compare and contrast simulation results for three computational fluid dynamics codes CABARET, Conv3D, and Nek5000 for the T-junction thermal striping problem that was the focus of a recent OECD/NEA blind benchmark. The corresponding codes utilize finite-difference implicit large eddy simulation (ILES), finite-volume LES on fully staggered grids, and an LES spectral element method (SEM), respectively. The simulations results are in a good agreement with experimenatl data. We present results from a study of sensitivity to computational mesh and time integration interval, and discuss the next steps in the simulation of this problem.

  17. Benchmark 1 - Failure Prediction after Cup Drawing, Reverse Redrawing and Expansion Part A: Benchmark Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Martin; Dick, Robert; Huang, Y. Helen; Lockley, Andrew; Cardoso, Rui; Santos, Abel

    2016-08-01

    This Benchmark is designed to predict the fracture of a food can after drawing, reverse redrawing and expansion. The aim is to assess different sheet metal forming difficulties such as plastic anisotropic earing and failure models (strain and stress based Forming Limit Diagrams) under complex nonlinear strain paths. To study these effects, two distinct materials, TH330 steel (unstoved) and AA5352 aluminum alloy are considered in this Benchmark. Problem description, material properties, and simulation reports with experimental data are summarized.

  18. Benchmarking in Identifying Priority Directions of Development of Telecommunication Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaharchenko Lolita A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses evolution of development and possibilities of application of benchmarking in the telecommunication sphere. It studies essence of benchmarking on the basis of generalisation of approaches of different scientists to definition of this notion. In order to improve activity of telecommunication operators, the article identifies the benchmarking technology and main factors, that determine success of the operator in the modern market economy, and the mechanism of benchmarking and component stages of carrying out benchmarking by a telecommunication operator. It analyses the telecommunication market and identifies dynamics of its development and tendencies of change of the composition of telecommunication operators and providers. Having generalised the existing experience of benchmarking application, the article identifies main types of benchmarking of telecommunication operators by the following features: by the level of conduct of (branch, inter-branch and international benchmarking; by relation to participation in the conduct (competitive and joint; and with respect to the enterprise environment (internal and external.

  19. Effects of Exposure Imprecision on Estimation of the Benchmark Dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Keiding, Niels; Grandjean, Philippe

    Environmental epidemiology; exposure measurement error; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; exposure standards; benchmark dose......Environmental epidemiology; exposure measurement error; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; exposure standards; benchmark dose...

  20. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. 11; Comparison of (alpha) Bootis and 1 Ceres with a Laboratory Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witteborn, Fred C.; Cohen, Martin; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.; Heere, Karen; Shirley, Eric L.

    1999-01-01

    Infrared spectra of two celestial objects frequently used as flux standards are calibrated against an absolute laboratory flux standard at a spectral resolving power of 100 to 200. The spectrum of the KI.5 III star alpha Boo is measured from 3 to 30 microns, and that of the C-type asteroid 1 Ceres from 5 to 30 microns. While these "standard" spectra do not have the apparent precision of those based on calculated models, they do not require the assumptions involved in theoretical models of stars and asteroids. Specifically, they provide a model-independent means of calibrating celestial flux in the spectral range from 12 to 30 microns, where accurate absolute photometry is not available. The agreement found between the spectral shapes of alpha Boo and Ceres based on laboratory standards and those based on observed ratios to alpha CMa (Sirius) and alpha Lyr (Vega), flux-calibrated by theoretical modeling of these hot stars, strengthens our confidence in the applicability of the stellar models as primary irradiance standards.

  1. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared 11: Comparison of (alpha) Boo and 1 Ceres with a Laboratory Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witteborn, Fred C.; Cohen, Martin; Bregman, Jess D.; Wooden, Diane; Heere, Karen; Shirley, Eric L.

    1998-01-01

    Infrared spectra of two celestial objects frequently used as flux standards are calibrated against an absolute laboratory flux standard at a spectral resolving power of 100 to 200. The spectrum of the K1.5III star, alpha Boo, is measured from 3 microns to 30 microns and that of the C-type asteroid, 1 Ceres, from 5 microns to 30 microns. While these 'standard' spectra do not have the apparent precision of those based on calculated models, they do not require the assumptions involved in theoretical models of stars and asteroids. Specifically they provide a model-independent means of calibrating celestial flux in the spectral range from 12 microns to 30 microns where accurate absolute photometry is not available. The agreement found between the spectral shapes of alpha Boo and Ceres based on laboratory standards, and those based on observed ratios to alpha CMa (Sirius) and alpha Lyr (Vega), flux calibrated by theoretical modeling of these hot stars strengthens our confidence in the applicability of the stellar models as primary irradiance standards.

  2. Pre Managed Earnings Benchmarks and Earnings Management of Australian Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrendu Rath

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates benchmark beating behaviour and circumstances under which managers inflate earnings to beat earnings benchmarks. We show that two benchmarks, positive earnings and positive earnings change, are associated with earnings manipulation. Using a sample ofAustralian firms from 2000 to 2006, we find that when the underlying earnings are negative or below prior year’s earnings, firms are more likely to use discretionary accruals to inflate earnings to beat benchmarks.

  3. Benchmarking of corporate social responsibility: Methodological problems and robustness.

    OpenAIRE

    Graafland, J.J.; Eijffinger, S.C.W.; Smid, H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the possibilities and problems of benchmarking Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). After a methodological analysis of the advantages and problems of benchmarking, we develop a benchmark method that includes economic, social and environmental aspects as well as national and international aspects of CSR. The overall benchmark is based on a weighted average of these aspects. The weights are based on the opinions of companies and NGO’s. Using different me...

  4. An Arbitrary Benchmark CAPM: One Additional Frontier Portfolio is Sufficient

    OpenAIRE

    Ekern, Steinar

    2008-01-01

    The benchmark CAPM linearly relates the expected returns on an arbitrary asset, an arbitrary benchmark portfolio, and an arbitrary MV frontier portfolio. The benchmark is not required to be on the frontier and may be non-perfectly correlated with the frontier portfolio. The benchmark CAPM extends and generalizes previous CAPM formulations, including the zero beta, two correlated frontier portfolios, riskless augmented frontier, and inefficient portfolio versions. The covariance between the of...

  5. Towards a Benchmark Suite for Modelica Compilers: Large Models

    OpenAIRE

    Frenkel, Jens; Schubert, Christian; Kunze, Günter; Fritzson, Peter; Sjölund, Martin; Pop, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a contribution to a Modelica benchmark suite. Basic ideas for a tool independent benchmark suite based on Python scripting along with models for testing the performance of Modelica compilers regarding large systems of equation are given. The automation of running the benchmark suite is demonstrated followed by a selection of benchmark results to determine the current limits of Modelica tools and how they scale for an increasing number of equations.

  6. Verification of the plant dynamics analytical code CERES. Comparison with the SAS4/SASSYS-1 code based on the analysis of the small fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CERES was validated by the comparison of code to code with a plant dynamics analysis code SAS4A/SASSYS-1. SAS4A/SASSYS-1 is developed by Argonne National Laboratory (USA), and, it has been verified by the FFTF/EBR-II analysis results. The loss-of-offsite-power event (TBO) and the unprotected-loss-of-flow event (ULOF) of 4S reactor (August 2006 design) were analyzed by both codes. The main results as follows; (1) Almost same values were predicted for the reactor core inlet/outlet temperature, the peak temperature occurrence timing, the IHX temperature, and the secondary system temperatures in the ULOF event analysis. (2) The IHX primary inlet temperature predicted by CERES lie between the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 results both with and without thermal stratification model in the TOB event that the low temperature sodium flows out to the upper plenum. From the result, the rationality of the plenum model of CERES was confirmed. Therefore, the fundamental abilities of the CERES to analyze natural circulation and the core reactivity feedback were able to be confirmed. (author)

  7. 47 CFR 69.108 - Transport rate benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transport rate benchmark. 69.108 Section 69.108... Computation of Charges § 69.108 Transport rate benchmark. (a) For transport charges computed in accordance with this subpart, the DS3-to-DS1 benchmark ratio shall be calculated as follows: the telephone...

  8. 29 CFR 1952.323 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.323 Section 1952.323... Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were required to...

  9. 29 CFR 1952.343 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.343 Section 1952.343... Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall, Compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were required to...

  10. 29 CFR 1952.213 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.213 Section 1952.213... Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were required to...

  11. 29 CFR 1952.373 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.373 Section 1952.373... Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were required to...

  12. 29 CFR 1952.163 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.163 Section 1952.163... Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall, compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were required to...

  13. 29 CFR 1952.203 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.203 Section 1952.203... Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall, compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were required to...

