WorldWideScience

Sample records for cerebral magnetic resonance

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-five patients with cerebral infarction were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and correlative CT scans. MRI was more sensitive than CT for detecting cerebral infarction, and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) pulse sequence was most sensitive for detecting cerebral infarction except for some subcortical infarction. The size of infarcted areas on MRI was larger than that on CT in 29 of 51 infarcted areas, equal in 22. The pulse sequence using long repetition time (TR) and double echo delay time (TE), such as SE (2000/30, 90), improved the detectability of cerebral infarction. (author)

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-vivo proton and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect changes in cerebral metabolism during ischemia and other types of metabolic stress. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in an animal model to observe morphological alterations during focal cerebral ischemia. Spectroscopy was performed in animal models with global ischemia, in volunteers during hyperventilation and pharmaco-logically altered cerebral perfusion, and in patients with acute and prolonged focal cerebral ischemia. (author). 396 refs.; 44 figs.; 14 tabs

  3. Magnetic Resonance Features of Cerebral Malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Cerebral malaria is a major health hazard, with a high incidence of mortality. The disease is endemic in many developing countries, but with a greater increase in tourism, occasional cases may be detected in countries where the disease in not prevalent. Early diagnosis and evaluation of cerebral involvement in malaria utilizing modern imaging modalities have an impact on the treatment and clinical outcome. Purpose: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) features of patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. Material and Methods: We present the findings in three patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. MR imaging using a 1.5-Tesla unit was carried out. The sequences performed were 5-mm-thick T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR), and T2-weighted gradient-echo axial sequences, and sagittal and coronal FLAIR. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm2, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were obtained. Results: Focal hyperintensities in the bilateral periventricular white matter, corpus callosum, occipital subcortex, and bilateral thalami were noticed on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences. The lesions were more marked in the splenium of the corpus callosum. No enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted MR images was observed. There was no evidence of restricted diffusion on the diffusion-weighted sequence and ADC map. Conclusion: MR is a sensitive imaging modality, with a role in the assessment of cerebral lesions in malaria. Focal white matter and corpus callosal lesions without any restricted diffusion were the key findings in our patients

  4. Magnetic Resonance Features of Cerebral Malaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, P.; Sharma, R.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, U. (Dept. of Radiodiagnosis and Dept. of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India))

    2008-06-15

    Background: Cerebral malaria is a major health hazard, with a high incidence of mortality. The disease is endemic in many developing countries, but with a greater increase in tourism, occasional cases may be detected in countries where the disease in not prevalent. Early diagnosis and evaluation of cerebral involvement in malaria utilizing modern imaging modalities have an impact on the treatment and clinical outcome. Purpose: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) features of patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. Material and Methods: We present the findings in three patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. MR imaging using a 1.5-Tesla unit was carried out. The sequences performed were 5-mm-thick T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR), and T2-weighted gradient-echo axial sequences, and sagittal and coronal FLAIR. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm2, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were obtained. Results: Focal hyperintensities in the bilateral periventricular white matter, corpus callosum, occipital subcortex, and bilateral thalami were noticed on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences. The lesions were more marked in the splenium of the corpus callosum. No enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted MR images was observed. There was no evidence of restricted diffusion on the diffusion-weighted sequence and ADC map. Conclusion: MR is a sensitive imaging modality, with a role in the assessment of cerebral lesions in malaria. Focal white matter and corpus callosal lesions without any restricted diffusion were the key findings in our patients

  5. Asymptomatic cerebral infarction examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To find the real incidence and risk factors in asymptomatic cerebral infarction, a retrospective review was made on magnetic resonance (MR) images, which were obtained from 713 outpatients seen at the Geriatrics Research Institute Hospital between March and November of 1990. The criteria for asymptomatic cerebral infarction are: high signal intensity areas larger than 3 mm in diameter on T2-weighted image; no history of stroke; no neurological and psychological signs or symptoms with or without subjective symptoms. Symptomatic cerebral stroke was defined as stroke episodes associated with neurological signs and infarction lesions on CT or MR imaging. Of a total of 713 patients, 215 (30.2%) had symtomatic cerebral infarction and 384 (53.9%) had no cerebral lesions. The incidence of asymptomatic cerebral infarction increased with aging. Cerebral risk factors, i.e. hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes mellitus, were more significantly common in both symptomatic and asymptomatic groups than the normal control group. In the group of asymptomatic patients, T2-weighted images showed hyperintensity in the corona radiata in 60.9%, in the frontal lobe in 32.1%, in the semioval center in 28.8%, and in the basal ganglia in 23.7%. Periventricular hyperintensity was present in 124 of all 713 patients (17.4%). Common complaints in asymptomatic patients were headache (40.0%), dizziness (14.4%), and neck muscle contraction (9.8%). In conclusion, MR imaging may contribute to manage asymptomatic patients. (N.K.)

  6. Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Cerebral Fat Embolism

    OpenAIRE

    Feride Kural; Fuldem Yıldırım Dönmez; Hülya Aslan; Burcu Akpınar; Ahmet Muhteşem Ağıldere

    2012-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is mostly associated with long bone fractures of the lower extremities. FES typically occurs between 1 and 3 days after the trauma, and the clinical triad is hypoxia, neurologic symptoms and petechial rash (4, 5). Neurologic symptoms widely vary from confusion to coma, rarely death may occur. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in the diagnosis of cerebral FES and typical findings are multipl punctate hyperintensities at subcortical and deep ...

  7. Pattern of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography changes in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a common but highly under-recognised condition, which is missed not only by general practitioners but also by neurologists. Computerised tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain alone is not sufficient to diagnose this condition. Objective of this study was to explore the pattern of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance venography (MRV) changes in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Methods: This was a descriptive study in which 52 cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with special emphasis on their MRI and MRV findings were included. The study was conducted in Neurology Unit, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, Pakistan, from January 2010 to July 2011. All patients suffering from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis were included in the study. Multi-planar/multi-sequential, Tesla 1.5 MRI/MRV time of flight images were done in all cases where there was suspicion of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Results: Out of 52 patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis 41 (78.84%) were female and 11 (21.15%) were male. Mean age was 37+-5 years. Definite risk factors were found in 38 (73.076%) patients with pregnancy, use of oral contraceptives or puerperium being the most frequently found risk factor in 20 (73.076%) patients. Most common complaint was headache found in 41 (78.84%) patients, followed by focal neurological deficits, and altered mental status and seizures. Papilloedema was seen in 20 (38.46%) patients. The cerebral venous sinuses most frequently involved were transverse and sigmoid sinuses in 17 patients (32.69%) while superior sagittal sinus alone in 10 (19.23%) patients. Overall CT brain was normal in 30% and MRI brain in 23.07% patients; however, MRV of these patients revealed CVST. Conclusion: Imaging plays a primary role in the diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because the clinical picture of CVST is non-specific and highly variable. Thrombosis of

  8. Analysis with magnetic resonance imaging of lesions in cerebral achromatopsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Yuichiro; Kitahara, Kenji; Kumegawa, Koichi [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Nakadomari, Satoshi [Kanagawa Rihabilitation Hospital, Atsugi (Japan); Umahara, Takahiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to localize the lesions associated with cerebral achromatopsia. We examined 20 patients with homonymous hemianopsia caused by cerebral infarction (17 men and 3 women aged 49 to 81 years; mean age, 65.1 years). Ishihara plates, standard pseudoiso-chromatic plates (part 2) and the panel D-15 test were used to examine color perception. Color matching tasks and color naming tasks were used to test color recognition. We tried to apply functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to lesion analysis in the brain. Cerebral achromatopsia was diagnosed in four patients. The analysis showed that lesions in the infracalcarine area (Brodmann's area 18 and 19) were associated with cerebral achromatopsia. Additionally, the lesions associated with failure of the panel D-15 (PD-15) test were located more anterior than the lesions associated with failure of Ishihara plates. We show evidence that lesions in the anterio-ventral temporo-occipital area are associated with cerebral achromatopsia. This result is in accord with past observations (autopsy, fMRI and positron emission tomography). (author)

  9. Cerebral Fat Embolism: Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PURPOSE: To demonstrate the diffusion-weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and the follow-up MRI findings, of cerebral fat embolism in the acute stage. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The initial DWI and clinical findings of six patients with cerebral fat embolism were retrospectively evaluated. The finding of DWI with a b-value of 1000 s/mm2 (b=1000) was compared with that of DWI with a b-value of 0 s/mm2 (b=0). In three patients who underwent follow-up MRI, the interval change of the lesion on T2-weighted images was investigated. RESULTS: The characteristic DWI finding of cerebral fat embolism in the acute stage was multiple, hyperintense, dot-like lesions disseminated in the brain. These lesions were distributed dominantly in the bilateral border-zone areas. Some lesions had an ancillary location including the cortex, deep white matter, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. The lesions were more intense and numerous in DWI (b=1000) than in DWI (b=0). The findings on the follow-up T2-weighted images were multiple confluent hyperintense lesions in the white matter with progression since the initial MRI. CONCLUSION: DWI could be a sensitive tool for detecting cerebral fat embolism in the acute phase. It is recommended that DWI be included in the initial evaluation of cerebral fat embolism with MRI

  10. Analysis with magnetic resonance imaging of lesions in cerebral achromatopsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to localize the lesions associated with cerebral achromatopsia. We examined 20 patients with homonymous hemianopsia caused by cerebral infarction (17 men and 3 women aged 49 to 81 years; mean age, 65.1 years). Ishihara plates, standard pseudoiso-chromatic plates (part 2) and the panel D-15 test were used to examine color perception. Color matching tasks and color naming tasks were used to test color recognition. We tried to apply functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to lesion analysis in the brain. Cerebral achromatopsia was diagnosed in four patients. The analysis showed that lesions in the infracalcarine area (Brodmann's area 18 and 19) were associated with cerebral achromatopsia. Additionally, the lesions associated with failure of the panel D-15 (PD-15) test were located more anterior than the lesions associated with failure of Ishihara plates. We show evidence that lesions in the anterio-ventral temporo-occipital area are associated with cerebral achromatopsia. This result is in accord with past observations (autopsy, fMRI and positron emission tomography). (author)

  11. Practical Introduction to Cerebral Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR ) imaging holds a privileged position within neuroimaging techniques owing to its high anatomic detail and its capacity to study many physiological processes. The appearance of functional magnetic resonance (fMR I) brings more relevance to MR , turning it into a powerful tool with the ability to group, in a single exam, high-resolution anatomy and cerebral function. In this article we describe the principles and some advantages of fMRI compared to other neuro functional imaging modalities. In addition, we present the site wide and analysis requisites for the performance and post-processing of the most common neuro functional experiments in clinical practice. We also include neuro functional images obtained at Instituto de Alta Tecnologia Medica of Antioquia (IATM ) on a healthy volunteer group and two pathological cases. Lastly, we mention some of the practical indications of this technique which is still in an intense development, research and validation phase.

  12. Rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis: Magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen A Lone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis (ROCM is a potentially fatal fungal infection that commonly affects diabetic and other immunocompromised patients. Necrotizing and angioinvasive features of this class of pathogenic fungi facilitate spread from sinuses into orbit and brain with devastating consequences like cavernous sinus thrombosis. We describe magnetic resonance, including diffusion weighted imaging findings in a case of micobiologically documented ROCM in a 50-year-old diabetic man. Restricted diffusion was demonstrated in the distribution of infiltrating lesion right from soft issue facial component through left orbit and in the cavernous sinus. Favorable outcome was achieved with surgical debridement and prolonged amphotericin therapy.

  13. Changes in signal intensity of cerebral hematoma in magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance is highly sensitive for the detection of intraparenchymatous hemorrhage. The evolution of hematoma over time translates into changes in signal intensity. This means that we can determine when the hematoma presented and, in addition. follow its course. On the other hand, many intracranial processes developing association with hemorrhage, the recognition of which is, in some cases, of importance. We have studied 60 cerebral hematomas and have described the changes that will take place in their signal and the reasons for them. (author)

  14. Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Cerebral Fat Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Kural

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fat embolism syndrome (FES is mostly associated with long bone fractures of the lower extremities. FES typically occurs between 1 and 3 days after the trauma, and the clinical triad is hypoxia, neurologic symptoms and petechial rash (4, 5. Neurologic symptoms widely vary from confusion to coma, rarely death may occur. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in the diagnosis of cerebral FES and typical findings are multipl punctate hyperintensities at subcortical and deep white matter on T2 weighted and diffusion weighted images which is called as starfield pattern. We report a case of cerebral FES in a patient who had neurologic symptoms after traumatic femur neck facture.

  15. Application of magnetic resonance angiography in cerebral vein system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore imaging technique of magnetic resonance in cerebral vein system and to evaluate the value of magnetic resonance veinography in displaying cerebral vein and diagnosing disease. Methods: The thrity-five persons experienced examinations of 2-dimension time of flight(2D TOF), 2-dimension phase contrast(2D PC) and then 3-dimension contrast-enhancement veinography(3D-CE MRV). The raw data treated with maxi intensitive projection. The images of veinography and disease changes were analysed as so to evaluate the dependability of the three methods in playing venous structions and disease changes. Results: All the diagnoses were proved by DSA or followed up. In 25 normal persons, 2D TOF and 2D PC of 10 persons showed abnormal in different type. But the 3D-CE MRV were normal.In 10 patients suffered from vein thrombosis,that all 2D-TOF MRV, 2D-PC MRV and 3D-CE MRV showed vein abnormality followed as: up radius sinus were no appeared in 2 cases, fined in 2 cases, local cannal of up radius sinus were narrowed in 1 cases. Right traversable sinus no appeared in 2 cases, fined in 2 cases, right sigmoid sinus no appeared in 1 cases. Additionally, in one patients, the left traversal sinus showed high signal as same as normal vein sinus in 2D TOF but of contrast medium was seen in 3D-CE-MRV. 3D-CE-MRV was dependable in describing structions of vein and displaying disease changes than 2D-TOF MRV and 2D-PC MRV. Conclusion: The techniques of vein imaging of 2D-TOF MRV and 2D-PC MRV combining with 3D-CE-MRV formed imaging method of cerebral vein system and it was dependable method for showing cerebral vein struction and diagnosing throb vein sinus thrombosis. (authors)

  16. CHARACTERISTIC MAGNETIC RESONANCE ENHANCEMENT PATTERN IN CEREBRAL SCHISTOSOMIASIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-qiu Liu; Xiao-yuan Feng; Zhen-wei Yao; Hua-ping Sun

    2006-01-01

    Objective To describe the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of cerebral schistosomiasis.Methods Twenty-five patients whose diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) schistosomiasis had been pathologically (n=8) and clinically (n=17) confirmed were randomly selected.MRI was performed on a Signal 1.5T MRI scanner before and after the intravenous administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine constrast medium.We reviewed the MRI studies obtained at the time of initial presentation,as well as follow-up studies obtained during and after medical treatment.Results Immunological tests in 15 patients indicated schistosomiasis haematobium.Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in 22 cases showed central linear enhancement surrounded by multiple enhancing punctate nodules,which appeared "arborized".Through operation and pathological examination,8 cases had the granuloma formation of schistosomal eggs extensive surrounded by inflammation and venous congestion.And 17 cases were treated with praziquantel and corticosteroid therapy.And they were followed up for 2 months by taking MRI,which turned out to be complete resolution of the enhancing structure and edema.At follow-up,all the patients' initial symptoms also resolved.Conclusion The specified MRI enhancement pattern of cerebral schistosomiasis is common in most cases of CNS schistosomiasis,so it should be taken account into the diagnosis of cerebral schistosomiasis.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Daniel A; Dehkharghani, Seena

    2015-12-01

    Imaging is indispensable in the evaluation of patients presenting with central nervous system emergencies. Although computed tomography (CT) is the mainstay of initial assessment and triage, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become vital in expanding diagnostic capabilities, refining management strategies, and developing our understanding of disease processes. Ischemic stroke and cerebral venous thrombosis are 2 areas wherein MRI is actively revolutionizing patient care. Familiarity with the imaging manifestations of these 2 disease processes is crucial for any radiologist reading brain MR studies. In this review, the fundamentals of image interpretation will be addressed in-depth. Furthermore, advanced imaging techniques which are redefining the role of emergency MRI will be outlined, with a focus on the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie image interpretation. In particular, emerging data surrounding the use of MR perfusion imaging in acute stroke management portend dramatic shifts in neurointerventional management. To this end, a review of the recent stroke literature will hopefully enhance the radiologist's role in both meaningful reporting and multidisciplinary teamwork. PMID:26636639

  18. Application of 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of cerebral infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the application of single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of cerebral infection according to manifestations of the 8 patients with cerebritis and 13 patients with gliomas. Methods: The patients including 8 cerebral abscess and 13 gliomas were examined with MRS. And the quantity of the NAA, Cho, Cr, Lip, Lac, AA were measured and compared. Results: There were differences between cerebral abscess and tumors on MRS. NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr of abscess were 4.114±3.637 and 3.084±0.933. NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr of tumors were 1.064±0.823 and 5.987±4.380. There was amino acids (AA) could be seen in some of cerebral abscess. Conclusion: 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy can supply important information in diagnosis cerebral infection and differentiate information with tumor. (authors)

  19. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate - a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Mark B; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik Bw

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% ([Formula: see text]), glutamate increased by 4.7% ([Formula: see text]) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p[Formula: see text]). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  20. Human cerebral osmolytes during chronic hyponatremia. A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    OpenAIRE

    Videen, J S; Michaelis, T.; Pinto, P; Ross, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenesis of morbidity associated with hyponatremia is postulated to be determined by the state of intracellular cerebral osmolytes. Previously inaccessible, these metabolites can now be quantitated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An in vivo quantitative assay of osmolytes was performed in 12 chronic hyponatremic patients (mean serum sodium 120 meq/liter) and 10 normal controls. Short echo time proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of occipital gray and parietal white matte...

  1. Term and Preterm Children with Cerebral Palsy: Etiology, Clinic and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Adın, Sait; Aslan, Mehmet; DOĞAN, Metin; Yakıncı, Cengiz; Alkan, Alpay

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a frequent neurologic disease of term and preterm neonates. The disorder has various causes and the etiology, clinical manifestations and radiological screening findings are different in term and preterms. Thirty six preterm and 66 term CP patients aged between 6 months-16 years were evaluated in this study and were compared according to their etiology, clinical manifestation and cerebral Magnetic Resonance Imagıng (MRI) findings statistically. Material and Met...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate that how early we can detect an ischemic lesion and how we can recognize the stages of evolution of ischemic infarcts, 10 patients with acute hemispheric cerebral infarction were studied by a high resolution MRI apparatus with 0.5 Tesla magnetic field and the following results were obtained: 1) In ischemic infarcts, the earliest change was detected 3 hours after the insult in one patient. In the other two patients, the change was seen 5 and 6 hours after the accidents respectively. So MRI can detect the earliest change within 24 hours after ischemic infarcts by T2 weighted image. 2) The stages of evolution of infarction involving the cerebral hemisphere was quite similar to those seen by CT. Selective gray matter high signal images were noted as the earliest changes by T2 weighted images within a few hours after the episode. During 24 hours to 1 week, the MRI abnormalities gradually extended to involve the underlying white matter with homogenously increased signal intensity on T2 weighted scans. In the subacute stage between 1 week to 3 weeks, the MRI had a rather mottled appearance with surrounding isodense areas, probably correlating to the fogging phenomenon seen by CT. In the chronic stage after 4 weeks, the lesion of the T2 image became smaller with the areas of mottled and decreased signal intensity. Some lesions were surrounded by areas of increased signal intensity. 3) T1 and T2 values of ischemic areas prolong significantly in comparison to the value in healthy white matter. But the change of T1, T2 values does not seem to be specific for the evolution of pathological changes. (author)

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging characteristics of cerebral Blastomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay A Vachhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blastomycosis is a dimorphic fungus that is endemic to the midwest and southwestern United States. Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS is thought to only represent 5-10% of cases of disseminated Blastomycosis. Case Description: A 54-year-old Caucasian female presented to the Neurosurgery service with a 1-day history of progressive right sided hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated a 2 × 4 cm heterogeneous intracranial mass lesion involving the left motor cortex and extending into the ipsilateral parietal lobe. Single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS over the enhancing area demonstrated diminished N-acetyl aspartate (NAA to creatine ratio (1.10, normal choline to NAA ratio (0.82, normal choline to creatine ratio (0.9, and a diminished myoinositol to creatine ratio (0.39. There appeared to be peaks between 3.6 and 3.8 ppm over the enhancing area that were not present in the contralateral normal brain and thought to represent a "trehalose" peak. Due to worsening symptoms and uncertain preoperative diagnosis, the patient underwent a left fronto-parietal craniotomy for open surgical biopsy with possible resection approximately one month after presentation. Pathological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of Blastomycosis. Conclusion: We present the second documented case of intracranial Blastomycosis with MRS imaging. There appears to be a characteristic peak between 3.6 and 3.8 ppm that is thought to represent a "trehalose" peak. This peak is rather specific to fungi and can be helpful in differentiating fungal abscesses from pyogenic abscesses and malignant neoplasms.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Criteria for Thrombolysis in Hyperacute Cerebral Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    AHMETGJEKAJ, ILIR; KABASHI-MUÇAJ, SERBEZE; LASCU, LUANA CORINA; KABASHI, ANTIGONA; BONDARI, A.; Bondari, Simona; DEDUSHI-HOTI, KRESHNIKE; BIÇAKU, ARDIAN; SHATRI, JETON

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Selection of patients with cerebral infarction for MRI that is suitable for thrombolytic therapy as an emerging application. Although the efficiency of the therapy with i.v. tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 3 hours after onset of symptoms has been proven in selected patients with CT, now these criteria are determined by MRI, as the data we gather are fast and accurate in the first hours. Material and methods: MRI screening in patients with acute cerebral infarction before ap...

  5. Detection of cerebral atrophy in type- II diabetes mellitus by magnetic resonance imaging of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that affects many systems in the body. Cerebral atrophy is one of the complications of diabetes and research is on going to find out its aetiopathological factors. The main aim of the study was to determine the frequency of cerebral atrophy in type-II diabetes mellitus using magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Methods: One hundred diabetic patients (Random blood sugar >126 mg/dl) were recruited in this study after the informed consent from every patient. Duration of diabetes was five years and more in all the patients as determined by their glycosylated haemoglobin which was >6 in all the patients. All the patients were undergone MRI of brain using 1.5 Tesla power magnetic resonance imaging machine of Picker Company. Evan's index, a specific parameter for measurement of cerebral atrophy was calculated on MR images and was used in this study. Results: In male group the frequency of cerebral atrophy was 22 (47%) and in female group it was found to be 23 (43%). When we study the overall population the frequency was found to be 45 (45%). The results are well in concordance with the previous data published on this issue. Conclusions: Cerebral atrophy, a complication of long standing diabetes is quite frequent in our population and is well diagnosed by MRI. (author)

  6. Role of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging in Cerebral Alveolar Echinococcosis

    OpenAIRE

    Guocai Yang; Qingxin Zhang; Guibo Tang; Hui Xu; Zhen Yang; Jianzhong Guo; Lin Liang; Yonghong Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background: To analyze the characteristic performance of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in cerebral alveolar echinococcosis (CAE). Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 clinical-identified CAE cases MR performance, and summarized the MRS and SWI performance of CAE. Results: The 10 cases of CAE all had the history of primary HAE, among who 6 cases had single lesion (60%), while the rest 4 cases had multiple lesions (40%); and 4 cases were conc...

  7. Bilateral optic nerve infarction in rhino-cerebral mucormycosis: A rare magnetic resonance imaging finding

    OpenAIRE

    Mandeep Singh Ghuman; Shabdeep Kaur; Samarjit Kaur Bhandal; Archana Ahluwalia; Kavita Saggar

    2015-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging disease in diabetes and immunocompromised patients. Rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis is one of the common forms of the disease. Mucormycosis leading to ischemic optic neuropathy is a rare complication. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy is limited and uncommonly reported. We report an unusual case of mucormycosis in which MRI revealed bilateral optic nerve infarction, in addition to perineural extension of t...

  8. Assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using T2*-weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidar, Fatemeh; Faeghi, Fariborz; Ghorbani, Askar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of gradient echo (GRE) sequences in the detection and characterization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis compared to conventional magnetic resonance sequences. Methods: A total of 17 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) were evaluated using different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The MRI sequences included T1-weighted spin echo (SE) imaging, T*2-weighted turbo SE (TSE), fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), T*2-weighted conventional GRE, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). MR venography (MRV) images were obtained as the golden standard. Results: Venous sinus thrombosis was best detectable in T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences in all patients except in one case. Venous thrombosis was undetectable in DWI. T*2-weighted GRE sequences were superior to T*2-weighted TSE, T1-weighted SE, and FLAIR. Enhanced MRV was successful in displaying the location of thrombosis. Conclusion: T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences are probably the best method for the assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The mentioned method is non-invasive; therefore, it can be employed in the clinical evaluation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27326365

  9. Changes in signal intensity of cerebral hematoma in magnetic resonance. Claves en la semiologia del hematoma cerebral en resonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galant, J.; Poyatos, C.; Marti-Bonmarti, L.; Martinez, J.; Ferrer, D.; Dualde, D.; Talens, A. (Universidad de Valencia (Spain). Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas)

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is highly sensitive for the detection of intraparenchymatous hemorrhage. The evolution of hematoma over time translates into changes in signal intensity. This means that we can determine when the hematoma presented and, in addition. follow its course. On the other hand, many intracranial processes developing association with hemorrhage, the recognition of which is, in some cases, of importance. We have studied 60 cerebral hematomas and have described the changes that will take place in their signal and the reasons for them. (author)

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Breath-Hold Divers with Cerebral Decompression Sickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of cerebral decompression sickness (DCS is still unclear. We report 2 cases of breath-hold divers with cerebral DCS in whom magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated distinctive characteristics. One case presented right hemiparesthesia, diplopia, and gait disturbance after breath-hold diving into the sea at a depth of 20 m. Brain MRI with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR sequence revealed multiple hyperintense lesions in the right frontal lobe, bilateral thalamus, pons, and right cerebellar hemisphere. The second case presented visual and gait disturbance after repetitive breath-hold diving into the sea. FLAIR imaging showed hyperintense areas in the bilateral occipito-parietal lobes. In both cases, diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient mapping revealed hyperintense areas in the lesions identified by FLAIR. Moreover, follow-up MRI showed attenuation of the FLAIR signal abnormalities. These findings are suggestive of transient hyperpermeability in the microvasculature as a possible cause of cerebral DCS.

  11. Design of an interventional magnetic resonance imaging coil for cerebral surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yue; Wang Wen-Tao; Wang Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    In clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),the design of the radiofrequency (RF) coil is very important.For certain applications,the appropriate coil can produce an improved image quality.However,it is difficult to achieve a uniform B1 field and a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) simultaneously.In this article,we design an interventional transmitter-and-receiver RF coil for cerebral surgery.This coil adopts a disassembly structure that can be assembled and disassembled repeatedly on the cerebral surgery gantry to reduce the amount of interference from the MRI during surgery.The simulation results and the imaging experiments demonstrate that this coil can produce a uniform RF field,a high SNR,and a large imaging range to meet the requirements of the cerebral surgery.

  12. Assessment of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase mutational status in cerebral gliomas by in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietze, Anna; Oettingen, Gorm von; Sangill, Ryan;

    concentrations in normal tissue or in gliomas with wildtype IDH. It has recently been shown that 2-HG is detectable non-invasively by clinical Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) [2]. The aim of our study is to establish 2-HG MRS in patients suspected for cerebral gliomas on a clinical Magnetic Resonance (MR...... and has the potential to open up for more personalized treatment approaches. It is usually assessed by immunohistochemistry or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in tumor tissue obtained by surgical biopsies. IDH-mutated tumor cells accumulate 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) that is present in very low...... overall acquisition duration was about 30 min. IDH mutational status in the tissue samples was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (3 cases) and PCR (1 case). Results: Two cases harbored IDH mutations, two had wildtype IDH, as assessed by immunohistochemistry or PCR. MRS detected IDH mutational status...

  13. Cerebral metabolism, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cognitive dysfunction in early multiple sclerosis: an exploratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, Morten; Mathiesen, Henrik K; Tscherning, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown that cortical cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) is reduced in multiple sclerosis (MS). Quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measures of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) normalized to creatine (NAA/Cr) assess neuronal...... deterioration, and several studies have shown reductions in MS. Furthermore, both PET and MRS reductions correlate with cognitive dysfunction in MS. Our aim was to determine if changes in cortical CMRglc in early MS correlate with NAA/Cr measurements of neuronal deterioration, as well as cognitive dysfunction...

  14. Long-term follow-up of cerebral infarction patients with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Sperling, B; Arlien-Søborg, P;

    1994-01-01

    serially from the acute stage to the chronic stage of infarction. Regional cerebral blood flow was also measured within the affected areas. These factors were compared with the clinical outcome. METHODS: Six patients with ischemic stroke were examined serially from the acute stage (< or = 2 days) to the...... chronic stage (> 6 months) with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cerebral blood flow was measured with single-photon emission-computed tomography with 99mTc-labeled d,l-hexamethylenepropyleneamine oxime as flow tracer. RESULTS: Lactate was found in all patients in the acute stage of stroke. Lactate...... in the acute and chronic stage, whereas hyperemia was found in 4 patients in the subacute stage. CONCLUSIONS: In this preliminary study no clear correlation was found between the level of N-acetylaspartate or lactate in the acute stage of stroke and the clinical outcome; however, there does appear to...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of a cerebral cavernous haemangioma in a dog : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Schoeman

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A 13-month-old, neutered, male Golden retriever presented with seizures and progressive depression. Clinical and neurological assessment was consistent with severe intracranial disease. The neurological condition progressively deteriorated and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed the presence of a large, contrast-enhancing, space-occupying mass in the right cerebral hemisphere. Therapy with corticosteroids, mannitol and furosemide ameliorated the signs of depression and ataxia, but the owner elected euthanasia after 1 week. Post mortem examination of the brain confirmed the presence of a large haemorrhagic lesion in the right olfactory lobe, the histopathological appearance of which was consistent with cerebral cavernous haemangioma. This is the 1st case describing the MRI appearance of a cavernous haemangioma of the cerebrum in the veterinary literature.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral infarction: Time course of Gd-DTPA enhancement and CT comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-five patients (7 females and 28 males) with cerebral infarction and suspicion of cerebral infarction of 4 h to 27 months duration were studied 45 times with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using Gd-DTPA. Spin echo (SE) images were obtained before and after the administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 or 0.15 mmol/kg) and compared with the enhanced CT. MR imaging using Gd-DTPA was more sensitive than enhanced CT and very useful for detecting a new focus of cerebral infarction, especially in the cases with multiple infarcted areas and for showing the extent of cortical and subcortical infarction. In most cases the MR enhancement was obvious in the subacute stage, especially after cerebral embolism, and the signal intensity of the lesion tended to show a gradual increase. The diagnosis of embolism was accepted on the basis of acute onset without prior TIA, coupled with angiography showing the embolus itself and/or a capillary blush and a wide area of infarction. (orig.)

  17. Cerebrovascular ischemic changes associated with fetal posterior cerebral artery- descriptive retrospective study with magnetic resonance imaging and angiography of brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatraman Indiran

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Circle of Willis, the main collateral pathway for cerebral circulation, is complete in only a portion of the population. There are many variations in the Circle of Willis. Fetal posterior cerebral artery, which is defined as posterior cerebral artery arising from internal carotid artery, is a common variant of the Circle of Willis. Though association between the fetal posterior cerebral artery and ischemia have been studied, no specific study has been conducted in the Indian population. We aim to identify the incidence of small and large vessel strokes in patients with fetal posterior cerebral artery using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA of brain in the Indian population. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed MR angiographies of the brain performed in our institution, in order to assess the posterior cerebral circulation and its association with small ischemic changes and large vessel strokes. Results: 92 of the 140 patients (65% with fetal posterior cerebral artery (PCA had small vessel ischemic changes. 72 patients (51.4% had large vessel infarcts in any of the vascular territories. 35% of the patients included in this study showed infarcts in the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory and 15 % showed infarcts in the PCA territory. Conclusion: Higher incidence of MCA infarcts in our study probably suggests that PCA cannot aid in collateral formation cases of reduced flow across the internal carotid artery and that fetal PCA could be an important risk factor in cerebrovascular ischemic diseases.

