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Sample records for cerenkov radiation imaging

  1. The HERMES dual-radiator ring imaging Cerenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akopov, N Z; Bailey, K; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Capitani, G P; Carter, P; Cisbani, E; De Leo, R; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Filippone, B W; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Hansen, J O; Hommez, B; Iodice, M; Jackson, H E; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kowalczyk, R; Lagamba, L; Maas, A; Muccifora, V; Nappi, E; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; O'Connor, T; O'Neill, T G; Potterveld, D H; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sato, F; Schwind, A; Shibata, T A; Suetsugu, K; Thomas, E; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van de Kerckhove, K; Van de Vyver, R; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G; Zhang, L F

    2002-01-01

    The construction and use of a dual radiator Ring Imaging Cerenkov(RICH) detector is described. This instrument was developed for the HERMES experiment at DESY which emphasizes measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. It provides particle identification for pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range from 2 to 15 GeV, which is essential to these studies. The instrument uses two radiators, C4F10, a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality. The photon detector consists of 1934 photomultiplier tubes for each detector half, held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet.

  2. Cerenkov radiation imaging as a method for quantitative measurements of beta particles in a microfluidic chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been observed that microfluidic chips used for synthesizing 18F-labeled compounds demonstrate visible light emission without nearby scintillators or fluorescent materials. The origin of the light was investigated and found to be consistent with the emission characteristics from Cerenkov radiation. Since 18F decays through the emission of high-energy positrons, the energy threshold for beta particles, i.e. electrons or positrons, to generate Cerenkov radiation was calculated for water and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the most commonly used polymer-based material for microfluidic chips. Beta particles emitted from 18F have a continuous energy spectrum, with a maximum energy that exceeds this energy threshold for both water and PDMS. In addition, the spectral characteristics of the emitted light from 18F in distilled water were also measured, yielding a broad distribution from 300 nm to 700 nm, with higher intensity at shorter wavelengths. A photograph of the 18F solution showed a bluish-white light emitted from the solution, further suggesting Cerenkov radiation. In this study, the feasibility of using this Cerenkov light emission as a method for quantitative measurements of the radioactivity within the microfluidic chip in situ was evaluated. A detector previously developed for imaging microfluidic platforms was used. The detector consisted of a charge-coupled device (CCD) optically coupled to a lens. The system spatial resolution, minimum detectable activity and dynamic range were evaluated. In addition, the calibration of a Cerenkov signal versus activity concentration in the microfluidic chip was determined. This novel method of Cerenkov radiation measurements will provide researchers with a simple yet robust quantitative imaging tool for microfluidic applications utilizing beta particles.

  3. The Track Imaging Cerenkov Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wissel, S A; Cunningham, J D; Drake, G; Hays, E; Horan, D; Kieda, D; Kovacs, E; Magill, S; Nodulman, L; Swordy, S P; Wagner, R; Wakely, S P

    2011-01-01

    We describe a dedicated cosmic-ray telescope that explores a new method for detecting Cerenkov radiation from high-energy primary cosmic rays and the large particle air shower they induce upon entering the atmosphere. Using a camera comprising 16 multi-anode photomultiplier tubes for a total of 256 pixels, the Track Imaging Cerenkov Experiment (TrICE) resolves substructures in particle air showers with 0.086 degree resolution. Cerenkov radiation is imaged using a novel two-part optical system in which a Fresnel lens provides a wide-field optical trigger and a mirror system collects delayed light with four times the magnification. TrICE records well-resolved cosmic-ray air showers at rates ranging between 0.01-0.1 Hz.

  4. Cerenkov Radiation as a New In Vivo Imaging Modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Nicole; Ali, Rehan; Noll, J. Matt; Graves, Edward

    2011-04-01

    Čerenkov radiation has been used in particle detectors for years, but has recently been ``rediscovered'' by biologists working with radioactive isotopes. Čerenkov Light Imaging (CLI) can be done with CCD devices typically used for fluorescence or bioluminescence imaging. This provides the first opportunity for in vivo imaging of beta emitting isotopes, such as those used for radiation therapy. The GEANT4 simulation package has been used to simulate the properties and limitations of CLI. The simulation begins with the radioactive decay, generates the Čerenkov photons, propagates the optical light through tissue and other materials, and allows for different detection geometries. The simulation results are compared to in vivo and in vitro data taken in the Stanford Small Animal Imaging Core Facility.

  5. Cerenkov radiation allows in vivo optical imaging of positron emitting radiotracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; D'Ambrosio, Daniela; Calderan, Laura; Marengo, Mario; Sbarbati, Andrea; Boschi, Federico

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we showed that Cerenkov radiation (CR) escaping from the surface of small living animals injected with 18F-FDG can be detected with optical imaging techniques. 18F decays by emitting positrons with a maximum energy of 0.635 MeV; such positrons, when travelling into tissues faster than the speed of light in the same medium, are responsible of CR emission. A detailed model of the CR spectrum considering the positron energy spectrum was developed in order to quantify the amount of light emission. The results presented in this work were obtained using a commercial optical imager equipped with charged coupled detectors (CCD). Our data open the door to optical imaging (OI) in vivo of the glucose metabolism, at least in pre-clinical research. We found that the heart and bladder can be clearly identified in the animal body reflecting the accumulation of the 18F-FDG. Moreover, we describe two different methods based on the spectral analysis of the CR that can be used to estimate the depth of the source inside the animal. We conclude that 18F-FDG can be employed as it is as a bimodal tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) and OI techniques. Our results are encouraging, suggesting that it could be possible to apply the proposed approach not only to β+ but also to pure β- emitters.

  6. Cerenkov radiation allows in vivo optical imaging of positron emitting radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we showed that Cerenkov radiation (CR) escaping from the surface of small living animals injected with 18F-FDG can be detected with optical imaging techniques. 18F decays by emitting positrons with a maximum energy of 0.635 MeV; such positrons, when travelling into tissues faster than the speed of light in the same medium, are responsible of CR emission. A detailed model of the CR spectrum considering the positron energy spectrum was developed in order to quantify the amount of light emission. The results presented in this work were obtained using a commercial optical imager equipped with charged coupled detectors (CCD). Our data open the door to optical imaging (OI) in vivo of the glucose metabolism, at least in pre-clinical research. We found that the heart and bladder can be clearly identified in the animal body reflecting the accumulation of the 18F-FDG. Moreover, we describe two different methods based on the spectral analysis of the CR that can be used to estimate the depth of the source inside the animal. We conclude that 18F-FDG can be employed as it is as a bimodal tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) and OI techniques. Our results are encouraging, suggesting that it could be possible to apply the proposed approach not only to β+ but also to pure β- emitters.

  7. TH-C-17A-02: New Radioluminescence Strategies Based On CRET (Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer) for Imaging and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volotskova, O; Sun, C; Pratx, G; Xing, L [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov photons are produced when charged particles, emitted from radionuclides, travel through a media with a speed greater than that of the light in the media. Cerenkov radiation is mostly in the UV/Blue region and, thus, readily absorbed by biological tissue. Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) is a wavelength-shifting phenomenon from blue Cerenkov light to more penetrating red wavelengths. We demonstrate the feasibility of in-depth imaging of CRET light originating from radionuclides realized by down conversion of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs, a novel particle composed of few atoms of gold coated with serum proteins) in vivo. Methods: Bovine Serum Albumin, Human Serum Albumin and Transferrin conjugated gold nanoclusters were synthesized, characterized and examined for CRET. Three different clinically used radiotracers: 18F-FDG, 90Y and 99mTc were used. Optical spectrum (440–750 nm) was recorded by sensitive bioluminescence imaging system at physiological temperature. Dose dependence (activity range from 0.5 up to 800uCi) and concentration dependence (0.01 to 1uM) studies were carried out. The compound was also imaged in a xenograft mouse model. Results: Only β+ and β--emitting radionuclides (18F-FDG, 90Y) are capable of CRET; no signal was found in 99mTc (γ-emitter). The emission peak of CRET by AuNCs was found to be ∼700 nm and was ∼3 fold times of background. In vitro studies showed a linear dependency between luminescence intensity and dose and concentration. CRET by gold nanoclusters was observed in xenografted mice injected with 100uCi of 18F-FDG. Conclusion: The unique optical, transport and chemical properties of AuNCs (gold nanoclusters) make them ideal candidates for in-vivo imaging applications. Development of new molecular imaging probes will allow us to achieve substantially improved spatiotemporal resolution, sensitivity and specificity for tumor imaging and detection.

  8. Multimodality imaging of 131I uptake in nude mice thyroid based on Cerenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To perform the multimodality 131I thyroid imaging using Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) and gamma imaging, and to compare the results of CLT and gamma imaging. Methods The nude mice (n=4, mass: (21 ±3) g) were injected with 1.67 ×107 Bq 131I. CLT and gamma imaging were acquired at 0.5, 3, 12 and 24 h after the injection. Three-dimensional biodistribution of 131I uptake in thyroid was reconstructed using Cerenkov source reconstruction method based on the diffusion equation (DE), and the reconstructed power of 131I in different acquisition time points was obtained. Additionally, the ROIs were drawn over the gamma images of the mouse neck, and the counts were read. The correlation between the reconstructed power of CLT and gamma ray counts of gamma imaging was analyzed. Results: The power of 131I uptake in thyroid at 0.5, 3, 12 and 24 h were 7.80 ×10-13, 1.62×10-12, 2.20×10-12 and 2.68 × 10-12 W, respectively. CLT results showed that reconstructed power increased with the increasing of acquisition time. Gamma imaging results indicated that 131I uptake decreased in abdomen and increased in thyroid with the collection time. The results of CLT were consistent with that of gamma imaging (r2=0.7620, P<0.05). Conclusion: CLT has the potential to identify and monitor functioning thyroid tissue at before and (or) after 131I treatment. (authors)

  9. The technique of Cerenkov ring image detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged particles with an energy between 2 GeV and 25 GeV can be identified in the DELPHI barrel RICH detector by using the technique of Cerenkov ring image detection. The method of identification is based on a determination of the Cerenkov angle by measuring the positions of the emitted Cerenkov photons to high precision in a photon detector. The resolution in the photon that can be obtained depends mainly on the chromatic dispersion in the radiators and on the resolution in the photon detector is used in the barrel RICH in combination with two radiators. The photon detector consists of 48 drift tubes, constructed from quarz plates, each equipped with a wire chamber at the end. The drift gas with which the tubes are filled contains a small admixture of TMAE vapour from which the Cerenkov photons can liberate photoelectrons. It is shown in this thesis that an efficient photon detection and an accurate localization of the photon conversion points is possible. The spatial resolution of the photon detector is determind by the resolution of the wire chambe, the accuracy of the drift measurement, the distortions in the paths of the drifting electrons. The resolution of the wire chamber has been measured to be 0.8 mm in the x- and 1.7 mm in the y-coordinate. The error in the z-coordinate introduced by the drift time measurement is 0.2 mm. The distortions in the paths of the drifting electrons have been measured both in the x and y-direction. The longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients have been measured as a function of the field strength for two different drift gas mixtures. (author). 96 refs.; 61 figs.; 11 tabs

  10. A search for x-ray Cerenkov radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Fritchie, William Robert

    1985-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Cerenkov x-ray emissions should not exist in media where the index of refraction is less than unity. In previous work, x-ray Cerenkov radiation at the K absorption edge of aluminum was reported to have been observed. The present experiment observed no x-ray Cerenkov radiation. However, radiation not characteristic of the Cerenkov mechanism was seen. The results of the experiment are provided. Various aspects of an experiment designed t...

  11. The SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe test beam results from a prototype Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The system includes both liquid and gas radiators, a long drift box containing gaseous TMAE and a proportional wire chamber with charge division readout. Measurements of the multiplicity and detection resolution of Cerenkov photons, from both radiators are presented. Various design aspects of a new engineering prototype, currently under construction, are discussed and recent R and D results relevant to this effort are reported

  12. Helical Cerenkov effect, a novel radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observability of the helical Cerenkov effect as a novel radiation source is discussed. Depending on the value of the index of refraction of the medium, the strength of the uniform magnetic field, and the electron beam energy, helical Cerenkov radiation can occur in the same spectral regions as the ordinary Cerenkov effect, that is, from microwave to visible wavelengths. From the kinematics point of view, the author argues that for a microwave wavelength of 10-1 cm this effect should be observable in a medium with an index of refraction of 1.4, with a beam energy of 3 MeV, and a uniform magnetic field of 4 T. On the specific level, however, for the sake of simplicity, he discusses the observability of this effect for visible light with the central wavelength of 5 x 10-5 cm which can be achieved with 2 MeV in beam energy, silica aerogel as a medium (with an index of refraction of 1.075), and uniform magnetic fields from 5 to 10 T. For a 10-T magnetic field, he calculates that in the visible region of 250 to 750 nm an electron will produce a photon per 10 cm of traveled length. As to the stimulated helical Cerenkov emission, the author estimates that respectable gains are possible even if the beam passes close to the dielectric rather than through it. In addition to being potentially a new radiation source, the helical Cerenkov effect could possibly be used as a detector of radiation by energetic electrons that are trapped in a medium by strong magnetic fields

  13. Cerenkov Radiation: A Multi-functional Approach for Biological Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei eMa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerenkov radiation (CR has been used in various biological research fields, which has aroused lots of attention in recent years. Combining optical imaging instruments and most of nuclear medicine imaging or radiotherapy probes, the CR was developed as a new imaging modality for biology studies, called Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI. On the other hand, it was novelly used as an internal excitation source to activate some fluorophores for energy transfer imaging. However, it also has some shortages such as relatively weak luminescence intensity and low penetration in tissue. Thus some scientific groups demonstrated to optimize the CLI and demonstrated it to three-dimension tomography. In this article, we elaborate on its principle, history, and applications and discuss a number of directions for technical improvements. Then concluded some advantages and shortages of CR and discuss some prospects of it.

  14. Megavoltage X-Ray Imaging Based on Cerenkov Effect: A New Application of Optical Fibres to Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Teymurazyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Monte Carlo simulation was used to study imaging and dosimetric characteristics of a novel design of megavoltage (MV X-ray detectors for radiotherapy applications. The new design uses Cerenkov effect to convert X-ray energy absorbed in optical fibres into light for MV X-ray imaging. The proposed detector consists of a matrix of optical fibres aligned with the incident X rays and coupled to an active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI for image readout. Properties, such as modulation transfer function, detection quantum efficiency (DQE, and energy response of the detector, were investigated. It has been shown that the proposed detector can have a zero-frequency DQE more than an order of magnitude higher than that of current electronic portal imaging device (EPID systems and yet a spatial resolution comparable to that of video-based EPIDs. The proposed detector is also less sensitive to scattered X rays from patients than current EPIDs.

  15. Fluorescence and Cerenkov luminescence imaging. Applications in small animal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenck, J; Fuchs, K; Eilenberger, S H L; Rolle, A-M; Castaneda Vega, S; Thaiss, W M; Maier, F C

    2016-04-12

    This review addresses small animal optical imaging (OI) applications in diverse fields of basic research. In the past, OI has proven to be cost- and time-effective, allows real-time imaging as well as high-throughput analysis and does not imply the usage of ionizing radiation (with the exception of Cerenkov imaging applications). Therefore, this technique is widely spread - not only geographically, but also among very different fields of basic research - and is represented by a large body of publications. Originally used in oncology research, OI is nowadays emerging in further areas like inflammation and infectious disease as well as neurology. Besides fluorescent probe-based contrast, the feasibility of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) has been recently shown in small animals and thus represents a new route for future applications. Thus, this review will focus on examples for OI applications in inflammation, infectious disease, cell tracking as well as neurology, and provides an overview over CLI. PMID:27067794

  16. Cerenkov ring imaging detector development at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imaging of Cerenkov light on to photosensitive detectors promises to be a powerful technique for identifying particles in colliding beam spectrometers. Toward this end two and three dimensional imaging photon detectors are being developed at SLAC. The present techniques involve photon conversion using easily ionized exotic chemicals like tetrakisdimethyl-amino-ethylene (TMAE) in a drift and amplifying gas mixture of methane and isobutane. Single photoelectrons from Cerenkov light are currently being drifted 20 cm and a new device under study will be used to study drifting up to 80 cm along a magnetic field. A short description of a large device currently being designed for the SLD spectrometer at the Stanford Linear Collider will be given

  17. Optical imaging of Cerenkov light generation from positron-emitting radiotracers

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, R; Germanos, M S; Li, C.; Mitchell, G.S.; Cherry, S R; M. D. Silva

    2009-01-01

    Radiotracers labeled with high-energy positron-emitters, such as those commonly used for positron emission tomography (PET) studies, emit visible light immediately following decay in a medium. This phenomenon, not previously described for these imaging tracers, is consistent with Cerenkov radiation and has several potential applications, especially for in vivo molecular imaging studies. Herein we detail a new molecular imaging tool, Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging, the experiments conducted tha...

  18. Development of a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cerenkov-light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects visible photons from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. However, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging remains unclear. If a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system were developed, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging would be clarified by directly comparing these two imaging modalities. Methods: The authors developed and tested a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system that consists of a dual-head PET system, a reflection mirror located above the subject, and a high sensitivity charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The authors installed these systems inside a black box for imaging the Cerenkov-light. The dual-head PET system employed a 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm3 GSO arranged in a 33 × 33 matrix that was optically coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube to form a GSO block detector. The authors arranged two GSO block detectors 10 cm apart and positioned the subject between them. The Cerenkov-light above the subject is reflected by the mirror and changes its direction to the side of the PET system and is imaged by the high sensitivity CCD camera. Results: The dual-head PET system had a spatial resolution of ∼1.2 mm FWHM and sensitivity of ∼0.31% at the center of the FOV. The Cerenkov-light imaging system's spatial resolution was ∼275μm for a 22Na point source. Using the combined PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, the authors successfully obtained fused images from simultaneously acquired images. The image distributions are sometimes different due to the light transmission and absorption in the body of the subject in the Cerenkov-light images. In simultaneous imaging of rat, the authors found that 18F-FDG accumulation was observed mainly in the Harderian gland on the PET image, while the distribution of Cerenkov-light was observed in the eyes. Conclusions: The authors conclude that their developed PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging

  19. Cerenkov radiation in materials with negative permittivity and permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie; Grzegorczyk, Tomasz; Zhang, Yan; Pacheco, Joe; Wu, Bae-Ian; Kong, Jin; Chen, Min

    2003-04-01

    The mathematical solution for Cerenkov radiation in a novel medium, left-handed medium (LH medium), which has both negative permittivity and permeability, is introduced in this paper. It is shown that the particle motion in the LH medium generates power that propagates backward. In this paper, both dispersion and dissipation are considered for the LH medium. The results show that in such a material, both forward power and backward power exist. In addition, we show that the losses will affect the Cerenkov angle. The idea of building a Cerenkov detector using LH medium is introduced, which could be useful in particle physics to identify charged particles of various velocities. PMID:19461784

  20. Measurement of radiation damage on silica aerogel Cerenkov radiator

    CERN Document Server

    Sahu, S K; Suda, R; Enomoto, R; Peng, K C; Wang, C H; Adachi, I; Amami, M; Chang, Y H; Guo, R S; Hayashi, K; Iijima, T; Sumiyoshi, T; Yoshida, Y

    1996-01-01

    We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the B-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

  1. SU-E-QI-15: Single Point Dosimetry by Means of Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volotskova, O; Jenkins, C; Xing, L [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov light is generated when a charged particles with energy greater then 250 keV, moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons during the static megavoltage linear accelerator (LINAC) operational mode. Recently, Cerenkov radiation gained considerable interest as possible candidate as a new imaging modality. Optical signals generated by Cerenkov radiation may act as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial radiation dose. We demonstrated a novel single point dosimetry method for megavoltage photon and electron therapy utilizing down conversion of Cerenkov photons. Methods: The custom build signal characterization system was used: a sample holder (probe) with adjacent light tight compartments was connected via fiber-optic cables to a photon counting photomultiplier tube (PMT). One compartment contains a medium only while the other contains medium and red-shifting nano-particles (Q-dots, nanoclusters). By taking the difference between the two signals (Cerenkov photons and CRET photons) we obtain a measure of the down-converted light, which we expect to be proportional to dose as measured with an adjacent ion chamber. Experimental results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations performed using the GEANT4 code. Results: The signal correlation between CR signal, CRET readings and dose produced by LINAC at a single point were investigated. The experimental results were compared with simulations. The dose linearity, signal to noise ratio and dose rate dependence were tested with custom build CRET based probe. Conclusion: Performance characteristics of the proposed single point CRET based probe were evaluated. The direct use of the induced Cerenkov emission and CRET in an irradiated single point volume as an indirect surrogate for the imparted dose was investigated. We conclude that CRET is a promising optical based dosimetry method that offers advantages over those already proposed.

  2. SU-E-QI-15: Single Point Dosimetry by Means of Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cerenkov light is generated when a charged particles with energy greater then 250 keV, moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons during the static megavoltage linear accelerator (LINAC) operational mode. Recently, Cerenkov radiation gained considerable interest as possible candidate as a new imaging modality. Optical signals generated by Cerenkov radiation may act as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial radiation dose. We demonstrated a novel single point dosimetry method for megavoltage photon and electron therapy utilizing down conversion of Cerenkov photons. Methods: The custom build signal characterization system was used: a sample holder (probe) with adjacent light tight compartments was connected via fiber-optic cables to a photon counting photomultiplier tube (PMT). One compartment contains a medium only while the other contains medium and red-shifting nano-particles (Q-dots, nanoclusters). By taking the difference between the two signals (Cerenkov photons and CRET photons) we obtain a measure of the down-converted light, which we expect to be proportional to dose as measured with an adjacent ion chamber. Experimental results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations performed using the GEANT4 code. Results: The signal correlation between CR signal, CRET readings and dose produced by LINAC at a single point were investigated. The experimental results were compared with simulations. The dose linearity, signal to noise ratio and dose rate dependence were tested with custom build CRET based probe. Conclusion: Performance characteristics of the proposed single point CRET based probe were evaluated. The direct use of the induced Cerenkov emission and CRET in an irradiated single point volume as an indirect surrogate for the imparted dose was investigated. We conclude that CRET is a promising optical based dosimetry method that offers advantages over those already proposed

  3. Ultrahigh-resolution Cerenkov-light imaging system for positron radionuclides: potential applications and limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; WATABE, Tadashi; IKEDA, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Ogata, Yoshimune; Kato, Katsuhiko; Hatazawa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cerenkov-light imaging provides inherently high resolution because the light is emitted near the positron radionuclide. However, the magnitude for the high spatial resolution of Cerenkov-light imaging is unclear. Its potential molecular imaging applications also remain unclear. We developed an ultrahigh-resolution Cerenkov-light imaging system, measured its spatial resolution, and explored its applications to molecular imaging research. Methods Our Cerenkov-light imaging system cons...

  4. A Study of an Acrylic Cerenkov Radiation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, B; De Barbaro, P; Bodek, Arie; Budd, H S

    1999-01-01

    An experiment investigating the angle of Cerenkov light emitted by 3-MeV electrons traversing an acrylic detector has been developed for use in the advanced physics laboratory course at the University of Rochester. In addition to exploring the experimental phenomena of Cerenkov radiation and total internal reflection, the experiment introduces students to several experimental techniques used in actual high energy and nuclear physics experiments, as well as to analysis techniques involving Poisson statistics. [to be published in Am. J. Phys. 67 (Oct/Nov 1999).

  5. Cerenkov Radiator Driven by a Superconducting RF Electron Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poole, B R; Harris, J R

    2011-03-07

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Niowave, Inc., and Boeing have recently demonstrated operation of the first superconducting RF electron gun based on a quarter wave resonator structure. In preliminary tests, this gun has produced 10 ps long bunches with charge in excess of 78 pC, and with beam energy up to 396 keV. Initial testing occurred at Niowave's Lansing, MI facility, but the gun and diagnostic beam line are planned for installation in California in the near future. The design of the diagnostic beam line is conducive to the addition of a Cerenkov radiator without interfering with other beam line operations. Design and simulations of a Cerenkov radiator, consisting of a dielectric lined waveguide will be presented. The dispersion relation for the structure is determined and the beam interaction is studied using numerical simulations. The characteristics of the microwave radiation produced in both the short and long bunch regimes will be presented.

  6. Stimulated Cerenkov-radiation processes in dusty AGN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron moving with a superluminal velocity in a dielectric medium gives rise to spontaneous Cerenkov radiation. If, instead of a single electron, a high density superluminal electron beam is made to pass through a dielectric, the spontaneously generated radiation will grow exponential with distance and is known as stimulated Cerenkov-Compton radiation. If, in addition, an incident electromagnetic field interacts with a strong superluminal or subluminal electron beam, a frequency up-converted stimulated scattered radiation is produced, which by analogy to a similar process in vacuum with subluminal electron beams, is known as Cerenkov-Raman radiation. We explore and point out the role of these processes in the dust environs of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Since, the refractive index of the dust matter is a key factor in these processes, their inclusion links the properties of the dust grains with the characteristics of the non-thermal continuum especially in the infrared range, which, the observations show to be particularly bumpy and therefore requires additional contributions over the thermal continuum

  7. A ring image Cerenkov detector for the CERN Omega Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A development program has been undertaken to produce a large ring image Cerenkov detector (RICH) for use at the CERN Omega Spectrometer. A prototype Cerenkov counter has been constructed and successfully operated in a high energy particle beam, Cerenkov rings having been observed in an experimental time projection chamber (TPC) using the photoionising agents Triethylamine (TEA) and Tetrakis (dimethylamine) ethylene (TMAE). Systematic measurements have been made of the optical properties of window materials and reflecting surfaces in the vacuum ultraviolet region. Results of these tests are presented, and the design of the large detector based on these experiences together with Monte Carlo simulations of the events expected in the WA69 experiment, is discussed. (author)

  8. A Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector for the CERN OMEGA spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large acceptance Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector has been constructed for use at the CERN Omega Spectrometer. The design of the detector is discussed, with attention paid to its principal components, and preliminary results are given which show that the detector is capable of identifying pions and protons at 100 GeV/c. (author)

  9. The Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector readout system user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manual describes the electronic readout system of the Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector at the CERN Omega Spectrometer. The system is described in its configuration of September 1984 after the Rich readout system had been used in two Omega experiments. (U.K.)

  10. Tests of large Cerenkov detectors with silica aerogel as radiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerenkov detectors with silica aerogel as radiator, and a detector surface of about 18X52cm2, have been tested in a particle beam at the CERN Proton Synchrotron. For 9cm thickness of silica aerogel the number of photoelectrons for β=1 particles was found to be 4.6 and 5.5 respectively, depending on the light collection system used. (Auth.)

  11. Beam Loss Position Monitor Using Cerenkov Radiation in Optical Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Körfer, M

    2005-01-01

    Single pass Free Electron Lasers SASE-FELs are developed for high brightness and short wavelength applications. The VUV-FEL at DESY will reach an average beam power of about 72 kW. To avoid particle losses in the radiation sensitive undulators a collimator system is installed. However, the proper operation of the collimator system needs to be measured with a beam loss monitor. Conventional radiation sensor systems are not suited for the VUV-FEL undulators, because the free space in the undulator gap is less than 1 mm. A Beam Loss Position Monitor (BLPM) based on Cerenkov light in optical fibers allows the monitoring of losses inside the undulator. Electrons with energies above 175 keV generate Cerenkov light during their penetration of the optical fiber. The fast response of the Cerenkov signal is detected with photomultipliers at the end of the irradiated fibers. The beam loss position along the section of interest can be determinate by exploiting the system trigger (bunch clock) of the accelerator system. T...

  12. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  13. Feasibility and improvement of biological imaging technique based on Cerenkov effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: There are several defects in traditional optical imaging such as background interference, toxic fluorescence stain, low stability etc. Similar problems can be avoided by use of Cerenkov light for optical imaging. Purpose: This work is to confirm the feasibility of Cerenkov light imaging in theory, find the shortage of Cerenkov light imaging, seek the feasible solution. Methods: Using the Monte Carlo method, (1) Simulate the condition that decay particles from three kinds of radioactive source (18F, 131I, 32P) produce Cerenkov light, analyze the relationship between thickness of the muscle and the number of Cerenkov photons; (2) Exchange the radioactive source to light source, analyze the penetration of photon in different wavelengths within Cerenkov light wavelength range. Results: The feasibility of Cerenkov light imaging is verified by using Monte Carlo method, penetrability. of single Cerenkov light is poor, however, penetrability appears better of Cerenkov light in long wavelength. Conclusion: Cerenkov light imaging can be used as a novel imaging method, it has promising application. The problem of poor penetrability can be solved by giving a way to make the wavelength of Cerenkov light 'red-shift'. (authors)

  14. In vivo 18F-FDG tumour uptake measurements in small animals using Cerenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2-[18F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) is a widely used PET radiotracer for the in vivo diagnosis of several diseases such as tumours. The positrons emitted by 18F-FDG, travelling into tissues faster than the speed of light in the same medium, are responsible for Cerenkov radiation (CR) emission which is prevalently in the visible range. The purpose of this study is to show that CR escaping from tumour tissues of small living animals injected with 18F-FDG can be detected with optical imaging (OI) techniques using a commercial optical instrument equipped with charge-coupled detectors (CCD). The theory behind the Cerenkov light emission and the source depth measurements using CR is first presented. Mice injected with 18F-FDG or saline solution underwent dynamic OI acquisition and a comparison between images was performed. Multispectral analysis of the radiation was used to estimate the depth of the source of Cerenkov light. Small animal PET images were also acquired in order to compare the 18F-FDG bio-distribution measured using OI and PET scanner. Cerenkov in vivo whole-body images of tumour-bearing mice and the measurements of the emission spectrum (560-660 nm range) are presented. Brain, kidneys and tumour were identified as a source of visible light in the animal body: the tissue time-activity curves reflected the physiological accumulation of 18F-FDG in these organs. The identification is confirmed by the comparison between CR and 18F-FDG images. These results will allow the use of conventional OI devices for the in vivo study of glucose metabolism in cancer and the assessment, for example, of anti-cancer drugs. Moreover, this demonstrates that 18F-FDG can be employed as it is a bimodal tracer for PET and OI techniques. (orig.)

  15. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  16. Monte Carlo feasibility study for image guided surgery: from direct beta minus detection to Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, C. R.; Altabella, L.; Boschi, F.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this work is to compare the performances of different beta minus detection strategies for image guided surgery or ex vivo tissue analysis. In particular we investigated Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) with and without the use of a radiator, direct and indirect beta detection and bremsstrahlung imaging using beta emitters commonly employed in Nuclear Medicine. Monte Carlo simulations were implemented using the GAMOS plug-in for GEANT4 considering a slab of muscle and a radioactive source (32P or 90Y) placed at 0.5 mm depth. We estimated the gain that can be obtained in terms of produced photons using different materials placed on the slab used as Cerenkov radiators, we then focused on the number of exiting photons and their spatial distribution for the different strategies. The use of radiator to enhance Cerenkov signal reduces the spatial resolution because of the increased optical spread. We found that direct beta detection and CLI are best approaches in term of resolution while the use of a thin scintillator increases the signal but the spatial resolution is degraded. Bremsstrahlung presents lower signal and it does not represent the best choice for image guided surgery. CLI represents a more flexible approach for image guided surgery using or ex vivo tissue analysis using beta-emitter imaging.

  17. Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging of brain tumor specimens during neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello Enrico; Schiariti, Marco P.; Grana, Chiara M.; Ferrari, Mahila; Cremonesi, Marta; Boschi, Federico

    2016-05-01

    We presented the first example of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI) of human tumor specimens. A patient with a brain meningioma localized in the left parietal region was injected with 166 MBq of Y90-DOTATOC the day before neurosurgery. The specimens of the tumor removed during surgery were imaged using both CLI and RLI using an optical imager prototype developed in our laboratory. The system is based on a cooled electron multiplied charge coupled device coupled with an f/0.95 17-mm C-mount lens. We showed for the first time the possibility of obtaining CLI and RLI images of fresh human brain tumor specimens removed during neurosurgery.

  18. Observations of visual sensations produced by Cerenkov radiation from high-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten cancer patients whose eyes were therapeutically irradiated with 6-18 MeV electrons reported visual light sensations. Nine reported seeing blue light and one reported seeing white light. Controls reported seeing no light. Additionally, tests with patients ruled out the x-ray contamination of the electron beam as being important. The photon yield due to Cerenkov radiation produced by radium and its daughters for both electrons and gamma rays was calculated; it was found to account for a turn-of-the-century human observation of the radium phosphene. We conclude that the dominant mechanism of this phosphene is Cerenkov radiation, primarily from betas. From our own patient data, based on the color seen and the Cerenkov production rates, we conclude that the dominant mechanism is Cerenkov radiation and that high-energy electrons are an example of particle induced visual sensations

  19. Measurement of therapeutic photon beams-induced Cerenkov radiation generated in PMMA- and PS-based plastic optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bongsoo; Shin, Sang Hun; Yoo, Wook Jae; Jang, Kyoung Won

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we characterized Cerenkov radiation generated in polystyrene (PS)- and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based plastic optical fibers (POFs) to select an adequate optical fiber for producing Cerenkov radiation. To determine the relationship between the absorbed dose and the intensity of Cerenkov radiation, we calculated the energy depositions of photon beams and fluxes of electrons inducing Cerenkov radiation using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code. Also, intensities of Cerenkov radiation generated in PS- and PMMA-based POFs were measured as functions of dose rate and monitor unit. At last, therapeutic photon beams-induced Cerenkov radiation in PS- and PMMA-based POFs was measured according to depths of solid water phantom.

  20. The Gamma-ray galactic diffuse radiation and Cerenkov telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using the PYTHIA version of the Lund Monte Carlo program, we study the photon yield of proton-proton collisions in the energy range between 10 GeV and 1 TeV. The resulting photon spectrum turns out to scale roughly with incident energy. Then, by folding the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray protons with the distribution of HI and CO, the Galactic diffuse emission of γ-rays above 100 GeV is mapped. Prospects for observing that diffuse radiation with atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes are discussed. Present instruments are able to detect the γ-ray glow of the Galactic center. The latter will be mapped by the next generation of telescopes if their energy threshold is decreased. However, a detailed survey of the Galactic ridge will be a real challenge, even in the long term. The MILAGRO project seems more appropriate. Finally, we investigate the γ-ray emission from weakly interacting massive particles clustering at the Galactic center. It has been speculated that those species are a major component of the halo dark matter. We show that their γ-ray signal is swamped in the Galactic diffuse radiation and cannot be observed at TeV energies. copyright 1995 The American Astronomical Society

  1. Plastic scintillation dosimetry for radiation therapy: minimizing capture of Cerenkov radiation noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade, there has been an increased interest in scintillation dosimetry using small water-equivalent plastic scintillators, because of their favourable characteristics when compared with other more commonly used detector systems. Although plastic scintillators have been shown to have many desirable dosimetric properties, as yet there is no successful commercial detector system of this type available for routine clinical use in radiation oncology. The main factor preventing this new technology from realizing its full potential in commercial applications is the maximization of signal coupling efficiency and the minimization of noise capture. A principal constituent of noise is Cerenkov radiation. This study reports the calculated capture of Cerenkov radiation by an optical fibre in the special case where the radiation is generated by a relativistic particle on the fibre axis and the fibre axis is parallel to the Cerenkov cone. The fraction of radiation captured is calculated as a function of the fibre core refractive index and the refractive index difference between the core and the cladding of the fibre for relativistic particles. This is then used to deduce the relative intensity captured for a range of fibre core refractive indices and fibre core-cladding refractive index differences. It is shown that the core refractive index has little effect on the amount of radiation captured compared to the refractive index difference. The implications of this result for the design of radiation therapy plastic scintillation dosimeters are considered

  2. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of human breast cancer: a Monte Carlo simulations study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, F.; Pagliazzi, M.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a novel molecular imaging technique based on the detection of Cerenkov light produced by beta particles traveling through biological tissues. In this paper we simulated using 18F and 90Y the possibility of detecting Cerenkov luminescence in human breast tissues, in order to evaluate the potential of the CLI technique in a clinical setting. A human breast digital phantom was obtained from an 18F-FDG CT-PET scan. The spectral features of the breast surface emission were obtained as well as the simulated images obtainable by a cooled CCD detector. The simulated images revealed a signal to noise ratio equal to 6 for a 300 s of acquisition time. We concluded that a dedicated human Cerenkov imaging detector can be designed in order to offer a valid low cost alternative to diagnostic techniques in nuclear medicine, in particular allowing the detection of beta-minus emitters used in radiotherapy.

  3. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of human breast cancer: a Monte Carlo simulations study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a novel molecular imaging technique based on the detection of Cerenkov light produced by beta particles traveling through biological tissues. In this paper we simulated using 18F and 90Y the possibility of detecting Cerenkov luminescence in human breast tissues, in order to evaluate the potential of the CLI technique in a clinical setting. A human breast digital phantom was obtained from an 18F-FDG CT-PET scan. The spectral features of the breast surface emission were obtained as well as the simulated images obtainable by a cooled CCD detector. The simulated images revealed a signal to noise ratio equal to 6 for a 300 s of acquisition time. We concluded that a dedicated human Cerenkov imaging detector can be designed in order to offer a valid low cost alternative to diagnostic techniques in nuclear medicine, in particular allowing the detection of beta-minus emitters used in radiotherapy

  4. Imaging Cerenkov emission as a quality assurance tool in electron radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new potential quality assurance (QA) method is explored (including assessment of depth dose, dose linearity, dose rate linearity and beam profile) for clinical electron beams based on imaging Cerenkov light. The potential of using a standard commercial camera to image Cerenkov light generated from electrons in water for fast QA measurement of a clinical electron beam was explored and compared to ionization chamber measurements. The new method was found to be linear with dose and independent of dose rate (to within 3%). The uncorrected practical range measured in Cerenkov images was found to overestimate the actual value by 3 mm in the worst case. The field size measurements underestimated the dose at the edges by 5% without applying any correction factor. Still, the measured field size could be used to monitor relative changes in the beam profile. Finally, the beam-direction profile measurements were independent of the field size within 2%. A simulation was also performed of the deposited energy and of Cerenkov production in water using GEANT4. Monte Carlo simulation was used to predict the measured light distribution around the water phantom, to reproduce Cerenkov images and to find the relation between deposited energy and Cerenkov production. The camera was modelled as a pinhole camera in GEANT4, to attempt to reproduce Cerenkov images. Simulations of the deposited energy and the Cerenkov light production agreed with each other for a pencil beam of electrons, while for a realistic field size, Cerenkov production in the build-up region overestimated the dose by +8%. (paper)

  5. A simple model for deep tissue attenuation correction and large organ analysis of Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, Frezghi; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Paik, David S.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-03-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is an emerging cost effective modality that uses conventional small animal optical imaging systems and clinically available radionuclide probes for light emission. CLI has shown good correlation with PET for organs of high uptake such as kidney, spleen, thymus and subcutaneous tumors in mouse models. However, CLI has limitations for deep tissue quantitative imaging since the blue-weighted spectral characteristics of Cerenkov radiation attenuates highly by mammalian tissue. Large organs such as the liver have also shown higher signal due to the contribution of emission of light from a greater thickness of tissue. In this study, we developed a simple model that estimates the effective tissue attenuation coefficient in order to correct the CLI signal intensity with a priori estimated depth and thickness of specific organs. We used several thin slices of ham to build a phantom with realistic attenuation. We placed radionuclide sources inside the phantom at different tissue depths and imaged it using an IVIS Spectrum (Perkin-Elmer, Waltham, MA, USA) and Inveon microPET (Preclinical Solutions Siemens, Knoxville, TN). We also performed CLI and PET of mouse models and applied the proposed attenuation model to correct CLI measurements. Using calibration factors obtained from phantom study that converts the corrected CLI measurements to %ID/g, we obtained an average difference of less that 10% for spleen and less than 35% for liver compared to conventional PET measurements. Hence, the proposed model has a capability of correcting the CLI signal to provide comparable measurements with PET data.

  6. Measurements of longitudinal gamma ray distribution using a multichannel fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, S. H.; Jeon, D.; Kim, J. S.; Jang, J. S.; Jang, K. W.; Yoo, W. J.; Moon, J. H.; Park, B. G.; Kim, S.; Lee, B.

    2014-11-01

    Cerenkov radiation occurs when charged particles are moving faster than the speed of light in a transparent dielectric medium. In optical fibers, Cerenkov radiation can also be generated due to the fiber’s dielectric components. Accordingly, the radiation-induced light signals can be obtained using the optical fibers without any scintillating material. In this study, we fabricated a multichannel, fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) system using silica optical fibers (SOFs), plastic optical fibers (POFs), an optical spectrometer, multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MA-PMTs) and a scanning system to measure the light intensities of Cerenkov radiation induced by gamma rays. To evaluate the fading effects in optical fibers, the spectra of Cerenkov radiation generated in the SOFs and POFs were measured based on the irradiation time by using an optical spectrometer. In addition, we measured the longitudinal distribution of gamma rays emitted from the cylindrical type Co-60 source by using MA-PMTs. The result was also compared with the distribution of the electron flux calculated by using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNPX).

  7. Measurements of longitudinal gamma ray distribution using a multichannel fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerenkov radiation occurs when charged particles are moving faster than the speed of light in a transparent dielectric medium. In optical fibers, Cerenkov radiation can also be generated due to the fiber’s dielectric components. Accordingly, the radiation-induced light signals can be obtained using the optical fibers without any scintillating material. In this study, we fabricated a multichannel, fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) system using silica optical fibers (SOFs), plastic optical fibers (POFs), an optical spectrometer, multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MA-PMTs) and a scanning system to measure the light intensities of Cerenkov radiation induced by gamma rays. To evaluate the fading effects in optical fibers, the spectra of Cerenkov radiation generated in the SOFs and POFs were measured based on the irradiation time by using an optical spectrometer. In addition, we measured the longitudinal distribution of gamma rays emitted from the cylindrical type Co-60 source by using MA-PMTs. The result was also compared with the distribution of the electron flux calculated by using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNPX). (paper)

  8. A comprehensive study of the yield of Cerenkov radiation in transparent media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive study on the theoretical and experimental yields (counting efficiencies) of Cerenkov radiation is made using different radioisotope solutions and different transparent refractive media. The used radioisotope solutions are 32P, 89Sr, 99Tc, 65Zn, 54Mn, 131I, 51Cr, 137Cs and 134Cs and the used transparent media are distilled water, KBr solution, NaCl solution and glycerol. An automatic liquid scintillation spectrometer fitted with two bialkaline phototubes in fast coincidence circuit is used for counting Cerenkov radiations. A computer program is written to compute the theoretical yield of the radiations. The comparison between theoretical and experimental yields shows a largely satisfactory agreement. (orig.)

  9. Development of gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid system for simultaneous imaging of I-131 radionuclide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Suzuki, Mayumi; Kato, Katsuhiko; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Ogata, Yoshimune; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Although iodine 131 (I-131) is used for radionuclide therapy, high resolution images are difficult to obtain with conventional gamma cameras because of the high energy of I-131 gamma photons (364 keV). Cerenkov-light imaging is a possible method for beta emitting radionuclides, and I-131 (606 MeV maximum beta energy) is a candidate to obtain high resolution images. We developed a high energy gamma camera system for I-131 radionuclide and combined it with a Cerenkov-light imaging system to form a gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system to compare the simultaneously measured images of these two modalities. The high energy gamma imaging detector used 0.85-mm×0.85-mm×10-mm thick GAGG scintillator pixels arranged in a 44×44 matrix with a 0.1-mm thick reflector and optical coupled to a Hamamatsu 2 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT: H12700 MOD). The gamma imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm thick tungsten shield, and a pinhole collimator was mounted on its top to form a gamma camera system. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was made of a high sensitivity cooled CCD camera. The Cerenkov-light imaging system was combined with the gamma camera using optical mirrors to image the same area of the subject. With this configuration, we simultaneously imaged the gamma photons and the Cerenkov-light from I-131 in the subjects. The spatial resolution and sensitivity of the gamma camera system for I-131 were respectively ~3 mm FWHM and ~10 cps/MBq for the high sensitivity collimator at 10 cm from the collimator surface. The spatial resolution of the Cerenkov-light imaging system was 0.64 mm FWHM at 10 cm from the system surface. Thyroid phantom and rat images were successfully obtained with the developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, allowing direct comparison of these two modalities. Our developed gamma-photon/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system will be useful to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these two

  10. Cerenkov emission in radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Helo, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A new potential quality assurance (QA) method is explored for clinical electron beams and clinical proton beams based on imaging and measuring Cerenkov light. A simulation was performed of the deposited energy and of Cerenkov production in water using Geant4. Monte Carlo simulation was used to predict the measured light distribution around the water phantom, to reproduce Cerenkov images and to find the relation between deposited energy and Cerenkov production. The camera was modelled as a pin...

  11. Treatment of Cerenkov radiation from electric and magnetic charges in dispersive and dissipative media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rigorous treatment of the problem of Cerenkov radiation from fast moving electric and magnetic charges is presented. This is based on the rigorous solution of Maxwell's equations in a general dispersive medium possessing dielectric and magnetic properties and with, and without, dissipation. It is shown that the fields are completely determined by one scalar function. Expressions for the exact fields are obtained. From the asymptotic fields all the relevant properties of Cerenkov radiation are reproduced. In particular, it is shown that in the absence of dissipation the energy in each mode travels with the phase velocity of that mode. For a dissipative medium the electric field develops a longitudinal component and the energy propagates at an angle to the phase velocity. Application to the case of a Tachyon shows that it must emit Cerenkov radiation in vacuum. An estimate is given for the resulting linear density of emitted radiation. Finally, two suggestions are made for the experimental detection of magnetic charges and electric dipole moments of elementary particles based upon the Cerenkov radiation which they would emit in dispersive media. (author)

  12. Cerenkov light spectrum in an optical fiber exposed to a photon or electron radiation therapy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Cerenkov signal is generated when energetic charged particles enter the core of an optical fiber. The Cerenkov intensity can be large enough to interfere with signals transmitted through the fiber. We determine the spectrum of the Cerenkov background signal generated in a poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber exposed to photon and electron therapeutic beams from a linear accelerator. This spectral measurement is relevant to discrimination of the signal from the background, as in scintillation dosimetry using optical fiber readouts. We find that the spectrum is approximated by the theoretical curve after correction for the wavelength dependent attenuation of the fiber. The spectrum does not depend significantly on the angle between the radiation beam and the axis of the fiber optic but is dependent on the depth in water at which the fiber is exposed to the beam.

  13. Properties of a silica aerogel Cerenkov radiator used in a cosmic ray telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, M.; Engelmann, J. J.; Koch, L.; Masse, P.; Lund, N.; Byrnak, B.

    1975-01-01

    A silica aerogel Cerenkov radiator with a refractive index of 1.06 has been flown in a balloon borne cosmic ray telescope. Clear separation of the elements in the iron group was achieved even at high energies. No detectable scintillation component was found. Some optical properties of the silica aerogel used in this flight are presented.

  14. Activating Photodynamic Therapy in vitro with Cerenkov Radiation Generated from Yttrium-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Brad A; Hirschberg, Henry; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    The translation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to the clinical setting has primarily been limited to easily accessible and/or superficial diseases, for which traditional light delivery can be performed noninvasively. Cerenkov radiation, as generated from medically relevant radionuclides, has been suggested as a means to deliver light to deeper tissues noninvasively to overcome this depth limitation. This article investigates the utility of Cerenkov radiation, as generated from the radionuclide yttrium-90, for activating the PDT process using clinically approved aminolevulinic acid at 1.0 mm and also the more efficient porphyrin-based photosensitizer mesotetraphenylporphine with two sulfonate groups on adjacent phenyl rings (TPPS2a) at 1.2 µm. Experiments were conducted with monolayer cultured glioma and breast tumor cell lines. Although aminolevulinic acid proved to be ineffective for generating a therapeutic effect at all but the highest activity levels, TPPS2a produced at least a 20% therapeutic effect at activities ranging from 6 to 60 µCi/well for the C6 glioma cell line. Importantly, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that Cerenkov radiation generated from a radionuclide can be used to activate PDT using clinically relevant photosensitizers. These results therefore provide evidence that it may be possible to generate a phototherapeutic effect in vivo using Cerenkov radiation and clinically relevant photosensitizers. PMID:27481495

  15. First observation of Cerenkov ring images using hybrid photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, E; Bibby, J H; Brook, N H; Duane, A; French, M; Gibson, V; Giles, R; Halley, A W; Harnew, N; John, M; Miller, D G; O'Shea, V; Schoemaker, R; Smale, N J; Websdale, David M; Wilkinson, G R; Wotton, S A

    1998-01-01

    A Ring-Imaging Cherenkov detector, equipped with Hybrid Photon Detectors, has been operated in a charged-particle beam. Focussed ring images from various particle types were detected using silica aerogel, air and C$_4$F$_{10}$ gas radiators. The detector, a prototype for the CERN LHCb experiment, is described and first observations are reported.

  16. Preliminary Therapy Evaluation of 225Ac-DOTA-c(RGDyK) Demonstrates that Cerenkov Radiation Derived from 225Ac Daughter Decay Can Be Detected by Optical Imaging for In Vivo Tumor Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Darpan N.; Hantgan, Roy; Budzevich, Mikalai M.; Kock, Nancy D.; Morse, David L.; Batista, Izadora; Mintz, Akiva; Li, King C.; Wadas, Thaddeus J.

    2016-01-01

    The theranostic potential of 225Ac-based radiopharmaceuticals continues to increase as researchers seek innovative ways to harness the nuclear decay of this radioisotope for therapeutic and imaging applications. This communication describes the evaluation of 225Ac-DOTA-c(RGDyK) in both biodistribution and Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) studies. Initially, La-DOTA-c(RGDyK) was prepared as a non-radioactive surrogate to evaluate methodologies that would contribute to an optimized radiochemical synthetic strategy and estimate the radioactive conjugate's affinity for αvβ3, using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy studies revealed the IC50 and Ki of La-DOTA-c(RGDyK) to be 33 ± 13 nM and 26 ± 11 nM, respectively, and suggest that the complexation of the La3+ ion to the conjugate did not significantly alter integrin binding. Furthermore, use of this surrogate allowed optimization of radiochemical synthesis strategies to prepare 225Ac-DOTA-c(RGDyK) with high radiochemical purity and specific activity similar to other 225Ac-based radiopharmaceuticals. This radiopharmaceutical was highly stable in vitro. In vivo biodistribution studies confirmed the radiotracer's ability to target αvβ3 integrin with specificity; specificity was detected in tumor-bearing animals using Cerenkov luminescence imaging. Furthermore, tumor growth control was achieved using non-toxic doses of the radiopharmaceutical in U87mg tumor-bearing nude mice. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the CLI of αvβ3+ tumors in live animals using the daughter products derived from 225Ac decay in situ. This concept holds promise to further enhance development of targeted alpha particle therapy. PMID:27022417

  17. Power Measurement and Automatic Reactor Control by Gamma- or Cerenkov-Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A power measuring system is described using the gamma and Cerenkov radiation from the reactor core. A measuring device based on the above principle was installed in the Institute's TRIGA-reactor and was tested for power measurements and automatic reactor control. This new method has some advantages over the conventional system using neutron detectors for power indication. For example, it is possible to mount the detector at some distance from the core with the result that the measurement is not so dependent on local flux variations due to irradiation samples in the core, changes of control rod positions and burn-up of fuel as if the neutron detector were mounted at the reflector. The detectors are free from neutron activation, radiation damage and sensitivity changes due to nuclear reactions in the detector material. Furthermore there are no insulation problems caused by irradiation of insulators. For the measurement of Cerenkov and gamma radiation conventional detectors were used. For fast power indication and automatic reactor control only the prompt fraction of Cerenkov and gamma radiation need be considered. For this purpose the delayed fraction was simulated by a simple electronic circuit and subtracted from the total detector current. To design the simulating circuit the transfer function of the Cerenkov and gamma radiation resulting from a step change of reactor power must be known. This function was obtained by an experimental method described in the paper. Current developments of the system and future applications for different types of reactors including high temperature types and also the design of detector probes are discussed. (author)

  18. Endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging: in vivo small animal tumor model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Hu, Zhenhua; Wang, Kun; Liu, Xia; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Background: Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides a great potential for clinical translation of optical molecular imaging techniques through using clinical approved radiotracers. However, it is difficult to obtain the Cerenkov luminescence signal of deeper biological tissues due to the small magnitude of the signal. To efficiently acquire the weak Cerenkov luminescence, we developed an endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging (ECLI) system to reduce the in vivo imaging depth with minimum invasion, and validated the system on small animal tumor models. Methods: For the ECLI system, the laparoscope was connected to a high sensitive charge-couple device (CCD) camera (DU888+, Andor, UK) by a custom made adapter. We conducted a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments by use of the system. In the in vitro experiment, the endoscopic luminescence images of the 18F-FDG with various activities in EP tubes were acquired using ECLI system, and the sensitivity was compared with conventional CLI system. In the in vivo tumor experiment, 18F-FDG with the activity of 200μCi were intravenously injected into 3 tumor mice. Then the ECLI system was used to acquire the optical images for both non-invasive and invasive conditions. Conclusion: Experimental data showed the ECLI system could detect the 18F-FDG with the activity as low as 1μCi. Furthermore, our preliminary results indicated the possibility of ECLI technique for detecting Cerenkov signals inside the tumor tissue with deeper depth and guiding the surgical operation of tumor excision. We believe that this technique can help to accelerate the clinical translation of CLI.

  19. Measurement of Cerenkov Radiation Induced by the Gamma-Rays of Co-60 Therapy Units Using Wavelength Shifting Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Won Jang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a wavelength shifting fiber that shifts ultra-violet and blue light to green light was employed as a sensor probe of a fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor. In order to characterize Cerenkov radiation generated in the developed wavelength shifting fiber and a plastic optical fiber, spectra and intensities of Cerenkov radiation were measured with a spectrometer. The spectral peaks of light outputs from the wavelength shifting fiber and the plastic optical fiber were measured at wavelengths of 500 and 510 nm, respectively, and the intensity of transmitted light output of the wavelength shifting fiber was 22.2 times higher than that of the plastic optical fiber. Also, electron fluxes and total energy depositions of gamma-ray beams generated from a Co-60 therapy unit were calculated according to water depths using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code. The relationship between the fluxes of electrons over the Cerenkov threshold energy and the energy depositions of gamma-ray beams from the Co-60 unit is a near-identity function. Finally, percentage depth doses for the gamma-ray beams were obtained using the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor, and the results were compared with those obtained by an ionization chamber. The average dose difference between the results of the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor and those of the ionization chamber was about 2.09%.

  20. Power Spectrum of Cerenkov Radiation from Laser Wakefield in Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Ito, Hiroaki; Nishida, Yasushi

    2000-10-01

    An angle and radiation frequecy distribution of the output power of the electromagnetic wave radiation from the laser wakefield in a magnetized plasma (Cerenkov wakes radiaiton) have been calculated. The magnetic field here is applied for the far field electromagnetic wave radiation = requirement. The radiation frequency is confined from ωp to = ω_h. The electromagnetic wave generation originates from the coupling between the DC perpendicular magnetic field and the plasma electron longitudinal = disturbance caused by the laser ponderomotive force. Under Coulomb gauge condition, the wave equation can be completely partitioned for the scale potential = and the vector field, so it can be easily obtained from the near zone static = field and far zone radiation field. The former has well been studied as the = static wakefield acceleration. Here we wish to present the detailed study on = the feature of the radiated electromagnetic field for the later case. The radiation = power spectrum which depends on the magnetic field, the laser pulse length, = the radiation frequency and the corresponding refraction index have been = given. The analysis shows that at the direction of \\cos θ= c=3D1/β n, where n is the refraction index of the magnetized plasma, the output = power has the maximum which satisfies the Cerenkov radiation angle condition, = so that the output power for the radiation frequency of ωp = is mainly located at the forward direction.