  14. 29 CFR 1952.293 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.293 Section 1952.293... Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were required to...

  15. 29 CFR 1952.223 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.223 Section 1952.223... Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were required to...

  16. 29 CFR 1952.233 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.233 Section 1952.233... Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were required to...

  17. 29 CFR 1952.113 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.113 Section 1952.113... Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall, compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were required to...

  18. 29 CFR 1952.93 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.93 Section 1952.93....93 Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were...

  19. 29 CFR 1952.353 - Compliance staffing benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance staffing benchmarks. 1952.353 Section 1952.353... Compliance staffing benchmarks. Under the terms of the 1978 Court Order in AFL-CIO v. Marshall, compliance staffing levels (benchmarks) necessary for a “fully effective” enforcement program were required to...

  20. Benchmarking ICRF Full-wave Solvers for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. V. Budny, L. Berry, R. Bilato, P. Bonoli, M. Brambilla, R. J. Dumont, A. Fukuyama, R. Harvey, E. F. Jaeger, K. Indireshkumar, E. Lerche, D. McCune, C. K. Phillips, V. Vdovin, J. Wright, and members of the ITPA-IOS

    2011-01-06

    Abstract Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by six full-wave solver groups to simulate the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating, and by three of these groups to simulate the current-drive. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power for the DT and He4 cases. Factor of two disagreements are found for the cases with second harmonic He3 heating in bulk H cases. Approximate agreement is achieved simulating the ICRF current drive.

  1. The PROOF benchmark suite measuring PROOF performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, S.; Ganis, G.

    2012-06-01

    The PROOF benchmark suite is a new utility suite of PROOF to measure performance and scalability. The primary goal of the benchmark suite is to determine optimal configuration parameters for a set of machines to be used as PROOF cluster. The suite measures the performance of the cluster for a set of standard tasks as a function of the number of effective processes. Cluster administrators can use the suite to measure the performance of the cluster and find optimal configuration parameters. PROOF developers can also utilize the suite to help them measure, identify problems and improve their software. In this paper, the new tool is explained in detail and use cases are presented to illustrate the new tool.

  2. Direct data access protocols benchmarking on DPM

    CERN Document Server

    Furano, Fabrizio; Keeble, Oliver; Mancinelli, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    The Disk Pool Manager is an example of a multi-protocol, multi-VO system for data access on the Grid that went though a considerable technical evolution in the last years. Among other features, its architecture offers the opportunity of testing its different data access frontends under exactly the same conditions, including hardware and backend software. This characteristic inspired the idea of collecting monitoring information from various testbeds in order to benchmark the behaviour of the HTTP and Xrootd protocols for the use case of data analysis, batch or interactive. A source of information is the set of continuous tests that are run towards the worldwide endpoints belonging to the DPM Collaboration, which accumulated relevant statistics in its first year of activity. On top of that, the DPM releases are based on multiple levels of automated testing that include performance benchmarks of various kinds, executed regularly every day. At the same time, the recent releases of DPM can report monitoring infor...

  3. Active vibration control of nonlinear benchmark buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xing-de; CHEN Dao-zheng

    2007-01-01

    The present nonlinear model reduction methods unfit the nonlinear benchmark buildings as their vibration equations belong to a non-affine system. Meanwhile,the controllers designed directly by the nonlinear control strategy have a high order, and they are difficult to be applied actually. Therefore, a new active vibration control way which fits the nonlinear buildings is proposed. The idea of the proposed way is based on the model identification and structural model linearization, and exerting the control force to the built model according to the force action principle. This proposed way has a better practicability as the built model can be reduced by the balance reduction method based on the empirical Grammian matrix. A three-story benchmark structure is presented and the simulation results illustrate that the proposed method is viable for the civil engineering structures.

  4. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 55 chemicals on six representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, white-footed mouse, cottontail ink, red fox, and whitetail deer) and eight avian wildlife species (American robin, woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, Cooper`s hawk, and redtailed hawk) (scientific names are presented in Appendix C). These species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. The benchmarks presented in this report are values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species.

  5. Specification for the VERA Depletion Benchmark Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-17

    CASL-X-2015-1014-000 iii Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CASL neutronics simulator MPACT is under development for the neutronics and T-H coupled simulation for the pressurized water reactor. MPACT includes the ORIGEN-API and internal depletion module to perform depletion calculations based upon neutron-material reaction and radioactive decay. It is a challenge to validate the depletion capability because of the insufficient measured data. One of the detoured methods to validate it is to perform a code-to-code comparison for benchmark problems. In this study a depletion benchmark suite has been developed and a detailed guideline has been provided to obtain meaningful computational outcomes which can be used in the validation of the MPACT depletion capability.

  6. Non-judgemental Dynamic Fuel Cycle Benchmarking

    CERN Document Server

    Scopatz, Anthony Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new fuel cycle benchmarking analysis methodology by coupling Gaussian process regression, a popular technique in Machine Learning, to dynamic time warping, a mechanism widely used in speech recognition. Together they generate figures-of-merit that are applicable to any time series metric that a benchmark may study. The figures-of-merit account for uncertainty in the metric itself, utilize information across the whole time domain, and do not require that the simulators use a common time grid. Here, a distance measure is defined that can be used to compare the performance of each simulator for a given metric. Additionally, a contribution measure is derived from the distance measure that can be used to rank order the importance of fuel cycle metrics. Lastly, this paper warns against using standard signal processing techniques for error reduction. This is because it is found that error reduction is better handled by the Gaussian process regression itself.

  7. Argonne Code Center: benchmark problem book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a supplement to the original report, published in 1968, as revised. The Benchmark Problem Book is intended to serve as a source book of solutions to mathematically well-defined problems for which either analytical or very accurate approximate solutions are known. This supplement contains problems in eight new areas: two-dimensional (R-z) reactor model; multidimensional (Hex-z) HTGR model; PWR thermal hydraulics--flow between two channels with different heat fluxes; multidimensional (x-y-z) LWR model; neutron transport in a cylindrical ''black'' rod; neutron transport in a BWR rod bundle; multidimensional (x-y-z) BWR model; and neutronic depletion benchmark problems. This supplement contains only the additional pages and those requiring modification

  8. KENO-IV code benchmark calculation, (6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of benchmark tests has been undertaken in JAERI in order to examine the capability of JAERI's criticality safety evaluation system consisting of the Monte Carlo calculation code KENO-IV and the newly developed multigroup constants library MGCL. The present report describes the results of a benchmark test using criticality experiments about Plutonium fuel in various shape. In all, 33 cases of experiments have been calculated for Pu(NO3)4 aqueous solution, Pu metal or PuO2-polystyrene compact in various shape (sphere, cylinder, rectangular parallelepiped). The effective multiplication factors calculated for the 33 cases distribute widely between 0.955 and 1.045 due to wide range of system variables. (author)

  9. Argonne Code Center: benchmark problem book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    This report is a supplement to the original report, published in 1968, as revised. The Benchmark Problem Book is intended to serve as a source book of solutions to mathematically well-defined problems for which either analytical or very accurate approximate solutions are known. This supplement contains problems in eight new areas: two-dimensional (R-z) reactor model; multidimensional (Hex-z) HTGR model; PWR thermal hydraulics--flow between two channels with different heat fluxes; multidimensional (x-y-z) LWR model; neutron transport in a cylindrical ''black'' rod; neutron transport in a BWR rod bundle; multidimensional (x-y-z) BWR model; and neutronic depletion benchmark problems. This supplement contains only the additional pages and those requiring modification. (RWR)

  10. Confidential benchmarking based on multiparty computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Damgård, Kasper Lyneborg; Nielsen, Kurt;

    ' and the consultancy house's data stays confidential, the banks as clients learn nothing but the computed benchmarking score. In the concrete business application, the developed prototype help Danish banks to find the most efficient customers among a large and challenging group of agricultural customers with too much...... state during the computation. We ran the system with two servers doing the secure computation using a database with information on about 2500 users. Answers arrived in about 25 seconds....

  11. Benchmarking Performance of Web Service Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shuai

    2011-01-01

    Web services are often used for retrieving data from servers providing information of different kinds. A data providing web service operation returns collections of objects for a given set of arguments without any side effects. In this project a web service benchmark (WSBENCH) is developed to simulate the performance of web service calls. Web service operations are specified as SQL statements. The function generator of WSBENCH converts user specified SQL queries into functions and automatical...