  18. Study of cerebral blood flow by magnetic resonance 0.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To asses the cerebral blood flow by magnetic resonance, 1.5 T superconductor imagers have been used, taking slices of the brain for dynamic study following rapid iv administration of gadolinium (Gd-DTPA). Our aim was to attempt to reproduce these data with a 0.5 T superconductor imager. Thirty-two dynamic studies of the head were carried out. The first 10 were used to modify the methodology until a standard technique was achieved, which was employed for the remaining 22:T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequence (TR=50msec, TE=23 msec, angle=10*, thickness=10mm, matrix=128x64, FOV=250 mm), taking 15 slices in 75 seconds following a 20 ml iv bolus of Gd-DTPA. When the signal intensity was measured at the level of the cerebral cortex, a reduction was detected in association with the passage of Gd-DTPA through the cerebral microcirculation, with a mean signal loss of 5.96%±2.25. This signal loss is significant (p<0.01) when compared with that reported in studies in which no contrast agent was used (2.54%±0.6). The maximum signal loss appeared at times varying between 10 and 40 seconds after administration of the contrast medium. It is concluded that passage (perfusion) through the cerebral microcirculation can be observed at 0.5 T, although the attenuation values obtained are lower than those reported by other authors in their series. The time at which the signal loss appears after iv contrast administration is unpredictable, fact which further limits the utility of this methodology. (Author)

  19. Magnetic Resonance Appearance of Cerebral Cystic Echinococcosis: World Health Organization (WHO) Classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razek, A.A.K. Abdel (Diagnostic Radiology Dept., Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura (Egypt)); El-Shamam, O. (Tripoli Medical Center, Tripoli (Libya)); Wahab, N. Abdel (Mansoura International Hospital, Mansoura (Egypt))

    2009-06-15

    Background: Cystic echinococcosis (CE) of the brain is an uncommon parasitic infestation. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently published a classification of hepatic CE based upon ultrasonographic findings. Purpose: To evaluate whether the new WHO classification of hepatic CE can be used in the classification of cerebral CE. Material and Methods: The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of 17 patients (14 male, three female), aged 10-24 years (mean age 16 years), with pathologically proved cerebral CE, and who underwent pre- and postcontrast MR imaging, were retrospectively evaluated. The cysts were classified according to the new WHO classification and their clinical stages. The MR imaging findings were correlated to the histopathologic findings. Results: The fertile active cysts (n=12) that showed protoscoleces appeared as unilocular cysts with no visible wall (cystic lesions; CL), unilocular spherical cysts with a clear visible wall (CE1), or as a unilocular mother cyst with multiple vesicles arranged peripherally along the cyst wall (CE2). The transitional form (CE3) (n=2) containing scoleces showed multiple daughter cysts entirely filling the maternal cyst. The inactive cysts (n=3) that had lost their fertility appeared as a 'ball of wool' with collapsed membrane or had detached membrane with water-lily sign (CE4) and calcified lesions (CE5). Conclusion: The WHO classification of hepatic CE can be used in the classification of cerebral CE when evaluated by MRI, as it can differentiate fertile active cysts from the transitional and inactive forms of cerebral cystic echinococcosis. This information is essential for treatment planning

  20. An Experimental Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Analysis on Early Stage of Acute Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易黎; 张苏明; 张新江

    2002-01-01

    Summary: Using different models of focal cerebral ischemia, the temporal and spatial rules ofmetabolism and energy changes in the post-ischemia brain tissue were measured by proton magnet-ic resonance spectroscopy(1HMRS) to provide valuable information for judging the prognosis of a-cute focal cerebral ischemia and carrying out effective therapy. Nine healthy Sprague-Dawly rats(both sexes) were randomly divided into two groups: The rats in the group A (n=4) were occlud-ed with self-thrombus for 1 h; The rats in the group B (n=5) were occluded with thread-embolifor 1 h. The 1H MRS at 30, 40, 50, 60 min respectively was examined and the metabolicchanges of NAA, Cho and Lac in the regions of interest were semiquantitatively analyzed. Thespectrum intregral calculus area ratio of NAA, Cho, Lac to Pcr+Ct was set as the criterion. Thevalues of NAA ~ Cho in the regions of interest were declined gradually within 1 h after ischemia,especially, the ratio of Cho/(Pcr+Cr), NAA/(Pcr+Cr) at 60 min had significant difference withthat at 50 min (P<0. 05). The ratio of Lac/(Pcr+Cr) began to decrease at 40 min from initial in-crease of Lac in both A and B groups. MR proton spectrum analysis was a non-invasive, direct andcomprehensive tool for the study of cellular metabolism and the status of the biochemical energy inacute ischemia stroke.

  1. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cerebral infarction in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamuro, Manabu; Katayama, Yasuo; Igarashi, Hironaka; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows the noninvasive study of metabolism in vivo. In order to further understand the time course of biochemical changes during cerebral infarction, we performed the MRS study with pathological analysis. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded in spontaneously hypertensive male rats (SHR) by the method of Tamura et al. The spectra were obtained from the infarcted hemisphere by placing the surface coils over the left side of the calvarium. {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H-MRS were performed at 3 hours, 24 hours and 7 days after MCA occlusion. Ischemic lesions caused by the left MCA occlusion extended into the parietal lobe and caudate putamen. After 3 hours of ischemia, vacuolated neurophils and shrunken neurons were observed. At 24 hours, these changes were severe. After 7 days, infiltration of monocytes and capillary hyperplasia were seen, and neurons had disappeared. At the acute stage of ischemia the phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi) peak ratio decreased. After 7 days of ischemia, these changes became obscure. The intracellular pH (pHi) decreased after 3 hours of ischemia and recovered almost to the control level at 24 hours post ischemia. Alkalosis was apparent 7 days after ischemia. This alkalosis might be due to increased permeability of the deteriorated blood brain barrier. Although the lactate level was high 24 hours post ischemia, the pHi was almost normal. The N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine ratio decreased significantly from the acute stage of stroke. This decrease correlated with pathological changes. The correlation of the magnetic resonance spectra with the histological results may open aspects for monitoring stroke therapy and a new approach to tissue characterization. (author)

  2. Effect of Acupuncture on NSE and Hcy Levels and Magnetic Resonance Spectrum in Cerebral Infarction Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Su; Xu Jing; Wang Peng; Luo Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of stage-based acupuncture on neuron specific enolase (NSE),homocysteine (Hcy) levels and magnetic resonance spectrum in patients with cerebral infarction.Methods:Ninety eligible subjects were randomized into two groups,45in each.The control group was intervened by conventional neurological medication,while the treatment group was by acupuncture according to different stages in addition to the conventional neurological medication.The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated after a treatment course.Results:The total effective rate was 97.8% in the treatment group versus 77.8% in the control group,and the treatment group was significantly superior to the control (P<0.01).In comparing the National Institutes of Health stroke scale (NIHSS) score,NSE and Hcy levels,the treatment group was lower than the control group,and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.01).The analysis of magnetic resonance spectrum revealed that the treatment group had a markedly higher N-acetyle-aspartate (NAA)concentration and lower lactic acid (Lac) concentration than the control group (P<0.01).Conclusion:Stage-based acupuncture significantly increases clinical efficacy and heals neurological function deficit,and its mechanism is possibly related to the decrease of NSE and Hcy levels,increase of NAA,and elimination of Lac.

  3. Magnetic resonance evaluation of cerebral toxoplasmosis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batra, A; Tripathi, R.P.; Gorthi, S.P. [Inst. of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi (India). NMR Research Center

    2004-04-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate and delineate the characteristics of cerebral toxoplasmosis lesions using a combination of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy, diffusion, and perfusion studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 8 patients with 23 lesions were evaluated on a 1.5-T MR system. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed with three 'b' values of 50, 500, and 1000 s/mm2, and the apparent diffusion coefficient maps were calculated. The diffusion-weighted appearances and the T2-weighted MR appearances of the lesions were compared. MR spectroscopy was performed using the point-resolved single-voxel technique with two TE values of 135 ms and 270 ms. Perfusion studies were carried out using the dynamic contrast-enhanced technique, and the relative cerebral blood volume maps were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. RESULTS: DWI revealed the majority of the lesions as having increased diffusion within their necrotic centers, with the ADC ranging from 0.5 to 3.01 (mean {+-} SD: 1.49 {+-} 0.7). All the lesions revealed a predominant lipid peak on MR spectroscopy and were extremely hypovascular on perfusion MR studies. CONCLUSION: MR diffusion, spectroscopy, and perfusion studies help in characterizing toxoplasmosis lesions and, in most cases, can be used in combination to help establish the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis.

  4. Magnetic resonance evaluation of cerebral toxoplasmosis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PURPOSE: To evaluate and delineate the characteristics of cerebral toxoplasmosis lesions using a combination of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy, diffusion, and perfusion studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 8 patients with 23 lesions were evaluated on a 1.5-T MR system. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed with three 'b' values of 50, 500, and 1000 s/mm2, and the apparent diffusion coefficient maps were calculated. The diffusion-weighted appearances and the T2-weighted MR appearances of the lesions were compared. MR spectroscopy was performed using the point-resolved single-voxel technique with two TE values of 135 ms and 270 ms. Perfusion studies were carried out using the dynamic contrast-enhanced technique, and the relative cerebral blood volume maps were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. RESULTS: DWI revealed the majority of the lesions as having increased diffusion within their necrotic centers, with the ADC ranging from 0.5 to 3.01 (mean ± SD: 1.49 ± 0.7). All the lesions revealed a predominant lipid peak on MR spectroscopy and were extremely hypovascular on perfusion MR studies. CONCLUSION: MR diffusion, spectroscopy, and perfusion studies help in characterizing toxoplasmosis lesions and, in most cases, can be used in combination to help establish the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis

  5. Application of magnetic resonance imaging for monitoring stem cell transplantation for the treatment of cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianglin Zhang; Gang Wang; Furen Dong; Zhiming Wang

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify global research trends in the application of MRI for monitoring stem cell transplantation using a bibliometric analysis of Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies relating to the application of MRI for detecting stem cell transplantation for the treatment of cerebral ischemia using papers in Web of Science published from 2002 to 2011. SELECTION CRITERIA: The inclusion criteria were: (a) peer-reviewed articles on the application of MRI for detecting transplanted stem cells published and indexed in Web of Science; (b) year of publication between 2002 and 2011. Exclusion criteria were: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) some corrected papers.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to journals; (3) distribution according to institution; (4) distribution according to country; (5) top cited authors over the last 10 years.RESULTS: A total of 1 498 studies related to the application of MRI for monitoring stem cell transplantation appeared in Web of Science from 2002 to 2011, almost half of which were derived from American authors and institutes. The number of studies on the application of MRI for detecting stem cell transplantation has gradually increased over the past 10 years. Most papers on this topic appeared in Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. CONCLUSION: This analysis suggests that few experimental studies have been investigated the use of MRI for tracking SPIO-labeled human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells during the treatment of cerebral ischemia.

  6. Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Demonstrates Long-Term Effect of Bone Marrow Transplantation in α-Mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Else R; Lund, Allan M; Thomsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    α-Mannosidosis, OMIM #248500, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by acidic α-mannosidase deficiency. Treatment options include bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and, possibly in the future, enzyme replacement therapy. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) enables non......-invasive monitoring of cerebral treatment effect. Accumulated cerebral mannose-containing oligosaccharides were demonstrated by MRS in a patient who at age 2 years and 11 months received a BMT from a haploidentical non-carrier sibling. The cerebral mannose-containing oligosaccharides had disappeared as early as 9......½ months after BMT. MRS furthermore demonstrated the persistent treatment effect at regular intervals up to 5½ years after BMT. MRS is a non-invasive tool that can demonstrate the effect of BMT treatment. Likewise, MRS may be used to demonstrate the cerebral effect of other potential treatments such as...

  7. Cerebral misery perfusion diagnosed using hypercapnic blood-oxygenation-level-dependent contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Souza Olympio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cerebral misery perfusion represents a failure of cerebral autoregulation. It is an important differential diagnosis in post-stroke patients presenting with collapses in the presence of haemodynamically significant cerebrovascular stenosis. This is particularly the case when cortical or internal watershed infarcts are present. When this condition occurs, further investigation should be done immediately. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian man presented with a stroke secondary to complete occlusion of his left internal carotid artery. He went on to suffer recurrent seizures. Neuroimaging demonstrated numerous new watershed-territory cerebral infarcts. No source of arterial thromboembolism was demonstrable. Hypercapnic blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure his cerebrovascular reserve capacity. The findings were suggestive of cerebral misery perfusion. Conclusions Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging allows the inference of cerebral misery perfusion. This procedure is cheaper and more readily available than positron emission tomography imaging, which is the current gold standard diagnostic test. The most evaluated treatment for cerebral misery perfusion is extracranial-intracranial bypass. Although previous trials of this have been unfavourable, the results of new studies involving extracranial-intracranial bypass in high-risk patients identified during cerebral perfusion imaging are awaited. Cerebral misery perfusion is an important and under-recognized condition in which emerging imaging and treatment modalities present the possibility of practical and evidence-based management in the near future. Physicians should thus be aware of this disorder and of recent developments in diagnostic tests that allow its detection.

  8. Serial magnetic resonance imaging of evolving focal cerebral ischemia in the CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized as a sensitive medium for detecting lesions within the central nervous system. Three cats were scanned under light pentobarbital anesthesia using various MRI techniques before and after right middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. Scanning began as early as four minutes after MCA occlusion and continued 8 to 10 hours. The animals were subsequently perfused with a colloidal carbon and phosphate buffered formalin. Brains were removed and sliced for histopathologic examination. The sharpest images were produced with a single spin-echo, multi-slice technique using a 0.6 Tesla (T) FIELD, 0.4 cm slice thickness, and a surface coil. Changes were apparent within 1 hr after MCA occlusion with T2 weighting (TR 2000 msec, TE 120 msec). Increased signal with this technique correlated with areas of decreased colloidal carbon perfusion. One animal with a large cortical infarction showed increased cortical signal at the time of the first MRI scan completed in the first 20 min. An animal with only mild cortical changes and severe ischemic changes in the dorsal thalamus nuclei had similar MRI results. T1 weighted images (TR 500 msec, TE 30 msec) revealed changes in hemispheric contour possibly corresponding to edema at 4 hours post occlusion. One animal imaged with almost double the slice thickness (0.75 cm) and with a 1.5 T field showed poor image quality using the above techniques but without a surface coil. MRI is sensitive in detecting changes due to cerebral ischemia within 30 minutes of onset. Increased MRI signal correlated with areas of decreased colloidal carbon perfusion, demonstrated at later times

  9. Use of 3-D magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography in detecting human cerebral stroke: a simulation study*

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, Shan-an; He, Bin

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new three dimensional (3-D) conductivity imaging approach and have used it to detect human brain conductivity changes corresponding to acute cerebral stroke. The proposed Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) approach is based on the J-Substitution algorithm and is expanded to imaging 3-D subject conductivity distribution changes. Computer simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the present MREIT imaging approach. Simulations of both types o...

  10. Whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral arteriovenous malformations involving the motor pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate cortical, basal ganglia and cerebellar activation in patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) involving the motor pathways, we studied ten patients (six male, four female, mean age 30.3 years, range 7.4-44.1) by whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a 1.5-T scanner with the EPI-BOLD-technique. In seven cases multiple fMRI studies were available, acquired in the course of the multi-session endovascular interventional treatment. Self-paced right- and left-handed finger-tapping tasks were used to invoke activation. In six patients a super-selective amytal test (Wada test) was performed during diagnostic pre-interventional angiography studies. Abnormal cortical activation patterns, with activation of the primary sensorimotor area, the supplementary motor area and/or the cerebellum shifted to unphysiological locations, were found in four patients. In all cases, localization of the AVM could account for the changes from the normal. After endovascular procedures, fMRI demonstrated shifts in the activation pattern in three patients. In the six patients that had undergone fMRI studies and the Wada test, both methods yielded comparable results. The fact that AVMs are structural anomalies for which the brain can partly compensate ('plasticity') was underlined by these results. fMRI is a valuable tool in the pre-therapeutic evaluation and post-interventional follow-up of patients with cerebral AVMs in whom an operation or an endovascular procedure is planned. (orig.)

  11. Imaging cerebral 2-ketoisocaproate metabolism with hyperpolarized (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butt, Sadia Asghar; Søgaard, Lise Vejby-Christensen; Magnusson, Peter O.; Lauritzen, Mette Hauge; Laustsen, Christoffer; Akeson, Per; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H

    2012-01-01

    The branched chain amino acid transaminase (BCAT) has an important role in nitrogen shuttling and glutamate metabolism in the brain. The purpose of this study was to describe the cerebral distribution and metabolism of hyperpolarized 2-keto[1-(13)C]isocaproate (KIC) in the normal rat using magnetic...

  12. Periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges in neuropsychiatric lupus: association with cerebritis in magnetic resonance imaging and resolution after intravenous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K-S; Cheong, K-L; Tan, C-T

    2010-05-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a known diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus presented with seizures and psychosis. An electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed continuous, non-evolving periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) in the left temporal region, which did not resolve with benzodiazepine. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan demonstrated a focal hyperintensity in the left medial temporal and left occipital lobes, left thalamus and bilateral cerebellar white matter, with evidence of vasculitis in the magnetic resonance angiography. Intravenous immunoglobulin was given because of failed steroid therapy, which resulted in a full resolution of clinical, EEG and MRI abnormalities. Lupus cerebritis should be considered as a possible aetiology in PLEDs, and immunoglobulin can be effective in neuropsychiatric lupus. PMID:20133346

  13. Absolute cerebral blood flow and blood volume measured by magnetic resonance imaging bolus tracking: comparison with positron emission tomography values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Leif; Smith, D F; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter;

    1998-01-01

    blood volume (CBV) estimates obtained using this normalization constant correlated well with values obtained by O-15 labeled carbonmonooxide (C15O) PET. However, PET CBV values were approximately 2.5 times larger than absolute MRI CBV values, supporting the hypothesized sensitivity of MRI to small...... hypercapnic conditions. After dose normalization and introduction of an empirical constant phi Gd, absolute regional CBF was calculated from MRI. The spatial resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of CBF measurements by MRI were better than by the H215O-PET protocol. Magnetic resonance imaging cerebral...

  14. Cerebral hemodynamics in human acute ischemic stroke: a study with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Karonen, J O; Vanninen, R L; Ostergaard, L; Roivainen, R; Nuutinen, J; Perkiö, J; Könönen, M; Hämäläinen, A; Vanninen, E J; Soimakallio, S; Kuikka, J T; Aronen, H J

    2000-06-01

    Nineteen patients with acute ischemic stroke (<24 hours) underwent diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted (PWI) magnetic resonance imaging at the acute stage and 1 week later. Eleven patients also underwent technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at the acute stage. Relative (ischemic vs. contralateral control) cerebral blood flow (relCBF), relative cerebral blood volume, and relative mean transit time were measured in the ischemic core, in the area of infarct growth, and in the eventually viable ischemic tissue on PWI maps. The relCBF was also measured from SPECT. There was a curvilinear relationship between the relCBF measured from PWI and SPECT (r = 0.854; P < 0.001). The tissue proceeding to infarction during the follow-up had significantly lower initial CBF and cerebral blood volume values on PWI maps (P < 0.001) than the eventually viable ischemic tissue had. The best value for discriminating the area of infarct growth from the eventually viable ischemic tissue was 48% for PWI relCBF and 87% for PWI relative cerebral blood volume. Combined diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging enables one to detect hemodynamically different subregions inside the initial perfusion abnormality. Tissue survival may be different in these subregions and may be predicted. PMID:10894174

  15. Diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction using diffusion-weighted imaging by low field (0.2 T) magnetic resonance image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, Tohru; Sasamori, Yumiko; Takahashi, Hachisaburou; Mikami, Juniti; Ishii, Yuuko; Okada, Kinya; Shirafuji, Naoko; Kashiwakura, Takeshi [Takahashi Neurosurgical Hospital, Sapporo (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to confirm the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction on diffusion-weighted imaging using low field (0.2 T) magnetic resonance image (MRI). Acute cerebral infarctions in 51 patients were examined on diffusion-weighted imaging using low field MRI within 48 hours after clinical symptoms. Diffusion-weighted imaging was examined using line scan method. Twenty-four cases were cortical infarction, and twenty-two cases were perforating infarction. In five cases out of 51 cases, ischemic regions were not detected as abnormal high signal intensity area on diffusion-weighted imaging. Four cases of no abnormal detection were transient ischemic attack, and the other one was a perforating infarction. The earliest detection time in cortical infarction cases was 1 hour and 20 minutes. On the other hand, the earliest detection time in perforating infarction cases was 3 hours. Detective ability for acute cerebral infarction on diffusion-weighted imaging by low field MRI was depending on both size and lesion of infarction. That is to say, either small size or brain stem infarction was hard to detect. Thin slice and vertical slice examination for the infarction may improve to diagnose in low field MRI. Our conclusion is acute cerebral infarction was able to be diagnosed on diffusion-weighted imaging by low field as well as high field MRI. (author)

  16. Diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction using diffusion-weighted imaging by low field (0.2 T) magnetic resonance image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to confirm the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction on diffusion-weighted imaging using low field (0.2 T) magnetic resonance image (MRI). Acute cerebral infarctions in 51 patients were examined on diffusion-weighted imaging using low field MRI within 48 hours after clinical symptoms. Diffusion-weighted imaging was examined using line scan method. Twenty-four cases were cortical infarction, and twenty-two cases were perforating infarction. In five cases out of 51 cases, ischemic regions were not detected as abnormal high signal intensity area on diffusion-weighted imaging. Four cases of no abnormal detection were transient ischemic attack, and the other one was a perforating infarction. The earliest detection time in cortical infarction cases was 1 hour and 20 minutes. On the other hand, the earliest detection time in perforating infarction cases was 3 hours. Detective ability for acute cerebral infarction on diffusion-weighted imaging by low field MRI was depending on both size and lesion of infarction. That is to say, either small size or brain stem infarction was hard to detect. Thin slice and vertical slice examination for the infarction may improve to diagnose in low field MRI. Our conclusion is acute cerebral infarction was able to be diagnosed on diffusion-weighted imaging by low field as well as high field MRI. (author)

  17. 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of vascular endothelial growth factor-induced neuroprotection following acute cerebral ischemia and reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yi; Haiou Zhang; Hao Lei; Li Wei

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has become generally accepted that measuring N-acetyI-L-aspartic acid through the use of 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) could be used to evaluate neuronal injury. OBJECTIVE: To study metabolic changes of N-acetyl-L-aspanic acid surrounding the acute cerebral ischcmia area following vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment using 1H-MRS imaging, and to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of VEGE.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomly controlled animal study, according to one-factor analysis of variance, was performed at the Shenzhen Hospital of Peking University and State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences from August 2003 to December 2005.MATERIALS: Twelve healthy, adult, Sprague Dawley rats were used to establish an ischemia/reperfusion model through the use of middle cerebral artery occlusion. The 4.7T superconducting nuclear magnetic resonance meter was provided by Brucker Company. VEGF164 was purchased from Shenzhen Jingmei Bioengineering Co., Ltd. Titus ancsthesia machine was purchased from Draeger Medical AG & Co. KG.METHODS: The rats were randomly divided into model control (n = 6) and VEGF-injected (n = 6) groups. All animals received 60-minute middle cerebral artery occlusion and 24-hour repcrfusion. Lateral cerebral ventricle injection was performed by stereotaxic technique at respective time points. The VEGF group received 0. 1 μ g/μ L VEGF (5 μL), and the model group received the same amount of normal saline, once daily for 3 days.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Metabolic changes of N-acetyl-L-aspartic acid and lactic acid following cerebral ischemia and reperfusion were detected using 1H-MRS, and the ischemic volume was measured.RESULTS: Twelve rats were included in the final analysis. =H-MRS results revealed that the ischemic volume increased in the control group compared with prior to injection (P < 0.01). In the

  18. Multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cerebral metabolites in healthy dogs at 1.5 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Song, Yumi; Lee, Kija; Lee, Youngwon

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to measure the difference in levels of cerebral metabolites in the right and left hemispheres, gray (GM) and white matter (WM), imaging planes, and anatomical regions of healthy dogs to establish normal variations. Eight male Beagle dogs (1 to 4 years of age; mean age, 2 years) with no evidence of neurologic disease were studied. Using the multi-voxel technique on a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner, metabolite values (N-acetyl aspartate [NAA], choline [Cho], creatine [Cr]) were obtained from the frontoparietal WM, parietal GM, temporal GM, occipital GM, thalamus, cerebellum, mid-brain, and pons. There was no significant difference in levels of these metabolites between the right and left in any locations or between the GM and WM in the cerebral hemispheres. However, there were significant differences in metabolite ratios within imaging planes. The NAA/Cr was lower in the cerebellum than other regions and the thalamus had a higher Cho/Cr and lower NAA/Cho ratio than in other regions. The spectral and metabolic values will provide a useful internal reference for clinical practice and research involving multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Measurement of metabolite values in the transverse plane is recommended for comparing levels of regional metabolites. PMID:26645339

  19. Multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cerebral metabolites in healthy dogs at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Song, Yumi; Lee, Kija; Lee, Youngwon; Choi, Hojung

    2016-06-30

    This study was conducted to measure the difference in levels of cerebral metabolites in the right and left hemispheres, gray (GM) and white matter (WM), imaging planes, and anatomical regions of healthy dogs to establish normal variations. Eight male Beagle dogs (1 to 4 years of age; mean age, 2 years) with no evidence of neurologic disease were studied. Using the multi-voxel technique on a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner, metabolite values (N-acetyl aspartate [NAA], choline [Cho], creatine [Cr]) were obtained from the frontoparietal WM, parietal GM, temporal GM, occipital GM, thalamus, cerebellum, mid-brain, and pons. There was no significant difference in levels of these metabolites between the right and left in any locations or between the GM and WM in the cerebral hemispheres. However, there were significant differences in metabolite ratios within imaging planes. The NAA/Cr was lower in the cerebellum than other regions and the thalamus had a higher Cho/Cr and lower NAA/Cho ratio than in other regions. The spectral and metabolic values will provide a useful internal reference for clinical practice and research involving multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Measurement of metabolite values in the transverse plane is recommended for comparing levels of regional metabolites. PMID:26645339

  20. In-vivo quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms from 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmonik, C. [The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States); Diaz, O.; Klucznik, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States); Grossman, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States). Neurosurgery

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is of interest for the assessment of aneurysmal rupture risk, for providing boundary conditions for computational simulations and as a validation tool for theoretical models. Materials and Methods: 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D pcMRI) in combination with quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA) was evaluated for measuring wall motion in 7 intracranial aneurysms. In each aneurysm, 2 (in one case 3) cross sections, oriented approximately perpendicular to each other, were measured. Results: The maximum aneurysmal wall distention ranged from 0.16 mm to 1.6 mm (mean 0.67 mm), the maximum aneurysmal wall contraction was -1.91 mm to -0.34 mm (mean 0.94 mm), and the average wall displacement ranged from 0.04 mm to 0.31 mm (mean 0.15 mm). Statistically significant correlations between average wall displacement and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 7 of 15 cross sections; statistically significant correlations between the displacement of the luminal boundary center point and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 6 of 15 cross sections. Conclusion: 2D pcMRI in combination with QMRA is capable of visualizing and quantifying wall motion in cerebral aneurysms. However, application of this technique is currently restricted by its limited spatial resolution. (orig.)

  1. In-vivo quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms from 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is of interest for the assessment of aneurysmal rupture risk, for providing boundary conditions for computational simulations and as a validation tool for theoretical models. Materials and Methods: 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D pcMRI) in combination with quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA) was evaluated for measuring wall motion in 7 intracranial aneurysms. In each aneurysm, 2 (in one case 3) cross sections, oriented approximately perpendicular to each other, were measured. Results: The maximum aneurysmal wall distention ranged from 0.16 mm to 1.6 mm (mean 0.67 mm), the maximum aneurysmal wall contraction was -1.91 mm to -0.34 mm (mean 0.94 mm), and the average wall displacement ranged from 0.04 mm to 0.31 mm (mean 0.15 mm). Statistically significant correlations between average wall displacement and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 7 of 15 cross sections; statistically significant correlations between the displacement of the luminal boundary center point and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 6 of 15 cross sections. Conclusion: 2D pcMRI in combination with QMRA is capable of visualizing and quantifying wall motion in cerebral aneurysms. However, application of this technique is currently restricted by its limited spatial resolution. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic Resonance Findings in Two Episodes of Repeated Cerebral Fat Embolisms in a Patient with Autologous Fat Injection into the Face

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyung Mi; Kim, Eui Jong; Jahng, Geon Ho; Chang, Dae-Il

    2012-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance image (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings in a patient of cerebral fat embolism (CFE) occurred in a 26-year-old woman after an autologous fat injection into the face. After initial neurologic symptom onset, MRI and MRS data were obtained two times to investigate repeated CFE. We obtained the MRS data in the two different time intervals and two different echo times to compare the lesions with normal brain parenchyma. The results of MRS data sho...

  3. Optimal velocity encoding during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of velocity encoding on measurement of brain blood flow and blood volume of inflow and outflow using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. A single two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography slice was applied perpendicular to the internal carotid artery and the vertebral artery at C2 level. For each subject, the velocity encoding was set from 30 to 90 cm/s with an interval of 10 cm/s for a total of seven settings. Various velocity encodings greatly affected blood flow volume, maximal blood flow velocity and mean blood flow velocity in the internal carotid artery, but did not significantly affect vertebral arteries and jugular veins. When velocity encoding was 60-80 cm/s, the inflow blood volume was 655 ± 118 mL/min, and the outflow volume was 506 ± 186 mL/min. The ratio of outflow/inflow was steady at 0.78-0.83, and there was no aliasing in any of the images. These findings suggest that velocity encodings of 60-80 cm/s should be selected during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography.