  1. Investigations on Cerenkov effect application of β-radiating nuclides in transparent media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged particles with higher energies are able to generate photons in transparent media by means of the Cerenkov effect. This can be used to detect β-radiading nuclides with more than 0.26 MeV maximum energy in aqueous solutions. Counter gain and impulse hight-spectra for different nuclides can be determined by means of a specially designed counter. The counter consists of two coincidence photomultipliers. It is possible to determine quantitatively β-radiating impurities in high activity γ-radiating solution. Further the possibility was examined to acquire spatial β-activity distributions by means of the Cerenkov effect. This yields a resolution, smaller than 1.3 mm for 32P and for superficially located sources. The intensity decreases exponentially with the depth (half-value-depth about 0.5 mm). With this the method is better than a semiconductor needle probe and has the advantage of a selective resolution of the surface distribution without a disturbing γ-influence, when compared with the conventional autoradiography. Advantageous applications of several Cerenkov counters in radiochemistry and nuclear medicine are described. (orig./HP)

  2. Alternative method of generation of Cerenkov radiation or shock wave

    OpenAIRE

    Halder, Amit

    1997-01-01

    An alternative method of generation of Cerenkev radiation is proposed over here with the help of a rotating source and a reflector. The principle is that, if we focus a narrow beam of light on to source of light is rotated with certain angular velocity then the light spot on the surface will move with very high velocity which may exceed the velocity of light. As a consequence of this we shall observe an effect very similar to Cerknov radiation.

  3. Development of a wavelength-separated type scintillator with optical fiber (SOF) dosimeter to compensate for the Cerenkov radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scintillator with optical fiber (SOF) dosimeter consists of a miniature scintillator mounted on the tip of an optical fiber. The scintillator of the current SOF dosimeter is a 1-mm diameter hemisphere. For a scintillation dosimeter coupled with an optical fiber, measurement accuracy is influenced by signals due to Cerenkov radiation in the optical fiber. We have implemented a spectral filtering technique for compensating for the Cerenkov radiation effect specifically for our plastic scintillator-based dosimeter, using a wavelength-separated counting method. A dichroic mirror was used for separating input light signals. Individual signal counting was performed for high- and low-wavelength light signals. To confirm the accuracy, measurements with various amounts of Cerenkov radiation were performed by changing the incident direction while keeping the Ir-192 source-to-dosimeter distance constant, resulting in a fluctuation of <5%. Optical fiber bending was also addressed; no bending effect was observed for our wavelength-separated SOF dosimeter. (author)

  4. Determination of phosphorous in cannabis by neutron activation analysis - measurement of 32P Cerenkov radiation by liquid scintillaton spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal neutron activaton analysis with measurement of 32P Cerenkov radiation by liquid scintillation spectrometer was used to determine phosphorus in cannabis. After irradiation of the sample, wet ashing was carried out with conc. nitric acid and 70% perchloric acid. The solution in l M perchloric acid transferred to an inorganic ion-exchange column containing acid aluminium oxide and phosphorus was quantitatively eluted with 1M hydrofluoric acid. The 32P radioactivity of each fraction of the eluate was counted with Cerenkov radiation by a liquid scintillation spectrometer from 2 to 7 weeks after the irradiation. The activity curve decayed with 32P half-life. The isotope channel ratio technique was applied for the quench correction. The optimal experimental conditions for chemical separation of phosphorus and for measuring the 32P Cerenkov radiation were also examined. (Author)

  5. Strontium-90 determinations by Cerenkov radiation counting for well monitoring at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid method for determination of 90Sr (28.8 y half-life) via its daughter 90Y (64.1 h half-life) in aqueous samples from the solid low-level radioactive waste disposal areas at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) utilized the principle of direct Cerenkov radiation counting. This technique is applicable for beta particles exhibiting maximum energies greater than 0.42 pJ (263 keV) in aqueous solution. In the presence of other contributing energetic beta emitters the technique may serve as a useful screening method to distinguish low activity samples from more moderate or higher activity concentrations. A comparison between analysis of 90Sr by Cerenkov radiation counting and by standard wet chemical separation techniques indicated a high degree of correlation and excellent agreement. The detection limit for a 20-mL sample under the prescribed experimental conditions and a counting interval of 20 min was approximately 0.2 dpm/mL

  6. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerating Structure as a Source of Terahertz Coherent Cerenkov Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss future experimental work proposed to study the performance of a cylindrical dielectric wakefield accelerating structure as a coherent Cerenkov radiation source at the Neptune laboratory at UCLA. The Cerenkov wakefield acceleration experiment carried out recently by UCLA/SLAC/USC, using the ultrashort and high charge beam (Q = 3 nC, σz = 20 micron) at the SLAC FFTB, demonstrated electromagnetic wakes at the few GV/m level. The motivation of our prospective experiment is to investigate the operation of a similar scenario using the comparatively long pulse, low charge beam (Q = 0.5 nC, σz = 200 micron) at UCLA Neptune. The field amplitude produced in this setup would be one to two orders of magnitude lower, at the few tens to few 100 MV/m level. Such a decelerating field would extract a significant amount of energy from a low-energy beam in a distance on the order of a few centimeters, allowing the use of short dielectric structures. We discuss details of the geometry and composition of the structures to be used in the experiment. We also examine the possibility of a future dedicated facility at UCLA Neptune based on a hybrid photoinjector currently in development. The intrinsic bunch compression capabilities and improved beam parameters (σz = 100 micron, Q = 1 nC) of the photoinjector would allow the creation of a high power radiation source in the terahertz regime

  7. Status of the Whipple Observatory Cerenkov air shower imaging telescope array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Fegan, D. J.; Fennell, S.; Freeman, S.; Frishman, D.; Harris, K.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D.; Lamb, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Recently the power of the Cerenkov imaging technique in Very High Energy gamma-ray astronomy was demonstrated by the detection of the Crab nebula at high statistical significance. In order to further develop this technique to allow the detection of weaker or more distant sources a second 10 m class reflector was constructed about 120 m from the original instrument. The addition of the second reflector will allow both a reduction in the energy threshold and an improvement in the rejection of the hadronic background. The design and construction of the second reflector, Gamma Ray Astrophysics New Imaging TElescope (GRANITE) is described.

  8. Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging of Interscapular Brown Adipose Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xueli; Kuo, Chaincy; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT), widely known as a “good fat” plays pivotal roles for thermogenesis in mammals. This special tissue is closely related to metabolism and energy expenditure, and its dysfunction is one important contributor for obesity and diabetes. Contrary to previous belief, recent PET/CT imaging studies indicated the BAT depots are still present in human adults. PET imaging clearly shows that BAT has considerably high uptake of 18F-FDG under certain conditions. In this video repo...

  9. Recent operational performance of the CERN Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the design and construction of the Time Projection chambers (TPCs) of the Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector (RICH). Details are given of the TPC high voltage system and its monitoring and control. In addition, the operation and monitoring of the readout is described together with results of tests on the performance of the front end amplifiers. The operation of the RICH TPCs and electronics during the first data run of WA69, in 1984, is discussed together with relevant results from laboratory tests. Results from the preliminary analysis of a sample of data from the 1984 run are also presented

  10. Component and system tests of the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The components of the SLD barrel Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) are now built and are being installed. We report on tests of these, including tests of the fiber optic calibration system, detailed studies of electron drift paths on production drift boxes and detectors, tests of the dynamic gating system and its effect on drift path distortions due to space-charge, and a measurement of the electron lifetime in a production drift box. In addition, we report on the UV transmission of recirculated liquid C6F14 and on the effects of CRID construction materials on electron lifetime. 9 refs., 11 figs

  11. Parametric effect of a spatially periodic voltage depression on operation of Cerenkov sources of electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In microwave sources of coherent Cerenkov radiation the electrons usually propagate near the rippled wall of a slow-wave structure. These ripples cause the periodic modulation of electron potential depression, and therefore, lead to periodic modulation of electron axial velocities. Since the period of this electrostatic pumping is the period of the slow-wave structure the parametric coupling of electrons to originally nonsynchronous spatial harmonics of the microwave field may occur. This effect can be especially important for backward-wave oscillators (BWO's) driven by high current, relativistic electron beams. In the paper both linear and nonlinear theories of the relativistic resonant BWO with periodic modulation of electron axial velocities are developed and results illustrating the evolution of the linear gain function and the efficiency of operation in the large-signal regime are presented

  12. The correction of atmospheric Cerenkov images for the effect of the geomagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes use the differences in shape and orientation of the images of development of cascades to distinguish between very high energy gamma rays and the cosmic ray background. We have previously shown that these images may be distorted by the effects of the geomagnetic field, which decreases the sensitivity of a telescope. In this paper we propose an analysis technique which corrects for (in first order) the effects of the geomagnetic field on the orientation of gamma ray images. Applying this technique to observations of gamma ray sources, we demonstrate that these corrections reduce the effect of the geomagnetic field and improve the sensitivity of the University of Durham Mark 6 telescope. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  13. Pixel-based parametric source depth map for Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altabella, L.; Boschi, F.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Optical tomography represents a challenging problem in optical imaging because of the intrinsically ill-posed inverse problem due to photon diffusion. Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) for optical photons produced in tissues by several radionuclides (i.e.: 32P, 18F, 90Y), has been investigated using both 3D multispectral approach and multiviews methods. Difficult in convergence of 3D algorithms can discourage to use this technique to have information of depth and intensity of source. For these reasons, we developed a faster 2D corrected approach based on multispectral acquisitions, to obtain source depth and its intensity using a pixel-based fitting of source intensity. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data were used to develop and validate the method to obtain the parametric map of source depth. With this approach we obtain parametric source depth maps with a precision between 3% and 7% for MC simulation and 5-6% for experimental data. Using this method we are able to obtain reliable information about the source depth of Cerenkov luminescence with a simple and flexible procedure.

  14. Partial defect detection using a digital Cerenkov viewing device and image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The digital Cerenkov viewing device (DCVD) is used by the inspectors of the International Atomic Energy Agency to non-intrusively verify long-cooled spent fuel. Collimated Cerenkov light between the fuel rods in spent fuel, detected when the instrument is moved a few centimetres off alignment, indicates the presence of fission products in the fuel assembly. The digital nature of the DCVD opens up the area of image processing. Image enhancement and noise reduction assist in the identification of fuel designs and give the potential to automatically detect missing and substituted fuel rods (partial defects). Image analysis programs such as Image Pro, MATLAB and LabVIEW were used to examine spent LWR fuel to detect characteristics of missing fuel rods, substituted fuel rods and partial-length fuel rods in a number of BWR fuel assemblies. One example is shown below in which MATLAB was used to measure the intensity of selected regions of interest. The example shows that the missing rods (identified as 2 and 3) clearly show higher counts than the immediately adjacent short-rod regions (1 and 4), indicating that more light is coming up from the full length of the assembly than the adjacent water regions where a partial length rod occupies much of the assembly length. Other areas of study included noise reduction by filtering, dark frame characterization, frame averaging/bad frame removal techniques and running average optimizations. Pattern (or object) recognition procedures were used to identify anomalous regions within a fuel assembly to enable highlighting of suspect rods in the assembly image. Graduated background intensities from near neighbours were also subtracted, pixel by pixel, from assemblies of interest. This paper provides results of this study, discusses the degree of success and indicates directions for future development

  15. Computed Cerenkov luminescence yields for radionuclides used in biology and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging is an emerging biomedical imaging modality that takes advantage of the optical Cerenkov photons emitted following the decay of radionuclides in dielectric media such as tissue. Cerenkov radiation potentially allows many biomedically-relevant radionuclides, including all positron-emitting radionuclides, to be imaged in vivo using sensitive CCD cameras. Cerenkov luminescence may also provide a means to deliver light deep inside tissue over a sustained period of time using targeted radiotracers. This light could be used for photoactivation, including photorelease of therapeutics, photodynamic therapy and photochemical internalization. Essential to assessing the feasibility of these concepts, and the design of instrumentation designed for detecting Cerenkov radiation, is an understanding of the light yield of different radionuclides in tissue. This is complicated by the dependence of the light yield on refractive index and the volume of the sample being interrogated. Using Monte Carlo simulations, in conjunction with step-wise use of the Frank–Tamm equation, we studied forty-seven different radionuclides and show that Cerenkov light yields in tissue can be as high as a few tens of photons per nuclear decay for a wavelength range of 400–800 nm. The dependency on refractive index and source volume is explored, and an expression for the scaling factor necessary to compute the Cerenkov yield in any arbitrary spectral band is given. This data will be of broad utility in guiding the application of Cerenkov radiation emitted from biomedical radionuclides. (paper)

  16. Does the Iron K and Alpha: Line of Active Galactic Nuclei Arise from the Cerenkov Line-like Radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J. H.; Liu, D. B.; Chen, W. P.; Chen, L.; Zhang, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    When thermal relativistic electrons with isotropic distribution of velocities move in a gas region or impinge upon the surface of a cloud that consists of a dense gas or doped dusts, the Cerenkov effect produces peculiar atomic or ionic emission lines, which is known as the Cerenkov line - like radiation. This newly recognized emission mechanism may find wide applications in high-energy astrophysics. In this paper we tentatively adopt this new line emission mechanism to discuss the origin of the iron Kα feature of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The motivation of this research is to attempt a solution to a problem encountered by the "disk fluorescence line" model, i.e. , the lack of temporal response of the observed iron Kα line flux to the changes of the X-ray continuum flux. If the Cerenkov line emission is indeed responsible significant ly for the iron Kα feature, the conventional scenario around the central supermassive black holes of AGNs would need to be modified to accomodate more energetic, more violent, and much denser environments than previously thought.

  17. Measuring velocity with the open-quotes optic boomclose quotes: The contribution of the Ring Imaging Cerenkov, Detector to the search for charmless beauty decay at fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A charged particle traveling in a medium with a speed exceeding the speed of light in that medium produces Cerenkov radiation (light). This effect is, in a very loose sense, the optical analogue of a sonic boom. The light is emitted at a specific angle, θ, determined by the velocity, β, of the particle according to the equation β=1/(ncosθ) where n is the index of refraction of the medium. In the Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector (RICH), light emitted at an angle θ is focused as a ring of radius r=f tan θ (f=local length) onto a detector. The velocity of the particle is calculated from the radius of the circular ring of light striking the detector, allowing the mass of the particle to be determined. E789 makes use of the well-known E605 RICH detector to study D- and B-meson decays. The physics explored by E789 and the operation of the RICH will be described, and images produced by analysis of data from the RICH will be presented

  18. Properties of 8-inch photomultiplier tubes for a large volume imaging water Cerenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Institut fuer Kernphysik I conceptional studies for a possible succession project for the KARMEN-ν-detector are performed. This design studies propose to build a large volume 1300 t imaging water Cerenkov detector. The main goal of this experiment will be the investigation of ν-e--scattering in the medium energy range up to 50 MeV. The sensitive surface of this detector will be instrumented with about 3000 8-inch photomultiplier tubes (PMT) providing a coverage of 20%. In the framework of this detector design, studies of the properties of hemispherical 8-inch phototubes have been investigated in this work. The topic was to optimise the quality of the important PMT properties like time- and energy-resolution which are crucial to achieve the required spatial and angular resolutions. A second task of this work was to construct a test facility for the PMT, with the possibility to test large quantities. Monte Carlo calculations show that the required detector resolutions of σE/E(Ee≤50 MeV)=5.2%+47%/√E, σt(Ee∼30 MeV)=0.6 ns, σx(Ee∼30 MeV)=13 cm, σΘ(Ee∼30 MeV)=20 , can be achieved if the phototubes have a transit-time spread less than 1 ns. Up to now, two different 8-inch tubes are available and have been tested, the HAMAMATSU R5912 and the EMI 9353. (orig.)

  19. Optical imaging as an expansion of nuclear medicine: Cerenkov-based luminescence vs fluorescence-based luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integration of optical imaging technologies can further strengthen the field of radioguided surgery. Rather than using two separate chemical entities to achieve this extension, hybrid imaging agents can be used that contain both radionuclear and optical properties. Two types of such hybrid imaging agents are available: (1) hybrid imaging agents generated by Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of β-emitters and (2) hybrid imaging agents that contain both a radioactive moiety and a fluorescent dye. One major challenge clinicians are now facing is to determine the potential value of these approaches. With this tutorial review we intend to clarify the differences between the two approaches and highlight the clinical potential of hybrid imaging during image-guided surgery applications. (orig.)

  20. Properties of 8-inch photomultiplier tubes for a large volume imaging water Cerenkov detector; Untersuchung der Eigenschaften hemisphaerischer 8-inch Photomultiplier fuer einen grossvolumigen Wasser-Cerenkov-Detektor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehler, C.

    1996-01-01

    In the Institut fuer Kernphysik I conceptional studies for a possible succession project for the KARMEN-{nu}-detector are performed. This design studies propose to build a large volume 1300 t imaging water Cerenkov detector. The main goal of this experiment will be the investigation of {nu}-e{sup -}-scattering in the medium energy range up to 50 MeV. The sensitive surface of this detector will be instrumented with about 3000 8-inch photomultiplier tubes (PMT) providing a coverage of 20%. In the framework of this detector design, studies of the properties of hemispherical 8-inch phototubes have been investigated in this work. The topic was to optimise the quality of the important PMT properties like time- and energy-resolution which are crucial to achieve the required spatial and angular resolutions. A second task of this work was to construct a test facility for the PMT, with the possibility to test large quantities. Monte Carlo calculations show that the required detector resolutions of {sigma}{sub E}/E(E{sub e}{<=}50 MeV)=5.2%+47%/{radical}E, {sigma}{sub t}(E{sub e}{approx}30 MeV)=0.6 ns, {sigma}{sub x}(E{sub e}{approx}30 MeV)=13 cm, {sigma}{sub {Theta}}(E{sub e}{approx}30 MeV)=20 , can be achieved if the phototubes have a transit-time spread less than 1 ns. Up to now, two different 8-inch tubes are available and have been tested, the HAMAMATSU R5912 and the EMI 9353. (orig.)

  1. Cerenkov ring imaging and spectroscopy of charged KSTAR interactions at 11 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, P.F.

    1988-11-01

    The physics and technology of this new Cerenkov detector are discussed, including materials studies, construction techniques, and resolution measurements. Sources of resolution error are individually identified and measured where possible. The results of all studied indicate that the measurement resolution is understood. This work has led to the adoption of a large scale ring imaging detector as part of a new high energy physics spectrometer, the SLD, at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Results from an amplitude analysis of strange meson final states in K/sup /minus//p ..-->.. /ovr K/sub 0//..pi../sup /minus//p interactions are presented. The data derive from a 4 event/nb exposure of the LASS (large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer to an 11 GeV/c K/sup /minus// beam. The data sample consists of /approximately/100,000 vents distributed over the Dalitz plot of the channel. The process is observed to be dominated by the production and decay of natural spin-parity (J/sup P/ = 1/sup /minus//,2/sup +/,3/sup /minus//,/hor ellipsis/) strange meson states. The data can be understood in terms of a simple model in which the resonant /ovr K*/sup -// are produced predominantly via natural parity exchange in the t channel. The leading K*(890), K/sub 2/*(1430), and K*(1780) resonances are clearly observed and measured, and the underlying spectroscopy is also extracted. Indications of higher mass resonance production are also shown. The observed properties of these states are used to confront current models of quark spectroscopy in strange meson systems. 94 refs., 96 figs., 23 tabs.

  2. Cerenkov ring imaging and spectroscopy of charged KSTAR interactions at 11 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics and technology of this new Cerenkov detector are discussed, including materials studies, construction techniques, and resolution measurements. Sources of resolution error are individually identified and measured where possible. The results of all studied indicate that the measurement resolution is understood. This work has led to the adoption of a large scale ring imaging detector as part of a new high energy physics spectrometer, the SLD, at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Results from an amplitude analysis of strange meson final states in K/sup /minus//p → /ovr K/sub 0//π/sup /minus//p interactions are presented. The data derive from a 4 event/nb exposure of the LASS (large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer to an 11 GeV/c K/sup /minus// beam. The data sample consists of /approximately/100,000 vents distributed over the Dalitz plot of the channel. The process is observed to be dominated by the production and decay of natural spin-parity (J/sup P/ = 1/sup /minus//,2+,3/sup /minus//,/hor ellipsis/) strange meson states. The data can be understood in terms of a simple model in which the resonant /ovr K*/sup -// are produced predominantly via natural parity exchange in the t channel. The leading K*(890), K2*(1430), and K*(1780) resonances are clearly observed and measured, and the underlying spectroscopy is also extracted. Indications of higher mass resonance production are also shown. The observed properties of these states are used to confront current models of quark spectroscopy in strange meson systems. 94 refs., 96 figs., 23 tabs

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of gas Cerenkov detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical study of selected gamma-ray and electron diagnostic necessitates coupling Cerenkov radiation to electron/photon cascades. A Cerenkov production model and its incorporation into a general geometry Monte Carlo coupled electron/photon transport code is discussed. A special optical photon ray-trace is implemented using bulk optical properties assigned to each Monte Carlo zone. Good agreement exists between experimental and calculated Cerenkov data in the case of a carbon-dioxide gas Cerenkov detector experiment. Cerenkov production and threshold data are presented for a typical carbon-dioxide gas detector that converts a 16.7 MeV photon source to Cerenkov light, which is collected by optics and detected by a photomultiplier

  4. Lepton-pair Cerenkov radiation emitted by tachyonic neutrinos: Lorentz-covariant approach and IceCube data

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, Ulrich D

    2016-01-01

    Current experiments do not exclude the possibility that one or more neutrinos are very slightly superluminal or that they have a very small tachyonic mass. Important bounds on the size of a hypothetical tachyonic neutrino mass term are set by lepton pair Cerenkov radiation (LPCR), i.e., by the decay channel nu -> e^+ e^- nu which proceeds via a virtual Z0 boson. Here, we use a Lorentz-invariant dispersion relation which leads to very tight constraints on the tachyonic mass of neutrinos; we also calculate decay and energy loss rates. A possible cutoff seen in the IceCube neutrino spectrum for E_nu > 2 PeV, due to the potential onset of LPCR, is discussed.

  5. Enhancement of Cerenkov luminescence imaging by dual excitation of Er(3+,Yb(3+-doped rare-earth microparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Ma

    Full Text Available Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI has been successfully utilized in various fields of preclinical studies; however, CLI is challenging due to its weak luminescent intensity and insufficient penetration capability. Here, we report the design and synthesis of a type of rare-earth microparticles (REMPs, which can be dually excited by Cerenkov luminescence (CL resulting from the decay of radionuclides to enhance CLI in terms of intensity and penetration.Yb(3+- and Er(3+- codoped hexagonal NaYF4 hollow microtubes were synthesized via a hydrothermal route. The phase, morphology, and emission spectrum were confirmed for these REMPs by power X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and spectrophotometry, respectively. A commercial CCD camera equipped with a series of optical filters was employed to quantify the intensity and spectrum of CLI from radionuclides. The enhancement of penetration was investigated by imaging studies of nylon phantoms and nude mouse pseudotumor models.the REMPs could be dually excited by CL at the wavelengths of 520 and 980 nm, and the emission peaks overlaid at 660 nm. This strategy approximately doubled the overall detectable intensity of CLI and extended its maximum penetration in nylon phantoms from 5 to 15 mm. The penetration study in living animals yielded similar results.this study demonstrated that CL can dually excite REMPs and that the overlaid emissions in the range of 660 nm could significantly enhance the penetration and intensity of CL. The proposed enhanced CLI strategy may have promising applications in the future.

  6. Evaluation of trench chemical treatment for radiostrontium immobilization and evaluation of in situ Cerenkov radiation detection of 90Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrective measures technology task for humid sites consists of two subtasks. The first has the objective of demonstrating that caustic soda/soda ash injection into a closed trench's backfill can achieve a fixation of radiostrontium from further contamination of surrounding groundwaters. Monitoring of groundwater in and around a demonstration trench, first treated in 1980, has indicated a return to near pretreatment 90Sr concentrations. However, soil samples taken in 1984 showed comparable amounts of 90Sr-CaCO3 and alkalinity to those found in samples obtained in 1981. Less than 15% of the 90Sr in these samples of backfill from the trench was leachable by 0.1N CaCl2 indicating that most of the 90Sr has remained in a fixed form up to the present. Depth incremental core samples were obtained immediately downslope of the trench and most of the 90Sr was found near the surface. Such a condition indicated that overflow of groundwater from the trench during wet periods has been the major route for 90Sr migration from the trench. The second subtask has the objective of demonstrating the feasibility of detecting 90Sr in groundwater via in situ Cerenkov radiation measurement. A prototype Cerenkov detector was fabricated of a photomultiplier tube optically coupled to a light-sealed sample chamber for lowering into a well. The device was tested on groundwaters from a group of monitoring wells within an ORNL solid waste storage area. The estimates of 90Sr concentrations were comparable to those found by other counting procedures. A second prototype detector is being designed to employ dual photomultiplier tubes in a coincident counting mode to lower background counting rates

  7. Feasibility study of novel endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system in detecting and quantifying gastrointestinal disease: first human results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides potential to use clinical radiotracers for optical imaging. The goal of this study was to present a newly developed endoscopic CLI (ECLI) system and illustrate its feasibility and potential in distinguishing and quantifying cancerous lesions of the GI tract. The ECLI system was established by integrating an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera with a flexible fibre endoscope. Phantom experiments and animal studies were conducted to test and illustrate the system in detecting and quantifying the presence of radionuclide in vitro and in vivo. A pilot clinical study was performed to evaluate our system in clinical settings. Phantom and mice experiments demonstrated its ability to acquire both the luminescent and photographic images with high accuracy. Linear quantitative relationships were also obtained when comparing the ECLI radiance with the radiotracer activity (r2 = 0.9779) and traditional CLI values (r2 = 0.9025). Imaging of patients revealed the potential of ECLI in the identification and quantification of cancerous tissue from normal, which showed good consistence with the clinical PET examination. The new ECLI system shows good consistence with the clinical PET examination and has great potential for clinical translation and in aiding detection of the GI tract disease. (orig.)

  8. Feasibility study of novel endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system in detecting and quantifying gastrointestinal disease: first human results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hao; Li, Shujun; Yao, Liping; Liang, Jie; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun [Fourth Military Medical University, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Cao, Xin; Lin, Yenan; Liu, Muhan; Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli [Xidian University, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an (China); Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Wang, Min [Xi' an Children' s Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Xi' an (China)

    2015-06-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides potential to use clinical radiotracers for optical imaging. The goal of this study was to present a newly developed endoscopic CLI (ECLI) system and illustrate its feasibility and potential in distinguishing and quantifying cancerous lesions of the GI tract. The ECLI system was established by integrating an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera with a flexible fibre endoscope. Phantom experiments and animal studies were conducted to test and illustrate the system in detecting and quantifying the presence of radionuclide in vitro and in vivo. A pilot clinical study was performed to evaluate our system in clinical settings. Phantom and mice experiments demonstrated its ability to acquire both the luminescent and photographic images with high accuracy. Linear quantitative relationships were also obtained when comparing the ECLI radiance with the radiotracer activity (r{sup 2} = 0.9779) and traditional CLI values (r{sup 2} = 0.9025). Imaging of patients revealed the potential of ECLI in the identification and quantification of cancerous tissue from normal, which showed good consistence with the clinical PET examination. The new ECLI system shows good consistence with the clinical PET examination and has great potential for clinical translation and in aiding detection of the GI tract disease. (orig.)

  9. Review of recent progress in the development of Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principle behind the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detectors (CRIDs) involves focussing the Cherenkov light, emitted by a relativistic charged particle in passing through a radiator medium, onto a high efficiency photocathode which can be in turn read out with good spatial resolution, to localize the point of origin of the photoelectrons. This information permits the reconstruction of the circle of Cherenkov light for each particle above threshold, and hence the determination of the Cherenkov angle to an accuracy of a few percent. The groups currently working on these detectors are discussed, the status of these projects is examined, and progress is reported on the R and D on two 4-pi devices being prepared for physics at the Z0. The activities are being done at Fermilab, CERN, and SLAC. 8 refs., 32 figs

  10. SU-E-T-111: Development of Proton Dosimetry System Using Fiber-Optic Cerenkov Radiation Sensor Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We had developed and evaluated a new dosimetric system for proton therapy using array of fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) which can measure a percent depth dose (PDD) instantly. In this study, the Bragg peaks and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the proton beams measured by FOCRS array were compared with those measured by an ion chamber. Methods and Method: We fabricated an optical fiber array of FOCRS in a handmade phantom which is composed of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). There are 75 holes of 1mm diameter inside the phantom which is designed to be exposed in direction of beam when it is emerged in water phantom. The proton beam irradiation was carried out using IBA cyclotron PROTEUS 235 at national cancer center in Korea and a commercial data acquisition system was used to digitize the analog signal. Results: The measured Bragg peak and SOBP for the proton ranges of 7∼ 20 cm were well matched with the result from ion chamber. The comparison results show that the depth of proton beam ranges and the width of SOBP measured by array of FOCRS are comparable with the measurement from multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) although there are some uncertainty in the measurement of FOCRS array for some specific beam ranges. Conclusion: The newly developed FOCRS array based dosimetric system for proton therapy can efficiently reduce the time and effort needed for proton beam range measurement compared to the conventional method and has the potential to be used for the proton pencil beam application

  11. SU-E-T-111: Development of Proton Dosimetry System Using Fiber-Optic Cerenkov Radiation Sensor Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J [National Cancer Center, Ilsan, Gyeonggi-do, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M; Shin, D; Lim, Y; Lee, S; Kim, J; Kim, J [National Cancer Center, Goyangsi, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, U [National Medical Center in Korea, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We had developed and evaluated a new dosimetric system for proton therapy using array of fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) which can measure a percent depth dose (PDD) instantly. In this study, the Bragg peaks and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the proton beams measured by FOCRS array were compared with those measured by an ion chamber. Methods and Method: We fabricated an optical fiber array of FOCRS in a handmade phantom which is composed of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). There are 75 holes of 1mm diameter inside the phantom which is designed to be exposed in direction of beam when it is emerged in water phantom. The proton beam irradiation was carried out using IBA cyclotron PROTEUS 235 at national cancer center in Korea and a commercial data acquisition system was used to digitize the analog signal. Results: The measured Bragg peak and SOBP for the proton ranges of 7∼ 20 cm were well matched with the result from ion chamber. The comparison results show that the depth of proton beam ranges and the width of SOBP measured by array of FOCRS are comparable with the measurement from multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) although there are some uncertainty in the measurement of FOCRS array for some specific beam ranges. Conclusion: The newly developed FOCRS array based dosimetric system for proton therapy can efficiently reduce the time and effort needed for proton beam range measurement compared to the conventional method and has the potential to be used for the proton pencil beam application.

  12. Study of cerenkov radiation. Production of γ rays by electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a critical comparison of the theories of Bremsstrahlung. Experimental results obtained by the production of γ radiation with electron accelerators are compared to the theoretical results in order to estimate the extent to which the various theories are valid. (author)

  13. Monte Carlo studies on the sensitivity of the HEGRA imaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescope system in observations of extended gamma-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric showers induced by diffuse γ-rays as detected by the high-energy gamma-ray astronomy (HEGRA) system of five imaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have investigated the sensitivity of observations on extended γ-ray emission over the entire field of view of the instrument. We discuss a technique to search for extended γ-ray sources within the field of view of the instrument. We give estimates for HEGRA sensitivity of observations on extended TeV γ-ray sources

  14. Mitigation of numerical Cerenkov radiation and instability using a hybrid finite difference-FFT Maxwell solver and a local charge conserving current deposit

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Peicheng; Tableman, Adam; Decyk, Viktor K; Tsung, Frank S; Fiuza, Frederico; Davidson, Asher; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O; Mori, Warren B

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid Maxwell solver for fully relativistic and electromagnetic (EM) particle-in-cell (PIC) codes is described. In this solver, the EM fields are solved in $k$ space by performing an FFT in one direction, while using finite difference operators in the other direction(s). This solver eliminates the numerical Cerenkov radiation for particles moving in the preferred direction. Moreover, the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) induced by the relativistically drifting plasma and beam can be eliminated using this hybrid solver by applying strategies that are similar to those recently developed for pure FFT solvers. A current correction is applied for the charge conserving current deposit to correctly account for the EM calculation in hybrid Yee-FFT solver. A theoretical analysis of the dispersion properties in vacuum and in a drifting plasma for the hybrid solver is presented, and compared with PIC simulations with good agreement obtained. This hybrid solver is applied to both 2D and 3D Cartesian and quasi-3D (...

  15. A large Cerenkov counter

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    The photo shows the vertex Cerenkov counter C0 back side (with 12 mirrors) of the NA9 experiment. On foreground are members of the team (CERN and Wuppertal Uni), Salvo .., Manfred Poetsch, ..., Jocelyn Thadome, Helmut Braun, Heiner Brueck.

  16. Imaging in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is an important part of cancer treatment in which cancer patients are treated using high-energy radiation such as x-rays, gamma rays, electrons, protons, and neutrons. Currently, about half of all cancer patients receive radiation treatment during their whole cancer care process. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver the necessary radiation dose to cancer cells while minimizing dose to surrounding normal tissues. Success of radiation therapy highly relies on how accurately 1) identifies the target and 2) aim radiation beam to the target. Both tasks are strongly dependent of imaging technology and many imaging modalities have been applied for radiation therapy such as CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonant Image), and PET (Positron Emission Tomography). Recently, many researchers have given significant amount of effort to develop and improve imaging techniques for radiation therapy to enhance the overall quality of patient care. For example, advances in medical imaging technology have initiated the development of the state of the art radiation therapy techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), gated radiation therapy, tomotherapy, and Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT). Capability of determining the local tumor volume and location of the tumor has been significantly improved by applying single or multi-modality imaging for static or dynamic target. The use of multi-modality imaging provides a more reliable tumor volume, eventually leading to a better definitive local control. Image registration technique is essential to fuse two different image modalities and has been in significant improvement. Imaging equipment and their common applications that are in active use and/or under development in radiation therapy are reviewed

  17. The use of the Cerenkov effect in the counting of β- and γ- emitting radionuclides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelsema, W.J.; Ligny, C.L. de; Luten, J.B.; Vossenberg, F.G.A.

    1975-01-01

    In a transparent medium, β-radiation and the electrons which are released, under certain conditions, by the interaction of γ-radiation with the medium cause Cerenkov-radiation. The intensity of this Cerenkov-radiation was measured in water, glycerol and saturated sodium iodide solution in water. The

  18. A Compact Gas Cerenkov Detector with Novel Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Sivertz, Michael; Berger, Bruce; Ehrlich, Richard; Bartlet, John; Csorna, Steven; Jain, Vivek; Marka, Szabolcs; Kinoshita, Kay; Pomianowski, Paula

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a threshold Cerenkov counter for identification of charged hadrons. The radiator is pressurized gas, which is contained in thin-walled cylindrical modules. A mirror system of novel design transports Cerenkov photons to photomultiplier tubes. This system is compact, contains relatively little material, and has a large fraction of active volume. A prototype of a module designed for the proposed CLEO III detector has been studied using cosmic rays. Result...

  19. Radiation therapy imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a radiation therapy imaging apparatus for providing images in a patient being treated on a radiation therapy apparatus for verification and monitoring of patient positioning and verification of alignment and shaping of the radiation field of the radiation therapy apparatus. It comprises: a high-energy treatment head for applying a radiation dose to a patient positioned on a treatment table, and a gantry rotatable about an isocentric axis and carrying the treatment head for permitting the radiation dose to be applied to the patient from any of a range of angles about the isocentric axis; the radiation therapy imaging apparatus including a radiation therapy image detector which comprises a video camera mounted on the gantry diametrically opposite the treat head, an elongated light-excluding enclosure enveloping the camera to exclude ambient light from the camera, a fluoroscopic plate positioned on a distal end of the enclosure remote from the camera and aligned with the head to produce a fluoroscopic image in response to radiation applied from the head through the patient, mirror means in the enclosure and oriented for reflecting the image to the camera to permit monitoring on a viewing screen of the position of the radiation field in respect to the patient, and means for retracting at least the distal end of the enclosure from a position in which the fluoroscopic plate is disposed opposite the treatment head without disturbing the position of the camera on the gantry, so that the enclosure can be collapsed and kept from projecting under the treatment table when the patient is being positioned on the treatment table

  20. Digital Radiation image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou-Bakr Ramadan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This work introduces a new way for data visualization. Its name is Digital Application name' Image. Normal digital image is created by digital camera or digital scanner but digital application name image is created by measurements of monitoring data. This work uses the data which is measured by radiation monitoring station and classifies it using fuzzy logic rules to create digital radiation image. The main unique advantage of digital radiation image is that it expresses thousands of measurements in a very clear form through only one picture while the maximum number of measurements does not exceed 100 with other conventional visualization methods. This feature gives a facility to view one year of all recorded measurements in only one photo. This picture helps the user to observe the behavior of thousands of measurements in few minutes instead of spending few hours for reviewing hundreds of charts for the same measurements.

  1. Radiation imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbitt, III, John T.; Immel, David M.; Folsom, Matthew D.; Plummer, Jean R.; Serrato, Michael G.

    2016-06-28

    A radiation imaging system includes a casing and a camera disposed inside the casing. A first field of view through the casing exposes the camera to light from outside of the casing. An image plate is disposed inside the casing, and a second field of view through the casing to the image plate exposes the image plate to high-energy particles produced by a radioisotope outside of the casing. An optical reflector that is substantially transparent to the high-energy particles produced by the radioisotope is disposed with respect to the camera and the image plate to reflect light to the camera and to allow the high-energy particles produced by the radioisotope to pass through the optical reflector to the image plate.

  2. Radiation imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Immel, David M.; Bobbit, III, John T.; Plummer, Jean R.; Folsom, Matthew D.; Serrato, Michael G.

    2016-03-22

    A radiation imaging system includes a casing and a camera disposed inside the casing. A first field of view through the casing exposes the camera to light from outside of the casing. An image plate is disposed inside the casing, and a second field of view through the casing to the image plate exposes the image plate to high-energy particles produced by a radioisotope outside of the casing. An optical reflector that is substantially transparent to the high-energy particles produced by the radioisotope is disposed with respect to the camera and the image plate to reflect light to the camera and to allow the high-energy particles produced by the radioisotope to pass through the optical reflector to the image plate.

  3. A large Cerenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several problems, e.g. a test of nucleon conservation and high-energy neutrino detection of interest to us at Case Institute, have led to the construction of a large Cerenkov detector. This device consists of a tank 2.4 m in diameter and 2.1 m high which is painted with a white reflecting coat. The 7400-l water-volume used as the filling at present is viewed from above by 52 type-6364 Dumont multiplier phototubes. Internal to the detector as it is being currently used is a 200-l liquid scintillation-counter enclosed in an 8000-kg Fe shield. In this paper we describe constructional details and the response of the detector using cosmic-ray muons as a probe. We also present results on the effectiveness of the detector as an anti-coincidence blanket and will discuss the relevance of these numbers to the question of detecting high-energy neutrinos-both cosmic and man-made. (author)

  4. Intrinsically Radioactive [64Cu]CuInS/ZnS Quantum Dots for PET and Optical Imaging: Improved Radiochemical Stability and Controllable Cerenkov Luminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Weisheng; Sun, Xiaolian; Jacobson, Orit; Yan, Xuefeng; Min, Kyunghyun; Srivatsan, Avinash; Niu, Gang; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Chang, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Functionalized quantum dots (QDs) have been widely explored for multimodality bioimaging and proven to be versatile agents. Attaching positron-emitting radioisotopes onto QDs not only endows their positron emission tomography (PET) functionality, but also results in self-illuminating QDs, with no need for an external light source, by Cerenkov resonance energy transfer (CRET). Traditional chelation methods have been used to incorporate the radionuclide, but these methods are compromised by the...

  5. The attenuation of atmospheric Cerenkov photons

    CERN Document Server

    Daniel, M K

    2003-01-01

    Whilst the atmosphere places a limit on the successful applications of many branches of astronomy, it becomes an invaluable tool for the detection of very high energy gamma-rays. This thesis is concerned with reducing the systematic uncertainties inherent to using the atmosphere as a detector of very high energy radiation. The interaction processes important to high energy particles are met in the first chapter. The second chapter explores how these interaction processes are responsible for generating observable Cerenkov radiation that can be detected by ground based telescopes. A description of one of these atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes, the University of Durham Mark 6 telescope, is given in chapter 3. A timing analysis was performed on data obtained with this telescope of the high mass X-ray binary Centaurus X-3 and the findings are given in chapter 5. The result of the test for orbital modulation of the VHE gamma-ray signal has implications for the possible site of VHE gamma-ray emission in this system a...

  6. Radiation-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention provides a new technique for obtaining information non-invasively on the composition and structures of a material or body by detecting radiation-induced thermoacoustic image features. This is accomplished by utilizing the acoustic wave generated by sudden thermal stress. The sudden thermal stress is induced by a pulse of radiation which deposits energy causing a rapid, but very small, rise of temperature (typically, ΔT approximately 10sup(-6) - 10sup(-5) deg C). The radiation may be ionizing radiation, such as high energy electrons, photons (x-rays), neutrons, or other charged particles or it may be non-ionizing radiation, such as R.F. and microwave electromagnetic radiation and ultrasonic radiation. The choice of radiation depends on the nature of the body to be imaged and the type of information desired

  7. Measurement of {sup 40}K by Cerenkov Effect in foods; Medicion de {sup 40}K por Efecto Cerenkov en alimentos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila R, J. I.; Cancino T, F.; Lopez del R, H.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: idavilara@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The {sup 40}K is a natural radioactive isotope of the potassium element that decays mainly by beta and gamma radiation emission. Although the gamma spectrometry is generally used for its measuring, the energy of the beta radiation is enough to produce Cerenkov radiation in water. Taking advantage of the high efficiency of the liquid scintillation counting, a procedure to measure {sup 40}K was developed through the Cerenkov radiation using a liquid scintillation counter. The methodology was applied in foods with high content of potassium like tomato, banana, and in olive. The efficiency and sensibility of the counting were superior to those reported for gamma spectrometry and the chemical recovery of potassium was of 82.3%. The activity of {sup 40}K varied between 2.9 and 8.4 Bq/kg in banana, between 12.3 and 19 Bq/kg in tomato, and in olive was minor to the detectable minimum activity of the method. (Author)

  8. Determination of the efficiency of an aerogel Cerenkov-detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CB-TAPS experiment at ELSA in Bonn is optimized for measuring neutral, photonic final states. The identification of charged particles is normally done by measuring time-of-flight and energy loss. Already at moderately high particle energies the discrimination becomes impossible. Using the Cerenkov-effect is a good method to improve the identification of the particles. Aerogel is a very appropriate radiator-material due to its very low density, its high transparency and its refraction-index of about n ∼ 1.05. Exploiting the Cerenkov-effect on aerogel, electrons and most charged pions can be discriminated from protons. Therefore a diffusively reflecting aerogel Cerenkov-detector was built. Its performance was tested at the ELSA accelerator in Bonn with an electron-beam. In addition a test with a 1.1 GeV π--beam at GSI, Darmstadt, was performed. Furthermore, the aerogel Cerenkov-detector has been employed in an experiment at ELSA searching for ω-mesic states. Results of these measurements are presented

  9. Tests of a silica aerogel Cerenkov detector to be used in the European hybrid spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 18 module Cerenkov detector with a total sensitive area of 2.3m2 having silica aerogel as radiator is being tested in a particle beam at CERN PS. The modules having a sensitive area of 23x55 cm2 give typically a Cerenkov signal for β=1 particles of 12 photoelectrons for silica aerogel of refractive index 1.03 and a thickness of 15 cm. (Auth.)

  10. Tests of a silica aerogel Cerenkov detector to be used in European Hybrid Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, P J; Kesteman, J; Norrby, J; Pingot, O; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Lancker, L

    1981-01-01

    An 18 module Cerenkov detector with a total sensitive area of 2.3 m /sup 2/ having silica aerogel as radiator is being tested in a particle beam at CERN PS. The modules having a sensitive area of 23*55 cm/sup 2/ give typically a Cerenkov signal for beta =1 particles of 12 photoelectrons for silica aerogel of refractive index 1.03 and a thickness of 15 cm. (0 refs).

  11. Workshops on radiation imaging detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sochinskii, N.V.; Sun, G.C.; Kostamo, P.; Silenas, A.; Saynatjoki, A.; Grant, J.; Owens, A.; Kozorezov, A.G.; Noschis, E.; Van Eijk, C.; Nagarkar, V.; Sekiya, H.; Pribat, D.; Campbell, M.; Lundgren, J.; Arques, M.; Gabrielli, A.; Padmore, H.; Maiorino, M.; Volpert, M.; Lebrun, F.; Van der Putten, S.; Pickford, A.; Barnsley, R.; Anton, M.E.G.; Mitschke, M.; Gros d' Aillon, E.; Frojdh, C.; Norlin, B.; Marchal, J.; Quattrocchi, M.; Stohr, U.; Bethke, K.; Bronnimann, C.H.; Pouvesle, J.M.; Hoheisel, M.; Clemens, J.C.; Gallin-Martel, M.L.; Bergamaschi, A.; Redondo-Fernandez, I.; Gal, O.; Kwiatowski, K.; Montesi, M.C.; Smith, K

    2005-07-01

    This document gathers the transparencies that were presented at the international workshop on radiation imaging detectors. 9 sessions were organized: 1) materials for detectors and detector structure, 2) front end electronics, 3) interconnected technologies, 4) space, fusion applications, 5) the physics of detection, 6) industrial applications, 7) synchrotron radiation, 8) X-ray sources, and 9) medical and other applications.

  12. Workshops on radiation imaging detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers the transparencies that were presented at the international workshop on radiation imaging detectors. 9 sessions were organized: 1) materials for detectors and detector structure, 2) front end electronics, 3) interconnected technologies, 4) space, fusion applications, 5) the physics of detection, 6) industrial applications, 7) synchrotron radiation, 8) X-ray sources, and 9) medical and other applications

  13. Forward model of Cerenkov luminescence tomography with the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianghong; Tian, Jie; Yang, Xin; Qin, Chenghu

    2011-03-01

    Applying Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) to localizing Cerenkov light sources in situ is still in its nascent stage. One of the obstacles hindering the development of the CLT is the lack of dedicated imaging mode. In this contribution, the paper presented a Cerenkov optical imaging mode, in which the propagation of optical photons inside tissues generated by the Vavilov-Cerenkov effect is modeled based on simplified spherical harmonics approximation. As a significantly more transport-like and computational-efficient approximation theory, the performance of the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP3) in the CLT forward is investigated in stages. Finally, the performance of the proposed forward model is validated using numerical phantoms and compared with the simulation data based on the Monte Carlo method.

  14. Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interdisciplinary efforts may significantly affect the way that clinical knowledge and scientific research related to imaging impact the field of Radiation Oncology. This report summarizes the findings of an intersociety workshop held in October 2008, with the express purpose of exploring 'Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology.' Participants from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), American Association of physicists in Medicine (AAPM), American Board of Radiology (ABR), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), and Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) discussed areas of education, clinical practice, and research that bridge disciplines and potentially would lead to improved clinical practice. Findings from this workshop include recommendations for cross-training opportunities within the allowed structured of Radiology and Radiation Oncology residency programs, expanded representation of ASTRO in imaging related multidisciplinary groups (and reciprocal representation within ASTRO committees), increased attention to imaging validation and credentialing for clinical trials (e.g., through the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN)), and building ties through collaborative research as well as smaller joint workshops and symposia.

  15. Digital Cerenkov viewing device for verification of spent LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scientific charge-coupled device (SCCD) has been evaluated as the detector in a Cerenkov Viewing Device (CVD) to verify spent LWR fuel. The study is part of a joint task between the Canadian and Swedish Support Programs to develop a CVD with higher sensitivity than the Mark IVe. A commercial laboratory camera system was coupled to a recently developed 250-mm lens and an ultraviolet-pass filter. The computer-controlled instrument was tested at the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant and the CLAB interim fuel storage facility in Sweden. Acquired Cerenkov glow images of BWR and PWR spent fuel assemblies showed more detail than those taken with the Mark IVe CVD. Moreover, examination of images showed new Cerenkov characteristics that had not been observed previously. The instrument was used to image a BWR fuel assembly cooled for 16 years with a burnup of 22,000 MWd/t U. This was judged to be the limit of the instrument and was comparable to the limit of the Mark IVe CVD. An increase in sensitivity can now be achieved with the latest generation of SCCD sensors. A new prototype Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) is being developed using a back-thinned SCCD having a quantum efficiency of > 40% in the ultraviolet. An improved filter has also been developed to increase the ultraviolet light throughput and to have very high rejection of visible and infrared light. The portable instrument will have an integrated compact display. Ergonomic design and operation (including software interface) will be emphasized in the development of this new instrument. The computer will be embedded in a separate light-weight wearable backpack. The prototype DCVD will be produced in early 1998 with testing later that year. (author)

  16. Cerenkov Characteristics of PWR Assemblies using a Prototype DCVD with a Back-Illuminated CCD. Prepared for the Canadian Safeguards Support Program and the Swedish Support Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian and Swedish Safeguards Support Programs have developed a prototype Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) to verify spent fuel. Field measurements were conducted in January 2003 at the Swedish facilities CLAB and Ringhals Unit 2 on PWR fuel and non-fuel assemblies. The images obtained are documented and the Cerenkov characteristics observed are discussed. New Cerenkov information obtained offers the possibility of computer assisted verification of spent fuel and non-fuel assemblies. Quantitative analysis for parameters such as cooling time, alignment and Cerenkov glow as a function of distance are discussed

  17. SU-E-T-238: Monte Carlo Estimation of Cerenkov Dose for Photo-Dynamic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, O; Price, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Eldib, A [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University Cairo (Egypt); Mora, G [de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Estimation of Cerenkov dose from high-energy megavoltage photon and electron beams in tissue and its impact on the radiosensitization using Protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) for tumor targeting enhancement in radiotherapy. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo code is used to generate dose distributions from 18MV Varian photon beam and generic high-energy (45-MV) photon and (45-MeV) electron beams in a voxel-based tissueequivalent phantom. In addition to calculating the ionization dose, the code scores Cerenkov energy released in the wavelength range 375–425 nm corresponding to the pick of the PpIX absorption spectrum (Fig. 1) using the Frank-Tamm formula. Results: The simulations shows that the produced Cerenkov dose suitable for activating PpIX is 4000 to 5500 times lower than the overall radiation dose for all considered beams (18MV, 45 MV and 45 MeV). These results were contradictory to the recent experimental studies by Axelsson et al. (Med. Phys. 38 (2011) p 4127), where Cerenkov dose was reported to be only two orders of magnitude lower than the radiation dose. Note that our simulation results can be corroborated by a simple model where the Frank and Tamm formula is applied for electrons with 2 MeV/cm stopping power generating Cerenkov photons in the 375–425 nm range and assuming these photons have less than 1mm penetration in tissue. Conclusion: The Cerenkov dose generated by high-energy photon and electron beams may produce minimal clinical effect in comparison with the photon fluence (or dose) commonly used for photo-dynamic therapy. At the present time, it is unclear whether Cerenkov radiation is a significant contributor to the recently observed tumor regression for patients receiving radiotherapy and PpIX versus patients receiving radiotherapy only. The ongoing study will include animal experimentation and investigation of dose rate effects on PpIX response.

  18. SU-E-T-238: Monte Carlo Estimation of Cerenkov Dose for Photo-Dynamic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Estimation of Cerenkov dose from high-energy megavoltage photon and electron beams in tissue and its impact on the radiosensitization using Protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) for tumor targeting enhancement in radiotherapy. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo code is used to generate dose distributions from 18MV Varian photon beam and generic high-energy (45-MV) photon and (45-MeV) electron beams in a voxel-based tissueequivalent phantom. In addition to calculating the ionization dose, the code scores Cerenkov energy released in the wavelength range 375–425 nm corresponding to the pick of the PpIX absorption spectrum (Fig. 1) using the Frank-Tamm formula. Results: The simulations shows that the produced Cerenkov dose suitable for activating PpIX is 4000 to 5500 times lower than the overall radiation dose for all considered beams (18MV, 45 MV and 45 MeV). These results were contradictory to the recent experimental studies by Axelsson et al. (Med. Phys. 38 (2011) p 4127), where Cerenkov dose was reported to be only two orders of magnitude lower than the radiation dose. Note that our simulation results can be corroborated by a simple model where the Frank and Tamm formula is applied for electrons with 2 MeV/cm stopping power generating Cerenkov photons in the 375–425 nm range and assuming these photons have less than 1mm penetration in tissue. Conclusion: The Cerenkov dose generated by high-energy photon and electron beams may produce minimal clinical effect in comparison with the photon fluence (or dose) commonly used for photo-dynamic therapy. At the present time, it is unclear whether Cerenkov radiation is a significant contributor to the recently observed tumor regression for patients receiving radiotherapy and PpIX versus patients receiving radiotherapy only. The ongoing study will include animal experimentation and investigation of dose rate effects on PpIX response

  19. Biological imaging in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosu, A.L.; Wiedenmann, N.; Molls, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this study was to discuss the value of integrating biological imaging (PET, SPECT, MRS etc.) in radiation treatment planning and monitoring. Studies in patients with brain tumors have shown that, compared to CT and MRI alone, the image fusion of CT/MRI and amino acid SPECT or PET allows a more correct delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and planning target volume (PTV). For FDG-PET, comparable results with different techniques are reported in the literature also for bronchial carcinoma, ear-nose-and-throat tumors, and cervical carcinoma, or, in the case of MRS, for prostate cancer. Imaging of hypoxia, cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumor angiogenesis, and gene expression leads to the identification of differently aggressive areas of a biologically inhomogeneous tumor mass that can be individually and more appropriately targeted using innovative IMRT. Thus, a biological, inhomogeneous dose distribution can be generated, the so-called dose painting. In addition, the biological imaging can play a significant role in the evaluation of the therapy response after radiochemotherapy. Clinical studies in ear-nose-and-throat tumors, bronchial carcinoma, esophagus carcinoma, and cervical carcinoma suggest that the sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for the therapy response are higher compared to anatomical imaging (CT and MRI). Clinical and experimental studies are required to define the real impact of these investigations in radiation treatment planning, and especially in the evaluation of therapy response. (orig.)

  20. High-power and superpower Cerenkov masers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linear and nonlinear theory of the efficient operation of high-power (gigawatt) and superpower (50 GW) Cerenkov masers is developed and discussed. Important technology issues such as breakdown, plasma production, and coupling to the output device are discussed. The relative merits of dielectric Cerenkov masers (DCM's) and plasma Cerenkov masers (PCM's) are considered. The principal design tool is a new particle simulation model that has been developed to investigate Cerenkov masers. The novel aspects of this model are briefly described along with a comparison of calculated and experimental results. The agreement between calculations and measurements is generally good. Finally, designs for a high-power and superpower PCM are described. These generators are compact and efficient (10- to 20- percent conversion from beam energy to microwave energy)

  1. Photomultiplier tubes for Low Level Cerenkov Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tube backgrounds of several 2-inch photomultiplier types having S11, 'S' , S13 and S20 cathodes are compared by measuring signal and background pulse height distributions at pulse heights corresponding to a few photo-electrons. The reference signal is generated by means of a β-source and a plexiglass radiator. It is found that comparatively good results are obtained with selected tubes of the EMI types 6097B and 9514B having equivalent dark current dc values down to 10-12 input lumens. Special interest is devoted to the correlation between the measured tube backgrounds and the dark current dc values of the tubes, as a good correlation between these parameters simplifies the selection of photomultiplier tubes. The equivalent dark currents of the tested tubes extend over the range 10-12 to 10-9 input lumens. Although the investigation deals with photomultiplier tubes intended for use in low level Cerenkov detectors it is believed that the results could be valuable in other fields where photomultiplier tubes are utilized for the detection of weak light pulses

  2. Photomultiplier tubes for Low Level Cerenkov Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strindehag, O.

    1965-03-15

    Tube backgrounds of several 2-inch photomultiplier types having S11, 'S' , S13 and S20 cathodes are compared by measuring signal and background pulse height distributions at pulse heights corresponding to a few photo-electrons. The reference signal is generated by means of a {beta}-source and a plexiglass radiator. It is found that comparatively good results are obtained with selected tubes of the EMI types 6097B and 9514B having equivalent dark current dc values down to 10{sup -12} input lumens. Special interest is devoted to the correlation between the measured tube backgrounds and the dark current dc values of the tubes, as a good correlation between these parameters simplifies the selection of photomultiplier tubes. The equivalent dark currents of the tested tubes extend over the range 10{sup -12} to 10{sup -9} input lumens. Although the investigation deals with photomultiplier tubes intended for use in low level Cerenkov detectors it is believed that the results could be valuable in other fields where photomultiplier tubes are utilized for the detection of weak light pulses.