  12. WIDER FACE: A Face Detection Benchmark

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shuo; Luo, Ping; Loy, Chen Change; Tang, Xiaoou

    2015-01-01

    Face detection is one of the most studied topics in the computer vision community. Much of the progresses have been made by the availability of face detection benchmark datasets. We show that there is a gap between current face detection performance and the real world requirements. To facilitate future face detection research, we introduce the WIDER FACE dataset, which is 10 times larger than existing datasets. The dataset contains rich annotations, including occlusions, poses, event categori...

  13. Benchmarking Nature Tourism between Zhangjiajie and Repovesi

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Since nature tourism became a booming business in modern society, more and more tourists choose nature-based tourism destination for their holidays. To find ways to promote Repovesi national park is quite significant, in a bid to reinforce the competitiveness of Repovesi national park. The topic of this thesis is both to find good marketing strategies used by the Zhangjiajie national park, via benchmarking and to provide some suggestions to Repovesi national park. The Method used in t...

  14. Benchmarking polish basic metal manufacturing companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pomykalski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic metal manufacturing companies are undergoing substantial strategic changes resulting from global changes in demand. During such periods managers should closely monitor and benchmark the financial results of companies operating in their section. Proper and timely identification of the consequences of changes in these areas may be crucial as managers seek to exploit opportunities and avoid threats. The paper examines changes in financial ratios of basic metal manufacturing companies operating in Poland in the period 2006-2011.

  15. BN-600 full MOX core benchmark analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a follow-up of the BN-600 hybrid core benchmark, a full MOX core benchmark was performed within the framework of the IAEA co-ordinated research project. Discrepancies between the values of main reactivity coefficients obtained by the participants for the BN-600 full MOX core benchmark appear to be larger than those in the previous hybrid core benchmarks on traditional core configurations. This arises due to uncertainties in the proper modelling of the axial sodium plenum above the core. It was recognized that the sodium density coefficient strongly depends on the core model configuration of interest (hybrid core vs. fully MOX fuelled core with sodium plenum above the core) in conjunction with the calculation method (diffusion vs. transport theory). The effects of the discrepancies revealed between the participants results on the ULOF and UTOP transient behaviours of the BN-600 full MOX core were investigated in simplified transient analyses. Generally the diffusion approximation predicts more benign consequences for the ULOF accident but more hazardous ones for the UTOP accident when compared with the transport theory results. The heterogeneity effect does not have any significant effect on the simulation of the transient. The comparison of the transient analyses results concluded that the fuel Doppler coefficient and the sodium density coefficient are the two most important coefficients in understanding the ULOF transient behaviour. In particular, the uncertainty in evaluating the sodium density coefficient distribution has the largest impact on the description of reactor dynamics. This is because the maximum sodium temperature rise takes place at the top of the core and in the sodium plenum.

  16. Direct Simulation of a Solidification Benchmark Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Carozzani, Tommy; Gandin, Charles-André; Digonnet, Hugues; Bellet, Michel; Zaidat, Kader; Fautrelle, Yves

    2013-01-01

    International audience A solidification benchmark experiment is simulated using a three-dimensional cellular automaton-finite element solidification model. The experiment consists of a rectangular cavity containing a Sn-3 wt pct Pb alloy. The alloy is first melted and then solidified in the cavity. A dense array of thermocouples permits monitoring of temperatures in the cavity and in the heat exchangers surrounding the cavity. After solidification, the grain structure is revealed by metall...

  17. Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment: Subsonic Fixed Wing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florance, Jennifer P.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental technical challenge in computational aeroelasticity is the accurate prediction of unsteady aerodynamic phenomena and the effect on the aeroelastic response of a vehicle. Currently, a benchmarking standard for use in validating the accuracy of computational aeroelasticity codes does not exist. Many aeroelastic data sets have been obtained in wind-tunnel and flight testing throughout the world; however, none have been globally presented or accepted as an ideal data set. There are numerous reasons for this. One reason is that often, such aeroelastic data sets focus on the aeroelastic phenomena alone (flutter, for example) and do not contain associated information such as unsteady pressures and time-correlated structural dynamic deflections. Other available data sets focus solely on the unsteady pressures and do not address the aeroelastic phenomena. Other discrepancies can include omission of relevant data, such as flutter frequency and / or the acquisition of only qualitative deflection data. In addition to these content deficiencies, all of the available data sets present both experimental and computational technical challenges. Experimental issues include facility influences, nonlinearities beyond those being modeled, and data processing. From the computational perspective, technical challenges include modeling geometric complexities, coupling between the flow and the structure, grid issues, and boundary conditions. The Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment task seeks to examine the existing potential experimental data sets and ultimately choose the one that is viewed as the most suitable for computational benchmarking. An initial computational evaluation of that configuration will then be performed using the Langley-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FUN3D1 as part of its code validation process. In addition to the benchmarking activity, this task also includes an examination of future research directions. Researchers within the

  18. Benchmarking and energy management schemes in SMEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huenges Wajer, Boudewijn [SenterNovem (Netherlands); Helgerud, Hans Even [New Energy Performance AS (Norway); Lackner, Petra [Austrian Energy Agency (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    Many companies are reluctant to focus on energy management or to invest in energy efficiency measures. Nevertheless, there are many good examples proving that the right approach to implementing energy efficiency can very well be combined with the business-priorities of most companies. SMEs in particular can benefit from a facilitated European approach because they normally have a lack of resources and time to invest in energy efficiency. In the EU supported pilot project BESS, 60 SMEs from 11 European countries of the food and drink industries successfully tested a package of interactive instruments which offers such a facilitated approach. A number of pilot companies show a profit increase of 3 up to 10 %. The package includes a user-friendly and web based E-learning scheme for implementing energy management as well as a benchmarking module for company specific comparison of energy performance indicators. Moreover, it has several practical and tested tools to support the cycle of continuous improvement of energy efficiency in the company such as checklists, sector specific measure lists, templates for auditing and energy conservation plans. An important feature and also a key trigger for companies is the possibility for SMEs to benchmark anonymously their energy situation against others of the same sector. SMEs can participate in a unique web based benchmarking system to interactively benchmark in a way which fully guarantees confidentiality and safety of company data. Furthermore, the available data can contribute to a bottom-up approach to support the objectives of (national) monitoring and targeting and thereby also contributing to the EU Energy Efficiency and Energy Services Directive. A follow up project to expand the number of participating SMEs of various sectors is currently being developed.

  19. Small vs. Large Convective Cloud Objects from CERES Aqua Observations: Where are the Intraseasonal Variation Signals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2016-01-01

    During inactive phases of Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), there are plenty of deep but small convective systems and far fewer deep and large ones. During active phases of MJO, a manifestation of an increase in the occurrence of large and deep cloud clusters results from an amplification of large-scale motions by stronger convective heating. This study is designed to quantitatively examine the roles of small and large cloud clusters during the MJO life cycle. We analyze the cloud object data from Aqua CERES observations for tropical deep convective (DC) and cirrostratus (CS) cloud object types according to the real-time multivariate MJO index. The cloud object is a contiguous region of the earth with a single dominant cloud-system type. The size distributions, defined as the footprint numbers as a function of cloud object diameters, for particular MJO phases depart greatly from the combined (8-phase) distribution at large cloud-object diameters due to the reduced/increased numbers of cloud objects related to changes in the large-scale environments. The medium diameter corresponding to the combined distribution is determined and used to partition all cloud objects into "small" and "large" groups of a particular phase. The two groups corresponding to the combined distribution have nearly equal numbers of footprints. The medium diameters are 502 km for DC and 310 km for cirrostratus. The range of the variation between two extreme phases (typically, the most active and depressed phases) for the small group is 6-11% in terms of the numbers of cloud objects and the total footprint numbers. The corresponding range for the large group is 19-44%. In terms of the probability density functions of radiative and cloud physical properties, there are virtually no differences between the MJO phases for the small group, but there are significant differences for the large groups for both DC and CS types. These results suggest that the intreseasonal variation signals reside at the

  20. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-13 Urvara Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Hanna; Williams, David; Platz, Thomas; Mest, Scott; Yingst, Aileen; Crown, David; O'Brien, David; Buczkowski, Debra; Schenk, Paul; Scully, Jennifer; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Nathues, Andreas; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Russell, Christopher; Raymond, Carol