  4. Surgical results in patients with unruptured asymptomatic cerebral aneurysms. Significance of evaluation of neuropsychological function, magnetic resonance images and cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated neuropsychological function, magnetic resonance (MR) images and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with unruptured asymptomatic cerebral aneurysms. Among consecutive operations (n=73) on 70 patients since 2000, direct surgery was performed in 53 operations on 50 patients, and intravascular surgery was performed in 20 operations on 20 patients. Surgical results of direct surgery were studied. Direct surgery was selected mainly for patients with small and anterior circulation aneurysms. MR imaging was conducted 1 week after surgery, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) examination and CBF measurement using 133Xe-SPECT were done before and 1 month after surgery. Abnormal neurological findings were recognized postoperatively in 26% of surgeries. Among them, visual disturbance was permanent in 4% of surgeries, all of which were surgeries for paraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysms. WAIS-R results deteriorated in 26% of surgeries at 1 month and at least in 5% of surgeries at 1 year after surgery. MR images at 1 week after surgery revealed brain damage in 30% of surgeries and subdural fluid collection in 19% of surgeries. Patients with large brain damage or thick subdural fluid collection frequently showed neurological deficits and/or WAISR deterioration. These complications were recognized frequently in patients with ACoA aneurysms. Resting CBF decreased significantly in the area supplied by the anterior cerebral artery and anterior border zone on the operated side postoperatively. The brain damage and subdural fluid collection were observed frequently and caused neurological deficits and neuropsychological dysfunction, although these were usually transient. It may be necessary to evaluate neuropsychological function, MRI and CBF in patients with unruptured asymptomatic cerebral aneurysms to improve surgical results. (author)

  5. Study of the correlation of brainstem auditory evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fobe, Lisete Pessoa de Oliveira [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina]. E-mail: lispessoa@yahoo.com

    1999-12-01

    Central auditory evaluation in 21 children with cerebral palsy was done with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) and correlated with brain magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI); 12 boys and 9 girls between 5 and 12 years old were studied. All children had follow-up at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo. The control group was done with 17 children, 10 boys and 7 girls (mean age 8.06 years, SD 2.27 years). The BAEP abnormalities were: decrease of latency of wave V; decrease of latency III-V and I-IV intervals at the right side. All patients has MRI supratentorial abnormalities and 11 had brainstem atrophy. The MRI pathologic findings were: ventricular enlargement (n=17 or 80.95%), cortical/subcortical atrophy (n=15 or 71.42%), left brainstem atrophy (n=11 or 52.38%), periventricular leukomalacia (n=10 or 47.61%), infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory (n=6 or 28.57%), and malformations such as schizencephaly and colpocephaly (n=5 or 23.80%). The findings of the decrease latencies in children with cerebral palsy suggest the contribution of decussating auditory fibers at the lower and upper pons and midbrain, the lack of homogeneity of the surrounding volume of the conductor fibres and the presence of several concurrently active potential generators sources, should be facilitating mechanisms for the nervous input to brainstem. (author)

  6. Use of 3-D magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography in detecting human cerebral stroke: a simulation study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Nuo; ZHU Shan-an; HE Bin

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new three dimensional (3-D) conductivity imaging approach and have used it to detect human brain conductivity changes corresponding to acute cerebral stroke. The proposed Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) approach is based on the J-Substitution algorithm and is expanded to imaging 3-D subject conductivity distribution changes. Computer simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the present MREIT imaging approach.Simulations of both types of cerebral stroke, hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke, were performed on a four-sphere head model Simulation results showed that the correlation coefficient (CC) and relative error (RE) between target and estimated conductivity distributions were 0.9245±0.0068 and 8.9997%±0.0084%, for hemorrhagic stroke, and 0.6748±0.0197 and 8.8986%±0.0089%,for ischemic stroke, when the SNR (signal-to-noise radio) of added GWN (Gaussian White Noise) was 40. The convergence characteristic was also evaluated according to the changes of CC and RE with different iteration numbers. The CC increases and RE decreases monotonously with the increasing number of iterations. The present simulation results show the feasibility of the proposed 3-D MREIT approach in hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke detection and suggest that the method may become a useful alternative in clinical diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke in humans.

  7. Study of the correlation of brainstem auditory evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central auditory evaluation in 21 children with cerebral palsy was done with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) and correlated with brain magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI); 12 boys and 9 girls between 5 and 12 years old were studied. All children had follow-up at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo. The control group was done with 17 children, 10 boys and 7 girls (mean age 8.06 years, SD 2.27 years). The BAEP abnormalities were: decrease of latency of wave V; decrease of latency III-V and I-IV intervals at the right side. All patients has MRI supratentorial abnormalities and 11 had brainstem atrophy. The MRI pathologic findings were: ventricular enlargement (n=17 or 80.95%), cortical/subcortical atrophy (n=15 or 71.42%), left brainstem atrophy (n=11 or 52.38%), periventricular leukomalacia (n=10 or 47.61%), infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory (n=6 or 28.57%), and malformations such as schizencephaly and colpocephaly (n=5 or 23.80%). The findings of the decrease latencies in children with cerebral palsy suggest the contribution of decussating auditory fibers at the lower and upper pons and midbrain, the lack of homogeneity of the surrounding volume of the conductor fibres and the presence of several concurrently active potential generators sources, should be facilitating mechanisms for the nervous input to brainstem. (author)

  8. An Early Continuous Experimental Study on Magnetic Resonance Diffusion-weighted Image of Focal Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The chronological and spatial rules of changes during focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in different brain regions with magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in a model of occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO) and the development of cytotoxic edema in acute phase were explored. Fifteen healthy S-D rats with MCA occluded by thread-emboli were randomly divided into three groups. 15 min after the operation, the serial imaging was scanned on DWI for the three groups. The relative mean signal intensity (RMSI) of the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, lateral cauda-putamen, medial cauda-putamen and the volume of regions of hyperintense signal on DWI were calculated. After the last DWI scanning, T2 WI was performed for the three groups. After 15min ischemia, the rats was presented hyperintense signals on DWI. The regions of hyperintense signal were enlarged with prolonging ischemia time. The regions of hyperintense signal were back to normal after 60 min reperfusion with a small part remaining to show hyperintense signal. The RMSIs of parietal lobe and lateral cauda-putamen were higher than that of the frontal lobe and medial cauda-putamen both in ischemia phase and recanalization phase. The three groups werenormal on T2WI imaging. DWI had good sensitivity to acute cerebral ischemia, which was used to study the chronological and spatial rules of development of early cell edema in ischemia regions.

  9. Evaluation of fetal brain development by magnetic resonance imaging. Subependymal germinal matrix layer and cerebral ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three dimensional data of brain from the formalin-fixed fetuses were collected without isolation, by the 4.7 tesla super high magnetic field MRI and the developmental process of the cerebral parenchyma was studied by 3D images. Subjects were 13 fetal brain and MRI was performed using 3D-steady-state free precession sequence. The isolated brain is very soft and fragile and is deformed by its weight at the imaging. However 3D-MRI can be obtained without isolation, and the deformation is remarkably small. The subependymal germinal matrix layer did not be observed in 7 weeks-old fetus, appeared at 9 weeks-old and increased gradually. Then it rapidly reduced from 28 weeks-old. The volume calculated, from 3D-MRI, increased rapidly from 9 weeks-old to 23 weeks-old, and reached the maximum (2.346 mm3) at 23 weeks-old. The relation between fetal ages and volume of cerebral ventricle also showed similar pattern. This method will be useful to examine the development of the fetal brain without any damage. (K.H.)

  10. Retrospective analysis of the prevalence of asymptomatic cerebral aneurysm in 4518 patients undergoing magnetic resonance angiography. When does cerebral aneurysm develop?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural history of cerebral aneurysms was investigated by measuring the prevalence of incidentally found unruptured aneurysms in the general population and evaluating the characteristics including risk factors. 'De novo' formation of aneurysm was also demographically estimated. The prevalence of incidental aneurysm was evaluated among 4518 patients who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) angiography for various reasons in a neurosurgical institute. Double the number of patients were randomly selected from the remaining patients without aneurysm as the Control group so that sex and age group were matched to the Aneurysm group. One hundred twenty seven patients (2.8%) had diagnoses of aneurysm. The prevalence of asymptomatic aneurysm among middle-aged and elderly patients were predominant in women and increased with age in both sexes. Patients with aneurysms had significantly more hypertension and family history of subarachnoid hemorrhage compared to the controls. The prevalence was markedly increased in the 8th decade in men and the 7th decade in women, and new aneurysms seemed to develop predominantly around these decades. Cerebral aneurysms become detectable on MR angiography in the middle or later decades, and women tend to develop aneurysm earlier than men. Hypertension and family history of subarachnoid hemorrhage are probably risk factors for the development of aneurysm. (author)

  11. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral white matter development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) has become a sensitive tool to monitor white matter development. Different applications of diffusion-weighted techniques provide information about premyelinating, myelinating, and postmyelinating states of white matter maturation. Mirroring maturational processes on the cellular level, DWI has to be regarded as a morphological method as well as a functional instrument, giving insight into molecular processes during the formation of axons and myelin sheets and into the steric arrangement of white matter tracts the formation of which is strongly influenced by their function

  12. Noninvasive measurements of regional cerebral perfusion in preterm and term neonates by magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Olofsson, K; Sidaros, Karam

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term...... higher (p < 0.0001) than in cortical gray matter (19 and 16 mL/100 g/min) and white matter (15 and 10 mL/100 g/min), both in preterm neonates at term-equivalent age and in term neonates. Perfusion was significantly higher (p = 0.01) in the preterm group than in the term infants, indicating that RCP may...... be influenced by developmental and postnatal ages. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that noninvasive ASL at 3T may be used to measure RCP in healthy unsedated preterm and term neonates. ASL is, therefore, a viable tool that will allow serial studies of RCP in high-risk neonates...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Plaque Morphology, Burden, and Distribution in Patients With Symptomatic Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Nikki; Yang, Wenjie; Abrigo, Jill M.; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; van der Kolk, Anja G.; Siero, Jeroen C.W.; Wong, Ka Sing; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial atherosclerosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. Intracranial vessel wall imaging is an upcoming field of interest to assess intracranial atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated total intracranial plaque burden in patients with symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis, assessed plaque morphological features, and compared features of symptomatic and asymptomatic lesions using a 3T vessel wall sequence. Methods— Nineteen consecutive Chinese patients with ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (mean age: 67 years; 7 females) with a middle cerebral artery stenosis were scanned at 3T magnetic resonance imaging; the protocol included a time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography and the T1-weighted volumetric isotropically reconstructed turbo spin echo acquisition sequence before and after (83%) contrast administration. Chi-square tests were used to assess associations between different plaque features. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results— Vessel wall lesions were identified in 18 patients (95%), totaling 57 lesions in 494 segments (12% of segments). Lesions were located primarily in the anterior circulation (82%). Eccentric lesions were associated with a focal thickening pattern and concentric lesions with a diffuse thickening pattern (P<0.001). When differentiating between asymptomatic and symptomatic lesions, an association (P<0.05) was found between eccentricity and asymptomatic lesions, but not for enhancement or a specific thickening pattern. Symptomatic lesions did not have any specific morphological features. Conclusions— Our results lead to a 2-fold conclusion: (1) The classification system of both thickening pattern and distribution of the lesion can be simplified by using distribution pattern only and (2) differentiation between symptomatic and asymptomatic atherosclerotic lesions was possible using intracranial vessel wall imaging. PMID:27301944

  14. Incidence and Predictors of Catheterization-Related Cerebral Infarction on Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Mitsumasa; Suu, Kanae; Kimura, Masahiro; Minamino-Muta, Eri; Nakane, Eisaku; Izumi, Toshiaki; Miyamoto, Shoichi; Haruna, Tetsuya; Ueyama, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and risk factors of catheterization-related CI in the contemporary era, using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive 84 patients who underwent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) after 2.81 ± 2.4 days (mean ± SD) of catheterization via aortic arch. We categorized the patients by the presence or absence of acute CI determined by diffusion-weighted MRI and analyzed the incidence and predictors. Results. Of 84 patients that underwent MRI after catheterization, acute CI was determined in 27 (32.1%) patients. In univariate analysis, dyslipidemia, age, coronary artery disease, antiplatelet agents, number of catheters used, urgent settings, and interventional procedures were significantly different. Multivariate analysis revealed dyslipidemia (odds ratio [OR], 4.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41–16.03; p = 0.01), higher age (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.007–1.19; p = 0.03), and the number of catheters used (OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.21–4.36; p = 0.01) as independent predictors of the incidence of catheterization-related acute CI. Conclusions. Dyslipidemia, higher age, and number of catheters used were independent predictors for acute CI after catheterization. These findings imply that managing dyslipidemia and comprehensive planning to minimize the numbers of catheters are important. PMID:27127790

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in chronic dialysis patients. Evaluation of high signal lesions in cerebral subcortical areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was aimed to evaluate the incidence of cerebral subcortical high signal lesions (SHS) on T2 weighted images of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in chronic dialysis patients. The incidence of SHS was investigated in three clinically different groups of patients (196 divided into 3 age groups (20-40, 41-60, 61-83 years old). SHS were graded according to size and number. The incidence and severity of SHS increased with advancing age in all groups of patients and were higher in hypertensive and dialysis patients. Patchy confluent SHS were not identified in any patient younger than 60 years old in normal subjects and hypertensive patients. They were present in 9% in patients 41 to 60 years old of dialysis patients. In patients over than 61 years old, patchy confluent SHS were present in 1% of normal subjects, 11% of hypertensive patients, and 30% of dialysis patients. Duration, methods of dialysis therapy or previous history of hypertension in dialysis patients did not affect the incidence of SHS. SHS were mainly located in the territory of anterior, middle carebral and lenticulostriate arteries. In one autopsy case of chronic dialysis patient with severe SHS on magnetic resonance images, microscopic finding at pathological examination showed dilated perivascular space and increased water content in white matter. The results demonstrate a high incidence of severe SHS in chronic dialysis patients, and suggest that the SHS in dialysis patients appear to represent increased water content in perivascular brain tissue. (author)

  16. Low intensity areas observed T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the cerebral cortex in various neurological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively studied magnetic resonance images of the brain in 158 patients (8 cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 16 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 8 cases of Parkinson's disease, 53 cases of multiple cerebral infarct, 20 cases of other central nervous system (CNS) diseases, and 53 cases without any CNS disease) to examine the appearance of T2-weighted low signal intensity areas (LIA) in the cerebral cortex. The age of subjects ranged from 36 to 85 years with the mean 65.0 and SD 9.9 years. LIA in the motor and sensory cortices, and brain atrophy were evaluated visually on axial images of the spin-echo sequence obtained with a 1.5 tesla system. The incidence of LIA in the motor cortex was significantly higher in all CNS diseases than in cases without any CNS disease, but not significantly different among CNS diseases. LIA in the motor cortex showed a correlation with age, temporal and parietal atrophy. The appearance of LIA in the sensory cortex correlated with that of LIA in the motor cortex, and parietal atrophy. These results suggest that LIA may appear according to age and be associated with the accumulation of nonheme iron in the cortex, especially in patients with CNS diseases. (author)

  17. The Application of Diffusion- and Perfusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis and Therapy of Acute Cerebral Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Dai

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI and PWI was applied for stroke diagnose in 120 acute (<48 h ischemic stroke patients. At hyperacute (<6 h stage, it is difficult to find out the infarction zone in conventional T1 or T2 image, but it is easy in DWI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC map; when at 3–6-hour stage it is also easy in PWI, cerebral blood flow (CBF map, cerebral blood volume (CBV map, and mean transit time (MTT map; at acute (6–48 h stage, DWI or PWI is more sensitive than conventional T1 or T2 image too. Combining DWI with ADC, acute and chronic infarction can be distinguished. Besides, penumbra which should be developed in meaning was used as an indication or to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. There were two cases (<1.5 h that broke the model of penumbra because abnormity was found in DWI but not that in PWI, finally they recovered without any sequela.

  18. Influence of the gender on cerebral vascular diameters observed during the magnetic resonance angiographic examination of willis circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Stefani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the calibers and anatomic configurations based on the Magnetic Resonance analysis (MRA, assaying the cerebral vascular territories and sex-linked variations. A randomized sample of 30 angiographic examinations in adult patients of both sexes was obtained and components of the circle of Willis were identified. Branch diameters were measured on a transversal cut 5mm from the vessel origin in a typical angiographic frontal incidence. For the comparative statistical analysis, tests were divided in the groups considering the patients' sex and age. The classical Circle of Willis configuration was oberved in only 15 samples (50%. Greater calibers were observed in the arteries of the posterior circulation and multiple linear regression analysis established that the caliber of the posterior circulation was influenced by an independent variable related to the gender. Additional variations included unilateral and bilateral fetal and hypoplasic Posterior communicating arteries. In the anterior cerebral artery (ACA, the presence of an accessory developed ACA, an ACA giving branches to the distal portion of the two hemispheres and a third median ACA the variants were observed. Gender influenced the variations on internal diameters of posterior circulation vessels, with larger measurements in men.

  19. The use of magnetic resonance and MR angiography in the detection of cerebral infarction: A complication of pediatric bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stošić-Opinćal Tatjana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground. Association of both cerebral infarction and acute bacterial meningitis is more common in younger patients than in the elderly. The rate of mortality and the frequency of sequel are very high inspite of the use of modern antibiotic therapy. In more than 30% of the cases of childhood bacterial meningitis, both arterial and venous infarctions can occur. The aim of this study was to present the role of the use of magnetic resonance (MRI, and MR angiography (MRA in the detection of bacterial meningitis in children complicated with cerebral infarctions. Method. In the Centre for MR, the Clinical Centre of Serbia, 25 patients with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, of which 9 children with cerebral infarction whose clinical conditon deteriorated acutely, despite the antibiotic therapy, underwent MRI and MR angiography examination on a 1T scanner. Examination included the conventional spin-echo techniques with T1-weighted saggital and coronal, and T2- weighted axial and coronal images. Coronal fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR and the postcontrast T1-weighted images in three orthogonal planes were also used. The use MR angiography was accomplished by the three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF technique. Results. The findings included: multiple hemorrhagic infarction in 4 patients, multiple infarctions in 3 patients, focal infarction in 1 patient and diffuse infarction (1 patient. Common sites of involvement were: the frontal lobes, temporal lobes and basal ganglia. The majority of infarctions were bilateral. In 3 of the patients empyema was found, and in 1 patient bitemporal abscess was detected. In 8 of the patients MR angiography confirmed inflammatory vasculitis. Conclusion. Infarction is the most common sequel of severe meningitis in children. Since the complication of cerebral infarction influences the prognosis of meningitis, repetitive MRI examinations are very significant for the evaluation of the time course of

  20. Suitable image parameters and analytical method for quantitatively measuring cerebral blood flow volume with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine suitable image parameters and an analytical method for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow volume. This was done by constructing an experimental model and applying the results to a clinical application. The experimental model was constructed from the aorta of a bull and circulating isotonic saline. The image parameters of PC-MRI (repetition time, flip angle, matrix, velocity rate encoding, and the use of square pixels) were studied with percent flow volume (the ratio of actual flow volume to measured flow volume). The most suitable image parameters for accurate blood flow measurement were as follows: repetition time, 50 msec; flip angle, 20 degrees; and a 512 x 256 matrix without square pixels. Furthermore, velocity rate encoding should be set ranging from the maximum flow velocity in the vessel to five times this value. The correction in measuring blood flow was done with the intensity of the region of interest established in the background. With these parameters for PC-MRI, percent flow volume was greater than 90%. Using the image parameters for PC-MRI and the analytical method described above, we evaluated cerebral blood flow volume in 12 patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. The results were compared with conventional xenon computed tomography. The values found with both methods showed good correlation. Thus, we concluded that PC-MRI was a noninvasive method for evaluating cerebral blood flow in patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. (author)

  1. Three-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography of Intracranial Vessels in a Canine Model of Ischemic Stroke with Permanent Occlusion of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    OpenAIRE

    KANG, Byeong-Teck; Jang, Dong-Pyo; Gu, Su-Hyun; Kim, Young-Bo; Lim, Chae-Young; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Woo, Eung-Je; Cho, Zang-Hee; Park, Hee-Myung

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential efficacy of 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) to validate a canine ischemic stroke model. Ischemic stroke was induced through permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in 5 healthy Beagle dogs. T2-turbo spin echo images and TOF-MRA were obtained with a 1.5-T magnetic resonance system before and 3 and 10 d after MCAO. In 3 dogs, angiograms of the brain obtained at 3 d after MCAO showed complete ...

  2. Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance hybrid scanner imaging of cerebral blood flow using 15O-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in newborn piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Julie B; Henning, William S; Lindberg, Ulrich;

    2015-01-01

    arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MR) on a hybrid PET/MR in seven newborn piglets. Positron emission tomography was performed with IV injections of 20 MBq and 100 MBq (15)O-water to confirm CBF reliability at low activity. Cerebral blood flow was quantified using a one-tissue-compartment-model......Abnormality in cerebral blood flow (CBF) distribution can lead to hypoxic-ischemic cerebral damage in newborn infants. The aim of the study was to investigate minimally invasive approaches to measure CBF by comparing simultaneous (15)O-water positron emission tomography (PET) and single TI pulsed......, PET-IDIF overestimated CBF. Injected activity of 20 MBq (15)O-water had acceptable concordance with 100 MBq, without compromising image quality. Single TI ASL was questionable for regional CBF measurements. Global ASL CBF and PET CBF were congruent during baseline but not during hyperperfusion....

  3. Cerebral Glioma Grading Using Bayesian Network with Features Extracted from Multiple Modalities of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiting; Liu, Renyuan; Zhang, Xin; Li, Ming; Yang, Yongbo; Yan, Jing; Niu, Fengnan; Tian, Chuanshuai; Wang, Kun; Yu, Haiping; Chen, Weibo; Wan, Suiren; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Many modalities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been confirmed to be of great diagnostic value in glioma grading. Contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging allows the recognition of blood-brain barrier breakdown. Perfusion weighted imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging enable the quantitative measurement of perfusion parameters and metabolic alterations respectively. These modalities can potentially improve the grading process in glioma if combined properly. In this study, Bayesian Network, which is a powerful and flexible method for probabilistic analysis under uncertainty, is used to combine features extracted from contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging. The networks were constructed using K2 algorithm along with manual determination and distribution parameters learned using maximum likelihood estimation. The grading performance was evaluated in a leave-one-out analysis, achieving an overall grading accuracy of 92.86% and an area under the curve of 0.9577 in the receiver operating characteristic analysis given all available features observed in the total 56 patients. Results and discussions show that Bayesian Network is promising in combining features from multiple modalities of MRI for improved grading performance. PMID:27077923

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Primary Cerebral Gliosarcoma: A Report of 15 Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, L.; Zhang, X.; Qiu, S.; Li, X.; Xiong, W.; Zhang, Y.; Qu, H.; Chang, R.; Chen, B.; Wang, W.; Li, S. (Dept. of Medical Imaging Center, Nan Fang Hospital, Southern Medical Univ., Guangzhou (China))

    2008-11-15

    Background: Gliosarcomas are rare tumors with mixed glial and mesenchymal components. Many of their radiologic features resemble those of other primary brain malignancies. Purpose: To investigate the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of gliosarcomas. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the MR images, pathology reports, and clinical information of 11 male and four female patients aged 15-71 years to evaluate the location, morphology, enhancement, and other features of their pathologically confirmed gliosarcomas. Results: Apart from one tumor in the right cerebellar hemisphere, all were supratentorial. Two tumors were intraventricular, and four involved the corpus callosum. The tumors were well demarcated, with an inhomogeneous or cystic appearance and moderate-to-extensive surrounding edema. Thick walls with strong rim and ring-like enhancement were observed in 13 (87%). Seven (47%) showed intratumoral paliform enhancement. Conclusion: Gliosarcoma demonstrates certain characteristic MR features, such as supratentorial and peripheral location, well-demarcated, abutting a dural surface, uneven and thick-walled rim-like or ring enhancement, as well as intratumoral strip enhancement. These findings, combined with patient age, can aid the differential diagnosis of gliosarcomas from more common primary brain tumors

  5. Clinical value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for differentiating recurrent or residual brain tumor from delayed cerebral necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Delayed cerebral necrosis (DN) is a significant risk for brain tumor patients treated with high-dose irradiation. Although differentiating DN from tumor progression is an important clinical question, the distinction cannot be made reliably by conventional imaging techniques. We undertook a pilot study to assess the ability of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) to differentiate prospectively between DN or recurrent/residual tumor in a series of children treated for primary brain tumors with high-dose irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twelve children (ages 3-16 years), who had clinical and MR imaging (MRI) changes that suggested a diagnosis of either DN or progressive/recurrent brain tumor, underwent localized 1H MRS prior to planned biopsy, resection, or other confirmatory histological procedure. Prospective 1H MRS interpretations were based on comparison of spectral peak patterns and quantitative peak area values from normalized spectra: a marked depression of the intracellular metabolite peaks from choline, creatine, and N-acetyl compounds was hypothesized to indicate DN, and median-to-high choline with easily visible creatine metabolite peaks was labeled progressive/recurrent tumor. Subsequent histological studies identified the brain lesion as DN or recurrent/residual tumor. Results: The patient series included five cases of DN and seven recurrent/residual tumor cases, based on histology. The MRS criteria prospectively identified five out of seven patients with active tumor, and four out of five patients with histologically proven DN correctly. Discriminant analysis suggested that the primary diagnostic information for differentiating DN from tumor lay in the normalized MRS peak areas for choline and creatine compounds. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy shows promising sensitivity and selectivity for differentiating DN from recurrent/progressive brain tumor. A novel diagnostic index based on peak areas for choline and creatine

  6. Cerebral metabolism in streptozotocin-diabetic rats: an in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Biessels, G.J.; Braun, K.P.; Graaf, R.A. de; Eijsden, P. van; Nicolay, K.

    2001-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis. It is increasingly evident that the brain is another site of diabetic end-organ damage. The pathogenesis has not been fully explained, but seems to involve an interplay between aberrant glucose metabolism and vascular changes. Vascular changes, such as deficits in cerebral blood flo

  7. Diffusion-Weighted and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Cerebral Cryptococcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of cryptococcoma involving the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The diffusion-weighted image shows hypointensity in the central cavity of the cryptococcoma, while apparent diffusion coefficient maps show hyperintensity. The imaging features of an intracerebral cryptococcoma mimic that of a central necrotic brain tumor, rather than a pyogenic brain abscess

  8. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral pain processing; Ereigniskorrelierte funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie zur Erforschung der zerebralen Schmerzverarbeitung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, H.; Baudendistel, K.; Bock, M.; Schad, L.R. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Biophysik und Medizinische Strahlenphysik; Kleinboehl, D.; Trojan, J.; Rabuffetti-Lehle, M.; Hoelzl, R. [Mannheim Univ. (Germany). Otto-Selz-Institut

    2001-07-01

    Neurofunctional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) offers the possibility to map cerebral activity non-invasively. The development of event-related techniques during the past years allows to study brain processes with high spatial and temporal resolution. Based on these techniques, EPI- and FLASH sequences were developed in this study, to investigate cerebral processing of experimental thermal pain simulation. Phasic and tonic stimulation paradigms were developed with an MR-compatible contact thermode. Functional mapping of pain-relevant areas was performed with these paradigms, as well as a specification of the temporal characteristics of the activation. Further, a randomized paradigm with several stimulus intensities could differentiate graded functional responses, dependent on stimulus intensity in specific 'regions-of-interest'. In this design, randomizing the stimulus order reduced habituation effects, while continuous subjective magnitude estimation of the stimuli kept attention of subjects maximal. (orig.) [German] Die neurofunktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (MTR) bietet die Moeglichkeit, Hirnfunktionen nicht-invasiv abzubilden. Die Entwicklung ereignisgesteuerter Messtechniken in den vergangenen Jahren erlaubt die Darstellung der Gehirnaktivitaet mit hoher raeumlicher und zeitlicher Aufloesung. Im Rahmen der Studie wurden basierend auf solchen Techniken EPI- und FLASH-Sequenzen entwickelt, mit denen die zerebrale Verarbeitung experimeteller thermischer Schmerzreize untersucht werden konnte. Phasische und tonische Reizmodelle wurden mit einer MR-tauglichen Kontaktreizthermode realisiert. Neben einer funktionellen Kartierung schmerzrelevanter Areale im Gehirn gelang mit dieser Untersuchungstechnik die Abbildung des zeitlichen Verlaufs der Aktivierung. Ein randomisiertes Untersuchungsprotokoll mit mehreren Reizstaerken erlaubt ferner den Nachweis einer graduierten funktionellen Aktivierung in Abhaengigkeit von der Reizstaerke in bestimmten &apos

  9. Cerebral cavernous malformations. Serial magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with and without gamma knife surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To classify the cerebral cavernous malformations and to investigate the natural history of cavernous malformations according to the classification, 41 patients with 61 cavernous malformations (40 cavernous malformations from 22 patients treated with gamma knife surgery) were regularly followed up using MR imaging for a mean period of 25.5 months in treated cavernous malformations and 20.7 months in untreated cavernous malformations, respectively. Cavernous malformations were classified into four types. Follow-up MR images were analyzed to evaluate changes in size, signal intensity, rebleeding, and perilesional adverse reaction of irradiation. A total of 61 cavernous malformations including 17 in type I, 23 in type II, 10 in type III, and 11 in type IV showed usual degradation of blood product in 22 cavernous malformations, no change in shape and signal intensity in 31 cavernous malformations, and eight cavernous malformations with rebleedings in the serial MR images. In these eight cavernous malformations with rebleedings, six occurred in type II and two in type III, but none in type I or IV. Rebleedings were more frequent in type II than in other types. Adverse reaction of irradiation was observed in five of 22 patients treated with gamma knife surgery. Although most cerebral cavernous malformations showed evolution of hemorrhage or no change in size or shape on follow-up MR images, cerebral cavernous malformations represented as mixture of subacute and chronic hemorrhage with hemosiderin rim (type II) have a higher frequency to rebleed than other types of cerebral cavernous malformations. Cerebral cavernous malformations represented as hemosiderin deposition without central core (type IV) have a lower tendency to rebleed than other types and do not need any treatment. Most of the adverse reaction of irradiation after gamma knife surgery around cavernous malformations are transient findings and are considered to be perilesional edema. (K.H)

  10. Study on the clinical usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging in cases of multiple cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical significance of MRI in thrombotic multiple cerebral infarction was examined in 9 patients having recent lacunar stroke. Recent infarct was identified on Gd-enhanced MRI in 4 patients. For patients multiple small infarction, Gd-enhanced MRI made it possible to differentiate recent from other lesions. To clarify the significance of periventricular high intensity lesion (PVH) on T2-weighted MRI, hemodynamic and neuropsychologic examinations were carried out in 41 patients with multiple cerebral infarction. All the patients had PVH, which was classified into three grades as follows: grade I (n=16) showing only a thin high intensity band along the body of lateral ventricles; grade 2 (n=15) showing a definite high intensity area around the lateral ventricles; grade 3 (n=10) showing diffuse thick and irregular foci around the whole ventricle. In these patients, rCBF was measured by 133Xe inhalation methods. Initial slope index was significantly higher in patients with grade 3 than those with grade I. Mini-mental state test score was significantly higher in patients with grade l than those with grade 2 and 3. Progression of PVH may be related with the reduction of the cerebral circulation and mental function in cases of multiple cerebral infarction. Ischemic and hemorrhagic lesions can be distinguished by MRI, because old intracerebral hemorrhage appear as hypointensity areas with or without hyperintensity area on T2w images. In 92 patients with multiple infarction, MRI was used to evaluate the incidence and distribution of coexisting old intracerebral hemorrhage. Old hemorrhage were found in 15 patients (16.3%). locating the site where hypertensive hemorrhage commonly occurred. High-field MRI is useful for assessing the coexistence of hemorrhage in hypertensive patients with multiple cerebral infarction. (N.K.)

  11. Study on the clinical usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging in cases of multiple cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyashita, Kotaro (Niigata Univ. (Japan). Brain Research Inst.)

    1991-09-01

    The clinical significance of MRI in thrombotic multiple cerebral infarction was examined in 9 patients having recent lacunar stroke. Recent infarct was identified on Gd-enhanced MRI in 4 patients. For patients multiple small infarction, Gd-enhanced MRI made it possible to differentiate recent from other lesions. To clarify the significance of periventricular high intensity lesion (PVH) on T2-weighted MRI, hemodynamic and neuropsychologic examinations were carried out in 41 patients with multiple cerebral infarction. All the patients had PVH, which was classified into three grades as follows: grade I (n=16) showing only a thin high intensity band along the body of lateral ventricles; grade 2 (n=15) showing a definite high intensity area around the lateral ventricles; grade 3 (n=10) showing diffuse thick and irregular foci around the whole ventricle. In these patients, rCBF was measured by {sup 133}Xe inhalation methods. Initial slope index was significantly higher in patients with grade 3 than those with grade I. Mini-mental state test score was significantly higher in patients with grade l than those with grade 2 and 3. Progression of PVH may be related with the reduction of the cerebral circulation and mental function in cases of multiple cerebral infarction. Ischemic and hemorrhagic lesions can be distinguished by MRI, because old intracerebral hemorrhage appear as hypointensity areas with or without hyperintensity area on T2w images. In 92 patients with multiple infarction, MRI was used to evaluate the incidence and distribution of coexisting old intracerebral hemorrhage. Old hemorrhage were found in 15 patients (16.3%). locating the site where hypertensive hemorrhage commonly occurred. High-field MRI is useful for assessing the coexistence of hemorrhage in hypertensive patients with multiple cerebral infarction. (N.K.).