  3. Optimization of second harmonic generation and nonlinear phase shifts in the Cerenkov regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijs J.M.; Torruellas, William; Stegeman, George J.; Hoekstra, Hugo J.W.M.; Lambeck, Paul V.

    1996-01-01

    We present beam propagation method (BPM) studies of second harmonic generation (SHG) and nonlinear phaseshifts by cascading. The studies concentrate on SHG by means of radiation modes; the Cerenkov regime. The presented modeling does take into account both depletion and nonlinear phase shifts of the

  4. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures

  5. Cerenkov counter for the experiment NA3

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    The program of the NA3 experiment included the study of hadronic interactions with a large transverse momentum pT, thus the inclusion in the set-up of three gas threshold Cerenkov counters of large acceptance. The photo shows the downstream part of the second Cerenkov (located at the output of the magnet). The yellow membrane is a temporary protection for the optics (shown in photo 7810540X) to be taken away when fixing this part to the gas tank (entering the magnet and not shown). The photomultipliers all around are heavily shielded.

  6. Cerenkov counters at the Omega Facility

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    P. Petroff on the left. Here one sees both the gas Cerenkov counters sitting in front of the magnet to select forward emitted particles. The smaller one, working at high pressure, sits nearest to the Omega magnet (see photo 7505073X), the other (see photo 7505071X) works at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Performance of silica aerogel threshold Cerenkov counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from a series of test beam measurements are presented for a two-cell silica aerogel Cerenkov counter system. The main achievement is the detection of 13±1 photoelectrons in a full-sized n=1.008 silica aerogel cell which is read out with a fine mesh photomultiplier in different magnetic fields up to 1.35T. (orig.)

  8. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouter van Es, H. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Engelen, A.M. [Department of Radiation Therapy, University Hospital Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Witkamp, T.D. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Ramos, L.M.P. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Feldberg, M.A.M. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1997-05-01

    Objective. To describe the MR imaging appearance of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy. Design. MR imaging was performed in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy and in one with surgically proven radiation fibrosis of the brachial plexus. Patients. Three patients who had had radiation therapy to the axilla and supraclavicular region (two with breast carcinoma and one with Hodgkin`s lymphoma) presented with symptoms in the arm and hand. To exclude metastases or tumor recurrence MR imaging was performed. Results and conclusion. In one patient, fibrosis showing low signal intensity was found, while in two patients high signal intensity fibrosis surrounding the brachial plexus was found on the T2-weighted images. In one case gadolinium enhancement of the fibrosis was seen 21 years after radiation therapy. It is concluded that radiation-induced brachial plexopathy can have different MR imaging appearances. We found that radiation fibrosis can have both low or high signal intensities on T2-weighted images, and that fibrosis can enhance even 21 years after radiation therapy. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  9. A comparison of proportional and Cerenkov counting for sulfur tablet neutron dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 32S(n,p)32P reaction in sulfur tablets is widely used as a fast neutron dosimeter. In one commonly used method of analysis maximum sensitivity is obtained by burning the irradiated tablet and then counting the β-particles from the remaining 32P by either Geiger-Mueller, proportional, or scintillation detectors. The analysis of both irradiated sulfur powder as a suspension and irradiated water-soluble sulfur compounds in a liquid scintillation counter by measuring Cerenkov radiation has been reported. In the present paper a modification of Cerenkov counting is reported, and a comparison is made between that technique and a proportional counting method. In addition, the effect of a wavelength shifter on Cerenkov counting is reported. Tablets compressed from elemental sulfur were irradiated with neutrons from a 14-MeV neutron generator. Cerenkov counting was found to be better than proportional counting in that it was more precise, 1.38% vs 3.64% standard deviation, and the 32P lost in the burning process was less, 3.53% vs 10.4%. (author)

  10. Radiation effects on CCD image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade, the micro process technology has advanced and some elaborate semiconductor devices with many microscopic elements in a cell of about 10 μm x 10 μm can be successfully used as radiation detectors and related parts in the field of nuclear physics and engineering. A CCD image sensor, for example, effectively measures details of particle-beam profiles in accelerator applications. This paper describes radiation effects on CCD image sensors. Some CCD samples were irradiated with 60Co gamma-rays and DD and DT neutrons for the examination of the reliability of CCDs used in radiation environments. This paper shows experimental data on radiation effects on CCDs and then discusses the difference in the radiation effects between gamma-rays and neutrons. The following two radiation effects on CCDs are described. One is the transient effect, which is induced by the ionisation process of radiations and is not permanent but recoverable. A CCD responds to radiations as well as light and outputs pseudo signals induced by radiation reactions in the normal video signals during irradiation. The other is the permanent effect, which is caused by the generation of the defects. A CCD image sensor is easily influenced by the trapped holes produced by ionisation in the gate oxide. The defects cause the generation of the leakage current within the depletion region, the trapping of signal charge within the channel of the charge shift register, and the flat band voltage shift which affects the CCD operating bias. (author)

  11. Radiation biology of medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kelsey, Charles A; Sandoval, Daniel J; Chambers, Gregory D; Adolphi, Natalie L; Paffett, Kimberly S

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a thorough yet concise introduction to quantitative radiobiology and radiation physics, particularly the practical and medical application. Beginning with a discussion of the basic science of radiobiology, the book explains the fast processes that initiate damage in irradiated tissue and the kinetic patterns in which such damage is expressed at the cellular level. The final section is presented in a highly practical handbook style and offers application-based discussions in radiation oncology, fractionated radiotherapy, and protracted radiation among others. The text is also supplemented by a Web site.

  12. Gas Cerenkov detector for measuring 16.7-MeV gamma rays from the D(T,γ)5He reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas Cerenkov detector has been developed for measuring radiation from the 16.7-MeV gamma branch of the D-T reaction. This has useful applications as a diagnostic tool for weapons tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), as well as for evaluation of ICF targets and Tokomak plasmas. The Cerenkov process was chosen because of excellent time response. A gas radiator allows threshold control to eliminate low-energy background, such as gamma radiation produced by a neutron capture or scattering. The detector consists of a thin aluminum converter to provide energetic pair and Compton electrons, a deflecting magnet, a Cerenkov radiator, and an optical system for collection and detection of Cerenkov light. The radiator is a gas chamber filled with approximately one atmosphere of carbon dioxide. A photodiode is used for light detection. The electron beam from the DOE/EG and G electron linear accelerator at EG and G's Santa Barbara Operations has been used to measure the detector response as functions of electron energy and gas pressure. A Monte Carlo production-transport code is used to calculate geometrical properties of the pair and Compton electron distributions as they enter the Cerenkov radiator. Fluorescence, transition radiation, and other optical backgrounds produced by subthreshold electrons are being evaluated in order to optimize the detector design

  13. Irradiated fuel examination using the Cerenkov technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for monitoring irradiated nuclear fuel inventories located in water filled storage ponds has been developed and demonstrated. This technique provides sufficient qualitative information to be useful as a confirmatory technique to International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. Measurements have been made on the Cerenkov glow light intensity from irradiated fuel that show the intensity of this light to be proportional to the cooling time. Fieldable instruments used in several tests confirm that such measurements can be made easily and rapidly, without fuel assembly movement or the introduction of apparatus into the storage ponds. The Cerenkov technique and instrumentation have been shown to be of potential use to operators of reactor spent fuel facilities and away from reactor storage facilities, and to the International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors who provide surveillance of the irradiated fuel stored in these facilities

  14. Advanced Imaging Algorithms for Radiation Imaging Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The intent of the proposed work, in collaboration with University of Michigan, is to develop the algorithms that will bring the analysis from qualitative images to quantitative attributes of objects containing SNM. The first step to achieving this is to develop an indepth understanding of the intrinsic errors associated with the deconvolution and MLEM algorithms. A significant new effort will be undertaken to relate the image data to a posited three-dimensional model of geometric primitives that can be adjusted to get the best fit. In this way, parameters of the model such as sizes, shapes, and masses can be extracted for both radioactive and non-radioactive materials. This model-based algorithm will need the integrated response of a hypothesized configuration of material to be calculated many times. As such, both the MLEM and the model-based algorithm require significant increases in calculation speed in order to converge to solutions in practical amounts of time.

  15. Phaseless computational imaging with a radiating metasurface

    OpenAIRE

    Fromenteze, Thomas; Liu, Xiaojun; Boyarsky, Michael; Gollub, Jonah; Smith, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Computational imaging modalities support a simplification of the active architectures required in an imaging system and these approaches have been validated across the electromagnetic spectrum. Recent implementations have utilized pseudo-orthogonal radiation patterns to illuminate an object of interest---notably, frequency-diverse metasurfaces have been exploited as fast and low-cost alternative to conventional coherent imaging systems. However, accurately measuring the complex-valued signals...

  16. Radiation: Rational use of diagnostic imaging studies in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this paper are to recognize the biological effects of radiation; explain the action of ionizing radiation on the cell; list the main sources of ionizing radiation; to indicate imaging studies considering the danger of radiation; select the method of imaging saving radiation; rational use of imaging studies without repeating exams.

  17. Radiation protection in medical imaging and radiation oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Stoeva, Magdalena S

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Protection in Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology focuses on the professional, operational, and regulatory aspects of radiation protection. Advances in radiation medicine have resulted in new modalities and procedures, some of which have significant potential to cause serious harm. Examples include radiologic procedures that require very long fluoroscopy times, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, and intravascular brachytherapy. This book summarizes evidence supporting changes in consensus recommendations, regulations, and health physics practices associated with these recent advances in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology. It supports intelligent and practical methods for protection of personnel, the public, and patients. The book is based on current recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and is complemented by detailed practical sections and professional discussions by the world’s leading medical and health physics professionals. It also ...

  18. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs

  19. Radiation imaging for basic and applied research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To peer into the interiors of a microscopic and macroscopic objects has been the dream of scientist and engineers for centuries. New frontiers in research and development in many branches of science and engineering such as biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, medical or physics have evolved around visual representation of the measurable property of an object, or phenomenon. Visualization using optical radiations provide limited information and often to look into the interiors of microscopic and macroscopic objects, probing with radiations such as x-ray or neutron is required. Such radiations are not directly visible and in order to unravel the data and images unfolded by such radiations, use of luminescent materials which convert these radiations into visible spectrum is required. Radiation imaging techniques have evolved in last few years and with this, new applications in the field of basic and applied sciences have developed. This has put greater demand on the development of new phosphors and scintillators suited for specific applications. This paper reviews new developments in radiation imaging techniques and applications and highlight the use of various phosphors and scintillators for such applications. As the subject is vast, only a few selected topics will be discussed on which work is being carried out at BARC. (author)

  20. An automated imaging system for radiation biodosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garty, Guy; Bigelow, Alan W; Repin, Mikhail; Turner, Helen C; Bian, Dakai; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Lyulko, Oleksandra V; Taveras, Maria; Yao, Y Lawrence; Brenner, David J

    2015-07-01

    We describe here an automated imaging system developed at the Center for High Throughput Minimally Invasive Radiation Biodosimetry. The imaging system is built around a fast, sensitive sCMOS camera and rapid switchable LED light source. It features complete automation of all the steps of the imaging process and contains built-in feedback loops to ensure proper operation. The imaging system is intended as a back end to the RABiT-a robotic platform for radiation biodosimetry. It is intended to automate image acquisition and analysis for four biodosimetry assays for which we have developed automated protocols: The Cytokinesis Blocked Micronucleus assay, the γ-H2AX assay, the Dicentric assay (using PNA or FISH probes) and the RABiT-BAND assay. PMID:25939519

  1. Mammography Radiation Dose and Image Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The early detection of breast cancer is technologically very challenging for radiography. At present screen-film mammography is the favoured method for early detection of breast cancer. In the United States, screening is under way and a large number of asymptomatic women are being exposed to radiation for the purpose of detecting early occult cancer. The prognosis for this disease is greatly improved if the cancer can be found before it reaches the size of 1 cm. Because of the widespread use of this imaging technology, much attention has been paid to its optimisation in terms of patient radiation dose, required image quality and quality control. Mammography in the USA is regulated by the Federal Government through mandatory facility certification including annual inspections and a specified quality control programme. However, there is still a wide range of radiation dose delivered to achieve a given film optical density and level of image quality. (author)

  2. Development of a high sensitivity Cerenkov viewing device. Field test at the Ringhals 2 PWR facility, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the joint Swedish and Canadian Safeguards Support Program, a new concept for a Cerenkov viewing device (CVD), based on a scientific charge coupled device (SCCD), has been evaluated. A feasibility test has been performed using a commercially-available system. With this system, images of Cerenkov light originating from PWR fuel assemblies have been recorded at the Ringhals 2 facility in Vaeroebacka, Sweden. This test is a continuation of feasibility study complimenting earlier tests performed on BWR fuel. During the present tests, images were taken of Cerenkov light from PWR fuel assemblies of varying burnup and cooling time, including assemblies with stopper and insert structures. In addition, Cerenkov glow images from a high-density, and a skeleton non-fuel assembly were obtained. Pseudo-colour images were produced from the digitally recorded images to provide an additional means of assessing the distribution of light emitted over the assembly. Analysis of a series of images taken as the instrument was scanned over a spent fuel assembly has provided the first quantitative demonstration of the collimation effect. The variation of image quality as a function of frame rate was determined to assess the maximum achievable frame rate with the new concept system. A performance comparison of the new SCCD-based CVD with the Mark IV CVD was made. The new concept system shows superior image quality compared to the Mark IV CVD, and allows detection of new Cerenkov characteristics previously not detected on spent fuel. For example, the centre of the PWR fuel assembly is brighter than the edges of the assembly, and the high resolution, achieved with the new instrument, has permitted observation of the spacer grid structure below the top plate of the assembly. 5 refs

  3. Low energy neutrino reactions in water Cerenkov detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the charged-current nuclear response of water Cerenkov detectors to neutrinos from supernovae, the neutral current nuclear response of carbon-bearing liquid scintillation detectors, and the possibility of detecting 8B solar neutrinos with a water Cerenkov detector enriched in 18O. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  4. Phaseless computational imaging with a radiating metasurface

    CERN Document Server

    Fromenteze, Thomas; Boyarsky, Michael; Gollub, Jonah; Smith, David R

    2016-01-01

    Computational imaging modalities support a simplification of the active architectures required in an imaging system and these approaches have been validated across the electromagnetic spectrum. Recent implementations have utilized pseudo-orthogonal radiation patterns to illuminate an object of interest---notably, frequency-diverse metasurfaces have been exploited as fast and low-cost alternative to conventional coherent imaging systems. However, accurately measuring the complex-valued signals in the frequency domain can be burdensome, particularly for sub-centimeter wavelengths. Here, computational imaging is studied under the relaxed constraint of intensity-only measurements. A novel 3D imaging system is conceived based on 'phaseless' and compressed measurements, with benefits from recent advances in the field of phase retrieval. In this paper, the methodology associated with this novel principle is described, studied, and experimentally demonstrated in the microwave range. A comparison of the estimated imag...

  5. Design of a cylindrical Cerenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of a cylindrical Cerenkov detector, with the aim of investigating a possible application of such a detector for distinguishing between pions and kaons, in the range of a few GeV/c, has been carried out. The detector design could, for example, be used for the experimental B-physics study with the upgraded collider detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron. Simulation methods were used to find the response of several configurations of such a detector as a function of the incident pion and kaon energies in the energy range of a few giga electron volts. It is shown that a straightforward configuration based on conventional materials could work

  6. Anomalous dispersion enhanced Cerenkov phase-matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, T.C.; Singer, K.D. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Cahill, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The authors report on a scheme for phase-matching second harmonic generation in polymer waveguides based on the use of anomalous dispersion to optimize Cerenkov phase matching. They have used the theoretical results of Hashizume et al. and Onda and Ito to design an optimum structure for phase-matched conversion. They have found that the use of anomalous dispersion in the design results in a 100-fold enhancement in the calculated conversion efficiency. This technique also overcomes the limitation of anomalous dispersion phase-matching which results from absorption at the second harmonic. Experiments are in progress to demonstrate these results.

  7. Silica aerogel Cerenkov detectors for particle identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present light yield measurements of silica aerogel Cerenkov detectors with photomultiplier readout, showing the light yield dependence of pure and wavelength-shifter-doped silica aerogel on block size using both cosmic muons and electrons from a 106Ru source. We present studies of fluorescent fibers and single photon avalanche diodes, including measurements of attenuation lengths and emission spectra of fibers versus wavelength and tests with a single photon avalanche diode. We show results of the response of a single photon avalanche diode to different light sources. Finally, we discuss a new readout scheme using avalanche photodiodes

  8. 3D IMAGING USING COHERENT SYNCHROTRON RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Cloetens

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional imaging is becoming a standard tool for medical, scientific and industrial applications. The use of modem synchrotron radiation sources for monochromatic beam micro-tomography provides several new features. Along with enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and improved spatial resolution, these include the possibility of quantitative measurements, the easy incorporation of special sample environment devices for in-situ experiments, and a simple implementation of phase imaging. These 3D approaches overcome some of the limitations of 2D measurements. They require new tools for image analysis.

  9. Radiation-induced uterine changes: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the capability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to demonstrate postirradiation changes in the uterus, MR studies of 23 patients who had undergone radiation therapy were retrospectively examined and compared with those of 30 patients who had not undergone radiation therapy. MR findings were correlated with posthysterectomy histologic findings. In premenopausal women, radiation therapy induced (a) a decrease in uterine size demonstrable as early as 3 months after therapy ended; (b) a decrease in signal intensity of the myometrium on T2-predominant MR images, reflecting a significant decrease in T2 relaxation time, demonstrable as early as 1 month after therapy; (c) a decrease in thickness and signal intensity of the endometrium demonstrable on T2-predominant images 6 months after therapy; and (d) loss of uterine zonal anatomy as early as 3 months after therapy. In postmenopausal women, irradiation did not significantly alter the MR imaging appearance of the uterus. These postirradiation MR changes in both the premenopausal and postmenopausal uteri appeared similar to the changes ordinarily seen on MR images of the nonirradiated postmenopausal uterus

  10. Multispectral hybrid Cerenkov luminescence tomography based on the finite element SPn method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixiao; Yang, Xin; Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Shi, Liangliang; Hu, Zhenhua; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) is a promising tool that enables three-dimensional noninvasive in vivo detection of radiopharmaceuticals. Conventionally, multispectral information and diffusion theory were introduced to achieve whole-body tomographic reconstruction. However, the diffusion theory inevitably causes systematic error in blue bands of the electromagnetic spectrum due to high-tissue absorption, and CL has a blue-weighted broad spectrum. Therefore, it is challenging to improve the accuracy of CLT. The performance of the n -order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SPn) in different spectra is evaluated, and a multispectral hybrid CLT based on the combination of different SPn models is proposed to handle the Cerenkov photon transport problem in complex media. The in vivo xenograft experiment shows that this approach can effectively improve the quality and accuracy of the reconstructed light source. We believe that the new reconstruction method will advance the development of CLT for more in vivo imaging applications PMID:26271053

  11. Radiation length imaging with high resolution telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Stolzenberg, U; Schwenker, B; Wieduwilt, P; Marinas, C; Lütticke, F

    2016-01-01

    The construction of low mass vertex detectors with a high level of system integration is of great interest for next generation collider experiments. Radiation length images with a sufficient spatial resolution can be used to measure and disentangle complex radiation length $X$/$X_0$ profiles and contribute to the understanding of vertex detector systems. Test beam experiments with multi GeV particle beams and high-resolution tracking telescopes provide an opportunity to obtain precise 2D images of the radiation length of thin planar objects. At the heart of the $X$/$X_0$ imaging is a spatially resolved measurement of the scattering angles of particles traversing the object under study. The main challenges are the alignment of the reference telescope and the calibration of its angular resolution. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of $X$/$X_0$ imaging, a test beam experiment has been conducted. The devices under test were two mechanical prototype modules of the Belle II vertex detector. A data sample of ...

  12. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    This dissertation investigates the feasibility of a real-time transthoracic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging system to measure myocardial function non-invasively in clinical setting. Heart failure is an important cardiovascular disease and contributes to the leading cause of death for developed countries. Patients exhibiting heart failure with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) can often be identified by clinicians, but patients with preserved LVEF might be undetected if they do not exhibit other signs and symptoms of heart failure. These cases motivate development of transthoracic ARFI imaging to aid the early diagnosis of the structural and functional heart abnormalities leading to heart failure. M-Mode ARFI imaging utilizes ultrasonic radiation force to displace tissue several micrometers in the direction of wave propagation. Conventional ultrasound tracks the response of the tissue to the force. This measurement is repeated rapidly at a location through the cardiac cycle, measuring timing and relative changes in myocardial stiffness. ARFI imaging was previously shown capable of measuring myocardial properties and function via invasive open-chest and intracardiac approaches. The prototype imaging system described in this dissertation is capable of rapid acquisition, processing, and display of ARFI images and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) movies. Also presented is a rigorous safety analysis, including finite element method (FEM) simulations of tissue heating, hydrophone intensity and mechanical index (MI) measurements, and thermocouple transducer face heating measurements. For the pulse sequences used in later animal and clinical studies, results from the safety analysis indicates that transthoracic ARFI imaging can be safely applied at rates and levels realizable on the prototype ARFI imaging system. Preliminary data are presented from in vivo trials studying changes in myocardial stiffness occurring under normal and abnormal

  13. Measurement accuracy and Cerenkov removal for high performance, high spatial resolution scintillation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With highly conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, radiosurgery, and tomotherapy becoming more common in clinical practice, the use of these narrow beams requires a higher level of precision in quality assurance and dosimetry. Plastic scintillators with their water equivalence, energy independence, and dose rate linearity have been shown to possess excellent qualities that suit the most complex and demanding radiation therapy treatment plans. The primary disadvantage of plastic scintillators is the presence of Cerenkov radiation generated in the light guide, which results in an undesired stem effect. Several techniques have been proposed to minimize this effect. In this study, we compared three such techniques--background subtraction, simple filtering, and chromatic removal--in terms of reproducibility and dose accuracy as gauges of their ability to remove the Cerenkov stem effect from the dose signal. The dosimeter used in this study comprised a 6-mm3 plastic scintillating fiber probe, an optical fiber, and a color charge-coupled device camera. The whole system was shown to be linear and the total light collected by the camera was reproducible to within 0.31% for 5-s integration time. Background subtraction and chromatic removal were both found to be suitable for precise dose evaluation, with average absolute dose discrepancies of 0.52% and 0.67%, respectively, from ion chamber values. Background subtraction required two optical fibers, but chromatic removal used only one, thereby preventing possible measurement artifacts when a strong dose gradient was perpendicular to the optical fiber. Our findings showed that a plastic scintillation dosimeter could be made free of the effect of Cerenkov radiation

  14. Radiation imaging apparatus with a slit collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In imaging apparatus comprising a slit collimator, means for imparting to said collimator a basic movement through a succession of different positions relative to a source of radiation, detector means for providing measurements of the radiation passing through the collimator in each of said positions, and means for processing data from said succession of measurements to gain information about said source, that improvement comprising means for superimposing upon said basic movement of said collimator a cyclic lateral movement of said collimator and said detector means transverse both to the direction of radiation transmission through said collimator and to the wall of said collimator defining said slits, and means for making a succession of said measurements during each cycle of said lateral movement

  15. Phaseless computational imaging with a radiating metasurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromenteze, Thomas; Liu, Xiaojun; Boyarsky, Michael; Gollub, Jonah; Smith, David R

    2016-07-25

    Computational imaging modalities support a simplification of the active architectures required in an imaging system and these approaches have been validated across the electromagnetic spectrum. Recent implementations have utilized pseudo-orthogonal radiation patterns to illuminate an object of interest-notably, frequency-diverse metasurfaces have been exploited as fast and low-cost alternative to conventional coherent imaging systems. However, accurately measuring the complex-valued signals in the frequency domain can be burdensome, particularly for sub-centimeter wavelengths. Here, computational imaging is studied under the relaxed constraint of intensity-only measurements. A novel 3D imaging system is conceived based on 'phaseless' and compressed measurements, with benefits from recent advances in the field of phase retrieval. In this paper, the methodology associated with this novel principle is described, studied, and experimentally demonstrated in the microwave range. A comparison of the estimated images from both complex valued and phaseless measurements are presented, verifying the fidelity of phaseless computational imaging. PMID:27464130

  16. Long-cooled spent fuel verification using a digital Cerenkov viewing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint Canadian/Swedish programme in support to the IAEA has developed a non-intrusive, non- destructive analytical instrument to verify long-cooled fuel in storage ponds. The handheld instrument, operated above the water surface, consists of an ultraviolet (UV) light transmitting lens, a UV band-pass filter, a charge-coupled device mounted in a camera head, a computer system based upon the PC/104-plus format, a liquid crystal display and a wearable liquid crystal heads-up display. The instrument was developed with specific imaging software to assist in the operation and verification of the spent fuel. The quantum efficiency of the charge-coupled device at the peak sensitivity of the detector, 300-nm, is 52%, which is a factor of 6 higher than the detector used in a previous instrument. The measurement objective is to verify that fuel has not been diverted and is radioactive (IAEA method H). This is achieved by measuring the Cerenkov glow from the spent fuel. The Cerenkov glow is produced by high-speed charged particles generated by gamma rays that interact with the water (Compton effect) adjacent to the fuel rods to produce light at very low intensities. Fission products emit these gamma rays, which is indicative of spent fuel. The verification is currently done using the Mark IVe Cerenkov viewing device. However, the IAEA requires a non-intrusive instrument that is capable of detecting fuel with a burnup of 10,000 MWd/t U and a cooling time of 40 years. This is beyond the capability of the Mark IVe CVD. The recently developed digital Cerenkov viewing device was successfully tested at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (CLAB) on PWR non-fuel and spent fuel, long- cooled BWR spent fuel and very long-cooled and low burnup Agesta PHWR fuel

  17. Concurrent image and dose reconstruction for image guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ke

    The importance of knowing the patient actual position is essential for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This procedure uses tightened margin and escalated tumor dose. In order to eliminate the uncertainty of the geometry in IMRT, daily imaging is prefered. The imaging dose, limited field of view and the imaging concurrency of the MVCT (mega-voltage computerized tomography) are investigated in this work. By applying partial volume imaging (PVI), imaging dose can be reduced for a region of interest (ROI) imaging. The imaging dose and the image quality are quantitatively balanced with inverse imaging dose planning. With PVI, 72% average imaging dose reduction was observed on a typical prostate patient case. The algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) based projection onto convex sets (POCS) shows higher robustness than filtered back projection when available imaging data is not complete and continuous. However, when the projection is continuous as in the actual delivery, a non-iterative wavelet based multiresolution local tomography (WMLT) is able to achieve 1% accuracy within the ROI. The reduction of imaging dose is dependent on the size of ROI. The improvement of concurrency is also discussed based on the combination of PVI and WMLT. Useful target images were acquired with treatment beams and the temporal resolution can be increased to 20 seconds in tomotherapy. The data truncation problem with the portal imager was also studied. Results show that the image quality is not adversely affected by truncation when WMLT is employed. When the online imaging is available, a perturbation dose calculation (PDC) that estimates the actual delivered dose is proposed. Corrected from the Fano's theorem, PDC counts the first order term in the density variation to calculate the internal and external anatomy change. Although change in the dose distribution that is caused by the internal organ motion is less than 1% for 6 MV beams, the external anatomy change has

  18. Use of imaging techniques in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging techniques are used in radiation oncology for: disease diagnosis, tumor localization and staging, treatment simulation, treatment planning, clinical dosimetry displays, treatment verification and patient follow up. In industrialized countries, up to the 1970's, conventional radiology was used for diagnosis, simulation and planning. Gamma cameras helped tumor staging by detecting metastases. In the 1970's, simulators were developed for exclusive use in radiation oncology departments. Clinical dosimetry displays consisted mainly in axial dose distributions. Treatment verification was done placing films in the radiation beam with the patient under treatment. In the 1980's, 2-D imaging was replaced by 3-D displays with the incorporation of computerized tomography (CT) scanners, and in the 1990's of magnetic resonance imagers (MRI). Ultrasound units, briefly used in the 1960's for treatment planning purposes, were found again useful, mainly for brachytherapy dosimetry. Digital portal imagers allowed accurate treatment field verification. Treatment planning systems incorporated the capability of 'inverse planning', i.e. once the desired dose distribution is decided, the field size, gantry, collimator and couch angles, etc, can be automatically selected. At the end of the millennium, image fusion permitted excellent anatomical display of tumors and adjacent sensitive structures. The 2000's are seeing a change from anatomical to functional imaging with the advent of MRI units capable of spectroscopy at 3 Tesla and positron emission tomography (PET) units. In 2001 combined CT/PET units appeared in RT departments. In 2002, fusion of CT, MRI and PET images became available. Molecular imaging is being developed. The situation in developing countries is quite different. To start with, cancer incidence is different in developing and in industrialized countries. In addition, the health services pattern is different: Cancer treatment is mostly done in public institutions

  19. The high pressure gas Cerenkov counter at the Omega Facility.

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The high-pressure gas Cerenkov was used to measure reactions as pion (or kaon)- hydrogen --> forward proton - X. It was built by the Ecole Polytechnique (Palaiseu). Here Peter Sonderegger and Patrick Fleury,

  20. Single photon emission computed tomography-guided Cerenkov luminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Jing; Cao, Feng; Tian, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) has become a valuable tool for preclinical imaging because of its ability of reconstructing the three-dimensional distribution and activity of the radiopharmaceuticals. However, it is still far from a mature technology and suffers from relatively low spatial resolution due to the ill-posed inverse problem for the tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we presented a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-guided reconstruction method for CLT, in which a priori information of the permissible source region (PSR) from SPECT imaging results was incorporated to effectively reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse reconstruction problem. The performance of the method was first validated with the experimental reconstruction of an adult athymic nude mouse implanted with a Na131I radioactive source and an adult athymic nude mouse received an intravenous tail injection of Na131I. A tissue-mimic phantom based experiment was then conducted to illustrate the ability of the proposed method in resolving double sources. Compared with the traditional PSR strategy in which the PSR was determined by the surface flux distribution, the proposed method obtained much more accurate and encouraging localization and resolution results. Preliminary results showed that the proposed SPECT-guided reconstruction method was insensitive to the regularization methods and ignored the heterogeneity of tissues which can avoid the segmentation procedure of the organs.

  1. Progress in imaging of brain radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of brain radiation injury mainly include three hypotheses: vascular injury, glial cells damage and immune response. Most scholars' studies have recently supported the former two ones. Vascular injury plays a major role in the effect of delayed radiation injury. Focal brain injury and diffuse white matter injury can be definitely diagnosed by CT and MRI. T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) in MRI shows high sensitivity in water contents, and is not affected by the beam hardening artifacts from the cranial base. Compared with CT, the sensitivity of MR for detecting white matter lesions is two to threefold higher. When lesions occurs at the site of an irradiated cerebral tumor, tumor recurrence and focal cerebral necrosis cannot be differentiated by CT or MR, PET and MRS now present a certain advantage of differential diagnosis. Tumor presents high metabolism and necrosis demonstrates low metabolism by utilizing PET scanning, however PET's sensitivity and specificity are far from satisfactory. The amount or ratio of metabolic products in the region of interest measured by MRS contributes to the deferential diagnosis. In addition, PET functional imaging and MRS can also predict the early asymptomatic reversible radiation injury so as to allow the early therapy of steroids and possibly other drugs, prior to the development of irreversible changes

  2. Development of a High Sensitivity Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device. Prototype Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device. Field test in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish and Canadian Safeguards Support Programs have developed a prototype Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) to verify long-cooled spent fuel. The instrument consists of a camera system and a custom portable computer equipped with a liquid crystal and a wearable heads-up display. The camera was coupled to a hardware user interface (HUI) and was operated with a computer program designed to image spent fuel and store the images. Measurements were taken at the CLAB facility on pressurized-water reactor fuel and non-fuel assemblies, a number of boiling-water reactor fuel assemblies, and long-cooled Aagesta fuel assemblies. The camera head, attached to the HUI, a battery-operated computer carried in a backpack and the heads-up display were field tested for portability. The ergonomics of this system is presented in the report. For the examination of long-cooled spent fuel, the camera head was mounted on a bracket that rested on the railing of a moving bridge. The DCVD instrument is approximately 100 times higher in sensitivity than the Mark IVe CVD. The oldest fuel with the lowest burnup at the CLAB facility was positively verified. The measurement capability of this instrument greatly exceeds the verification criteria of 10,000 MWd/t U and 40 years cooling

  3. Objective assessment of image quality VI: imaging in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earlier work on objective assessment of image quality (OAIQ) focused largely on estimation or classification tasks in which the desired outcome of imaging is accurate diagnosis. This paper develops a general framework for assessing imaging quality on the basis of therapeutic outcomes rather than diagnostic performance. By analogy to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and their variants as used in diagnostic OAIQ, the method proposed here utilizes the therapy operating characteristic or TOC curves, which are plots of the probability of tumor control versus the probability of normal-tissue complications as the overall dose level of a radiotherapy treatment is varied. The proposed figure of merit is the area under the TOC curve, denoted AUTOC. This paper reviews an earlier exposition of the theory of TOC and AUTOC, which was specific to the assessment of image-segmentation algorithms, and extends it to other applications of imaging in external-beam radiation treatment as well as in treatment with internal radioactive sources. For each application, a methodology for computing the TOC is presented. A key difference between ROC and TOC is that the latter can be defined for a single patient rather than a population of patients. (paper)

  4. The Cerenkov effect revisited: from swimming ducks to zero modes in gravitational analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Carusotto, Iacopo

    2012-01-01

    We present an interdisciplinary review of the generalized Cerenkov emission of radiation from uniformly moving sources in the different contexts of classical electromagnetism, superfluid hydrodynamics, and classical hydrodynamics. The details of each specific physical systems enter our theory via the dispersion law of the excitations. A geometrical recipe to obtain the emission patterns in both real and wavevector space from the geometrical shape of the dispersion law is discussed and applied to a number of cases of current experimental interest. Some consequences of these emission processes onto the stability of condensed-matter analogs of gravitational systems are finally illustrated.

  5. Imaging Jupiter Radiation Belts At Low Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Zarka, P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Fender, R.; Pewg, Lofar

    2014-04-01

    The ultra-relativistic electrons, trapped in the inner radiation belts of Jupiter, generates a strong synchrotron radio emission (historically known as the jovian decimeter radiation (DIM)) which is beamed, polarized (~20% linear, ~1% circular) and broadband. It has been extensively observed by radio telescopes/ probes and imaged by radio interferometers over a wide frequency spectrum (from >300 MHz up to 22 GHz). This extended emission presents two main emission peaks constantly located on both sides of the planet close to the magnetic plane. High latitude emissions were also regularly observed at particular frequencies, times and in particular observational configurations. This region of the magnetosphere is "frozen" due to the strong magnetic field (~4.2 G as the equator) and therefore is forced to rotate at the planetary period (T≈9h55m). Due to the tilt (~ 10o) between the spin axis of the planet and the magnetic axis (which can be seen as dipolar in first approximation), the belts and the associated radio emission wobble around the planet center. The analysis of the flux at different frequencies highlighted spatial, temporal and spectral variabilities which origins are now partly understood. The emission varies at different time scales (short-time variations of hours to long-term variation over decades) due to the combination of visibility effect (wobbling, beaming, position of the observer in the magnetic rotating reference frame) [1], [2] and intrinsic local variations (interaction between relativistic electrons and satellites/dust, delayed effect of the solar wind ram pressure, impacts events) [3], [4], [5]. A complete framework is necessary to fully understand the source, loss and transport processes of the electrons originating from outside the belt, migrating by inward diffusion and populating the inner region of the magnetosphere. Only a few and unresolved measurements were made below 300 MHz and the nonsystematic observation of this radio emission

  6. The Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission

    CERN Document Server

    André, Philippe; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoȋt, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J.A.P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford; Cabrera, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM

  7. Simulation study on radiative imaging of combustion flame in furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Radiative imaging of combustion flame in furnace of power plant plays an increasingly important role in combustion diagnosis. This paper presents a new method for calculating the radiative imaging of three-dimensional (3D) combustion flame based on Monte Carlo method and optical lens imaging. Numerical simulation case was used in this study. Radiative images were calculated and images obtained can not only present the energy distribution on the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera target plane but also reflect the energy distribution condition in the simulation furnace. Finally the relationships between volume elements and energy shares were also discussed.

  8. Application of Java technology in radiation image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acquisition and processing of radiation image plays an important role in modern application of civil nuclear technology. The author analyzes the rationale of Java image processing technology which includes Java AWT, Java 2D and JAI. In order to demonstrate applicability of Java technology in field of image processing, examples of application of JAI technology in processing of radiation images of large container have been given

  9. Development of the image registration program for portal and DRR images in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, the authors propose an image registration program of portal images and digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) images used as simulation images for external beam radiation therapy planning. First, the center of the radiation field in a portal image taken using a computed radiograhy cassette is matched to the center of the portal image. Then scale points projected on a DRR image and the portal image are deleted, and the portal image with the radiation field is extracted. Registration of the DRR and portal images is performed using mutual information as the registration criterion. It was found that the absolute displacement misregistrations in two directions (x, y) were 1.2±0.7 mm and 0.5±0.3 mm, respectively, and rotation disagreement about the z axis 0.3±0.3deg. It was concluded the proposed method was applicable to image registration of portal and DRR images in radiation therapy. (author)

  10. SORIS—A standoff radiation imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelakiewicz, Scott; Hoctor, Ralph; Ivan, Adrian; Ross, William; Nieters, Edward; Smith, William; McDevitt, Daniel; Wittbrodt, Michael; Milbrath, Brian

    2011-10-01

    The detection of radiological and special nuclear material within the country's borders is a crucial component of the national security network. Being able to detect small amounts of radiological material at large distances is especially important for search applications. To provide this capability General Electric's Research Center has developed, as a part of DNDO's standoff radiation detection system advanced technology demonstration (SORDS-ATD) program, a standoff radiation imaging system (SORIS). This vehicle-based system is capable of detecting weak sources at large distances in relatively short times. To accomplish this, GE has developed a novel coded aperture detector based on commercial components from GE Healthcare. An array of commercial gamma cameras modified to increase the system efficiency and energy range are used as position sensitive detectors. Unlike typical coded aperture systems, however, SORIS employs a non-planar mask and thus does not suffer the typical limitations of partially encoded regions giving it a wide field of view. Source identification is done using both low-statistics anomaly indicators and conventional high-statistics algorithms being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of scanned areas and threats identified are displayed to the user and overlaid on satellite imagery.

  11. Radiation protection in newer imaging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Not even a week passes without a paper getting published in peer reviewed journals on radiation protection in newer imaging technologies that either did not exist 10 y ago or were not established for routine use. Computed tomography (CT) happens to be a common element in most of these technologies. Radiation protection is high on the agenda of manufacturers and researchers and that is becoming a driving force for users and international organisations. The media and thus the public have their own share in increasing the momentum. The slice war seems to be shifting to dose war. Manufacturers are now chasing the target of sub-mSv CT. The era of two digit mSv effective dose for a CT procedure is far from losing ground, although cardiac CT within 5 mSv seems possible. A few years ago the change in technology was faster than adoption of dose management but currently even the development of dose reduction techniques is faster than its adoption. There is dearth of large scale surveys of practice and lack of surveys with change in technology. (authors)

  12. Diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the third edition of CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 (now CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 114), which is one of a series of standards issued by the Canadian Standards Association under Part II of the Canadian Electrical Code. This edition marks an important shift towards harmonization of Canadian requirements with those of the European community and the United States. Also important to this edition is the expansion of its scope to include the complete range of diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment, rather than solely radiation-emitting equipment. In so doing, equipment previously addressed by CSA Standard C22.2 No. 125, Electromedical Equipment, specifically lasers for medical applications and diagnostic ultrasound units, is now dealt with in the new edition. By virtue of this expanded scope, many of the technical requirements in the electromedical equipment standard have been introduced to the new edition, thereby bringing CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 up to date. 14 tabs., 16 figs

  13. Radiation dosimetry using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new dosimetry system for 3D dose distribution measurements based on the Fricke dosimeter and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been developed. The dosimeter consists of a ferrous sulphate solution incorporated in an agarose gel, which together constitute the dosimeter gel. The absorbed dose to the gel is measured by means of the proton spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1 in an MR scanner. The dose distribution to an arbitrary slice within a dosimeter gel phantom can thus be determined. The chemical yield of the dosimeter gel is significantly higher than that of the for Fricke solution, and is strongly dependent of the initial ferrous sulphate concentration, assuming that the gel is bubbled with oxygen during preparation. A gel of 1.5 mM [Fe2+] and 50 mM [H2SO4] has a sensitivity of 0.108 s-1Gy-1 and is linear up to 50 Gy. The dosimeter gel has uniform dose response over large volumes. Above 50 mM[H2SO4] the yield increases only slightly, but the gel strength decreases and results in gel phantoms with non-uniform dose response. Below 50 mM[H2SO4] the sensitivity of the dosimeter falls rapidly due to the decreased relaxivity of the ferric ions. The high chemical yield can be explained by a chain reaction and a reaction scheme is accordingly proposed. The dosimeter gel shows no dependence on dose rate or radiation quality and can be regarded as water-equivalent with respect to the interaction of the radiation. The diffusion coefficient of the ferric ions in the agarose gel is 1.19x10-2 cm2/h. The diffusion blurs the dosimeteric image, but poses only a minor problem if the MR measurements are completed within the first two hours after irradiation. Dose distribution data from external radiation therapy units have been determined using the dosimeter gel and MRI with good accuracy, but the precision is poor, about 5-10%. (au) (84 refs.)

  14. OPTIMAX 2014 - Radiation dose and image quality optimisation in medical imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hogg, Peter; Lança, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging is a powerful diagnostic tool. Consequently, the number of medical images taken has increased vastly over the past few decades. The most common medical imaging techniques use X-radiation as the primary investigative tool. The main limitation of using X-radiation is associated with the risk of developing cancers. Alongside this, technology has advanced and more centres now use CT scanners; these can incur significant radiation burdens compared with traditional X-ray imaging ...

  15. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging among patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, Alan N

    2012-03-01

    There are concerns about levels of radiation exposure among patients who undergo diagnostic imaging for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with other gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We quantified imaging studies and estimated the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation received by patients with organic and functional GI disorders. We also identified factors and diagnoses associated with high CEDs.

  16. Image-Guidance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The term stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) describes a recently introduced external beam radiation paradigm by which small lesions outside the brain are treated under stereotactic conditions, in a single or few fractions of high-dose radiation delivery. Similar to the treatment planning and delivery process for cranial radiosurgery, the emphasis is on sparing of adjacent normal tissues through the creation of steep dose gradients. Thus, advanced methods for assuring an accurate relationship between the target volume position and radiation beam geometry, immediately prior to radiation delivery, must be implemented. Such methods can employ imaging techniques such as planar (e.g., x-ray) or volumetric (e.g., computed tomography [CT]) approaches and are commonly summarized under the general term image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). This review summarizes clinical experience with volumetric and ultrasound based image-guidance for SBRT. Additionally, challenges and potential limitations of pre-treatment image-guidance are presented and discussed

  17. Cerenkov Emission by Neutral Particles in Gravitoelectro-magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, S Q

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that under the post-Newtonian approximation the Einstein equations can be reduced to the standard Maxwell-type field equations in a medium; in such a context the Cerenkov emission by a neutralparticle gives large energy loss while the particle moves at faster than the phase speed of waves in the medium.

  18. A silica aerogel Cerenkov counter with diffusing walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Cerenkov counter with an active area of 28 x 80 cm2, using silica aerogel with a refractive index 1.03 is described. The light is collected by diffuse reflecting walls. With 9 cm of aerogel 9 photoelectrons is obtained for β = 1 particles. Scintillations in the walls of the detector amounts to a maximum of 0.07 photoelectrons. (orig.)

  19. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source dual-energy CT: Radiation dose and image quality

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Lifeng; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng, Shuai; Wang, Jia; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of virtual monochromatic images synthesized from dual-source dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in comparison with conventional polychromatic single-energy CT for the same radiation dose.

  20. The conversion of synchrotron radiation biomedical and medical images into DICOM images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunling; Sun, Jianyong; Sun, Jianqi; Zhang, Jianguo

    2014-03-01

    With Synchrotron Radiation light source, there was a lot of imaging methods being developed to perform biomedical and medical imaging researches such as X-ray absorption imaging, phase-contrast imaging and micro-CT imaging. In this presentation, we present an approach to transform a various kinds of SR images into proper DICOM images so that to use a rich of medical processing display software to process and display SR biomedical and medical images. The new generated SR DICOM images can be transferred, stored, processed and displayed by using most of commercial medical imaging software.

  1. Radiation Protection of the Child from Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Rebecca S

    2015-01-01

    In recent years due to the technological advances in imaging techniques, which have undoubtedly improved diagnostic accuracy and resulted in improved patient care, the utilization of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging has significantly increased. Computed tomography is the major contributor to the radiation burden, but fluoroscopy continues to be a mainstay in paediatric radiology. The rise in the use of ionizing radiation is of particular concern with regard to the paediatric population, as they are up to 10 times more sensitive to the effects of radiation than adults, due to their increased tissue radiosensitivity, increased cumulative lifetime radiation dose and longer lifetime in which to manifest the effects. This article will review the estimated radiation risk to the child from diagnostic imaging and summarise the various methods through which both the paediatrician and radiologist can practice the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle, which underpins the safe practice of radiology. Emphasis is on the justification for an examination, i.e. weighing of benefits versus radiation risk, on the appropriate utilization of other, non-ionizing imaging modalities such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, and on optimisation of a clinically indicated examination. It is essential that the paediatrician and radiologist work together in this decision making process for the mutual benefit of the patient. The appropriate practical application of ALARA in the workplace is crucial to the radiation safety of our paediatric patients. PMID:26219738

  2. Knowledge of medical imaging radiation dose and risk among doctors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) scans has revolutionised healthcare but also greatly increased population radiation doses. Overuse of diagnostic radiation is becoming a feature of medical practice, leading to possible unnecessary radiation exposures and lifetime-risks of developing cancer. Doctors across all medical specialties and experience levels were surveyed to determine their knowledge of radiation doses and potential risks associated with some diagnostic imaging. A survey relating to knowledge and understanding of medical imaging radiation was distributed to doctors at 14 major Queensland public hospitals, as well as fellows and trainees in radiology, emergency medicine and general practice. From 608 valid responses, only 17.3% correctly estimated the radiation dose from CT scans and almost 1 in 10 incorrectly believed that CT radiation is not associated with any increased lifetime risk of developing cancer. There is a strong inverse relationship between a clinician's experience and their knowledge of CT radiation dose and risks, even among radiologists. More than a third (35.7%) of doctors incorrectly believed that typical NM imaging either does not use ionising radiation or emits doses equal to or less than a standard chest radiograph. Knowledge of CT and NM radiation doses is poor across all specialties, and there is a significant inverse relationship between experience and awareness of CT dose and risk. Despite having a poor understanding of these concepts, most doctors claim to consider them prior to requesting scans and when discussing potential risks with patients.

  3. Charge-Transfer CMOS Image Sensors: Device and Radiation Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandra Rao, P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was twofold: investigating the effect of ionizing radiation on 4-T CMOS image sensors and the possibility of realizing a CCD like sensor in standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology (for medical applications). Both the aims are complementary; borrowing and lending many aspects of radiation and device physics amongst each other.

  4. Acute radiation nephritis. Its evolution on sequential bone imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute radiation nephritis typically affects the kidneys 3-12 months after radiation exposure and may occur with doses as low as 2500 rads. After an initial latent period, the affected portions of the kidneys become swollen and edematous, and develop multiple petechiae. Necrotizing vasculitis and interstitial hemorrhage occur, and the end stage is that of scarring. Two patients are presented in whom localized acute radiation nephritis developed, and whose kidneys demonstrated the characteristic sequential changes of this entity on serial bone imaging

  5. Experimental radiation injury: combined MR imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of radiation injury to the brain was developed in the cat. Definite radiation changes were demonstrated at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in four of six cats. These changes consisted of high-intensity abnormalities on images obtained with a long repetition time (TR) and a long echo time (TE), which were initially noted 208-285 days after irradiation. These changes were associated with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhancement on short TR and inversion-recovery (IR) pulse sequences. Gd-DTPA enhancement and the high intensity on the long TR/TE images were identified at the same time and became more prominent throughout the study. Chemical-shift imaging and phosphorus spectroscopy demonstrated no notable changes despite clear-cut MR evidence of abnormalities. Sodium imaging was positive in one case. Correlation of MR and pathologic findings revealed areas of radiation necrosis and wallerian degeneration that corresponded to areas of Gd-DTPA enhancement on short TR and IR images and to areas of high intensity on long TR/TE images. Peripheral to the areas of Gd-DTPA enhancement were nonenhanced zones of high-signal-intensity abnormality on long TR/TE images, which represented regions of demyelination without necrosis. Gd-DTPA-enhanced proton imaging was the most sensitive method for detecting radiation damage in this animal model

  6. Preparation of silica aerogel and its application in the TASSO Cerenkov counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charged hadrons in the TASSO detector at PETRA are identified by time-of-flight counters and a Cerenkov system combined with the momentum information of the central detector. This Cerenkov system consists of 3 threshold counters filled with 1700 liters of aerogel, with Freon 114 and CO2. All the aerogel was manufactured at DESY. This paper describes the method used for the production of aerogel, its performance and the properties of the Cerenkov detectors

  7. Radiation Dose from Medical Imaging: A Primer for Emergency Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse G.A. Jones, MD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical imaging now accounts for most of the US population’s exposure to ionizingradiation. A substantial proportion of this medical imaging is ordered in the emergency setting. We aimto provide a general overview of radiation dose from medical imaging with a focus on computedtomography, as well as a literature review of recent efforts to decrease unnecessary radiation exposureto patients in the emergency department setting.Methods: We conducted a literature review through calendar year 2010 for all published articlespertaining to the emergency department and radiation exposure.Results: The benefits of imaging usually outweigh the risks of eventual radiation-induced cancer inmost clinical scenarios encountered by emergency physicians. However, our literature review identified3 specific clinical situations in the general adult population in which the lifetime risks of cancer mayoutweigh the benefits to the patient: rule out pulmonary embolism, flank pain, and recurrent abdominalpain in inflammatory bowel disease. For these specific clinical scenarios, a physician-patientdiscussion about such risks and benefits may be warranted.Conclusion: Emergency physicians, now at the front line of patients’ exposure to ionizing radiation,should have a general understanding of the magnitude of radiation dose from advanced medicalimaging procedures and their associated risks. Future areas of research should include thedevelopment of protocols and guidelines that limit unnecessary patient radiation exposure.

  8. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xu, Lisa X [Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Sun Jianqi; Gu Xiang; Liu Ping [Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Xiao Tiqiao [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai (China)], E-mail: pingliu@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: lisaxu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2010-04-21

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  9. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Jun; Sun, Jianqi; Gu, Xiang; Xiao, Tiqiao; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-04-01

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  10. Geomagnetic effects on the performance of atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have reported the results of the interaction between the geomagnetic field and the development of atmospheric electron cascades as manifested by the distortion of the atmospheric Cerenkov signal. We will summarize these effects and describe our initial attempt to remove this distortion for those cases where the cascade develops perpendicular to a strong (>0.35 G) field and so enhance the hadron rejection procedures of gamma ray telescopes

  11. A silica aerogel Cerenkov counter with diffusing walls

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, P J

    1979-01-01

    A Cerenkov counter with an active area of 28*80 cm/sup 2/, using silica aerogel with a refractive index 1.03 is described. The light is collected by diffuse reflecting walls. With 9 cm of aerogel 9 photoelectrons are obtained for beta =1 particles. Scintillations in the walls of the detector amount to a maximum of 0.07 photoelectrons. (3 refs).

  12. Radiation Dose Risk and Diagnostic Benefit in Imaging Investigations

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrescu, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents many facets of medical imaging investigations radiological risks. The total volume of prescribed medical investigations proves a serious lack in monitoring and tracking of the cumulative radiation doses in many health services. Modern radiological investigations equipment is continuously reducing the total dose of radiation due to improved technologies, so a decrease in per caput dose can be noticed, but the increasing number of investigations has determined a net increase of the annual collective dose. High doses of radiation are cumulated from Computed Tomography investigations. An integrated system for radiation safety of the patients investigated by radiological imaging methods, based on smart cards and Public Key Infrastructure allow radiation absorbed dose data storage.

  13. Cerenkov Detectors for Fission Product Monitoring in Reactor Coolant Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expected properties of Cerenkov detectors when used for fission product monitoring in water cooled reactors and test loops are discussed from the point of view of the knowledge of the sensitivity of these detectors to some beta emitting isotopes. The basic theory for calculation of the detector response is presented, taking the optical transmission in the sample container and the properties of the photomultiplier tube into account. Special attention is paid to the energy resolution of this type of Cerenkov detector. For the design of practical detectors the results from several investigations of various window and reflector materials are given, and the selection of photomultiplier tubes is briefly discussed. In the case of optical reflectors and photomultiplier tubes reference is made to two previous reports by the author. The influence of the size and geometry of the sample container on the energy resolution follows from a separate investigation, as well as the relative merits of sample containers with transparent inner walls. Provided that the energy resolution of the Cerenkov detector is sufficiently high, there are several reasons for using this detector type for failed-fuel-element detection. It seems possible to attain the desired energy resolution by careful detector design

  14. Observation of Neutrons with a Gadolinium Doped Water Cerenkov Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dazeley, S; Bowden, N S; Svoboda, R

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous and induced fission in Special Nuclear Material (SNM) such as 235U and 239Pu results in the emission of neutrons and high energy gamma-rays. The multiplicities of and time correlations between these particles are both powerful indicators of the presence of fissile material. Detectors sensitive to these signatures are consequently useful for nuclear material monitoring, search, and characterization. In this article, we demonstrate sensitivity to both high energy gamma-rays and neutrons with a water Cerenkov based detector. Electrons in the detector medium, scattered by gamma-ray interactions, are detected by their Cerenkov light emission. Sensitivity to neutrons is enhanced by the addition of a gadolinium compound to the water in low concentrations. Cerenkov light is similarly produced by an 8 MeV gamma-ray cascade following neutron capture on the gadolinium. The large solid angle coverage and high intrinsic efficiency of this detection approach can provide robust and low cost neutron and gamma-ray...