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres similar to that done for Vesta [1,2], including production of a Survey- and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO)-based global map, and a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. In this abstract we discuss the geologic evolution of the Ac-H-13 Urvara Quadrangle. At the time of this writing LAMO images (35 m/pixel) are just becoming available. Thus, our geologic maps are based on HAMO images (140 m/pixel) and Survey (400 m/pixel) digital ter-rain models (for topographic information). Dawn Framing Camera (FC) color images are also used to provide context for map unit identification. The maps to be presented as posters will be updated from analyses of LAMO images. The Urvara Quadrangle is dominated by the 170-km diameter impact basin Urvara (46.4°S, 248.6°E) and includes cratered terrain to the west. Named features include the impact craters Meanderi (40.9°S, 193.7°E, 103 km diameter), Sekhet (66.4°S, 254.9°E, 41 km diameter), and Fluusa (31.5°S, 277.9°E), as well as the crater chains Gerber Catena (38.1°S, 214.8°E) and Sam-hain Catena (19.6°S, 210.3°E). Based on preliminary geologic mapping [3,4], we interpret the two prominent catenae as pit craters associated with large scale tectonism rather than secondary impacts. We interpret two large curvilinear depressions near the eastern quadrangle boundary as secondary crater chains resulting from the Urvara impact. Textural and morphological asymme-tries in crater materials within the quadrangle indicate heterogeneities in subsurface composition and volatile content. Features on the Urvara basin floor are consistent with impact fluidization of target materials; post impact extrusion of volatile rich material may have also played a minor role. References: [1] Williams D.A. et al. (2014) Icarus, 244, 1-12. [2] Yingst R.A. et al. (2014) PSS, 103, 2-23. [3] Sizemore et al. (2015) GSA Abstracts with Program

  1. Benchmark calculations of sodium fast critical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high expectations from fast critical experiments impose the additional requirements on reliability of final reconstructed values, obtained in experiments at critical facility. Benchmark calculations of critical experiments are characterized by impossibility of complete experiment reconstruction, the large amounts of input data (dependent and independent) with very different reliability. It should also take into account different sensitivity of the measured and appropriate calculated characteristics to the identical changes of geometry parameters, temperature, and isotopic composition of individual materials. The calculations of critical facility experiments are produced for the benchmark models, generated by the specific reconstructing codes with its features when adjusting model parameters, and using the nuclear data library. The generated benchmark model, providing the agreed calculated and experimental values for one or more neutronic characteristics can lead to considerable differences for other key characteristics. The sensitivity of key neutronic characteristics to the extra steel allocation in the core, and ENDF/B nuclear data sources is performed using a few calculated models of BFS-62-3A and BFS1-97 critical assemblies. The comparative analysis of the calculated effective multiplication factor, spectral indices, sodium void reactivity, and radial fission-rate distributions leads to quite different models, providing the best agreement the calculated and experimental neutronic characteristics. This fact should be considered during the refinement of computational models and code-verification purpose. (author)

  2. A PWR Thorium Pin Cell Burnup Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Zhao, X.; Pilat, E. E; Hejzlar, P.

    2000-05-01

    As part of work to evaluate the potential benefits of using thorium in LWR fuel, a thorium fueled benchmark comparison was made in this study between state-of-the-art codes, MOCUP (MCNP4B + ORIGEN2), and CASMO-4 for burnup calculations. The MOCUP runs were done individually at MIT and INEEL, using the same model but with some differences in techniques and cross section libraries. Eigenvalue and isotope concentrations were compared on a PWR pin cell model up to high burnup. The eigenvalue comparison as a function of burnup is good: the maximum difference is within 2% and the average absolute difference less than 1%. The isotope concentration comparisons are better than a set of MOX fuel benchmarks and comparable to a set of uranium fuel benchmarks reported in the literature. The actinide and fission product data sources used in the MOCUP burnup calculations for a typical thorium fuel are documented. Reasons for code vs code differences are analyzed and discussed.

  3. BENCHMARKING ON-LINE SERVICES INDUSTRIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John HAMILTON

    2006-01-01

    The Web Quality Analyser (WQA) is a new benchmarking tool for industry. It hasbeen extensively tested across services industries. Forty five critical success features are presented as measures that capture the user's perception of services industry websites. This tool differs to previous tools, in that it captures the information technology (IT) related driver sectors of website performance, along with the marketing-services related driver sectors. These driver sectors capture relevant structure, function and performance components.An 'on-off' switch measurement approach determines each component. Relevant component measures scale into a relative presence of the applicable feature, with a feature block delivering one of the sector drivers. Although it houses both measurable and a few subjective components, the WQA offers a proven and useful means to compare relevant websites.The WQA defines website strengths and weaknesses, thereby allowing for corrections to the website structure of the specific business. WQA benchmarking against services related business competitors delivers a position on the WQA index, facilitates specific website driver rating comparisons, and demonstrates where key competitive advantage may reside. This paper reports on the marketing-services driver sectors of this new benchmarking WQA tool.

  4. Perspective: Selected benchmarks from commercial CFD codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, C.J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Computational Mechanics Section

    1995-06-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a series of five benchmark simulations which were completed using commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These simulations were performed by the vendors themselves, and then reported by them in ASME`s CFD Triathlon Forum and CFD Biathlon Forum. The first group of benchmarks consisted of three laminar flow problems. These were the steady, two-dimensional flow over a backward-facing step, the low Reynolds number flow around a circular cylinder, and the unsteady three-dimensional flow in a shear-driven cubical cavity. The second group of benchmarks consisted of two turbulent flow problems. These were the two-dimensional flow around a square cylinder with periodic separated flow phenomena, and the stead, three-dimensional flow in a 180-degree square bend. All simulation results were evaluated against existing experimental data nd thereby satisfied item 10 of the Journal`s policy statement for numerical accuracy. The objective of this exercise was to provide the engineering and scientific community with a common reference point for the evaluation of commercial CFD codes.

  5. Introduction to the HPC Challenge Benchmark Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luszczek, Piotr; Dongarra, Jack J.; Koester, David; Rabenseifner,Rolf; Lucas, Bob; Kepner, Jeremy; McCalpin, John; Bailey, David; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2005-04-25

    The HPC Challenge benchmark suite has been released by the DARPA HPCS program to help define the performance boundaries of future Petascale computing systems. HPC Challenge is a suite of tests that examine the performance of HPC architectures using kernels with memory access patterns more challenging than those of the High Performance Linpack (HPL) benchmark used in the Top500 list. Thus, the suite is designed to augment the Top500 list, providing benchmarks that bound the performance of many real applications as a function of memory access characteristics e.g., spatial and temporal locality, and providing a framework for including additional tests. In particular, the suite is composed of several well known computational kernels (STREAM, HPL, matrix multiply--DGEMM, parallel matrix transpose--PTRANS, FFT, RandomAccess, and bandwidth/latency tests--b{sub eff}) that attempt to span high and low spatial and temporal locality space. By design, the HPC Challenge tests are scalable with the size of data sets being a function of the largest HPL matrix for the tested system.

  6. Benchmarking and accounting for the (private) cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleman, J.; Schwickerath, U.

    2015-12-01

    During the past two years large parts of the CERN batch farm have been moved to virtual machines running on the CERN internal cloud. During this process a large fraction of the resources, which had previously been used as physical batch worker nodes, were converted into hypervisors. Due to the large spread of the per-core performance in the farm, caused by its heterogenous nature, it is necessary to have a good knowledge of the performance of the virtual machines. This information is used both for scheduling in the batch system and for accounting. While in the previous setup worker nodes were classified and benchmarked based on the purchase order number, for virtual batch worker nodes this is no longer possible; the information is now either hidden or hard to retrieve. Therefore we developed a new scheme to classify worker nodes according to their performance. The new scheme is flexible enough to be usable both for virtual and physical machines in the batch farm. With the new classification it is possible to have an estimation of the performance of worker nodes also in a very dynamic farm with worker nodes coming and going at a high rate, without the need to benchmark each new node again. An extension to public cloud resources is possible if all conditions under which the benchmark numbers have been obtained are fulfilled.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of CERES-Wheat model parameters based on EFAST method%基于EFAST方法的CERES-Wheat作物模型参数敏感性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张静潇; 苏伟

    2012-01-01

    为有效识别作物模型关键参数,减少模型模拟的不适用性,根据中国农业大学上庄实验站小麦田间实测数据,应用EFAST方法对CERES-Wheat模型输入参数进行定量的全局敏感性分析,分析小麦模拟产量对作物参数、土壤参数和田间管理参数变化的敏感性。结果表明:CERES-Wheat模型的作物品种型参数中,标准籽粒质量参数对模拟结果影响最大,而生态型参数中影响最大的是营养生长末期叶片面积质量比率;土壤参数中的矿化系数对模拟结果影响最显著;管理参数中的施氮量、播种日期、施肥日期、播种深度对模拟结果影响较显著。基于EFAST方法的敏感性分析对作物模型修正具有指导意义,可为确定模型关键参数及模型进一步优化提供参考依据。%In order to effectively identify the key parameters of crop models and reduce the inapplicability of model simulation,the Extend Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test(EFAST) was used to analyze the global sensitivity of CERES-Wheat model parameters in Shangzhuang experimental station of China Agricultural University in Beijing.The sensitivity of crop,soil and field management parameters was analyzed.The results of the sensitivity analysis showed that standard kernel size under optimum conditions had the greatest impact on the simulation wheat yields among crop cultivar parameters while lamina area to weight ratio of phase 2 was the most significant one in crop ecotype parameters.For soil parameters,nitrogen mineralized factor was the most critical input.The amount of nitrogenous fertilizer,planting date,fertilization date and planting depth among all of field management parameters had the most significant influence on the simulation results.The research showed that the global sensitivity analysis based on EFAST had guiding significance for crop model correction and provided reference for parameter selection and crop model optimization.