  12. Cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrates reversibility of N-acetylaspartate/creatine in gray matter after delayed encephalopathy due to carbon monoxide intoxication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Kondziella, Daniel; Danielsen, Else Rubæk;

    2014-01-01

    with cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed a dramatically decrease in N-acetylaspartate to total creatine ratios and elevated lactate levels in the gray matter. Subsequently, our patient received six additional sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy with only minimal recovery. At six...... reversal of N-acetylaspartate to total creatine ratios in gray matter has, to our knowledge, never been described before and shows that severe, initial measurements may not predict poor long-term patient outcome....

  13. Cerebral Perfusion and Aortic Stiffness Are Independent Predictors of White Matter Brain Atrophy in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Assessed With Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    van Elderen, Saskia G. C.; Brandts, Anne; van der Grond, Jeroen; Westenberg, Jos J. M.; Kroft, Lucia J.M.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Smit, Johannes W.A.; de Roos, Albert

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify vascular mechanisms of brain atrophy in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients by investigating the relationship between brain volumes and cerebral perfusion and aortic stiffness using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Approval from the local institutional review board was obtained, and patients gave informed consent. Fifty-one type 1 DM patients (30 men; mean age 44 ± 11 years; mean DM duration 23 ± 12 years) and 34 age- and sex-matched healt...

  14. A middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rabbits: development with endovascular interventional techniques and evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Deok Hee; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Sang Joon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Sang Hun; Park, Kil Sun [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a new middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in rabbits using a less invasive, endovascular interventional technique. The new animal model' s technical feasibility and its success in producing lesions was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten rabbits were used to develop the MCAO models using a transfemoral catheter-based technique. After catheterization of the common carotid artery, a microcatheter was introduced coaxially through the catheter to cannulate the internal carotid artery and to embolize the MCA with polyvinyl alcohol particles. We evaluated how successful we were in selecting the vessels, catheterization, embolization, and also evaluated how many of the animals survived until the end of experiment. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) were performed in one-hour intervals to monitor the ischemic lesion for a total of six hours following successful occlusion of the target artery. The relative volume of the lesion was calculated as a hemispheric lesion volume (HLV, %). The signals of the lesion and contralateral normal brain (control) were measured in each image at every time point. Lesion-to-control signal-intensity ratio (SIR) of DWI, and T2WI were obtained together with relative apparent diffusion coefficient (rADC). Catheterization and embolization of the internal carotid artery were successful in all 10 rabbits, which showed relevant lesions on MRI. All rabbits survived until the end of the experiment. The HLV (mean {+-} standard deviation) was 35.7 {+-} 14.6%. The relative ADC was 0.80 {+-} 0.13. The lesion signals on DWI and T2WI showed a gradual increase as time passed, while the ADC value of the lesion gradually decreased ({rho} < 0.0001). The rabbit MCAO model using an endovascular interventional technique is technically feasible, and provides a reproducible lesion in the target arterial territory. MRI successfully revealed a typical findings of acute

  15. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in the initially differentiating recurrent brain gliomas after radiation therapy from delayed cerebral necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in the differentiating recurrent brain gliomas after radiation therapy from delayed cerebral necrosis. Methods: Fifteen patients who had clinical and CT, MRI changes that suggested a diagnosis of delayed cerebral necrosis or recurrent brain tumor after radiation therapy and 5 patients who had a definite clinical diagnosis of delayed cerebral necrosis underwent single MR spectroscopy simultaneously both in the lesion's region and the contralateral side. Results: Of the former 15 cases who proved by surgical pathology, 14 cases were gliomas, 1 case was delayed cerebral necrosis, and their etiologic diagnoses of 1H MRS were correct. (1) 1H MRS in 14 cases with gliomas exhibited specific spectral peaks including prominent choline-containing compounds (Cho), decreased or absent acetylaspartate (NAA) and total creatine (Cr), and the metabolic ratios showed significantly increased Cho/Cr, decreased NAA/Cr. Twelve cases showed abnormal lactate (Lac). (2) Among 6 cases with delayed cerebral necrosis, 5 cases exhibited decreased or absent Cho, NAA, Cr, and abnormal Lipid, 1 case showed absent Cho, NAA, and Cr with a flat curve without Lac. Conclusion: 1H MRS was positively claimed for differentiating recurrent brain gliomas after radiation therapy from delayed cerebral necrosis

  16. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging for assessing lacunar infarction after proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion in a canine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Shan-shan; LIU Sheng; ZU Qing-quan; XU Xiao-quan; WANG Jian-wei; YU Jing; SUN Lei; SHI Hai-bin

    2013-01-01

    Background A new lacunar infarction model was recently established in beagle dogs through proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion by thrombus.This study aimed to characterize the model by multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to investigate its potential role for the future stroke research.Methods The left proximal MCA was embolized with an autologous thrombus in six beagles.Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWl) and T2-weighted imaging (T2Wl) were performed every half hour during the first six hours after occlusion,followed by three time points at 12 hours,24 hours,and one week.Perfusion-weighted imaging (PWl) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were carried out at six hours,24 hours and one week.The PWI-DWl mismatch ratio was defined as (PWI-DWI)/DWI ischemic volume.Results Lacunar infarcts induced by MCA occlusion were located in the left caudate nucleus and internal capsule.All the lesions could be detected within two hours by DWI.Lesion volume on DWI increased in a time dependent manner,from (87.19±67.16) mm3 at one hour up to (368.98±217.05) mm3 at 24 hours (P=-0.009),while that on PWI gradually decreased from (7315.00±2054.38) mm3 at six hours to (4900.33±1319.71) mm3 at 24 hours and (3334.33±1195.11) mm3 at one week (P=0.002).The mismatch ratio was 41.93±22.75 at six hours after ischemia,showing "extensive mismatch",and decreased to 18.10+13.74 at 24 hours (P=0.002).No MCA recanalization was observed within 24 hours after MCA occlusion.Conclusions Lacunar infarction induced by proximal MCA occlusion could be detected early by DWI and was characterized by extensive PWI-DWI mismatch.Multimodal MRI is useful to demonstrate the natural evolution of PWI-DWI mismatch.This ischemic model could be further used for investigating early thrombolysis in lacunar stroke showing extensive mismatch.

  17. Cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrates reversibility of N-acetylaspartate/creatine in gray matter after delayed encephalopathy due to carbon monoxide intoxication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Vibeke Andree; Kondziella, Daniel; Larsen, Ole Hyldegaard; Danielsen, Else Rubæk; Jansen, Erik Christian; Hansen, Marco Bo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Predictive markers for long-term outcome in carbon monoxide-intoxicated patients with late encephalopathy are desired. Here we present the first data demonstrating a full reversibility pattern of specific brain substances measured by cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in...... a carbon monoxide-intoxicated victim. This may provide clinicians with important information when estimating patient outcome. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a 40-year-old Caucasian woman with severe carbon monoxide poisoning who was treated with five repetitive sessions of hyperbaric...... mid-occipital gray matter and partial reversal in white matter. CONCLUSIONS: The present case indicates that cerebral proton magnetic spectroscopy provides valuable information on brain metabolism in patients presenting with delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide intoxication. The full...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral anomalies in subjects with resistance to thyroid hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, C.M. [Univ. of Florida Health Science Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hauser, P.; Weintraub, B.D. [National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Baltimore VA Medical Center, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-19

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the human thyroid receptor beta gene on chromosome 3. Individuals with RTH have an increased incidence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this study was to search for developmental brain malformations associated with RTH. Forty-three subjects (20 affected males [AM], 23 affected females [AF]) with resistance to thyroid hormone and 32 unaffected first degree relatives (18 unaffected males [UM], 14 unaffected females [UF]) underwent MRI brain scans with a volumetric acquisition that provided 90 contiguous 2 mm thick sagittal images. Films of six contiguous images beginning at a standard sagittal position lateral to the insula were analyzed by an investigator who was blind with respect to subject characteristics. The presence of extra or missing gyri in the parietal bank of the Sylvian fissure (multimodal association cortex) and multiple Heschl`s transverse gyri (primary auditory cortex) were noted. There was a significantly increased frequency of anomalous Sylvian fissures in the left hemisphere in males with RTH (AM: 70%; AF: 30%; UM: 28% UF: 28%). Also, there was an increased frequency of anomalous Sylvian fissures on the left combined with multiple Heschl`s gyri in either hemisphere in males with RTH (AM: 50%; AF: 9%; UM: 6%; UF: 0%). However, RTH subjects with anomalies did not have an increased frequency of ADHD as compared with RTH subjects with no anomalies. Abnormal thyroid hormone action in the male fetus early during brain development may be associated with grossly observable cerebral anomalies of the left hemisphere. The effects of mutations in the thyroid receptor beta gene provide a model system for studying the complex interaction of genetic and non-genetic factors on brain and behavioral development. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 {+-} 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 {+-} 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  20. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 ± 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 ± 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  1. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  2. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 8 MB) Also available in Other Language versions . Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  3. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRA; Angiography - magnetic resonance ... Kwong RY. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . ...

  4. Region-specific effects on brain metabolites of hypoxia and hyperoxia overlaid on cerebral ischemia in young and old rats: a quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliani Patricia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both hypoxia and hyperoxia, deregulating the oxidative balance, may play a role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders underlain by cerebral ischemia. In the present study, quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to evaluate regional metabolic alterations, following a 24-hour hypoxic or hyperoxic exposure on the background of ischemic brain insult, in two contrasting age-groups of rats: young - 3 months old and aged - 24 months old. Methods Cerebral ischemia was induced by ligation of the right common carotid artery. Concentrations of eight metabolites (alanine, choline-containing compounds, total creatine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, lactate, myo-inositol and N-acetylaspartate were quantified from extracts in three different brain regions (fronto-parietal and occipital cortices and the hippocampus from both hemispheres. Results In the control normoxic condition, there were significant increases in lactate and myo-inositol concentrations in the hippocampus of the aged rats, compared with the respective values in the young ones. In the ischemia-hypoxia condition, the most prevalent changes in the brain metabolites were found in the hippocampal regions of both young and aged rats; but the effects were more evident in the aged animals. The ischemia-hyperoxia procedure caused less dedicated changes in the brain metabolites, which may reflect more limited tissue damage. Conclusions We conclude that the hippocampus turns out to be particularly susceptible to hypoxia overlaid on cerebral ischemia and that old age further increases this susceptibility.

  5. 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy screening for animals with acute cerebral infraction suitable for thrombolytic therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yi; Haiou Zhang; Hao Lei; Li Wei

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a non-invasive technique which can provide comprehensive biological information, 'H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ('H-MRS) may provide valuable reference data for irreversible recovery or reversible changes in ischemic tissue after stroke.OBJECTIVE: To monitor and evaluate the effect of the urokinase thrombolytic therapy after experimental acute cerebral ischemia by 'H-MRS technology and investigate its adaptability. DESIGN: Randomly controlled animal study. SETTINGS: Shenzhen Hospital of Peking University and National Key Laboratory of Pattern and Atom & Molecular Physics, Wuhan Physics and Mathematics Institute, Chinese Academy of Science. MATERIALS: Eleven healthy adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, weighing 260 - 300 g and of both genders, were supplied by Experimental Animal Center of Tongji Medical Collage, Huazhong University of Science and Technology [SCXK (e) 2004-007]. 4.7T superconducting nuclear magnetic resonance meter was provided by Brucker Company. METHODS: The experiment was carried out in Shenzhen Hospital of Peking University and National Key Laboratory of Pattern and Atom & Molecular Physics, Wuhan Physics and Mathematics Institute, Chinese Academy of Science from August 2003 to December 2005. ① The rats were randomly divided into 30-minute self-thrombo-embolism group (n =6) and 60-minute self-thrombo-embolism group (n =5). Six rats in 30-minute self-thrombo-embolism group were occluded with clot embolus for 30 minutes and 5 rats in 60-minute self-thrombo-embolism group were occluded for 60 minutes. 10 000 1H/kg urokinase was dissolved in 2 Ml saline and the operation lasted for 5 minutes. ②1H-MRS was performed before thrombolysis and at 3 hours and 24 hours after successful embolization. The metabolic changes of N-acetyl-L-aspartic acid (NAA)/phosphocreatine (PCr) + creatine (Cr), choline phosphate (Cho)/PCr+Cr and lactic acid (Lac)/PCr+Cr in the region of interests were analyzed. ③The T2W image was conducted 24 hours after

  6. Detecção da encefalopatia hepática subclínica por espectroscopia cerebral Detection of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Justo Schulz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: A encefalopatia hepática é anormalidade neuropsiquiátrica comum em cirróticos e está associada com alterações típicas de determinados metabólitos cerebrais, como o decréscimo de mio-inositol e colina e o aumento de glutamina-glutamato, observadas na espectroscopia cerebral por ressonância magnética. OBJETIVO: Determinar os níveis dos metabólitos cerebrais em pacientes cirróticos para diagnóstico da encefalopatia hepática em estágios iniciais. MÉTODOS Foram estudados 25 pacientes com cirrose hepática, do Serviço de Transplante Hepático da Universidade Federal do Paraná, através de avaliação clínica (exame neurológico e testes neuropsicométricos e espectroscopia por ressonância magnética cerebral. A área espectral estudada por ressonância magnética envolveu a região occipital (substância branca e cinzenta. Trinta voluntários sadios formaram o grupo controle. RESULTADOS: A encefalopatia hepática subclínica foi diagnosticada em 12 pacientes (48%. Reduções significativas nos índices de MI/Cr foram observadas nos pacientes com encefalopatia quando comparados aos controles (0,49±0,10 vs. 0,83±0,13; P BACKGROUND: Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuro-psychiatric abnormality in liver cirrhosis associated with typical changes of cerebral metabolite pattern, such as a decrease of myo-inositol and cholina and increase of glutamine-glutamate, observed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. AIM: To determine cerebral metabolite ratios in liver cirrhosis patients with early stages of hepatic encephalopathy. METHODS: Twenty-five patients with chronic hepatic failure from Liver Transplantation Unit of the Federal University of Paraná were studied with clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Localized magnetic resonance spectra were acquired in the occipital gray/white matter regions. Thirty healthy volunteers were also subjected to the same evaluations, making up the control group. RESULTS

  7. Cerebrovascular ischemic changes associated with fetal posterior cerebral artery- descriptive retrospective study with magnetic resonance imaging and angiography of brain

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatraman Indiran; Prabakaran Maduraimuthu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Circle of Willis, the main collateral pathway for cerebral circulation, is complete in only a portion of the population. There are many variations in the Circle of Willis. Fetal posterior cerebral artery, which is defined as posterior cerebral artery arising from internal carotid artery, is a common variant of the Circle of Willis. Though association between the fetal posterior cerebral artery and ischemia have been studied, no specific study has been conducted in the Indian popul...

  8. Symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis and occlusion. Comparison of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography with conventional angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Motoshi; Yano, Hirohito; Shinoda, Jun; Funakoshi, Takashi (Daiyukai General Hospital, Ichinomiya, Aichi (Japan)); Kumagai, Morio

    1994-10-01

    The usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using the three-dimensional time-of-flight method for the characterization of symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusive lesions was evaluated in 10 patients with MCA occlusion and 10 with MCA stenosis. All lesions were symptomatic and documented by conventional angiography. There was no false-negative MR angiogram that failed to demonstrate the MCA occlusive lesion. MR angiography correctly evaluated the location of lesions and the difference between stenosis and occlusion. Stenosis appeared as a focal signal loss (<1.0cm) of the MCA at the site of stenosis, and occlusion as a complete signal loss of the MCA distal to the site of occlusion. However, MR angiography could not distinguish diffuse stenosis and one point stenosis demonstrated by conventional angiography. MR angiography is a useful noninvasive diagnostic method for evaluating occlusive lesions of the MCA in symptomatic patients. (author).

  9. A double blind study to evaluate the tolerability of gadodiamide injection and its effect on renal function in patients undergoing cerebral magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadodiamide injection was administered intravenously to 28 patients with cancer undergoing cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two parallel groups were used to evaluate the safety of single doses of 0.1 and 0.3 mmol per kilogram body weight (kgbw). Adverse events, vital signs, blood chemistry, haematology and urinalysis were the principal measures of safety. Four patients, all in the 0.1 mmol kgbw-1 group, experienced a total of six adverse events. No adverse events were reported in the 0.3 mmol kgbw-1 group. No clinically significant changes in blood chemistry, haematology or urinalysis occurred. No significant changes in renal tubular function or glomerular filtration rate were observed after injection at either dose. (author)

  10. 3 Tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy: cerebral gliomas vs. metastatic brain tumors. Our experience and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caivano, R; Lotumolo, A; Rabasco, P; Zandolino, A; D'Antuono, F; Villonio, A; Lancellotti, M I; Macarini, L; Cammarota, A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to report about the value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in differentiating brain metastases, primary high-grade gliomas (HGG) and low-grade gliomas (LGG). MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and MRS were performed in 60 patients with histologically verified brain tumors: 32 patients with HGG (28 glioblastomas multiforme [GBM] and 4 anaplastic astrocytomas), 14 patients with LGG (9 astrocytomas and 5 oligodendrogliomas) and 14 patients with metastatic brain tumors. The Cho/Cr (choline-containing compounds/creatine-phosphocreatine complex), Cho/NAA (N-acetyl aspartate) and NAA/Cr ratios were assessed from spectral maps in the tumoral core and peritumoral edema. The differences in the metabolite ratios between LGG, HGG and metastases were analyzed statistically. Lipids/lactate contents were also analyzed. Significant differences were noted in the tumoral and peritumoral Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA and NAA/Cr ratios between LGG, HGG and metastases. Lipids and lactate content revealed to be useful for discriminating gliomas and metastases. The results of this study demonstrate that MRS can differentiate LGG, HGG and metastases, therefore diagnosis could be allowed even in those patients who cannot undergo biopsy. PMID:23390934

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  12. Cerebral Anatomy of the Spider Monkey Ateles Geoffroyi Studied Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. First Report: a Comparative Study with the Human Brain Homo Sapiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Chico-Ponce de León

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present qualitative studywas to analyze the morphological aspects of theinner cerebral anatomy of two species of primates,using magnetic resonance images (MRI:spider monkey (A. geoffroyi and human (H.sapiens, on the basis of a comparative study ofthe cerebral structures of the two species, focusingupon the brain of the spider monkey and,primarily, its limbic system. In spite of beingan endemic Western hemisphere species, a factwhich is by its own right interesting for researchdue to this animal’s social organization and motorfunctions, the spider monkey (A. geoffroyihas hardly been studied in regard to its neuroanatomy.MRI was carried out, in one spidermonkey, employing a General Electric Signa1.5 T scanner. This investigation was carried inaccordance to international regulations for theprotection of animals in captivity, taking intoaccount all protective means utilized in experimentalhandling, and not leaving behind any residualeffects, either physiological or behavioral.From a qualitative point of view, the brains ofthe spider monkey and the human were found to have similar structures. In reference to shape,the most similar structures were found in thelimbic system; proportionally, however, cervical curvature, amygdala, hippocampus, anteriorcommissure and the colliculi, were larger in thespider monkey than in the human.

  13. Autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model applied to quantification of cerebral blood flow using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model for quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in comparison with deconvolution analysis based on singular value decomposition (DA-SVD). Using computer simulations, we generated a time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent in the volume of interest (VOI) from the arterial input function (AIF) modeled as a gamma-variate function under various CBFs, cerebral blood volumes and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for three different types of residue function (exponential, triangular, and box-shaped). We also considered the effects of delay and dispersion in AIF. The ARMA model and DA-SVD were used to estimate CBF values from the simulated concentration-time curves in the VOI and AIFs, and the estimated values were compared with the assumed values. We found that the CBF value estimated by the ARMA model was more sensitive to the SNR and the delay in AIF than that obtained by DA-SVD. Although the ARMA model considerably overestimated CBF at low SNRs, it estimated the CBF more accurately than did DA-SVD at high SNRs for the exponential or triangular residue function. We believe this study will contribute to an understanding of the usefulness and limitations of the ARMA model when applied to quantification of CBF with DSC-MRI. (author)

  14. Cerebral activation during unilateral clenching in patients with temporomandibular joint synovitis and biting pain: an functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-ping; MA Xu-chen; JIN Zhen; LI Ke; LIU Gang; ZENG Ya-wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance is a non-invasive method that can examine brain activity and has been widely used in various fields including jaw movement and pain processing. Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is one of the most frequent facial pain problems. The objective of this study was to investigate the brain activities using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during unilateral maximal voluntary clenching tasks in the TMD synovitis patients with biting pain.Methods Fourteen TMD synovitis patients with unilateral biting pain and 14 controls were included in the study.Contralateral biting pain was defined as right molar clenching causing left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. Ipsilateral biting pain was defined as right molar clenching causing right TMJ pain. Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90) was administered to the patients and controls. Independent sample t-test was used to compare the SCL-90 subscales between the two groups. Unilateral clenching tasks were performed by the patients and controls. Imaging data were analyzed using SPM99.Results Patients were divided into contralateral TMD biting pain group (n=8) and ipsilateral TMD biting pain group (n=6). The SCL-90 subscales were significantly different between the two groups for somatization, depression, anxiety,phobic anxiety, and paranoid ideation. Group analysis of the controls demonstrated brain activations in the inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, and insular. The areas of activation were different between right and left clenching task. In TMJ synovitis patients with contralateral or ipsilateral biting pain, the group analysis showed activations in the inferior frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, medium frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus,and anterior cingulate cortex.Conclusions The inferior frontal gyrus and precentral gyrus play essential roles during the unilateral clenching task.Activation of anterior cingulate cortex in the

  15. Two patterns of cerebral metabolite abnormalities are detected on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in HIV-infected subjects commencing antiretroviral therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winston, Alan; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D. [Imperial College London, St. Mary' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Duncombe, Chris [HIV-NAT, Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, Bangkok (Thailand); Li, Patrick C.K. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Gill, John M. [Calgary Regional Health Authority, Calgary (Canada); Kerr, Stephen J. [HIV-NAT, Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, Bangkok (Thailand); University of New South Wales, National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Puls, Rebekah L.; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David A. [University of New South Wales, National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Collaboration: for the Altair Study Group

    2012-12-15

    Cerebral function impairment remains problematic in subjects with chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection despite effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Using cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS), we aimed to determine if abnormalities could be detected in neurologically asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects electively commencing cART. Therapy-naive, HIV-infected individuals and HIV-uninfected controls underwent {sup 1}H MRS in several anatomical voxels including the mid-frontal grey matter (FGM) and right basal ganglia (RBG). Differences in cerebral metabolite ratios between groups and correlations between immune and virological status were assessed. Forty-six subjects were recruited (26 HIV-infected and 20 control subjects). In the HIV-infected group, mean CD4+ count (SD, cells per microlitre) and plasma HIV RNA (SD, log10 copies per millilitre) were 192 (86) and 4.71 (0.64), respectively. Choline (Cho)/Creatine (Cr) and myoinositol (MI)/Cr ratios were significantly lower in the FGM in HIV-infected subjects compared to controls (0.67 (0.14) versus 0.88 (0.49), p = 0.036, and 0.94 (0.28) and 1.17 (0.26), p = 0.008, for Cho/Cr and MI/Cr, respectively) and Cho/Cr ratio associated with CD4+ lymphocyte count (p = 0.041). N-Acetyl-aspartate (NAA)/Cho ratio was significantly lower in the RBG in HIV-infected subjects compared to controls (2.27 (0.54) versus 2.63 (0.68), p = 0.002), and this was associated with greater plasma HIV RNA load (p = 0.014). Two patterns of cerebral metabolite abnormalities were observed in HIV-infected subjects electively commencing cART. Greater inflammatory metabolite ratios (Cho/Cr and MI/Cr) associated with lower markers of peripheral immune markers (CD4+ lymphocyte count) in the FGM and lower neuronal metabolite ratios (NAA/Cho) associated with greater HIV viraemia in the RBG were present in HIV-infected subjects. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resonance Imaging (MRI) What is an MRI? MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. It is an important ... MRI is often used for diagnosis or for monitoring disease. For example, if someone is having severe ...

  17. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and changes in cerebral blood flow : The Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease-Magnetic Resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Pieternella H.; Muller, Majon; Vincken, Koen L.; Westerink, Jan; Mali, Willem P. T. M.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Doevendans, PAFM

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin and hematocrit are important determinants of blood viscosity and arterial oxygen content and may therefore influence cerebral blood flow (CBF). We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations of hemoglobin and hematocrit with CBF in 569 patients with manifest arterial disease (me

  18. Utility of FDG-PETCT and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in differentiating between cerebral lymphoma and non-malignant CNS lesions in HIV-infected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In HIV infected patients, MRI cannot reliably differentiate between central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and non-malignant CNS lesions, particularly cerebral toxoplasmosis (CTOX). This study prospectively investigates the utility of FDG PET-CT and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in discriminating CNS lymphoma from non-malignant CNS lesions in HIV infected patients, and assesses the ability of FDG PET-CT to guide the use of early brain biopsy. Methods: 10 HIV patients with neurological symptoms and contrast enhancing lesions on MRI were commenced on anti-toxoplasmosis therapy before undergoing FDG PET-CT and MRS. Brain biopsies were sought in those with FDG PET-CT suggestive of CNS lymphoma, and in those with a negative FDG PET-CT scan who failed to respond to therapy. Final diagnosis was based on histology or treatment response. Results: Two patients were confirmed to have CNS lymphoma and FDG PET-CT was consistent with this diagnosis in both. Six patients had cerebral toxoplasmosis in all of whom FDG PET-CT was consistent with non-malignant disease. One patient had progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), FDG PET-CT was equivocal. One patient had a haemorrhagic brain metastasis and FDG PET-CT wrongly suggested non-malignant disease. MRS was performed successfully in eight subjects: three results were suggestive of CNS lymphoma (one true positive, two false positive), four suggested CTOX (two false negative, two true negative), one scan was equivocal. Conclusion: FDG PET-CT correctly identified all cases of CNS lymphoma and CTOX, supporting its use in this situation. MRS was unhelpful in our cohort

  19. Improved cerebral time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography at 7 Tesla--feasibility study and preliminary results using optimized venous saturation pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten H Wrede

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Conventional saturation pulses cannot be used for 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA due to specific absorption rate (SAR limitations. We overcome these limitations by utilizing low flip angle, variable rate selective excitation (VERSE algorithm saturation pulses. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-five neurosurgical patients (male n = 8, female n = 17; average age 49.64 years; range 26-70 years with different intracranial vascular pathologies were enrolled in this trial. All patients were examined with a 7 Tesla (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens whole body scanner system utilizing a dedicated 32-channel head coil. For venous saturation pulses a 35° flip angle was applied. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the delineation of arterial vessels in the Circle of Willis, delineation of vascular pathologies, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue contrast and overall image quality of TOF MRA scans in consensus on a five-point scale. Normalized signal intensities in the confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter were measured and vessel-tissue contrasts were calculated. RESULTS: Ratings for the majority of patients ranged between good and excellent for most of the evaluated features. Venous saturation was sufficient for all cases with minor artifacts in arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas. Quantitative signal intensity measurements showed high vessel-tissue contrast for confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter. CONCLUSION: The use of novel low flip angle VERSE algorithm pulses for saturation of venous vessels can overcome SAR limitations in 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution TOF MRA. Our protocol is suitable for clinical application with excellent image quality for delineation of various intracranial vascular pathologies.

  20. Utility of FDG-PETCT and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in differentiating between cerebral lymphoma and non-malignant CNS lesions in HIV-infected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westwood, Thomas D., E-mail: tdwestwood@googlemail.com [Department of Radiology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Hogan, Celia, E-mail: celiahogan@hotmail.com [Monsall Unit, Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, North Manchester General Hospital, Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Julyan, Peter J., E-mail: Peter.Julyan@christie.nhs.uk [Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Coutts, Glyn, E-mail: Glyn.Coutts@christie.nhs.uk [Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bonington, Suzie, E-mail: suzi.bonington@christie.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Carrington, Bernadette, E-mail: Bernadette.Carrington@christie.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Taylor, Ben, E-mail: Ben.taylor@christie.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Khoo, Saye, E-mail: S.H.Khoo@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Royal Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Bonington, Alec, E-mail: Alec.Bonington@pat.nhs.uk [Monsall Unit, Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, North Manchester General Hospital, Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Background and purpose: In HIV infected patients, MRI cannot reliably differentiate between central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and non-malignant CNS lesions, particularly cerebral toxoplasmosis (CTOX). This study prospectively investigates the utility of FDG PET-CT and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in discriminating CNS lymphoma from non-malignant CNS lesions in HIV infected patients, and assesses the ability of FDG PET-CT to guide the use of early brain biopsy. Methods: 10 HIV patients with neurological symptoms and contrast enhancing lesions on MRI were commenced on anti-toxoplasmosis therapy before undergoing FDG PET-CT and MRS. Brain biopsies were sought in those with FDG PET-CT suggestive of CNS lymphoma, and in those with a negative FDG PET-CT scan who failed to respond to therapy. Final diagnosis was based on histology or treatment response. Results: Two patients were confirmed to have CNS lymphoma and FDG PET-CT was consistent with this diagnosis in both. Six patients had cerebral toxoplasmosis in all of whom FDG PET-CT was consistent with non-malignant disease. One patient had progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), FDG PET-CT was equivocal. One patient had a haemorrhagic brain metastasis and FDG PET-CT wrongly suggested non-malignant disease. MRS was performed successfully in eight subjects: three results were suggestive of CNS lymphoma (one true positive, two false positive), four suggested CTOX (two false negative, two true negative), one scan was equivocal. Conclusion: FDG PET-CT correctly identified all cases of CNS lymphoma and CTOX, supporting its use in this situation. MRS was unhelpful in our cohort.