  15. Image-guided radiation therapy: Physician′s perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of radiotherapy has been ontogenetically linked to medical imaging. Over the years, major technological innovations have resulted in substantial improvements in radiotherapy planning, delivery, and verification. The increasing use of computed tomography imaging for target volume delineation coupled with availability of computer-controlled treatment planning and delivery systems have progressively led to conformation of radiation dose to the target tissues while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Recent advances in imaging technology coupled with improved treatment delivery allow near-simultaneous soft-tissue localization of tumor and repositioning of patient. The integration of various imaging modalities within the treatment room for guiding radiation delivery has vastly improved the management of geometric uncertainties in contemporary radiotherapy practice ushering in the paradigm of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT. Image-guidance should be considered a necessary and natural corollary to high-precision radiotherapy that was long overdue. Image-guided radiation therapy not only provides accurate information on patient and tumor position on a quantitative scale, it also gives an opportunity to verify consistency of planned and actual treatment geometry including adaptation to daily variations resulting in improved dose delivery. The two main concerns with IGRT are resource-intensive nature of delivery and increasing dose from additional imaging. However, increasing the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery through IGRT is likely to reduce toxicity with potential for dose escalation and improved tumor control resulting in favourable therapeutic index. The radiation oncology community needs to leverage this technology to generate high-quality evidence to support widespread adoption of IGRT in contemporary radiotherapy practice.

  16. Imaging of Radiation Dose for Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Timothy Y; Almond, Peter R; Park, Hwan C; Lindberg, Robert D; Shields, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    The distributions of radiation dose for stereotactic radiosurgery, using a modified linear accelerator (Philips SL-25 and SRS-200), have been studied by using three different dosimeters: (1) ferrous-agarose-xylenol orange (FAX) gels, (2) TLD, and (3) thick-emulsion GafChromic dye film. These dosimeters were loaded into a small volume of defect in a phantom head. A regular linac stereotactic radiosurgery treatment was then given to the phantom head for each type of dosimeter. The measured radiation dose and its distributions were found to be in good agreement with those calculated by the treatment planning computer. PMID:27421869

  17. Television imaging transducers for use in radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For optical television equipment widely used in nuclear energetics it appears to be importance to account for various radiation effects on the device material and units aiming at diminishing negative effects of radiation upon the devices operation. Basing on the experimental results (along with the analysis of literature data) the authors propose a mechanism of radiation effect upon television imaging sensors (TIS). Operation principles and construction of up-to date TIS are briefly described, as well as the characteristics of radiation conditions. Various radiation effects upon the TIS material and construction have been considered. Optimal radiation conditions and levels have been suggested for the equipment operation. The efficiencies of various TIS are compared. 230 refs.; 86 figs.; 4 tabs

  18. Global Solar Radiation in Spain from Satellite Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the present work a series of algorithms of calculation of the solar radiation from satellite images has been developed. These models, have been applied to three years of images of the Meteosat satellite and the results of the treatment have been extrapolated to long term. For the development of the models of solar radiation registered in ground stations have been used, corresponding all of them to localities of peninsular Spain and the Balearic ones. The maximum periods of data available have been used, supposing in most of the cases periods of between 6 and 9 years. From the results has a year type of images of global solar radiation on horizontal surface. The original resolution of the image of 7x7 km in the study latitudes, has been reevaluated to 5x5 km. This supposes to have a value of the typical radiation for every day of the year, each 5x5 km in the study territory. This information, supposes an important advance as far as the knowledge of the space distribution of the radiation solar, impossible to reach about alternative methods. Doubtlessly, the precision of the provided values is not comparable with pyrano metric measures in a concrete locality, but it provides a very valid indicator in places in which it is not had previous information. In addition to the radiation maps, tables of the global solar radiation have been prepared on different inclinations, from the global radiation on horizontal surface calculated for every day of the year and in each pixel of the image. (Author) 24 refs

  19. Sensitivity improvement of Cerenkov luminescence endoscope with terbium doped Gd2O2S nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous study showed a great attenuation for the Cerenkov luminescence endoscope (CLE), resulting in relatively low detection sensitivity of radiotracers. Here, a kind of radioluminescence nanoparticles (RLNPs), terbium doped Gd2O2S was mixed with the radionuclide 68Ga to enhance the intensity of emitted luminescence, which finally improved the detection sensitivity of the CLE by using the radioluminescence imaging technique. With the in vitro and in vivo pseudotumor experiments, we showed that the use of RLNPs mixed with the radionuclide 68Ga enabled superior sensitivity compared with the radionuclide 68Ga only, with 50-fold improvement on detection sensitivity, which guaranteed meeting the demands of the clinical diagnosis of gastrointestinal tract tumors

  20. Simulations of Radiation Defect Images from Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Sang Chul; Shin, Chan Sub; Kwon, Jun Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Defect clusters in irradiated materials occur radiation hardening and embrittlement. Behaviors of radiation defects should be understood to clarify radiation damage mechanisms. Properties of irradiated materials depend on density, size, kinds, microstructure and etc. of radiation defects. These can be measured with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), positron annihilation (PA), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and 3D atom probe (3DAP). The TEM is undoubtedly the most important technique having made contributions to analysis of characteristics of radiation defects. The TEM is a unique technique, with which a shape and a microstructure of defect clusters can be observed at the images. Radiation defects are mainly dislocation loops. The behavior of a dislocation loop depends on the direction of Burgers vector and a habit plane. Dislocation loops can be observed with a TEM, when the diameter of a loop is larger than 2 nm. When the size is below 5 nm, special cares are required for a determination of directions of the Burgers vector and the habit plane. Generally, g{center_dot}b=0 invisibility criterion is used to determine the Burgers vectors of line dislocations. However, when the size is below 5 nm, loops with g{center_dot}b=0 are often not invisible and loops with g{center_dot}b{ne}0 may also show very weak contrast under weak beam imaging conditions. A special method such as black-white contrast analysis should be used for the determination. This method can be applied to black=white lobe images obtained under dynamical two beam contrast conditions. The directions can be determined roughly with only experimental images. It is needed for a correct determination to match experimental images with computer-generated images. This paper presents results from analyses of dislocation loops with an image simulation technique, TEMACI which was developed by Zhongfu, the Oxford University.

  1. Patients radiation protection in medical imaging. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the conference organised by the French society of radiation protection about patients radiation protection in medical imaging. Twelve presentations (slides) are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Medical exposure of the French population: methodology and results (Bernard Aubert, IRSN); 2 - What indicators for the medical exposure? (Cecile Etard, IRSN); 3 - Guidebook of correct usage of medical imaging examination (Philippe Grenier, Pitie-Salpetriere hospital); 4 - Radiation protection optimization in pediatric imaging (Hubert Ducou-Le-Pointe, Aurelien Bouette (Armand-Trousseau children hospital); 5 - Children's exposure to image scanners: epidemiological survey (Marie-Odile Bernier, IRSN); 6 - Management of patient's irradiation: from image quality to good practice (Thierry Solaire, General Electric); 7 - Dose optimization in radiology (Cecile Salvat (Lariboisiere hospital); 8 - Cancer detection in the breast cancer planned screening program - 2004-2009 era (Agnes Rogel, InVS); 9 - Mammographic exposures - radiobiological effects - radio-induced DNA damages (Catherine Colin, Lyon Sud hospital); 10 - Breast cancer screening program - importance of non-irradiating techniques (Anne Tardivon, Institut Curie); 11 - Radiation protection justification for the medical imaging of patients over the age of 50 (Michel Bourguignon, ASN); 12 - Search for a molecular imprint for the discrimination between radio-induced and sporadic tumors (Sylvie Chevillard, CEA)

  2. Ultrafast transient grating radiation to optical image converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Richard E; Vernon, Stephen P; Steel, Paul T; Lowry, Mark E

    2014-11-04

    A high sensitivity transient grating ultrafast radiation to optical image converter is based on a fixed transmission grating adjacent to a semiconductor substrate. X-rays or optical radiation passing through the fixed transmission grating is thereby modulated and produces a small periodic variation of refractive index or transient grating in the semiconductor through carrier induced refractive index shifts. An optical or infrared probe beam tuned just below the semiconductor band gap is reflected off a high reflectivity mirror on the semiconductor so that it double passes therethrough and interacts with the radiation induced phase grating therein. A small portion of the optical beam is diffracted out of the probe beam by the radiation induced transient grating to become the converted signal that is imaged onto a detector.

  3. MR imaging of late radiation brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and four patients treated with radiotherapy for intracranial tumors and their related conditions were reviewed to evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in demonstrating increased signal intensity areas on T2-weighted images that were considered to be late adverse effects of irradiation of the brain. High signal intensity areas of the white matter were divided into five patterns according to their size and extension. Severity was found to increase with age and irradiation doses of more than 50 Gy. In patients with irradiation doses of more than 60 Gy, the severity of increased with shorter interval after radiotherapy than in those given low irradiation doses. Clinical findings such as mental deterioration, motor abnormality, and visual defect were observed in 12 patients. These findings were closely correlated with the severity of the MR pattern. In most patients, high signal intensity areas were stable or progressive during the course of follow-up. However, these areas were regressive in three patients. Imaging with Gd-DTPA was performed in 36 patients, six of whom showed enhancement. Pathological findings on enhancement included astrocyte proliferation and coalescing vacuoles in neural tissue. MR imaging is an excellent method with which to monitor the adverse effects of radiotherapy of the brain. (author)

  4. Preclinical imaging in animal models of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern radiotherapy benefits from precise and targeted diagnostic and pretherapeutic imaging. Standard imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) offer high morphological detail but only limited functional information on tumors. Novel functional and molecular imaging modalities provide biological information about tumors in addition to detailed morphological information. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) CT or ultrasound-based perfusion imaging as well as hybrid modalities, such as positron emission tomography (PET) CT or MRI-PET have the potential to identify and precisely delineate viable and/or perfused tumor areas, enabling optimization of targeted radiotherapy. Functional information on tissue microcirculation and/or glucose metabolism allow a more precise definition and treatment of tumors while reducing the radiation dose and sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. In the development of new imaging methods for planning individualized radiotherapy, preclinical imaging and research plays a pivotal role, as the value of multimodality imaging can only be assessed, tested and adequately developed in a preclinical setting, i.e. in animal tumor models. New functional imaging modalities will play an increasing role for the surveillance of early treatment response during radiation therapy and in the assessment of the potential value of new combination therapies (e.g. combining anti-angiogenic drugs with radiotherapy). (orig.)

  5. Radiation dose computation for renal dynamic radionuclide-imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the internal radiation dose in kidney and bladder for the renal dynamic radionuclide-imaging. Methods: A double compartment chain related to kidney-bladder excretion model was set out. The correlative mathematical expressions were educed to simulate the absorbed radionuclide medicament for renal dynamic imaging's transfer and excretion. The total disintegration amount in kidney, bladder and other organs was counted. Monte Carlo methods were used to calculate the radionuclide disintegration radial energy deposited in kidney and bladder, and their effective doses were calculated according to the radiation quality factor. Results: To take 131I-OIH and 99Tcm-DTPA imaging agents for example, the internal radiation dose in kidney was 0.058 mGy/MBq(for 131I-OIH) and 0.0054 mGy/MBq(for 99Tcm-DTPA), respectively, while the internal radiation dose in bladder is 0.40 mGy/MBq(for 131I-OIH) and 0.033 mGy/MBq(for 99Tcm. DTPA), respectively. Conclusions: The internal radiation doses in kidney and bladder are very low for renal dynamic radionuclide- imaging at the conventional dose. (authors)

  6. Minimizing Patient Exposure to Radiation in Gastrointestinal Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many diagnostic imaging examinations in gastroenterology involve exposure to ionizing radiation. These procedures include plain radiography, barium studies, nuclear medicine studies, computed tomography (CT), interventional radiology procedures, and procedures performed under fluoroscopy guidance in an endoscopy suite (e.g. endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography). Radiation protection is vital for all procedures performed under fluoroscopy guidance, including those performed in the endoscopy suite. Radiation protection in the endoscopy suite should follow published guidelines from the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the World Gastroenterology Organisation, which specifically address the issue of radiation protection for fluoroscopically guided procedures performed outside imaging departments and in the endoscopy suite. Recent studies have examined the issue of lifetime cumulative effective doses received by patients attending hospital with gastrointestinal disorders and have shown potential for substantial radiation exposures from gastrointestinal imaging, especially in small groups of patients with chronic gastrointestinal disorders such as Crohn’s disease. In these studies, CT is the major contributor to cumulative dose. In these patients, radiation dose optimization is necessary and should follow the principles of justification, optimization and limitation. (author)

  7. The Use of Radiation Detectors in Medicine: Radiation Detectors for Functional Imaging (2/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The development of radiation detectors in the field of nuclear and particle physics has had a terrific impact in medical imaging since this latter discipline took off in late ’70 with the invention of the CT scanners. The massive use in High Energy Physics of position sensitive gas detectors, of high Z and high density scintillators coupled to Photomultiplier (PMT) and Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT), and of solid state detectors has triggered during the last 30 years a series of novel applications in Medical Imaging with ionizing radiation. The accelerated scientific progression in genetics and molecular biology has finally generated what it is now called Molecular Imaging. This field of research presents additional challenges not only in the technology of radiation detector, but more and more in the ASIC electronics, fast digital readout and parallel software. In this series of three lectures I will try to present how high energy physics and medical imaging development have both benefited by t...

  8. The Use of Radiation Detectors in Medicine: Radiation Detectors for Morphological Imaging (1/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The development of radiation detectors in the field of nuclear and particle physics has had a terrific impact in medical imaging since this latter discipline took off in late ’70 with the invention of the CT scanners. The massive use in High Energy Physics of position sensitive gas detectors, of high Z and high density scintillators coupled to Photomultiplier (PMT) and Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT), and of solid state detectors has triggered during the last 30 years a series of novel applications in Medical Imaging with ionizing radiation. The accelerated scientific progression in genetics and molecular biology has finally generated what it is now called Molecular Imaging. This field of research presents additional challenges not only in the technology of radiation detector, but more and more in the ASIC electronics, fast digital readout and parallel software. In this series of three lectures I will try to present how high energy physics and medical imaging development have both benefited by t...

  9. Charge-Transfer CMOS Image Sensors: Device and Radiation Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramachandra Rao, P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was twofold: investigating the effect of ionizing radiation on 4-T CMOS image sensors and the possibility of realizing a CCD like sensor in standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology (for medical applications). Both the aims are complementary; borrowing and lending many aspects of radia

  10. A method of imaging viscoelastic parameters with acoustic radiation force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acoustic radiation force has been proposed as a method of interrogating the mechanical properties of tissue. One simple approach applies a series of focused ultrasonic pulses to generate an acoustic radiation force, then processes the echoes returned from these pulses to estimate the radiation-force-induced displacement as a function of time. This process can be repeated at a number of locations to acquire data for image formation. In previous work we have formed images of tissue stiffness by depicting the maximum displacement induced at each tissue location after a finite period of insonification. While these maximum displacement images are able to differentiate materials of disparate mechanical properties, they exploit only a fraction of the information available. In this paper we show that the time-displacement curves acquired from tissue mimicking phantoms exhibit a viscoelastic response which is accurately described by the Voigt model. We describe how the viscous and elastic parameters of this model may be determined from experimental data. Finally, we show phantom images that depict not only the maximum local displacement, but also the viscous and elastic model parameters. These images offer complementary information about the target. (author)

  11. Cosmic AntiParticle Ring Imaging Cerenkov Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %RE2A \\\\ \\\\ %title \\\\ \\\\The CAPRICE experiment studies antimatter and light nuclei in the cosmic rays as well as muons in the atmosphere. The experiment is performed with the spectrometer shown in the figure which is lifted by a balloon to an altitude of 35-40 km. At this altitude less than half a percent of the atmosphere is above the 2 ton spectrometer which makes it possible to study the cosmic ray flux without too much background from atmospherically produced particles. The spectrometer includes time-of-flight scintillators, a gaseous RICH counter, a drift chamber tracker and a silicon electromagnetic calorimeter. The important feature of the spectrometer is to discriminate between different particles.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment aims at measuring the flux of the antiparticles (antiprotons and positrons) above about 5 GeV and relate the fluxes to models including exotic production of antiparticles like dark matter supersymmetric particles. The flux of muons is measured during descent of the balloon through the at...

  12. Use of molecular imaging to guide and assess radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging is intimately associated with radiation therapy (RT). Anatomical imaging is the standard of care for crucial components of the RT process such as tumor localization, treatment planning, and positioning verification. However, as disease progression and treatment response at the molecular and cellular level precede visible structural changes to tissue, applications of functional and molecular imaging are becoming increasingly more important. Use of molecular imaging in RTcan be divided into three phases: (1) Imaging for diagnosis and staging, performed during the initial phases of RT to establish the presence and progression of disease (2) Imaging for target definition, performed prior to RT in order to determine the spatial extent of the tumor and the position of normal tissue (3) Imaging for treatment response assessment, performed during or after RT to establish effectiveness, predict outcome, and potentially modify therapy. Following diagnosis and staging molecular imaging can help to define which type of therapy should be used, as well assess the spatial extent of the tumor, thus providing grounds for more reliable target definition. Molecular imaging has been shown to significantly reduce large inter-observer variability in target definition compared to anatomical imaging. This reduction leads to significant reduction in treatment margin, thereby enabling more accurate and precise tumor targeting. Furthermore, molecular imaging has the potential to characterize biological heterogeneity within tumors, providing foundations for so-called biologically conformal radiotherapy, or dose painting. Early treatment response assessment refers to the use of molecular imaging during the course of therapy, and late treatment response assessment refers to the use of molecular imaging after the therapy has been completed. While late assessment enables prediction of treatment outcome, early assessment, in addition, enables treatment adaptation

  13. Clinical imaging centers: The role of state radiation control programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Protection is mandated in all 50 states. Regulatory control over naturally occurring and accelerator produced radioactive materials use is exclusively by state government. Although states are independent bodies there are many similarities in their regulatory approaches. Differences in the degree of regulatory control are minimized through use of the Suggested State Regulations for the Control of Radiation and other guidance documents provided by the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc. This paper discusses the general requirements to obtain a license and/or registration to produce radioactive material in an accelerator, prepare an imaging agent and/or operate an imaging clinic. These requirements include minimum standards for training and experience of all principal users, equipment specifications, facilities design and construction, specific operating and emergency procedures, radiation protection surveys and monitoring of personnel exposures, ongoing training of staff, and a commitment to ALARA (the philosophy of keeping radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable). The nature and frequency of routine inspections to ensure adequate protection of workers and the public is also covered

  14. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Clayton B; Thompson, Holly M; Benedict, Stanley H; Seibert, J Anthony; Wong, Kenneth; Vaughan, Andrew T; Chen, Allen M

    2016-04-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning--a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of "gentle IGRT

  15. Monitoring radiation use in cardiac fluoroscopy imaging procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Timely identification of systematic changes in radiation delivery of an imaging system can lead to a reduction in risk for the patients involved. However, existing quality assurance programs involving the routine testing of equipment performance using phantoms are limited in their ability to effectively carry out this task. To address this issue, the authors propose the implementation of an ongoing monitoring process that utilizes procedural data to identify unexpected large or small radiation exposures for individual patients, as well as to detect persistent changes in the radiation output of imaging platforms. Methods: Data used in this study were obtained from records routinely collected during procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization imaging facility at St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, over the period January 2008-March 2010. A two stage monitoring process employing individual and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts was developed and used to identify unexpectedly high or low radiation exposure levels for individual patients, as well as detect persistent changes in the radiation output delivered by the imaging systems. To increase sensitivity of the charts, we account for variation in dose area product (DAP) values due to other measured factors (patient weight, fluoroscopy time, and digital acquisition frame count) using multiple linear regression. Control charts are then constructed using the residual values from this linear regression. The proposed monitoring process was evaluated using simulation to model the performance of the process under known conditions. Results: Retrospective application of this technique to actual clinical data identified a number of cases in which the DAP result could be considered unexpected. Most of these, upon review, were attributed to data entry errors. The charts monitoring the overall system radiation output trends demonstrated changes in equipment performance

  16. Study warns of radiation risk in medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-10-01

    A study of a million US patients suggests that some who undergo medical imaging could be exposed to more ionizing radiation than those who work with radioactive materials in nuclear power plants. The study, reported in The New England Journal of Medicine (361 849), implies that current exposure to radiation from conventional X-ray equipment as well as computed tomography (CT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners could lead to tens of thousands of extra cases of cancer in the US alone.

  17. Monitoring radiation use in cardiac fluoroscopy imaging procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Nathaniel T.; Steiner, Stefan H.; Smith, Ian R.; MacKay, R. Jock [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences, Business and Industrial Statistics Research Group, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); St. Andrew' s Medical Institute, St. Andrew' s War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland 4000 (Australia); Department of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences, Business and Industrial Statistics Research Group, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Timely identification of systematic changes in radiation delivery of an imaging system can lead to a reduction in risk for the patients involved. However, existing quality assurance programs involving the routine testing of equipment performance using phantoms are limited in their ability to effectively carry out this task. To address this issue, the authors propose the implementation of an ongoing monitoring process that utilizes procedural data to identify unexpected large or small radiation exposures for individual patients, as well as to detect persistent changes in the radiation output of imaging platforms. Methods: Data used in this study were obtained from records routinely collected during procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization imaging facility at St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, over the period January 2008-March 2010. A two stage monitoring process employing individual and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts was developed and used to identify unexpectedly high or low radiation exposure levels for individual patients, as well as detect persistent changes in the radiation output delivered by the imaging systems. To increase sensitivity of the charts, we account for variation in dose area product (DAP) values due to other measured factors (patient weight, fluoroscopy time, and digital acquisition frame count) using multiple linear regression. Control charts are then constructed using the residual values from this linear regression. The proposed monitoring process was evaluated using simulation to model the performance of the process under known conditions. Results: Retrospective application of this technique to actual clinical data identified a number of cases in which the DAP result could be considered unexpected. Most of these, upon review, were attributed to data entry errors. The charts monitoring the overall system radiation output trends demonstrated changes in equipment

  18. Rapid determination of strontium-90 in environmental samples by single Cerenkov counting using two different colour quench curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The validation of the Cerenkov radiation measurement of 90Y to determine the activity concentration of 90Sr in environmental samples is described. Liquid-liquid extraction with di-2-ethyhexylphosphoric acid in toluene was used to separate 90Y from 90Sr. Optimum conditions for Cerenkov counting (low-level counting option, counting windows, mass of solution to be measured) were established. The need for a counting efficiency correction by using a colour quench curve is stated to be essential, otherwise a significant error may occur. Two different colour quench curves (counting efficiency versus the channel ratio or spectral index parameter) were used and the results were compared. The method was applied to 12 environmental matrices: sea-water, algae, carobs, milk, almonds, hake, honey, shellfish, lamb meat, sardine, pork meat and shore sand. No significant differences were observed on using either of the two colour quench curves for any of these environmental matrices. In order to validate the proposed method, a certified soil reference material (CRM IAEA-375) was used, together with participation in an interlaboratory exercise to determine 90Sr in a natural water sample. Again, efficiency correction was performed by using either of the two colour quench curves and in both instances the calculated 90Sr activity concentration was in good agreement with the known values. (Author)

  19. Rapid determination of strontium-90 in environmental samples by single Cerenkov counting using two different colour quench curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, J.M.; Garcia, J.F.; Llaurado, M.; Rauret, G. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Analitica

    1996-11-01

    The validation of the Cerenkov radiation measurement of {sup 90}Y to determine the activity concentration of {sup 90}Sr in environmental samples is described. Liquid-liquid extraction with di-2-ethyhexylphosphoric acid in toluene was used to separate {sup 90}Y from {sup 90}Sr. Optimum conditions for Cerenkov counting (low-level counting option, counting windows, mass of solution to be measured) were established. The need for a counting efficiency correction by using a colour quench curve is stated to be essential, otherwise a significant error may occur. Two different colour quench curves (counting efficiency versus the channel ratio or spectral index parameter) were used and the results were compared. The method was applied to 12 environmental matrices: sea-water, algae, carobs, milk, almonds, hake, honey, shellfish, lamb meat, sardine, pork meat and shore sand. No significant differences were observed on using either of the two colour quench curves for any of these environmental matrices. In order to validate the proposed method, a certified soil reference material (CRM IAEA-375) was used, together with participation in an interlaboratory exercise to determine {sup 90}Sr in a natural water sample. Again, efficiency correction was performed by using either of the two colour quench curves and in both instances the calculated {sup 90}Sr activity concentration was in good agreement with the known values. (Author).

  20. Potential of biological images for radiation therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent technical advances in 3D conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (3DCRT and IMRT) based, on patient-specific CT and MRI images, have the potential of delivering exquisitely conformal dose distributions to the target volume while avoiding critical structures. Emerging clinical results in terms of reducing treatment-related morbidity and increasing local control appear promising. Recent developments in imaging have suggested that biological images may further positively impact cancer diagnosis, characterization and therapy. While in the past radiological images are largely anatomical, the new types of images can provide metabolic, biochemical, physiological, functional and molecular (genotypic and phenotypic) information. For radiation therapy, images that give information about factors (e.g. tumor hypoxia, Tpot) that influence radiosensitivity and treatment outcome can be regarded as radiobiological images. The ability of IMRT to 'paint' (in 2D) or 'sculpt' (in 3D) the dose, and produce exquisitely conformal dose distributions begs the '64 million dollar question' as to how to paint or sculpt, and whether biological imaging may provide the pertinent information. Can this new approach provide 'radiobiological phenotypes' non-invasively, and incrementally improve upon the predictive assays of radiobiological characteristics such as proliferative activity (Tpot - the potential doubling time), radiosensitivity (SF2 - the surviving fraction at a dose of 2 Gy), energy status (relative to sublethal damage repair), pH (a possible surrogate of hypoxia), tumor hypoxia, etc. as prognosticator(s) of radiation treatment outcome. Important for IMRT, the spatial (geometrical) distribution of the radiobiological phenotypes provide the basis for dose distribution design to conform to both the physical (geometrical) and the biological attributes. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  1. MO-G-BRF-07: Optical Characterization of Novel Terbium-Doped Nanophosphors Excited by Clinical Electron and Photon Beams for Potential Use in Molecular Imaging Or Photodynamic Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Optical properties of terbium (Tb3+)-doped gadolinium trifluoride (GdF3) nanoplates irradiated by electron and photon beams were investigated for their potential as optical probes. The contribution of induced Cerenkov radiation in exciting the nanophosphors was investigated as well. Methods: The emission spectra of Terbium-doped GdF3 dispersed in hexane, embedded in tissue mimicking phantoms were collected by an optical fiber connected to a CCD-coupled spectrograph, while the samples were irradiated by a medical linear accelerator with electron beams of energies 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV or X-ray beams of energies of 6, and 15 MV. The contribution of induced Cerenkov radiation in exciting the nanophosphores was investigated in a dedicated experimental apparatus through optical isolation of the samples and also by using 125 kVp X-ray beams whose energy is below the threshold for generating Cerenkov radiation in that medium. Results: Terbium-doped GdF3 nanoplates show characteristic cathodoluminescence emission peaks at 488, 543, 586, and 619 nm, which are responsible for the characteristic f-f transition of terbium ion. In a series of experiments, the contribution of Cerenkov radiation in the luminescence of such nanophosphors was ruled out. Conclusion: We have characterized the optical properties of Terbium-doped GdF3 nanoplates. Such nanocrystals with emission tunability and high surface area that facilitates attachment with targeting reagents are promising in situ light source candidates for molecular imaging or exciting a photosensitizer for ultralow fluence photodynamic therapy. This work is supported by the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania, the American Cancer Society through IRG-78-002-28, and the University of Pennsylvania's Nano/Bio Interface Center through NSEC DMR08-32802

  2. Systematic measurements of whole-body imaging dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haelg, Roger A.; Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland); Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich 8057 (Switzerland) and Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The full benefit of the increased precision of contemporary treatment techniques can only be exploited if the accuracy of the patient positioning is guaranteed. Therefore, more and more imaging modalities are used in the process of the patient setup in clinical routine of radiation therapy. The improved accuracy in patient positioning, however, results in additional dose contributions to the integral patient dose. To quantify this, absorbed dose measurements from typical imaging procedures involved in an image-guided radiation therapy treatment were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom for a complete course of treatment. The experimental setup, including the measurement positions in the phantom, was exactly the same as in a preceding study of radiotherapy stray dose measurements. This allows a direct combination of imaging dose distributions with the therapy dose distribution. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from imaging devices used with treatment machines from the manufacturers Accuray, Elekta, Siemens, and Varian and from computed tomography scanners from GE Healthcare were determined and the resulting effective dose was calculated. The list of investigated imaging techniques consisted of cone beam computed tomography (kilo- and megavoltage), megavoltage fan beam computed tomography, kilo- and megavoltage planar imaging, planning computed tomography with and without gating methods and planar scout views. Results: A conventional 3D planning CT resulted in an effective dose additional to the treatment stray dose of less than 1 mSv outside of the treated volume, whereas a 4D planning CT resulted in a 10 times larger dose. For a daily setup of the patient with two planar kilovoltage images or with a fan beam CT at the TomoTherapy unit, an additional effective dose outside of the treated volume of less than 0.4 mSv and 1

  3. Radiation dose in cardiac CT angiography: Protocols and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to evaluate the radiation dose exposure of patients submitted to cardiac computed tomography angiography. The effective dose was obtained from the product of dose-length product values and the conversion factor established in the European Working Group for Guidelines on Quality Criteria in CT. The image noise and contrast-and signal-to-noise ratios were obtained for all images. Sixty-four- and 256-slice CT angiographies were used in 211 (68.5 %) and 97 (31.5 %) patients, respectively. The calculated mean effective dose with prospective CT angiography was 6.0±1.0 mSv and the retrospective mode was 8.4±1.2 mSv. The mean image noise values were 38.5±9.5 and 21.4±5.3 for prospective and retrospective modes, respectively. It was observed that the image noise increased by 44.4 % using a prospective mode. Prospective CT angiography reduces radiation dose by ∼29 % compared with the retrospective mode, while maintaining diagnostic image quality and the ability to assess obstructions in patients. (authors)

  4. The role of imaging in pediatric radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pediatric radiation oncologist is involved in treating a different spectrum of tumors that is generally seen by the adult radiation oncologist. More than one-third of pediatric patients with malignancies suffer from acute lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas. Approximately one-quarter of the patients have primary tumors of the brain and central nervous system, while the remaining patients mostly present with mesenchymal sarcomas as opposed to the carcinomas more generally seen in adult practice. Pediatric tumors are frequently deep seated and therefore more difficult to evaluate by physical examination that the typical adult epithelial tumors. In the following sections, the various tumor types and locations are discussed with reference to the specific imaging requirements for each of the groups. This is preceded by a brief introduction to modern radiation oncology in order to clarify the role of these modalities

  5. Multi-sensor radiation detection, imaging, and fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Glenn Knoll was one of the leaders in the field of radiation detection and measurements and shaped this field through his outstanding scientific and technical contributions, as a teacher, his personality, and his textbook. His Radiation Detection and Measurement book guided me in my studies and is now the textbook in my classes in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at UC Berkeley. In the spirit of Glenn, I will provide an overview of our activities at the Berkeley Applied Nuclear Physics program reflecting some of the breadth of radiation detection technologies and their applications ranging from fundamental studies in physics to biomedical imaging and to nuclear security. I will conclude with a discussion of our Berkeley Radwatch and Resilient Communities activities as a result of the events at the Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan more than 4 years ago.

  6. Imaging Jupiter's radiation belts down to 127 MHz with LOFAR

    OpenAIRE

    Girard, J. N.; Zarka, P.; Tasse, C.; Hess, S.; de Pater, I.; Santos-Costa, D.; Nenon, Q.; Sicard, A.; Bourdarie, S.; J. Anderson; Asgekar, A.; Bell, M. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Observing Jupiter's synchrotron emission from the Earth remains today the sole method to scrutinize the distribution and dynamical behavior of the ultra energetic electrons magnetically trapped around the planet (because in-situ particle data are limited in the inner magnetosphere). Aims. We perform the first resolved and low-frequency imaging of the synchrotron emission with LOFAR at 127 MHz. The radiation comes from low energy electrons (~1-30 MeV) which map a broad region of Jupit...

  7. Characteristics of imaging plate and its applications to radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since Imaging Plate has very high sensitivity of ∼103 times to conventional x-ray films, large dynamic range ∼105 and large area up to 35cmx43cm, it has many applicational fields which are still expanding. Distributions of radioactivity on granite surface and slite radioactive-contamination in a hot laboratory can be easily measured. Many times successive read-out method can give the informations on the radiation kind and energy. (author)

  8. Biological imaging in radiation therapy: role of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiation therapy (RT), staging, treatment planning, monitoring and evaluation of response are traditionally based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These radiological investigations have the significant advantage to show the anatomy with a high resolution, being also called anatomical imaging. In recent years, so called biological imaging methods which visualize metabolic pathways have been developed. These methods offer complementary imaging of various aspects of tumour biology. To date, the most prominent biological imaging system in use is positron emission tomography (PET), whose diagnostic properties have clinically been evaluated for years. The aim of this review is to discuss the valences and implications of PET in RT. We will focus our evaluation on the following topics: the role of biological imaging for tumour tissue detection/delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) and for the visualization of heterogeneous tumour biology. We will discuss the role of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET in lung and head and neck cancer and the impact of amino acids (AA)-PET in target volume delineation of brain gliomas. Furthermore, we summarize the data of the literature about tumour hypoxia and proliferation visualized by PET. We conclude that, regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy, PET offers advantages in terms of tumour delineation and the description of biological processes. However, to define the real impact of biological imaging on clinical outcome after radiotherapy, further experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analyses are required. (topical review)

  9. Solid Appearance of Pancreatic Serous Cystadenoma Diagnosed as Cystic at Ultrasound Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Mirko D’Onofrio; Anna Gallotti; Enrico Martone; Roberto Pozzi Mucelli

    2009-01-01

    Context Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an emerging imaging modality. The study of the pancreas is a new and promising application of ultrasound acoustic radiation force impulse imaging. Case report We present the first case of pancreatic serous cystadenoma which mimics a solid neoplasm at conventional imaging (US and CT), correctly diagnosed as cystic at ultrasound acoustic radiation force impulse imaging. Conclusion The “XXXX” values always measured at Virtual TouchTM tissue qua...

  10. Optimization of image quality and radiation dose in neuroradiological computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Löve, Askell

    2013-01-01

    Background: The goal of clinical computed tomography (CT) is to produce images of diagnostic quality using the lowest possible radiation exposure. Degradation of image quality, with increased image noise and reduced spatial resolution, is a major limitation for radiation dose reduction in CT. This can be counteracted with new post-processing image filters and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms that improve image quality and allow for reduced radiation doses. Implementation of new method...

  11. Light at the end of the tunnel in radiation therapy: molecular imaging in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate dose delivery to malignant tissue in radiotherapy is quite important for enhancing the treatment efficacy while minimizing morbidity of surrounding normal tissues. Advances in therapeutic strategies and diagnosis technologies along with our understanding of the biology of tumor response to radiation therapy have paved way to allow nearly 60% of current cancer patients to be treated with Radiation Therapy. The confluence of molecular imaging and nanotechnology fields are bridging physics and medicine and are quickly making strides in opening new avenues and therapeutic strategies that complement radiation therapy - with a distinct footprint in immunotherapy, adoptive cell therapy, and targeted chemotherapy. Incorporating optical imaging in radiation therapy in my laboratory, we demonstrated that molecular probes can monitor radiation-induced physiological changes at the target and off-target sites using in vivo molecular imaging approaches. Further we show endogenous bioluminescence resulting from whole body irradiation, which is distinct from the Cherenkov radiation. Mice without anesthesia were held in ventilated mouse pie cage and subjected to 5 Gy X-ray irradiation using commercially available X-RAD320 irradiator (1 Gy/min; F2 beam hardening filter 1.5 mm Al, 0.25 mm Cu, 0.75 mm Sn,). The endogenous bioluminescence from the subjects was captured using cooled CCD camera. Significant increase (up to 100 fold) in the amounts of photons released as bioluminescence was detected during 5 min capture from the mice subjected to irradiation compared to that of the control. To determine the early inflammatory response, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity was monitored using L-012 (8-amino-5-chloro-7-phenylpyridol (3,4-d)pyridazine-1,4(2H,3H) dione), a chemiluminescence reporter. L-012 was administered (i.p) after 15 min of irradiation. Chemiluminescence resulting from the irradiation induced ROS activity, possible through the action of the

  12. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source dual-energy CT: Radiation dose and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of virtual monochromatic images synthesized from dual-source dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in comparison with conventional polychromatic single-energy CT for the same radiation dose. Methods: In dual-energy CT, besides the material-specific information, one may also synthesize monochromatic images at different energies, which can be used for routine diagnosis similar to conventional polychromatic single-energy images. In this work, the authors assessed whether virtual monochromatic images generated from dual-source CT scanners had an image quality similar to that of polychromatic single-energy images for the same radiation dose. First, the authors provided a theoretical analysis of the optimal monochromatic energy for either the minimum noise level or the highest iodine contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for a given patient size and dose partitioning between the low- and high-energy scans. Second, the authors performed an experimental study on a dual-source CT scanner to evaluate the noise and iodine CNR in monochromatic images. A thoracic phantom with three sizes of attenuating rings was used to represent four adult sizes. For each phantom size, three dose partitionings between the low-energy (80 kV) and the high-energy (140 kV) scans were used in the dual-energy scan. Monochromatic images at eight energies (40 to 110 keV) were generated for each scan. Phantoms were also scanned at each of the four polychromatic single energy (80, 100, 120, and 140 kV) with the same radiation dose. Results: The optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on several factors: phantom size, partitioning of the radiation dose between low- and high-energy scans, and the image quality metrics to be optimized. With the increase of phantom size, the optimal monochromatic energy increased. With the increased percentage of radiation dose on the low energy scan, the optimal monochromatic energy decreased. When maximizing the iodine CNR in

  13. Cerenkov counting as a complement to liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercially available spectrometer was calibrated for liquid scintillation (LS) and Cerenkov counting efficiency (CCE) using National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable solutions. The CCE increased linearly over a 3 order of magnitude range in 40K β activity, and by 42% per MeV as β-energies increased from 0.300 to 3.54 MeV, achieving a maximum value of 80% for 106Ru/106Rh The CCE can be enhanced by 10-15% when a wavelength shifter is used. A comparison of the data showed that the CCE was typically 20-50% less than the LS counting efficiency for β-particles with maximum energies >1 MeV. Applications that utilize sequential CCE and LS counting to quantitate activity concentrations are discussed for samples containing two β-emitting nuclides of differing energies. (Author)

  14. The gamma-ray diffuse background and Cerenkov telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using the Pythia version of the Lund Monte-Carlo, the photon yield of proton-proton collisions in the energy range between 10 GeV and 10 TeV has been studied. The resulting photon spectrum turns out to scale with incident energy. Then, by folding the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray protons with the distribution of HI and CO, the Galactic diffuse emission of γ-rays above 100 GeV has been mapped. Prospects for observing this diffuse background with forthcoming ground-based Cerenkov detectors are quite promising. Finally, the γ-ray emission from a hypothetical nucleus of neutralinos at the Galactic center is shown to be swamped in the diffuse background. (author). 29 refs., 6 figs

  15. Quantitative analysis for radiation image measured by bio-image analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bio-image analyzer is a system for detecting radiation images. In the system, the radiation image recorded on the imaging plate (coated with photostimulable phosphor on a polyester plate) is read out as light signals by laser beam excitation and the image data are processed by a computer. This system is mainly applied for the autoradiography of biological samples. In order to clarify the characteristics of the analyzer, the factors that affect to the quantification of radiation image have been investigated. The photostimulable phosphor shows the fading phenomenon and its quantity depends on the preservation temperature and period. Irradiating C14-β ray for definite time, the plates were preserved for 1 hour to 14 days under 10degC to 40degC and read out. The absolute output value, defined as a value unaffected by fading, was determined from the relation between irradiation time and the output, by extraporating the time to zero. Compared to the absolute value, the calibration factors were calculated and expressed as the function of storage time and temperature. The fading effects after Tl204-β and γ ray irradiation were also examined and the fading rates almost coincide with that of C14-β ray. (author)

  16. Laminographic imaging using synchrotron radiation – challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron-radiation computed laminography (SRCL) was developed as a nondestructive three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique for flat and laterally extended objects. Complementing the established method of computed tomography, SRCL is based on the inclination of the tomographic axis with respect to the incident x-ray beam by a defined angle. Its ability for 3D imaging of regions of interest in flat specimens was demonstrated in various fields of investigation, e.g. in nondestructive testing, material science and life sciences. We introduce the principles of the method and report on the latest developments of SRCL. The experimental set-ups at the ESRF beamlines ID19 and ID22NI are dedicated to 3D micro- and nano-scale imaging, respectively, utilising different contrast modes including absorption, phase contrast and fluorescence. Selected examples from materials science outline the potential of the method for an unparalleled nondestructive 3D characterisation of flat specimens.

  17. Laminographic imaging using synchrotron radiation - challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfen, Lukas; Xu, Feng; Suhonen, Heikki; Cloetens, Peter; Baumbach, Tilo

    2013-03-01

    Synchrotron-radiation computed laminography (SRCL) was developed as a nondestructive three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique for flat and laterally extended objects. Complementing the established method of computed tomography, SRCL is based on the inclination of the tomographic axis with respect to the incident x-ray beam by a defined angle. Its ability for 3D imaging of regions of interest in flat specimens was demonstrated in various fields of investigation, e.g. in nondestructive testing, material science and life sciences. We introduce the principles of the method and report on the latest developments of SRCL. The experimental set-ups at the ESRF beamlines ID19 and ID22NI are dedicated to 3D micro- and nano-scale imaging, respectively, utilising different contrast modes including absorption, phase contrast and fluorescence. Selected examples from materials science outline the potential of the method for an unparalleled nondestructive 3D characterisation of flat specimens.

  18. Radiation risks of medical imaging: separating fact from fantasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendee, William R; O'Connor, Michael K

    2012-08-01

    During the past few years, several articles have appeared in the scientific literature that predict thousands of cancers and cancer deaths per year in the U.S. population caused by medical imaging procedures that use ionizing radiation. These predictions are computed by multiplying small and highly speculative risk factors by large populations of patients to yield impressive numbers of "cancer victims." The risk factors are acquired from the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII report without attention to the caveats about their use presented in the BEIR VII report. The principal data source for the risk factors is the ongoing study of survivors of the Japanese atomic explosions, a population of individuals that is greatly different from patients undergoing imaging procedures. For the purpose of risk estimation, doses to patients are converted to effective doses, even though the International Commission on Radiological Protection warns against the use of effective dose for epidemiologic studies or for estimation of individual risks. To extrapolate cancer incidence to doses of a few millisieverts from data greater than 100 mSv, a linear no-threshold model is used, even though substantial radiobiological and human exposure data imply that it is not an appropriate model. The predictions of cancers and cancer deaths are sensationalized in electronic and print public media, resulting in anxiety and fear about medical imaging among patients and parents. Not infrequently, patients are anxious about a scheduled imaging procedure because of articles they have read in the public media. In some cases, medical imaging examinations may be delayed or deferred as a consequence, resulting in a much greater risk to patients than that associated with imaging examinations. © RSNA, 2012. PMID:22821690

  19. Expected reconstruction error of arrival direction in observation by water Cerenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on reconstruction error of emitted direction of electrons observed in water Cerenkov detector which is estimated assuming gaussian approximation for multiple scattering process and exponential decrease with increasing mean square angle for detecting efficiency of Cerenkov photon. After correcting geometrical limitation by Mott formula the authors got reasonable result explaining experimental data of wide energy range. Similar estimation by Kamioka group seems unable to explain those data because of inadequate cut of large angle scattering used in EGS simulation code

  20. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 μGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 μGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures

  1. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E [Radiology Department, Medicine School, Complutense University and San Carlos University Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ubeda, C [Clinical Sciences Department, Faculty of the Science of Health, Tarapaca University, 18 de Septiembre 2222, Arica (Chile); Leyton, F [Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile); Miranda, P [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Avenida Antonio Varas 360, Providencia, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: eliseov@med.ucm.es

    2008-08-07

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 {mu}Gy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 {mu}Gy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  2. The Use of Medical Images in Planning and Delivery of Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kalet, Ira J; Austin-Seymour, Mary M.

    1997-01-01

    The authors provide a survey of how images are used in radiation therapy to improve the precision of radiation therapy plans, and delivery of radiation treatment. In contrast to diagnostic radiology, where the focus is on interpretation of the images to decide if disease is present, radiation therapy quantifies the extent of the region to be treated, and relates it to the proposed treatment using a quantitative modeling system called a radiation treatment planning (RTP...

  3. Effects of Radiation Exposure From Cardiac Imaging: How Good Are the Data?

    OpenAIRE

    Einstein, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about medical exposure to ionizing radiation have become heightened in recent years due to rapid growth in procedure volumes and the high radiation doses incurred from some procedures. This article summarizes the evidence base undergirding concerns about radiation exposure in cardiac imaging. After classifying radiation effects, explaining terminology used to quantify the radiation received by patients, and describing typical doses from cardiac imaging procedures, I address the major...

  4. Radiation Dose Reduction Methods For Use With Fluoroscopic Imaging, Computers And Implications For Image Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Hynes, D. M.; Rowlands, J. A.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1988-06-01

    The use of a beam splitting device for medical gastro-intestinal fluoroscopy has demonstrated that clinical images obtained with a 100mm photofluorographic camera, and a 1024 X 1024 digital matrix with pulsed progressive readout acquisition techniques, are identical. In addition, it has been found that clinical images can be obtained with digital systems at dose levels lower than those possible with film. The use of pulsed fluoroscopy with intermittent storage of the fluoroscopic image has also been demonstrated to reduce the fluoroscopy part of the examination to very low dose levels, particularly when low repetition rates of about 2 frames per second (fps) are used. The use of digital methods reduces the amount of radiation required and also the heat generated by the x-ray tube. Images can therefore be produced using a very small focal spot on the x-ray tube, which can produce further improvement in the resolution of the clinical images.

  5. Radiation dose reduction and new image modalities development for interventional C-arm imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Kai

    Cardiovascular disease and stroke are the leading health problems and causes of death in the US. Due to the minimally invasive nature of the evolution of image guided techniques, interventional radiological procedures are becoming more common and are preferred in treating many cardiovascular diseases and strokes. In addition, with the recent advances in hardware and device technology, the speed and efficacy of interventional treatment has significantly improved. This implies that more image modalities can be developed based on the current C-arm system and patients treated in interventional suites can potentially experience better health outcomes. However, during the treatment patients are irradiated with substantial amounts of ionizing radiation with a high dose rate (digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with 3muGy/frame and 3D cone beam CT image with 0.36muGy/frame for a Siemens Artis Zee biplane system) and/or a long irradiation time (a roadmapping image sequence can be as long as one hour during aneurysm embolization). As a result, the patient entrance dose is extremely high. Despite the fact that the radiation dose is already substantial, image quality is not always satisfactory. By default a temporal average is used in roadmapping images to overcome poor image quality, but this technique can result in motion blurred images. Therefore, reducing radiation dose while maintaining or even improving the image quality is an important area for continued research. This thesis is focused on improving the clinical applications of C-arm cone beam CT systems in two ways: (1) Improve the performance of current image modalities on the C-arm system. (2) Develop new image modalities based on the current system. To be more specific, the objectives are to reduce radiation dose for current modalities (e.g., DSA, fluoroscopy, roadmapping, and cone beam CT) and enable cone beam CT perfusion and time resolved cone beam CT angiography that can be used to diagnose and triage acute

  6. Imaging challenges: a US perspective on controlling exposure to ionizing radiation in children with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issues pertaining to control of radiation dose exposures in pediatric imaging are on the forefront of patient care worldwide. Certain factors contribute to appropriate - or inappropriate - use of ionizing radiation in pediatric medical imaging. Such issues include naivete regarding cancer risk and the role of medical imaging in its development, misinformation about exposure to ionizing radiation, resource availability, staffing, scheduling ''snags,'' costs, limited evidence-based imaging practice information and shrinking funding. These issues will be introduced in this paper. (orig.)

  7. Search for Primordial Black Holes with the Whipple Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Eric

    2005-04-01

    Stephen Hawking's prediction that black holes should radiate like black bodies has several important consequences, including the possibility for the detection of small (˜10^15 g) black holes created in the very early universe. The detection of such primordial black holes (PBHs) would not only validate Hawking's theory, but would provide useful insights into the history of the early universe. A search through 5.5 years of archival data from the Whipple Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescope was made for TeV gamma-ray bursts on 1 s, 3 s, and 5 s timescales. Based on a null result, an upper-limit on the evaporation rate of PBHs of 2.69 x10^6 pc-3 yr^- 1 (99% CL) was made, assuming the Standard Model of particle physics. When combined with the results of an earlier search through Whipple data, this limit was lowered to 1.33 x10^6 pc-3 yr-1, which is nearly a factor of 2 better than the previous limit at this energy range.

  8. A large solid angle Cerenkov counter for the DELCO experiment at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design, construction and performance of a 70% of 4π atmospheric pressure gas Cerenkov detector built in twelve sectors is described. Economical methods to achieve the necessary light gathering performance of the mirrors and other optical components are presented. One full scale sector of the detector was built and operated in an electron/pion beam at SLAC to secure data on the photoelectron yield as a function of beam electron direction and origin. A one meter radiator length of ethane yielded approximately 10.5 photoelectrons in an RCA 8854 photomultiplier tube coated with a p-terphenyl wavelength shifter. The efficiency of the counter, obtained using energetic electrons from Bhabha events and averaged over the twelve counter sectors and the initial running period at SPEAR, is (97+-1)%. Assuming that there are no real single prompt electrons that result from psi-decay, the counter trigger rate of 0.35% per hadron event establishes a trigger rate of <0.1% per incident pion. The counter was found to have a momentum cut off for P<0.2GeV/c at which value the efficiency falls to 50%. (Auth.)

  9. Image-based modeling of radiation-induced foci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Sylvain; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Chen, James; Chou, William; Gascard, Philippe

    Several proteins involved in the response to DNA double strand breaks (DSB) form microscopically visible nuclear domains, or foci, after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced foci (RIF) are believed to be located where DNA damage occurs. To test this assumption, we used Monte Carlo simulations to predict the spatial distribution of DSB in human nuclei exposed to high or low-LET radiation. We then compared these predictions to the distribution patterns of three DNA damage sensing proteins, i.e. 53BP1, phosphorylated ATM and γH2AX in human mammary epithelial. The probability to induce DSB can be derived from DNA fragment data measured experimentally by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. We first used this probability in Monte Carlo simulations to predict DSB locations in synthetic nuclei geometrically described by a complete set of human chromosomes, taking into account microscope optics from real experiments. Simulations showed a very good agreement for high-LET, predicting 0.7 foci/µm along the path of a 1 GeV/amu Fe particle against measurement of 0.69 to 0.82 foci/µm for various RIF 5 min following exposure (LET 150 keV/µm). On the other hand, discrepancies were shown in foci frequency for low-LET, with measurements 20One drawback using a theoretical model for the nucleus is that it assumes a simplistic and static pattern for DNA densities. However DNA damage pattern is highly correlated to DNA density pattern (i.e. the more DNA, the more likely to have a break). Therefore, we generalized our Monte Carlo approach to real microscope images, assuming pixel intensity of DAPI in the nucleus was directly proportional to the amount of DNA in that pixel. With such approach we could predict DNA damage pattern in real images on a per nucleus basis. Since energy is randomly deposited along high-LET particle paths, RIF along these paths should also be randomly distributed. As expected, simulations produced DNA-weighted random (Poisson) distributions. In

  10. The HERMES dual-radiator ring imaging Cherenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akopov, N; Bailey, K; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Capitani, G P; Carter, P; Cisbani, E; De Leo, R; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Filippone, B W; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Hansen, J O; Hommez, B; Iodice, M; Jackson, H E; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kowalczyk, R; Lagamba, L; Maas, A; Muccifora, V; Nappi, E; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; O'Connor, T; O'Neill, T G; Potterveld, D H; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sato, F; Schwind, A; Shibata, T A; Suetsugu, K; Thomas, E; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van De Kerckhove, K; Van De Vyver, R; Yoneyama, S; Zhang, L F; Zohrabyan, H G

    2002-01-01

    The construction and use of a dual radiator Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is described. This instrument was developed for the HERMES experiment at DESY which emphasises measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. It provides particle identification for pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range from 2 to 15 GeV, which is essential to these studies. The instrument uses two radiators, C sub 4 F sub 1 sub 0 , a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large, homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality. The photon detector consists of 1934 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for each detector half, held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet.

  11. Public perception of radiation-related risks of imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, diagnostic procedures using ionizing radiation have achieved a great boom, although patients are often unaware of the risks they involve. Objectives: To know how is ionizing radiation perceived by the population attending Clinica Davila, Department of Radiology (DRCD). Methods: A voluntary and anonymous survey was conducted on patients and / or companions. Results: A total of 330 adults were surveyed. An 57% had completed higher education, whereas 7.9% had only finished elementary schooling; 78.8% had undergone three or more imaging tests. CT examination was considered to pose the highest levels of risk (42.4%), followed by Ultrasonography (30.6%). Discussion: The survey group was made up of young adults, mostly college graduates, and predominantly female. Surprinsingly enough, considering that obstetric sonography is commonly used during pregnancy, US was ranked second in terms of associated health risks. There is an evident interest in the subject, since 90% of responders would like to receive further information

  12. The HERMES dual-radiator ring imaging Cherenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and use of a dual radiator Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is described. This instrument was developed for the HERMES experiment at DESY which emphasises measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. It provides particle identification for pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range from 2 to 15 GeV, which is essential to these studies. The instrument uses two radiators, C4F10, a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large, homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality. The photon detector consists of 1934 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for each detector half, held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet

  13. Occupational radiation protection of health workers in imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational radiological protection (RP) is still a challenge in several clinical practices. ICRP has included specific recommendations and advice for occupational protection in most of the documents published in recent years and its current programme of work includes the preparation of documents with specific contents on Occupational Protection. Different professional groups and different medical specialists need dedicated training, supervision and advice to optimise their practices. Many medical specialties outside the imaging departments are still using fluoroscopically guided procedures in surgical theatres without the appropriate RP tools. In addition to the stochastic radiation risks, the new thresholds for tissue reactions proposed by ICRP, and especially the ones for the lens of the eyes and the cerebrovascular system, are a matter of concern for some groups of health workers. More support from medical physics and radiation protection experts regarding occupational issues in the medical field will be needed in the coming years. (authors)

  14. Development of Superconducting Tunnel Junction as an Imaging Radiation Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, N. Y.; Rokutanda, E.; Kikuchi, K.; Kushino, A.; Ohashi, T.; Kurakado, M.

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) as X-ray detectors have been developed mainly aiming at high resolution spectrometers. We archived an energy resolution of 106 eV at 5.9 keV (FWHM) using an STJ developed at Nippon Steel Corporation with a cooled (~ 100K) FET. Furthermore, series-connected STJs as an imaging radiation detector are developed. Both the pulse hight and the rise time of signals from 241Am α-particles irradiated on a series-connected STJ give a good position sensitivity, indicating the intrinsic position resolution less than 0.5 mm

  15. From 'Image Gently' to image intelligently: a personalized perspective on diagnostic radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of ionizing radiation from diagnostic imaging has been a popular topic in the radiology literature and lay press. Communicating the magnitude of risk to patients and caregivers is problematic because of the uncertainty in estimates derived principally from epidemiological studies of large populations, and alternative approaches are needed to provide a scientific basis for personalized risk estimates. The underlying patient disease and life expectancy greatly influence risk projections. Research into the biological mechanisms of radiation-induced DNA damage and repair challenges the linear no-threshold dose-response assumption and reveals that individuals vary in sensitivity to radiation. Studies of decision-making psychology show that individuals are highly susceptible to irrational biases when judging risks. Truly informed medical decision-making that respects patient autonomy requires appropriate framing of radiation risks in perspective with other risks and with the benefits of imaging. To follow the principles of personalized medicine and treat patients according to their specific phenotypic and personality profiles, diagnostic imaging should optimally be tailored not only to patient size, body region and clinical indication, but also to underlying disease conditions, radio-sensitivity and risk perception and preferences that vary among individuals. (orig.)