  8. State of the art: benchmarking microprocessors for embedded automotive applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Shaout

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking microprocessors provides a way for consumers to evaluate the performance of the processors. This is done by using either synthetic or real world applications. There are a number of benchmarks that exist today to assist consumers in evaluating the vast number of microprocessors that are available in the market. In this paper an investigation of the various benchmarks available for evaluating microprocessors for embedded automotive applications will be performed. We will provide an overview of the following benchmarks: Whetstone, Dhrystone, Linpack, standard performance evaluation corporation (SPEC CPU2006, embedded microprocessor benchmark consortium (EEMBC AutoBench and MiBench. A comparison of existing benchmarks will be given based on relevant characteristics of automotive applications which will give the proper recommendation when benchmarking processors for automotive applications.

  9. SPICE benchmark for global tomographic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yilong; Capdeville, Yann; Maupin, Valerie; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Lebedev, Sergei; Beucler, Eric

    2008-11-01

    The existing global tomographic methods result in different models due to different parametrization, scale resolution and theoretical approach. To test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and by the inadequacy of data quality and coverage, it is necessary to perform a global-scale benchmark to understand the resolving properties of each specific imaging algorithm. In the framework of the Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network (SPICE) project, it was decided to perform a benchmark experiment of global inversion algorithms. First, a preliminary benchmark with a simple isotropic model is carried out to check the feasibility in terms of acquisition geometry and numerical accuracy. Then, to fully validate tomographic schemes with a challenging synthetic data set, we constructed one complex anisotropic global model, which is characterized by 21 elastic constants and includes 3-D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy (radial and azimuthal anisotropy), attenuation, density, as well as surface topography and bathymetry. The intermediate-period (>32 s), high fidelity anisotropic modelling was performed by using state-of-the-art anisotropic anelastic modelling code, that is, coupled spectral element method (CSEM), on modern massively parallel computing resources. The benchmark data set consists of 29 events and three-component seismograms are recorded by 256 stations. Because of the limitation of the available computing power, synthetic seismograms have a minimum period of 32 s and a length of 10 500 s. The inversion of the benchmark data set demonstrates several well-known problems of classical surface wave tomography, such as the importance of crustal correction to recover the shallow structures, the loss of resolution with depth, the smearing effect, both horizontal and vertical, the inaccuracy of amplitude of isotropic S-wave velocity variation, the difficulty of retrieving the magnitude of azimuthal

  10. Exposed H2O-rich areas detected on Ceres with Dawn Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Jean-Philippe; Raponi, Andrea; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Tosi, Federico; Ammannito, Eleonora; Byrne, Shane; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Hayne, Paul O.; Hughson, Kynan Horace; Johnson, Katherine Ellen; Landis, Margaret E.; Mazarico, Erwan; McCord, Thomas B.; Pieters, Carle; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Singh, Sandeep; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.; VIR Team

    2016-10-01

    H2O-rich materials are exposed at the surface of Ceres as discovered from VIR spectra [1] of the Dawn mission [2]. Oxo crater exhibits the most diagnostic absorption bands of the H2O molecule at 1.65 and 1.28 µm [3]. These features exist in at least four other locations, and they are consistent with H2O ice mixed with low-albedo components [3,4]. Spectra of mineral hydrates such as salts are also characterized by H2O absorption overtones, however they do not fit VIR observations as well as H2O ice spectra. In order to further constrain the composition, the thermophysical and chemical stability of exposed H2O-rich compounds on Ceres and results from chemical models of Ceres interior are being investigated. One meter of pure H2O ice exposed to direct sunlight would sublimate within a few tens of years [5-7].The sublimation of a H2O ice-cemented regolith would leave a low-albedo lag deposit that would also decrease detectability over time [8]. All the reported H2O exposures occur at latitudes higher than 30°N in fresh craters near rim shadows, have surface area < 3 km2, and relatively high albedo.The exposed H2O ice observed by VIR is likely due to a recent impact or a landslide. In some occurrences, high-albedo materials observed within these shadows by the Framing Camera (FC) are contiguous to the observed H2O several of them could be in Permanently Shadowed Regions. The surface shape model and history of illumination will allow us to determine whether these areas could be cold traps where H2O ice could be preserved from sublimation [9].AcknowledgementsThe funding for this research was provided under the NASA Dawn mission through a subcontract 2090-S-MB516 from the University of California, Los Angeles and the Dawn Guest Investigator Program. The VIR instrument and VIR team are funded by ASI (Italian Space Agency) and INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica).References1. De Sanctis M.C. et al.,2011, SSR 1632. Russell C. T. et al., 2011, SSR 1633. Combe J-Ph. et al

  11. AIRS Water Vapor and Cloud Products Validate and Explain Recent Negative Global and Tropical OLR Trends Observed by CERES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susskind, Joel; Molnar, Gyula; Iredell, Lena

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares spatial and temporal anomalies and trends of OLR as observed by CERES and computed based on AIRS retrieved surface and atmospheric geophysical parameters over the time period September 2002 February 2010. This time period is marked by a substantial decreasing OLR trend on the order of -0.1 W/m2/yr averaged over the globe. There are very large spatial variations of these trends however, with local values ranging from -2.6 W/m2/yr to +3.0 W/m2/yr in the tropics. The spatial patterns of the AIRS and CERES trends are in essentially perfect agreement with each other, as are the anomaly time series averaged over different spatial regions. This essentially perfect agreement of OLR anomalies and trends derived from observations by two different instruments, in totally independent and different manners, implies that both sets of results must be highly accurate. The agreement of anomalies and trends of OLR as observed by CERES and computed from AIRS derived products also indirectly validates the anomalies and trends of the AIRS derived products as well. We used the anomalies and trends of AIRS derived water vapor and cloud products to explain why global OLR has had a large negative trend over the time period September 2002 through February 2010. Tropical OLR began to decrease significantly at the onset of a strong La Nina in mid-2007. AIRS products show that cloudiness and mid-tropospheric water vapor began to increase in the region 5degN - 20degS latitude extending eastward from 150degW - 30 E longitude at that time, with a corresponding very large drop in OLR in this region. Late 2009 is characterized by a strong El-Nino, with a corresponding change in sign of observed anomalies of mid-tropospheric water vapor, cloud cover, and OLR in this region, as we] l as that of OLR anomalies in the tropics and globally. Monthly mean anomalies of OLR, water vapor and cloud cover over this region are all shown to be highly correlated in time with those of an El Nino

  12. Next-Generation Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Calculation from the CERES Instruments: Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W.; Corbett, J.; Eitzen, Z.; Liang, L.

    2015-01-01

    The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes are critical components to advancing our understanding of the Earth's radiative energy balance, radiative effects of clouds and aerosols, and climate feedback. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments provide broadband shortwave and longwave radiance measurements. These radiances are converted to fluxes by using scene-type-dependent angular distribution models (ADMs). This paper describes the next-generation ADMs that are developed for Terra and Aqua using all available CERES rotating azimuth plane radiance measurements. Coincident cloud and aerosol retrievals, and radiance measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and meteorological parameters from Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) data assimilation version 5.4.1 are used to define scene type. CERES radiance measurements are stratified by scene type and by other parameters that are important for determining the anisotropy of the given scene type. Anisotropic factors are then defined either for discrete intervals of relevant parameters or as a continuous functions of combined parameters, depending on the scene type. Significant differences between the ADMs described in this paper and the existing ADMs are over clear-sky scene types and polar scene types. Over clear ocean, we developed a set of shortwave (SW) ADMs that explicitly account for aerosols. Over clear land, the SW ADMs are developed for every 1 latitude1 longitude region for every calendar month using a kernel-based bidirectional reflectance model. Over clear Antarctic scenes, SW ADMs are developed by accounting the effects of sastrugi on anisotropy. Over sea ice, a sea-ice brightness index is used to classify the scene type. Under cloudy conditions over all surface types, the longwave (LW) and window (WN) ADMs are developed by combining surface and cloud-top temperature, surface and cloud emissivity, cloud fraction, and precipitable water

  13. 基于CERES-Maize模型的玉米遗传参数优化及验证%Optimization and Validation of Genetic Parameters of Maize Based on CERES-Maize Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范铭丰; 武伟; 刘洪斌

    2010-01-01

    利用玉米生长观测资料、气象资料、土壤资料、田间管理资料,采用CERES-Maize模型对玉米进行应用研究.首先运用均匀设计进行数值模拟,并对模拟结果进行回归分析,根据模拟及优化结果选取最佳的遗传参数,最后通过模型对玉米的产量、每平方米粒数、生育期模拟值和观测值间的比较,结果表明总体上模型模拟值和观测值之间具有很好的一致性.