  1. Analyzing Ph value, energy and phospholipid metabolism of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissue with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tan; Guangyao Wu; Junmo Sun

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) can be used to non-injuredly and dynamicly detect various metabolites including phosphorus in organis and reflect changes of phospholipid metabolism and energy metabolism in tissue and pH value in cells.OBJECTIVE: To observe changes of pH value, phospholipid metabolism and energy metabolism of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissue with 31P MRS.DESIGN: Semi-quantitative contrast observation.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 44 patients with cerebral tumor diagnosed with surgery operation were selected from the Department of Magnetic Resonance, Central South Hospital, Wuhan University from September 2004 to June 2006. All the subjects had complete 31P MRS data before steroid and operation. Among them,16 patients had glioma of grade Ⅱ-Ⅲ, 12 spongioblastoma and 16 meningioma. The mean age was (45±6)years. Another 36 subjects without focus on cerebral MRI were regarded as normal group, including 19 males and 18 females, and the mean age was (41±4) years. Included subjects were consent.METHODS: Eclipse1.5T MRS (Philips Company) was used to collect wave spectrum; jMRUI(1.3) was used to analyze experimental data and calculate pH value in voxel and ratios of phosphocreatine (PCr)/inorganic phosphate (Pi), PCr/phosphodiesterase (PDE) and phosphomonoesterase (PME)/β-adenosine triphosphate (β-ATP) of various metabolites. 31P MRS results were compared with t test between tumor patients and normal subjects.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes of phospholipid metabolism (PME/PDE), energy metabolism (PCr/ATP) and pH value of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissues.RESULTS: A total of 44 cases with cerebral tumor and 36 normal subjects were involved in the final analysis. pH value and semi-quantitative measurements of normal brain tissues and various cerebral tumors: ① pH value at top occipital region and temple occipital region of normal brain tissue was 7.04±0.02;PCt/β-ATP was 1.51 ±0.03; PCt/Pi was 2.85

  2. Visual field damage in normal-tension glaucoma patients with or without ischemic changes in cerebral magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the pattern of visual field damage between normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) patients with signs indicative of ischemic changes and those NTG patients without signs of ischemic changes, using brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in a single center, cross-sectional study. In 94 consecutive NTG patients who were younger than 61 years old, brain MRI images were obtained using fluid-attenuated inversion recovery pulse sequences. The presence of signs indicative of ischemic changes in brain MRI images was decided separately by two neuroradiologists masked to the diagnosis and stage of glaucoma. Visual field testing was performed using the 30-2 program of the Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer. Between the patients with signs indicative of ischemic changes in brain MRI (ischemic group) and those without MRI signs (nonischemic group), total deviation (TD) at each test point less the average of TDs of the 30-2 program ([TD-TDmean]) was compared at each test point. Signs indicative of ischemic changes in brain MRI were found in 32 of the 94 patients (34.0%). Age, blood pressure, refraction, intraocular pressure, the average of TDs, mean deviation, and corrected pattern standard deviation were not significantly different between the ischemic (N=32) and nonischemic (N=62) groups (P>0.2). [TD-TDmean] in the ischemic group was significantly smaller than that in the nonischemic group at 6 nonedge contiguous test points in the inferior pericentral to nasal field (P=0.005-0.047). NTG patients with signs indicative of ischemic changes in brain MRI had a relatively deeper depression in the inferior pericentral visual field. (author)

  3. Neonatal encephalopathic cerebral injury in South India assessed by perinatal magnetic resonance biomarkers and early childhood neurodevelopmental outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Lally

    Full Text Available Although brain injury after neonatal encephalopathy has been characterised well in high-income countries, little is known about such injury in low- and middle-income countries. Such injury accounts for an estimated 1 million neonatal deaths per year. We used magnetic resonance (MR biomarkers to characterise perinatal brain injury, and examined early childhood outcomes in South India.We recruited consecutive term or near term infants with evidence of perinatal asphyxia and a Thompson encephalopathy score ≥6 within 6 h of birth, over 6 months. We performed conventional MR imaging, diffusion tensor MR imaging and thalamic proton MR spectroscopy within 3 weeks of birth. We computed group-wise differences in white matter fractional anisotropy (FA using tract based spatial statistics. We allocated Sarnat encephalopathy stage aged 3 days, and evaluated neurodevelopmental outcomes aged 3½ years using Bayley III.Of the 54 neonates recruited, Sarnat staging was mild in 30 (56%; moderate in 15 (28% and severe in 6 (11%, with no encephalopathy in 3 (6%. Six infants died. Of the 48 survivors, 44 had images available for analysis. In these infants, imaging indicated perinatal rather than established antenatal origins to injury. Abnormalities were frequently observed in white matter (n = 40, 91% and cortex (n = 31, 70% while only 12 (27% had abnormal basal ganglia/thalami. Reduced white matter FA was associated with Sarnat stage, deep grey nuclear injury, and MR spectroscopy N-acetylaspartate/choline, but not early Thompson scores. Outcome data were obtained in 44 infants (81% with 38 (79% survivors examined aged 3½ years; of these, 16 (42% had adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes.No infants had evidence for established brain lesions, suggesting potentially treatable perinatal origins. White matter injury was more common than deep brain nuclei injury. Our results support the need for rigorous evaluation of the efficacy of rescue hypothermic

  4. Cerebral blood flow in asymptomatic individuals; Relationship with cerebrovascular risk factors and magnetic resonance imaging signal abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaka, Yoshinari; Iiji, Osamu; Ashida, Keiichi; Imaizumi, Masatoshi (National Osaka Hospital (Japan))

    1993-04-01

    We studied the relationship between cortical grey matter flow (CBF) and age, cerebrovascular risk factors and the severity of subcortical hypersignals (HS, hyperintensity score in MRI) in 47 asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors. Multiple regression analysis revealed that HS was most strongly related to CBF, and that hematocrit, age and evidence of ischemic change detected in the electrocardiogram also appeared to be independent determinants of CBF. Both the severity and location of hypersignals were correlated with CBF. The most significant negative correlation observed was that between CBF and HS in the basal ganglia-thalamic region, where the degree of signal abnormality was modest. Decreased CBF in asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors may be related to microcirculatory disturbance associated with elevated hematocrit and an increase in the number of risk factors, and functional suppression of cerebral cortex due to the neuronal disconnection associated with subcortical lesions. In addition, impaired cerebral circulation may be related to MRI signal abnormalities. (author).

  5. Canine model of ischemic stroke with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion: clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Joon-Hyeok; JUNG, Hae-Won; Jang, Hyo-Mi; MOON, Jong-Hyun; Park, Ki-Tae; Lee, Hee-Chun; Lim, Ha-Young; Sur, Jung-Hyang; KANG, Byeong-Teck; HA, Jeongim; Jung, Dong-In

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify time-related changes in clinical, MRI, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical findings associated with ischemic stroke in dogs. Additionally, the association of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and tissue levels of interleukin (IL)-6 with clinical prognosis was assessed. Ischemic stroke was induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in nine healthy experimental dogs. The dogs were divided into three groups according to survival time and d...

  6. Analysis of metabolites in human brain tumors and cerebral infarctions using 31P- and 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    31P- and 1H-MRS with a 2.0 tesla MRI/S system was used to monitor the cerebral energy levels, phospholipid metabolism, intracellular pH, and lactate and amino acid levels in patients with brain tumors and cerebral infarctions. Studies of human brain tumors have suggested that the 31P-MRS of malignant brain tumors show low concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr) and β-ATP, high levels of phosphomonoester (PME) and inorganic Pi, and an alkaline pH. The Pi, PME, and intracellular pH of malignant lymphoma were higher than those of other brain tumors. 1H-MRS showed an increase of lactate in malignant brain tumors and epidermoids. After ACNU administration, the tumor 31P-MRS showed transient reduction and elevation of Pi on five patients with malignant gliomas. Intracellular pH also showed a transient reduction during radiotherapy. 1H-MRS showed a reduction of lactate at the beginning of therapy and showed a marked re-elevation of lactate with tumor regrowth. After radiotherapy, the normal brain 31P-MRS showed transient elevation and reduction of Pi. Intracellular pH also showed a transient elevation during radiotherapy. To investigate the mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) in cerebral ischemia, changes of brain lactate level were estimated by 1H-MRS. Although the Lactate/Creatine ratio decreased consistently over time in all patients, it decreased more rapidly in the patients receiving HBO therapy than in those without such therapy. 1H-MRS demonstrated that HBO therapy may improve metabolism in the ischemic brain and reduces the lactate levels. 31P- and 1H-MRS are practical tools for the clinical analysis of cerebral disorders as well as for deciding on therapeutic procedures and evaluating the response. (K.H.)

  7. Extent of silent cerebral infarcts in adult sickle-cell disease patients on magnetic resonance imaging: is there a correlation with the clinical severity of disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterini Solomou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to correlate the extent of silent cerebral infarcts (SCIs on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with the clinical severity of sickle cell disease (SCD in adult patients. Twenty-four consecutive adult asymptomatic SCD patients (11 male and 13 female with a mean age of 38.4 years (range 20-59 were submitted to brain MRI on a 1 Tesla Gyroscan Intera, Philips MR scanner with a dedicated head coil. The protocol consisted of TSE T2-weighted and FLAIR images on the axial and coronal planes. MRI readings were undertaken by two radiologists and consensus readings. Patients were compound heterozygotes (HbS/β-thal. The extent of SCIs was classified from 0-2 with 0 designating no lesions. Clinical severity was graded as 0-2 by the hematologist, according to the frequency and severity of vaso-occlusive crises. There was no statistically significant correlation between the severity of clinical disease and the extent of SCIs on MR imaging. The extent of SCI lesions did not differ statistically between younger and older patients. Patients receiving hydroxyurea had no statistically significant difference in the extent of SCI lesions. The extent of SCIs in heterozygous (HbS/β-thal SCD patients is not age related and may be quite severe even in younger (<38.4 years patients. However the extent of SCIs is not correlated with the severity of clinical disease.

  8. Cerebral blood flow volume measurements of the carotid artery and ipsilateral branches using two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    The optimal velocity encoding of phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC MRA) in measuring cerebral blood flow volume (BFV) ranges from 60 to 80 cm/s. To verify the accuracy of two-dimensional (2D) PC MRA, the present study localized the region of interest at blood vessels of the neck using PC MRA based on three-dimensional time-of-flight sequences, and the velocity encodingwas set to 80 cm/s. Results of the measurements showed that the error rate was 7.0 ± 6.0%in the estimation of BFV in the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery and the ipsilateralcommon carotid artery. There was no significant difference, and a significant correlation in BFV between internal carotid artery + external carotid artery and ipsilateral common carotid artery. Inaddition, the BFV of the common carotid artery was correlated with that of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. The main error was attributed to the external carotid artery and its branches. Therefore,after selecting the appropriate scanning parameters and protocols, 2D PC MRA is more accuratein the determination of BFV in the carotid arteries.

  9. Dapsone improves functional deficit and diminishes brain damage evaluated by 3-Tesla magnetic resonance image after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Mondragón-Lozano, Rodrigo; Heras-Romero, Yessica; Mendez-Armenta, Marisela; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Nava-Ruiz, Concepción; Ríos, Camilo

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of death and the first of disability in the world population. We have shown that dapsone acts as an antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic agent after brain Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) in rats; however, its therapeutic efficacy, measured by imaging has not been characterized. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of dapsone by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate imaging markers with motor function and oxidative stress after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). We used male rats throughout the experiment. Functional deficit after I/R was assessed by using Longa scale. The area of brain tissue damage was measured by histology. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Finally, difussion tensor MRI was employed to measure the fractional anisotropy (FA), as a MRI marker of the pathophysiologic brain status. Results showed a better functional recovery and less damaged tissue in animals treated with dapsone vs control group. The values of FA were higher in animals receiving treatment, indicating a better preservation of brain structure. At early stages of the damage, dapsone was able to reduce both oxidative markers (Nrf-2 and ROS). Our findings provide new evidence for the efficacy of dapsone when administered during the acute phase after I/R and that quantitative sequences of MRI are useful for characterizing its potential therapeutic benefits after stroke. PMID:27321157

  10. Transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography for visualization of signal Intensity distribution pattern within an unruptured cerebral aneurysm: preliminarily assessment with anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural history of unruptured cerebral aneurysm is not known; also unknown is the potential growth and rupture in any individual aneurysm. The authors have developed transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) obtained by a time-of-flight sequence to investigate the interaction between the intra-aneurysmal signal intensity distribution patterns and configuration of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Transluminal color-coded images were reconstructed from volume data of source magnetic resonance angiography by using a parallel volume-rendering algorithm with transluminal imaging technique. By selecting a numerical threshold range from a signal intensity opacity chart of the three-dimensional volume-rendering dataset several areas of signal intensity were depicted, assigned different colors, and visualized transparently through the walls of parent arteries and an aneurysm. Patterns of signal intensity distribution were analyzed with three operated cases of an unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and compared with the actual configurations observed at microneurosurgery. A little difference in marginal features of an aneurysm was observed; however, transluminal color-coded images visualized the complex signal intensity distribution within an aneurysm in conjunction with aneurysmal geometry. Transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography can thus provide numerical analysis of the interaction between spatial signal intensity distribution patterns and aneurysmal configurations and may offer an alternative and practical method to investigate the patient-specific natural history of individual unruptured cerebral aneurysms. (orig.)

  11. Early magnetic resonance detection of cortical necrosis and acute network injury associated with neonatal and infantile cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabe, Tetsuhiko; Aida, Noriko; Nozawa, Kumiko [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Niwa, Tetsu [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Tokai University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Isehara (Japan); Shibasaki, Jun [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Neonatology, Yokohama (Japan); Osaka, Hitoshi [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    Knowledge of MRI findings in pediatric cerebral infarction is limited. To determine whether cortical necrosis and network injury appear in the acute phase in post-stroke children and to identify anatomical location of acute network injury and the ages at which these phenomena are seen. Images from 12 children (age range: 0-9 years; neonates [<1 month], n=5; infants [1 month-12 months], n=3; others [≥1 year], n=4) with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) cortical infarction were retrospectively analyzed. Cortical necrosis was defined as hyperintense cortical lesions on T1-weighted imaging that lacked evidence of hemorrhage. Acute network injury was defined as hyperintense lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging that were not in the MCA territory and had fiber connections with the affected cerebral cortex. MRI was performed within the first week after disease onset. Cortical necrosis was only found in three neonates. Acute network injury was seen in the corticospinal tract (CST), thalamus and corpus callosum. Acute network injury along the CST was found in five neonates and one 7-month-old infant. Acute network injury was evident in the thalamus of four neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months) and in the corpus callosum of five neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months). The entire thalamus was involved in three children when infarction of MCA was complete. In acute MCA cortical infarction, MRI findings indicating cortical necrosis or acute network injury was frequently found in neonates and early infants. Response to injury in a developing brain may be faster than that in a mature one. (orig.)

  12. Combined screening method for unruptured cerebral aneurysm, using magnetic resonance angiography and three-dimensional CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity and specificity for cerebral aneurysms were investigated in MR angiography (MRA) and three-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA), and the usefulness of combining the two methods was evaluated. Thirty-one patients with 39 unruptured intracranial aneurysms verified by conventional angiography and 11 control patients underwent 3D time-of-flight MRA (maximum intensity projection image) and helical scanning 3D-CTA (volume rendering image). Five neuroradiologists independently read the images, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. The sensitivity of 3D-CTA (86.7%) was significantly higher (p value<0.001) than that of MRA (70.1%). False negatives on MRA were attributed to the small size of aneurysms; those on 3D-CTA were due to the bony structures hiding the aneurysms. Sensitivity with combined 3D-CTA and MRA (94.4%) was much higher than that of MRA alone (p value <0.001). The specificity of MRA (97.4%) was similar to that of 3D-CTA (96.3%). While fairly good sensitivity and specificity were obtained with either 3D-CTA or MRA, false-negative and false-positive findings were still present. The combined method using both 3D-CTA and MRA improved the efficacy of screening for cerebral aneurysm because considering both types of results together enables the neuroradiologist to compensate for problems encountered in each method. (author)

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection...

  14. Discriminating between silent cerebral infarction and deep white matter hyperintensity using combinations of three types of magnetic resonance images: a multicenter observer performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Makoto [Iwate Medical University, Advanced Medical Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Hirai, Toshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Taoka, Toshiaki [Nara Prefectural Medical University, Department of Radiology, Kashihara (Japan); Higano, Shuichi [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Sendai (Japan); Wakabayashi, Chieko [Suiseikai Kajikawa Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsusue, Eiji [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan); Ida, Masahiro [Ebara Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    We attempted to determine the most appropriate combination of magnetic resonance (MR) images that can accurately detect and discriminate between asymptomatic infarction and deep white matter hyperintensity (DWMH); these lesions have different clinical implications and are occasionally confused. We performed an observer performance analysis using cerebral MR images of 45 individuals with or without asymptomatic small white matter infarction and/or mild DWMH who participated in a physical checkup program at four institutions. Six observers interpreted whether infarction and/or DWMH existed in combinations of two or three image types of the T1-weighted images (T1WI), T2-weighted images (T2WI), and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. The observers' performance was evaluated with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The averaged area under the ROC curve (Az) for detecting a infarction was significantly larger in the combination of all the three image types (0.95) than that in any combinations of the two image types (T1WI and FLAIR images, 0.87; T2WI and FLAIR images, 0.85; T1WI and T2WI, 0.86). The Az for detecting DWMH was significantly smaller in the combination of T1WI and T2WI (0.79) than that in other image combinations (T1WI and FLAIR, 0.89; T2WI and FLAIR, 0.91; T1WI, T2WI, and FLAIR, 0.90). The combination of T1WI, T2WI, and FLAIR images is required to accurately detect both small white matter infarction and mild DWMH. (orig.)

  15. Cerebral edema induced in mice by a convulsive dose of soman. Evaluation through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the present study, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and histology were used to assess cerebral edema and lesions in mice intoxicated by a convulsive dose of soman, an organophosphate compound acting as an irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor. Methods: Three hours and 24 h after the intoxication with soman (172 μg/kg), the mice were anesthetized with an isoflurane/N2O mixture and their brain examined with DW-MRI. After the imaging sessions, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis of their brain. Results: A decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was detected as soon as 3 h after the intoxication and was found strongly enhanced at 24 h. A correlation was obtained between the ADC change and the severity of the overall brain damage (edema and cellular degeneration): the more severe the damage, the stronger the ADC drop. Anesthesia was shown to interrupt soman-induced seizures and to attenuate edema and cell change in certain sensitive brain areas. Finally, brain water content was assessed using the traditional dry/wet weight method. A significant increase of brain water was observed following the intoxication. Conclusions: The ADC decrease observed in the present study suggests that brain edema in soman poisoning is mainly intracellular and cytotoxic. Since entry of water into Brain was also evidenced, this type of edema is certainly mixed with others (vasogenic, hydrostatic, osmotic). The present study confirms the potential of DW-MRI as a non-invasive tool for monitoring the acute neuropathological consequences (edema and neurodegeneration) of soman-induced seizures

  16. Fully automated quantification of regional cerebral blood flow with three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest template. Validation using magnetic resonance imaging. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The previously reported three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest (ROI) template (3DSRT-t) for the analysis of anatomically standardized technetium-99m-L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images was modified for use in a fully automated regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) quantification software, 3DSRT, incorporating an anatomical standardization engine transplanted from statistical parametric mapping 99 and ROIs for quantification based on 3DSRT-t. Three-dimensional T2-weighted magnetic resonance images of 10 patients with localized infarcted areas were compared with the ROI contour of 3DSRT, and the positions of the central sulcus in the primary sensorimotor area were also estimated. All positions of the 20 lesions were in strict accordance with the ROI delineation of 3DSRT. The central sulcus was identified on at least one side of 210 paired ROIs and in the middle of 192 (91.4%) of these 210 paired ROIs among the 273 paired ROIs of the primary sensorimotor area. The central sulcus was recognized in the middle of more than 71.4% of the ROIs in which the central sulcus was identifiable in the respective 28 slices of the primary sensorimotor area. Fully automated accurate ROI delineation on anatomically standardized images is possible with 3DSRT, which enables objective quantification of rCBF and vascular reserve in only a few minutes using 99mTc-ECD SPECT images obtained by the resting and vascular reserve (RVR) method. (author)

  17. Fully automated quantification of regional cerebral blood flow with three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest template. Validation using magnetic resonance imaging. Technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Ryo; Katayama, Shigenori; Takeda, Naoya; Fujita, Katsuzo [Nishi-Kobe Medical Center (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Fukui Medical Univ., Matsuoka (Japan); Konishi, Junji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2003-03-01

    The previously reported three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest (ROI) template (3DSRT-t) for the analysis of anatomically standardized technetium-99m-L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images was modified for use in a fully automated regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) quantification software, 3DSRT, incorporating an anatomical standardization engine transplanted from statistical parametric mapping 99 and ROIs for quantification based on 3DSRT-t. Three-dimensional T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance images of 10 patients with localized infarcted areas were compared with the ROI contour of 3DSRT, and the positions of the central sulcus in the primary sensorimotor area were also estimated. All positions of the 20 lesions were in strict accordance with the ROI delineation of 3DSRT. The central sulcus was identified on at least one side of 210 paired ROIs and in the middle of 192 (91.4%) of these 210 paired ROIs among the 273 paired ROIs of the primary sensorimotor area. The central sulcus was recognized in the middle of more than 71.4% of the ROIs in which the central sulcus was identifiable in the respective 28 slices of the primary sensorimotor area. Fully automated accurate ROI delineation on anatomically standardized images is possible with 3DSRT, which enables objective quantification of rCBF and vascular reserve in only a few minutes using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPECT images obtained by the resting and vascular reserve (RVR) method. (author)

  18. Efficient isotropic magnetic resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, O. J. F.; Gay-Balmaz, P.

    2002-01-01

    We study experimentally and numerically a novel three-dimensional magnetic resonator structure with high isotropy. It is formed by crossed split-ring resonators and has a response independent of the illumination direction in a specific plane. The utilization of such elements to build a finite left-handed medium is discussed. (C) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  20. Metabolic changes of prefrontal cerebral lobe ,white matter and cerebellum in patients with post-stroke depression A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinggang Xu; Hong Cao; Qingwei Song; Jianlin Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy(1H-MRS)non-invasively detects changes in chemical substances in the brain,which reflects the pathological metabolism.OBJECTIVE:To investigate changes in N-acetyl-aspartate(NAA),choline(Cho),creatine(Cr),and myoinositol(MI)in the gray and white matter of cerebral prefrontal lobe and cerebellum of patients with differential degrees of post-stroke depression(PSD)using 1H-MRS.DESIGN:A case control study.SETTING:The First Affiliated Hospital of the Dalian Medical University.PARTICIPANTS:A total of 38 patients with stroke(28 male and 10 female patients,aged 40 to 79 years)were selected from the Department of Neurology,1st Atfiliated Hospital,Dalian Medical University,from February to October in 2004.All subjects met the DSM-IV criteria for cerebrovascular disease and depression.The degree of depression was defined according to Hamilton criteria.38 patients with PSD were divided into two groups according to the time after ischemia,20 patients in the acute group with less than 10 days after ischemic attack(mild:16 patients,moderate/severe:4 patients)and 18 patients in the chronic group with more than 11 days after ischemic attack(mild:15 patients,moderate/severe:3 patients).Seventeen healthy volunteers with matching age from 41 to 80 years were examined as a control group.The study was approved by the Medical Ethics Committee of the University Medical Center Utrecht,and each participant signed an informed consent form.METHODS:Spectra were acquired by multi-voxel point-resolved spectroscopy(PRESS)sequence with GE signal.ST MP-di,localized in prefrontal cerebral lobe and cerebellum.Values of NAA,Cho,MI,and Cr ere compared between different graded PSD patients and control subjects with one-way analysis of variance in software SPSS11.5.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Metabolite concentration in different brain regions of interest.Difference in metabolites between distinctly graded PSD patients and control subjects.Exclusion of age

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Ginat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosarcoidosis is an uncommon condition with protean manifestations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often used in the diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of patients with neurosarcoidosis. Therefore, familiarity with the variety of MRI appearances is important. In this pictorial essay, the range of possible patterns of involvement in neurosarcoidosis are depicted and discussed. These include intracranial and spine leptomeningeal involvement, cortical and cerebral white matter lesions, corpus callosum involvement, sellar and suprasellar involvement, periventricular involvement, cranial nerve involvement, cavernous sinus involvement, hydrocephalus, dural involvement, ischemic lesions, perivascular involvement, orbit lesions, osseous involvement, nerve root involvement, and spinal cord intramedullary involvement. Differential diagnoses for each pattern of involvement of neurosarcoidosis are also provided.

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty cases diagnosed as diffuse brain injury (DBI) were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 3 days after injury. These cases were divided into two groups, which were the concussion group and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) group established by Gennarelli. There were no findings on computerized tomography (CT) in the concussion group except for two cases which had a brain edema or subarachnoid hemorrhage. But on MRI, high intensity areas on T2 weighted imaging were demonstrated in the cerebral white matter in this group. Many lesions in this group were thought to be edemas of the cerebral white matter, because of the fact that on serial MRI, they were isointense. In mild types of DAI, the lesions on MRI were located only in the cerebral white matter, whereas, in the severe types of DAI, lesions were located in the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum, the dorsal part of the brain stem as well as in the cerebral white matter. As for CT findings, parenchymal lesions were not visualized especially in mild DAI. Our results suggested that the lesions in cerebral concussion were edemas in cerebral white matter. In mild DAI they were non-hemorrhagic contusion; and in severe DAI they were hemorrhagic contusions in the cerebral white matter, the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum or the dorsal part of the brain stem. (author)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Henmi, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Toshibumi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    Forty cases diagnosed as diffuse brain injury (DBI) were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 3 days after injury. These cases were divided into two groups, which were the concussion group and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) group established by Gennarelli. There were no findings on computerized tomography (CT) in the concussion group except for two cases which had a brain edema or subarachnoid hemorrhage. But on MRI, high intensity areas on T2 weighted imaging were demonstrated in the cerebral white matter in this group. Many lesions in this group were thought to be edemas of the cerebral white matter, because of the fact that on serial MRI, they were isointense. In mild types of DAI, the lesions on MRI were located only in the cerebral white matter, whereas, in the severe types of DAI, lesions were located in the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum, the dorsal part of the brain stem as well as in the cerebral white matter. As for CT findings, parenchymal lesions were not visualized especially in mild DAI. Our results suggested that the lesions in cerebral concussion were edemas in cerebral white matter. In mild DAI they were non-hemorrhagic contusion; and in severe DAI they were hemorrhagic contusions in the cerebral white matter, the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum or the dorsal part of the brain stem. (author).

  5. Resonant magnetic vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using the complex angular momentum method, we provide a semiclassical analysis of electron scattering by a magnetic vortex of Aharonov-Bohm type. Regge poles of the S matrix are associated with surface waves orbiting around the vortex and supported by a magnetic field discontinuity. Rapid variations of sharp characteristic shapes can be observed on scattering cross sections. They correspond to quasibound states which are Breit-Wigner-type resonances associated with surface waves and which can be considered as quantum analogues of acoustic whispering-gallery modes. Such a resonant magnetic vortex could provide a different kind of artificial atom while the semiclassical approach developed here could be profitably extended in various areas of the physics of vortices

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining very ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during MRI, but this is rarely a problem. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... conditions such as: brain tumors stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid spaces within the brain ( ...

  9. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  13. Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Uecker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The main disadvantage of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are its long scan times and, in consequence, its sensitivity to motion. Exploiting the complementary information from multiple receive coils, parallel imaging is able to recover images from under-sampled k-space data and to accelerate the measurement. Because parallel magnetic resonance imaging can be used to accelerate basically any imaging sequence it has many important applications. Parallel imaging brought a fundamental shift in image reconstruction: Image reconstruction changed from a simple direct Fourier transform to the solution of an ill-conditioned inverse problem. This work gives an overview of image reconstruction from the perspective of inverse problems. After introducing basic concepts such as regularization, discretization, and iterative reconstruction, advanced topics are discussed including algorithms for auto-calibration, the connection to approximation theory, and the combination with compressed sensing.

  14. Comparative anatomy of the pig brain : an integrative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the porcine brain with special emphasis on the external morphology of the cerebral cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Verena

    2015-01-01

    For this study the healthy brains of the domestic pigs are examined post mortem. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans in transverse, sagittal and dorsal orientation (native and formalin fixed) are produced with a 1.0 Tesla scanner. 12 sagittal, 13 dorsal and 22 transverse scans are selected and labelled to produce a MRI picture atlas of the porcine brain. With the aid of the graphical software programs AMIRA® and AVIZO® (Mercury Computer Systems Inc.) it was possible to identify brain s...

  15. 磁共振多模态影像在脑胶质瘤诊断及其分级中的应用分析%Application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Diagnosis and Grad-ing of Cerebral Gliomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王恩力

    2015-01-01

    多模态磁共振是将不同功能的磁共振技术融合到为患者进行诊断和检查的一种新兴颅脑成像技术。由于具有精确度高,图像分辨率高,检查侵入性低等优势,同时还可以提供颅脑组织解剖、脑部代谢、细胞功能等信息,多模态磁共振技术已被广泛的运用到各种脑组织病变和神经疾病的诊断和治疗中。本文重点综述了多模态磁共振在诊断脑胶质瘤和对其进行分级中的应用。%Multi modality magnetic resonance imaging was a new imaging technique for the diag-nosis and examination of patients with different functional magnetic resonance imaging.Because of its high accuracy, high resolution image, check the invasion of advantages, also can provide brain tissue anatomy, brain metabolism and cell function etc. information, multi modality magnetic reso-nance imaging technology has been widely using to the diagnosis and treatment of various brain lesions and neurodegenerative diseases. This paper reviews the application of multi modality mag-netic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of cerebral gliomas and its classification.

  16. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  17. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  18. 脑梗死前期磁共振脑灌注成像20例分析%Correlation analysis of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging and its stages of regional cerebral hypoperfusion in pre-infarction period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾裕镜

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨脑梗死前期MR脑灌注成像的表现和分期临床应用价值.方法 采用MR脑灌注成像对20例脑血管病患者的197层脑灌注图像和对照组20例非脑血管病患者的197层脑灌注成像进行分析,计算每层图像的患/健侧比值,并与对照组的正常比值及其范围比较.以非参数统计方法、多元方差分析和两两比较分析病例组和对照组脑灌注血流动力学参数及其分期.结果 病例组和对照组的4个血流动力学参数差异均有统计学意义(P<0.01).TTP(time to peak)和MTT(mean transit time)与发病的相关系数较高,分别为0.482和0.471,rCBV(regional cerebral blood volume)和rCBF(regional cerebral blood flow)较低,且为负值.脑梗死前期分期特征为:Ⅰ期一型TTP稍有延长,Ⅰ期二型MTT显著延长,Ⅱ期一型rCBF明显下降,Ⅱ期二型rCBV下降.结论 MR脑灌注成像可提供脑梗死前期的血流动力学参数变化的信息,并可以对其参数变化进行分期.%Objective To explore clinical value of application to magnetic resonance(MR) perfusion imaging and stages of regional cerebral hypoperfusion in preinfarction period and improve the diagnosis level for pre-infarction period,and prevent or decrease the incidence of cerebral infarction. Methods 20 cases of cerebral ischemia in case group and 20 cases of non-cerebral ischemia in control group were performed with dynamic perfusion. 197 MR images of case group were compared with 197 images of control group,calculating the ratios of illness side to normal for every image at hypoperfusion areas in the regional cerebral isehemia and referring and comparing their range provided by control group with methods of nonparametrie statistics and multivariate analysis of variance and multiple comparison. Results Four parameters of blood flow dynamics between two groups showed a significant difference (P<0.01). Correlation coefficients between time to peak(TTP) and time to peak(MTT) and incidence

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic ... that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation ...

  1. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new examination technique used in diagnostic medicine. Its use has increased notably during the last few years in Finland, too. The biological effects of electromagnetic fields used in MRI are quite different from the effects of x-rays. This report introduces the physics and the techniques of MRI; the biological effects of magnetic fields and the hazards associated with the use of MRI systems are briefly discussed. The major national and international recommendations are summarized, too. Furthermore, a description is given how safety aspects are considered in Finnish MRI units. Finally, recommendations are given to restrict the exposure caused by MRI and to ensure the safe use of MRI. Diagnostic applications and clinical or economic aspects fall outside the scope of this report. (orig.)

  3. Long-term cerebral metabolite changes on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients cured of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with previous intrathecal methotrexate and cranial irradiation prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term brain metabolite changes on 1H-MRS in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients who had intrathecal methotrexate (ITMTX) and cranial irradiation (CRT) for central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis against CNS relapse. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven ALL patients (12 females, 25 males) with history of ITMTX and CRT for CNS prophylaxis were studied. Age ranges at the time of diagnosis and at magnetic resonance examination were 0.8-13 years and 12-27 years, respectively. The interval since diagnosis was 5.6-19 years. T2-weighted and gradient-recalled echo (GRE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) were performed to assess brain injury. Results: On MRI, 3 leukoencephalopathy (LEP) and 1 infarct were detected. Twenty-two patients had evidence of hemosiderin. On 1H-MRS no statistically significant difference in choline (Cho)/creatine (Cr) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/Cr was associated with LEP. A lower Cho/Cr (p=0.006) and NAA/Cr (p=0.078) was observed in brains with hemosiderin. Linear-regression analysis showed no statistically significant relationship between NAA/Cr or Cho/Cr with age at diagnosis, but there was a statistically significant decreasing trend of NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr with the interval since diagnosis. Conclusion: Long-term brain injury in ALL survivors after CNS prophylaxis with ITMTX and CRT was reflected by decreasing NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr with the interval since diagnosis. The lower Cho/Cr associated with hemosiderin but not LEP suggested a different pathophysiology for these brain lesions

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  5. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is currently a recognized, but rare, complication ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging appearance of hypertensive encephalopathy in a dog

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, Chloe A; Witham, Adrian; Tyrrell, Dayle; Long, Sam N

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old female spayed English Staffordshire terrier was presented for evaluation of a 10-month history of intermittent myoclonic episodes, and a one weeks history of short episodes of altered mentation, ataxia and collapse. Magnetic resonance imaging identified subcortical oedema, predominately in the parietal and temporal lobes and multiple cerebral microbleeds. Serum biochemistry, indirect blood pressure measurements and magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities were consistent with hy...