  16. Angiographer's exposure to radiation under different fluoroscopic imaging conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scattered radiation levels near an imaging system commonly used in angiography were measured with a 200 mm thick water phantom. The scattered radiation exposure rate was measured in lines parallel in space to the central ray of the x-ray beam, at lateral distances of 30-100 cm. The effects of an x-ray beam limiting device, geometric and electric magnification, and rotation angle of the C-arm were also determined. The results indicated that the highest scattered radiation levels occurred near the surface of the phantom where the x-ray beam enters. In P-A geometry, the highest radiation levels occurred below the angiographer's waist. These areas of the body corresponded to the gonads of the angiographer. It has been suggested that angiographers' exposure rates are higher near the gonads than near the chest. However, lead aprons efficiently protect these areas. When smaller field sizes were limited by a variable x-ray beam limiting device, the volume of irradiated tissue was reduced, and the scattered radiation exposure rate was decreased. Further, when larger magnification factors were chosen for the analogue magnification method, the volume of irradiated tissue was reduced by the automatic x-ray beam limiting device, and the scattered radiation exposure rate was decreased. However, smaller field sizes markedly increased patient exposure by auto brightness control. To mitigate the angiographer's exposure, smaller field sizes with x-ray limiting devices are required. However, a larger field size should be used whenever possible to minimize patient exposure. The angiographer's exposure rate was influenced by the incidence direction of the x-ray beam when the C-arm had been rotated around the phantom. Consequently, the angiographer's exposure rate was maximum when the x-ray tube most closely approached the angiographer and was minimum when the image intensifier most closely approached the angiographer. Therefore, to mitigate the angiographer's exposure, attention needs

  17. Radiation exposure near Chernobyl based on analysis of satellite images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced damage in conifers adjacent to the damaged Chernobyl nuclear power plant has been evaluated using LANDSAT Thematic Mapper satellite images. Eight images acquired between April 22, 1986 and May 15, 1987 were used to assess the extent and magnitude of radiation effects on pine trees within 10 km of the reactor site. The timing and spatial extent of vegetation damaged was used to estimate the radiation doses in the near field around the Chernobyl nuclear power station and to derive dose rates as a function of time during and after the accident. A normalized vegetation index was developed from the TM spectral band data to visually demonstrate the damage and mortality to nearby conifer stands. The earliest date showing detectable injury 1 km west of the reactor unit was June 16, 1986. Subsequent dates revealed continued expansion of the affected areas to the west, north, and south. The greatest aerial expansion of this area occurred by October 15, 1986, with vegetation changes evident up to 5 km west, 2 km south, and 2 km north of the damaged Reactor Unit 4. By May 11, 1987, further scene changes were due principally to removal and mitigation efforts by the Soviet authorities. Areas showing spectral evidence of vegetation damage during the previous growing season do not show evidence of recovery and reflectance in the TM Bands 4 and 3 remain higher than surrounding vegetation, which infers that the trees are dead. The patterns of spectral change indicative of vegetation stress are consistent with changes expected for radiation injury and mortality. The extent and the timing of these effects enabled developing an integrated radiation dose estimate, which was combined with the information regarding the characteristics of radionuclide mix to provide an estimate of maximum dose rates during the early period of the accident. The derived peak dose rates during the 10-day release in the accident are high and are estimated at about 0.5 to 1 rad per hour. These

  18. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  19. The quantitative imaging network: the role of quantitative imaging in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential value of modern medical imaging methods has created a need for mechanisms to develop, translate and disseminate emerging imaging technologies and, ideally, to quantitatively correlate those with other related laboratory methods, such as the genomics and proteomics analyses required to support clinical decisions. One strategy to meet these needs efficiently and cost effectively is to develop an international network to share and reach consensus on best practices, imaging protocols, common databases, and open science strategies, and to collaboratively seek opportunities to leverage resources wherever possible. One such network is the Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) started by the National Cancer Institute, USA. The mission of the QIN is to improve the role of quantitative imaging for clinical decision making in oncology by the development and validation of data acquisition, analysis methods, and other quantitative imaging tools to predict or monitor the response to drug or radiation therapy. The network currently has 24 teams (two from Canada and 22 from the USA) and several associate members, including one from Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India. Each QIN team collects data from ongoing clinical trials and develops software tools for quantitation and validation to create standards for imaging research, and for use in developing models for therapy response prediction and measurement and tools for clinical decision making. The members of QIN are addressing a wide variety of cancer problems (Head and Neck cancer, Prostrate, Breast, Brain, Lung, Liver, Colon) using multiple imaging modalities (PET, CT, MRI, FMISO PET, DW-MRI, PET-CT). (author)

  20. Block-Based Compressed Sensing for Neutron Radiation Image Using WDFB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ideal compression method for neutron radiation image should have high compression ratio while keeping more details of the original image. Compressed sensing (CS, which can break through the restrictions of sampling theorem, is likely to offer an efficient compression scheme for the neutron radiation image. Combining wavelet transform with directional filter banks, a novel nonredundant multiscale geometry analysis transform named Wavelet Directional Filter Banks (WDFB is constructed and applied to represent neutron radiation image sparsely. Then, the block-based CS technique is introduced and a high performance CS scheme for neutron radiation image is proposed. By performing two-step iterative shrinkage algorithm the problem of L1 norm minimization is solved to reconstruct neutron radiation image from random measurements. The experiment results demonstrate that the scheme not only improves the quality of reconstructed image obviously but also retains more details of original image.

  1. Image-guided radiation therapy. Paradigm change in radiation therapy; Bildgestuetzte Strahlentherapie. Paradigmenwechsel in der Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenz, F. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Belka, C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Muenchen (Germany); Reiser, M. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The introduction of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has changed the workflow in radiation oncology more dramatically than any other innovation in the last decades. Imaging for treatment planning before the initiation of the radiotherapy series does not take alterations in patient anatomy and organ movement into account. The principle of IGRT is the temporal and spatial connection of imaging in the treatment position immediately before radiation treatment. The actual position and the target position are compared using cone-beam computed tomography (CT) or stereotactic ultrasound. The IGRT procedure allows a reduction of the safety margins and dose to normal tissue without an increase in risk of local recurrence. In the future the linear treatment chain in radiation oncology will be developed based on the closed-loop feedback principle. The IGRT procedure is increasingly being used especially for high precision radiotherapy, e.g. for prostate or brain tumors. (orig.) [German] Die Einfuehrung der bildgestuetzten Radiotherapie (IGRT - ''image-guided radiotherapy'') hat wie kaum eine andere Innovation die Behandlungsablaeufe in der Radioonkologie veraendert. Eine einmalige Bildgebung zur Bestrahlungsplanung vor der Behandlungsserie beruecksichtigt nicht die Aenderung der Patientengeometrie und die Organbeweglichkeit. Das Prinzip der IGRT besteht in der raeumlichen und zeitlichen Zusammenfuehrung von Bildgebung in der Bestrahlungsposition unmittelbar vor der eigentlichen Bestrahlung. Mittels Cone-beam-CT oder stereotaktischem Ultraschall wird die Ist- mit der Sollposition verglichen. Die IGRT erlaubt die Reduktion der Sicherheitssaeume und damit die Schonung des Normalgewebes, ohne das Rezidivrisiko zu erhoehen. Zukuenftig wird die lineare Behandlungskette in der Radioonkologie durch eine geschlossene, multipel rueckgekoppelte Therapieschleife ersetzt werden. Speziell bei Praezisionsbestrahlungen wie z. B. Prostata- oder Hirntumoren kommt die IGRT

  2. Imaging Jupiter's radiation belts down to 127 MHz with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Girard, J N; Tasse, C; Hess, S; de Pater, I; Santos-Costa, D; Nenon, Q; Sicard, A; Bourdarie, S; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Bell, M E; van Bemmel, I; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Breton, R P; Broderick, J W; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; Ciardi, B; Corbel, S; Corstanje, A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Mann, G; Markov, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Moldon, J; Munk, H; Nelles, A; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Schwarz, D; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Thoudam, S; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wucknitz, O

    2015-01-01

    Context. Observing Jupiter's synchrotron emission from the Earth remains today the sole method to scrutinize the distribution and dynamical behavior of the ultra energetic electrons magnetically trapped around the planet (because in-situ particle data are limited in the inner magnetosphere). Aims. We perform the first resolved and low-frequency imaging of the synchrotron emission with LOFAR at 127 MHz. The radiation comes from low energy electrons (~1-30 MeV) which map a broad region of Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. Methods (see article for complete abstract) Results. The first resolved images of Jupiter's radiation belts at 127-172 MHz are obtained along with total integrated flux densities. They are compared with previous observations at higher frequencies and show a larger extent of the synchrotron emission source (>=4 $R_J$). The asymmetry and the dynamic of east-west emission peaks are measured and the presence of a hot spot at lambda_III=230 {\\deg} $\\pm$ 25 {\\deg}. Spectral flux density measurements ar...

  3. Laser system for testing radiation imaging detector circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycka, Weronika; Kasinski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Performance and functionality of radiation imaging detector circuits in charge and position measurement systems need to meet tight requirements. It is therefore necessary to thoroughly test sensors as well as read-out electronics. The major disadvantages of using radioactive sources or particle beams for testing are high financial expenses and limited accessibility. As an alternative short pulses of well-focused laser beam are often used for preliminary tests. There are number of laser-based devices available on the market, but very often their applicability in this field is limited. This paper describes concept, design and validation of laser system for testing silicon sensor based radiation imaging detector circuits. The emphasis is put on keeping overall costs low while achieving all required goals: mobility, flexible parameters, remote control and possibility of carrying out automated tests. The main part of the developed device is an optical pick-up unit (OPU) used in optical disc drives. The hardware includes FPGA-controlled circuits for laser positioning in 2 dimensions (horizontal and vertical), precision timing (frequency and number) and amplitude (diode current) of short ns-scale (3.2 ns) light pulses. The system is controlled via USB interface by a dedicated LabVIEW-based application enabling full manual or semi-automated test procedures.

  4. Comparison of radiation dosimetry for several potential myocardial imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although myocardial imaging is currently dominated by Tl-201, several alternative agents with improved physiologic or radionuclidic properties have been proposed. Based on human and animal studies in the literature, the metabolism of several of these compounds was studied for the purpose of generating radiation dose estimates. Dose estimates are listed for several I-123-labeled free fatty acids, an I-123-labeled phosphonium compound, Rb-82, Cu-64, F-18 FDG (all compounds which are taken up by the normal myocardium), and for Tc-99m pyrophosphate (PYP) (which localizes in myocardial infarcts). Dose estimates could not be generated for C-11 palmitate, but his compound was included in a comparison of myocardial retention times. For the I-123-labeled compounds, I-124 was included as a contaminant in generating the dose estimates. Radiation doses were lowest for Rb-82 (gonads 0.3-0.4 Gy/MBq, kidneys 8.6 Gy/MBq). Doses for the I-123-labeled fatty acids were similar to one another, with IPPA being the lowest (gonads 15 Gy/MBq, heart wall 18 Gy/MBq). Doses for Tc-99m PYP were also low (gonads 4-7 Gy/MBq, heart wall 4 Gy/MBq, skeleton 15 Gy/MBq). The desirability of these compounds is discussed briefly, considering half-life, imaging mode and energy, and dosimetry, including a comparison of the effective whole body dose equivalents. 37 references, 11 tables

  5. Development of Ring Imaging Cherenkov counter with silica aerogel radiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to answer a simple and basic question on how spin 1/2 of proton can be understood from spin quark, one of its constructing elements, some deep inelastic scattering experiments using high energy polarized electron beam and polarized target have been carried out. At this time, if amounts of informations can also be increased by carrying out particle discrimination of hadron particle formed with the scattering, it can be practiced to investigate some contributions to proton spin at every flavor of the quark and of gluon present in proton. It is a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counter capable of detecting a light (Cherenkov radiation) conically radiated when charged ;article moves at higher speed than that of light in a medium, to measure speed of the particle. Now, a RICH counter using two kinds of materials such as silica aerogel with middle refractive indices between solid/liquid and vapor (n = 1.03) and C4F10 gas (n = 1.0014) for a radiator was developed to make possible on discrimination of pion/kaon meson, proton and anti-proton at a momentum region of 2 to 20 GeV/c. Here were described on some characteristics of the RICH developed at HERMES experiment, and then on structure of the RICH and features of particle discrimination. (G.K.)

  6. Development of an X-ray Imaging System for the Laser Megajoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turk, G.; Reverdin, C.; Gontier, D.; Darbon, S. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Dujardin, C.; Ledoux, G. [Universite Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5620, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Hamel, M.; Simic, V.; Normand, S. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-07-01

    This system intends to record spatially resolved images of core shape and size of a DT micro-balloon during fusion experiments for the Megajoule Laser. It must operate in the radiation background generated by fusion reaction. It consists of a scintillator imaged by an optical relay system on a CCD camera. The latter lies in a shielded area far from the experiment chamber. This design proposes a simple solution for the optical relay, based on Maksutov objectives. The main requirements affect the scintillator (short duration emission), and the optical relay (length of 15 meters, no Cerenkov radiation production, spatial resolution better than 10 {mu}m in the object plane). Spatial resolution and performances to radiative background have been measured on a system shorter than 15 meters, with a YAG:Ce scintillator. Pinhole images have been obtained on the plasma laser facility EQUINOX at CEA/DIF. Hardening measurements have been achieved at the ELSA facility

  7. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical imaging has seen many developments as it has evolved since the mid-1890s. In the last 30-40 years, the pace of innovation has increased, starting with the introduction of computed tomography (CT) in the early 1970s. During the last decade, the rate of change has accelerated further, in terms of continuing innovation and its global application. Most patient exposure now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago. These developments are evident in the technology on which this volume is based - multislice/detector CT scanning and its application in cardiac imaging. However, this advance is achieved at the cost of a radiation burden to the individual patient, and possibly to the community, if its screening potential is exploited. Much effort will be required to ensure that the undoubted benefit of this new practice will not pose an undue level of detriment to the individual in multiple examinations. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven by both the imaging industry and an increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practices lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill this growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice from experienced practitioners to bear on the problems involved. The advice in this report has been developed as part of the IAEA's statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for the worldwide application of these standards. The Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) were issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by organizations including the Food and Agriculture

  8. Imaging of rare radiation injuries after radiosurgery for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) is generally an effective and safe treatment for brain metastases. We report 3 rare complicated cases after GKS due to radiation injury including image findings. Case 1: A 58-year-old man received whole brain radiation therapy for right occipital brain metastasis from lung cancer. However, local recurrence was noted and GKS was carried out 5 months later (size 28 mm, marginal dose 23 Gy (50% isodose)). Four years later, a cyst appeared and the patient developed apraxia and visual disturbance. Surgery was performed and the histopathology showed necrosis. Case 2: A 51-year-old woman received GKS for 4 brain metastases from breast cancer. The right occipital lobe lesion was treated with marginal dose of 18 Gy (size 24 mm, 50% isodose). Thirty-one months later, she developed left homonymous hemianopsia and MR imaging and CT scan showed intracerebral hemorrhage with cyst formation. An operation was performed and the histology revealed necrosis. Case 3: A 37-year-old man received GKS for left temporal brain metastasis from lung cancer (size 14 mm, marginal dose 23 Gy (50% isodose)). Twelve months later, the lesion increased in size again, so we carried out a second GKS on the same lesion (size 15 mm, marginal dose 23 Gy (50% isodose)). Thirty-five months later, massive peritumoral edema appeared and the patient developed left oculomotor palsy. An emergency operation was performed and the histopathological diagnosis was cavernous malformation that was thought to be induced by radiosurgery. Although the incidence is low, rare complications associated with radiation therapy can also occur by radiosurgery. (author)

  9. Correlation between image quality and radiation dose on screening mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To obtain the matched parameters between image quality and radiation dose by exploring the influence of the exposure parameters of screening mammography on both the image quality and radiation dose. Methods: The correlation between the exposure parameters and average glandular doses to 507 patients undergoing screening mammography were retrospectively analyzed. The influence of breast compression thickness on radiation dose by exposing different thickness of PMMA was obtained. The correlation with image quality was analyzed by combined testing of contrast detail test mode (CDMAM3.4) and different thickness of PMMAs. Results: The groups aged 30 to 49 years were the main groups in 507 examined patients, up to 67.06% of the total. The mean value of average gland doses (AGD) in contrast-prior mode was the highest in three kinds of exposure modes,accounting for 137.5% of standard mode.In standard mode, target material/filtration board combination was Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and Rh/Rh, accounting for 1/3 respectively. Mo/Rh and Rh/Rh were selected in dose-prior mode,accounting for 50% respectively. Mo/Mo was mainly selected in contrast-prior,accounting for 52%. Breast compression thickness was positively correlated with average gland doses. Image quality figure inverse (IQFinv) under three kinds of modes (STD, DOSE, CNT) was 98.32, 95.41 and 107.02, respectively, and IQFinv of contrast-prior mode was the highest among them. IQFinv was in general agreement in the three kinds of exposure modes when the thickness of PMMA plates plates was greater than or equal to 5 cm. Conclusions: In clinical practice, when the breast is of density type and pressed thickness is less than 4 em, the dose-prior mode should be selected. When the pressed thickness is between 4 and 6 cm, the standard exposure mode should be selected. When the pressed thickness is larger than 6 cm, the manual mode should be selected. (authors)

  10. Sensitivity improvement of Cerenkov luminescence endoscope with terbium doped Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xin; Chen, Xueli, E-mail: xlchen@xidian.edu.cn, E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn; Cao, Xu; Zhan, Yonghua; Liang, Jimin, E-mail: xlchen@xidian.edu.cn, E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Molecular and Neuro Imaging of the Ministry of Education and School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710071 (China); Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Wu, Kaichun [Department of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)

    2015-05-25

    Our previous study showed a great attenuation for the Cerenkov luminescence endoscope (CLE), resulting in relatively low detection sensitivity of radiotracers. Here, a kind of radioluminescence nanoparticles (RLNPs), terbium doped Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S was mixed with the radionuclide {sup 68}Ga to enhance the intensity of emitted luminescence, which finally improved the detection sensitivity of the CLE by using the radioluminescence imaging technique. With the in vitro and in vivo pseudotumor experiments, we showed that the use of RLNPs mixed with the radionuclide {sup 68}Ga enabled superior sensitivity compared with the radionuclide {sup 68}Ga only, with 50-fold improvement on detection sensitivity, which guaranteed meeting the demands of the clinical diagnosis of gastrointestinal tract tumors.

  11. Patient-centered image and data management in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: recent changes in the radiotherapy (RT) workflow through the introduction of complex treatment paradigms such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and, recently, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with their increase in data traffic for different data classes have mandated efforts to further integrate electronic data management for RT departments in a patient- and treatment-course-centered fashion. Methods: workflow in an RT department is multidimensional and multidirectional and consists of at least five different data classes (RT/machine data, patient-related documents such as reports and letters, progress notes, DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) image data, and non-DICOM image data). Data has to be handled in the framework of adaptive feedback loops with increasing frequency. This is in contrast to a radiology department where mainly DICOM image data and reports have to be widely accessible but are dealt with in a mainly unidirectional manner. When compared to a diagnostic Radiology Information System (RIS)/Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), additional legal requirements have to be conformed to when an integrated electronic RT data management system is installed. Among these are extended storage periods, documentation of treatment plan approval by physicians and physicist, documentation of informed consent, etc. Conclusion: since the transition to a paper- and filmless environment in medicine and especially m radiation ''neology is unavoidable this review discusses these issues and suggests a possible hardware and organizational architecture of an RT department information system under control of a Hospital Information System (HIS), based on combined features of genuine RT Record and Verify (R and V) Systems, PACS, and Electronic Medical Records (EMR). (orig.)

  12. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV46 and CTV60, respectively). MTVCho and MTVNAA were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTVNAA were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTVCho was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV46 and CTV60. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTVCho for these patients were outside of CTV60. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on metabolic information

  13. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and

  14. Towards breast tomography with synchrotron radiation at Elettra: first images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, R.; Arfelli, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Bottigli, U.; Brez, A.; Brun, F.; Brunetti, A.; Delogu, P.; Di Lillo, F.; Dreossi, D.; Fanti, V.; Fedon, C.; Golosio, B.; Lanconelli, N.; Mettivier, G.; Minuti, M.; Oliva, P.; Pinchera, M.; Rigon, L.; Russo, P.; Sarno, A.; Spandre, G.; Tromba, G.; Zanconati, F.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the SYRMA-CT collaboration is to set-up the first clinical trial of phase-contrast breast CT with synchrotron radiation (SR). In order to combine high image quality and low delivered dose a number of innovative elements are merged: a CdTe single photon counting detector, state-of-the-art CT reconstruction and phase retrieval algorithms. To facilitate an accurate exam optimization, a Monte Carlo model was developed for dose calculation using GEANT4. In this study, high isotropic spatial resolution (120 μm)3 CT scans of objects with dimensions and attenuation similar to a human breast were acquired, delivering mean glandular doses in the range of those delivered in clinical breast CT (5-25 mGy). Due to the spatial coherence of the SR beam and the long distance between sample and detector, the images contain, not only absorption, but also phase information from the samples. The application of a phase-retrieval procedure increases the contrast-to-noise ratio of the tomographic images, while the contrast remains almost constant. After applying the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to low-dose phase-retrieved data sets (about 5 mGy) with a reduced number of projections, the spatial resolution was found to be equal to filtered back projection utilizing a four fold higher dose, while the contrast-to-noise ratio was reduced by 30%. These first results indicate the feasibility of clinical breast CT with SR.

  15. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    classification based on calcium scores shows excellent agreement with classification on the basis of conventional coronary artery calcium scoring. These studies demonstrate dual-energy cardiovascular CT can potentially be a noninvasive and sensitive modality in high risk patients. On-board KV/MV Imaging. To enhance soft tissue contrast and reduce metal artifacts, we have developed a dual-energy CBCT technique and a novel on-board kV/MV imaging technique based on hardware available on modern linear accelerators. We have also evaluated the feasibility of these two techniques in various phantom studies. Optimal techniques (energy, beam filtration, # of overlapping projections, etc) have been investigated with unique calibration procedures, which leads to successful decomposition of imaged material into acrylic-aluminum basis material pair. This enables the synthesis of virtual monochromatic (VM) CBCT images that demonstrate much less beam hardening, significantly reduced metal artifacts, and/or higher soft tissue CNR compared to single-energy CBCT. Adaptive Radiation Therapy. DECT could actually contribute to the area of Dose-Guided Radiation Therapy (or Adaptive Therapy). The application of DECT imaging using 80kV and 140 kV combinations could potentially increase the image quality by reducing the bone or high density material artifacts and also increase the soft tissue contrast by a light contrast agent. The result of this higher contrast / quality images is beneficial for deformable image registration / segmentation algorithm to improve its accuracy hence to make adaptive therapy less time consuming in its recontouring process. The real time re-planning prior to per treatment fraction could become more realistic with this improvement especially in hypofractional SBRT cases. Learning Objectives: Learn recent developments of dual-energy imaging in diagnosis and radiation therapy; Understand the unique clinical problem and required quantification accuracy in each application

  16. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Li, B [Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chen, H [New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    classification based on calcium scores shows excellent agreement with classification on the basis of conventional coronary artery calcium scoring. These studies demonstrate dual-energy cardiovascular CT can potentially be a noninvasive and sensitive modality in high risk patients. On-board KV/MV Imaging. To enhance soft tissue contrast and reduce metal artifacts, we have developed a dual-energy CBCT technique and a novel on-board kV/MV imaging technique based on hardware available on modern linear accelerators. We have also evaluated the feasibility of these two techniques in various phantom studies. Optimal techniques (energy, beam filtration, # of overlapping projections, etc) have been investigated with unique calibration procedures, which leads to successful decomposition of imaged material into acrylic-aluminum basis material pair. This enables the synthesis of virtual monochromatic (VM) CBCT images that demonstrate much less beam hardening, significantly reduced metal artifacts, and/or higher soft tissue CNR compared to single-energy CBCT. Adaptive Radiation Therapy. DECT could actually contribute to the area of Dose-Guided Radiation Therapy (or Adaptive Therapy). The application of DECT imaging using 80kV and 140 kV combinations could potentially increase the image quality by reducing the bone or high density material artifacts and also increase the soft tissue contrast by a light contrast agent. The result of this higher contrast / quality images is beneficial for deformable image registration / segmentation algorithm to improve its accuracy hence to make adaptive therapy less time consuming in its recontouring process. The real time re-planning prior to per treatment fraction could become more realistic with this improvement especially in hypofractional SBRT cases. Learning Objectives: Learn recent developments of dual-energy imaging in diagnosis and radiation therapy; Understand the unique clinical problem and required quantification accuracy in each application

  17. Spatially weighted mutual information image registration for image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a new metric for image registration that incorporates the (sub)pixelwise differential importance along spatial location and to demonstrate its application for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: It is well known that rigid-body image registration with mutual information is dependent on the size and location of the image subset on which the alignment analysis is based [the designated region of interest (ROI)]. Therefore, careful review and manual adjustments of the resulting registration are frequently necessary. Although there were some investigations of weighted mutual information (WMI), these efforts could not apply the differential importance to a particular spatial location since WMI only applies the weight to the joint histogram space. The authors developed the spatially weighted mutual information (SWMI) metric by incorporating an adaptable weight function with spatial localization into mutual information. SWMI enables the user to apply the selected transform to medically ''important'' areas such as tumors and critical structures, so SWMI is neither dominated by, nor neglects the neighboring structures. Since SWMI can be utilized with any weight function form, the authors presented two examples of weight functions for IGRT application: A Gaussian-shaped weight function (GW) applied to a user-defined location and a structures-of-interest (SOI) based weight function. An image registration example using a synthesized 2D image is presented to illustrate the efficacy of SWMI. The convergence and feasibility of the registration method as applied to clinical imaging is illustrated by fusing a prostate treatment planning CT with a clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) image set acquired for patient alignment. Forty-one trials are run to test the speed of convergence. The authors also applied SWMI registration using two types of weight functions to two head and neck cases and a prostate case with clinically acquired CBCT/MVCT image sets. The

  18. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto;

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five ...

  19. VERITAS: Very energetic radiation imaging telescope array system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERI-TAS) is a wide energy range (50 GeV-50 TeV) atmospheric Cherenkov detector and will start operation in 2004. The design is driven by a major scientific interest in jets of active galactic nuclei, probing the intergalactic IR fields with TeV γ-ray beams, measuring the high energy spectrum of γ-ray bursts and galactic sources of cosmic rays. Also γ-rays signatures of quantum gravity, neutralinos and primordial black holes constitute the exotic scientific motivations to built a highly versatile detector that can be operated in various modes. The technical concept and design of the seven-telescope array system is described

  20. Micro-focus radiation image acquisition and communication based on DICOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The micro-focus X-ray Imaging System, FXS-160, consisting of a X-ray tube, an image intensifier, a five-mode manipulator, expediently obtains real-time radiation images on the monitor, applied to the inspection of chips, circuit boards or other miniature apparatus. Employed the FXS-160, this paper describes an industrial Micro-PACS based on DICOM, realizing the acquisition,communication of radiation images in the industry. It provides an expandable and flexible platform for industrial radiation imaging. It is beneficial experiment to the foundation of industrial PACS. (authors)

  1. Solid Appearance of Pancreatic Serous Cystadenoma Diagnosed as Cystic at Ultrasound Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko D’Onofrio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an emerging imaging modality. The study of the pancreas is a new and promising application of ultrasound acoustic radiation force impulse imaging. Case report We present the first case of pancreatic serous cystadenoma which mimics a solid neoplasm at conventional imaging (US and CT, correctly diagnosed as cystic at ultrasound acoustic radiation force impulse imaging. Conclusion The “XXXX” values always measured at Virtual TouchTM tissue quantification allow the diagnosis of a pancreatic cystic lesion with simple fluid content suggesting the diagnosis of serous cystadenoma.

  2. Public perception on radiation-related risks of imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In recent years, diagnostic procedures using ionizing radiation have achieved a great boom, although patients are often unaware of the risks they involve. Objectives: To know how is ionizing radiation perceived by the population attending Clinica Davila, Department of Radiology (DRCD).Methods: A voluntary and anonymous survey was conducted on patients and / or companions. Results: A total of 330 adults were surveyed. An 57% had completed higher education, whereas 7.9% had only finished elementary schooling; 78.8% had undergone three or more imaging tests. CT examination was considered to pose the highest levels of risk (42.4%), followed by Ultrasonography (30.6%). Discussion: The survey group was made up of young adults, mostly college graduates, and predominantly female. Surprisingly enough, considering that obstetric sonography is commonly used during pregnancy, US was ranked second in terms of associated health risks. There is an evident interest in the subject, since 90% of responders would like to receive further information

  3. Radiation exposures to technologists from nuclear medicine imaging procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposures incurred by nuclear medicine technologists during diagnostic imaging and gamma camera quality control (QC) were measured on a procedural basis over a three-month period using a portable, low-range, self-reading ion chamber. A total of more than 400 measurements were made for 15 selected procedures. From these, mean procedural exposures and standard deviations were calculated. The results show that daily flood phantom QC, at 0.58 mR, and gated cardiac studies, at 0.45 mR, were the two greatest sources of exposure. Other procedures resulted in exposures varying roughly from 0.10 to 0.20 mR. Difficult patients were responsible for a doubling of technologist exposure for many procedures. Standard deviations were large for all procedures, averaging 65% of the mean values. Comparison of technologist exposure inferred from the procedural measurements with the time coincident collective dose equivalent recorded by the TLD service of the Radiation Protection Bureau indicates that approximately half of the collective technologist exposure arose from patient handling and flood QC

  4. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy: the potential for imaging science research to improve cancer treatment outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    The role of medical imaging in the planning and delivery of radiation therapy (RT) is rapidly expanding. This is being driven by two developments: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and biological image-based planning (BIBP). IGRT is the systematic use of serial treatment-position imaging to improve geometric targeting accuracy and/or to refine target definition. The enabling technology is the integration of high-performance three-dimensional (3D) imaging systems, e.g., onboard kilovoltage x-ray cone-beam CT, into RT delivery systems. IGRT seeks to adapt the patient's treatment to weekly, daily, or even real-time changes in organ position and shape. BIBP uses non-anatomic imaging (PET, MR spectroscopy, functional MR, etc.) to visualize abnormal tissue biology (angiogenesis, proliferation, metabolism, etc.) leading to more accurate clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and more accurate targeting of high doses to tissue with the highest tumor cell burden. In both cases, the goal is to reduce both systematic and random tissue localization errors (2-5 mm for conventional RT) conformality so that planning target volume (PTV) margins (varying from 8 to 20 mm in conventional RT) used to ensure target volume coverage in the presence of geometric error, can be substantially reduced. Reduced PTV expansion allows more conformal treatment of the target volume, increased avoidance of normal tissue and potential for safe delivery of more aggressive dose regimens. This presentation will focus on the imaging science challenges posed by the IGRT and BIBP. These issues include: Development of robust and accurate nonrigid image-registration (NIR) tools: Extracting locally nonlinear mappings that relate, voxel-by-voxel, one 3D anatomic representation of the patient to differently deformed anatomies acquired at different time points, is essential if IGRT is to move beyond simple translational treatment plan adaptations. NIR is needed to map segmented and labeled anatomy from the

  5. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, N. Andres [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Maudsley, Andrew A. [Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Gupta, Rakesh K. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Ishkanian, Fazilat; Huang, Kris [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Walker, Gail R. [Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core Resource, Sylvester Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Padgett, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Roy, Bhaswati [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Panoff, Joseph; Markoe, Arnold [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Stoyanova, Radka, E-mail: RStoyanova@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}, respectively). MTV{sub Cho} and MTV{sub NAA} were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTV{sub NAA} were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTV{sub Cho} was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTV{sub Cho} for these patients were outside of CTV{sub 60}. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on

  6. Feasibility of an image planning system for kilovoltage image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Image guidance has become a standard of care for many treatment scenarios in radiation therapy. This is most typically accomplished by use of kV x-ray devices mounted onto the linear accelerator (Linac) gantry that yield planar, fluoroscopic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Image acquisition parameters are chosen via preset techniques that rely on broad categorizations in patient anatomy and imaging goal. However, the optimal imaging technique results in detectability of the features of interest while exposing the patient to minimum dose. Herein, the authors present an investigation into the feasibility of developing an image planning system (IPS) for radiotherapy.Methods: In this first phase, the authors focused on developing an algorithm to predict tissue contrast produced by a common radiotherapy planar imaging chain. Input parameters include a CT dataset and simulated planar imaging technique settings that include kV and mAs. Energy-specific attenuation through each voxel of the CT dataset was calculated in the algorithm to derive a net transmitted intensity. The response of the flat panel detector was integrated into the image simulation algorithm. Verification was conducted by comparing simulated and measured images using four phantoms. Comparisons were made in both high and low contrast settings, as well as changes in the geometric appearance due to image saturation. Results: The authors studied a lung nodule test object to assess the planning system's ability to predict object contrast and detectability. Verification demonstrated that the slope of the pixel intensities is similar, the presence of the nodule is evident, and image saturation at high mAs values is evident in both images. The appearance of the lung nodule is a function of the image detector saturation. The authors assessed the dimensions of the lung nodule in measured and simulated images. Good quantitative agreement affirmed the algorithm's predictive capabilities

  7. R&D Paths of Pixel Detectors for Vertex Tracking and Radiation Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, M; Bortoletto, D; Brenner, R; Campbell, M; Collins, P; Dalla Betta, G F; Demarteau, Marcel; Denes, P; Graafsma, H; Gregor, I M; Kluge, A; Manzari, V; Parkes, C; Re, V; Riedler, P; Rizzo, G; Snoeys, W; Wermes, Norbert; Winter, M

    2013-01-01

    This report reviews current trends in the R&D of semiconductor pixellated sensors for vertex tracking and radiation imaging. It identifies requirements of future HEP experiments at colliders, needed technological breakthroughs and highlights the relation to radiation detection and imaging applications in other fields of science.

  8. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multislice/detector computed tomography (CT) scanning, applied to visualization of the colon in CT colonography (CTC), also known as virtual colonoscopy (VC), is a relatively new application of CT introduced in recent years. The possibility of its application in population screening techniques raises a number of questions. Effort is required to ensure that the benefit of this new practice will not pose an undue level of detriment to the individual in multiple examinations. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven by both the imaging industry and by an ever increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practice lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations being achieved. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill this growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice to bear on the problems involved. Under its statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for worldwide application of these standards, the IAEA has developed the Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS). The BSS was issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO), and requires radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and through optimization. The IAEA programme on radiation protection of patients encourages the reduction of patient doses without losing diagnostic benefits. To facilitate this

  9. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Carlos; Martisikova, Maria; Jakubek, Jan; Opalka, Lukas; Gwosch, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.

  10. Implementation of an image-guided radiation therapy program: lessons learn and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this paper is to detail the experience obtained in implementing an image-guided radiation therapy program at the Northern Sydney Cancer Centre. This required retrofitting a Varian Clinac 21EX with an on-board imager. The commissioning and quality assurance procedures, organisation of a multidisciplinary image guided radiation therapy group, and the development of clinical protocols for orthogonal kV and cone beam computed tomography implementation are described. Reassessment of the image-guided radiation therapy program has continued as new equipment and software versions were made available in the department.

  11. Pulsed fluoroscopy reduces radiation doses to patients and improves image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed fluoroscopy is a relatively new technique offering considerable improvements in terms of radiation doses and image quality, as co pared to continuous fluroscopy. The radiation is applied in the form of intermittent X-ray flashes. The technique holds the potential of producing fluoroscopic images and stored images essentially improved in sharpness and contrast. The optimal technique has been found to be grid-controlled, pulsed image acquisition, as it offers advantages in terms of radiation dose application and control. (orig./CB)

  12. Reducing Radiation Dose Without Compromising Image Quality in Preoperative Perforator Flap Imaging With CTA Using ASIR Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Niumsawatt, Vachara; Debrotwir, Andrew N.; Rozen, Warren Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) has become a mainstay in preoperative perforator flap planning in the modern era of reconstructive surgery. However, the increased use of CTA does raise the concern of radiation exposure to patients. Several techniques have been developed to decrease radiation dosage without compromising image quality, with varying results. The most recent advance is in the improvement of image reconstruction using an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) ...

  13. Images of the radiatively inefficient accretion flow surrounding a Kerr black hole: application in Sgr A*

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Ye-Fei; Cao, Xinwu; Huang, Lei; Shen, Zhi-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    In fully general relativity, we calculate the images of the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) surrounding a Kerr black hole with arbitrary spins, inclination angles, and observational wavelengths. For the same initial conditions, such as the fixed accretion rate, it is found that the intrinsic size and radiation intensity of the images become larger, but the images become more compact in the inner region, while the size of the black hole shadow decreases with the increase of the b...

  14. The iQID camera: An ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Barber, H. Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detector’s response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The confirmed response to this broad range of...

  15. DART : a 3D model for remote sensing images and radiative budget of earth surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.P.; Grau, E.; Lauret, N.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling the radiative behavior and the energy budget of land surfaces is relevant for many scientific domains such as the study of vegetation functioning with remotely acquired information. DART model (Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer) is developed since 1992. It is one of the most complete 3D models in this domain. It simulates radiative transfer (R.T.) in the optical domain: 3D radiative budget and remote sensing images (i.e., radiance, reflectance, brightness temperature) of vegeta...

  16. Medical imaging using ionizing radiation: Optimization of dose and image quality in fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2012 Summer School of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) focused on optimization of the use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging. Day 2 of the Summer School was devoted to fluoroscopy and interventional radiology and featured seven lectures. These lectures have been distilled into a single review paper covering equipment specification and siting, equipment acceptance testing and quality control, fluoroscope configuration, radiation effects, dose estimation and measurement, and principles of flat panel computed tomography. This review focuses on modern fluoroscopic equipment and is comprised in large part of information not found in textbooks on the subject. While this review does discuss technical aspects of modern fluoroscopic equipment, it focuses mainly on the clinical use and support of such equipment, from initial installation through estimation of patient dose and management of radiation effects. This review will be of interest to those learning about fluoroscopy, to those wishing to update their knowledge of modern fluoroscopic equipment, to those wishing to deepen their knowledge of particular topics, such as flat panel computed tomography, and to those who support fluoroscopic equipment in the clinic

  17. Medical imaging using ionizing radiation: Optimization of dose and image quality in fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A. Kyle, E-mail: kyle.jones@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Balter, Stephen [Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Rauch, Phillip [Retired-Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Wagner, Louis K. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    The 2012 Summer School of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) focused on optimization of the use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging. Day 2 of the Summer School was devoted to fluoroscopy and interventional radiology and featured seven lectures. These lectures have been distilled into a single review paper covering equipment specification and siting, equipment acceptance testing and quality control, fluoroscope configuration, radiation effects, dose estimation and measurement, and principles of flat panel computed tomography. This review focuses on modern fluoroscopic equipment and is comprised in large part of information not found in textbooks on the subject. While this review does discuss technical aspects of modern fluoroscopic equipment, it focuses mainly on the clinical use and support of such equipment, from initial installation through estimation of patient dose and management of radiation effects. This review will be of interest to those learning about fluoroscopy, to those wishing to update their knowledge of modern fluoroscopic equipment, to those wishing to deepen their knowledge of particular topics, such as flat panel computed tomography, and to those who support fluoroscopic equipment in the clinic.

  18. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events.

  19. Atmospheric Cerenkov light from large air showers observed at 5200m above sea level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary result is presented on the arrival-time distribution of atmospheric Cerenkov light from air showers of 1017 eV observed at Chacaltaya. The rise time and the FWHM are consistent with those expected from high multiplicity models, indicating the very fast development of electrons at the early stage

  20. Activation of photodynamic therapy in vitro with Cerenkov luminescence generated from Yttrium-90 (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Brad A.; Hirschberg, Henry; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon R.

    2016-03-01

    Translation of photodynamic therapy to the clinical setting has primarily been limited to easily accessible and/or superficial diseases where traditional light delivery can be performed noninvasively. Cerenkov luminescence, as generated from medically relevant radionuclides, has been suggested as a means to deliver light to deeper tissues noninvasively in order to overcome this depth limitation. We report on the use of Cerenkov luminescence generated from Yttrium-90 as a means to active the photodynamic therapy process in monolayer tumor cell cultures. The current study investigates the utility of Cerenkov luminescence for activating both the clinically relevant aminolevulinic acid at 1.0 mM and also the more efficient photosensitizer TPPS2a at 1.2 µM. Cells were incubated with aminolevulinic acid for 6 hours prior to radionuclide addition, as well as additional daily treatments for three days. TPPS2a was delivered as a single treatment with an 18 hour incubation time before radionuclide addition. Experiments were completed for both C6 glioma cells and MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells. Although aminolevulinic acid proved ineffective for generating a therapeutic effect at any activity for either cell line, TPPS2a produced at least a 20% therapeutic effect at activities ranging from 6 to 60 µCi/well for the C6 cell line. Current results demonstrate that it may be possible to generate a therapeutic effect in vivo using Cerenkov luminescence to activate the photodynamic therapy process with clinically relevant photosensitizers.

  1. Development of Fast and Highly Efficient Gas Ionization Chamber For Patient Imaging and Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Hinderler; H. Keller; T.R. Mackie; M.L. Corradini

    2003-09-08

    In radiation therapy of cancer, more accurate delivery techniques spur the need for improved patient imaging during treatment. To this purpose, the megavoltage radiation protocol that is used for treatment is also used for imaging.

  2. Development of a Fast and Highly Efficient Gas Ionization Chamber For Patient Imaging and Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Hinderler, R; Keller, H; Mackie, T R

    2003-01-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer, more accurate delivery techniques spur the need for improved patient imaging during treatment. To this purpose, the megavoltage radiation protocol that is used for treatment is also used for imaging.

  3. Computed radiation imaging physics and mathematics of forward and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, Esam M A

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted imaging with radiation (x- and gamma rays) is an integral part of modern medical-diagnostic practice. This imaging technology is also slowly finding its way into industrial applications. Although the technology is well developed, there is a need for further improvement to enhance image quality, reduce artifacts, minimize patient radiation exposure, compete with and complement other imaging methods (such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonics), and accommodate dense and large objects encountered in industrial applications. Scientists and engineers, attempting to pro

  4. Imaging Primary Mouse Sarcomas After Radiation Therapy Using Cathepsin-Activatable Fluorescent Imaging Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuneo, Kyle C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Mito, Jeffrey K.; Javid, Melodi P. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ferrer, Jorge M. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Kim, Yongbaek [Department of Clinical Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W. David [The David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Bawendi, Moungi G. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Brigman, Brian E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G., E-mail: david.kirsch@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and other tumors undergo radiation therapy (RT) before surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials: A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes, and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a hand-held imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by Western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results: RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b-positive tumor-associated immune cells. Conclusions: In this primary murine model of STS, RT did not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes labeled tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to include patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes.

  5. Reducing radiation dose without compromising image quality in preoperative perforator flap imaging with CTA using ASIR technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niumsawatt, Vachara; Debrotwir, Andrew N; Rozen, Warren Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) has become a mainstay in preoperative perforator flap planning in the modern era of reconstructive surgery. However, the increased use of CTA does raise the concern of radiation exposure to patients. Several techniques have been developed to decrease radiation dosage without compromising image quality, with varying results. The most recent advance is in the improvement of image reconstruction using an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm. We sought to evaluate the image quality of ASIR in preoperative deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap surgery, through a direct comparison with conventional filtered back projection (FBP) images. A prospective review of 60 consecutive ASIR and 60 consecutive FBP CTA images using similar protocol (except for radiation dosage) was undertaken, analyzed by 2 independent reviewers. In both groups, we were able to accurately identify axial arteries and their perforators. Subjective analysis of image quality demonstrated no statistically significant difference between techniques. ASIR can thus be used for preoperative imaging with similar image quality to FBP, but with a 60% reduction in radiation delivery to patients. PMID:25058789

  6. The application of a novel image-inspecting dispatch in a radiation imaging system for inspecting aviation transaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system for inspecting aviation transaction is a synthesis radiation imaging system followed by the large container inspecting system. A set of novel image-inspecting dispatch technology applied in the system such as interlocking dual pipelining structure based on querying queue, mutex principle for queue request etc

  7. Estimation of the secondary cancer risk induced by diagnostic imaging radiation during proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have estimated the secondary cancer risk (SCR) introduced by image-guided procedures during proton therapy. The physical dose from imaging radiation and the corresponding organ equivalent dose were calculated for the case of a lumbar spine patient. The maximum physical dose delivered to the patient during the imaging procedure was estimated to be ∼ 0.35% of the prescribed dose of 46 Gy. However, this small imaging dose substantially raised the radiation-induced SCR by ∼ 8%. In addition, the clinical benefit (improved accuracy during the procedure) and costs (extra SCR) associated with image-guided procedures were quantitatively modelled by systematically investigating the changes in SCR as a function of the prescribed dose, treatment target volume and imaging field size. The results showed that the SCR varied sensitively with the volume receiving the imaging and the therapeutic radiation, whereas the SCR depended to a lesser extent on the magnitude of the applied therapeutic radiation. These results showed that the additional SCR introduced by imaging radiation could be efficiently reduced by minimizing the imaging field size during image-guided procedures.

  8. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU-correspondence with the planning CT images, and total volume HU error. Artefacts are reduced and CT-like HUs are recovered in the artefact corrected CBCT images. Visual inspection confirms that artefacts are indeed suppressed by the proposed method, and the HU root mean square difference between reconstructed CBCTs and the reference CT images are reduced by 31% when using the artefact corrections compared to the standard clinical CBCT reconstruction. A versatile artefact correction method for clinical CBCT images acquired for IGRT has been developed. HU values are recovered in the corrected CBCT images. The proposed method relies on post processing of clinical projection images, and does not require patient specific optimisation. It is thus a powerful tool for image quality improvement of large numbers of CBCT images.

  9. Theoretical study on the Cerenkov-type second-harmonic generation in optical superlattices without paraxial approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yang-Yang; Xiao, Han; Yang, Bo; Lu, Rong-Er; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Chao; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-05-30

    In this paper, the Cerenkov-type second-harmonic generation in bulk optical superlattices has been studied theoretically with the non-paraxial wave equations, where the paraxial approximation is avoided. The corresponding phase-matching condition is determined strictly by solving the non-paraxial wave equations under proper boundary conditions, and the result coincides well with the traditional Cerenkov phase-matching condition. In addition, a backward Cerenkov phase-matching condition is deduced from the wave equations as well, and the physical requirement of this condition is clarified. PMID:27410081

  10. Current radiation exposure of man: a comparison between digital imaging and environmental, workplace and accidental radiation burden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray imaging in diagnostic radiology is recognized worldwide as an outstanding tool for the early recognition and prevention of diseases. The reverse side is that radiography contributes essentially to the exposure of the public. Mean effective doses, averaged over patients and non-patients, are reaching or exceeding the level of natural radiation. This is particularly the case when digital imaging techniques are utilized, such as CT, coronary angiography and interventional radiology. Individual effective doses for a patient may occur between several mSv and several hundred mSv by one examination or a series of examinations, while individual organ doses of a patient may reach equivalent doses even up to several Sv, such as for the skin. The purpose of this review is to provide information on effective dose levels occurring in diagnostic radiology as compared with individual effective doses achieved from environmental radiation, radiation at workplaces and after major radiation incidents. (author)

  11. Overview of ionizing radiation effects in image sensors fabricated in a deep-submicrometer CMOS imaging technology

    OpenAIRE

    Goiffon, Vincent; Estribeau, Magali; Magnan, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    An overview of ionizing radiation effects in imagers manufactured in a 0.18-μm CMOS image sensor technology is presented. Fourteen types of image sensors are characterized and irradiated by a 60Co source up to 5 kGy. The differences between these 14 designs allow us to separately estimate the effect of ionizing radiation on microlenses, on low- and zero-threshold-voltage MOSFETs and on several pixel layouts using P+ guard-rings and edgeless transistors. After irradiation, wavelength depend...

  12. Calibration of a liquid scintillation counter for alpha, beta and Cerenkov counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calibration data are presented for 25 radionuclides that were individually measured in a Packard Tri-Carb 2250CA liquid scintillation (LS) counter by both conventional and Cerenkov detection techniques. The relationships and regression data between the quench indicating parameters and the LS counting efficiencies were determined using microliter amounts of tracer added to low 40K borosilicate glass vials containing 15 mL of Insta-Gel XF scintillation cocktail. Using 40K, the detection efficiencies were linear over a three order of magnitude range (10 - 10,000 mBq) in beta activity for both LS and Cerenkov counting. The Cerenkov counting efficiency (CCE) increased linearly (42% per MeV) from 0.30 to 2.0 MeV, whereas the LS efficiency was >90% for betas with energy in excess of 0.30 MeV. The CCE was 20 - 50% less than the LS counting efficiency for beta particles with maximum energies in excess of 1 MeV. Based on replicate background measurements, the lower limit of detection (LLD) for a 1-h count at the 95% confidence level, using water as a solvent, was 0.024 counts sec--1 and 0.028 counts sec-1 for plastic and glass vials, respectively. The LLD for a 1-h-count ranged from 46 to 56 mBq (2.8 - 3.4 dpm) for both Cerenkov and conventional LS counting. This assumes: (1) a 100% counting efficiency, (2) a 50% yield of the nuclide of interest, (3) a 1-h measurement time using low background plastic vials, and (4) a 0-50 keV region of interest. The LLD is reduced an order of magnitude when the yield recovery exceeds 90% and a lower background region is used (i.e., 100 - 500 keV alpha region of interest). Examples and applications of both Cerenkov and LS counting techniques are given in the text and appendices

  13. Clinical usefulness of the management and delivery of radiation dose-distribution images using the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K; Onogi, Y; Aoki, Y; Kozuka, T; Ohtomo, K

    1998-01-01

    Dose distribution images in radiation therapy play important roles in the management of cancer patients. To date, hard copies of these images have been stored for referral by radiation oncologists as needed. In most cases, these images are not available to medical personnel outside the radiation oncology department. We have developed a means to access these dose distribution images from the hospital via the World-Wide Web (WWW). A screen snapshot of a dose distribution image on the CRT of a treatment planning unit is copied to the WWW server and converted to a GIF (graphic interchange format) image. Similarly, we can register dose volume histograms and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) on the WWW. Medical personnel can view these images through the WWW browser from anywhere in the hospital. As a result, radiation oncologists are given detailed information on target definition in treatment planning by expert physicians. The system also helps co-medical personnel in understanding dose distribution and predicting radiation injury. At the same time, it actualizes an electronic archive of dose distribution images, which is a database for quick and reliable review, evaluation, and comparison of treatment plans. This technique also fosters closer relationships among radiation oncologists, physicians, and co-medical personnel. PMID:9814423

  14. Photobiological aspects of radiation damage to bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, we, submit a critical analysis of experiments aimed to estimate the contribution of the processes of ionization and electron excitation to lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. In discussing the phenomenon of photoreactivation after the effect of ionizing radiation, we arrived at a conclusion that the processes of electron excitation, initiated by either Vavilov-Cerenkov light or the direct reaction of radiation energy with the substance, play an important role in the biological effect of ionizing radiation

  15. Radiation therapists' perceptions of the minimum level of experience required to perform portal image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Our aim was to explore radiation therapists' views on the level of experience necessary to undertake portal image analysis and clinical decision making. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was developed to determine the availability of portal imaging equipment in Australia and New Zealand. We analysed radiation therapists' responses to a specific question regarding their opinion on the minimum level of experience required for health professionals to analyse portal images. We used grounded theory and a constant comparative method of data analysis to derive the main themes. Results: Forty-six radiation oncology facilities were represented in our survey, with 40 questionnaires being returned (87%). Thirty-seven radiation therapists answered our free-text question. Radiation therapists indicated three main themes which they felt were important in determining the minimum level of experience: 'gaining on-the-job experience', 'receiving training' and 'working as a team'. Conclusions: Radiation therapists indicated that competence in portal image review occurs via various learning mechanisms. Further research is warranted to determine perspectives of other health professionals, such as radiation oncologists, on portal image review becoming part of radiation therapists' extended role. Suitable training programs and steps for implementation should be developed to facilitate this endeavour

  16. Cherenkov Video Imaging Allows for the First Visualization of Radiation Therapy in Real Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether Cherenkov light imaging can visualize radiation therapy in real time during breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: An intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was synchronized to the 3.25-μs radiation pulses of the clinical linear accelerator with the intensifier set × 100. Cherenkov images were acquired continuously (2.8 frames/s) during fractionated whole breast irradiation with each frame an accumulation of 100 radiation pulses (approximately 5 monitor units). Results: The first patient images ever created are used to illustrate that Cherenkov emission can be visualized as a video during conditions typical for breast radiation therapy, even with complex treatment plans, mixed energies, and modulated treatment fields. Images were generated correlating to the superficial dose received by the patient and potentially the location of the resulting skin reactions. Major blood vessels are visible in the image, providing the potential to use these as biological landmarks for improved geometric accuracy. The potential for this system to detect radiation therapy misadministrations, which can result from hardware malfunction or patient positioning setup errors during individual fractions, is shown. Conclusions: Cherenkoscopy is a unique method for visualizing surface dose resulting in real-time quality control. We propose that this system could detect radiation therapy errors in everyday clinical practice at a time when these errors can be corrected to result in improved safety and quality of radiation therapy

  17. MO-G-9A-01: Imaging Refresher for Standard of Care Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labby, Z [The University of Michigan Hospital ' Health Sys, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sensakovic, W [Florida Hospital, Orlando, FL (United States); Hipp, E [NYULMC Clinical Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Altman, M [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Imaging techniques and technology which were previously the domain of diagnostic medicine are becoming increasingly integrated and utilized in radiation therapy (RT) clinical practice. As such, there are a number of specific imaging topics that are highly applicable to modern radiation therapy physics. As imaging becomes more widely integrated into standard clinical radiation oncology practice, the impetus is on RT physicists to be informed and up-to-date on those imaging modalities relevant to the design and delivery of therapeutic radiation treatments. For example, knowing that, for a given situation, a fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) image set is most likely what the physician would like to import and contour is helpful, but may not be sufficient to providing the best quality of care. Understanding the physics of how that pulse sequence works and why it is used could help assess its utility and determine if it is the optimal sequence for aiding in that specific clinical situation. It is thus important that clinical medical physicists be able to understand and explain the physics behind the imaging techniques used in all aspects of clinical radiation oncology practice. This session will provide the basic physics for a variety of imaging modalities for applications that are highly relevant to radiation oncology practice: computed tomography (CT) (including kV, MV, cone beam CT [CBCT], and 4DCT), positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and imaging specific to brachytherapy (including ultrasound and some brachytherapy specific topics in MR). For each unique modality, the image formation process will be reviewed, trade-offs between image quality and other factors (e.g. imaging time or radiation dose) will be clarified, and typically used cases for each modality will be introduced. The current and near-future uses of these modalities and techniques in radiation oncology clinical practice will also be discussed. Learning

  18. MO-G-9A-01: Imaging Refresher for Standard of Care Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging techniques and technology which were previously the domain of diagnostic medicine are becoming increasingly integrated and utilized in radiation therapy (RT) clinical practice. As such, there are a number of specific imaging topics that are highly applicable to modern radiation therapy physics. As imaging becomes more widely integrated into standard clinical radiation oncology practice, the impetus is on RT physicists to be informed and up-to-date on those imaging modalities relevant to the design and delivery of therapeutic radiation treatments. For example, knowing that, for a given situation, a fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) image set is most likely what the physician would like to import and contour is helpful, but may not be sufficient to providing the best quality of care. Understanding the physics of how that pulse sequence works and why it is used could help assess its utility and determine if it is the optimal sequence for aiding in that specific clinical situation. It is thus important that clinical medical physicists be able to understand and explain the physics behind the imaging techniques used in all aspects of clinical radiation oncology practice. This session will provide the basic physics for a variety of imaging modalities for applications that are highly relevant to radiation oncology practice: computed tomography (CT) (including kV, MV, cone beam CT [CBCT], and 4DCT), positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and imaging specific to brachytherapy (including ultrasound and some brachytherapy specific topics in MR). For each unique modality, the image formation process will be reviewed, trade-offs between image quality and other factors (e.g. imaging time or radiation dose) will be clarified, and typically used cases for each modality will be introduced. The current and near-future uses of these modalities and techniques in radiation oncology clinical practice will also be discussed. Learning

  19. Evaluation of Setup Error Correction for Patients Using On Board Imager in Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Soo Man [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To reduce side effects in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and to improve the quality of life of patients, also to meet accurate SETUP condition for patients, the various SETUP correction conditions were compared and evaluated by using on board imager (OBI) during the SETUP. Each 30 cases of the head, the neck, the chest, the belly, and the pelvis in 150 cases of IGRT patients was corrected after confirmation by using OBI at every 2-3 day. Also, the difference of the SETUP through the skin-marker and the anatomic SETUP through the OBI was evaluated. General SETUP errors (Transverse, Coronal, Sagittal) through the OBI at original SETUP position were Head and Neck: 1.3 mm, Brain: 2 mm, Chest: 3 mm, Abdoman: 3.7 mm, Pelvis: 4 mm. The patients with more that 3 mm in the error range were observed in the correction devices and the patient motions by confirming in treatment room. Moreover, in the case of female patients, the result came from the position of hairs during the Head and Neck, Brain tumor. Therefore, after another SETUP in each cases of over 3 mm in the error range, the treatment was carried out. Mean error values of each parts estimated after the correction were 1 mm for the head, 1.2 mm for the neck, 2.5 mm for the chest, 2.5 mm for the belly, and 2.6 mm for the pelvis. The result showed the correction of SETUP for each treatment through OBI is extremely difficult because of the importance of SETUP in radiation treatment. However, by establishing the average standard of the patients from this research result, the better patient satisfaction and treatment results could be obtained.