  14. The performance of regional simulation of CERES-Rice model and its uncertainties%站点CERES-Rice模型区域应用效果和误差来源

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊伟

    2009-01-01

    作物区域模拟是利用有限的空间数据,最大限度地反映出生育期、产量等作物性状的时空变化规律.由于目前的作物模型大多是田间尺度的站点模型,把它运用到区域水平的效果如何研究甚少.文章利用CERES-Rice模型,对作物模型在我国的区域应用效果进行了分析.首先利用田间观测数据在各实验点上对模型进行了详细的站点校准,以验证模型在我国的模拟能力;然后以我国水稻生态区(精确到亚区)为单位,运用均方根差(RMSE)法进行了区域校准和验证;最后利用区域校准后的CERES-Rice模型,模拟了1980~2000年的网格(50km×50km)水稻产量,并与同期农调队调查产量进行统计比较,以验证区域应用的效果,为区域模拟的推广和应用提供参考.结果表明:经过空间校准后的CERES-Rice模型,在水稻的主产区1~4区(占种植面积的95%)模拟的平均产量与调查产量相对均方根差在22%以内,两者的符合度也较好,个别区域(5、6) RMSE%在24%~30%之间;1980~2000年水稻各产区模拟的平均产量与调查产量随时间变化趋势也具有一定的一致性;全国1896个网格中,大部分网格(71.01%)模拟的21年水稻年产量与调查产量的RMSE%在30%之内,且大部分分布在水稻主产区,考虑到水稻种植面积的权重后,认为利用区域校准和验证后的CERES-Rice模型进行水稻区域模拟,可以反映出产量的时空分布特征,能够为宏观决策提供相应的信息.但目前区域模拟中还存在着一定的误差,有待今后进一步研究.

  15. CERES-Rice模型在中国主要水稻生态区的模拟及其检验%Simulation and Validation of CERES-Rice Model in Main Rice Ecological Zones in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚凤梅; 许吟隆; 冯强; 林而达; 延晓冬

    2005-01-01

    本文利用水稻生长观测资料和气象资料,采用CERES-Rice模型在中国主要稻区开展应用研究,对水稻产量、开花期和生物量等的模拟能力进行了评价.所选试验站点分布在不同的水稻生态区,地跨北纬20°02'(海南海口)至北纬45°45'(黑龙江五常).结果表明,在不同的水稻生态区,CERES-Rice模型模拟水稻开花期、每平方米粒数、单位产量及生物量的误差在合理的范围内,其中模拟开花期分布在-10%~+15%的相对误差线内,模拟产量分布在-15%~+20%相对误差范围内,模拟和观测值的分布具有很好的一致性.如果考虑田间观测10%~15%的误差,且排除害虫和病害的影响可得出以下结论:在中国不同水稻生态区,应用文中的水稻品种,该模型能够合理模拟水稻开花期、产量、生物量及产量构成要素(每平方米粒数).

  16. INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY TRAINING AS A BASE-BENCHMARKING PROJECT

    OpenAIRE

    Наталья Николаевна Масюк; Петр Владимирович Петрищев

    2013-01-01

    Integration of universities in the international educational space includes not only the usual attraction of foreign students, but also the interaction with the best universities in the world in the field of knowledge with a view to the mutual agreement of all kinds. To do this, at the preliminary stage is implemented benchmarking project to study the experience of best practices.Objective: To study the international experience of training in the hospitality industry.Method or the methodology...

  17. Sensitivity Studies for the Exercise I-1 of the OECD/UAM Benchmark

    OpenAIRE

    Canuti, E.; Petruzzi, A.; F. D'Auria; Kozlowski, T.

    2012-01-01

    OECD/NEA has initiated an international Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) benchmark focused on uncertainties in modeling of Light Water Reactor (LWR). The first step of uncertainty propagation is to perform sensitivity to the input data affected by the numerical errors and physical models. The objective of the present paper is to study the effect of the numerical discretization error and the manufacturing tolerances on fuel pin lattice integral parameters (multiplication factor and macro...

  18. Benchmarking D and D procurement best practices at four commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has as two of its strategic objectives to safely accomplish the world's largest environmental clean-up of contaminated sites and the adoption of the best management practices of the private sector to achieve business-like results efficiently and effectively. An integral part of the strategic response to the challenges facing the Department has been the use of benchmarking and best practice management to facilitate identifying and implementing leading-edge thinking, practices, approaches, and solutions

  19. Continuum discretization methods in a composite-particle scattering off a nucleus: the benchmark calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsova, O A; Moro, A M

    2008-01-01

    The direct comparison of two different continuum discretization methods towards the solution of a composite particle scattering off a nucleus is presented. The first approach -- the Continumm-Discretized Coupled Channel method -- is based on the differential equation formalism, while the second one -- the Wave-Packet Continuum Discretization method -- uses the integral equation formulation for the composite-particle scattering problem. As benchmark calculations we have chosen the deuteron off \

  20. Peculiarity by Modeling of the Control Rod Movement by the Kalinin-3 Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents an important part of the results of the OECD/NEA benchmark transient 'Switching off one main circulation pump at nominal power' analyzed as a boundary condition problem by the coupled system code ATHLET-BIPR-VVER. Some observations and comparisons with measured data for integral reactor parameters are discussed. Special attention is paid on the modeling and comparisons performed for the control rod movement and the reactor power history. (Authors)

  1. A Uranium Bioremediation Reactive Transport Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Sengor, Sevinc; Fang, Yilin

    2015-06-01

    A reactive transport benchmark problem set has been developed based on in situ uranium bio-immobilization experiments that have been performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, USA. Acetate-amended groundwater stimulates indigenous microorganisms to catalyze the reduction of U(VI) to a sparingly soluble U(IV) mineral. The interplay between the flow, acetate loading periods and rates, microbially-mediated and geochemical reactions leads to dynamic behavior in metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, pH, alkalinity, and reactive mineral surfaces. The benchmark is based on an 8.5 m long one-dimensional model domain with constant saturated flow and uniform porosity. The 159-day simulation introduces acetate and bromide through the upgradient boundary in 14-day and 85-day pulses separated by a 10 day interruption. Acetate loading is tripled during the second pulse, which is followed by a 50 day recovery period. Terminal electron accepting processes for goethite, phyllosilicate Fe(III), U(VI), and sulfate are modeled using Monod-type rate laws. Major ion geochemistry modeled includes mineral reactions, as well as aqueous and surface complexation reactions for UO2++, Fe++, and H+. In addition to the dynamics imparted by the transport of the acetate pulses, U(VI) behavior involves the interplay between bioreduction, which is dependent on acetate availability, and speciation-controlled surface complexation, which is dependent on pH, alkalinity and available surface complexation sites. The general difficulty of this benchmark is the large number of reactions (74), multiple rate law formulations, a multisite uranium surface complexation model, and the strong interdependency and sensitivity of the reaction processes. Results are presented for three simulators: HYDROGEOCHEM, PHT3D, and PHREEQC.