  9. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance angiographic assessment after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Praharaj, S S; Coulthard, A; Gholkar, A; English, P; Mendelow, A D

    1996-01-01

    Extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass operation may be performed to augment the distal cerebral circulation. The bypass patency is usually assessed postoperatively with conventional cerebral angiography. Six patients are reported in whom the bypass patency was assessed using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA): Two had intracavernous carotid aneurysms, three had base of skull tumours encompassing the internal carotid artery, and one had occlusion of the right internal carotid artery with ...

  11. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of radiogenic changes after radiosurgery of cerebral arteriovenous malformations with implications for the differential diagnosis of radionecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of radionecrosis after radiosurgery is 5–20%. That radionecrosis after radiosurgery may be confused with a malignant tumor is a known phenomenon and problem. Three similarly treated patients with cAVM, 1 patient with symptomatic radionecrosis and 2 patients with normal post-radiation MRI changes, were selected and studied in detail with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). 2 cAVM were located in eloquent locations and were classified as Spetzler-Martin grade (SM) III such that interdisciplinary radiosurgery was recommended; a third patient with a left frontal SM II cAVM refused surgery. 1 patient was male, and 2 were female. The patient’s ages ranged from 38 to 62 years (median, 39 years). The nidus volume (= planning target volume = PTV) ranged from 2.75 to 6.89 ccm (median, 6.41 ccm). The single dose was 20 Gy at the isocenter of the PTV encompassing the 80 – 90% isodose. The median follow-up period was 20 months (range, 16 – 84 months). Toxicities were evaluated with the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for adverse events version 3.0. No patient suffered a bleeding from cAVM during the study period. A complete nidus occlusion was shown in all patients with time-resolved MRA. All patients showed radiogenic MRI changes, 1 patient showed excessive radionecrosis. This patient was oligosymptomatic and under temporary corticoid therapy symptoms resolved completely. Following patterns associated with radionecrosis in the MRS studies were identified in our collective: • 2D spectroscopic imaging (2D-SI) revealed much lower concentrations of metabolites in the lesion as compared to contralateral healthy tissue in all patients. • Whereas regions with regular post-radiosurgery effects showed almost normal levels of Cho and a Cho/Cr ratio < 2.0, regions with radionecrosis were characterized by increased lipid levels and a Cho/Cr ratio > 2.0 in conjunction with decreased

  12. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a ...

  14. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic Resonance angiography. Pt 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to describe the basic physical principles important in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). The data used were obtained from recent articles on MRA and direct experience working with prototype MRA sequence. The information is presented in a manner suitable for those unfamiliar with the principles of MRA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Magnetic resonance angiography is an important method that can be used to obtain angiograms without the injection of intravascular contrast medium. It is already proving to be of clinical use in the assessment of vascular disease. 11 refs., 5 figs

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  20. Manganese encephalopathy: utility of early magnetic resonance imaging.

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, K; Golnick, J; Korn, T; Angle, C

    1993-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides visual evidence of cerebral deposits of paramagnetic metals. The usefulness of MRI is described in connection with the manganese poisoning of a 44 year old arc welder who had been engaged in the repair and recycling of railroad track made of manganese steel alloy.

  1. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference. PMID:26878709

  2. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of influences of cranial irradiation on cerebral energy metabolism in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of cranial irradiation on the cerebrum was studied. Energy metabolism in the brain was assessed before and after cranial irradiation using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The subjects were 3 pediatric patients with initial acute lymphotic leukemia (ALL), who underwent induction chemotherapy and central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis according to the ALL high risk 911 protocol of Children's Cancer and Leukemia Study Group. The patients underwent 31P-MRS within one week before and after prophylactic CNS irradiation with a total dose of 18 Gy (i.e., 0.5 Gy in two fractions, 1.0 Gy in two fractions, and 1.5 Gy in 10 fractions - 4 times a week in 3-4 weeks). All 3 patients showed a decrease in phosphocreatine and ATP levels, which are indicators of energy metabolism, and also in the intracellular pH level in the brain tissue. Cranial irradiation was thus suggested to induce hypoxia in the brain tissue. (S.Y.)

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ... CD. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat ...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Connectome Automated Pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, William R.; Bogovic, John A.; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Landman, Bennett A.; Prince, Jerry L.; Vogelstein, R. Jacob

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript presents a novel, tightly integrated pipeline for estimating a connectome, which is a comprehensive description of the neural circuits in the brain. The pipeline utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to produce a high-level estimate of the structural connectivity in the human brain. The Magnetic Resonance Connectome Automated Pipeline (MRCAP) is efficient and its modular construction allows researchers to modify algorithms to meet their specific requirements. The pipe...

  9. Advances in magnetic resonance 4

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 4 deals with the relaxation, irradiation, and other dynamical effects that is specific to systems having resolved structure in their magnetic resonance spectra. This book discusses the anisotropic rotation of molecules in liquids by NMR quadrupolar relaxation; rotational diffusion constants; alternating linewidth effect; and theoretical formulations of the problem. The line shapes in high-resolution NMR; matrix representations of the equations of motion; matrix representations of the equations of motion; and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also delibera

  10. Evaluation of engraftment of superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled mesenchymal stem cells using three-dimensional reconstruction of magnetic resonance imaging in photo thrombotic cerebral infarction models of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Jae Hyun; Kwak, Byung Kook; Jung, Ji Sung; Park, Se Rah [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate engraftment by visualizing the location of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) three-dimensionally in photothrombotic cerebral infarction (PTCI) models of rats. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of an agarose block containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled hBM-MSCs was performed using a 3.0-T MRI, T2-(T2WI), T2{sup *}-(T2{sup *}WI), and susceptibility-weighted images (SWI). PTCI was induced in 6 rats, and 2.5 x 10(5) SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs were infused through the ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA group) or tail vein (IV group). MRI was performed on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after stem cell injection. Dark signal regions were confirmed using histology. Three-dimensional MRI reconstruction was performed using the clinical workflow solution to evaluate the engraftment of hBM-MSCs. Volumetric analysis of the engraftment was also performed. The volumes of SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs in the phantom MRI were 129.3, 68.4, and 25.9 microL using SWI, T2{sup *}WI, and T2WI, respectively. SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs appeared on day 1 after injection, encircling the cerebral infarction from the ventral side. Dark signal regions matched iron positive cells and human origin (positive) cells. The volume of the engraftment was larger in the ICA group on days 1, 3, and 7, after stem cell injection (p < 0.05 on SWI). SWI was the most sensitive MRI pulse sequence (p < 0.05). The volume of infarction decreased until day 14. The engraftment of SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs can be visualized and evaluated three-dimensionally in PTCI models of rats. The engraftment volume was larger in the ICA group than IV group on early stage within one week.

  11. Evaluation of engraftment of superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled mesenchymal stem cells using three-dimensional reconstruction of magnetic resonance imaging in photo thrombotic cerebral infarction models of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate engraftment by visualizing the location of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) three-dimensionally in photothrombotic cerebral infarction (PTCI) models of rats. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of an agarose block containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled hBM-MSCs was performed using a 3.0-T MRI, T2-(T2WI), T2*-(T2*WI), and susceptibility-weighted images (SWI). PTCI was induced in 6 rats, and 2.5 x 10(5) SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs were infused through the ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA group) or tail vein (IV group). MRI was performed on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after stem cell injection. Dark signal regions were confirmed using histology. Three-dimensional MRI reconstruction was performed using the clinical workflow solution to evaluate the engraftment of hBM-MSCs. Volumetric analysis of the engraftment was also performed. The volumes of SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs in the phantom MRI were 129.3, 68.4, and 25.9 microL using SWI, T2*WI, and T2WI, respectively. SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs appeared on day 1 after injection, encircling the cerebral infarction from the ventral side. Dark signal regions matched iron positive cells and human origin (positive) cells. The volume of the engraftment was larger in the ICA group on days 1, 3, and 7, after stem cell injection (p < 0.05 on SWI). SWI was the most sensitive MRI pulse sequence (p < 0.05). The volume of infarction decreased until day 14. The engraftment of SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs can be visualized and evaluated three-dimensionally in PTCI models of rats. The engraftment volume was larger in the ICA group than IV group on early stage within one week.

  12. Changes of the cerebral metabolite patterns in patients undergoing hemodialysis due to chronic renal failure: evaluation with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Hye Won; Yu, Hyeon; Yu, Soo Jeong; Kim, Gi Hyeon [Chung-Ang University Medical Center, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    We wanted to evaluate the cerebral metabolites in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) and who were undergoing hemodialysis by performing proton MR spectroscopy and were wanted to evaluate the correlation between the changes in the cerebral metabolite ratios and the duration after starting the initial hemodialysis. Proton MR spectroscopy was performed in 15 patients with CRF and who were undergoing hemodialysis and in ten healthy volunteers. The changes in N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline-containing compounds (Cho), myo-inositol (Myo), glutamine/glutamate complex (Glx), and creatine (Cr) were analyzed. MR spectroscopy was performed before and after hemodialysis. For the patients with CRF before hemodialysis, the Cho/Cr ratio in the gray matter ({rho} < 0.001) and the Myo/Cr ratio in both the gray and white matter ({rho} < 0.01) were significantly elevated compared with those in the control subjects. For the patients with CRF after hemodialysis, their Cho/Cr ratios were significantly reduced in both the gray and white matter compared with that before hemodialysis ({rho} < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the Cho/Cr ratio and serum Cr in the gray matter of CRF patients after hemodialysis (r = 0.54, {rho} < 0.05). The cerebral metabolite ratios were not significantly correlated with the duration after starting the initial hemodialysis. The cerebral metabolite patterns are significantly different between the patients with CRF and who are undergoing hemodialysis and the normal controls. The cerebral metabolite ratios are not significantly correlated with the duration after starting the initial hemodialysis.

  13. Nuclear magnetic gamma double resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of problems corresponding to different variants of experiments using nuclear magnetic-gamma double resonance (NMGDR) are theoretically investigated. Calculation is carried out and its results are compared to experimental ones concerning NMGDR for tantalum. Time dynamics of the source or scatterer nucleus sublevel populations under double resonance conditions with non-uniform initial population of this nucleus sublevels is studied

  14. Standard magnetic resonance imaging is inadequate for patients with refractory focal epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oertzen, J. von; Urbach, H.; Jungbluth, S.; Kurthen, M.; Reuber, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Elger, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with intractable epilepsy may benefit from epilepsy surgery especially if they have a radiologically demonstrable cerebral lesion. Dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols as performed at epilepsy surgery centres can detect epileptogenic abnormalities with great sens

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    OpenAIRE

    Sax, Steven L.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent noninvasive method for evaluating thoracic aortic dissections. A variety of magnetic resonance scans of aortic dissections are shown, documenting the ability of magnetic resonance to image the true lumen, the false channel, and the intimal septum. Detail is provided on magnetic resonance imaging techniques and findings. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:262-70)

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  18. Analysis of metabolites in human brain tumors and cerebral infarctions using {sup 31}P- and {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirakawa, Wataru [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-08-01

    {sup 31}P- and {sup 1}H-MRS with a 2.0 tesla MRI/S system was used to monitor the cerebral energy levels, phospholipid metabolism, intracellular pH, and lactate and amino acid levels in patients with brain tumors and cerebral infarctions. Studies of human brain tumors have suggested that the {sup 31}P-MRS of malignant brain tumors show low concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr) and {beta}-ATP, high levels of phosphomonoester (PME) and inorganic Pi, and an alkaline pH. The Pi, PME, and intracellular pH of malignant lymphoma were higher than those of other brain tumors. {sup 1}H-MRS showed an increase of lactate in malignant brain tumors and epidermoids. After ACNU administration, the tumor {sup 31}P-MRS showed transient reduction and elevation of Pi on five patients with malignant gliomas. Intracellular pH also showed a transient reduction during radiotherapy. {sup 1}H-MRS showed a reduction of lactate at the beginning of therapy and showed a marked re-elevation of lactate with tumor regrowth. After radiotherapy, the normal brain {sup 31}P-MRS showed transient elevation and reduction of Pi. Intracellular pH also showed a transient elevation during radiotherapy. To investigate the mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) in cerebral ischemia, changes of brain lactate level were estimated by {sup 1}H-MRS. Although the Lactate/Creatine ratio decreased consistently over time in all patients, it decreased more rapidly in the patients receiving HBO therapy than in those without such therapy. {sup 1}H-MRS demonstrated that HBO therapy may improve metabolism in the ischemic brain and reduces the lactate levels. {sup 31}P- and {sup 1}H-MRS are practical tools for the clinical analysis of cerebral disorders as well as for deciding on therapeutic procedures and evaluating the response. (K.H.)

  19. A DXA-Based Mathematical Model Predicts Midthigh Muscle Mass from Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Typically Developing Children but Not in Those with Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy12

    OpenAIRE

    Modlesky, Christopher M.; Cavaiola, Matthew L.; Smith, Jarvis J.; Rowe, David A.; Johnson, David L.; Miller, Freeman

    2010-01-01

    Valid methods for assessing regional muscle mass in children are needed. The aim of this study was to determine whether dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) can accurately estimate midthigh muscle mass from MRI (muscleMRI) in typically developing children and children with quadriplegic cerebral palsy (CP). A mathematical model predicting muscleMRI from midthigh, fat-free soft tissue mass from DXA (FFSTDXA) was developed using 48 typically developing children (6–13 y) and was validated using...

  20. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and single photon emission computerized tomography--cerebral blood flow in a case of pure sensory stroke and mild dementia owing to subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger's disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure sensory stroke (PSS) is typically caused by a lacunar infarct located in the ventral-posterior (VP) thalamic nucleus contralateral to the paresthetic symptoms. The lesion is usually so small that it cannot be seen on computerized tomography (CT), as illustrated by our case. In our moderately hypertensive, 72-year-old patient with PSS, CT scanning and conventional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) scanning using a 7-mm-thick slice on a 1.5 Tesla instrument all failed to visualize the thalamic infarct. Using the high-resolution mode with 2-mm slice thickness it was, however, clearly seen. In addition, NMRI unexpectedly showed diffuse periventricular demyelinization as well as three other lacunar infarcts, i.e., findings characteristic of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE). This prompted psychometric testing, which revealed signs of mild (subclinical) dementia, in particular involving visiospatial apraxia; this pointed to decreased function of the right parietal cortex, which was structurally intact on CT and NMRI. Single photon emission computerized tomography by Xenon-133 injection and by hexamethyl-propyleneamine-oxim labeled with Technetium-99m showed asymmetric distribution of cerebral blood flow (CBF), with an 18% lower value in the right parietal cortex compared to the left side; this indicated asymmetric disconnection of the cortex by the SAE. Thus, the tomograms of the functional parameter, CBF, correlated better with the deficits revealed by neuropsychological testing than by CT or NMRI

  1. Cerebral responses to innocuous somatic pressure stimulation following aerobic exercise rehabilitation in chronic pain patients: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micalos PS

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Peter S Micalos,1 Mayuresh S Korgaonkar,2 Eric J Drinkwater,3 Jack Cannon,3 Frank E Marino3 1School of Biomedical Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, 2Brain Dynamics Centre, Westmead Millennium Institute, University of Sydney Medical School, Sydney, 3School of Human Movement Studies, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW, Australia Objective: The purpose of this research was to assess the functional brain activity and perceptual rating of innocuous somatic pressure stimulation before and after exercise rehabilitation in patients with chronic pain. Materials and methods: Eleven chronic pain patients and eight healthy pain-free controls completed 12 weeks of supervised aerobic exercise intervention. Perceptual rating of standardized somatic pressure stimulation (2 kg on the right anterior mid-thigh and brain responses during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI were assessed at pre- and postexercise rehabilitation. Results: There was a significant difference in the perceptual rating of innocuous somatic pressure stimulation between the chronic pain and control groups (P=0.02 but no difference following exercise rehabilitation. Whole brain voxel-wise analysis with correction for multiple comparisons revealed trends for differences in fMRI responses between the chronic pain and control groups in the superior temporal gyrus (chronic pain > control, corrected P=0.30, thalamus, and caudate (control > chronic, corrected P=0.23. Repeated measures of the regions of interest (5 mm radius for blood oxygen level-dependent signal response revealed trend differences for superior temporal gyrus (P=0.06, thalamus (P=0.04, and caudate (P=0.21. Group-by-time interactions revealed trend differences in the caudate (P=0.10 and superior temporal gyrus (P=0.29. Conclusion: Augmented perceptual and brain responses to innocuous somatic pressure stimulation were shown in the chronic pain group compared to the control group; however, 12-weeks of exercise

  2. Magnetic resonance and porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mention the words magnetic resonance to your medical advisor and he or she will immediately think of a multi-million pound scanner that peers deep into the brain. A chemist, on the other hand, will imagine a machine that costs several hundred thousand pounds and produces high-resolution spectra for chemical analysis. Food technologists will probably think of a bench-top instrument for determining moisture content, while an oil prospector will envisage a device that can be operated several kilometres down an oil well. To a physicist the term is more likely to conjure up a mental picture of nuclear spins precessing in a magnetic field. These examples illustrate the diverse aspects of a phenomenon discovered by physicists over 50 years ago. Electron spin resonance was first discovered by Russian scientists, and nuclear magnetic resonance was discovered in the US shortly afterwards by Ed Purcell at Harvard University and Felix Bloch at Stanford University. Today, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most widely used technique. Modern NMR machines are making it possible to probe microstructure and molecular movement in materials as diverse as polymers, cements, rocks, soil and foods. NMR allows the distribution of different components in a material to be determined with a resolution approaching 1μm, although the signal can be sensitive to even smaller lengthscales. In this article the authors describe how physicists are still developing magnetic resonance to exploit a range of new applications. (UK)

  3. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  4. In vivo tracking of human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol in rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferumoxytol, an iron replacement product, is a new type of superparamagnetic iron oxide approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Herein, we assessed the feasibility of tracking transplanted human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol in middle cerebral artery occlusion-injured rats by 3.0 T MRI in vivo. 1 × 10 4 human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine were transplanted into the brains of rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neurologic impairment was scored at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days after transplantation. T2-weighted imaging and enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography were used to observe transplanted cells. Results of imaging tests were compared with results of Prussian blue staining. The modified neurologic impairment scores were significantly lower in rats transplanted with cells at all time points except 1 day post-transplantation compared with rats without transplantation. Regions with hypointense signals on T2-weighted and enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography images corresponded with areas stained by Prussian blue, suggesting the presence of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles within the engrafted cells. Enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography image exhibited better sensitivity and contrast in tracing ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine-labeled human adipose-derived stem cells compared with T2-weighted imaging in routine MRI.

  5. Detecção da encefalopatia hepática subclínica por espectroscopia cerebral Detection of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Justo Schulz; Julio Cézar Uili Coelho; Jorge Eduardo Fouto Matias; Antônio Carlos Ligocki Campos; Danielle Duck Schulz; Guilherme Augusto Bertoldi

    2007-01-01

    RACIONAL: A encefalopatia hepática é anormalidade neuropsiquiátrica comum em cirróticos e está associada com alterações típicas de determinados metabólitos cerebrais, como o decréscimo de mio-inositol e colina e o aumento de glutamina-glutamato, observadas na espectroscopia cerebral por ressonância magnética. OBJETIVO: Determinar os níveis dos metabólitos cerebrais em pacientes cirróticos para diagnóstico da encefalopatia hepática em estágios iniciais. MÉTODOS Foram estudados 25 pacientes com...

  6. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31P, 13C, 1H (and possibly 19F and 23Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  7. magnetic resonance imaging,etc.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张福基

    1998-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging n.[1984] a noninvasive diagnostic technique that produces computerized images of internal body tissues and is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of atoms within he body induced by the application of radio waves磁共振成像(指一种非侵害 性诊断技术,能生成内部身体组织的计算机化影像,其依据是应用无线电波 感生体内原子并使之产磁共振)

  8. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) protocols are based on standard sequence protocols like time of flight MRA, which evaluates inflowing spins. This technique is limited by a variety of artifacts like the saturation artifact via turbulent blood flow. Contrast media diminish these artifacts like extracellular agents and blood-pool contrast media. The clinical value of the contrast-enhanced MRA for cerebral pathologies is based on the use of the paramagnetic contrast agent Gd-DTPA. For extracerebral diseases this technique is restricted because of the simultaneous visualization of both arterial and venous vascular territorities. Occult venous sinus thrombosis or AV malformations are clinical essential indications for the use of C-MRA. Experimental data prove the excellent contrast abilities of blood-pool agents like Gd-DTPA-polylysin or Gd-DTPA-albumin, which demonstrate long intravascular persistence and retarded excretion. (orig.)

  9. An investigation of cerebral magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), part 9. Diagnostic ability of intracranial occlusive vessels with MRA using 1.5 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF) MRA with a 1.5 T MRI system, we assessed the capability of MRA to detect intracranial occlusive lesions. Ten observers evaluated MRA images of 78 patients (including 33 cases with 57 intracranial occlusive lesions) using maximum intensity projection (MIP) images alone, MIP+selective MIP images, and MIP+selective MIP+original images. By receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the ability to detect the 33 patients with occlusive lesions, the sensitivity of MIP images was 89±7% (mean ±S. D.) while the specificity was 80%. The sensitivity was significantly higher than that for detecting aneurysms (74±8%). Adding selective MIP and original images to MIP images did not improve the sensitivity in detecting occlusive lesions. Sensitivity for detection of severe stenosis and occlusion was over 75%, which was considered to be satisfactory to identity the lesions, while that for mild stenosis was 44%. Although the sensitivity did not show any difference between internal coroted (IC) and middle cerebral artery stenosis (MCA), false positive IC lesions were more frequent. These results indicate that the sensitivity of MRA in detecting occlusive lesions is generally satisfactory, while care should be taken in diagnosing mild stenotic lesions and lesions in the IC. (author)

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance ... allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell your doctor about any health problems, recent surgeries or allergies ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ... into the bloodstream. The radiologist , technologist or a nurse may ask if you have allergies of any ...

  13. No advantage of time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography at 3 Tesla compared to 1.5 Tesla in the follow-up after endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term follow-up after coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms is mandatory to monitor coil compacting and aneurysm recurrence. Most centers perform one digital subtraction angiography (DSA) on follow-up continuing with time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA). This study explores the diagnostic value of TOF-MRA at 1.5 T versus 3 T compared to DSA. In 18 patients with 20 aneurysms treated with coil embolization, TOF-MRA at 1.5 and 3 T were performed the day before follow-up DSA, the latter serving as reference. Optimized diagnostic protocols were applied (1.5T:0.78 x 0.55 x 0.8 mm, voxel size; acquisition time (TA), 6.37 min; 3T:0.56 x 0.45 x 0.65 mm, voxel size; TA, 3.12 min). Three independent neuroradiologists experienced in neuroendovascular therapy rated the occlusion rate (''complete occlusion'' vs. ''residual neck'' vs. ''residual aneurysm'') and compared the two methods subjectively. Weighted κ statistics were calculated to assess the level of interobserver agreement. Compared to DSA, TOF-MRA was more sensitive in detecting neck remnants, with a slight advantage at 3 T. Regarding artifact load, there are advantages at 1.5 T. Ratings of the occlusion rate correlated highly between all observers (r>0.85, pw∼0.8, respectively). TOF-MRA is a reliable tool for follow-up imaging of cerebral aneurysms after endovascular treatment. Our study shows no advantage of TOF-MRA at 3 T over 1.5 T, when comparable measurement protocols are applied. TOF-MRA at 1.5 T therefore provides appropriate information regarding a therapeutic decision. (orig.)

  14. Magnetometer of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer that measures magnetic fields, between 2,500 gauss and 5,000 gauss, with an accuracy of a few parts per million. The circuit of the magnetometer, based on a marginal oscillator, permits a continuous tunning in the frequency range comprised between 10.0 MHz, with a signal to noise ratio of about 20. The radiofrequency amplifier is of the cascode type in integrated circuit and it operates with two 9V batteries. The modulation is at 35 Hz and it is provided by an external oscillator. The instrument is compact, inexpensive and easy to operate; it can also be used for didactic purposes to show the phenomenon of magnetic nuclear resonance and its main characteristics. (author)

  15. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  16. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  17. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin. (U.K.)

  18. Imaging and assessment of diffusion coefficients by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of assessment of molecular diffusion by magnetic resonance is highlighted and some typical applications of diffusion imaging in the diagnosis, e.g., of cerebral ischemia, changes in patients with phenylketonuria or multiple sclerosis are discussed. The images were obtained by using diffusion weighted spin echo Echo-Planar Imaging sequence with subsequent correction of the geometrical distortion of the images and calculation of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient map

  19. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors

  20. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of O(10−15 Gauss) today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing

  1. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information. PMID:26916887

  2. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad;

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to char...... a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging....

  3. 脑梗塞治疗前后磁共振波谱分析与临床评分的相关性分析%The Correlation Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1HMRS) and Clinical Markers before and after Treatment of Cerebral Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘汉桥; 冯飞; 聂伟霞; 戚玉龙; 田鑫; 陈鹏; 沈慧敏; 易黎; 王成林

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过应用氢质子磁共振波谱成像技术(1H magnetic resonance spect-roscopy,1HMRS)对组织缓激肽释放酶(tissue kallikrein,TK)治疗急性脑梗塞患者缺血及缺血半暗带区脑组织中以N-乙酰天门氨酸、乳酸等代谢产物的生物变化及其演变规律进行分析,将其分析结果与临床评分结果做一致性分析,评估急性脑梗塞治疗前后磁共振波谱分析与临床评分的相关性.方法 对我院17例临床诊断为急性脑梗塞的病人,在急性发病期、TK药物治疗14天后分别对其进行磁共振波谱分析,将其分析结果和临床美国国立卫生研究院卒中量表(the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale,NIHSS)的评分进行一致性分析.结果 磁共振波谱分析可以对脑梗塞进行早期诊断;脑梗塞治疗前、后的代谢产物的变化具有统计学意义,将分析结果与临床评分具有较好的一致性.结论 磁共振波谱对脑梗塞治疗前后的代谢产物的分析与临床评分具有较好的一致性.%Objective Through analysis the biological changes of metabolites including N -acetyl tianmen acid; c lactic acid act by the technology of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1 H magnetic resonance spect-roscopy, 1 HMRS) in acute cerebral infarction patients, who were before and after treatmented by the organization slow shock peptide release enzyme (tissue kallikrein, TK), Then, Analysis of the consistency about the result of MRS analysis and the clinical scoring, to evaluation the correlation of magnetic resonance spectrum analysis and the clinical scoring in cerebral infarction. Methods 17 cases acute cerebral infarction patients, who were processed magnetic resonance imaging in the acute onset period, after treatmented by TK drug respectively.the results and the score of clinical analysis of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, NIHSS) were processed consistency analysis. Results

  4. Tomography by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging methods based on nuclear magnetic resonance allow the production of sectional images of the human body without ionizing radiation. It is possible to measure the density and relaxation times of the water protons in body fluids or tissue. This allows not only to obtain morphological information but also to get some insight into the spatial distribution of physiological data. Starting with a review of the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance it is explained how the measured signal can be associated with an image point; it is also explained what type of apparatus is necessary and what the physical limitations are. Possible risks the patient may be exposed to in an examination using nuclear magnetic resonance are discussed. The present state of the technical development enables the production of whole-body sectional images of a living person within about one minute. By means of some typical examples the nature and properties of these images are explained. Although extensive clinical studies will be necessary before a more general assessment can be made of this method, an outlook is provided on expected further developments and possible future fields of application. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic Resonance Force Detection using a Membrane Resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Scozzaro, Nicolas; Ruchotzke, Will; Belding, Amanda; Cardellino, Jeremy D.; Blomberg, Erick C.; McCullian, Brendan A.; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Hammel, P. Chris

    2016-01-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost magnetic resonance imaging instruments would further broaden the substantial impact of this technology. We report highly sensitive detection of magnetic resonance using low-stress silicon nitride (SiN$_x$) membranes. We use these membranes as low-loss, high-frequency mechanical oscillators and find they are able to mechanically detect spin-dependent forces with high sensitivity enabling ultrasensitive magnetic resonance detection. The high force detection...

  6. Magnetic resonance image abnormality in migraine with aura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, D.K.; Batnitzky, S.; Barter, R.; McMillan, J.H. (Kansas Univ., Kansas City, KS (United States). Medical Center)

    1991-07-01

    Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 18 patients with migraine characterized by aura consisting of both visual symtoms and parasthesias. 15 headache-free individuals of the same age range were used as controls. Records were radomized and read in blind fashion by two neuroradiologists. Small subcortical white matter lesions were seen in three migraine cases and two controls. In one migraine case cortical infarctions were seen. In two controls, small areas of increased density similar to those in migraine were seen. No consistent correlation of migraine or its duration with cerebral atrophy was found. It is concluded that identification of both these MRI findings (small subcortical white lesions and cerebral atrophy) as significantly associated with migraine is doubtful. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  8. Magnetic resonance image abnormality in migraine with aura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 18 patients with migraine characterized by aura consisting of both visual symtoms and parasthesias. 15 headache-free individuals of the same age range were used as controls. Records were radomized and read in blind fashion by two neuroradiologists. Small subcortical white matter lesions were seen in three migraine cases and two controls. In one migraine case cortical infarctions were seen. In two controls, small areas of increased density similar to those in migraine were seen. No consistent correlation of migraine or its duration with cerebral atrophy was found. It is concluded that identification of both these MRI findings (small subcortical white lesions and cerebral atrophy) as significantly associated with migraine is doubtful. 21 refs., 2 figs

  9. Ultra-high frequency magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Magill, Arthur W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of radiofrequency probe design for Ultra High Frequency Magnetic Resonance Imaging (7T). The signal-to-noise ratio available in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is determined by the static magnetic field strength, causing a continued drive toward higher fields to enable faster image acquisition at finer spatial resolution. The resonant frequency increases linearly with static field strength. At 7T the proton resonant frequency is 300MHz, with a wavelength...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) employs radio-frequency radiation in the presence of a static magnetic field to produce signals from naturally occurring nuclei in biological tissue. The information in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be derived from these signals in any orthogonal plane. Hydrogen is the most abundant of such nuclei, occurring naturally in water and lipid, and can be detected at relatively low magnetic field strength (0.04 tesla (T) upwards). The MR signal from hydrogen depends not only on the proton density and the T1 and T2 relaxation times of those protons following radio-frequency pulse disturbances, but also on the timing parameters of the radio-frequency pulse sequences employed. Image contrast depends on the interaction between all these factors; not simply as in X-ray computed tomography (CT) on the properties of the tissue itself. Therefore an understanding of both the imaging process and the pathology under investigation is essential in the proper use of MRI

  11. Detection of acute cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by magnetic induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J.; Jin, G.; Qin, M.X. [College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China, College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wan, Z.B. [Experimental Animal Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China, Experimental Animal Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wang, J.B.; Wang, C.; Guo, W.Y. [College of Electronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an, China, College of Electronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an (China); Xu, L.; Ning, X.; Xu, J.; Pu, X.J.; Chen, M.S. [College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China, College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Zhao, H.M. [Experimental Animal Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China, Experimental Animal Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2014-02-17

    Acute cerebral hemorrhage (ACH) is an important clinical problem that is often monitored and studied with expensive devices such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. These devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions of the world, emergency departments, and emergency zones. We have developed a less expensive tool for non-contact monitoring of ACH. The system measures the magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS) between the electromagnetic signals on two coils. ACH was induced in 6 experimental rabbits and edema was induced in 4 control rabbits by stereotactic methods, and their intracranial pressure and heart rate were monitored for 1 h. Signals were continuously monitored for up to 1 h at an exciting frequency of 10.7 MHz. Autologous blood was administered to the experimental group, and saline to the control group (1 to 3 mL) by injection of 1-mL every 5 min. The results showed a significant increase in MIPS as a function of the injection volume, but the heart rate was stable. In the experimental (ACH) group, there was a statistically significant positive correlation of the intracranial pressure and MIPS. The change of MIPS was greater in the ACH group than in the control group. This high-sensitivity system could detect a 1-mL change in blood volume. The MIPS was significantly related to the intracranial pressure. This observation suggests that the method could be valuable for detecting early warning signs in emergency medicine and critical care units.