  20. Implementation of adaptive radiation therapy for urinary bladder carcinoma - Imaging, planning and image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) for urinary bladder cancer has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional RT with potential to minimize radiation-induced toxicity to healthy tissues. In this work we have studied bladder volume variations and their effect on healthy bladder dose sparing and intra fractional margins, in order to refine our ART strategy. Material and methods: An online ART treatment strategy was followed for five patients with urinary bladder cancer with the tumors demarcated using Lipiodol. A library of 3-4 predefined treatment plans for each patient was created based on four successive computed tomography (CT) scans. Cone beam CT (CBCT) images were acquired before each treatment fraction and after the treatment at least weekly. In partial bladder treatment the sparing of the healthy part of the bladder was investigated. The bladder wall displacements due to bladder filling were determined in three orthogonal directions (CC, AP, DEX-SIN) using the treatment planning CT scans. An ellipsoidal model was applied in order to find the theoretical maximum values for the bladder wall displacements. Moreover, the actual bladder filling rate during treatment was evaluated using the CBCT images. Results: In partial bladder treatment the volume of the bladder receiving high absorbed doses was generally smaller with a full than empty bladder. The estimation of the bladder volume and the upper limit for the intra fractional movement of the bladder wall could be represented with an ellipsoidal model with a reasonable accuracy. Observed maximum growth of bladder dimensions was less than 10 mm in all three orthogonal directions during 15 minute interval. Conclusion: The use of Lipiodol contrast agent enables partial bladder treatment with reduced irradiation of the healthy bladder volume. The ellipsoidal bladder model can be used for the estimation of the bladder volume changes and the upper limit of the bladder wall movement during the treatment

  1. An intelligent approach for cooling radiator fault diagnosis based on infrared thermal image processing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research presents a new intelligent fault diagnosis and condition monitoring system for classification of different conditions of cooling radiator using infrared thermal images. The system was adopted to classify six types of cooling radiator faults; radiator tubes blockage, radiator fins blockage, loose connection between fins and tubes, radiator door failure, coolant leakage, and normal conditions. The proposed system consists of several distinct procedures including thermal image acquisition, image pre-processing, image processing, two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform (2D-DWT), feature extraction, feature selection using a genetic algorithm (GA), and finally classification by artificial neural networks (ANNs). The 2D-DWT is implemented to decompose the thermal images. Subsequently, statistical texture features are extracted from the original images and are decomposed into thermal images. The significant selected features are used to enhance the performance of the designed ANN classifier for the 6 types of cooling radiator conditions (output layer) in the next stage. For the tested system, the input layer consisted of 16 neurons based on the feature selection operation. The best performance of ANN was obtained with a 16-6-6 topology. The classification results demonstrated that this system can be employed satisfactorily as an intelligent condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for a class of cooling radiator. - Highlights: • Intelligent fault diagnosis of cooling radiator using thermal image processing. • Thermal image processing in a multiscale representation structure by 2D-DWT. • Selection features based on a hybrid system that uses both GA and ANN. • Application of ANN as classifier. • Classification accuracy of fault detection up to 93.83%

  2. Adapting MRI Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging For In Vivo Human Brain Focused Ultrasound Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kaye, Elena A.; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2012-01-01

    A variety of MRI acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) pulse sequences as the means for image guidance of focused ultrasound therapy have been recently developed and tested ex vivo and in animal models. To successfully translate MR-ARFI guidance into human applications, ensuring that MR-ARFI provides satisfactory image quality in the presence of patient motion and deposits safe amount of ultrasound energy during image acquisition is necessary. The first aim of this work was to study the ...

  3. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging for dynamic radiation behavior study using infrared imaging video bolometers in large helical device plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Ryuichi; Peterson, Byron J.; Teranishi, Masaru; Iwama, Naofumi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Pandya, Shwetang N.

    2016-05-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) tomography system using four InfraRed imaging Video Bolometers (IRVBs) has been designed with a helical periodicity assumption for the purpose of plasma radiation measurement in the large helical device. For the spatial inversion of large sized arrays, the system has been numerically and experimentally examined using the Tikhonov regularization with the criterion of minimum generalized cross validation, which is the standard solver of inverse problems. The 3D transport code EMC3-EIRENE for impurity behavior and related radiation has been used to produce phantoms for numerical tests, and the relative calibration of the IRVB images has been carried out with a simple function model of the decaying plasma in a radiation collapse. The tomography system can respond to temporal changes in the plasma profile and identify the 3D dynamic behavior of radiation, such as the radiation enhancement that starts from the inboard side of the torus, during the radiation collapse. The reconstruction results are also consistent with the output signals of a resistive bolometer. These results indicate that the designed 3D tomography system is available for the 3D imaging of radiation. The first 3D direct tomographic measurement of a magnetically confined plasma has been achieved.

  4. Contribution of modern medical imaging technology to radiation health effects in exposed populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I,

    1980-11-01

    The introduction of technically-advanced imaging systems in medicine carries with it potential health hazards, particularly from ionizing and nonionizing radiation exposure of human populations. This paper will discuss what we know and what we do not know about the health effects of low-level radiation, how the risks of radiation-induced health effects may be estimated, the sources of the scientific data, the dose-response models used, the uncertainties which limit precision of estimation of excess health risks from low-level radiation, and what the implications might be for radiation protection in medicine and public health policy.

  5. Contribution of modern medical imaging technology to radiation health effects in exposed populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of technically-advanced imaging systems in medicine carries with it potential health hazards, particularly from ionizing and nonionizing radiation exposure of human populations. This paper will discuss what we know and what we do not know about the health effects of low-level radiation, how the risks of radiation-induced health effects may be estimated, the sources of the scientific data, the dose-response models used, the uncertainties which limit precision of estimation of excess health risks from low-level radiation, and what the implications might be for radiation protection in medicine and public health policy

  6. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, Jillian R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ketonen, Leena [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Jeremy Y. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulino, Arnold C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weinberg, Jeffrey [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Khatua, Soumen [Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Adesina, Adekunle [Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahajan, Anita, E-mail: amahajan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  7. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem

  8. [Management and delivery of radiation dose distribution images using the Internet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onogi, Y; Nakagawa, K; Aoki, Y; Kozuka, T; Toyoda, T; Sasaki, Y

    1998-01-01

    Dose distribution images play important roles in the management of cancer patients. To date hard copies of these images have been stored and referred to by radiation oncologists as needed. In most cases, these images were not available to medical personnel outside the radiation oncology department. We have developed a mechanism in the hospital to access these dose distribution images via WWW (World Wide Web). A screen snapshot of a dose distribution image on the CRT of a treatment planning machine is copied to the WWW server and converted to a GIF image. Similarly, we can register dose volume histograms and digitally reconstructed radiographs on the WWW. Medical personnel throughout the hospital can access the images through the WWW browser. As a result, radiation oncologists are given detailed information on target definition in treatment planning by expert physicians. The system also helps co-medical staff in understanding dose distributions and predicting radiation injuries. At the same time, it actualizes an electronic archive of dose distribution images, which is a database for quick and reliable review, evaluation and comparison of treatment plans. This technique also furthers a close relationship among radiation oncologists, physicians, and co-medical personnel. PMID:9493431

  9. Ageing effects on image sensors due to terrestrial cosmic radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nampoothiri, G.G.; Horemans, M.L.R.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the “ageing” effect on image sensors introduced by neutrons present in natural (terrestrial) cosmic environment. The results obtained at sea level are corroborated for the first time with accelerated neutron beam tests and for various image sensor operation conditions. The results reveal many fascinating effects that these rays introduce on image sensors.

  10. Novel computational methods for image analysis and quantification using position sensitive radiation detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez Crespo, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    The major advantage of position sensitive radiation detector systems lies in their ability to non invasively map the regional distribution of the emitted radiation in real-time. Three of such detector systems were studied in this thesis, gamma-cameras, positron cameras and CMOS image sensors. A number of physical factors associated to these detectors degrade the qualitative and quantitative properties of the obtained images. These blurring factors could be divided into two groups. The first g...

  11. Device for generation of transversal tomographic images of a body by penetrating radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improvement of equipment for the examination of patients using penetrating radiation (e.g. gamma or X-ray radiation) is proposed, in particular of equipment as under US patent 3778614, which avoids undesirable patterns on the reconstructed image. The invention is explained by several models. (orig./PW)

  12. INVITED REVIEW-IMAGE REGISTRATION IN VETERINARY RADIATION ONCOLOGY: INDICATIONS, IMPLICATIONS, AND FUTURE ADVANCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yang; Lawrence, Jessica; Cheng, Kun; Montgomery, Dean; Forrest, Lisa; Mclaren, Duncan B; McLaughlin, Stephen; Argyle, David J; Nailon, William H

    2016-03-01

    The field of veterinary radiation therapy (RT) has gained substantial momentum in recent decades with significant advances in conformal treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), and intensity-modulated (IMRT) techniques. At the root of these advancements lie improvements in tumor imaging, image alignment (registration), target volume delineation, and identification of critical structures. Image registration has been widely used to combine information from multimodality images such as computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) to improve the accuracy of radiation delivery and reliably identify tumor-bearing areas. Many different techniques have been applied in image registration. This review provides an overview of medical image registration in RT and its applications in veterinary oncology. A summary of the most commonly used approaches in human and veterinary medicine is presented along with their current use in IGRT and adaptive radiation therapy (ART). It is important to realize that registration does not guarantee that target volumes, such as the gross tumor volume (GTV), are correctly identified on the image being registered, as limitations unique to registration algorithms exist. Research involving novel registration frameworks for automatic segmentation of tumor volumes is ongoing and comparative oncology programs offer a unique opportunity to test the efficacy of proposed algorithms. PMID:26777133

  13. X-ray imaging dose due to the digital imaging devices used in radiation therapy for patient positioning and repositioning: How to take it into account?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patient positioning and repositioning control in radiation therapy all along the treatment can be conducted using a variety of X-ray sources and imaging detector devices. The development of image guided radiation therapy techniques leads to more frequent use of this imaging control. In this article we summarize the current methods for measuring the dose delivered by X-ray imaging devices used in radiation therapy, as well as basic proposals to take account of these imaging doses for prescribing, recording and reporting radiation therapy treatment. (authors)

  14. Measurement of the 2-dimensional plasma radiation structure during asymmetric radiative collapse by a tangentially viewing infrared imaging video bolometer on LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infrared (IR) imaging video bolometer (IRVB) is a new type of plasma radiation measurement system, which uses an IR camera. For the 4th LHD campaign (2000), the IRVB type has been installed at a tangential port. Very clear helical plasma radiation structures were measured which agreed well with corresponding images of CIII radiation from a CCD camera. A change in the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the radiated power is observed during radiative collapse of the plasma which indicates that the asymmetric radiation is coming from the lower inboard side. (author)

  15. Imaging challenges: a U.S. perspective on controlling exposure to ionizing radiation in children with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kaste, Sue C.

    2008-01-01

    Issues pertaining to control of radiation dose exposures in pediatric imaging are on the forefront of patient care worldwide. Certain factors contribute to appropriate – or inappropriate – use of ionizing radiation in pediatric medical imaging. Such issues include naiveté regarding cancer risk and the role of medical imaging in its development, misinformation about exposure to ionizing radiation, resource availability, staffing, scheduling “snags,” costs, limited evidence-based imaging practi...

  16. Rapid Simultaneous Determination of 89Sr and 90Sr in Milk: A Procedure Using Cerenkov and Scintillation Counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2004, the IAEA programme related to the terrestrial environment has included activities aimed at developing and testing a set of procedures for the determination of radionuclides in environmental samples. Both 89Sr and 90Sr are fission products that can be, and have been, released to the environment during nuclear explosions and nuclear reactor accidents. Since strontium uptake from milk is an important pathway for incorporation of radioactive strontium into the human body, the rapid and accurate analysis of radioactive strontium isotopes in milk is of crucial importance in emergency situations in order to protect the public from radiation hazards. This report describes a new approach for the rapid determination of 89Sr and 90Sr in milk using Cerenkov and scintillation counting methods that was tested and validated by the analysis of four spiked milk samples in terms of repeatability, reproducibility and trueness (relative bias) in accordance with ISO guidelines. The report also describes the calculation of the uncertainty budget. This research was proposed in 2007 at the Asia-Pacific regional meeting of the IAEA Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity (ALMERA) network. Several ALMERA network laboratories participated in the validation procedure by performing reproducibility tests. The resulting recommended procedure is designed to be of general use to a wide range of laboratories, including those in the ALMERA network. It is expected that this rapid method for determining 89Sr and 90Sr in milk will be useful in emergency conditions and for routine environmental monitoring of elevated levels of radioactivity

  17. Image storage in radiation oncology: What did we learn from diagnostic radiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, Kurt; Luick, Marc; Colonias, Athanasios; Gayou, Olivier; Karlovits, Stephen; Werts, E. Day

    2009-02-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard was developed by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) for medical image archiving and retrieval. An extension to this implemented a standard named DICOM-RT for use in Radiation Oncology. There are currently seven radiotherapy-specific DICOM objects which include: RT Structure Set, RT Plan, RT Dose, RT Image, RT Beams Treatment Record, RT Brachy Treatment Record, and RT Treatment Summary Record. The type of data associated with DICOM-RT includes (1) Radiation treatment planning datasets (CT, MRI, PET) with radiation treatment plans showing beam arrangements, isodose distributions, and dose volume histograms of targets/normal tissues and (2) Image-guided radiation modalities such as Siemens MVision mega-voltage cone beam CT (MV-CBCT). With the advent of such advancing technologies, there has been an exponential increase in image data collected for each patient, and the need for reliable and accessible image storage has become critical. A potential solution is a Radiation Oncology specific picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) that would allow data storage from multiple vendor devices and support the storage and retrieval needs not only of a single site but of a large, multi-facility network of radiation oncology clinics. This PACS system must be reliable, expandable, and cost-effective to operate while protecting sensitive patient image information in a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant environment. This paper emphasizes the expanding DICOM-RT storage requirements across our network of 8 radiation oncology clinics and the initiatives we undertook to address the increased volume of data by using the ImageGrid (CANDELiS Inc, Irvine CA) server and the IGViewer license (CANDELiS Inc, Irvine CA) to create a DICOM-RT compatible PACS system.

  18. The application of automatic image analysis in studies of bubble populations produced by radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a method by which automatic image analysis can be applied to the study of size distributions of small (< 5 nm) radiation induced bubbles. Statistically valid results are obtained directly from transmission electron microscope negatives and the optimum imaging conditions for obtaining reliable data are discussed. (author)

  19. Cerenkov Counter for In-Situ Groundwater Monitoring of 90Sr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay C. Todd

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater contamination from 90Sr is an environmental challenge posed topresent and former nuclear weapons related sites. Traditional methods of extractinggroundwater samples and performing laboratory analyses are expensive, time-consumingand induce significant disposal challenges. The authors present here a prototype countercapable of measuring 90Sr groundwater concentrations in-situ at or below the drinking waterlimit of 8 pCi/liter. The 90Y daughter of 90Sr produces high-energy electrons, which cancreate Cerenkov light. Photomultiplier tubes convert the Cerenkov light into an electronicpulse, which then undergoes signal processing with standard electronics. Strontium-90concentrations near the drinking water limit can be measured in a matter of hours if it is insecular equilibrium with the 90Y daughter. The prototype counter is compact, can bedeployed in an American Standard 6-inch, well while operated by a single person, andtransmits the results to a central monitoring location.

  20. Detection of the Cerenkov effect of β particles in a liquid by rapid photomultipliers in coincidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electronic assembly in the nanosecond region was studied for the detection of weak light pulses due to the Cerenkov effect, which an ordinary photomultiplier represents by pulses of a level comparable to that of the thermal noise at ambient temperature. The elimination of these extraneous counts was effected by rapid coincidence between two photomultipliers viewing the same source of light. This arrangement, eliminating the cooling normally used in this type of detection, permits a significant reduction of the volume and weight of the apparatus used with the Cerenkov detector proper. The apparatus described has been applied to the detection of β-emitters in solution; it has permitted the measurement of Sr-Y activity in water, in concentrations at the MCP level. (author)

  1. Design and development of photoelectron detection chambers for the DELPHI experiment RICH Cerenkov counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle identifier of the Barrel-RICH detector, based on the Cerenkov effect is a crucial element of the DELPHI spectrometer. In this detector, Cerenkov light is focussed as a ring whose diameter is related to the velocity of the particle. The measure of the ring's diameter is done by conversion of photons in a gaseous environment and then by measure of the position of the photons in a wire chamber after the drift of the photoelectrons. Three types of wire chambers (chambers in U shape, circular chambers, chambers with flat cathodes) have been designed and tested. The choice of the flat cathode chambers has been determined by the reliability, the simplicity and the considerations of price

  2. Large-scale Gadolinium-doped Water Cerenkov Detector for Non-Proliferation

    CERN Document Server

    Sweany, M; Bowden, N S; Dazeley, S; Keefer, G; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, M

    2011-01-01

    Fission events from Special Nuclear Material (SNM), such as highly enriched uranium or plutonium, can produce simultaneous emission of multiple neutrons and high energy gamma-rays. The observation of time correlations between any of these particles is a significant indicator of the presence of fissionable material. Cosmogenic processes can also mimic these types of correlated signals. However, if the background is sufficiently low and fully characterized, significant changes in the correlated event rate in the presence of a target of interest constitutes a robust signature of the presence of SNM. Since fission emissions are isotropic, adequate sensitivity to these multiplicities requires a high efficiency detector with a large solid angle with respect to the target. Water Cerenkov detectors are a cost-effective choice when large solid angle coverage is required. In order to characterize the neutron detection performance of large-scale water Cerenkov detectors, we have designed and built a 3.5 kL water Cerenko...

  3. A comparative study of color quenching correction methods for Cerenkov counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The color quenching correction for Cerenkov counting is normally based on indexes defined for liquid scintillation spectra. Because of the differences in the spectrum shapes, these indexes are not optimal, and a different method was proposed based on the integral counting of the external 152Eu source spectra of a 1200 Quantulus system. We have shown that this method, named ESAR (external source area ratio), is superior to all the other correction methods, offering the highest sensitivity and the widest range of application. - Highlights: ► A new color quenching correction method was tested for Cerenkov counting. ► It uses the spectrum of the 152Eu outer source of a Quantulus 1220™ system. ► The method (ESAR) was compared to conventional quenching correction methods. ► It is sensitive and adequate also for low level counting. ► It works over a higher range of quenching than all other conventional methods.

  4. Radiation dose in neuroangiography using image noise reduction technology: a population study based on 614 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the reduction in patient radiation dose by X-ray imaging technology using image noise reduction and system settings for neuroangiography and to assess its impact on the working habits of the physician. Radiation dose data from 190 neuroangiographies and 112 interventional neuroprocedures performed with state-of-the-art image processing and reference system settings were collected for the period January-June 2010. The system was then configured with extra image noise reduction algorithms and system settings, which enabled radiation dose reduction without loss of image quality. Radiation dose data from 174 neuroangiographies and 138 interventional neuroprocedures were collected for the period January-June 2012. Procedures were classified as diagnostic or interventional. Patient radiation exposure was quantified using cumulative dose area product and cumulative air kerma. Impact on working habits of the physician was quantified using fluoroscopy time and number of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images. The optimized system settings provided significant reduction in dose indicators versus reference system settings (p2 and from 0.78 to 0.27 Gy for neuroangiography, and from 328 to 109 Gy cm2 and from 2.71 to 0.89 Gy for interventional neuroradiology. Differences were not significant between the two systems with regard to fluoroscopy time or number of DSA images. X-ray imaging technology using an image noise reduction algorithm and system settings provided approximately 60% radiation dose reduction in neuroangiography and interventional neuroradiology, without affecting the working habits of the physician. (orig.)

  5. Radiation dose in neuroangiography using image noise reduction technology: a population study based on 614 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederman, Michael; Andersson, Tommy; Holmin, Staffan [Karolinska University Hospital - Solna, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute and Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Mauti, Maria; Boon, Sjirk; Hoornaert, Bart [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Omar, Artur; Marteinsdottir, Maria [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Section of Imaging Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the reduction in patient radiation dose by X-ray imaging technology using image noise reduction and system settings for neuroangiography and to assess its impact on the working habits of the physician. Radiation dose data from 190 neuroangiographies and 112 interventional neuroprocedures performed with state-of-the-art image processing and reference system settings were collected for the period January-June 2010. The system was then configured with extra image noise reduction algorithms and system settings, which enabled radiation dose reduction without loss of image quality. Radiation dose data from 174 neuroangiographies and 138 interventional neuroprocedures were collected for the period January-June 2012. Procedures were classified as diagnostic or interventional. Patient radiation exposure was quantified using cumulative dose area product and cumulative air kerma. Impact on working habits of the physician was quantified using fluoroscopy time and number of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images. The optimized system settings provided significant reduction in dose indicators versus reference system settings (p<0.001): from 124 to 47 Gy cm{sup 2} and from 0.78 to 0.27 Gy for neuroangiography, and from 328 to 109 Gy cm{sup 2} and from 2.71 to 0.89 Gy for interventional neuroradiology. Differences were not significant between the two systems with regard to fluoroscopy time or number of DSA images. X-ray imaging technology using an image noise reduction algorithm and system settings provided approximately 60% radiation dose reduction in neuroangiography and interventional neuroradiology, without affecting the working habits of the physician. (orig.)

  6. A proposal for a precision test of the standard model by neutrino-electron scattering (Large /hacek C/erenkov Detector Project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A precision measurement of neutrino-electron elastic scattering from a beam stop neutrino source at LAMPF is proposed. The total error in sin2θ/sub W/ is estimated to be +-0.89/percent/. The experiment also will be sensitive to neutrino oscillations and supernova-neutrino bursts, and should set improved limits on the neutrino-charge radius and magnetic-dipole moment. The detector consists of a 2.5-million-gallon tank of water with approximately 14,000 photomultiplier tubes lining the surfaces of the tank. Neutrino-electron scattering events will be observed from the /hacek C/erenkov radiation emitted by the electrons in the water. 19 refs

  7. A proposal for a precision test of the standard model by neutrino-electron scattering (Large /hacek C/erenkov Detector Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; Lu, X-Q.; Gollwitzer, K.; Igo, G.J.; Gulmez, E.; Whitten, C.; VanDalen, G.; Layter, J.; Fung, Sun Yui; Shen, B.C.

    1988-04-01

    A precision measurement of neutrino-electron elastic scattering from a beam stop neutrino source at LAMPF is proposed. The total error in sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ is estimated to be +-0.89/percent/. The experiment also will be sensitive to neutrino oscillations and supernova-neutrino bursts, and should set improved limits on the neutrino-charge radius and magnetic-dipole moment. The detector consists of a 2.5-million-gallon tank of water with approximately 14,000 photomultiplier tubes lining the surfaces of the tank. Neutrino-electron scattering events will be observed from the /hacek C/erenkov radiation emitted by the electrons in the water. 19 refs.

  8. Cardiovascular CT angiography in neonates and children: Image quality and potential for radiation dose reduction with iterative image reconstruction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate image quality (IQ) of low-radiation-dose paediatric cardiovascular CT angiography (CTA), comparing iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with filtered back-projection (FBP) and estimate the potential for further dose reductions. Forty neonates and children underwent low radiation CTA with or without ECG synchronisation. Data were reconstructed with FBP, IRIS and SAFIRE. For ECG-synchronised studies, half-dose image acquisitions were simulated. Signal noise was measured and IQ graded. Effective dose (ED) was estimated. Mean absolute and relative image noise with IRIS and full-dose SAFIRE was lower than with FBP (P < 0.001), while SNR and CNR were higher (P < 0.001). Image noise was also lower and SNR and CNR higher in half-dose SAFIRE studies compared with full-and half-dose FBP studies (P < 0.001). IQ scores were higher for IRIS, full-dose SAFIRE and half-dose SAFIRE than for full-dose FBP and higher for half-dose SAFIRE than for half-dose FBP (P < 0.05). Median weight-specific ED was 0.3 mSv without and 1.36 mSv with ECG synchronisation. The estimated ED of half-dose SAFIRE studies was 0.68 mSv. IR improves image noise, SNR, CNR and subjective IQ compared with FBP in low-radiation-dose paediatric CTA and allows further dose reductions without compromising diagnostic IQ. (orig.)

  9. Study of various photomultiplier tubes with muon beams and Cerenkov light produced in electron showers

    OpenAIRE

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; De Wolf, E. A.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P.; Blyweert., S; Damgov, J.(Texas Tech University, Lubbock, USA); Dimitrov, L.; Genchev, V.; Piperov, S.

    2010-01-01

    The PMTs of the CMS Hadron Forward calorimeter were found to generate a large size signal when their windows were traversed by energetic charged particles. This signal, which is due to. Cerenkov light production at the PMT window, could interfere with the calorimeter signal and mislead the measurements. In order to find a viable solution to this problem, the response of four different types of PMTs to muons traver...

  10. Elimination of the numerical Cerenkov instability for spectral EM-PIC codes

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Peicheng; Decyk, Viktor K; Fiuza, F; Vieira, Jorge; Tsung, Frank S; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O; Mori, Warren B

    2014-01-01

    When using an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) code to simulate a relativistically drifting plasma, a violent numerical instability known as the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) occurs. The NCI is due to the unphysical coupling of electromagnetic waves on a grid to wave-particle resonances, including aliased resonances, i.e., $\\omega + 2\\pi\\mu/\\Delta t=(k_1+ 2\\pi\

  11. QUALITY OF RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGES: LABORATORY EVALUATION OF INTRAORAL FILMS, FILTERS, COLLIMATORS, AND RADIATION EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAMBURUS José Roberto

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate density, radiographic contrast and dose of radiation exposure, the author analyzed 80 radiographs containing 640 optical density data of the images of a penetrometer, exposed to the radiation beam with combinations between D and E periapical films, aluminum and copper/aluminum filters, and circular or rectangular collimators. The data obtained were analyzed by ANOVA and allowed the following conclusions: 1 aluminum filtration resulted in improved image contrast; 2 the use of group D film and an aluminum filter produced improved image contrast quality; 3 the rectangular collimator contributed to the production of improved contrast and to the reduction of radiation exposure, but did not affect density; 4 the combination of copper/aluminum filter, E group film and rectangular collimation significantly reduced radiation exposure.

  12. An imaging time-of-propagation system for charged particle identification at a super B factory

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimura, K; Hoedlmoser, H; Jacobson, B; Kennedy, J; Rosen, M; Ruckman, L; Varner, G; Wong, A; Yen, W

    2009-01-01

    Super B factories that will further probe the flavor sector of the Standard Model and physics beyond will demand excellent charged particle identification (PID), particularly K/pi separation, for momenta up to 4 GeV/c, as well as the ability to operate under beam backgrounds significantly higher than current B factory experiments. We describe an Imaging Time-of-Propagation (iTOP) detector which shows significant potential to meet these requirements. Photons emitted from charged particle interactions in a Cerenkov radiator bar are internally reflected to the end of the bar, where they are collected on a compact image plane using photodetectors with fine spatial segmentation in two dimensions. Precision measurements of photon arrival time are used to enhance the two dimensional imaging, allowing the system to provide excellent PID capabilities within a reduced detector envelope. Results of the ongoing optimization of the geometric and physical properties of such a detector are presented, as well as simulated PI...

  13. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  14. CT–fluoroscopy in chest interventional radiology: Sliding scale of imaging parameters based on radiation exposure dose and factors increasing radiation exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To verify the usefulness of a sliding scale of imaging parameters to reduce radiation exposure during chest interventional radiology (IR), and to identify factors that increase radiation exposure in order to obtain acceptable computed tomography (CT)–fluoroscopy image quality. Materials and methods: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, for which the need for informed consent was waived. Interventional radiologists determined the optimal CT–fluoroscopy imaging parameters using the sliding scale based on the radiation exposure dose. The imaging parameters were changed from those generating low radiation (120 kV/10 mA, 1.2 mGy/s) to others generating higher radiation exposure until acceptable image quality was obtained for each procedure. Validation of the imaging parameter sliding scale was done using regression analysis. Factors that increase radiation exposure were identified using multiple regression analysis. Results: In 125 patients, 217 procedures were performed, of which 72 procedures (33.2%, 72/217) were performed with imaging parameters of minimum radiation exposure, but increased radiation exposure was necessary in 145 (66.8%, 145/217). Significant correlation was found between the radiation exposure dose and the percentage achievement of acceptable image quality (R2 = 0.98). Multivariate regression analysis showed that high body weight (p < 0.0001), long device passage (p < 0.0001), and lesions above the aortic arch (p = 0.04) were significant independent factors increasing radiation exposure. Conclusion: Although increased radiation exposure dose might be necessary to obtain acceptable chest CT–fluoroscopy images depending on the patient, lesion, and procedure characteristics, a sliding scale of imaging parameters helps to reduce radiation exposure.

  15. Determination of the relationship between dose deposition and Cerenkov photons in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms during radiotherapy using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the response relationship between Cerenkov photons and dose deposition, which is the theoretical premise of dose measurement based on Cerenkov effect, Geant4 was used to simulate the process of homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms irradiated with monoenergetic or clinical beam energy spectrum. Results showed certain response relationship between Cerenkov photons and dose deposition regardless of the phantom used under different irradiation conditions. However, deviation observed in the axial distribution of dose deposition as characterized by Cerenkov photons was larger under electron beam than under photon beam. (author)

  16. Scintillating optical fibers in detection of X synchrotron radiation images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is pointed out how the use of optical fiber matrices (or alluminated optical guides) of scintillating glass can constitute systems of X image detection with energy higher than 2 KeV, with high efficiency, high spatial resolution and an acquisition capability dependent on the X flux, in the formation of the single images

  17. Evaluation of scattered radiation from radiographic intensifying screen on dental image contrast using Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most dental imaging is performed by means a imaging system consisting of a film/screen combination. Fluorescent intensifying screens for X-ray films are used in order to reduce the radiation dose. They produce visible light which increases the efficiency of the film. In addition, the primary radiation can be scattered elastically (Rayleigh scattering) and inelastically (Compton scattering) which will degrade the image resolution. Scattered radiation produced in Gd2O2S:Tb intensifying screens was simulated by using a Monte Carlo radiation transport code - the EGS4. The magnitude of scattered radiation striking the film is typically quantified using the scatter to primary radiation and the scatter fraction. The angular distribution of the intensity of the scattered radiation (sum of both the scattering effects) was simulated, showing that the ratio of secondary-to-primary radiation incident on the X-ray film is about 5.67% and 3.28 % and the scatter function is about 5.27% and 3.18% for the front and back screen, respectively, over the range from 0 to π rad. (author)

  18. Image Formation by Incoherent and Coherent Transition Radiation from Flat and Rough Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we derive equations for the image formation of transverse profile of a relativistic beam obtained by means of optical transition radiation (OTR) from flat and rough metal surfaces. The motivation behind this study lies in the desire to suppress coherent transition radiation (COTR) observed in experiments at modern free electron lasers. The physical mechanism behind the problem of COTR is that the OTR is predominantly radiated at small angles of order of 1/{gamma} where {gamma} is the relativistic factor of the beam. This means that the transverse formation size of the image is of order of {bar {lambda}}{gamma} where {bar {lambda}} = {lambda}/2{pi} with {lambda} the radiation wavelength. For relativistic beams this can be comparable or even exceed the transverse size of the beam, which would mean that the image of the beam has very little to do with its transverse profile. It is fortuitous, however, that the incoherent image is formed by adding radiation energy of electrons and results in the transverse formation size being of order of {bar {lambda}}/{theta}{sub a}, with {theta}{sub a} is the aperture angle of the optical system. The COTR image, in contrast, is formed by adding electromagnetic field of electrons, and leads to the formation size {bar {lambda}}{gamma}. In situations when the COTR intensity exceeds that of OTR the COTR imaging makes the diagnostic incapable of measuring the beam profile.

  19. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part I – 4D Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Rosu, Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available “first generation” 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are descri...

  20. Radiation produced by the modulated electron beam of a free electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Neighbours, John Robert; Maruyama, Xavier K.; Buskirk, Fred Ramon

    1986-01-01

    The electron beam in a free electron laser (FEL) becomes axially modulated at the optical wave length of the FEL radiation. This electron beam passed through a gas may produce intense Cerenkov radiation. The effects of the radial and axial dimension of the electron bunches on the radiation are explored

  1. Self-filling and self-purging apparatus for detecting spontaneous radiation from substances in fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, I. Lauren; Chiles, Marion M.; Miller, V. Clint

    1993-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a radiation detector providing for the in situ automatic sampling of fluids containing substances emitting radiation, especially Cerenkov radiation. The detector permits sampling within well casings and is self-purging such that no additional provisions must be established for the storage and disposal of contaminated fluids.

  2. Advances in image-guided radiation therapy-the role of PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the era of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), the greatest challenge remains target delineation, as the opportunity to maximize cures while simultaneously decreasing radiation dose to the surrounding normal tissues is to be realized. Over the last 2 decades, technological advances in radiographic imaging, biochemistry, and molecular biology have played an increasing role in radiation treatment planning, delivery, and evaluation of response. Previously, fluoroscopy formed the basis of radiation treatment planning. Beginning in the late 1980s, computed tomography (CT) has become the basis for modern radiation treatment planning and delivery, coincident with the rise of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). Additionally, multi-modality anatomic imaging registration was the solution pursued to augment delineation of tumors and surrounding structures on CT-based treatment planning. Although these imaging modalities provide the customary anatomic details necessary for radiation treatment planning, they have limitations, including difficulty with identification of small tumor deposits, tumor extension, and distinction from scar tissues. To overcome these limitations, PET and, more recently, PET-CT have been innovative regarding the extent of disease appraisal, target delineation in the treatment planning, and assessment of therapy response. We review the role of functional imaging in IGRT as it reassures transformations on the field of radiation oncology. As we move toward the era of IGRT, the use of multi-modality imaging fusion, and the introduction of more sensitive and specific PET-CT tracers may further assist target definition. Furthermore, the potential to predict early outcome or even detect early recurrence of tumor, may allow for the tailoring of intervention in cancer patients. The convergence of a biological target volume, and perhaps multi-tracer tumor, molecular, and genetic profile tumors will probably be vital in cancer treatment

  3. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging by synchrotron-radiation computed laminography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfen, L.; Baumbach, T.; Pernot, P.; Mikulík, P.; DiMichiel, M.; Baruchel, J.

    2006-08-01

    The methodical development and first instrumental implementation of computed laminography / tomosynthesis using synchrotron radiation are presented. The technique was developed for three-dimensional imaging of flat and laterally extended objects with high spatial resolution. This paper introduces the fundamental principle of the imaging process and discusses the method's particularities in comparison to computed tomography and computed laminography / digital tomosynthesis. Introducing a simple scanning geometry adapted to the particular experimental conditions of synchrotron imaging set-ups (such as the stationary source and a parallel beam) allows us to combine the advantages of laminography and those provided by synchrotron radiation, for instance monochromatic radiation in order to avoid beam hardening artefacts, high beam intensity for achieving high spatial resolution and fast scanning times or spatial coherence for exploiting phase contrast. The potential of the method for three-dimensional imaging of microelectronic devices is demonstrated by examples of flip-chip bonded and wire-bonded devices.

  4. These images show thermal infrared radiation from Jupiter at different wavelengths which are diagnos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    These images show thermal infrared radiation from Jupiter at different wavelengths which are diagnostic of physical phenomena The 7.85-micron image in the upper left shows stratospheric temperatures which are elevated in the region of the A fragment impact (to the left of bottom). Temperatures deeper in the atmosphere near 150-mbar are shown by the 17.2-micron image in the upper right. There is a small elevation of temperatures at this depth, indicated by the arrow, and confirmed by other measurements near this wavelength. This indicates that the influence of the impact of fragment A on the troposphere has been minimal. The two images in the bottom row show no readily apparent perturbation of the ammmonia condensate cloud field near 600 mbar, as diagnosed by 8.57-micron radiation, and deeper cloud layers which are diagnosed by 5-micron radiation.

  5. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a (60)Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The...... clinical tolerances. CONCLUSIONS: A commercial (60)Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system....

  6. In-room CT techniques for image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate patient setup and target localization are essential to advanced radiation therapy treatment. Significant improvement has been made recently with the development of image-guided radiation therapy, in which image guidance facilitates short treatment course and high dose per fraction radiotherapy, aiming at improving tumor control and quality of life. Many imaging modalities are being investigated, including x-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonant imaging, magnetic resonant spectroscopic imaging, and kV/MV imaging with flat panel detectors. These developments provide unique imaging techniques and methods for patient setup and target localization. Some of them are different; some are complementary. This paper reviews the currently available kV x-ray CT systems used in the radiation treatment room, with a focus on the CT-on-rails systems, which are diagnostic CT scanners moving on rails installed in the treatment room. We will describe the system hardware including configurations, specifications, operation principles, and functionality. We will review software development for image fusion, structure recognition, deformation correction, target localization, and alignment. Issues related to the clinical implementation of in-room CT techniques in routine procedures are discussed, including acceptance testing and quality assurance. Clinical applications of the in-room CT systems for patient setup, target localization, and adaptive therapy are also reviewed for advanced radiotherapy treatments

  7. Prospective Evaluation of Dual-Energy Imaging in Patients Undergoing Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Initial Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherertz, Tracy; Hoggarth, Mark; Luce, Jason; Block, Alec M.; Nagda, Suneel; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: A prospective feasibility study was conducted to investigate the utility of dual-energy (DE) imaging compared to conventional x-ray imaging for patients undergoing kV-based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved feasibility study enrolled patients with lung cancer undergoing IGRT and was initiated in September 2011. During daily setup, 2 sequential respiration-gated x-ray images were obtained using an on-board imager. Imaging was composed of 1 standard x-ray image at 120 kVp (1 mAs) and a second image obtained at 60 kVp (4 mAs). Weighted logarithmic subtraction of the 2 images was performed offline to create a soft tissue-selective DE image. Conventional and DE images were evaluated by measuring relative contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and also by comparing spatial localization, using both approaches. Imaging dose was assessed using a calibrated ion chamber. Results: To date, 10 patients with stage IA to IIIA lung cancer were enrolled and 57 DE images were analyzed. DE subtraction resulted in complete suppression of overlying bone in all 57 DE images, with an average improvement in relative contrast of 4.7 ± 3.3 over that of 120 kVp x-ray images (P<.0002). The improvement in relative contrast with DE imaging was seen for both smaller (gross tumor volume [GTV] ≤5 cc) and larger tumors (GTV >5 cc), with average relative contrast improvement ratios of 3.4 ± 4.1 and 5.4 ± 3.6, respectively. Moreover, the GTV was reliably localized in 95% of the DE images versus 74% of the single energy (SE images, (P=.004). Mean skin dose per DE image set was 0.44 ± 0.03 mGy versus 0.43 ± 0.03 mGy, using conventional kV imaging parameters. Conclusions: Initial results of this feasibility study suggest that DE thoracic imaging may enhance tumor localization in lung cancer patients receiving kV-based IGRT without increasing imaging dose.

  8. Development and testing of a Cerenkov counter for hyperon on line tagging (WA89 experiment at CERN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HYPOLIT (HYPerons On LIne Tagging) is a new Counter for tagging hyperons on line, in the 250 GeV/c beam (rms 7%) of the second phase of the WA89 experiment at CERN. It is a fast RICH counter with low angular acceptance but a great resolution power. The counter is equipped with a 6 m focal length spherical mirror and a chromatic corrector. The size of the Cerenkov rings is reduced by means of set of two conical mirrors to match the active area of an image intensifier. Its output window is devided into 160 pixels read with 160 photomultipliers via fibre optics. The counter has been tested at CERN in 2, 4 and 8 GeV/c electron beam and in 220 GeV/c pion beam containing also 5.3% kaons and 0.7% antiprotons. A spatial resolution of 0.125 mm was achieved on the radius, which represents 1/5 of the pion-Kaon separation. The ring radius is determined electronically in less than 2.5 microseconds. A Monte-Carlo simulation was performed at 360 GeV/c. It is shown that the tagging is also possible at this energy, despite the ten times greater emittance of this beam, after some modifications on the chromatic corrector and the detection system. (orig.)

  9. Feasibility of human/robot cooperation in image-directed radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameduri, Scott A.; Newman, Wyatt S.; Weinhous, Martin S.; Glosser, Greg D.; Macklis, Roger

    1998-12-01

    Image-directed radiation therapy potentially offers significant improvement over current open-loop radiotherapy techniques. Utilizing real-time imaging of tumors, it may be possible to direct a treatment beam to achieve better localization of radiation dose. Since real-time imaging offers relatively poor fidelity, automated analysis of images is formidable. However, experienced physicians may take advantage of visual cues and knowledge of how cancer spreads to infer the location of tumors in partially occluded or otherwise ambiguous scenes. At the Cleveland Clinic, an image-directed radiation treatment system, consisting of a relatively compact linear accelerator manipulated by a 6 degree-of-freedom robot, is in use for treatment of brain tumors. This same system could be applied to teleoperated radiation treatment of non-stationary tumors. To evaluate the prospects for operator-interactive, image-directed therapy, a simulator was constructed to determine the effectiveness of emulated human-in-the-loop treatments. Early performance results based on video recordings of actual lung tumors show that image-directed treatment can offer significant improvements over current practice, motivating development of teleoperated treatment systems.

  10. Imaging of sub-wavelength structures radiating coherently near microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, Alexey V., E-mail: avmaslov@yandex.ru [University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Astratov, Vasily N., E-mail: astratov@uncc.edu [Department of Physics and Optical Science, Center for Optoelectronics and Optical Communications, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223-0001 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Using a two-dimensional model, we show that the optical images of a sub-wavelength object depend strongly on the excitation of its electromagnetic modes. There exist modes that enable the resolution of the object features smaller than the classical diffraction limit, in particular, due to the destructive interference. We propose to use such modes for super-resolution of resonant structures such as coupled cavities, metal dimers, or bowties. A dielectric microsphere in contact with the object forms its magnified image in a wide range of the virtual image plane positions. It is also suggested that the resonances may significantly affect the resolution quantification in recent experimental studies.

  11. Deformable registration of the planning image (kVCT) and the daily images (MVCT) for adaptive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incorporation of daily images into the radiotherapy process leads to adaptive radiation therapy (ART), in which the treatment is evaluated periodically and the plan is adaptively modified for the remaining course of radiotherapy. Deformable registration between the planning image and the daily images is a key component of ART. In this paper, we report our researches on deformable registration between the planning kVCT and the daily MVCT image sets. The method is based on a fast intensity-based free-form deformable registration technique. Considering the noise and contrast resolution differences between the kVCT and the MVCT, an 'edge-preserving smoothing' is applied to the MVCT image prior to the deformable registration process. We retrospectively studied daily MVCT images from commercial TomoTherapy machines from different clinical centers. The data set includes five head-neck cases, one pelvis case, two lung cases and one prostate case. Each case has one kVCT image and 20-40 MVCT images. We registered the MVCT images with their corresponding kVCT image. The similarity measures and visual inspections of contour matches by physicians validated this technique. The applications of deformable registration in ART, including 'deformable dose accumulation', 'automatic re-contouring' and 'tumour growth/regression evaluation' throughout the course of radiotherapy are also studied

  12. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Westphalen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher’s exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25 and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34. Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. RESULTS: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58% had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59 for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59. For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2. CONCLUSION: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy.

  13. Optical transition radiation from a thin carbon foil: a beam profile monitor for the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This memo considers placement of an ultra thin carbon foil into the SLC beam. Transition radiation light would be emitted from the surface of the foil. The optical spot from the foil could be viewed with a microscope objective lens and registered with an image detector. Multiple scattering for the foil thicknesses necessary will not affect the beam emittance. Calculations show that a thin carbon foil can withstand the electron beam if the electron beam is larger than 10 μm in size. There are many possible radiation mechanisms from a foil - bremsstrahlung, black body temperature radiation, Cerenkov light, scintillation light, and transition radiation. Transition radiation is apparently dominant. It is proposed to use thin carbon foils, 75 to 150 A thick. Calculations indicate that 5 x 1010 beam electrons will radiate a useable number of optical photons. Specifically with 150 A foils the fractional yield of useful optical photons is 10-3 photons per incident electron 5 x 10+7 optical photons imaged upon an image plane. Spread these photons over a 32 x 32 pixel CCD and one has the readout system of a monitor

  14. Radiation imaging with a new scintillator and a CMOS camera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurosawa, S.; Shoji, Y.; Pejchal, Jan; Yokota, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, Jul (2015), C07015. ISSN 1748-0221 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillators * scintillation and light emission processes * image processin Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.399, year: 2014

  15. Visualization, imaging and new preclinical diagnostics in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innovative strategies in cancer radiotherapy are stimulated by the growing knowledge on cellular and molecular tumor biology, tumor pathophysiology, and tumor microenvironment. In terms of tumor diagnostics and therapy monitoring, the reliable delineation of tumor boundaries and the assessment of tumor heterogeneity are increasingly complemented by the non-invasive characterization of functional and molecular processes, moving preclinical and clinical imaging from solely assessing tumor morphology towards the visualization of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Functional and molecular imaging techniques allow for the non-invasive characterization of tissues in vivo, using different modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET) and optical imaging (OI). With novel therapeutic concepts combining optimized radiotherapy with molecularly targeted agents focusing on tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and cell death, the non-invasive assessment of tumor microcirculation and tissue water diffusion, together with strategies for imaging the mechanisms of cellular injury and repair is of particular interest. Characterizing the tumor microenvironment prior to and in response to irradiation will help to optimize the outcome of radiotherapy. These novel concepts of personalized multi-modal cancer therapy require careful pre-treatment stratification as well as a timely and efficient therapy monitoring to maximize patient benefit on an individual basis. Functional and molecular imaging techniques are key in this regard to open novel opportunities for exploring and understanding the underlying mechanisms with the perspective to optimize therapeutic concepts and translate them into a personalized form of radiotherapy in the near future

  16. New method for imaging epicardial motion with scattered radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for monitoring cardiac motion is described which employs the secondary radiation emerging from the thorax during fluoroscopic x-ray examination of the heart. The motion of selected points on the heart's epicardial surface can be investigated by detecting the intensity variations of radiation scattered in the local vicinity of the heart-lung border. Also discussed are the radiation detectors and signal processing electronics used to produce a voltage analog depicting the periodic displacements of the heart surface. Digital data processing methods are described which are used to accomplish a transformation from a time scale for representing surface motion, to a frequency scale that is better suited for the quantitative analysis of the heart's myocardial dynamics. The dynamic radiographic technique is compared to other methods such as electrocardiography, phonocardiography, radarkymography, and echocardiography; which are also used to sense the dynamic state of the heart. A three-dimensional Monte Carlo computer code is used to investigate the transport of x-radiation in the canine thorax. The Monte Carlo computer studies are used to explore the capabilities and limitations of the dynamic radiograph as it is used to sense motions of the canine heart. Animal studies were conducted with the dynamic radiograph to determine the reproducibility of the examination procedure. Canine case studies are reported showing the effects of increased myocardial contractility resulting from intervention with these inotropic agents

  17. Radiation exposure and mortality risk from CT and PET imaging of patients with malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To quantify radiation exposure and mortality risk from computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in patients with malignant lymphoma (Hodgkin's disease [HD] or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [NHL]). First, organ doses were assessed for a typical diagnostic work-up in children with HD and adults with NHL. Subsequently, life tables were constructed for assessment of radiation risks, also taking into account the disease-related mortality. In children with HD, cumulative effective dose from medical imaging ranged from 66 mSv (newborn) to 113 mSv (15 years old). In adults with NHL the cumulative effective dose from medical imaging was 97 mSv. Average fractions of radiation-induced deaths for children with HD [without correction for disease-related mortality in brackets] were 0.4% [0.6%] for boys and 0.7% [1.1%] for girls, and for adults with NHL 0.07% [0.28%] for men and 0.09% [0.37%] for women. Taking into account the disease-related reduction in life expectancy of patients with malignant lymphoma results in a higher overall mortality but substantial lower incidence of radiation induced deaths. The modest radiation risk that results from imaging with CT and 18F-FDG PET can be considered as justified, but imaging should be performed with care, especially in children. (orig.)

  18. 3D ultrasound Nakagami imaging for radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Bruner, Debrorah; Tridandapani, Srini; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis is a debilitating side-effect affecting up to 80% of women receiving radiotherapy for their gynecological (GYN) malignancies. Despite the significant incidence and severity, little research has been conducted to identify the pathophysiologic changes of vaginal toxicity. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that ultrasound Nakagami shape and PDF parameters can be used to quantify radiation-induced vaginal toxicity. These Nakagami parameters are derived from the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals to capture the physical properties (e.g., arrangement and distribution) of the biological tissues. In this paper, we propose to expand this Nakagami imaging concept from 2D to 3D to fully characterize radiation-induced changes to the vaginal wall within the radiation treatment field. A pilot study with 5 post-radiotherapy GYN patients was conducted using a clinical ultrasound scanner (6 MHz) with a mechanical stepper. A serial of 2D ultrasound images, with radio-frequency (RF) signals, were acquired at 1 mm step size. The 2D Nakagami shape and PDF parameters were calculated from the RF signal envelope with a sliding window, and then 3D Nakagami parameter images were generated from the parallel 2D images. This imaging method may be useful as we try to monitor radiation-induced vaginal injury, and address vaginal toxicities and sexual dysfunction in women after radiotherapy for GYN malignancies.

  19. Radiation exposure and mortality risk from CT and PET imaging of patients with malignant lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nievelstein, R.A.J.; Kwee, T.C.; Beek, F.J.A.; Mali, W.P.T.M. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (E 01.132), Utrecht (Netherlands); Quarles van Ufford, H.M.E. [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Bierings, M.B. [University Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Ludwig, I. [University Medical Center, Department of Hematology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Klerk, J.M.H. de [Meander Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Bruin, P.W. de; Geleijns, J. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    To quantify radiation exposure and mortality risk from computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in patients with malignant lymphoma (Hodgkin's disease [HD] or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [NHL]). First, organ doses were assessed for a typical diagnostic work-up in children with HD and adults with NHL. Subsequently, life tables were constructed for assessment of radiation risks, also taking into account the disease-related mortality. In children with HD, cumulative effective dose from medical imaging ranged from 66 mSv (newborn) to 113 mSv (15 years old). In adults with NHL the cumulative effective dose from medical imaging was 97 mSv. Average fractions of radiation-induced deaths for children with HD [without correction for disease-related mortality in brackets] were 0.4% [0.6%] for boys and 0.7% [1.1%] for girls, and for adults with NHL 0.07% [0.28%] for men and 0.09% [0.37%] for women. Taking into account the disease-related reduction in life expectancy of patients with malignant lymphoma results in a higher overall mortality but substantial lower incidence of radiation induced deaths. The modest radiation risk that results from imaging with CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET can be considered as justified, but imaging should be performed with care, especially in children. (orig.)

  20. Multiscale registration of planning CT and daily cone beam CT images for adaptive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is the incorporation of daily images in the radiotherapy treatment process so that the treatment plan can be evaluated and modified to maximize the amount of radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to healthy tissue. Registration of planning images with daily images is thus an important component of ART. In this article, the authors report their research on multiscale registration of planning computed tomography (CT) images with daily cone beam CT (CBCT) images. The multiscale algorithm is based on the hierarchical multiscale image decomposition of E. Tadmor, S. Nezzar, and L. Vese [Multiscale Model. Simul. 2(4), pp. 554-579 (2004)]. Registration is achieved by decomposing the images to be registered into a series of scales using the (BV, L2) decomposition and initially registering the coarsest scales of the image using a landmark-based registration algorithm. The resulting transformation is then used as a starting point to deformably register the next coarse scales with one another. This procedure is iterated at each stage using the transformation computed by the previous scale registration as the starting point for the current registration. The authors present the results of studies of rectum, head-neck, and prostate CT-CBCT registration, and validate their registration method quantitatively using synthetic results in which the exact transformations our known, and qualitatively using clinical deformations in which the exact results are not known.

  1. The direct measurement using an imaging plate for coincidence of radiation centre and laser position in external radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method of quality assurance has been studied to measure coincidence of the radiation centre and a patient-setup laser position on a transverse plane to the beam at the isocentre. This measurement is achieved by using an imaging plate (IP). When radiation is applied to an IP, the energy is stored as trapped electrons. The number of electrons is decreased by local laser exposure. As a result, the radiation field produced by external beam irradiation is recorded as 'positive' information and the position of the patient-setup laser is recorded as 'negative' on an IP. The advantages of this method are the direct measurement, short time and high resolution. These are required for daily and monthly quality checks. We confirmed the advantage of this method by an experiment using a proton beam. (note)

  2. Advanced data readout technique for Multianode Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube applicable in radiation imaging detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the best performing PSPMT tubes from Hamamatsu and Burle are designed with a pad-matrix anode layout. However, for obtaining a high resolution, a small-sized anode photomultiplier tubes are preferable; these tubes may have 64, 256 or 1024 anodes per tube. If the tubes are used in array to get a larger area detector, the number of analog channels may range from hundreds to thousands. Multichannel analog readout requires special electronics ICs, ASICs etc., which are attached to multichannel DAQ system. As a result, the data file and data processing time will be increased. Therefore, this readout could not be performed in a small project. Usually, most of radiation imaging applications allow the use of analog data processing in front-end electronics, significantly reducing the number of the detector's output lines to data acquisition without reducing the image quality. The idea of pad-matrix decoupling circuit with gain correction was invented and intensively tested in JLab. Several versions of PSPMT readout electronics were produced and studied. All developments were done and optimized specifically for radiation imaging projects. They covered high resolution SPECT, high speed PET, fast neutron imaging, and single tube and multi tube array systems. This paper presents and discusses the summary of the observed results in readout electronics evaluation with different PSPMTs and radiation imaging systems, as well as the advantages and limitations of the developed approach to radiation imaging detectors readout.