  2. Towards Systematic Benchmarking of Climate Model Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleckler, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The process by which climate models are evaluated has evolved substantially over the past decade, with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) serving as a centralizing activity for coordinating model experimentation and enabling research. Scientists with a broad spectrum of expertise have contributed to the CMIP model evaluation process, resulting in many hundreds of publications that have served as a key resource for the IPCC process. For several reasons, efforts are now underway to further systematize some aspects of the model evaluation process. First, some model evaluation can now be considered routine and should not require "re-inventing the wheel" or a journal publication simply to update results with newer models. Second, the benefit of CMIP research to model development has not been optimal because the publication of results generally takes several years and is usually not reproducible for benchmarking newer model versions. And third, there are now hundreds of model versions and many thousands of simulations, but there is no community-based mechanism for routinely monitoring model performance changes. An important change in the design of CMIP6 can help address these limitations. CMIP6 will include a small set standardized experiments as an ongoing exercise (CMIP "DECK": ongoing Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima), so that modeling groups can submit them at any time and not be overly constrained by deadlines. In this presentation, efforts to establish routine benchmarking of existing and future CMIP simulations will be described. To date, some benchmarking tools have been made available to all CMIP modeling groups to enable them to readily compare with CMIP5 simulations during the model development process. A natural extension of this effort is to make results from all CMIP simulations widely available, including the results from newer models as soon as the simulations become available for research. Making the results from routine

  3. Prevalencia de hiperlipidemia en niños y adolescentes de la provincia de Cáceres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prieto Albino Luis

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Actualmente se considera al factor lipídico como el principal responsable del riesgo cardiovascular del individuo joven, factor ya presente en la infancia en proporciones preocupantes y crecientes como parecen mostrar diversos estudios nacionales. En el presente trabajo se analiza la prevalencia de hiperlipidemia en niños de la provincia de Cáceres según diversos criterios, describiendo los cambios según grupos de edad y sexo, y comparando los resultados globales con otros estudios autóctonos. MÉTODO: Estudio descriptivo transversal de una muestra representativa y proporcional de 2.150 niños (2 a 16 años de la provincia de Cáceres (N=91.083. Se determina: colesterol total, fracciones, apolipoproteinas y cocientes de riesgo (técnica enzimática. RESULTADOS: El 27.9% de los niños presenta valores de colesterol total >200 mg/dl.; 7.5% de las mujeres y 4.7% de los varones muestran cifras superiores a 230 mg/dl. Niveles de C-LDL>130 mg/dl. aparecen en un 26.4%, de Apo-B>75 mg/dl en el 65.5% y de C-NO-HDL>165 en el 8.4%. Un C-HDL3.5 y LDL/HDL>2.2 se mostraron en el 36.1% y en el 39.8% respectivamente. La prevalencia de hiperlipidemia es superior en mujeres y etapas prepuberales. CONCLUSIONES: De forma global, e independientemente del criterio utilizado, la proporción de casos de hiperlipidemia es elevada y superior a la referida en otros estudios españoles. La prevalencia de hiperlipidemia es mayor en mujeres prepuberales, mostrándose los cocientes de riesgo mas discriminativos e identificando mejor el cambio del perfil lipídico puberal.

  4. BEGAFIP. Programming service, development and benchmark calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes improvements to BEGAFIP (the Swedish equivalent to the Oak Ridge computer code ORIGEN). The improvements are: addition of a subroutine making it possible to calculate neutron sources, exchange of fission yields and branching ratios in the data library to those published by Meek and Rider in 1978. In addition, BENCHMARK-calculations have been made with BEGAFIP as well as with ORIGEN regarding the build-up of actinides for a fuel burnup of 33 MWd/kg U. The results were compared to those arrived upon from the more sophisticated code CASMO. (author)

  5. An OpenMP Compiler Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias S. Müller

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this benchmark is to propose several optimization techniques and to test their existence in current OpenMP compilers. Examples are the removal of redundant synchronization constructs, effective constructs for alternative code and orphaned directives. The effectiveness of the compiler generated code is measured by comparing different OpenMP constructs and compilers. If possible, we also compare with the hand coded "equivalent" solution. Six out of seven proposed optimization techniques are already implemented in different compilers. However, most compilers implement only one or two of them.

  6. Benchmarks for multicomponent diffusion and electrochemical migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasouli, Pejman; Steefel, Carl I.; Mayer, K. Ulrich;

    2015-01-01

    In multicomponent electrolyte solutions, the tendency of ions to diffuse at different rates results in a charge imbalance that is counteracted by the electrostatic coupling between charged species leading to a process called “electrochemical migration” or “electromigration.” Although not commonly...... not been published to date. This contribution provides a set of three benchmark problems that demonstrate the effect of electric coupling during multicomponent diffusion and electrochemical migration and at the same time facilitate the intercomparison of solutions from existing reactive transport codes...

  7. Benchmarks in Tacit Knowledge Skills Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tackney, Charles T.; Strömgren, Ole; Sato, Toyoko

    2006-01-01

    experience more empowering of essential tacit knowledge skills than that found in educational institutions in other national settings. We specify the program forms and procedures for consensus-based governance and group work (as benchmarks) that demonstrably instruct undergraduates in the tacit skill...... of an undergraduate business school education. This paper presents case analysis of the research-oriented participatory education curriculum developed at Copenhagen Business School because it appears uniquely suited, by a curious mix of Danish education tradition and deliberate innovation, to offer an educational...

  8. COVE 2A Benchmarking calculations using NORIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six steady-state and six transient benchmarking calculations have been performed, using the finite element code NORIA, to simulate one-dimensional infiltration into Yucca Mountain. These calculations were made to support the code verification (COVE 2A) activity for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. COVE 2A evaluates the usefulness of numerical codes for analyzing the hydrology of the potential Yucca Mountain site. Numerical solutions for all cases were found to be stable. As expected, the difficulties and computer-time requirements associated with obtaining solutions increased with infiltration rate. 10 refs., 128 figs., 5 tabs

  9. ABM11 parton distributions and benchmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhin, Sergey [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Protvino (Russian Federation); Bluemlein, Johannes; Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    We present a determination of the nucleon parton distribution functions (PDFs) and of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD based on the world data for deep-inelastic scattering and the fixed-target data for the Drell-Yan process. The analysis is performed in the fixed-flavor number scheme for n{sub f}=3,4,5 and uses the MS scheme for {alpha}{sub s} and the heavy quark masses. The fit results are compared with other PDFs and used to compute the benchmark cross sections at hadron colliders to the NNLO accuracy.

  10. Benchmarking analysis of three multimedia models: RESRAD, MMSOILS, and MEPAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multimedia modelers from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) collaborated to conduct a comprehensive and quantitative benchmarking analysis of three multimedia models. The three models-RESRAD (DOE), MMSOILS (EPA), and MEPAS (DOE)-represent analytically based tools that are used by the respective agencies for performing human exposure and health risk assessments. The study is performed by individuals who participate directly in the ongoing design, development, and application of the models. A list of physical/chemical/biological processes related to multimedia-based exposure and risk assessment is first presented as a basis for comparing the overall capabilities of RESRAD, MMSOILS, and MEPAS. Model design, formulation, and function are then examined by applying the models to a series of hypothetical problems. Major components of the models (e.g., atmospheric, surface water, groundwater) are evaluated separately and then studied as part of an integrated system for the assessment of a multimedia release scenario to determine effects due to linking components of the models. Seven modeling scenarios are used in the conduct of this benchmarking study: (1) direct biosphere exposure, (2) direct release to the air, (3) direct release to the vadose zone, (4) direct release to the saturated zone, (5) direct release to surface water, (6) surface water hydrology, and (7) multimedia release. Study results show that the models differ with respect to (1) environmental processes included (i.e., model features) and (2) the mathematical formulation and assumptions related to the implementation of solutions (i.e., parameterization)

  11. Citizen Science participation in the NASA CERES Students' Cloud Observations Online Project (S'COOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, P. M.; Moore, S.; Crecelius, S.; Rogerson, T.; Chambers, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    ground truth data for CERES the 3 satellites currently carrying those instruments provide several options for scheduling. Should the citizen scientist be of school age, the student will be able to take the skills learned with the S'COOL project from the backyard to the classroom - or vice versa. S'COOL has attracted some unique citizen scientists over the years, providing ground truth observations from several unique locations. These include a group that circumnavigated the American continents, a woman who has rowed solo across all the world's oceans, and planned participation this fall from several Pacific research cruises. Classroom students turn ROVER observers, or citizen scientists that observe from varying locations, help over summer breaks and vacations. This is the case with a dedicated Connecticut elementary classroom that observes clouds as a class and is assigned summer work as roving observers to continue the data collection over their break. Outcomes: This paper will summarize the S'COOL project's experience with a variety of citizen scientists over the course of activities to date.

  12. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-3 Dantu Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneissl, Thomas; Schmedemann, Nico; Neesemann, Adrian; Williams, David A.; Crown, David A.; Mest, Scott C.; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Frigeri, Allessandro; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Hiesinger, Harald; Walter, Sebastian H. G.; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Kersten, Elke; Naß, Andrea; Nathues, Andreas; Platz, Thomas; Russell, Chistopher T.