  12. Detection of acute cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by magnetic induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute cerebral hemorrhage (ACH) is an important clinical problem that is often monitored and studied with expensive devices such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. These devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions of the world, emergency departments, and emergency zones. We have developed a less expensive tool for non-contact monitoring of ACH. The system measures the magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS) between the electromagnetic signals on two coils. ACH was induced in 6 experimental rabbits and edema was induced in 4 control rabbits by stereotactic methods, and their intracranial pressure and heart rate were monitored for 1 h. Signals were continuously monitored for up to 1 h at an exciting frequency of 10.7 MHz. Autologous blood was administered to the experimental group, and saline to the control group (1 to 3 mL) by injection of 1-mL every 5 min. The results showed a significant increase in MIPS as a function of the injection volume, but the heart rate was stable. In the experimental (ACH) group, there was a statistically significant positive correlation of the intracranial pressure and MIPS. The change of MIPS was greater in the ACH group than in the control group. This high-sensitivity system could detect a 1-mL change in blood volume. The MIPS was significantly related to the intracranial pressure. This observation suggests that the method could be valuable for detecting early warning signs in emergency medicine and critical care units

  13. Imaging findings and cerebral perfusion in arterial ischemic stroke due to transient cerebral arteriopathy in children; Achados de imagem e perfusao arterial cerebral em acidente vascular cerebral isquemico devido a arteriopatia transitoria em crianca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa Junior, Alcino Alves, E-mail: alcinojr@uol.com.br [Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagem, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ellovitch, Saada Resende de Souza [Neuropediatria, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pincerato, Rita de Cassia Maciel [Hospital Samaritano, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    We report the case of a 4-year-old female child who developed an arterial ischemic stroke in the left middle cerebral artery territory, due to a proximal stenosis of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery, most probably related to transient cerebral arteriopathy of childhood. Computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance angiography are presented, as well as follow-up by magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance angiography exams. Changes in cerebral perfusion and diffusion-perfusion mismatch call attention. As far as we know, this is the first report of magnetic resonance perfusion findings in transient cerebral arteriopathy. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the spectroscopic experiment on excised rat brain (cortex, white matter, hippocampus and thalamus for normal and ischemia-laden brain), T1 and T2 relaxation times and water content were determined. The ischemic insult was induced for 60 min by the method of Pulsinelli followed by 60 min of reperfusion. All of the T1, T2, and water content significantly increased in the ischemic tissue. Gray-white difference was evident in T1 and T1 was linearly correlated with the water content of the tissue. T2 way by far prolonged in the ischemic tissue compared with the increase in the water content, showing greater sensitivity of T2 for detection of ischemia. In the imaging experiment, coronal NMR imaging at 0.5 tesla was performed employing proton density-weighted saturation recovery (TR = 1.6 s, TE = 14 ms), T1-weighted inversion recovery (TR = 1.6 s, TI = 300 ms, TE = 14 ms) and T2-weighted spin echo (TR = 1.6 s, TE = 106 ms) pulse sequences. Spatial resolution of the images was excellent (0.3 - 0.5 mm) and the imaging of a gerbil brain clearly delineated anatomy separating cortex, white matter, hippocampus and thalamus. Hemispheric ischemia of a gerbil brain was detected as early as 30 min after occlusion of the carotid artery in T2-weighted images and the evolution of the lesion was clearly picturized in T1- and T2-weighted images. On the other hand. SR images were far less sensitive. Caluculated T1 and T2 relaxation times by the pixel-to-pixel computation indicated progress of the lesion and excellently correlated with the water content of the tissue (r = 0.892 and 0.744 for T1 and T2, respectively). (J.P.N.)

  15. Fast magnetization reversal of nanoclusters in resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Yukalov, V. I.; Yukalova, E. P.

    2012-01-01

    An effective method for ultrafast magnetization reversal of nanoclusters is suggested. The method is based on coupling a nanocluster to a resonant electric circuit. This coupling causes the appearance of a magnetic feedback field acting on the cluster, which drastically shortens the magnetization reversal time. The influence of the resonator properties, nanocluster parameters, and external fields on the magnetization dynamics and reversal time is analyzed. The magnetization reversal time can ...

  16. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  17. Hyperpolarized Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP) technology has enabled a new paradigm for renal imaging investigations. It allows standard magnetic resonance imaging complementary renal metabolic and functional fingerprints within seconds without the use of ionizing radiation....... Increasing evidence supports its utility in preclinical research in which the real-time interrogation of metabolic turnover can aid the physiological and pathophysiological metabolic and functional effects in ex vivo and in vivo models. The method has already been translated to humans, although the clinical...

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  19. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesch, C.; Issakainen, J.; Kewitz, G.; Kikinis, R.; Martin, E.; Boltshauser, E.

    1989-01-01

    The children (age 2 months to 8 years) with a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 2.35 Tesla magnet. CMV infection was confirmed by serological investigations and virus culture in the neonatal period. Nine children had severe mental retardation and cerebral palsy, 1 patient suffered from microcephaly, ataxia and deafness. The cranial MRI examination showed the following abnormalities (N): Dilated lateral ventricles (10) and subarachnoid space (8), oligo/pacgyria (8), delayed/pathological myelination (7), paraventricular cysts (6), intra-cerebral calcification (1). This lack of sensitivity for calcification is explainable by the basic principles of MRI. The paraventricular cystic lesions were adjacent ot the occipital horns of the lateral ventricles and separated only by a thin membrane. This finding might represent a 'new sign' for congenital CMV infection in MRI examinations, being characteristic but nevertheless nonspecific, like calcification in CT.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The children (age 2 months to 8 years) with a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 2.35 Tesla magnet. CMV infection was confirmed by serological investigations and virus culture in the neonatal period. Nine children had severe mental retardation and cerebral palsy, 1 patient suffered from microcephaly, ataxia and deafness. The cranial MRI examination showed the following abnormalities (N): Dilated lateral ventricles (10) and subarachnoid space (8), oligo/pacgyria (8), delayed/pathological myelination (7), paraventricular cysts (6), intra-cerebral calcification (1). This lack of sensitivity for calcification is explainable by the basic principles of MRI. The paraventricular cystic lesions were adjacent ot the occipital horns of the lateral ventricles and separated only by a thin membrane. This finding might represent a 'new sign' for congenital CMV infection in MRI examinations, being characteristic but nevertheless nonspecific, like calcification in CT. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The width of substantia nigra (SN) in 59 cases of idiopathic Parkinson's disease as well as 21 normal controls was analyzed by T2 weighted image (T2WI) of 1.5 Tesla high-field magnetic resonance image (MRI). All patients and controls underwent MRI with the spin-echo sequences used TR/TE: 3000/30 (short TE), and TR/TE: 3000/80 (long TE), in 5-mm-thick volumes. The width between the red nucleus and the cerebral peduncle showing low signal intensity areas was measured as that of SN and its ratio to the distance from the aqueduct to the midline of the cerebral peduncle was also measured. The calculated values of the width of SN and its ratio were analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. The significant reduction in the width of SN and its ratio in Parkinson's disease were disclosed below: the mean calculated values of the width of SN were 2.95±0.51 mm in controls, 2.68±0.99 mm in Parkinson's disase on long TE images (P<0.01), and the mean ratio of the width of SN were 13.58±4.21% in controls, 10.52±3.07% in Parkinson's disease on long TE images (P=0.0002). The narrowing of SN in Parkinson's disease was more prominent in men, and advanced cases with Yahr stage III and IV. Considering that the pars reticulata, which is normally containing iron, shows low signal intensity on long TE images, the width of pars compacta could be measured more precisely on this sequences. The evaluation of the ratio of SN in midbrain on long TE images seemed to be more sensitive than the calculated values in detecting the narrowing of SN and pars compacta in Parkinson's disease. (author)

  3. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and single photon emission computerized tomography--cerebral blood flow in a case of pure sensory stroke and mild dementia owing to subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger's disease)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiara, S; Lassen, N A; Andersen, A R;

    1987-01-01

    hypertensive, 72-year-old patient with PSS, CT scanning and conventional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) scanning using a 7-mm-thick slice on a 1.5 Tesla instrument all failed to visualize the thalamic infarct. Using the high-resolution mode with 2-mm slice thickness it was, however, clearly seen. In...

  4. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  5. Cerebellar hemangioblastoma: magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To characterize the results of magnetic resonance imaging in cerebellar hemangioblastoma. This retrospective study deals with seven cases of histologically-confirmed cerebellar hemangioblastoma after surgery. Another patient, diagnosed as having Von Hippel-Lindau disease, also developed this lesions, but the finding was not histologically confirmed. In all, there were 2 women and 6 men. Three of these patients presented Von Hippel-Lindaus disease. All were studied on a 0.5 T imager with T1, T2 and PD-weighted spin-echo axial planes; T1-weighted sequences were repeated after intravenous gadolinium administration. According to their aspects, the lesions were divided into three groups as follows: cyst containing a mural nodule (n=3)solid tumor (n=3) and cavitated tumor (n=1). In one patient, the lesion was initially solid and was found to present cavitation two years later. Abnormal vascularization was observed in all the tumors except for two small solid tumors, and the findings were not clear in one of the cysts containing a mural nodule. In the differential diagnosis it may be difficult to rule out other tumors, such as cystic astrocytoma. However, magnetic resonance imaging, together with the clinical data, is of diagnostic value in the three morphological types of cerebellar hemangioblastoma. (Author) 15 refs

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  7. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    OpenAIRE

    van Rossum Albert C; Raman Subha V; McConnell Michael V; Lawson Mark A; Higgins Charles B; Friedrich Matthias G; Bogaert Jan G; Bluemke David; Hundley W Gregory; Flamm Scott; Kramer Christopher M; Nagel Eike; Neubauer Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examinations.

  8. Clinical impacts of 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress of the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the cerebral stroke patients was remarkable, and it became possible to evaluate a brain perfusion or function. Here, we describe about the clinical application of the neuronal tracts and brain perfusion evaluation using 3.0 Tesla MR imaging. The subjects were patients with internal cerebral hemorrhage and major cerebral occlusive diseases. Three dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were accepted to estimate the damages of neurnal tracts. Perfusion weighted images with the contrast medium were performed for a quantitative evaluation. The pyramidal tracts were depicted well with 3DAC imaging. Fractional anisotropy (FA) value generated from DTI can predict the outcome of the motor dysfunction in each patient at early stage. Cerebral blood volume calculated from perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) was correlated with and cerebral vascular reserve capacity. 3.0 Tesla MR imaging may develop in cerebral stroke patients in near future. (author)

  9. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataganara, Tuangsit; Ebrashy, Alaa; Aliyu, Labaran Dayyabu; Moreira de Sa, Renato Augusto; Pooh, Ritsuko; Kurjak, Asim; Sen, Cihat; Adra, Abdallah; Stanojevic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly adopted in obstetrics practice in the past three decades. MRI aids prenatal ultrasound and improves diagnostic accuracy for selected maternal and fetal conditions. However, it should be considered only when high-quality ultrasound cannot provide certain information that affects the counseling, prenatal intervention, pregnancy course, and delivery plan. Major indications of fetal MRI include, but are not restricted to, morbidly adherent placenta, selected cases of fetal brain anomalies, thoracic lesions (especially in severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia), and soft tissue tumors at head and neck regions of the fetus. For fetal anatomy assessment, a 1.5-Tesla machine with a fast T2-weighted single-shot technique is recommended for image requisition of common fetal abnormalities. Individual judgment needs to be applied when considering usage of a 3-Tesla machine. Gadolinium MRI contrast is not recommended during pregnancy. MRI should be avoided in the first half of pregnancy due to small fetal structures and motion artifacts. Assessment of fetal cerebral cortex can be achieved with MRI in the third trimester. MRI is a viable research tool for noninvasive interrogation of the fetus and the placenta. PMID:27092644

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracavernous pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of intracavernous pathology, T1-weighted spin echo images of four vascular lesions and 10 neoplastic lesions with surgically confirmed cavernous sinus (CS) invasion were reviewed retrospectively. In one case of traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) and one of dural arteriovenous malformation (AVM), the internal carotid artery (ICA) and rapid shunted flow were depicted as signal voids, and the relationship between the ICA and shunted flow was clearly shown. Normal venous flow appeared as a low-intensity area and was observed even in the presence of the CCF and dural AVM. In two cases of thrombosed aneurysms, the thrombosis was clearly demonstrated, along with patent arterial flow in one case; in the other case, however, it was impossible to differentiate patent arterial flow from calcification. The intensity of all neoplastic lesions was similar to that of the cerebral cortex. The relationship between the ICA and the tumors was clearly demonstrated. The visual pathways were also plainly shown unless they were involved, or markedly compressed, by tumor. CS invasion was strongly associated with four findings: 1) encasement of the ICA by the tumor; 2) marked displacement of the ICA; 3) absence of low intensity, which reflects normal venous flow, in the CS; and 4) extension of extrasellar tumors to the medial wall or of intrasellar tumors to the lateral wall. MR imaging was judged promising in the evaluation of intracavernous pathology. (author)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracavernous pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, Masaki; Yasui, Toshihiro; Yagura, Hisatsugu; Fu, Yoshihiko; Baba, Mitsuru (Baba Memorial Hospital, Sakai, Osaka (Japan)); Hakuba, Akira; Nishimura, Shuro

    1989-07-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of intracavernous pathology, T{sub 1}-weighted spin echo images of four vascular lesions and 10 neoplastic lesions with surgically confirmed cavernous sinus (CS) invasion were reviewed retrospectively. In one case of traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) and one of dural arteriovenous malformation (AVM), the internal carotid artery (ICA) and rapid shunted flow were depicted as signal voids, and the relationship between the ICA and shunted flow was clearly shown. Normal venous flow appeared as a low-intensity area and was observed even in the presence of the CCF and dural AVM. In two cases of thrombosed aneurysms, the thrombosis was clearly demonstrated, along with patent arterial flow in one case; in the other case, however, it was impossible to differentiate patent arterial flow from calcification. The intensity of all neoplastic lesions was similar to that of the cerebral cortex. The relationship between the ICA and the tumors was clearly demonstrated. The visual pathways were also plainly shown unless they were involved, or markedly compressed, by tumor. CS invasion was strongly associated with four findings: (1) encasement of the ICA by the tumor; (2) marked displacement of the ICA; (3) absence of low intensity, which reflects normal venous flow, in the CS; and (4) extension of extrasellar tumors to the medial wall or of intrasellar tumors to the lateral wall. MR imaging was judged promising in the evaluation of intracavernous pathology. (author).

  12. Scatter-based magnetic resonance elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elasticity is a sensitive measure of the microstructural constitution of soft biological tissues and increasingly used in diagnostic imaging. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) uniquely allows in vivo measurement of the shear elasticity of brain tissue. However, the spatial resolution of MRE is inherently limited as the transformation of shear wave patterns into elasticity maps requires the solution of inverse problems. Therefore, an MRE method is introduced that avoids inversion and instead exploits shear wave scattering at elastic interfaces between anatomical regions of different shear compliance. This compliance-weighted imaging (CWI) method can be used to evaluate the mechanical consistency of cerebral lesions or to measure relative stiffness differences between anatomical subregions of the brain. It is demonstrated that CWI-MRE is sensitive enough to reveal significant elasticity variations within inner brain parenchyma: the caudate nucleus (head) was stiffer than the lentiform nucleus and the thalamus by factors of 1.3 ± 0.1 and 1.7 ± 0.2, respectively (P < 0.001). CWI-MRE provides a unique method for characterizing brain tissue by identifying local stiffness variations.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of a brain abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 13 patients with brain abscesses, and the alternation of MRI findings, as correlated with the progression of brain-abscess formation, was reviewed. In the cerebritis stage, spin-echo images showed a high intensity, and inversion-recovery images, a low intensity, due to inflammation and edema. The spin-echo images were very sensitive in delineating the brain edema; however, it was difficult to distinguish the inflammation from the surrounding edema. In the capsule stage, due to the accumulation of purulent material, the central necrotic area was demonstrated as a low-intensity area, while the capsule of the abscess was revealed as an iso-intensity ring on the inversion-recovery images. The central necrotic area also decreased in intensity on spin-echo images in the later period of this stage. With contrast enhancement (Gd-DTPA), the SR image showed the capsule as a high-intensity ring. MRI was found to be a useful method for estimating the process of the formation of a brain abscess. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of a brain abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikawa, Akihiro; Kagawa, Mizuo; Yatoh, Seiji; Izawa, Masahiro; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Jun; Onda, Hideaki; Kitamura, Kohichi

    1988-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 13 patients with brain abscesses, and the alternation of MRI findings, as correlated with the progression of brain-abscess formation, was reviewed. In the cerebritis stage, spin-echo images showed a high intensity, and inversion-recovery images, a low intensity, due to inflammation and edema. The spin-echo images were very sensitive in delineating the brain edema; however, it was difficult to distinguish the inflammation from the surrounding edema. In the capsule stage, due to the accumulation of purulent material, the central necrotic area was demonstrated as a low-intensity area, while the capsule of the abscess was revealed as an iso-intensity ring on the inversion-recovery images. The central necrotic area also decreased in intensity on spin-echo images in the later period of this stage. With contrast enhancement (Gd-DTPA), the SR image showed the capsule as a high-intensity ring. MRI was found to be a useful method for estimating the process of the formation of a brain abscess.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  16. Synovial pathology: Magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synovial membrane lines the inner surface of the entire joint capsule of the so-called synovial, or diarthrosis, joints. It also constitutes the lining synovial bursa and tendon sheaths. It is lubricated at all these sites by the synovial fluid secreted by the membrane itself. The identification of this structure is bases on the correct knowledge of its anatomical locations. Synovial membrane pathology includes lesions produced by tumors, inflammation, degeneration and trauma. In this report, we classify them as benign (cysts, chondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, inflammatory synovitis and hemangioma) or malignant (synovial sarcoma and hemangiosarcoma). Magnetic resonance (MR) constitutes a useful and reliable method for diagnosis synovial lesions, providing a means of determining their origin and identifying distinctive features of some types. We present our experience in 12 cases of synovial pathology studied by MR over the past year, all of which were confirmed by histopathological study. 13 refs

  17. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  18. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.brugger@meduniwien.ac.at; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages.

  19. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  1. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes

  2. Pituitary tumors: Diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a survey of the current status of the diagnosis of pituitary tumors by means of magnetic resonance imaging. It focuses on the clinical and practical aspects. The recommended procedure and the sequences and slice orientations for magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary gland are presented, and the features that are essential for the diagnosis of pituitary tumors are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance force microscopy: recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Force detection of magnetic resonance has been demonstrated experimentally and used for imaging in EPR. This paper will review the basic principles of Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) and will report some recent results in NMR imaging and the operation of a low-temperature MRFM. (author). 31 refs., 14 figs

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C;

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C;

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of erythrocyte membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, D.; Kamat, V.B.; Gier, J. de; Penkett, S.A.

    1968-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for studying molecular interactions in biological membranes has been investigated using erythrocyte membrane fragments. Sonic dispersion of these fragments produces a sharp and well-defined high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. The sp

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher's disease is a progressive encephalopathy with demyelination of the cerebral white matter. The diagnosis cannot be made on clinical or biological grounds: pathological investigation is necessary to confirm tigroid demyelination. CT scanning failure to visualize this type of anomaly but detection is now possible with the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The authors studied the case of a boy who, at the age of 8 presented with symptoms characeristic of the disease, rotatory nystagmus, progressive encephalopathy, and inherited X-linked recessive traits. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a high signal in the supra-tentorial white matter and the usual contrast was inverted. The authors believe that MRI can make an important contribution to the diagnosis of the disease. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Journel, H.; Roussey, M.; Allaire, C.; Le Marec, B.; Gandon, Y.; Carsin, M.

    1987-07-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher's disease is a progressive encephalopathy with demyelination of the cerebral white matter. The diagnosis cannot be made on clinical or biological grounds: pathological investigation is necessary to confirm tigroid demyelination. CT scanning failure to visualize this type of anomaly but detection is now possible with the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The authors studied the case of a boy who, at the age of 8 presented with symptoms characeristic of the disease, rotatory nystagmus, progressive encephalopathy, and inherited X-linked recessive traits. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a high signal in the supra-tentorial white matter and the usual contrast was inverted. The authors believe that MRI can make an important contribution to the diagnosis of the disease.

  10. Magnetic non-collinear neutron wave resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Khaidukov, Yu N

    2009-01-01

    The expression are received for amplitude of neutron reflection from layered magnetic non-collinear structure (neutron wave resonator (NWR)). It is showed the magnetic non-collinear NWR is characterized by the system of pairs of resonances for the spin flipped neutrons. The conditions are defined at which amplifying of spin-flipped neutron flux in wave resonator is multiple increased in comparison with amplifying of neutron absorption.

  11. Magnetic Resonance of the Knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been applied to muscoloskeletal pathoanatomy and has proved to be useful in the detection and characterization of knees and 8 normal knees were examined. The images were obtained in the Diagnostic Centre RMRC of Naples on a 0.5 T superconductive magnetic system, using a surface coil and a spin-echo pulse sequence (SE 600/28 ms). The examined limb was immobilized and bent at 8-10 grade, extrarotated for the examination of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) only. Images were obtained on a 256x256 matrix and had a 2 or 4-mm thickness. MRI cleary showed all the anatomical structures. The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PAL) and tha patellar ligament were shown by sagittal SE images through the intercondylar notch; the tibial and fibular collateral ligaments (TCL and FCL) were evaluated on coronal SE images; the articular capsula and menisci on axial transverse SE images. Objective criteria for ACL and PCL tears were: lack of continuity of the signal and change in signal intensity; in meniscal pathology, menisci with small linear regions of increased signal or with grossly truncated shape were interpreted as tears. Preliminary results of this study indicate that MRI together with clinical evaluation may be an useful non-invasive procedure in the assessment of acute injuries of the knee

  12. Corpus callosum agenesis: Role of fetal magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achour Radhouane

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Corpus callosum agenesis (CCA was evaluated by ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with many studies. Ultrasonography was able to suspect CCA by indirect signs but a definitive diagnosis of CCA was achieved in rare cases. MRI was able to diagnose complete CCA in majority of cases. Additional neurological abnormalities including heterotopia, gyration anomaly, asymmetry of the cerebral hemispheres, and Dandy-Walker variant were documented, as well as an ocular anomaly which was described, by MRI examination. Prenatal counseling for fetal agenesis of the corpus callosum is difficult as the prognosis is uncertain. The association with other cerebral abnormalities increases the likelihood of a poor outcome and ultrasonographic assessment of the fetal brain is limited. We found MRI to be a safe and useful additional procedure to complement ultrasonographic diagnosis or suspicion of CCA.

  13. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as step...

  14. Magnetic Microparticle Aggregation For Viscosity Determination By Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Rui; Cima, Michael J; Weissleder, Ralph; Josephson, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Micron-sized magnetic particles were induced to aggregate when placed in homogeneous magnetic fields, like those of magnetic resonance (MR) imagers and relaxometers, and then spontaneously returned to their dispersed state when removed from the field. Associated with the aggregation and dispersion of the magnetic particles were time dependent increases and decreases in the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of the water. Magnetic nanoparticles, with far smaller magnetic moments per particle, did ...

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging; Resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibierge, M.; Sevestre, L.; Slupecki, P. [Centre Hospitalier de Charleville-Mezieres, 08 (France)

    1998-06-01

    After many years of low profile business in the USA, MRI is back. Improvements are focused on high field magnets and on low field magnets. The former, are dedicated to high quality imaging. The new scanners are more and more efficient because of the spreading use of real time imaging. They can do now, procedures that just could not be imagined some years ago. Vascular imaging is done routinely. Abdominal imaging in apnea of EPI, perfusion and diffusion imaging, and, last not least, all the field of functional imaging are on the verge of coming out. The new magnets unveiled in 1997 are lighter, smaller, more, user friendly, less impressive for patients subject to claustrophobia. They also need less helium to operate and less space to be sited. The latter, are dedicated to interventional procedures. The new magnets are wide opened and a lot of companies show off. Though Picker unveiled a new light superconductive 0.5 Tesla magnet, it seems that this kind of machines are about to disappear. No significant progress was noticed in the field of dedicated MRI devices. Some features can be highlighted: the new Siemens short bore and its table integrates the Panoramic Array Coil Concept. It will allow simultaneous scanning with up to four coils; the excellent homogeneity of the new Picker magnet that will allow spectroscopy at 1 Tesla; the twin gradients of the Elscint Prisma that will open the field of microscopy MRI; the Philips `floppy gradients` that could speed up 4 or 6 times, the time needed for imaging; some new sequences sensitive to temperature are studied as WIP; a lot of work is achieved on 3 or 4 Tesla scanners etc. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in mucopolysaccharidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Seijun; Tanaka, Akemi; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Hattori, Hideji; Matsuoka, Osamu; Murata, Ryosuke; Isshiki, Gen; Inoue, Yuichi

    1988-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images in six patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), two with type I S, one with type II A, two with type III B, and one with type VI MPS, were reviewed and compared with reported pathological findings and with CT scans. We used a Picker International MR imager with a 0.5-tesla superconducting magnet. The pulse sequences involved the inversion recovery technique (TR, 2,100 msec ; TI, 600 msec ; TE, 40 msec) for the T/sub 1/-weighted images and spin echo technique (TR, 1,800 msec ; TE, 120 msec) for the T/sub 2/-weighted images. The TC scanner was a Somatom 2 or DR3. In the patients with type II A and type VI MPS, there were multi-focal lesions of various sizes that showed prolonged T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ in the white matter. These lesions, which were not detected by CT, seemed to be correlated with the pathological findings of cavitation and dilated periadventitial space with viscous fluid. In the patients with type II A and type III B MPS, the T/sub 2/-weighted images showed a reduced contrast between gray and white matters, which may be related to the deposition of glycolipids and mucopolysaccharides in the lysosomes of the neurons and astrocytes of the gray and white matters. These findings seemed to be correlated with the clinical finding of mental retardation. In the patient of type II A MPS, there were lesions that showed prolonged T/sub 2/ of the periventricular white matter, suggesting periventricular edema. But CT hardly detected these lesions. In the patients with type I S MPS, no abnormal findings were found in MR imaging. It was concluded that MR imaging was far more sensitive for the detection of MPS lesions than CT, and was a useful method for differential diagnosis in MPS.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in mucopolysaccharidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images in six patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), two with type I S, one with type II A, two with type III B, and one with type VI MPS, were reviewed and compared with reported pathological findings and with CT scans. We used a Picker International MR imager with a 0.5-tesla superconducting magnet. The pulse sequences involved the inversion recovery technique (TR, 2,100 msec ; TI, 600 msec ; TE, 40 msec) for the T1-weighted images and spin echo technique (TR, 1,800 msec ; TE, 120 msec) for the T2-weighted images. The TC scanner was a Somatom 2 or DR3. In the patients with type II A and type VI MPS, there were multi-focal lesions of various sizes that showed prolonged T1 and T2 in the white matter. These lesions, which were not detected by CT, seemed to be correlated with the pathological findings of cavitation and dilated periadventitial space with viscous fluid. In the patients with type II A and type III B MPS, the T2-weighted images showed a reduced contrast between gray and white matters, which may be related to the deposition of glycolipids and mucopolysaccharides in the lysosomes of the neurons and astrocytes of the gray and white matters. These findings seemed to be correlated with the clinical finding of mental retardation. In the patient of type II A MPS, there were lesions that showed prolonged T2 of the periventricular white matter, suggesting periventricular edema. But CT hardly detected these lesions. In the patients with type I S MPS, no abnormal findings were found in MR imaging. It was concluded that MR imaging was far more sensitive for the detection of MPS lesions than CT, and was a useful method for differential diagnosis in MPS. (author)

  18. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  19. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Yumin Hou

    2013-01-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE osci...

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  1. Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI. (orig.)

  2. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  3. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovich, Dmitry; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    All-dielectric “magnetic light” nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here an approach for enhancing of magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of the magnetic moment, tailoring the latter in the dynamical range of 100% and delivering enhancement up to 36% relative to performances of standalone spherical particles. The proposed approach provides pathways for designs of all-dielectric metamaterials and metasurfaces with strong magnetic responses.

  4. No advantage of time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography at 3 Tesla compared to 1.5 Tesla in the follow-up after endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Buhk, Jan-Hendrik; Kallenberg, Kai; Mohr, Alexander; Dechent, Peter; Knauth, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Long-term follow-up after coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms is mandatory to monitor coil compacting and aneurysm recurrence. Most centers perform one digital subtraction angiography (DSA) on follow-up continuing with time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOFMRA). This study explores the diagnostic value of TOFMRA at 1.5 T versus 3 T compared to DSA. Materials and methods: In 18 patients with 20 aneurysms treated with coil embolization, TOFMRA at 1.5 and 3 T we...

  5. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  6. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join the ISMRM Journals History & Mission Central Office Society Award Winners Strategic Plan Policies Corporate Members Contact ... E-Library Virtual Meetings Connect With Us International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2300 Clayton Road, ...

  7. Magnetic moment of the Roper resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, T. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Gegelia, J., E-mail: gegelia@kph.uni-mainz.de [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); High Energy Physics Institute of TSU, 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Scherer, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2012-08-29

    The magnetic moment of the Roper resonance is calculated in the framework of a low-energy effective field theory of the strong interactions. A systematic power-counting procedure is implemented by applying the complex-mass scheme.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging for uterus leiomyoma diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities of a new technique, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in leiomyoma diagnosis was studied. MRI has clear advantages to differentiate adenomyosis from lysosomes and to reveal combination of these processes, which can considerably influence the tactics of the treatment

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  10. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Video: Contrast Material Radiology and You Take our survey About this Site ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  12. Biliary Ascariasis on Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography

    OpenAIRE

    Hashmi, Mohammad A; Jevan K De

    2009-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl presented with features of biliary obstruction. Magnetic resonance cholangi-pancreatography revealed typical linear signals in common bile duct, which appears like Ascaris lumbricoides. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic removal of the worm.

  13. Magnetic moment of the Roper resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, T.; Gegelia, J.; Scherer, S.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the Roper resonance is calculated in the framework of a low-energy effective field theory of the strong interactions. A systematic power-counting procedure is implemented by applying the complex-mass scheme.

  14. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  15. Contribution to nuclear magnetic resonance imager using permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After some recalls of nuclear magnetic resonance, ways to get a stable and homogeneous magnetic field are studied with permanent magnets. Development of correction coils on integrated circuits has been particularly stressed. Gradient coil specific systems have been studied taking in account ferromagnetic material presence. Antenna system has been improved and possibility of image obtention with the prototype realized has been shown

  16. Advanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Peng; 曹鹏

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a well-known non-invasive technique that provides spectra (by MR spectroscopy, MRS) and images (by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) of the examined tissue with detailed metabolic, structural, and functional information. This doctoral work is focused on advanced methodologies and applications of MRS for probing cellular and molecular changes in vivo. A single-voxel diffusion-weighted (DW) MRS method was first developed for monitoring the size changes of intramyocellu...