  3. Radiation safety and quality in diagnostic x-ray imaging 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The obligations of the medical exposure directive (97/43/Euratom) for hospitals dominate the current activities in radiation protection in medical radiology. The directive gives special emphasis to radiation exposure of children, to examinations with high radiation doses and to radiation exposure in health screening programmes. The most important examinations with high doses are radiological interventions, where even acute skin effects are possible, and the computed tomography where the number of CT examinations makes only about 5% from the total number of x-ray examinations but the collective effective dose about 40% from the combined collective effective dose of all x-ray examinations. In the research projects financed by the European Commission, radiation exposures to paediatric patients have been measured in radiography, fluoroscopy and CT, and various dose assessment methods have been compared to develop a method for national follow-up of patients' radiation dose. The newest research project is focused on dosimetry and quality assurance in interventional radiology and digital imaging. Other actual topics are the development of radiation protection regulations and quality systems, education and training programmes, and clinical audits. This report deals with new radiation protection guides and recommendations and the education and training of radiological staff in radiation protection. One important topic is the development of national follow-up method of radiation exposure to patients and comparison of various dose assessment methods. Quality assurance in health care and in paediatric radiology, and the acceptance test and quality assurance measurements of radiological equipment are also described. (orig.)

  4. Phantom evaluation of a commercially available three modality image guided radiation therapy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe a detailed evaluation of the capabilities of imaging and image registration systems available with Varian linear accelerators for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Specifically, they present modulation transfer function curves for megavoltage planar, kilovoltage (kV) planar, and cone beam computed tomography imaging systems and compare these with conventional computed tomography. While kV planar imaging displayed the highest spatial resolution, all IGRT imaging techniques were assessed as adequate for their intended purpose. They have also characterized the image registration software available for use in conjunction with these imaging systems through a comprehensive phantom study involving translations in three orthogonal directions. All combinations of imaging systems and image registration software were found to be accurate, although the planar kV imaging system with automatic registration was generally superior, with both accuracy and precision of the order of 1 mm, under the conditions tested. Based on their phantom study, the attainable accuracy for rigid body translations using any of the features available with Varian equipment will more likely be limited by the resolution of the couch readouts than by inherent limitations in the imaging systems and image registration software. Overall, the accuracy and precision of currently available IGRT technology exceed published experience with the accuracy and precision of contouring for planning.

  5. From 'Image Gently' to image intelligently: a personalized perspective on diagnostic radiation risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillerman, R.P. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The risk of ionizing radiation from diagnostic imaging has been a popular topic in the radiology literature and lay press. Communicating the magnitude of risk to patients and caregivers is problematic because of the uncertainty in estimates derived principally from epidemiological studies of large populations, and alternative approaches are needed to provide a scientific basis for personalized risk estimates. The underlying patient disease and life expectancy greatly influence risk projections. Research into the biological mechanisms of radiation-induced DNA damage and repair challenges the linear no-threshold dose-response assumption and reveals that individuals vary in sensitivity to radiation. Studies of decision-making psychology show that individuals are highly susceptible to irrational biases when judging risks. Truly informed medical decision-making that respects patient autonomy requires appropriate framing of radiation risks in perspective with other risks and with the benefits of imaging. To follow the principles of personalized medicine and treat patients according to their specific phenotypic and personality profiles, diagnostic imaging should optimally be tailored not only to patient size, body region and clinical indication, but also to underlying disease conditions, radio-sensitivity and risk perception and preferences that vary among individuals. (orig.)

  6. Systems and methods for imaging using radiation from laser produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard-Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Cowan, Thomas E.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Rassuchine, Jennifer

    2009-06-30

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides systems and methods for imaging a subject using radiation emitted from a laser produced plasma generating by irradiating a target with a laser. In particular examples, the target includes at least one radiation enhancing component, such as a fluor, cap, or wire. In further examples, the target has a metal layer and an internal surface defining an internal apex, the internal apex of less than about 15 .mu.m, such as less than about 1 .mu.m. The targets may take a variety of shapes, including cones, pyramids, and hemispheres. Certain aspects of the present disclosure provide improved imaging of a subject, such as improved medical images of a radiation dose than typical conventional methods and systems.

  7. An image analysis technique for detection of radiation-induced DNA fragmentation after CHEF electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHEF-electrophoresis was used as a technique to detect radiation-induced DNA breakage with special emphasis to biological relevant X-ray doses (0-10 Gy). Fluorescence detection of DNA-fragments using a sensitive image analysis system was directly compared with conventional scintillation counting of 3H-thymidine prelabelled DNA in HeLa S3 cells. It is shown that the image analysis-based fluorescence detection of fragmented DNA after ionizing radiation is as sensitive and reproducible as detection using radioactively prelabelled cells without the putative shortcomings of fluorescence detection methods described earlier (Blocher and Kuhni 1990). Therefore, the image analysis-based detection of radiation-induced DNA fragmentation after CHEF electrophoresis seems to be the most reliable method for applications to non-cycling cells and biopsy material. (Author)

  8. Computation of radiative image formation in isolated source and collimated irradiation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the ray effect, it is not suitable to employ the discrete ordinates method to calculate the radiation field and the image-formation process in radiative problems with isolated radiative sources (such as point and line sources, isolated medium or boundary source). In this paper, a hybrid method, named Monte Carlo-discrete ordinates method (Macadam) is developed. Firstly, the Monte Carlo method is used to calculate the emission process. Secondly, the discrete ordinates method is employed to calculate the scattering process, correspondingly, an alternative energy partitioning method is proposed to combine the above two conventional methods. Thirdly, the DOS+ISW algorithm (JQSRT, 2003, 78: 437-453) is used to calculate the image-formation process. Finally, the MCDOM is applied to computing the image formation of an endoscope, which was used to study the hydrodynamics of circulating fluidized beds (Powder Technology, 2001;114:71-83)

  9. Computation of radiative image formation in isolated source and collimated irradiation problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hongshun [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)]. E-mail: lihs_hust@yahoo.com.cn; Werther, Joachim [Chemical Engineering I, Technical University Hamburg-Harburg, Denickestrasse 15, 21071 Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-01-15

    Due to the ray effect, it is not suitable to employ the discrete ordinates method to calculate the radiation field and the image-formation process in radiative problems with isolated radiative sources (such as point and line sources, isolated medium or boundary source). In this paper, a hybrid method, named Monte Carlo-discrete ordinates method (Macadam) is developed. Firstly, the Monte Carlo method is used to calculate the emission process. Secondly, the discrete ordinates method is employed to calculate the scattering process, correspondingly, an alternative energy partitioning method is proposed to combine the above two conventional methods. Thirdly, the DOS+ISW algorithm (JQSRT, 2003, 78: 437-453) is used to calculate the image-formation process. Finally, the MCDOM is applied to computing the image formation of an endoscope, which was used to study the hydrodynamics of circulating fluidized beds (Powder Technology, 2001;114:71-83)

  10. VERITAS The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System

    CERN Document Server

    Weekes, T C; Biller, S D; Breslin, A C; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Cawley, M F; Dingus, B L; Fazio, G G; Fegan, D J; Finley, J; Fishman, G; Gaidos, J A; Gillanders, G H; Gorham, P W; Grindlay, J E; Hillas, A M; Huchra, J P; Kaaret, P E; Kertzman, M P; Kieda, D B; Krennrich, F; Lamb, R C; Lang, M J; Marscher, A P; Matz, S; McKay, T; Müller, D; Ong, R; Purcell, W; Rose, J; Sembroski, G H; Seward, F D; Slane, P O; Swordy, S P; Tümer, T O; Ulmer, M P; Urban, M; Wilkes, B J

    1997-01-01

    A next generation atmospheric Cherenkov observatory is described based on the Whipple Observatory $\\gamma$-ray telescope. A total of nine such imaging telescopes will be deployed in an array that will permit the maximum versatility and give high sensitivity in the 50 GeV - 50 TeV band (with maximum sensitivity from 100 GeV to 10 TeV).

  11. Mitigation technique for use of CMOS image sensors in megajoule class laser radiative environment

    OpenAIRE

    Goiffon, Vincent; Girard, Sylvain; Paillet, Philippe; Magnan, Pierre; Chabane, Aziouz; Rousseau, Adrien; Darbon, Stéphane; Cervantes, Paola; Bourgade, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Presented is a new mitigation technique to improve the radiation tolerance of CMOS image sensors to the radiation constraints associated to the fusion by inertial confinement experiments at megajoule class laser facilities. Using the global reset mode, results acquired at the OMEGA facility show the efficiency of this technique to reduce by more than 70% the number of white pixels induced by the mixed 14%MeV neutron and %-ray pulse.

  12. Simulation of X-ray Photon and Radiation Dose for Nano CT Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the simulation of x-ray photon and radiation dose used in nano radiographic imaging system. It is well known that smaller size of x-ray focal beam has derived greater benefit to nano-scale resolution (4 photons/mm2/sec) in this CCD detector. Finally radiation dose simulation also furnished the evaluation of optimal parameter of X-ray exposure condition with acceptable dose for in-vivo mouse sample. (Author)

  13. Mitigation technique for use of CMOS image sensors in mega-joule class laser radiative environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented is a new mitigation technique to improve the radiation tolerance of CMOS image sensors to the radiation constraints associated to the fusion by inertial confinement experiments at mega-joule class laser facilities. Using the global reset mode, results acquired at the OMEGA facility show the efficiency of this technique to reduce by more than 70% the number of white pixels induced by the mixed 14 MeV neutron and gamma-ray pulse. (authors)

  14. Radiation exposure and mortality risk from CT and PET imaging of patients with malignant lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nievelstein, R. A. J.; Quarles van Ufford, H.M.E.; Kwee, T. C.; Bierings, M.B.; Ludwig, I.; Beek, F. J. A.; de Klerk, J. M. H.; Mali, W P Th M; de Bruin, P.W.; Geleijns, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To quantify radiation exposure and mortality risk from computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in patients with malignant lymphoma (Hodgkin’s disease [HD] or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma [NHL]). Methods First, organ doses were assessed for a typical diagnostic work-up in children with HD and adults with NHL. Subsequently, life tables were constructed for assessment of radiation risks, also taking into account the diseas...

  15. Measurement of regional compliance using 4DCT images for assessment of radiation treatment1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Hualiang; Jin, Jian-Yue; Ajlouni, Munther; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced damage, such as inflammation and fibrosis, can compromise ventilation capability of local functional units (alveoli) of the lung. Ventilation function as measured with ventilation images, however, is often complicated by the underlying mechanical variations. The purpose of this study is to present a 4DCT-based method to measure the regional ventilation capability, namely, regional compliance, for the evaluation of radiation-induced lung damage.

  16. Parametric study of total radiation power loss from the Aditya tokamak using infrared imaging video bolometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared Imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a new type of total radiation power loss measurement technique which provides the time resolved two-dimensional images of the line integrated plasma radiation with wide field of view. An IRVB system has been designed, developed, calibrated and tested for its performance and is to be installed on the ADITYA tokamak. This ADITYA IRVB has a broad radiation absorption band ∼1 eV to 85 keV, wide Field of View 46° x 46°, 9 x 9 bolometer pixel array (81 channels), data acquisition rate 166 Hz with a spatial resolution at plasma mid plane of ∼ 7 cm and the Noise Equivalent Power Density (NEPD) ∼200 μW/cm2. Using the IRVB, 2-D radiation brightness images were obtained and analyzed. The present paper describes IRVB data analysis scheme and estimation of total radiation power loss from the ADITYA plasma. Parametric variations of the total radiated power loss obtained from analyzed IRVB images with density, temperature (Te) and plasma current (Ip) had have been reported here. It is found that during plasma current flat-top the total radiation power loss varies from 20% to 40% of the total input ohmic power for different plasma discharges. Also, the radiated power fraction f∼Prad/Pin has been found to be increasing with the increasing average plasma density and decreases with increasing Te and Ip . The recent results also confirm the previous measurements carried out on the ADITYA tokamak using AXUV-Bolometer. (author)

  17. PET-guided delineation of radiation therapy treatment volumes: a survey of image segmentation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, anatomical CT and MR images were used to delineate the gross tumour volumes (GTVs) for radiotherapy treatment planning. The capabilities offered by modern radiation therapy units and the widespread availability of combined PET/CT scanners stimulated the development of biological PET imaging-guided radiation therapy treatment planning with the aim to produce highly conformal radiation dose distribution to the tumour. One of the most difficult issues facing PET-based treatment planning is the accurate delineation of target regions from typical blurred and noisy functional images. The major problems encountered are image segmentation and imperfect system response function. Image segmentation is defined as the process of classifying the voxels of an image into a set of distinct classes. The difficulty in PET image segmentation is compounded by the low spatial resolution and high noise characteristics of PET images. Despite the difficulties and known limitations, several image segmentation approaches have been proposed and used in the clinical setting including thresholding, edge detection, region growing, clustering, stochastic models, deformable models, classifiers and several other approaches. A detailed description of the various approaches proposed in the literature is reviewed. Moreover, we also briefly discuss some important considerations and limitations of the widely used techniques to guide practitioners in the field of radiation oncology. The strategies followed for validation and comparative assessment of various PET segmentation approaches are described. Future opportunities and the current challenges facing the adoption of PET-guided delineation of target volumes and its role in basic and clinical research are also addressed. (orig.)

  18. Structural inhomogeneity in mammography quality control phantoms detected by refraction-enhanced synchrotron radiation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation imaging with the refraction-enhancement mode visualized structural inhomogeneities in phantoms used for image quality control of mammography. Eight phantoms were examined, all of which were manufactured in the United States and approved by the American College of Radiology as dedicated phantoms. In addition to fiber- and mass-mimicking test objects, each phantom has 5 groups of calcification specks of various sizes. Synchrotron radiation (SR) imaging was performed at SPring-8, a synchrotron radiation facility in Japan. Images were obtained with monochromatic 20-keV x-ray beams, a radiation field of 15 mm x 26 mm at a sample plane, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with a resolution of 6 micrometers as a detector, and a sample-to-detector distance of 10 to 11 m. Two hundred and forty specks were evaluated in total in the SR images, and the surrounding area of each speck was also included. Evaluation of the images showed that 14 crack-like structures were depicted near specks, and there were 62 specks with attached void(s) or air bubble(s). Refraction-enhanced SR imaging sensitively detected structural inhomogeneities and abnormalities in phantoms which were implicitly agreed to have a homogeneous matrix and test objects without foreign substances. A possible manufacturing-dependent quality issue was identified. The effect of inhomogeneities detected by SR imaging on visual scoring of specks could not be identified in the tested phantoms; this should be assessed on images of other phantoms in a future study. (author)

  19. Ultra low radiation dose digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging using low rank constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Kai; Li, Yinsheng; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Wu, Yijing; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-03-01

    In this work we developed a novel denoising algorithm for DSA image series. This algorithm takes advantage of the low rank nature of the DSA image sequences to enable a dramatic reduction in radiation and/or contrast doses in DSA imaging. Both spatial and temporal regularizers were introduced in the optimization algorithm to further reduce noise. To validate the method, in vivo animal studies were conducted with a Siemens Artis Zee biplane system using different radiation dose levels and contrast concentrations. Both conventionally processed DSA images and the DSA images generated using the novel denoising method were compared using absolute noise standard deviation and the contrast to noise ratio (CNR). With the application of the novel denoising algorithm for DSA, image quality can be maintained with a radiation dose reduction by a factor of 20 and/or a factor of 2 reduction in contrast dose. Image processing is completed on a GPU within a second for a 10s DSA data acquisition.

  20. Radiation Reduction Capabilities of a Next-Generation Pediatric Imaging Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Luke J; Moran, Martine; Torgeson, Jenna N; Hokanson, John S

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify patient radiation exposure for a single interventional procedure during transition from an adult catheterization laboratory to a next-generation imaging system with pediatric settings, and to compare this radiation data to published benchmarks. Radiation exposure occurs with any X-ray-directed pediatric catheterization. Technologies and imaging techniques that limit dose while preserving image quality benefit patient care. Patient radiation dose metrics, air kerma, and dose-area product (DAP) were retrospectively obtained for patients patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure on a standard imaging system (Group 1, n = 11) and a next-generation pediatric imaging system (Group 2, n = 10) with air-gap technique. Group 2 radiation dose metrics were then compared to published benchmarks. Patient demographics, procedural technique, PDA dimensions, closure devices, and fluoroscopy time were similar for the two groups. Air kerma and DAP decreased by 65-70% in Group 2 (p values value = 0.06); therefore, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted that confirmed significantly lower dose measures in Group 2. This degree of dose reduction was similar when Group 2 data (Kerma 28 mGy, DAP 199 µGy m(2)) was compared to published benchmarks for PDA closure (Kerma 76 mGy, DAP 500 µGy m(2)). This is the first clinical study documenting the radiation reduction capabilities of a next-generation pediatric imaging platform. The true benefit of this dose reduction will be seen in patients requiring complex and often recurrent catheterizations. PMID:26215767

  1. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3   ±   1.0 and 3.3   ±   3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target. (note)

  2. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3   ±   1.0 and 3.3   ±   3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target. This paper was presented at RSNA 2013 and was carried out at Kanazawa University, JAPAN.

  3. Radiation signatures from an external relativist electron beam

    OpenAIRE

    Wee, Kyoum Bok

    1988-01-01

    X-band radiation has been observed which occurs when an electron beam travelling in air traverses an aluminum plate. The radiation pattern is more complicated than can be explained with a simplified model of Cerenkov radiation from air and transition radiation from the aluminum-air interface. The empirical observation is that the peak angle decreases with energy until about 70 MeV, then increases with energy. The angular width of the peak distribution shows a similar behavior with energy. The...

  4. Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in medical X-ray imaging have enabled the development of new techniques capable of assessing not only bone quantity but also structure. This article provides (a) a brief review of the current X-ray methods used for quantitative assessment of the skeleton, (b) data on the levels of radiation exposure associated with these methods and (c) information about radiation safety issues. Radiation doses associated with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry are very low. However, as with any X-ray imaging technique, each particular examination must always be clinically justified. When an examination is justified, the emphasis must be on dose optimisation of imaging protocols. Dose optimisation is more important for paediatric examinations because children are more vulnerable to radiation than adults. Methods based on multi-detector CT (MDCT) are associated with higher radiation doses. New 3D volumetric hip and spine quantitative computed tomography (QCT) techniques and high-resolution MDCT for evaluation of bone structure deliver doses to patients from 1 to 3 mSv. Low-dose protocols are needed to reduce radiation exposure from these methods and minimise associated health risks. (orig.)

  5. Injectable Colloidal Gold for Use in Intrafractional 2D Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Rydhog, Jonas S.; Christensen, Anders Nymark; Hansen, Anders Elias; Bruun, Linda Maria; Schaarup-Jensen, Henrik; von Wenck, Asger Stevner; Borresen, Betina; Kristensen, Annemarie T.; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Kjær, Andreas; Conradsen, Knut; Larsen, Rasmus; af Rosenschold, Per Munck; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2015-01-01

    often inserted inside the tumor to improve IGRT precision and to enable monitoring of the tumor position during radiation therapy. In the present article, a liquid fiducial tissue marker is presented, which can be injected into tumor tissue using thin and flexible needles. The liquid fiducial has high...... radio-opacity, which allows for marker-based image guidance in 2D and 3D X-ray imaging during radiation therapy. This is achieved by surface-engineering gold nanoparticles to be highly compatible with a carbohydrate-based gelation matrix. The new fiducial marker is investigated in mice where they are...

  6. Comparison of radiation exposure and associated radiation-induced cancer risks from mammography and molecular imaging of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent studies have raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging procedures. Little has been published regarding the relative exposure and risks associated with breast imaging techniques such as breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI), molecular breast imaging (MBI), or positron emission mammography (PEM). The purpose of this article was to estimate and compare the risks of radiation-induced cancer from mammography and techniques such as PEM, BSGI, and MBI in a screening environment. Methods: The authors used a common scheme for all estimates of cancer incidence and mortality based on the excess absolute risk model from the BEIR VII report. The lifetime attributable risk model was used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality. All estimates of cancer incidence and mortality were based on a population of 100 000 females followed from birth to age 80 and adjusted for the fraction that survives to various ages between 0 and 80. Assuming annual screening from ages 40 to 80 and from ages 50 to 80, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality attributed to digital mammography, screen-film mammography, MBI, BSGI, and PEM was calculated. The corresponding cancer incidence and mortality from natural background radiation was calculated as a useful reference. Assuming a 15%-32% reduction in mortality from screening, the benefit/risk ratio for the different imaging modalities was evaluated. Results: Using conventional doses of 925 MBq Tc-99m sestamibi for MBI and BSGI and 370 MBq F-18 FDG for PEM, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality were found to be 15-30 times higher than digital mammography. The benefit/risk ratio for annual digital mammography was >50:1 for both the 40-80 and 50-80 screening groups, but dropped to 3:1 for the 40-49 age group. If the primary use of MBI, BSGI, and PEM is in women with dense breast tissue, then the administered doses need to be in the range

  7. Implementation of radiation image detector based on lutetium and gadolinium phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Shin, J.; Oh, K.; Noh, S.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Hong, J.; Park, S.; Kim, J.; Nam, S.

    2013-03-01

    The clinical use of radiation image detectors is influenced by the degree to which patients are exposed to radiation. Phosphors are being used as the radiation receptor materials in a number of radiation imaging systems for the detection of radiation. Rare earth phosphors such as those of Gd, Y, Lu, and La are attracting attention in particular as they exhibit improved properties. However, there has not been any research on the conditions for the synthesis of these phosphors, including the optimal concentrations in which the sensitizer should be added to them. Therefore, in this study, the optimal conditions for the phosphor synthesis were determined by analyzing the characteristics of the phosphors fabricated using various sensitizer concentrations. The deposition method used to form films of the synthesized phosphors was screen printing. This technique is suitable for large-area deposition and allowed for imaging to be performed in conjunction with a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image detector. The phosphors synthesized were Gd2O3:Eu and Lu2O3:Eu, and the sensitizer used was citric acid, which was added in varying concentrations (0.00-0.05 g) to the phosphors during synthesis. Films of the phosphors 5 × 5 cm in size, which was the size of the active area of the CMOS image sensor, and 100-250 μm in thickness were formed. The structural characteristics of the phosphors were determined through X-ray diffraction analyses and scanning electron microscopy, and the optical characteristics through photoluminescence (PL) measurements. A CMOS-based X-ray detector was manufactured by attaching the phosphor films to the CMOS image sensor and evaluating the modulation transfer functions of the images obtained. The results showed that of all the phosphor samples synthesized, the Gd2O3:Eu and Lu2O3:Eu samples synthesized using 0.02 g of citric acid exhibited the best luminescence characteristics.

  8. Defects of a mammography quality control phantom visualized by synchrotron radiation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) imaging of an RMI 156 mammography quality control phantom, serial number 156-15330, revealed some defects which degraded the visibility of calcification specks. SR imaging was performed at SPring-8, in Harima, Japan by using a monochromatic energy of 20 keV with a field-of-view of 24 X 24 mm. Different kinds of images were obtained by changing sample-to-detector distances; absorption images and refraction-enhanced images. Specks were embedded in a wax matrix and were imaged as black in an absorption image. In a refraction-enhanced image, they were imaged as a black region with white margins. Foreign objects with opposite contrast were detected near, or overlapped with, some specks. As they were depicted as white in the absorption image and as white with a black margin in the refraction-enhanced image, it seemed that they had low X-ray attenuation and a low refraction index compared with the surrounding wax. They might presumable be air bubbles. Visibility of specks in an absorption image was seriously interfered with when those object(s) overlapped with specks. This kind of defect may cause a difficulty in meeting quality assurance specifications when a facility inadvertently purchases defective phantoms. (author)

  9. Reduction of radiation dose and imaging costs in scoliosis radiography. Application of large-screen image intensifier photofluorography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manninen, H.; Kiekara, O.; Soimakallio, S.; Vainio, J.

    1988-04-01

    Photofluorography using a large-field image intensifier (Siemens Optilux 57) was applied to scoliosis radiography and compared with a full-size rare-earth screen/film technique. When scoliosis radiography (PA-projection) was performed on 25 adolescent patients, the photofluorographs were found to be of comparable diagnostic quality with full-size films. A close correspondence between the imaging techniques was found in the Cobb angle measurements as well as in the grading of rotation with the pedicle method. The use of photofluorography results in a radiation dose reduction of about one-half and considerable savings in direct imaging costs and archive space. In our opinion the method is particularly well-suited for follow-up and screening evaluation of scoliosis, but in tall patients the image field size of 40 x 40 cm restricts its usefulness as initial examination.

  10. Design of a wire imaging synchrotron radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper documents the design of a detector invented to measure the positions of synchrotron radiation beams for the precision energy spectrometers of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The energy measurements involve the determination, on a pulse-by-pulse basis, of the separation of pairs of intense beams of synchrotron photons in the MeV energy range. The detector intercepts the beams with arrays of fine wires. The ejection of Compton recoil electrons results in charges being developed in the wires, thus enabling a determination of beam positions. 10 refs., 4 figs

  11. In situ study on dendrite growth of metallic alloy by a synchrotron radiation imaging technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This study was trying to observe the real-time dendrite growth of Sn-Bi and Sn-Pb binary alloys by a synchrotron radiation imaging technology.The imaging system includes an intense and high brightness synchrotron radiation source,a high-resolution and fast-readout charge coupled device camera,an alloy sample and a Bridgman solidification system.The imaging experiments were done at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility with an updated synchrotron radiation imaging technique,diffraction-enhanced imaging,which was firstly used to study the dendrite growth of metallic alloy.A series of growth behavior and morphology evolution of dendrite have been in situ observed,such as columnar-to-equiaxed transition,dendrite competition,dendrite fragmentation and floating,etc.,which can offer the direct proofs to verify or improve the solidification theories of metallic alloy.This research opens a novel window for the study of alloy solidification and enables the unambiguous understanding of solidification processes in optically opaque,metallic alloys.

  12. Radiation exposure and image quality in x-Ray diagnostic radiology physical principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aichinger, Horst; Joite-Barfuß, Sigrid; Säbel, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    The largest contribution to radiation exposure to the population as a whole arises from diagnostic X-rays. Protecting the patient from radiation is a major aim of modern health policy, and an understanding of the relationship between radiation dose and image quality is of pivotal importance in optimising medical diagnostic radiology. In this volume the data provided for exploring these concerns are partly based on X-ray spectra, measured on diagnostic X-ray tube assemblies, and are supplemented by the results of measurements on phantoms and simulation calculations.

  13. Segmentation of Synchrotron Radiation micro-Computed Tomography Images using Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research on applications of segmentation algorithms to Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray micro-Computed Tomography (SR-μCT) is an open problem, due to the interesting and well-known characteristics of SR images, such as the phase contrast effect. The Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts (EMvGC) algorithm represents state-of-art segmentation algorithm, presenting an enormous potential of application in SR-μCT imaging. We describe the application of the algorithm EMvGC with swap move for the segmentation of bone images acquired at the ELETTRA Laboratory (Trieste, Italy). - Highlights: ► Microstructures of Wistar rats' ribs are investigated with Synchrotron Radiation μCT imaging. ► The present work is part of a research on the effects of radiotherapy on the thoracic region. ► Application of the Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts algorithm for segmentation is described.

  14. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S; Mellor, Matthew P; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors. PMID:26450669

  15. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Mellor, Matthew P.; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J.

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors.

  16. Investigation of radiation keeping property of barite coated cloth via image processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preservative clothes which are able to absorb radiation beam are needed not only for saving people working at radioactive environment but also for saving others from natural and man-made radiation sources we are exposed in daily life. Barite is a mineral which can be used for armour plating because of high atomic numbered element barium constituent of barite. In this study, armour plating property of barite was applied to fabrics. Barite coated fabric having characteristic of keeping radiation was obtained by penetrating barite on cloth via coating method. Radiation keeping property of fabrics obtained was determined via image processing. The results of experiments showed that barite coated fabrics have blocked radiation more than normal fabrics have done.

  17. Investigation of radiation keeping property of barite coated cloth via image processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilincarslan, S.; Akkurt, I.; Molla, T.; Akarslan, F. [Department of Construction Education, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey); Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey); Department of Construction Education, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey); Textil Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta (Turkey)

    2012-09-06

    Preservative clothes which are able to absorb radiation beam are needed not only for saving people working at radioactive environment but also for saving others from natural and man-made radiation sources we are exposed in daily life. Barite is a mineral which can be used for armour plating because of high atomic numbered element barium constituent of barite. In this study, armour plating property of barite was applied to fabrics. Barite coated fabric having characteristic of keeping radiation was obtained by penetrating barite on cloth via coating method. Radiation keeping property of fabrics obtained was determined via image processing. The results of experiments showed that barite coated fabrics have blocked radiation more than normal fabrics have done.

  18. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer and erectile (dys)function: The role of imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incrocci, Luca [Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2005-10-01

    Incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) after radiotherapy reported in the literature varies from 7 to 72% after external-beam radiotherapy to 5-51% after brachytherapy. Most of these studies are retrospective, the definition of ED is variable and sexual functioning is frequently assessed by asking only one question. Already in the 1980's it was suggested that post-radiation ED was attributable to vascular damage. The most reliable method to assess vasculogenic ED is the use of the Doppler ultrasound. More recently, many studies have assessed the relationship between radiation dose and volume of the penile bulb and post-radiation ED, though the outcome is controversial. The penile structures and the neurovascular bundles are best seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore the use of a computer tomography scan/MRI image fusion can result in reducing the planning target volume and consequently the radiation dose to the penile bulb and bodies. If radiation induces vascular damage that causes ED, any means of reducing the dose to the pelvic vascular structures would likely decrease ED, therefore new radiation techniques such as the intensity modulated radiation therapy or the implant of fiducial markers can help decrease the margins and therefore ED.

  19. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer and erectile (dys)function: The role of imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) after radiotherapy reported in the literature varies from 7 to 72% after external-beam radiotherapy to 5-51% after brachytherapy. Most of these studies are retrospective, the definition of ED is variable and sexual functioning is frequently assessed by asking only one question. Already in the 1980's it was suggested that post-radiation ED was attributable to vascular damage. The most reliable method to assess vasculogenic ED is the use of the Doppler ultrasound. More recently, many studies have assessed the relationship between radiation dose and volume of the penile bulb and post-radiation ED, though the outcome is controversial. The penile structures and the neurovascular bundles are best seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore the use of a computer tomography scan/MRI image fusion can result in reducing the planning target volume and consequently the radiation dose to the penile bulb and bodies. If radiation induces vascular damage that causes ED, any means of reducing the dose to the pelvic vascular structures would likely decrease ED, therefore new radiation techniques such as the intensity modulated radiation therapy or the implant of fiducial markers can help decrease the margins and therefore ED

  20. Development of a multifunctional particle spectrometer for space radiation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For future exploration of the solar system, the European Space Agency (ESA) is planning missions to Mercury (BepiColombo), the Sun (SolarOrbiter) and to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. The expected intensity of radiation during such missions is hazardous for the scientific instruments and the satellite. To extend the lifetime of the satellite and its payload a multifunctional particle spectrometer (MPS) is being developed. The basic function of the MPS is to send an alarm signal to the satellite control system during periods of high radiation. In addition the MPS is a scientific instrument that will unfold the composition of the different contributing particles on-line by the dE/dx versus E method. The energy spectrum and angular distribution of the particles will be recorded as well. This article describes the main requirements and the base line design for the MPS. A readout scheme consisting of a 32 channel ASIC from IDEAS is proposed and the signal filtering algorithm will run on a digital signal processor based on FPGA technology. Results are shown from prototype calibration studies with a proton beam

  1. Evaluation of radiation dose and positioning accuracy on X-ray volume imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, and Cancer Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, C.-H. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, J.-K. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, and Cancer Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, K.-M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, and Cancer Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiological Technology, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Wu, T.-H. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, C.-J.; Chen, C.-L. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jason J.S. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw

    2008-05-15

    Linear accelerators equipped with X-ray volumetric cone-beam Imaging (XVI) system enable verification of location of patients and displacement of tumors for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The objective of this study is to evaluate the positioning accuracy using the XVI system for image-guided patient setup and to establish a lower-dose imaging protocol without sacrificing positioning accuracy for routine treatment courses. Several low-dose imaging protocols are proposed by modifying tube voltage from 120 to 100 kV and lowering tube current from 40 to 10 mA. The positioning accuracy of both bone and gray value registration methods provided by XVI system were also evaluated. Phantom study revealed that the gray value algorithm was more accurate than the bone algorithm in position and registration. However, both translational and rotational accuracies were less than 0.15 mm and 0.8' deg. at all dimensions, which were considered negligible in clinical applications. In addition, the lower-dose protocol (100 kV, 10 mA) produced relative much less radiation dose compared to the default CBCT protocol in the XVI system. In conclusion, our proposed lower-dose protocol results in significant radiation dose reduction without compromising positioning accuracy and may have the potential to be adopted for clinical usage in the future.

  2. Molecular-imaging-based dose painting – a novel paradigm for radiation therapy prescription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, Søren M.; Gregoire, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Dose painting is the prescription of a non-uniform radiation dose distribution to the target volume based on functional or molecular images shown to be indicative of the local risk of relapse. Two prototypical strategies for implementing this novel paradigm in radiation oncology are reviewed: sub-volume boosting and dose painting by numbers. Sub-volume boosting involves the selection of a “target within the target”, defined by image segmentation on the basis of the quantitative information in the image or morphologically, and this is related to image based target volume selection and delineation. Dose painting by numbers is a voxel-level prescription of dose based on a mathematical transformation of the image intensity of individual pixels. Quantitative use of images to decide both where and how to delivery radiation therapy in an individual case is also called theragnostic imaging. Dose painting targets are imaging surrogates for cellular or microenvironmental phenotypes associated with poor radioresponsiveness. In this review, the focus is on positron emission tomography (PET) tracers: FDG and choline as surrogates for tumor burden, FLT as a surrogate for proliferation (or cellular growth fraction) and hypoxia sensitive tracers including FMISO, EF3, EF5 and Cu-ATSM as surrogates of cellular hypoxia. Research advances supporting the clinico-biological rationale for dose painting are reviewed as are studies of the technical feasibility of optimizing and delivering realistic dose painted radiation therapy plans. Challenges and research priorities in this exciting research field are defined and a possible design for a randomized clinical trial of dose painting is presented. PMID:21356478

  3. Paediatric imaging radiation dose awareness and use of referral guidelines amongst radiology practitioners and radiographers

    OpenAIRE

    Portelli, Jonathan L.; McNulty, Jonathan P.; Bezzina, Paul; Rainford, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives are to investigate radiology practitioners’ and radiographers’ radiation dose awareness and use of referral guidelines for paediatric imaging examinations. Methods A prospective cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst radiology practitioners and radiographers working at a primary paediatric referral centre in Malta. Part of the survey asked participants to indicate the typical effective dose (ED) for several commonly performed paediatric imaging examinations, an...

  4. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Beaumont, Jonathan; Villa, Mario; Mellor, Matthew; Joyce, Malcolm John

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has bee...

  5. The iQID camera: An ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Brian W., E-mail: brian.miller@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); College of Optical Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Barrett, Harrison H.; Bradford Barber, H.; Furenlid, Lars R. [Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); College of Optical Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-12-11

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detector's response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The confirmed response to this broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated by particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. The spatial location and energy of individual particles are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, excellent detection efficiency for charged particles, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discriminate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is real-time, single-particle digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  6. Investigation of hybrid pixel detector arrays by synchrotron-radiation imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfen, L. [Institut fuer Synchrotronstrahlung (ISS/ANKA), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)]. E-mail: helfen@esrf.fr; Myagotin, A. [Institut fuer Synchrotronstrahlung (ISS/ANKA), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pernot, P. [Institut fuer Synchrotronstrahlung (ISS/ANKA), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); DiMichiel, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Mikulik, P. [Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Masaryk University, CZ-61137 Brno (Czech Republic); Berthold, A. [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren IZFP-D, D-01326 Dresden (Germany); Baumbach, T. [Institut fuer Synchrotronstrahlung (ISS/ANKA), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Synchrotron-radiation imaging was applied to the non-destructive testing of detector devices during their development cycle. Transmission imaging known as computed laminography was used to examine the microstructure of the interconnections in order to investigate the perfection of technological steps necessary for hybrid detector production. A characterisation of the solder bump microstructure can reveal production flaws such as missing or misaligned bumps, voids in bumps or bridges and thus give valuable information about the bonding process.

  7. Investigation of hybrid pixel detector arrays by synchrotron-radiation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron-radiation imaging was applied to the non-destructive testing of detector devices during their development cycle. Transmission imaging known as computed laminography was used to examine the microstructure of the interconnections in order to investigate the perfection of technological steps necessary for hybrid detector production. A characterisation of the solder bump microstructure can reveal production flaws such as missing or misaligned bumps, voids in bumps or bridges and thus give valuable information about the bonding process

  8. Reduction of radiation exposure and image quality using dose reduction tool on computed tomography fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our study was to measure the reduction rate of radiation dose and variability of image noise using the angular beam modulation (ABM) on computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy. The Alderson-Rando phantom and the homemade phantom were used in our study. These phantoms were scanned at on-center and off-center positions at -12 cm along y-axis with and without ABM technique. Regarding the technique, the x-ray tube is turned off in a 100-degree angle sector at the center of 12 o'clock, 10 o'clock, and 2 o'clock positions during CT fluoroscopy. CT fluoroscopic images were obtained with tube voltages, 120 kV; tube current-time product per reconstructed image, 30 mAs; rotation time, 0.5 s/rot; slice thickness, 4.8 mm; and reconstruction kernel B30s in each scanning. After CT scanning, radiation exposure and image noise were measured and the image artifacts were evaluated with and without the technique. The reduction rate for radiation exposure was 75-80% with and without the technique at on-center position regardless of each angle position. In the case of the off-center position at -12 cm, the reduction rate was 50% with and without the technique. In contrast, image noise remained constant with and without the technique. Visual inspection for image artifacts almost have the same scores with and without the technique and no statistical significance was found in both techniques (p>0.05). ABM is an appropriate tool for reducing radiation exposure and maintaining image-noise and artifacts during CT fluoroscopy. (author)

  9. Synchrotron radiation phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of acupuncture points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongming; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinyi [Fudan University, Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Liu, Chenglin [Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers' College, Yancheng (China); Dang, Ruishan [The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xiao, Tiqiao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Peiping [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2011-08-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using synchrotron radiation in-line X-ray phase contrast computerized tomography. Two acupuncture points, named Zhongji (RN3) and Zusanli (ST36), were studied. We found an accumulation of microvessels at each acupuncture point region. Images of the tissues surrounding the acupuncture points do not show such kinds of structure. This is the first time that 3D images have revealed the specific structures of acupuncture points. (orig.)

  10. Synchrotron radiation phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of acupuncture points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional (3D) topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using synchrotron radiation in-line X-ray phase contrast computerized tomography. Two acupuncture points, named Zhongji (RN3) and Zusanli (ST36), were studied. We found an accumulation of microvessels at each acupuncture point region. Images of the tissues surrounding the acupuncture points do not show such kinds of structure. This is the first time that 3D images have revealed the specific structures of acupuncture points. (orig.)

  11. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, Max, E-mail: max.seidensticker@med.ovgu.de [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin (Germany); Burak, Miroslaw [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology (Poland); Kalinski, Thomas [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Institut für Pathologie (Germany); Garlipp, Benjamin [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Gefäßchirurgie (Germany); Koelble, Konrad [Philipps Universität Marburg, Fachbereich Medizin der, Abteilung für Neuropathologie (Germany); Wust, Peter [Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Klinik für Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie (Germany); Antweiler, Kai [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Institut für Biometrie und Medizinische Informatik (Germany); Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  12. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted

  13. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response

  14. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorek, Daniel L.J., E-mail: dthorek1@jhmi.edu [Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kramer, Robin M. [Tri-Institutional Training Program in Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), Weill Cornell Medical College, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve [Department of Medicine, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Ulmert, David [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Skåne University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L. [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States); Russell, James, E-mail: russellj@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, MSKCC, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response.

  15. Virtual computed tomography colonoscopy: artifacts, image quality and radiation dose load in a cadaver study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the interdependency of spatial resolution, image reconstruction artifacts, and radiation doses in virtual CT colonoscopy by comparing various CT scanning protocols. A pig's colon with several artificial polypoid lesions was imaged after air insufflation with helical CT scanning using 1-, 3-, and 5-mm collimation, and pitch values varying from 1.0 to 3.0. Virtual endoscopic images and ''fly through'' sequences were calculated on a Sun Sparc 20 workstation (Navigator Software, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis.). Several reconstruction artifacts as well as overall image quality were evaluated by three independent reviewers. In addition, radiation doses for the different CT protocols were measured as multiple-scan average dose using a 10-cm ion chamber and a standard Plexiglass body phantom. Generally, image quality and reconstruction artifacts were less affected by pitch values than by beam collimation. Thus, narrow beam collimation at higher pitch values (e. g. 3 mm/2.0) seems to be a reasonable compromise between quality of virtual endoscopic images and radiation dose load. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  17. Programmable CCD imaging system for synchrotron radiation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A real-time imaging system for x-ray detection has been developed. The CAMAC-based system has a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) as its active detection element. The electronics consist of a CAMAC-crate-based dedicated microprocessor coupled to arbitrary waveform generators, programmable timing, and ADC modules. The hardware flexibility achievable through this system enables one to use virtually any commercially available CCD. A dedicated CAMAC-based display driver allows for real-time imaging on a high-resolution color monitor. An optional front end consisting of a fiber-optic taper and a focusing optical lens system coupled to a phosphor screen allows for large area imaging. Further, programming flexibility, in which the detector can be used in different read-out modes, enables it to be exploited for time-resolved experiments. In one mode, sections of the CCD can be read-out with millisecond time-resolution and, in another, the use of the CCD as a storage device is exploited resulting in microsecond time-resolution. Three different CCDs with radically different read-out timings and waveforms have been tested: the TI 4849, a 39Ox584 pixel array; TC 215, a 1024x1O24 pixel array; and the TH 7883, a 576x384 pixel array. The TC 215 and TI 4849 are single-phase CCDs manufactured by Texas Instruments, and the TH 7883 is a four-phase device manufactured by Thomson-CSF. The CCD characterized for uniformity, charge transfer efficiency (CTE), linearity, and sensitivity is the TC215

  18. Radiation Exposure by Nuclear Medicine Imaging Procedures: Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using high-resolution gamma spectrometry, we investigated the activity concentrations of thallium radioisotopes in a urine sample collected during a period of 24 h following nuclear medicine cardiac imaging. As part of a thallium stress test the subject of the study received a radiopharmaceutical preparation with 201Tl (activity 111 MBq). In order to assess whether the cardiac imaging procedure resulted in lymphocyte genome damage, we studied the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and lymphocyte cell kinetics in the blood samples collected before and after the cardiac imaging. The highest activity concentration (538960.9 ± 405.9 Bq/Lurine) was estimated for 201Tl, followed by 1770.54 ± 3.57 Bq/Lurine for 202Tl, and 422.035 ± 2.091 Bq/Lurine for 200Tl. The applied radiopharmaceutical contained 99.595 % of 201Tl, 0.078 % of 200Tl and 0.327 % of 202Tl. The estimated effective dose received through a single exposure to the radiopharmaceutical and calculated for a period of two days was mostly affected by 201Tl (0.0453 mSv). Due to its half-life of 12.2 days, the contribution of 202Tl (0.0008 mSv) to the effective dose was also significant. Results of the cytogenetic analysis indicate that a single diagnostic exposure to thallium caused an increase of SCE frequency and decrease of the proliferation rate index (PRI). Both parameters normalized steadily 14 days after the cardiac imaging procedure, which is also in accord with data obtained in previous studies. Our results indicate the presence of impurities in the radiopharmaceutical which should contain only 201Tl. This calls for a stricter process of quality control for radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medical diagnostic procedures. In this particular case, we emphasize 'contamination' with 202Tl, whose contribution to the effective dose cannot be ignored if one takes into account that it has the longest half-life of all three thallium radioisotopes detected in the urine sample.(author)

  19. Cerenkov emission of acoustic phonons electrically generated from three-dimensional Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubakaddi, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    Cerenkov acoustic phonon emission is theoretically investigated in a three-dimensional Dirac semimetal (3DDS) when it is driven by a dc electric field E. Numerical calculations are made for Cd3As2 in which mobility and electron concentration are large. We find that Cerenkov emission of acoustic phonons takes place when the electron drift velocity vd is greater than the sound velocity vs. This occurs at small E (˜few V/cm) due to large mobility. Frequency (ωq) and angular (θ) distribution of phonon emission spectrum P(ωq, θ) are studied for different electron drift velocities vd (i.e., different E) and electron concentrations ne. The frequency dependence of P(ωq, θ) shows a maximum Pm(ωq, θ) at about ωm ≈ 1 THz and is found to increase with the increasing vd and ne. The value of ωm shifts to higher region for larger ne. It is found that ωm/ne1/3 and Pm(ωq, θ)/ne2/3 are nearly constants. The latter is in contrast with the Pm(ωq, θ)ne1/2 = constant in conventional bulk semiconductor. Each maximum is followed by a vanishing spectrum at nearly "2kf cutoff," where kf is the Fermi wave vector. Angular dependence of P(ωq, θ) and the intensity P(θ) of the phonon emission shows a maximum at an emission angle 45° and is found to increase with increasing vd. P(θ) is found to increase linearly with ne giving the ratio P(θ)/(nevd) nearly a constant. We suggest that it is possible to have the controlled Cerenkov emission and generation of acoustic phonons with the proper choice of E, θ, and ne. 3DDS with large ne and mobility can be a good source of acoustic phonon generation in ˜THz regime.

  20. Behaviors study of image registration algorithms in image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Study the behaviors of image registration algorithms, and analyze the elements which influence the performance of image registrations. Methods: Pre-known corresponding coordinates were appointed for reference image and moving image, and then the influence of region of interest (ROI) selection, transformation function initial parameters and coupled parameter spaces on registration results were studied with a software platform developed in home. Results: Region of interest selection had a manifest influence on registration performance. An improperly chosen ROI resulted in a bad registration. Transformation function initial parameters selection based on pre-known information could improve the accuracy of image registration. Coupled parameter spaces would enhance the dependence of image registration algorithm on ROI selection. Conclusions: It is necessary for clinic IGRT to obtain a ROI selection strategy (depending on specific commercial software) correlated to tumor sites. Three suggestions for image registration technique developers are automatic selection of the initial parameters of transformation function based on pre-known information, developing specific image registration algorithm for specific image feature, and assembling real-time image registration algorithms according to tumor sites selected by software user. (authors)

  1. Instruments for radiation measurement in biosciences. Series 3. radioluminography. 13. Application of imaging plate for radiation control works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imaging plate (IP) is useful for measurement of both distribution and intensity of radiation. This paper described application of IP in radiation control works. Since IP has the 500 times higher sensitivity than the film badge for X-ray-range radiation of 12-120 keV, it can be useful as a personnel dosemeter in medical field. IP is suitable for measurement of radioactivity in a lot of samples and it can be useful for measurement of smear test papers although a problem concerning 3H monitoring remains. Since IP gives the two-dimensional information of radiation distribution, IP can be useful for monitoring of contamination status such as its site and area. A contamination accident occurred by 68Ge in PET apparatus is described for instance. IP can be also useful for measurement of the low level radioactivity in solutions, such as waste water. The author made an apparatus for drain monitoring which composed from acryl-box and IP. The surface of the former box, containing the water, is stuck by various shields of acryl- and lead-plates and is in contact with IP. Both measurement of radioactivity concentration and identification of radionuclide are possible. The important defect is pointed out to be fading phenomenon in those works above. (K.H.)

  2. Circulation model for water circulation and purification in a water Cerenkov detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hao-Qi; YANG Chang-Gen; WANG Ling-Yu; XU Ji-Lei; WANG aui-Guang; WANG Zhi-Min; WANG Yi-Fang

    2009-01-01

    Owing to its low cost and good transparency, highly purified water is widely used as a medium in large water Cerenkov detector experiments. The water circulation and purification system is usually needed to keep the water in good quality. In this work, a practical circulation model is built to describe the variation of the water resistivity in the circulation process and compared with the data obtained from a prototype experiment. The successful test of the model makes it useful in the future design and optimization of the circulation/purification system.

  3. Introduction of the muonic and Cerenkov effects in the EGS4 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duverger, E.; Gschwind, R.I.; Makovicka, L. [Univ. de Franche Comte, Montbeliard (France). RMC LMIT; Mishev, A.; Stamenov, J. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). INRNE

    2001-07-01

    An absolute calibration and a signal modelling is realised to diminish the discrepancies of the results. In a first part, we redefine rapidly the Crenkov effect and the model introduced inside the EGS4 Monte Carlo Code in order to simulate it. This approach permits the development of new technics for the registration of cosmic rays based on Cerenkov light in the atmosphere and the estimation of atmospheric transparency. In a second part we describe the telescope used and the comparison between the experimental and theoretical results obtained. (orig.)

  4. Cerenkov-Like Emission of Pions by Photons in a Lorentz-Violating Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Altschul, Brett

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of Lorentz violation, the Cerenkov-like process $\\gamma\\rightarrow\\gamma+\\pi^{0}$ may become allowed for sufficiently energetic photons. Photons above the threshold would lose energy rapidly through pion emission. The fact that propagating photons with energies of up to 80 TeV survive to be observed on Earth allows us to place a one-sided constraint on an isotropic Lorentz violating parameter at the $7\\times 10^{-13}$ level; this is more than an order of magnitude better than best previous result.

  5. The arrival direction of energetic cosmic rays measured with a fast timing Cerenkov light technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accurate arrival directions of air showers (0) available from a fast timing Cerenkov light experiment are used to search for point sources of ultra high energy γ-rays. The data span the energy range 5 x 1015 eV - 1017 eV and were recorded in the period 1977-1980 at Dugway, Utah. Most of the exposure was of the Galactic anticentre region. Flux limits of approximately 10-13 to approximately 2 x 10-15 cm-2 sec-1 for primaries of energy >= 3 x 1015 to >=1017 eV from the Crab nebula have been determined

  6. Three dimensional nonlinear analysis of a single-grating rectangular waveguide Cerenkov maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three dimensional (3-D) nonlinear model for illustrating the beam-wave interaction in a single-grating rectangular waveguide sheet-beam Cerenkov maser is presented. The dynamical equations and the equations of motion are solved self-consistently to predict the device performance. Space-charge effects and Ohmic losses are considered in the model. A 1.03 THz backward wave oscillator and a 0.65 THz traveling wave tube are discussed as two illustrative examples

  7. Does Imaging Technology Cause Cancer? Debunking the Linear No-Threshold Model of Radiation Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jeffry A; Welsh, James S

    2016-04-01

    In the past several years, there has been a great deal of attention from the popular media focusing on the alleged carcinogenicity of low-dose radiation exposures received by patients undergoing medical imaging studies such as X-rays, computed tomography scans, and nuclear medicine scintigraphy. The media has based its reporting on the plethora of articles published in the scientific literature that claim that there is "no safe dose" of ionizing radiation, while essentially ignoring all the literature demonstrating the opposite point of view. But this reported "scientific" literature in turn bases its estimates of cancer induction on the linear no-threshold hypothesis of radiation carcinogenesis. The use of the linear no-threshold model has yielded hundreds of articles, all of which predict a definite carcinogenic effect of any dose of radiation, regardless of how small. Therefore, hospitals and professional societies have begun campaigns and policies aiming to reduce the use of certain medical imaging studies based on perceived risk:benefit ratio assumptions. However, as they are essentially all based on the linear no-threshold model of radiation carcinogenesis, the risk:benefit ratio models used to calculate the hazards of radiological imaging studies may be grossly inaccurate if the linear no-threshold hypothesis is wrong. Here, we review the myriad inadequacies of the linear no-threshold model and cast doubt on the various studies based on this overly simplistic model. PMID:25824269

  8. TH-A-16A-01: Image Quality for the Radiation Oncology Physicist: Review of the Fundamentals and Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expansion and integration of diagnostic imaging technologies such as On Board Imaging (OBI) and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) into radiation oncology has required radiation oncology physicists to be responsible for and become familiar with assessing image quality. Unfortunately many radiation oncology physicists have had little or no training or experience in measuring and assessing image quality. Many physicists have turned to automated QA analysis software without having a fundamental understanding of image quality measures. This session will review the basic image quality measures of imaging technologies used in the radiation oncology clinic, such as low contrast resolution, high contrast resolution, uniformity, noise, and contrast scale, and how to measure and assess them in a meaningful way. Additionally a discussion of the implementation of an image quality assurance program in compliance with Task Group recommendations will be presented along with the advantages and disadvantages of automated analysis methods. Learning Objectives: Review and understanding of the fundamentals of image quality. Review and understanding of the basic image quality measures of imaging modalities used in the radiation oncology clinic. Understand how to implement an image quality assurance program and to assess basic image quality measures in a meaningful way

  9. Coincident observation of air Cerenkov light by a surface array and muon bundles by a deep underground detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the simultaneous observation of atmospheric Cerenkov light by a prototype five telescope array, GRACE, (Gran Sasso Air Cerenkov Experiment) with deep underground muons in the MACRO (Monopole Astrophysics and Cosmic Ray Observatory). The telescope array was deployed at Campo Imperatore above the Gran Sasso Laboratory for a run completed in the fall of 1992. The total live time for the combined surface-underground operation was ∼100 h during which more than 300 events were seen in coincidence. The efficacy of this technique to monitor the electromagnetic and penetrating muon components of a cosmic-ray-induced cascade is discussed

  10. Late radiation change in the CNS: MR imaging following gadolinium enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, A.M.; Carrington, B.M.; Slevin, N.J. [Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging technique for the detection of radiotherapy-induced changes in the central nervous system but there are few studies detailing the MRI appearances of radiation effects following enhancement with intravenous gadolinium. In this paper, gadolinium enhanced MR imaging findings were reviewed in seven patients with evidence of late radiation injury following radiotherapy for primary head and neck tumours. On T1-weighted enhanced sequences, abnormal focal areas were present in the anterior temporal lobes and antero-inferior aspects of the frontal lobes. These lesions were well defined and enhanced intensely following intravenous gadolinium. They were present in the white matter in five patients and involved both grey and white matter in two patients. Cystic components were present in larger lesions in three patients and mass effect was present around the enhancing lesions in four patients. All abnormalities occurred within the radiation treatment portals and corresponded to the distribution of increased signal intensity changes in the brain on T2-weighted images. Late radiation-induced injury should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any intensely enhancing lesion occurring within irradiated brain tissue. (author).