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres similar to that done for Vesta [1,2], including production of a Survey- and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO)-based global map and a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. In this abstract we discuss the geologic evolution of the Ac-H-3 Dantu Quadrangle. The current map is based on a Framing Camera (FC) clear-filter image mosaic from HAMO data (~140 m/px) as well as a digital terrain model (DTM) derived from imagery of the Survey phase [3]. Albedo variations were identified and mapped using a mosaic of photometrically corrected HAMO images provided by DLR. FC color images provided further context for map unit identification. LAMO images (35m/pixel), which have just become available at the time of writing, will be used to update the map to be presented as a poster. The quadrangle is located between 21-66°N and 90-180°E in a large-scale depression north of the impact basin Kerwan. The northern and southeastern parts of the quadrangle are characterized by cratered terrain while the south and southwest are dominated by the partially smooth ejecta blankets of craters Dantu and Gaue. East-west oriented pit/crater chains in the southern half of the quadrangle might be related to tectonic processes [4,5]. Dantu crater (d=~126 km) is a complex impact crater showing slump terraces and a partially smooth crater floor with concentric and radial fractures. Furthermore, Dantu shows a central pit structure with pitted terrain on its floor as well as several bright spots in the interior and exterior of the crater. High-resolution measurements of crater size-frequency distributions (CSFDs) superposed on Dantu indicate a formation/modification age of ~200 - 700 Ma. Most of the ejecta appear to be relatively bright and correspond to parts of the #2 high albedo region observed with the Hubble Space Telescope [6]. However, the southwestern portion of the ejecta blanket is

  13. Benchmark Evaluation of the HTR-PROTEUS Absorber Rod Worths (Core 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-06-01

    PROTEUS was a zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. The critical assembly was constructed from a large graphite annulus surrounding a central cylindrical cavity. Various experimental programs were investigated in PROTEUS; during the years 1992 through 1996, it was configured as a pebble-bed reactor and designated HTR-PROTEUS. Various critical configurations were assembled with each accompanied by an assortment of reactor physics experiments including differential and integral absorber rod measurements, kinetics, reaction rate distributions, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects [1]. Four benchmark reports were previously prepared and included in the March 2013 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook) [2] evaluating eleven critical configurations. A summary of that effort was previously provided [3] and an analysis of absorber rod worth measurements for Cores 9 and 10 have been performed prior to this analysis and included in PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-004 [4]. In the current benchmark effort, absorber rod worths measured for Core Configuration 4, which was the only core with a randomly-packed pebble loading, have been evaluated for inclusion as a revision to the HTR-PROTEUS benchmark report PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-002.

  14. TRIPOLI-4® - MCNP5 ITER A-lite neutronic model benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaboulay, J.-C.; Cayla, P.-Y.; Fausser, C.; Lee, Y.-K.; Trama, J.-C.; Li-Puma, A.

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the capability of TRIPOLI-4®, the CEA Monte Carlo code, to model a large-scale fusion reactor with complex neutron source and geometry. In the past, numerous benchmarks were conducted for TRIPOLI-4® assessment on fusion applications. Experiments (KANT, OKTAVIAN, FNG) analysis and numerical benchmarks (between TRIPOLI-4® and MCNP5) on the HCLL DEMO2007 and ITER models were carried out successively. In this previous ITER benchmark, nevertheless, only the neutron wall loading was analyzed, its main purpose was to present MCAM (the FDS Team CAD import tool) extension for TRIPOLI-4®. Starting from this work a more extended benchmark has been performed about the estimation of neutron flux, nuclear heating in the shielding blankets and tritium production rate in the European TBMs (HCLL and HCPB) and it is presented in this paper. The methodology to build the TRIPOLI-4® A-lite model is based on MCAM and the MCNP A-lite model (version 4.1). Simplified TBMs (from KIT) have been integrated in the equatorial-port. Comparisons of neutron wall loading, flux, nuclear heating and tritium production rate show a good agreement between the two codes. Discrepancies are mainly included in the Monte Carlo codes statistical error.

  15. Building with Benchmarks: The Role of the District in Philadelphia's Benchmark Assessment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulkley, Katrina E.; Christman, Jolley Bruce; Goertz, Margaret E.; Lawrence, Nancy R.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, interim assessments have become an increasingly popular tool in districts seeking to improve student learning and achievement. Philadelphia has been at the forefront of this change, implementing a set of Benchmark assessments aligned with its Core Curriculum district-wide in 2004. In this article, we examine the overall context…

  16. Development of a California commercial building benchmarking database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2002-05-17

    Building energy benchmarking is a useful starting point for commercial building owners and operators to target energy savings opportunities. There are a number of tools and methods for benchmarking energy use. Benchmarking based on regional data can provides more relevant information for California buildings than national tools such as Energy Star. This paper discusses issues related to benchmarking commercial building energy use and the development of Cal-Arch, a building energy benchmarking database for California. Currently Cal-Arch uses existing survey data from California's Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), a largely underutilized wealth of information collected by California's major utilities. Doe's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is used by a similar tool, Arch, and by a number of other benchmarking tools. Future versions of Arch/Cal-Arch will utilize additional data sources including modeled data and individual buildings to expand the database.

  17. Simulation of transient viscoelastic flow with second order time integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    1995-01-01

    The Lagrangian Integral Method (LIM) for the simulation of time-dependent flow of viscoelastic fluids is extended to second order accuracy in the time integration. The method is tested on the established sphere in a cylinder benchmark problem.......The Lagrangian Integral Method (LIM) for the simulation of time-dependent flow of viscoelastic fluids is extended to second order accuracy in the time integration. The method is tested on the established sphere in a cylinder benchmark problem....

  18. Benchmark results in vector atmospheric radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper seven vector radiative transfer codes are inter-compared for the case of underlying black surface. They include three techniques based on the discrete ordinate method (DOM), two Monte-Carlo methods, the successive orders scattering method, and a modified doubling-adding technique. It was found that all codes give very similar results. Therefore, we were able to produce benchmark results for the Stokes parameters both for reflected and transmitted light in the cases of molecular, aerosol and cloudy multiply scattering media. It was assumed that the single scattering albedo is equal to one. Benchmark results have been provided by several studies before, including Coulson et al., Garcia and Siewert, Wauben and Hovenier, and Natraj et al. among others. However, the case of the elongated phase functions such as for a cloud and with a high angular resolution is presented here for the first time. Also in difference with other studies, we make inter-comparisons using several codes for the same input dataset, which enables us to quantify the corresponding errors more accurately.

  19. Benchmark analysis of KRITZ-2 critical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the KRITZ-2 critical experiments, criticality and pin power distributions were measured at room temperature and high temperature (about 245 degC) for three different cores (KRITZ-2:1, KRITZ-2:13, KRITZ-2:19) loading slightly enriched UO2 or MOX fuels. Recently, international benchmark problems were provided by ORNL and OECD/NEA based on the KRITZ-2 experimental data. The published experimental data for the system with slightly enriched fuels at high temperature are rare in the world and they are valuable for nuclear data testing. Thus, the benchmark analysis was carried out with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MVP and its four nuclear data libraries based on JENDL-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI.8. As a result, fairly good agreements with the experimental data were obtained with any libraries for the pin power distributions. However, the JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI.8 give under-prediction of criticality and too negative isothermal temperature coefficients for slightly enriched UO2 cores, although the older nuclear data JENDL-3.2 and JEF-2.2 give rather good agreements with the experimental data. From the detailed study with an infinite unit cell model, it was found that the differences among the results with different libraries are mainly due to the different fission cross section of U-235 in the energy range below 1.0 eV. (author)

  20. Simple mathematical law benchmarks human confrontations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Medina, Pablo; Zhao, Guannan; Messinger, Daniel S.; Horgan, John; Gill, Paul; Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Mattson, Whitney; Gangi, Devon; Qi, Hong; Manrique, Pedro; Velasquez, Nicolas; Morgenstern, Ana; Restrepo, Elvira; Johnson, Nicholas; Spagat, Michael; Zarama, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Many high-profile societal problems involve an individual or group repeatedly attacking another - from child-parent disputes, sexual violence against women, civil unrest, violent conflicts and acts of terror, to current cyber-attacks on national infrastructure and ultrafast cyber-trades attacking stockholders. There is an urgent need to quantify the likely severity and timing of such future acts, shed light on likely perpetrators, and identify intervention strategies. Here we present a combined analysis of multiple datasets across all these domains which account for >100,000 events, and show that a simple mathematical law can benchmark them all. We derive this benchmark and interpret it, using a minimal mechanistic model grounded by state-of-the-art fieldwork. Our findings provide quantitative predictions concerning future attacks; a tool to help detect common perpetrators and abnormal behaviors; insight into the trajectory of a `lone wolf' identification of a critical threshold for spreading a message or idea among perpetrators; an intervention strategy to erode the most lethal clusters; and more broadly, a quantitative starting point for cross-disciplinary theorizing about human aggression at the individual and group level, in both real and online worlds.