  11. Late radiation change in the CNS: MR imaging following gadolinium enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging technique for the detection of radiotherapy-induced changes in the central nervous system but there are few studies detailing the MRI appearances of radiation effects following enhancement with intravenous gadolinium. In this paper, gadolinium enhanced MR imaging findings were reviewed in seven patients with evidence of late radiation injury following radiotherapy for primary head and neck tumours. On T1-weighted enhanced sequences, abnormal focal areas were present in the anterior temporal lobes and antero-inferior aspects of the frontal lobes. These lesions were well defined and enhanced intensely following intravenous gadolinium. They were present in the white matter in five patients and involved both grey and white matter in two patients. Cystic components were present in larger lesions in three patients and mass effect was present around the enhancing lesions in four patients. All abnormalities occurred within the radiation treatment portals and corresponded to the distribution of increased signal intensity changes in the brain on T2-weighted images. Late radiation-induced injury should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any intensely enhancing lesion occurring within irradiated brain tissue. (author)

  12. Radiation exposure and mortality risk from CT and PET imaging of patients with malignant lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nievelstein, R. A. J.; van Ufford, H. M. E. Quarles; Kwee, T. C.; Bierings, M. B.; Ludwig, I.; Beek, F. J. A.; de Klerk, J. M. H.; Mali, W. P. Th. M.; de Bruin, P. W.; Geleijns, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To quantify radiation exposure and mortality risk from computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) in patients with malignant lymphoma (Hodgkin's disease [HD] or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [NHL]). Methods First, organ doses we

  13. Image-producing procedures for non-medical applications. Benefits, risks, radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is given of image-producing procedures for non-medical applications, and this under technical, juridical and radiation protection aspects. The historical development of these procedures is also described. An example is given for today's practical application.

  14. Radiation-induced medulloblastoma in an adult: A functional imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma M

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe functional imaging findings using MRI, 1H-Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography in a case of radiation-induced medulloblastoma following radiotherapy for pineal gland tumor. MRS showed a prominent choline peak; FDG, 11C-Met and 11C-Choline PET showed a minimal glucose, increased methionine and choline uptake.

  15. Sensitive detection of voids in solid materials by refraction-enhanced synchrotron radiation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voids in opaque materials (minute air bubbles) were imaged with synchrotron radiation in a refraction enhancement mode. The voids are imaged by an enhanced x-ray intensity inside the bubble, surrounded by a border region with decreased x-ray intensity, thus allowing sensitive detection of air bubbles in plastic materials. As those 'impurities' could not be depicted with conventional radiography, and optical inspection is not useful if the matrix is opaque, this in-situ imaging technique offers the potential to obtain information of air inclusions, voids, and cracking that appear inadvertently in opaque plastics and possibly in metals as well

  16. Polarization imaging of multiply-scattered radiation based on integral-vector Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new integral-vector Monte Carlo method (IVMCM) is developed to analyze the transfer of polarized radiation in 3D multiple scattering particle-laden media. The method is based on a 'successive order of scattering series' expression of the integral formulation of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) for application of efficient statistical tools to improve convergence of Monte Carlo calculations of integrals. After validation against reference results in plane-parallel layer backscattering configurations, the model is applied to a cubic container filled with uniformly distributed monodispersed particles and irradiated by a monochromatic narrow collimated beam. 2D lateral images of effective Mueller matrix elements are calculated in the case of spherical and fractal aggregate particles. Detailed analysis of multiple scattering regimes, which are very similar for unpolarized radiation transfer, allows identifying the sensitivity of polarization imaging to size and morphology.

  17. Use of an external source (60Co) for 32P detection efficiency determination by the Cerenkov effect, in soil extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of 32P in aqueous extracts is usually made with the aid of a Geiger-Muller detector, with thin window and sample on a planchet. Presently the technique is being developed of detection of high energy beta particles emitters (32P, 42K, 86Rb) through the Cerenkov effect, using a commercial liquid scintillation system. This technique, despite being approximately 30 times more sensitive, has the inconvenience of varying the detection efficiency, mainly for color samples (soil extracts, for instance). From this stems the need for determining the detection efficiency for each sample. The internal standardization and channels ratio methods show a series of drawbacks, mainly the non-reutilization of the samples (1st method) and statistical uncertainty for low activity samples (2nd method). The elimination of these dreawbacks can be achieved through the utilization of the external standardization method. A 60Co source with 1,4 μCi activity has been adapted to the sample elevator of the detector system, and a comparison was made with the channels ratio method to evaluate the efficiency of 32P detection in soil extracts (P extraction and fractionation). The external standardization method showed to be more accurate, besides being influenced to a lesser degree by high voltage variation, sample volume and vial types. In the case of large samples, it is advisable to carry out detection in vials filled up to their full capacity; in the case of small samples, the whole volume should be transferred to the vials and completed up to 9 ml for nylon vials,10 ml for glass vials and 11 to 14 ml for polyethilene vials. On the other hand, plastic vials showed higher detection efficiency than ones. As to background radiation, the lowest rates were given by nylon vials and the highest by Beckman glass vials

  18. Vision 20/20: Increased image resolution versus reduced radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a review of methods, currently and potentially, available for significantly reducing x-ray exposure in medical x-ray imaging. It is stimulated by the radiation exposure implications of the growing use of helical scanning, multislice, x-ray computed tomography for screening, such as for coronary artery atherosclerosis and cancer of the colon and lungs. Screening requires high-throughput imaging with high spatial and contrast resolution to meet the need for high sensitivity and specificity of detection and classification of specific imaged features. To achieve this goal beyond what is currently available with x-ray imaging methods requires increased x-ray exposure, which increases the risk of tissue damage and ultimately cancer development. These consequences limit the utility of current x-ray imaging in screening of at-risk subjects who have not yet developed the clinical symptoms of disease. Current methods for reducing x-ray exposure in x-ray imaging, mostly achieved by increasing sensitivity and specificity of the x-ray detection process, may still have potential for an up-to-tenfold decrease. This could be sufficient for doubling the spatial resolution of x-ray CT while maintaining the current x-ray exposure levels. However, a spatial resolution four times what is currently available might be needed to adequately meet the needs for screening. Consequently, for the proposed need to increase spatial resolution, an additional order of magnitude of reduction of x-ray exposure would be needed just to keep the radiation exposure at current levels. This is conceivably achievable if refraction, rather than the currently used attenuation, of x rays is used to generate the images. Existing methods that have potential for imaging the consequences of refracted x ray in a clinical setting are (1) by imaging the edge enhancement that occurs at the interfaces between adjacent tissues of different refractive indices, or (2) by imaging the changes in interference

  19. The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Bradbury, S M; Breslin, A C; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Criswell, S; Dingus, B L; Fegan, D J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Grindlay, J; Hillas, A M; Harris, K; Hermann, G; Kaaret, P E; Kieda, D B; Knapp, J; Krennrich, F; Le Bohec, S; Lessard, R W; Lloyd-Evans, J; McKernan, B; Müller, D; Ong, R; Quenby, J J; Quinn, J; Rochester, G D; Rose, H J; Salamon, M B; Sembroski, G H; Sumner, T J; Swordy, S P; Vasilev, V; Weekes, T C

    1999-01-01

    We give an overview of the current status and scientific goals of VERITAS, a proposed hexagonal array of seven 10 m aperture imaging Cherenkov telescopes. The selected site is Montosa Canyon (1390 m a.s.l.) at the Whipple Observatory, Arizona. Each telescope, of 12 m focal length, will initially be equipped with a 499 element photomultiplier camera covering a 3.5 degree field of view. A central station will initiate the readout of 500 MHz FADCs upon receipt of multiple telescope triggers. The minimum detectable flux sensitivity will be 0.5% of the Crab Nebula flux at 200 GeV. Detailed simulations of the array's performance are presented elsewhere at this meeting. VERITAS will operate primarily as a gamma-ray observatory in the 50 GeV to 50 TeV range for the study of active galaxies, supernova remnants, pulsars and gamma-ray bursts.

  20. Assessment of neural networks training strategies for histomorphometric analysis of synchrotron radiation medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-computed tomography (μCT) obtained by synchrotron radiation (SR) enables magnified images with a high space resolution that might be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique for the quantitative analysis of medical images, in particular the histomorphometry (HMM) of bony mass. In the preprocessing of such images, conventional operations such as binarization and morphological filtering are used before calculating the stereological parameters related, for example, to the trabecular bone microarchitecture. However, there is no standardization of methods for HMM based on μCT images, especially the ones obtained with SR X-ray. Notwithstanding the several uses of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in medical imaging, their application to the HMM of SR-μCT medical images is still incipient, despite the potential of both techniques. The contribution of this paper is the assessment and comparison of well-known training algorithms as well as the proposal of training strategies (combinations of training algorithms, sub-image kernel and symmetry information) for feed-forward ANNs in the task of bone pixels recognition in SR-μCT medical images. For a quantitative comparison, the results of a cross validation and a statistical analysis of the results for 36 training strategies are presented. The ANNs demonstrated both very low mean square errors in the validation, and good quality segmentation of the image of interest for application to HMM in SR-μCT medical images.

  1. Large area 3-D optical coherence tomography imaging of lumpectomy specimens for radiation treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuihuan; Kim, Leonard; Barnard, Nicola; Khan, Atif; Pierce, Mark C.

    2016-02-01

    Our long term goal is to develop a high-resolution imaging method for comprehensive assessment of tissue removed during lumpectomy procedures. By identifying regions of high-grade disease within the excised specimen, we aim to develop patient-specific post-operative radiation treatment regimens. We have assembled a benchtop spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system with 1320 nm center wavelength. Automated beam scanning enables "sub-volumes" spanning 5 mm x 5 mm x 2 mm (500 A-lines x 500 B-scans x 2 mm in depth) to be collected in under 15 seconds. A motorized sample positioning stage enables multiple sub-volumes to be acquired across an entire tissue specimen. Sub-volumes are rendered from individual B-scans in 3D Slicer software and en face (XY) images are extracted at specific depths. These images are then tiled together using MosaicJ software to produce a large area en face view (up to 40 mm x 25 mm). After OCT imaging, specimens were sectioned and stained with HE, allowing comparison between OCT image features and disease markers on histopathology. This manuscript describes the technical aspects of image acquisition and reconstruction, and reports initial qualitative comparison between large area en face OCT images and HE stained tissue sections. Future goals include developing image reconstruction algorithms for mapping an entire sample, and registering OCT image volumes with clinical CT and MRI images for post-operative treatment planning.

  2. Assessment of neural networks training strategies for histomorphometric analysis of synchrotron radiation medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura Meneses, Anderson Alvarenga; Pinheiro, Christiano Jorge Gomes; Rancoita, Paola; Schaul, Tom; Gambardella, Luca Maria; Schirru, Roberto; Barroso, Regina Cely; de Oliveira, Luís Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Micro-computed tomography (μCT) obtained by synchrotron radiation (SR) enables magnified images with a high space resolution that might be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique for the quantitative analysis of medical images, in particular the histomorphometry (HMM) of bony mass. In the preprocessing of such images, conventional operations such as binarization and morphological filtering are used before calculating the stereological parameters related, for example, to the trabecular bone microarchitecture. However, there is no standardization of methods for HMM based on μCT images, especially the ones obtained with SR X-ray. Notwithstanding the several uses of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in medical imaging, their application to the HMM of SR-μCT medical images is still incipient, despite the potential of both techniques. The contribution of this paper is the assessment and comparison of well-known training algorithms as well as the proposal of training strategies (combinations of training algorithms, sub-image kernel and symmetry information) for feed-forward ANNs in the task of bone pixels recognition in SR-μCT medical images. For a quantitative comparison, the results of a cross validation and a statistical analysis of the results for 36 training strategies are presented. The ANNs demonstrated both very low mean square errors in the validation, and good quality segmentation of the image of interest for application to HMM in SR-μCT medical images.

  3. Assessment of neural networks training strategies for histomorphometric analysis of synchrotron radiation medical images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga de Moura Meneses, Anderson, E-mail: ameneses@lmp.ufrj.b [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Nuclear Engineering Program, CP 68509, CEP 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), University of Lugano (Switzerland); Gomes Pinheiro, Christiano Jorge [State University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rancoita, Paola [IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), University of Lugano (Switzerland); Mathematics Department, Universita degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Schaul, Tom; Gambardella, Luca Maria [IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), University of Lugano (Switzerland); Schirru, Roberto [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Nuclear Engineering Program, CP 68509, CEP 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barroso, Regina Cely; Oliveira, Luis Fernando de [State University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-09-21

    Micro-computed tomography ({mu}CT) obtained by synchrotron radiation (SR) enables magnified images with a high space resolution that might be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique for the quantitative analysis of medical images, in particular the histomorphometry (HMM) of bony mass. In the preprocessing of such images, conventional operations such as binarization and morphological filtering are used before calculating the stereological parameters related, for example, to the trabecular bone microarchitecture. However, there is no standardization of methods for HMM based on {mu}CT images, especially the ones obtained with SR X-ray. Notwithstanding the several uses of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in medical imaging, their application to the HMM of SR-{mu}CT medical images is still incipient, despite the potential of both techniques. The contribution of this paper is the assessment and comparison of well-known training algorithms as well as the proposal of training strategies (combinations of training algorithms, sub-image kernel and symmetry information) for feed-forward ANNs in the task of bone pixels recognition in SR-{mu}CT medical images. For a quantitative comparison, the results of a cross validation and a statistical analysis of the results for 36 training strategies are presented. The ANNs demonstrated both very low mean square errors in the validation, and good quality segmentation of the image of interest for application to HMM in SR-{mu}CT medical images.

  4. Synchrotron radiation XRF imaging techniques at the Brazil-LNLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a well-established method for quantitative multi-elemental bulk analysis. The use of a synchrotron radiation source allows constructing effective x-ray microprobes for study trace elements in small (nanogram) samples or their distributions with high spatial resolution. Since its operation, the XRF fluorescence beamline of the LNLS has offered to the user community several hard x-ray microprobes configurations to develop microscopic x-ray fluorescence analysis. The initially developed setup consisted of a fine conical monocapillary that allows condensing the polychromatic synchrotron beam down to an area of 20 microns in diameter. Novel strategies are now routinely in use or being installed at several synchrotron laboratories that require determining the 3D compositional structure of minor and trace elements in specific samples. These experimental setups take advantages of the high penetration depth of the x-rays (several orders of magnitude higher than the microbeam size). These alternative (microanalytical) methods are called x-ray fluorescence microtomography and confocal micro-XRF. This lecture intends to give a general description of all above configurations, showing their advantages/disadvantages and also pretends to show some specific applications carried out at the XRF Fluorescence beamline of the LNLS. (author)

  5. Synchrotron radiation XRF imaging techniques at the Brazil-LNLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Carlos A., E-mail: perez@lnls.br [X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Group, Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a well-established method for quantitative multi-elemental bulk analysis. The use of a synchrotron radiation source allows constructing effective x-ray microprobes for study trace elements in small (nanogram) samples or their distributions with high spatial resolution. Since its operation, the XRF fluorescence beamline of the LNLS has offered to the user community several hard x-ray microprobes configurations to develop microscopic x-ray fluorescence analysis. The initially developed setup consisted of a fine conical monocapillary that allows condensing the polychromatic synchrotron beam down to an area of 20 microns in diameter. Novel strategies are now routinely in use or being installed at several synchrotron laboratories that require determining the 3D compositional structure of minor and trace elements in specific samples. These experimental setups take advantages of the high penetration depth of the x-rays (several orders of magnitude higher than the microbeam size). These alternative (microanalytical) methods are called x-ray fluorescence microtomography and confocal micro-XRF. This lecture intends to give a general description of all above configurations, showing their advantages/disadvantages and also pretends to show some specific applications carried out at the XRF Fluorescence beamline of the LNLS. (author)

  6. Global quality control perspective for the physical and technical aspects of screen-film mammography - Image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The systematic monitoring of image quality and radiation dose is an ultimate solution to ensuring the continuously high quality of mammography examination. At present several protocols exist around the world, and different test objects are used for quality control (QC) of the physical and technical aspects of screen-film mammography. This situation may lead to differences in radiation image quality and dose reported. This article reviews the global QC perspective for the physical and technical aspects of screen-film mammography with regard to image quality and radiation dose. It points out issues that must be resolved in terms of radiation dose and that also affect the comparison. (authors)

  7. Collimation effects on the radiation detectors in the iCT image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Diego Vergacas de Sousa; Kirita, Rodrigo; Mesquita, Carlos Henrique de; Hamada, Margarida Mizue, E-mail: dvcarvalho@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferreira, Erick Oliveira; Dantas, Carlos Costa [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    This work studies the collimation effect in radiation detectors on the image quality of the iCT scanner, in which the path traversed by radiation beams is similar to a fan. The collimators were made of lead, 5 cm deep and 12 cm high, with rectangular holes (slits) of 2 x 5 mm, 4 x 10 mm (width x height) and circular hole of 5 mm diameter. The matrix images reconstructed from the data obtained with these collimation holes are presented. The spatial resolution of the image depends on the geometry of the collimator. One of the major advantages of narrow beam transmission tomography is the so-called hard field property. This property is capable of producing high quality images, though it decreases the count value and it takes a longer time. In contrast, a large collimation diameter produces a fuzzy image but with a faster scanning time. Moreover, the enlargement of the aperture from 2 x 5 mm to 4 x 10 mm barely affects the image quality. The aperture from 4 x 10 mm and 5 mm diameter presented similar quality image. (author)

  8. Interactive Learning Module Improves Resident Knowledge of Risks of Ionizing Radiation Exposure From Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Alexander Y; Breaud, Alan H; Schneider, Jeffrey I; Kadom, Nadja; Mitchell, Patricia M; Linden, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    Physician awareness of the risks of ionizing radiation exposure related to medical imaging is poor. Effective educational interventions informing physicians of such risk, especially in emergency medicine (EM), are lacking. The SIEVERT (Suboptimal Ionizing Radiation Exposure Education - A Void in Emergency Medicine Residency Training) learning module was designed to improve provider knowledge of the risks of radiation exposure from medical imaging and comfort in communicating these risks to patients. The 1-hour module consists of introductory lecture, interactive discussion, and role-playing scenarios. In this pilot study, we assessed the educational effect using unmatched, anonymous preintervention and postintervention questionnaires that assessed fund of knowledge, participant self-reported imaging ordering practices in several clinical scenarios, and trainee comfort level in discussing radiation risks with patients. All 25 EM resident participants completed the preintervention questionnaire, and 22 completed the postintervention questionnaire within 4 hours after participation. Correct responses on the 14-question learning assessment increased from 6.32 (standard deviation = 2.36) preintervention to 12.23 (standard deviation = 1.85) post-intervention. Overall, 24% of residents were comfortable with discussing the risks of ionizing radiation exposure with patients preintervention, whereas 41% felt comfortable postintervention. Participants ordered fewer computed tomography scans in 2 of the 4 clinical scenarios after attending the educational intervention. There was improvement in EM residents' knowledge regarding the risks of ionizing radiation exposure from medical imaging, and increased participant self-reported comfort levels in the discussion of these risks with patients after the 1-hour SIEVERT learning module. PMID:26657346

  9. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of radiation dose and image quality of computed tomography images using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Fahad Ahmed; Mail, Noor; Shamy, Abdulrahman M; Suliman, Alghamdi; Saoudi, Abdelhamid

    2016-01-01

    Image quality is a key issue in radiology, particularly in a clinical setting where it is important to achieve accurate diagnoses while minimizing radiation dose. Some computed tomography (CT) manufacturers have introduced algorithms that claim significant dose reduction. In this study, we assessed CT image quality produced by two reconstruction algorithms provided with GE Healthcare's Discovery 690 Elite positron emission tomography (PET) CT scanner. Image quality was measured for images obtained at various doses with both conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithms. A stan-dard CT dose index (CTDI) phantom and a pencil ionization chamber were used to measure the CT dose at 120 kVp and an exposure of 260 mAs. Image quality was assessed using two phantoms. CT images of both phantoms were acquired at tube voltage (kV) of 120 with exposures ranging from 25 mAs to 400 mAs. Images were reconstructed using FBP and ASIR ranging from 10% to 100%, then analyzed for noise, low-contrast detectability, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and modulation transfer function (MTF). Noise was 4.6 HU in water phantom images acquired at 260 mAs/FBP 120 kV and 130 mAs/50% ASIR 120 kV. The large objects (fre-quency frequency >7 lp/cm) showed poor visibility compared to FBP at 260 mAs and even worse for images acquired at less than 130 mAs. ASIR blending more than 50% at low dose tends to reduce contrast of small objects (frequency >7 lp/cm). We concluded that dose reduction and ASIR should be applied with close attention if the objects to be detected or diagnosed are small (frequency > 7 lp/cm). Further investigations are required to correlate the small objects (frequency > 7 lp/cm) to patient anatomy and clinical diagnosis. PMID:27167261

  10. Image Gently: A campaign to promote radiation protection for children worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Applegate

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the goal of raising awareness and developing stakeholder educational tools for the appropriate imaging of children, the Image Gently campaign was launched in 2007. This campaign is a product of a multidisciplinary alliance with international representation which now numbers nearly 100 medical and dental professional societies and organisations, and includes regulatory organisations. The alliance focuses on increasing awareness and developing education materials that support the protection of children worldwide from unnecessary radiation in medicine. The alliance members work with agencies and regulatory bodies to improve standards and measures that are specific to children. The campaign has produced open source modules for all stakeholders regarding CT, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, interventional radiology, digital radiography and dental imaging. The philosophy of the Image Gently steering committee is to collaborate, to share information freely, to keep messaging simple and to commit to lifelong learning. Many healthcare practitioners may not understand how to decrease children’s radiation exposure; the goal of Image Gently is to increase all stakeholders’ understanding of both the benefits and the risks and to encourage radiation reduction strategies. This article summarises the rationale and goals of the global campaign to date.

  11. Development of fiber beam loss monitor based on Cerenkov principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: A new type of beam loss monitor (BLM) system is needed in the synchrotron radiation light source or FEL facility to monitor the real-time beam loss inside the small-gap insertion devices. Purpose: A BLM system was developed with optical fiber as the probe to meet the requirements of SSRF. Methods: The whole system consists of a 30-m long step-index fiber, photomultiplier tubes (PMT), a 10-bit 8-GS/s high-speed waveform digitizer and a PXI input-output controller. The software was developed under the Linux system based on Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). A new measurement and corresponding calculation method were designed to make the system work well with the multi-bunch operation mode in the storage ring of SSRF. Results: The BLM system worked well at SSRF. And the results of beam experiments showed that the system could detect beam loss properly even at the 1-mA low current case. Conclusions: This system could be used in the detection of beam loss dose and position. In the experiments the counts of light pulses can be used as a rough estimation of beam loss dose. The noise floor is about 3.56% of the total count in the 220-mA top-up user operation mode. (authors)

  12. Influence of different exposure modes on image quality and radiation dose in digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of different exposure modes on radiation dose and image quality in digital mammography, and to explore how to reduce patient's radiation injury by choosing proper exposure mode and exposure conditions without sacrifice image quality. Methods: A breast phantom was exposed by using automatic exposure mode (60 mAs, 28 k/V) and manual exposure modes (37.5 to 70 mAs range, 24 to 32 kV range) respectively. Same oppression thickness and pressure were set for all modes. The average glandular dose (AGD), entrance surface dose (ESD), and image quality score according to American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria were recorded for each image. Kruskal Wallis test was used to compare the image quality scores between automatic and manual modes. All statistic analyses were performed by using SPSS17.0. Results: Compared to automatic exposure mode (60 mAs, 28 k/V), the overall score of image quality of manual modes (45 to 70 mAs range, 26 to 32 kV range) had no significant difference. Both ESD and ACD decreased 26.1% and increased 15.4% when the tube loading was changed from 60 mAs to 45 mAs and 70 mAs respectively. The ESD and ACD decreased 22.6%, 28.2% and increased 47.0%, 62.7% when the tube voltage was changed from 28 kV to 26 kV and 32 kV respectively. Conclusion: When the image quality reaches to a certain level, it will not be raised by a higher photographic condition. Without sacrifice image quality, the tube loading and tube voltage can be manually decreased to reduce radiation dose. (authors)

  13. The relationship between compression force, image quality and radiation dose in mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Korf

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mammography aims to obtain mammograms of best possible image quality with least possible radiation dose.1 Theoretically, an increase in breast compression gives a reduction in thickness, without changing the density, resulting in improved image quality and reduced radiation dose. Aim.\tThis study aims to investigate the relationship between compression force, phantom thickness, image quality and radiation dose. The existence of a compression point beyond which increased compression gives a change in density rather than thickness is also considered. Method. Image quality is assessed with a contrast-detail phantom within Superflab phantom on a computed radiography (CR mammography unit using automatic exposure control (AEC. Image quality is determined by visual inspection and image quality figure (IQF scoring. The effect of compression and lesion depth on image quality is determined. Entrance and exit doses are calculated. The relationship between entrance dose, compression and thickness is investigated, as is the existence of a compression point beyond which a change in phantom density occurs. The average glandular dose (AGD is calculated from the scanning average level (SAL and logarithmic mean (LgM according to Koen et al,2 and compared to the allowable limit. Results.\tThe geometry effect was not observed. An improvement in image quality with increased compression was found. Entrance dose did decrease with increased compression. This trend was not observed with exit dose as AEC was used and exit dose was calculated from SAL values. The “change-in-density” point of compression was determined. Both LgM and SAL could be used successfully for AGD calculation.

  14. Preliminary study on application of synchrotron radiation imaging to tumor angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis. However, only vessels lager than 200 μm in diameter can be observed using conventional medical image. Synchrotron radiation(SR) phase contrast imaging, with a spatial resolution being as high as 1 μm, has great advantages in imaging soft tissue structure, such as blood vessels and tumors. The morphology of tumor angiogenesis at different stages in the 4T1 nude mice tumor window model was firstly studied without contrast agent using the SR phase contrast imaging at SSRF X-ray imaging and biomedical application beamline. The results showed dense, irregular and tortuous tumor angiogenesis with the smallest vessels of 20-30 μm in diameter. (authors)

  15. Ion beam induced charge and cathodoluminescence imaging of response uniformity of CVD diamond radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J; Galbiati, A; Maghrabi, M; Townsend, P D

    2002-01-01

    The uniformity of response of CVD diamond radiation detectors produced from high quality diamond film, with crystallite dimensions of >100 mu m, has been studied using ion beam induced charge imaging. A micron-resolution scanning alpha particle beam was used to produce maps of pulse height response across the device. The detectors were fabricated with a single-sided coplanar electrode geometry to maximise their sensitivity to the surface region of the diamond film where the diamond crystallites are highly ordered. High resolution ion beam induced charge images of single crystallites were acquired that demonstrate variations in intra-crystallite charge transport and the termination of charge transport at the crystallite boundaries. Cathodoluminescence imaging of the same crystallites shows an inverse correlation between the density of radiative centres and regions of good charge transport.

  16. Optimization of Encoding Gradients for Magnetic Resonance Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Watkins, Ron; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2009-04-01

    For HIFU treatments without significant heating, MR monitoring could be done by imaging the acoustic radiation force (MR-ARFI). MR-ARFI used motion-sensitizing gradients to encode the small displacement induced by the acoustic radiation force into the phase of the image. Unfortunately, large conventional gradients render the image sensitive to motion, and susceptible to artifacts, which are seen as a non-linear background phase and can be larger than the displacement-induced phase. In this work, MR-ARFI encoding gradients are optimized to minimize these problems. The proposed repeated bipolar gradients are robust against motion and eddy current, and the SNR is significantly enhanced at no cost of scan time or encoding sensitivity.

  17. Diffusion-weighted and PET/MR Imaging after Radiation Therapy for Malignant Head and Neck Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Rager, Olivier; Dulguerov, Pavel; Burkhardt, Karim; Ailianou, Angeliki; Becker, Minerva

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting imaging studies of the irradiated neck constitutes a challenge because of radiation therapy-induced tissue alterations, the variable appearances of recurrent tumors, and functional and metabolic phenomena that mimic disease. Therefore, morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging, positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT), and software fusion of PET and MR imaging data sets are increasingly used to facilitate diagnosis in clinical practice. Because MR imaging and PET often yield complementary information, PET/MR imaging holds promise to facilitate differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation therapy-induced changes and complications. This review focuses on clinical applications of DW and PET/MR imaging in the irradiated neck and discusses the added value of multiparametric imaging to solve diagnostic dilemmas. Radiologists should understand key features of radiation therapy-induced tissue alterations and potential complications seen at DW and PET/MR imaging, including edema, fibrosis, scar tissue, soft-tissue necrosis, bone and cartilage necrosis, cranial nerve palsy, and radiation therapy-induced arteriosclerosis, brain necrosis, and thyroid disorders. DW and PET/MR imaging also play a complementary role in detection of residual and recurrent disease. Interpretation pitfalls due to technical, functional, and metabolic phenomena should be recognized and avoided. Familiarity with DW and PET/MR imaging features of expected findings, potential complications, and treatment failure after radiation therapy increases diagnostic confidence when interpreting images of the irradiated neck. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26252192

  18. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging-based evaluation of optic-radiation shape and position in meningioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueming Lv; Xiaolei Chen; Bainan Xu; Gang Zheng; Jinjiang Li; Fangye Li; Guochen Sun; liusan

    2012-01-01

    Employing magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional white-matter imaging and conventional magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate the tumor parenchyma, peritumoral edema and compression on surrounding brain tissue. A color-coded tensor map and three-dimensional tracer diagram were applied to clearly display the optic-radiation location, course and damage. Results showed that the altered anisotropy values of meningioma patients corresponded with optic-radiation shape, size and position on both sides. Experimental findings indicate that the magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging technique is a means of tracing and clearly visualizing the optic radiation.

  19. Computer-aided quantitative control applied to image and radiation of x-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete test of publication follows. Introduction. Using of digital x-ray equipment allows to limit the radiation effect on patients and to improve the quality of medical images. In this paper the comparative research of film and digital x-ray equipment was performed by computer-aided quantitative control. Materials and methods. Film x-ray equipment RUM-20M (Mostrentgen, Russian) and digital x-ray equipment Multix Pro (Siemens, Germany) were compared. For radiation control of micro-roentgen radiation the monitor RM-60 (Aware Electronix, USA) connected with computer was used. The quality of medical images was estimated with an aid of test object TRS-2 (Ukraine). The medical images were tested by evaluation of contours deformation level and quantitative heterogeneous pattern. The proposed algorithm and software for estimation of spatial chaos in digital medical image is based on calculation of the skew and the spread parameters and autocorrelation function. Results. Comparative experimental study showed that x-ray diagnostic system Multix Pro has higher value of the scale characteristic and the relative sensitivity by 55% and 32% respectively in comparison with to RUM-20M, as well as resolution was also higher by 41%. Thus the air dose x-radiation on a surface of the detector is 7,7 times lower. Conclusion. Performed analysis spoke about the necessity to upgrade the x-ray instrumentation of low-doses by receivers with digital image processing and harmonization of domestic rules for dose loads and image quality in accordance with European standards.

  20. CIPHER: coded imager and polarimeter for high-energy radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Caroli, E; Dusi, W; Bertuccio, G; Sampietro, M

    2000-01-01

    The CIPHER instrument is a hard X- and soft gamma-ray spectroscopic and polarimetric coded mask imager based on an array of cadmium telluride micro-spectrometers. The position-sensitive detector (PSD) will be arranged in 4 modules of 32x32 crystals, each of 2x2 mm sup 2 cross section and 10 mm thickness giving a total active area of about 160 cm sup 2. The micro-spectrometer characteristics allow a wide operating range from approx 10 keV to 1 MeV, while the PSD is actively shielded by CsI crystals on the bottom in order to reduce background. The mask, based on a modified uniformly redundant array (MURA) pattern, is four times the area of the PSD and is situated at about 100 cm from the CdTe array top surface. The CIPHER instrument is proposed for a balloon experiment, both in order to assess the performance of such an instrumental concept for a small/medium-size satellite survey mission and to perform an innovative measurement of the Crab polarisation level. The CIPHER's field of view allows the instrument to...

  1. Imaging Thomson scattering measurements of radiatively heated Xe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, B; Meinecke, J; Kuschel, S; Ross, J S; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Tynan, G R

    2012-05-01

    Uniform density and temperature Xe plasmas have been produced over >4 mm scale-lengths using x-rays generated in a cylindrical Pb cavity. The cavity is 750 {micro}m in depth and diameter, and is heated by a 300 J, 2 ns square, 1054 nm laser pulse focused to a spot size of 200 {micro}m at the cavity entrance. The plasma is characterized by simultaneous imaging Thomson scattering measurements from both the electron and ion scattering features. The electron feature measurement determines the spatial electron density and temperature profile, and using these parameters as constraints in the ion feature analysis allows an accurate determination of the charge state of the Xe ions. The Thomson scattering probe beam is 40 J, 200 ps, and 527 nm, and is focused to a 100 {micro}m spot size at the entrance of the Pb cavity. Each system has a spatial resolution of 25 {micro}m, a temporal resolution of 200 ps (as determined by the probe duration), and a spectral resolution of 2 nm for the electron feature system and 0.025 nm for the ion feature system. The experiment is performed in a Xe filled target chamber at a neutral pressure of 3-10 Torr, and the x-rays produced in the Pb ionize and heat the Xe to a charge state of 20 {+-} 4 at up to 200 eV electron temperatures.

  2. Radiation measurement for safeguards environmental samples by imaging plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to contribute to the strengthened safeguards system based on the Program 93+2 of the IAEA, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) constructed the CELAR facility (Clean Laboratory for Environmental Analysis and Research) and is developing analytical technology for ultra-trace amounts of nuclear materials in environmental samples. To avoid cross-contamination among the samples and contamination of the clean rooms, radioactive materials in the samples to be introduced into the CLEAR facility will be limited to a certain amount. For this purpose the authors have examined the feasibility of Imaging-plate method, which is a kind of autoradiography and is suitable for determination of distribution of low-level radioactivity in the samples. Examination with β-ray (K-40), the linearity was obtained in the range of 0.01-0.2 Bq. The experiments with α-ray (Sm-147) suggested the detection limit of 0.05 Bq, which was equivalent to 2 μg of natural uranium. (author)

  3. Application of imaging plate to measurement of radiation spatial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An imaging plate (IP) was applied to 1) detecting of low-level contamination that was difficult to detect by a conventional way, 2) measurement of spatial distributions of thermal neutrons and 3) profile measurement of fast neutrons and proton beam of low intensity. For 1), a large-size IP (BAS-IIIs) was disposed to the sample, and the position and intensity of the contamination was identified unambiguously by scanning IP. For 2), activation foils were combined with IP to avoid γ-rays from neutron sources and radioactive accelerator components. We placed small gold activation foils at many points of interest in an accelerator room and disposed them on IP after irradiation. This method enables to measure neutron spatial distribution in a single scanning. We extended this method to profiling of fast neutron by using an aluminum plate and proton beams with intensity too low to measure by beam current but too strong to measure by pulse counting by using a thin copper foil. (author)

  4. Student and intern awareness of ionising radiation exposure from common diagnostic imaging procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This study aims to evaluate medical student and intern awareness of ionising radiation exposure from common diagnostic imaging procedures and to suggest how education could be improved. Fourth to sixth year medical students enrolled at a Western Australian university and interns from three teaching hospitals in Perth were recruited. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of 26 questions on their background, knowledge of ionising radiation doses and learning preferences for future teaching on this subject. A total of 331 completed questionnaires were received (95.9%). Of the 17 questions assessing knowledge of ionising radiation, a mean score of 6.0 was obtained by respondents (95% CI 5.8-6.2). Up to 54.8% of respondents underestimated the radiation dose from commonly requested radiological procedures. Respondents (11.3 and 25.5%) incorrectly believed that ultrasound and MRI emit ionising radiation, respectively. Of the four subgroups of respondents, the intern doctor subgroup performed significantly better (mean score 6.9, P< 0.0001, 95% CI 6.5-7.3) than each of the three medical student subgroups. When asked for the preferred method of teaching for future radiation awareness, a combination of lectures, tutorials and workshops was preferred. This study has clearly shown that awareness of ionising radiation from diagnostic imaging is lacking among senior medical students and interns. The results highlight the need for improved education to minimise unnecessary exposure of patients and the community to radiation. Further studies are required to determine the most effective form of education.

  5. Radiation safety and quality in diagnostic x-ray imaging 2001; Saeteilyturvallisuus ja laatu roentgendiagnostiikassa 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T. (eds.)

    2001-05-01

    The obligations of the medical exposure directive (97/43/Euratom) for hospitals dominate the current activities in radiation protection in medical radiology. The directive gives special emphasis to radiation exposure of children, to examinations with high radiation doses and to radiation exposure in health screening programmes. The most important examinations with high doses are radiological interventions, where even acute skin effects are possible, and the computed tomography where the number of CT examinations makes only about 5% from the total number of x-ray examinations but the collective effective dose about 40% from the combined collective effective dose of all x-ray examinations. In the research projects financed by the European Commission, radiation exposures to paediatric patients have been measured in radiography, fluoroscopy and CT, and various dose assessment methods have been compared to develop a method for national follow-up of patients' radiation dose. The newest research project is focused on dosimetry and quality assurance in interventional radiology and digital imaging. Other actual topics are the development of radiation protection regulations and quality systems, education and training programmes, and clinical audits. This report deals with new radiation protection guides and recommendations and the education and training of radiological staff in radiation protection. One important topic is the development of national follow-up method of radiation exposure to patients and comparison of various dose assessment methods. Quality assurance in health care and in paediatric radiology, and the acceptance test and quality assurance measurements of radiological equipment are also described. (orig.)

  6. Response-driven imaging biomarkers for predicting radiation necrosis of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation necrosis is an uncommon but severe adverse effect of brain radiation therapy (RT). Current predictive models based on radiation dose have limited accuracy. We aimed to identify early individual response biomarkers based upon diffusion tensor (DT) imaging and incorporated them into a response model for prediction of radiation necrosis. Twenty-nine patients with glioblastoma received six weeks of intensity modulated RT and concurrent temozolomide. Patients underwent DT-MRI scans before treatment, at three weeks during RT, and one, three, and six months after RT. Cases with radiation necrosis were classified based on generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of whole brain and DT index early changes in the corpus callosum and its substructures. Significant covariates were used to develop normal tissue complication probability models using binary logistic regression. Seven patients developed radiation necrosis. Percentage changes of radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium at three weeks during RT and at six months after RT differed significantly between the patients with and without necrosis (p = 0.05 and p = 0.01). Percentage change of RD at three weeks during RT in the 30 Gy dose–volume of the splenium and brain gEUD combined yielded the best-fit logistic regression model. Our findings indicate that early individual response during the course of RT, assessed by radial diffusivity, has the potential to aid the prediction of delayed radiation necrosis, which could provide guidance in dose-escalation trials. (paper)

  7. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging in young patients with testicular cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, C.J.; Twomey, M.; O' Regan, K.N. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); Murphy, K.P.; Maher, M.M.; O' Connor, O.J. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); University College Cork, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); McLaughlin, P.D. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Emergency and Trauma Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Power, D.G. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Medical Oncology, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-04-01

    Risks associated with high cumulative effective dose (CED) from radiation are greater when imaging is performed on younger patients. Testicular cancer affects young patients and has a good prognosis. Regular imaging is standard for follow-up. This study quantifies CED from diagnostic imaging in these patients. Radiological imaging of patients aged 18-39 years, diagnosed with testicular cancer between 2001 and 2011 in two tertiary care centres was examined. Age at diagnosis, cancer type, dose-length product (DLP), imaging type, and frequency were recorded. CED was calculated from DLP using conversion factors. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS. In total, 120 patients with a mean age of 30.7 ± 5.2 years at diagnosis had 1,410 radiological investigations. Median (IQR) surveillance was 4.37 years (2.0-5.5). Median (IQR) CED was 125.1 mSv (81.3-177.5). Computed tomography accounted for 65.3 % of imaging studies and 98.3 % of CED. We found that 77.5 % (93/120) of patients received high CED (>75 mSv). Surveillance time was associated with high CED (OR 2.1, CI 1.5-2.8). Survivors of testicular cancer frequently receive high CED from diagnostic imaging, mainly CT. Dose management software for accurate real-time monitoring of CED and low-dose CT protocols with maintained image quality should be used by specialist centres for surveillance imaging. (orig.)

  8. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging in young patients with testicular cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risks associated with high cumulative effective dose (CED) from radiation are greater when imaging is performed on younger patients. Testicular cancer affects young patients and has a good prognosis. Regular imaging is standard for follow-up. This study quantifies CED from diagnostic imaging in these patients. Radiological imaging of patients aged 18-39 years, diagnosed with testicular cancer between 2001 and 2011 in two tertiary care centres was examined. Age at diagnosis, cancer type, dose-length product (DLP), imaging type, and frequency were recorded. CED was calculated from DLP using conversion factors. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS. In total, 120 patients with a mean age of 30.7 ± 5.2 years at diagnosis had 1,410 radiological investigations. Median (IQR) surveillance was 4.37 years (2.0-5.5). Median (IQR) CED was 125.1 mSv (81.3-177.5). Computed tomography accounted for 65.3 % of imaging studies and 98.3 % of CED. We found that 77.5 % (93/120) of patients received high CED (>75 mSv). Surveillance time was associated with high CED (OR 2.1, CI 1.5-2.8). Survivors of testicular cancer frequently receive high CED from diagnostic imaging, mainly CT. Dose management software for accurate real-time monitoring of CED and low-dose CT protocols with maintained image quality should be used by specialist centres for surveillance imaging. (orig.)

  9. Monitoring proton radiation therapy with in-room PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Xuping; Ouyang Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges [Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Espana, Samuel; Daartz, Juliane; Liebsch, Norbert; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas R, E-mail: elfakhri@pet.mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    We used a mobile positron emission tomography (PET) scanner positioned within the proton therapy treatment room to study the feasibility of proton range verification with an in-room, stand-alone PET system, and compared with off-line equivalent studies. Two subjects with adenoid cystic carcinoma were enrolled into a pilot study in which in-room PET scans were acquired in list-mode after a routine fractionated treatment session. The list-mode PET data were reconstructed with different time schemes to generate in-room short, in-room long and off-line equivalent (by skipping coincidences from the first 15 min during the list-mode reconstruction) PET images for comparison in activity distribution patterns. A phantom study was followed to evaluate the accuracy of range verification for different reconstruction time schemes quantitatively. The in-room PET has a higher sensitivity compared to the off-line modality so that the PET acquisition time can be greatly reduced from 30 to <5 min. Features in deep-site, soft-tissue regions were better retained with in-room short PET acquisitions because of the collection of {sup 15}O component and lower biological washout. For soft tissue-equivalent material, the distal fall-off edge of an in-room short acquisition is deeper compared to an off-line equivalent scan, indicating a better coverage of the high-dose end of the beam. In-room PET is a promising low cost, high sensitivity modality for the in vivo verification of proton therapy. Better accuracy in Monte Carlo predictions, especially for biological decay modeling, is necessary.

  10. Impact of Computed Tomography Image Quality on Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Based on Soft Tissue Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Natalya V.; Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Qi, X. Sharon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado (United States); Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), different computed tomography (CT) modalities with varying image quality are being used to correct for interfractional variations in patient set-up and anatomy changes, thereby reducing clinical target volume to the planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. We explore how CT image quality affects patient repositioning and CTV-to-PTV margins in soft tissue registration-based IGRT for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four CT-based IGRT modalities used for prostate RT were considered in this study: MV fan beam CT (MVFBCT) (Tomotherapy), MV cone beam CT (MVCBCT) (MVision; Siemens), kV fan beam CT (kVFBCT) (CTVision, Siemens), and kV cone beam CT (kVCBCT) (Synergy; Elekta). Daily shifts were determined by manual registration to achieve the best soft tissue agreement. Effect of image quality on patient repositioning was determined by statistical analysis of daily shifts for 136 patients (34 per modality). Inter- and intraobserver variability of soft tissue registration was evaluated based on the registration of a representative scan for each CT modality with its corresponding planning scan. Results: Superior image quality with the kVFBCT resulted in reduced uncertainty in soft tissue registration during IGRT compared with other image modalities for IGRT. The largest interobserver variations of soft tissue registration were 1.1 mm, 2.5 mm, 2.6 mm, and 3.2 mm for kVFBCT, kVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. Conclusions: Image quality adversely affects the reproducibility of soft tissue-based registration for IGRT and necessitates a careful consideration of residual uncertainties in determining different CTV-to-PTV margins for IGRT using different image modalities.

  11. Impact of Computed Tomography Image Quality on Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Based on Soft Tissue Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), different computed tomography (CT) modalities with varying image quality are being used to correct for interfractional variations in patient set-up and anatomy changes, thereby reducing clinical target volume to the planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. We explore how CT image quality affects patient repositioning and CTV-to-PTV margins in soft tissue registration-based IGRT for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four CT-based IGRT modalities used for prostate RT were considered in this study: MV fan beam CT (MVFBCT) (Tomotherapy), MV cone beam CT (MVCBCT) (MVision; Siemens), kV fan beam CT (kVFBCT) (CTVision, Siemens), and kV cone beam CT (kVCBCT) (Synergy; Elekta). Daily shifts were determined by manual registration to achieve the best soft tissue agreement. Effect of image quality on patient repositioning was determined by statistical analysis of daily shifts for 136 patients (34 per modality). Inter- and intraobserver variability of soft tissue registration was evaluated based on the registration of a representative scan for each CT modality with its corresponding planning scan. Results: Superior image quality with the kVFBCT resulted in reduced uncertainty in soft tissue registration during IGRT compared with other image modalities for IGRT. The largest interobserver variations of soft tissue registration were 1.1 mm, 2.5 mm, 2.6 mm, and 3.2 mm for kVFBCT, kVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. Conclusions: Image quality adversely affects the reproducibility of soft tissue-based registration for IGRT and necessitates a careful consideration of residual uncertainties in determining different CTV-to-PTV margins for IGRT using different image modalities.

  12. A threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectrometer with double velocity imaging using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) imaging spectrometer at the U14-A beamline of the Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is presented. A set of open electron and ion lenses are utilized to map velocity imaging of photoelectrons and photoions simultaneously, in which a repelling electric field using an extra lens is applied to magnify images of photoelectrons instead of traditional accelerating electric field in order to suppress the contribution of energetic electrons in the threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) and the mass-selected TPEPICO spectroscopy. The typical energy resolution of TPES is measured to be 9 meV (full width at half maximum), as shown on the 2P1/2 ionization of argon. The measured mass resolving power for the present TPEPICO imaging spectrometer is above 900 of M/ΔM. Subsequently as a benchmark, oxygen molecule is photoionized by monochromatic synchrotron radiation at 20.298 eV and dissociates to an oxygen atomic ion and a neutral oxygen atom, and the translation energy distribution of oxygen atomic ion is measured by the time-sliced imaging based on mass-selected TPEPICO experiment. The kinetic energy resolution of the present ion velocity imaging is better than 3% of ΔE/E.

  13. Wiener-filter-based compensation of a transmitter’s radiation pattern using synthetic transmit aperture acoustic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne acoustic imaging has the capability of obtaining distance information of an object in a scene, the capability of distinguishing objects from the background or a texture and it can also estimate the velocity of objects. However, the nonideal radiation pattern of a transmitter used for insonifying an imaging space can degrade imaging results. In this work, radiation patterns have been investigated, and a new approach to decrease the effect of a transmitter’s radiation pattern in acoustic imaging is proposed. The novelty of our proposed method is that we used the measurement-based transmitter’s radiation compensation. The compensation can be accomplished without knowing anything about the model and characteristics of the transmitter, the receiver and the medium. We compensated for the transmitter’s radiation pattern and reconstructed acoustic images using the synthetic transmit aperture imaging technique. The compensation was based on the radiation pattern obtained from real measurements using a Wiener filter. The Wiener filter was used to compensate for the nonideal radiation pattern of the ultrasonic transmitter for both the phase and amplitude aspects simultaneously. To verify the proposed method, an indoor airborne acoustic imaging experiment was conducted using a two-dimensional (2D) receiver array and a 2D transmitter array. The results show an obvious improvement in the vertical angular resolution of the reconstructed three-dimensional images as well as a satisfactory horizontal angular resolution. (paper)

  14. Evaluation of non-radiologist physicians' knowledge on aspects related to ionizing radiation in imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to assess the non-radiologist physicians' knowledge on the use of ionizing radiation in imaging. Materials and Methods: cross-sectional study utilizing an anonymous questionnaire responded by physicians in clinical and surgical specialties, divided into two parts as follows: one including questions about the physicians' characteristics, frequency of imaging studies requests and participation in professional updating events, and another part including multiple choice questions approaching general knowledge about radiation, optimization principles and radioprotection. Results: from a total of 309 questionnaires, 120 (38.8%) were responded, 50% by physicians in surgical specialties and 50% in clinical specialties; respectively 45% and 2.5% of physicians responded that magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography use ionizing radiation. Overall, the average grade was higher for surgical specialists with no significant difference, except for the question about exposure in pregnant women (p = 0.047). Physicians who are professionally updated, particularly those attending clinical meetings (p = 0.050) and participating in teaching activities (p = 0.047), showed statistically superior knowledge about ionizing radiation as compared with others. Conclusion: the non-radiologist physicians' is heterogeneous and in some points needs to be improved. Multidisciplinary clinical meetings and teaching activities are important ways to disseminate information on the subject. (author)

  15. Treatment results of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Image Guided Radiation Therapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose is to evaluate treatment results of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) for head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: descriptive cross sectional study on 45 head and neck cancer patients treated by IMRT-IGRT with curative intent at Department of Radiation Oncology, 108 Central Military Hospital from 12/2013 to 3/2015. Results: 100% IMRT plan underwent quality assurance with gamma index ≥ 95%. Mean conformity index of IMRT plans was 1.21 ± 0.13. Patient setup errors in supero-inferior (SI), antero-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) were ≤ 3 mm. Overall treatment complete response, partial response and stable disease rates were 75.6% and 15.6 % and 8.8%, respectively. There were 42.2 % patients with no xerostomia; 57.8% grade 1 and no grade 2 - 4 xerostomia. Conclusions: Head and neck cancers treatment with IMRT-IGRT showed good tumor response with safety, high accuracy and acceptable side effects. (author)

  16. Image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography using the coupled radiative transport-diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coupled radiative transport-diffusion model can be used as light transport model in situations in which the diffusion equation is not a valid approximation everywhere in the domain. In the coupled model, light propagation is modelled with the radiative transport equation in sub-domains in which the approximations of the diffusion equation are not valid, such as within low-scattering regions, and the diffusion approximation is used elsewhere in the domain. In this paper, an image reconstruction method for diffuse optical tomography based on using the coupled radiative transport-diffusion model is developed. In the approach, absorption and scattering distributions are estimated by minimising a regularised least-squares error between the measured data and solution of the coupled model. The approach is tested with simulations. Reconstructions from different cases including domains with low-scattering regions are shown. The results show that the coupled radiative transport-diffusion model can be utilised in image reconstruction problem of diffuse optical tomography and that it produces as good quality reconstructions as the full radiative transport equation also in the presence of low-scattering regions.

  17. 3D modeling of satellite spectral images, radiation budget and energy budget of urban landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastellu-Etchegorry, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    DART EB is a model that is being developed for simulating the 3D (3 dimensional) energy budget of urban and natural scenes, possibly with topography and atmosphere. It simulates all non radiative energy mechanisms (heat conduction, turbulent momentum and heat fluxes, water reservoir evolution, etc.). It uses DART model (Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer) for simulating radiative mechanisms: 3D radiative budget of 3D scenes and their remote sensing images expressed in terms of reflectance or brightness temperature values, for any atmosphere, wavelength, sun/view direction, altitude and spatial resolution. It uses an innovative multispectral approach (ray tracing, exact kernel, discrete ordinate techniques) over the whole optical domain. This paper presents two major and recent improvements of DART for adapting it to urban canopies. (1) Simulation of the geometry and optical characteristics of urban elements (houses, etc.). (2) Modeling of thermal infrared emission by vegetation and urban elements. The new DART version was used in the context of the CAPITOUL project. For that, districts of the Toulouse urban data base (Autocad format) were translated into DART scenes. This allowed us to simulate visible, near infrared and thermal infrared satellite images of Toulouse districts. Moreover, the 3D radiation budget was used by DARTEB for simulating the time evolution of a number of geophysical quantities of various surface elements (roads, walls, roofs). Results were successfully compared with ground measurements of the CAPITOUL project.

  18. Reducing Radiation Dose in Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Using Image Noise Reduction Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrati, Mirlind; Langenbrink, Lukas; Piatkowski, Michal; Michaelsen, Jochen; Reimann, Doris; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to quantitatively evaluate the reduction of radiation dose in coronary angiography and angioplasty with the use of image noise reduction technology in a routine clinical setting. Radiation dose data from consecutive 605 coronary procedures (397 consecutive coronary angiograms and 208 consecutive coronary interventions) performed from October 2014 to April 2015 on a coronary angiography system with noise reduction technology (Allura Clarity IQ) were collected. For comparison, radiation dose data from consecutive 695 coronary procedures (435 coronary angiograms and 260 coronary interventions) performed on a conventional coronary angiography system from October 2013 to April 2014 were evaluated. Patient radiation dosage was evaluated based on the cumulative dose area product. Operators and operator practice did not change between the 2 evaluated periods. Patient characteristics were collected to evaluate similarity of patient groups. Image quality was evaluated on a 5-grade scale in 30 patients of each group. There were no significant differences between the 2 evaluated groups in gender, age, weight, and fluoroscopy time (6.8 ± 6.1 vs 6.9 ± 6.3 minutes, not significant). The dose area product was reduced from 3195 ± 2359 to 983 ± 972 cGycm(2) (65%, p noise reduction technology. Image quality was graded as similar between the evaluated systems (4.0 ± 0.7 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, not significant). In conclusion, a new x-ray technology with image noise reduction algorithm provides a substantial reduction in radiation exposure without the need to prolong the procedure or fluoroscopy time. PMID:27344273

  19. Algorithm-enabled exploration of image-quality potential of cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilo-voltage (KV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit mounted onto a linear accelerator treatment system, often referred to as on-board imager (OBI), plays an increasingly important role in image-guided radiation therapy. While the FDK algorithm is currently used for reconstructing images from clinical OBI data, optimization-based reconstruction has also been investigated for OBI CBCT. An optimization-based reconstruction involves numerous parameters, which can significantly impact reconstruction properties (or utility). The success of an optimization-based reconstruction for a particular class of practical applications thus relies strongly on appropriate selection of parameter values. In the work, we focus on tailoring the constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction, an optimization-based reconstruction previously shown of some potential for CBCT imaging conditions of practical interest, to OBI imaging through appropriate selection of parameter values. In particular, for given real data of phantoms and patient collected with OBI CBCT, we first devise utility metrics specific to OBI-quality-assurance tasks and then apply them to guiding the selection of parameter values in constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction. The study results show that the reconstructions are with improvement, relative to clinical FDK reconstruction, in both visualization and quantitative assessments in terms of the devised utility metrics. (paper)

  20. Algorithm-enabled exploration of image-quality potential of cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Sidky, Emil Y.; Bian, Junguo; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-06-01

    Kilo-voltage (KV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit mounted onto a linear accelerator treatment system, often referred to as on-board imager (OBI), plays an increasingly important role in image-guided radiation therapy. While the FDK algorithm is currently used for reconstructing images from clinical OBI data, optimization-based reconstruction has also been investigated for OBI CBCT. An optimization-based reconstruction involves numerous parameters, which can significantly impact reconstruction properties (or utility). The success of an optimization-based reconstruction for a particular class of practical applications thus relies strongly on appropriate selection of parameter values. In the work, we focus on tailoring the constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction, an optimization-based reconstruction previously shown of some potential for CBCT imaging conditions of practical interest, to OBI imaging through appropriate selection of parameter values. In particular, for given real data of phantoms and patient collected with OBI CBCT, we first devise utility metrics specific to OBI-quality-assurance tasks and then apply them to guiding the selection of parameter values in constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction. The study results show that the reconstructions are with improvement, relative to clinical FDK reconstruction, in both visualization and quantitative assessments in terms of the devised utility metrics.