  17. Concepts and indications of abdominal magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature review and conceptualization was performed of the main indications of magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen and the characteristic findings for each sequence, according to organ and pathology. The radiologist has had in mind main indications for magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen, with the purpose to guide the clinician in the choice of imaging modality that works best for the patient at diagnosis

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Dielectric Lens

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, F.; Marrufo, O.; MARTIN,R; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, metamaterials have been introduced to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of magnetic resonance images with very promising results. However, the use polymers in the generation of high quality images in magnetic resonance imaging has not been fully been investigated. These investigations explored the use of a dielectric periodical array as a lens to improve the image SNR generated with single surface coils. Commercial polycarbonate glazing sheets were used together with a circula...

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Peter L.; Crooks, Lawrence E.; Margulis, Alexander R.; Kaufman, Leon

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging can produce tomographic images of the body without ionizing radiation. Images of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities have been obtained and normal structures and pathology have been identified. Soft tissue contrast with this method is superior to that with x-ray computerized tomography and its spatial resolution is approaching that of x-ray computerized tomography. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enables us to image along the sag...

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the right ventricle

    OpenAIRE

    Alpendurada, Francisco Diogo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Whilst most of the attention has been devoted to the left ventricle in cardiovascular disease, the right ventricle has been somewhat neglected. In the last decades, there has been a renewal of interest in the right ventricle, in part driven by advances in cardiovascular imaging. Methods: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance is arguably the best imaging modality for the study of the right ventricle. In this research thesis, cardiovascular magnetic resonance w...

  1. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  2. Cat scratch disease: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cat scratch disease is an infectious lymphadenitis frequently occurring in children and adolescents. We present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of two patients with this disease. In both cases, lymphadenopathy was characterized by extensive stranding of the surrounding soft tissues, consistent with the inflammatory nature of this condition. Magnetic resonance imaging can be diagnostic and may obviate the need for invasive means of evaluation in patients suspected of having cat scratch disease. (orig.)

  3. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in depression

    OpenAIRE

    Naren P Rao; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Bangalore N Gangadhar

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a unique technique that can directly assess the concentration of various biochemical metabolites in the brain. Thus, it is used in the study of molecular pathophysiology of different neuropsychiatric disorders, such as, the major depressive disorder and has been an area of active research. We conducted a computer-based literature search using the Pubmed database with ‘magnetic resonance spectroscopy’, ‘MRS’, ‘depression’, and ‘major depressive disorder...

  4. Magnetic resonance urography in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imaging methods play an important role in the diagnosing of the urinary tract diseases in children. The magnetic resonance urography (MRU) aids the morphological and functional assessment of the urinary tract as well as the increase of the accuracy of the diagnosing process. Objective: The aim of the study is to assess the capabilities of the MRU for the diagnosing of the urogenital tract in children. Material and methods: In 30 children, age between 20 days and 14 years, suspected for urinary tract pathology MRU is performed. The technique includes a native and contrast examination of the abdomen and the pelvis. The duration, depending on the pathology, is between 20 and 30 min. The axial scans and the 3-dimensional reconstructed images have been processed at different reconstruction angle. The findings have been compared to the other imaging methods applied and the postoperative results. Results: The MRU has allowed to diagnose different types of urogenital diseases in children - 3 with double pyelo-calyx system, 12 with obstructed mega ureter, 5 with obstruction of the pyelo-urinary segment, 5 with accompanying parenchyma anomalies, 6 with renal calculi, 5 with tumors, 1 with extrarenal tumor formation, 3 with bladder anomalies and 1 with kidney transplantation. Most of the children have combined pathology. Conclusions: MRU shows significant advantages in a number of pathological conditions as urinary tract obstruction, renal tumors, transplanted kidney and some congenital anomalies. The technique is safe, non-invasive and relatively fast for children examinations. These features of MRU presents a reason to assume that it will replace a number of conventional radiography techniques, giving more precise diagnostic information

  5. Complex Response Function of Magnetic Resonance Spectrometers

    OpenAIRE

    Annino, G.; Cassettari, M.; Fittipaldi, M.; M. Martinelli

    2002-01-01

    A vectorial analysis of magnetic resonance spectrometers, based on traveling wave resonators and including the reference arm and the automatic control of frequency, has been developed. The proposed model, valid also for stationary wave resonators, gives the response function of the spectrometer for any working condition, including scalar detectors with arbitrary response law and arbitrary excitation frequency. The purely dispersive and purely absorptive linear responses are discussed in detai...

  6. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Markovich, Dmitry; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here a new approach for increasing magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer nanoantenna. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of magnetic polarizability, tailoring the later in the dynamical range of 100 % and enhancement up to 36 % relative to performances of standalone spherical particles....

  7. Nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging: Progress and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based on the sensitive detection of nuclear spins, enables three dimensional imaging without radiation damage. Conventional MRI techniques achieve spatial resolution that is at best a few micrometers due to sensitivity limitations of conventional inductive detection. The advent of ultrasensitive nanoscale magnetic sensing opens the possibility of extending MRI to the nanometer scale. If this can be pushed far enough, one can envision taking 3D images of individual biomolecules and, perhaps, even solving molecular structures of proteins. In this talk we will discuss issues related to nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging, especially its implementation using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). MRFM is based on the detection of ultrasmall (attonewton) magnetic forces. While 3D spatial resolution below 5 nm has been demonstrated, further progress depends on overcoming poorly understood near-surface force noise effects. We also consider the future possibility of using NV centers in diamond for detection of nanoMRI.

  8. Magnetic resonance tomography in eclampsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eclampsia is a rare but severe complication during the course of a pregnancy. The CT-findings at the brain are well known. Reports on MRT-findings are limited, however, especially in German literature. We describe the MRT picture of the cerebral changes caused by eclampsia and discuss the advantages of MRT in comparison with CT. The use of contrast agents with MRT shows breakdown of blood-brain barrier but does not provide any information of therapeutical consequences and should be avoided during pregnancy. An early and targeted use of MRT in any case of unclear or suspicious neurological symptoms during pregnancy is recommended. MRT supports differential diagnosis regarding non pregnancy-related cerebral disease and can be helpful for therapy planning in cases of preeclampsia. Additionally, MRT offers the possibility to control the effect of therapy with regard to brain damage. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  11. Coherence of magnetic resonators in a metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The coherence of periodic magnetic resonators (MRs under oblique incidence is studied using simulations. The correlated phase of interaction including both the retardation effect and relative phase difference between two MRs is defined, and it plays a key role in the MR interaction. The correlated phase is anisotropic, as is the coherence condition. The coherence condition is the same as the Wood's anomaly and verified by the Fano resonance. This study shows that the applications of the Fano resonance of periodic MRs will become widespread owing to achieving the Fano resonance simply by tuning the incident angle.

  12. Low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wago, Koichi

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a technique whose goal is to combine the three-dimensional, chemically specific imaging capability of magnetic resonance imaging with the atomic-scale spatial resolution of scanning force microscopy. MRFM relies on the detection of small oscillatory magnetic forces between spins in the sample and a magnetic tip, using a micromechanical cantilever. The force resolution is a key issue for successfully operating MRFM experiments. Operating at low temperature improves the force resolution because of the reduced thermal energy and increased mechanical Q of the cantilever. The spin polarization is also enhanced at low temperature, leading to the improved magnetic resonance sensitivity for ensemble spin samples. A low-temperature magnetic resonance force detection apparatus was built and used to demonstrate a force resolution of 8×10sp{-17}\\ N/sqrt{Hz} at 6 K with a commercial single-crystal silicon cantilever. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were detected in micron-size samples. Force-detection technique was also applied to a wide range of magnetic resonance measurements, including inversion recovery, nutation, and spin echoes. Force-detected EPR spectra of phosphorus-doped silicon revealed hyperfine splitting, illustrating the possibility of using the MRFM technique for spectroscopic purposes. An improved low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscope was also built, incorporating a magnetic tip mounted directly on the cantilever. This allows a much wider variety of samples to be investigated and greatly improves the convenience of the technique. Using the improved microscope, three-dimensional EPR imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed a broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and myelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postnatal development of the brain is characterized by growth and by myelination. Myelination of the brain normally extends from birth until about two years of age. MRI changes corresponding to the various myelination stages are due mainly to changes in the water content of the cerebral parenchyma. Myelination kinetics follow a fairly precise timetable, with variations across areas of the brain. Abnormalities of white matter are responsible for relatively stereotyped, nonspecific manifestations, which are mainly due to an increase in the amount of water contained in diseased white matter, whatever the cause of the disorder. Interpretation is based on the location, distribution, and progression of lesions. (authors). 7 refs., 5 figs

  14. Neurologic screening by magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic subjects in Self Defence Force Maizuru guard area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify usefulness of cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for group health care. We performed 1136 cranial MRI and MRA examinations between March 1992 and February 1997 in members of the Self Defense Force (SDF) stationed in the Maizuru area. We selected subjects when they reached the age of 40 years, when they retired, or when they were found to have risk factors for cerebrovascular disease. Furthermore, we investigated occurrence of symptomatic cerebral disease of our subjects and non-subjects in SDF Maizuru area during MRI screening. We found 77 asymptomatic cerebral infarctions, 8 unruptured cerebral aneurysms, 2 pituitary adenomas, 4 venous angiomas and 4 arachnoid cysts. Among asymptomatic cerebral disease, the number of cerebral infarctions was significantly greater in the risk factor and retired group compared to the 40-year-old group. In 24 patients with asymptomatic cerebral infarction whom we were able to follow, we prescribed antiplatelet drugs and none became symptomatic. Unruptured cerebral aneurysms and pituitary tumors we treated operatively, resulting in good functional outcomes in all patients. There were less symptomatic cerebral diseases in the subject group (0.08%) vs. in the non-subject group (0.3%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p=.20). Screening cranial MRI and MRA examinations indicated considerable overall utility. However, further human study is warranted to identify usefulness of MRI screening system. (author)

  15. Neurologic screening by magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic subjects in Self Defence Force Maizuru guard area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Terai, Chikanori; Okada, Yoshiaki [National Defence Medical Coll., Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan). Hospital; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Shima, Katsuji

    1998-12-01

    To clarify usefulness of cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for group health care. We performed 1136 cranial MRI and MRA examinations between March 1992 and February 1997 in members of the Self Defense Force (SDF) stationed in the Maizuru area. We selected subjects when they reached the age of 40 years, when they retired, or when they were found to have risk factors for cerebrovascular disease. Furthermore, we investigated occurrence of symptomatic cerebral disease of our subjects and non-subjects in SDF Maizuru area during MRI screening. We found 77 asymptomatic cerebral infarctions, 8 unruptured cerebral aneurysms, 2 pituitary adenomas, 4 venous angiomas and 4 arachnoid cysts. Among asymptomatic cerebral disease, the number of cerebral infarctions was significantly greater in the risk factor and retired group compared to the 40-year-old group. In 24 patients with asymptomatic cerebral infarction whom we were able to follow, we prescribed antiplatelet drugs and none became symptomatic. Unruptured cerebral aneurysms and pituitary tumors we treated operatively, resulting in good functional outcomes in all patients. There were less symptomatic cerebral diseases in the subject group (0.08%) vs. in the non-subject group (0.3%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p=.20). Screening cranial MRI and MRA examinations indicated considerable overall utility. However, further human study is warranted to identify usefulness of MRI screening system. (author)

  16. 170 Nanometer Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Thurber, K R; Smith, D D; Thurber, Kent R.; Harrell, Lee E.; Smith, Doran D.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the semiconductor GaAs with 170 nanometer slice separation and resolve two regions of reduced nuclear spin polarization density separated by only 500 nanometers. This is achieved by force detection of the magnetic resonance, Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM), in combination with optical pumping to increase the nuclear spin polarization. Optical pumping of the GaAs creates spin polarization up to 12 times larger than the thermal nuclear spin polarization at 5 K and 4 T. The experiment is sensitive to sample volumes containing $\\sim 4 \\times 10^{11}$ $^{71}$Ga$/\\sqrt{Hz}$. These results demonstrate the ability of force-detected magnetic resonance to apply magnetic resonance imaging to semiconductor devices and other nanostructures.

  17. Embroidered Coils for Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Newton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is a widely used technique for medical and materials imaging. Even though the objects being imaged are often irregularly shaped, suitable coils permitting the measurement of the radio-frequency signal in these systems are usually made of solid copper. One problem often encountered is how to ensure the coils are both in close proximity and conformal to the object being imaged. Whilst embroidered conductive threads have previously been used as antennae in mobile telecommunications applications, they have not previously been reported for use within magnetic resonance. In this paper we show that an embroidered single loop coil can be used in a commercial unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance system as an alternative to a solid copper. Data is presented showing the determination of both longitudinal (T1 and effective transverse (T2eff relaxation times for a flat fabric coil and the same coil conformed to an 8 cm diameter cylinder. We thereby demonstrate the principles required for the wider use of fabric based conformal coils within nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Nonischemic causes of hyperintense signals on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinman, J.M.; Provenzale, J.M. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Div. of Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for tissue characterization on the basis of microscopic intravoxel incoherent (diffusional) motion of water. Diffusion-weighted MRI is performed by applying a pair of pulsed magnetic field gradients in association with a 90{sup o}-180{sup o} spin-echo pulse; this results in varying degrees of signal loss according to the rate of diffusion (i.e., random motion) of water molecules within tissue. The rate of signal loss depends on a number of factors, including some that are operator dependent (e.g., strength and duration of gradient pulses) and some that are tissue specific (e.g., microscopic structure of the tissue). The hyperintense appearance of acute cerebral infarction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images has been well outlined in numerous reports. In this pictorial essay, increased signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images due to causes other than acute cerebral ischemia are reviewed. (author)

  19. Nonischemic causes of hyperintense signals on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for tissue characterization on the basis of microscopic intravoxel incoherent (diffusional) motion of water. Diffusion-weighted MRI is performed by applying a pair of pulsed magnetic field gradients in association with a 90o-180o spin-echo pulse; this results in varying degrees of signal loss according to the rate of diffusion (i.e., random motion) of water molecules within tissue. The rate of signal loss depends on a number of factors, including some that are operator dependent (e.g., strength and duration of gradient pulses) and some that are tissue specific (e.g., microscopic structure of the tissue). The hyperintense appearance of acute cerebral infarction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images has been well outlined in numerous reports. In this pictorial essay, increased signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images due to causes other than acute cerebral ischemia are reviewed. (author)

  20. Planar Magnetic Metamaterial Slabs for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Lai; Guo, Jie; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Quan-Qiang; Ma, Wei-Tao; Miao, Xi-Gen; Zhao, Zhi-Ya; Luan, Lin

    2014-07-01

    A type of planar magnetic metamaterial is proposed with a square winding microstructure as a superlens for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. A direct magnetic field mapping measurement demonstrates that the radio-frequency magnetic field passing through the superlens is increased by as high as 46.9% at the position of about 3 cm behind the superlens. The resonance frequency of the fabricated slabs is found to be in good agreement with the target frequency (63.6 MHz) for a 1.5T MRI system. MRI experiments with the magnetic superlens show that the intensity of the image and the SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) are both enhanced, implying promising MRI applications of our planar magnetic superlens.

  1. Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging in neuropsychiatry: present utility and future promise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renshaw, P.F.; Levin, J.M.; Kaufman, M.J.; Ross, M.H. [Brain Imaging Center, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA 02178 (United States); Lewis, R.F.; Harris, G.J. [Neuroimaging Research Laboratory, New England Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) provides a noninvasive means to create high resolution maps of the regional distribution of cerebral blood volume (CBV). Most DSC MRI studies conducted to date have focused on the evaluation of patients with cerebral neoplasms, ischemia or infarction, and epilepsy. However, preliminary work suggests that DSC MRI may also provide clinically important information for the evaluation of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, especially dementia and schizophrenia. Additionally, with appropriate modification, DSC MRI may be used to reliably evaluate the effects of pharmacological challenges on cerebral hemodynamics. As pharmacotherapy is an important component in the treatment of a range of psychiatric disorders, the dynamic assessment of changes in cerebral perfusion associated with drug administration may ultimately lead to the development of ``brain function tests`` for a wide range of disorders. (orig.) With 4 figs., 50 refs.

  2. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  3. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic plasmonic Fano resonance at optical frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanjun; Hu, Zhijian; Li, Ziwei; Zhu, Xing; Fang, Zheyu

    2015-05-13

    Plasmonic Fano resonances are typically understood and investigated assuming electrical mode hybridization. Here we demonstrate that a purely magnetic plasmon Fano resonance can be realized at optical frequency with Au split ring hexamer nanostructure excited by an azimuthally polarized incident light. Collective magnetic plasmon modes induced by the circular electric field within the hexamer and each of the split ring can be controlled and effectively hybridized by designing the size and orientation of each ring unit. With simulated results reproducing the experiment, our suggested configuration with narrow line-shape magnetic Fano resonance has significant potential applications in low-loss sensing and may serves as suitable elementary building blocks for optical metamaterials. PMID:25594885

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, C.B.; Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides reference to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body. Beginning with explanatory chapters on the physics, instrumentation, and interpretation of MRI, it proceeds to the normal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Other chapters cover magnetic resonance imaging of blood flow, the larynx, the lymph nodes, and the spine, as well as MRI in obstetrics. The text features detailed coverage of magnetic resonance imaging of numerous disorders and disease states, including neck disease, thoracic disease; breast disease; congenital and acquired heart disease; vascular disease; diseases of the liver, pancreas, and spleen; diseases of the kidney, adrenals, and retroperitoneum; diseases of the male and female pelvis; and musculoskeletal diseases. Chapters on the biological and environmental hazards of MRI, the current clinical status of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities, and economic considerations are also included.

  6. Focal renal masses: magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty patients with focal renal masses were evaluated on a .12-Tesla resistive magnetic resonance unit using partial saturation and spin echo pulse sequence. Fifteen patients had cystic lesions, nine patients had renal cell carcinoma, two had metastatic lesions, one had an angiomyolipoma, and three had focal bacterial infection. Renal cell carcinomas demonstrated areas of increased signal using a partial saturation sequence. Magnetic resonance imaging accurately detected perinephric extension and vascular invasion in all patients. Metastatic disease to the kidney was uniformly low in signal, in contrast to primary renal cell carcinoma; an angiomyolipoma demonstrated very high signal intensity. Two masses resulting from acute focal bacterial nephritis were uniformly low in signal. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be an accurate way of detecting, identifying, and staging focal renal masses

  7. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  8. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, ... magnetic field is not harmful in itself, implanted medical devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause problems ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... material called gadolinium, which is less likely to cause an allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell ... magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses are activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while others ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. ... still during imaging. A person who is very large may not fit into the opening of certain ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  20. Magnetic resonance neurography. Imaging of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) is a non-invasive technique using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to diagnose peripheral nerve pathologies and their underlying etiologies. MRN is already in clinical use and is now mostly used to delineate the anatomy of nerves and to establish the continuity or discontinuity of nerves in patients with traumatic nerve injuries, as well as to monitor processes of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration. This article reviews established and evolving novel MRN technologies with regard to their potential to meet the requirements for non-invasive imaging of peripheral nerves in clinical settings. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Dielectric Lens

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, F; Martin, R; Rodriguez, A O

    2009-01-01

    Recently, metamaterials have been introduced to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of magnetic resonance images with very promising results. However, the use polymers in the generation of high quality images in magnetic resonance imaging has not been fully been investigated. These investigations explored the use of a dielectric periodical array as a lens to improve the image SNR generated with single surface coils. Commercial polycarbonate glazing sheets were used together with a circular coil to generate phantom images at 3 Tesla on a clinical MR imager.

  2. The progress of coronary magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a kind of disease with high morbidity and mortality. The early detection and treatment has important significance to patient. With the features of noninvasive, no radiation, good soft tissue contrast and multi parameter, and displaying anatomy in arbitrary plane, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was gradually applied in coronary artery imaging. In this paper, the main sequence and scanning technology of coronary MRI were reviewed, factors that affecting the quality of coronary magnetic resonance imaging were summarized, and the main advantages and disadvantages were concluded. (authors)

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance as a petrophysical measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of hydrogen nuclei in fluids which saturate porous rocks is important in oil exploration and production, since NMR logs can provide good estimates of permeability and fluid flow. This paper reviews developments which connect the NMR properties of rocks with petrophysical properties, and particularly those relating to fluid flow. The recent advances in the use of NMR in boreholes which have spurred these developments are also discussed. The relevance of other NMR measurements on geological samples, including magnetic resonance imaging, is briefly referred to. (author)

  4. Progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Emsley, J W; Sutcliffe, L H

    2013-01-01

    Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Part 1 is a two-chapter text that reviews significant developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications.The first chapter discusses NMR studies of molecules physisorbed on homogeneous surfaces. This chapter also describes the phase changes in the adsorbed layer detected by following the variation in the NMR parameters. The second chapter examines the process to obtain a plotted, data reduced Fourier transform NMR spectrum. This chapter highlights the pitfalls that can cause a decrease in information content in a NMR spectrum. The

  5. Magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Upadhyaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is being increasingly recognised all over the world as the imaging modality of choice for brachial plexus and peripheral nerve lesions. Recent refinements in MRI protocols have helped in imaging nerve tissue with greater clarity thereby helping in the identification, localisation and classification of nerve lesions with greater confidence than was possible till now. This article on Magnetic Resonance Neurography (MRN is based on the authors′ experience of imaging the brachial plexus and peripheral nerves using these protocols over the last several years.

  6. Complex Response Function of Magnetic Resonance Spectrometers

    CERN Document Server

    Annino, G; Fittipaldi, M; Martinelli, M

    2002-01-01

    A vectorial analysis of magnetic resonance spectrometers, based on traveling wave resonators and including the reference arm and the automatic control of frequency, has been developed. The proposed modelization, valid also for stationary wave resonators, gives the response function of the spectrometer for any working condition, including scalar detectors with arbitrary responsivity law and arbitrary excitation frequency. The purely dispersive and purely absorptive linear responses are discussed in detail for different scalar detectors. The developed approach allows to optimize the performances of the spectrometer and to obtain the intrinsic lineshape of the sample in a very broad range of working conditions. More complex setups can be modelized following the proposed scheme.

  7. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip–sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip–sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium. (paper)

  8. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium.

  9. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. Materials And Methods: Fifty-five patients with musculoskeletal tumors (27 malignant and 28 benign) were studied. The examinations were performed in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner with standard protocol, and single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 135 msec echo time. The dynamic contrast study was performed using T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence after intravenous gadolinium injection. Time signal intensity curves and slope values were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed with the Levene's test, followed by a Student's t-test, besides the Pearson's chi-squared and Fischer's exact tests. Results: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were, respectively, 87.5%, 92.3% and 90.9% (p < 0.0001). Statistically significant difference was observed in the slope (%/min) between benign (mean, 27.5%/min) and malignant (mean, 110.9%/min) lesions (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The time-intensity curve and slope values using dynamic-enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in association with the presence of choline peak demonstrated by single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy study are useful in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. (author)

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance of thermally oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The more recent developments in the spectroscopy of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance on Oriented Nuclei (NMRON) are reviewed; both theoretical and experimental advances are summarised with applications to On-Line and Off-Line determination of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine parameters. Some emphasis is provided on solid state considerations with indications of where likely enhancements in technique will lead in conventional hyperfine studies. (orig.)

  11. Multi-dimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of white matter diseases of prematurity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Mary A.; Supramaniam, Veena; Ederies, Ashraf; Chew, Andrew; Anjari, Mustafa; Counsell, Serena [Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, Robert Steiner MR Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); Bassi, Laura; Groppo, Michela; Ramenghi, Luca A. [University of Milan, NICU, Institute of Pediatrics and Neonatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli e Regina Elena, Milan (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Periventricular leucomalacia (PVL) and parenchymal venous infarction complicating germinal matrix/intraventricular haemorrhage have long been recognised as the two significant white matter diseases responsible for the majority of cases of cerebral palsy in survivors of preterm birth. However, more recent studies using magnetic resonance imaging to assess the preterm brain have documented two new appearances, adding to the spectrum of white matter disease of prematurity: punctate white matter lesions, and diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI). These appear to be more common than PVL but less significant in terms of their impact on individual neurodevelopment. They may, however, be associated with later cognitive and behavioural disorders known to be common following preterm birth. It remains unclear whether PVL, punctate lesions, and DEHSI represent a continuum of disorders occurring as a result of a similar injurious process to the developing white matter. This review discusses the role of MR imaging in investigating these three disorders in terms of aetiology, pathology, and outcome. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of white matter diseases of prematurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periventricular leucomalacia (PVL) and parenchymal venous infarction complicating germinal matrix/intraventricular haemorrhage have long been recognised as the two significant white matter diseases responsible for the majority of cases of cerebral palsy in survivors of preterm birth. However, more recent studies using magnetic resonance imaging to assess the preterm brain have documented two new appearances, adding to the spectrum of white matter disease of prematurity: punctate white matter lesions, and diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI). These appear to be more common than PVL but less significant in terms of their impact on individual neurodevelopment. They may, however, be associated with later cognitive and behavioural disorders known to be common following preterm birth. It remains unclear whether PVL, punctate lesions, and DEHSI represent a continuum of disorders occurring as a result of a similar injurious process to the developing white matter. This review discusses the role of MR imaging in investigating these three disorders in terms of aetiology, pathology, and outcome. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in sudden deafness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The etiology of sudden deafness can remain undetermined despite extensive investigation. This study addresses the value of magnetic resonance imaging in the analysis of sudden deafness patients.Study Design: transversal cohort.Material And Method: In a prospective study, 49 patients attended at otolaryngology emergency room of Federal University of Sao Paulo - Escola Paulista de Medicina, from April 2001 to May 2003, were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging.Results: Magnetic Resonance abnormalities were seen in 23 (46.9%) patients and revealed two tumors suggestive of meningioma, three vestibular schwannomas, thirteen microangiopathic changes of the brain and five (21.7%) pathological conditions of the labyrinth.Conclusion: Sudden deafness should be approached as a symptom common to different diseases. The presence of cerebellopontine angle tumors in 10.2% of our cases, among other treatable causes, justifies the recommendation of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance use, not only to study the auditory peripheral pathway, but to study the whole auditory pathway including the brain. (author)

  15. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system

  16. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.;

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...

  17. Sports Health Magnetic Resonance Imaging Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Gary A.; Stadnick, Michael E.; Awh, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians.

  18. Sports Health Magnetic Resonance Imaging Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Gary A.; Stadnick, Michael E.; Awh, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians. PMID:23015984

  19. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  20. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    2001-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing rad

  2. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  3. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid;

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  4. Recent progress in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a powerful tool in the life sciences and medical diagnosis, for which it was awarded the 2003 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine. The latest progress in MRI, including medical, brain-functional, in-vivo spectroscopic, and microscopic imaging are briefly reviewed

  5. 3D Reconstruction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulka, J.; Bartušek, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 7 (2010), s. 617-620. ISSN 1931-7360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/09/0314 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : reconstruction methods * magnetic resonance imaging Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  6. 3D Reconstruction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulka, J.; Bartušek, Karel

    Cambridge : The Electromagnetics Academy, 2010, s. 1043-1046. ISBN 978-1-934142-14-1. [PIERS 2010 Cambridge. Cambridge (US), 05.07.2010-08.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/09/0314 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : 3D reconstruction * magnetic resonance imaging Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  7. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Tyrosinemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3.5-year-old girl with tyrosinemia is reported. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed multiple hepatic nodules. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral high-signal changes confined to the globus pallidus on T2-weighted images. Globus pallidus lesions likely represented neuropathologic changes such as astocytosis, delayed myelination, and status spongiosus (myelin splitting and vacuolation)

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Maceira Alicia M; Mohiaddin Raad H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue char...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Lithography with Nanometer Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad AlGhannam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose an approach for super-resolution optical lithography which is based on the inverse of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The technique uses atomic coherence in an ensemble of spin systems whose final state population can be optically detected. In principle, our method is capable of producing arbitrary one and two dimensional high-resolution patterns with high contrast.

  10. Texture analysis methodologies for magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Materka, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    Methods for the analysis of digital-image texture are reviewed. The functions of MaZda, a computer program for quantitative texture analysis developed within the framework of the European COST (Cooperation in the Field of Scientific and Technical Research) B11 program, are introduced. Examples of texture analysis in magnetic resonance images are discussed.

  11. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  12. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  13. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  14. Modelling Strategies for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    This thesis collects research done on several models for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging (fMRI) data. Several extensions for unsupervised factor analysis type decompositions including explicit delay modelling as well as handling of spatial and temporal smoothness and...

  15. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D2O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10-5 on the D2O concentration. (author)

  16. Biliary ascariasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Hashmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old girl presented with features of biliary obstruction. Magnetic resonance cholangi-pancreatography revealed typical linear signals in common bile duct, which appears like Ascaris lumbricoides. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic removal of the worm.

  17. Magnetic resonance studies of solid polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a review of the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to solid polymers. In the first, theoretical part, the elements of the theory of NMR, which are necessary for the study of the properties of solid polymers are discussed: the moments method, nuclear relaxation and the distribution of correlation times. In the second part the experimental results are presented. (author)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daffner, R.H.; Lupetin, A.R.; Dash, N.; Riemer, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    The diagnosis of acute tendon ruptures of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon ruptures. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles tendon rupture are presented.

  19. Magnetic resonance angiography in meningovascular syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meningovascular neurosyphilis (MN) is an unusual cause of stroke in young adults. The clinical manifestations include prodromal symptoms weeks or months before definitive stroke. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings and examination of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of MN with basilar artery irregularities demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. (orig.)

  20. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  1. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Risk of Death, Ischemic Stroke, and Cardiac Complications in Patients With Atherosclerotic Disease The Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease-Magnetic Resonance (SMART-MR) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.A. Conijn; R.P. Kloppenborg; A. Algra; W.P.T.M. Mali; L.J. Kappelle; K.L. Vincken; Y. van der Graaf; M.I. Geerlings

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Cerebral small vessel disease may be related to vascular and nonvascular pathology. We assessed whether lacunar infarcts and white matter lesions on MRI increased the risk of vascular and nonvascular death and future vascular events in patients with atherosclerotic disease. Me

  2. The working principle of magnetic resonance therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa; Fermi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe briefly the basic aspects of magnetic resonance therapy, registered as TMR therapy. Clinical studies have shown that application of this therapy significantly accelerates wound healing and, in particular, healing of the diabetic foot disease. To understand the working principle of this therapy, we analyze relevant to it biological effects produced by magnetic fields. Based on these data, we show that there is a hierarchy of the possible physical mechanisms, which can produce such effects. The mutual interplay between the mechanisms can lead to a synergetic outcome delayed in time, which can affect the physiological state of the organism. In particular, we show that soliton mediated charge transport during the redox processes in living organisms is sensitive to magnetic fields, so that such fields can facilitate redox processes in particular, and can stimulate the healing effect of the organism in general. This and other non-thermal resonant mechanisms of the biological effects of mag...

  3. An atypical meningioma demystified and advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despoina Voultsinou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old male presented with visuospatial processing disturbances. Family history was free. Conventional and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies were performed. On T2 and fluid attenuation inversion recovery images, an increased signal intensity extra-axial lesion was demonstrated. Post-contrast scans depicted homogeneous intense contrast medium enhancement. T2FNx01 star sequence was negative for hemorrhagic or calcification foci. Diffusion-weighted imaging findings were indicative of malignant behavior and magnetic resonance venography confirmed superior sagittal sinus infiltration. Increased cerebral blood volume values were observed and peri-lesional oedema on perfusion-weighted imaging was also demonstrated. The signal intensity-time curve depicted the characteristic meningioma pattern. Spectroscopy showed increased choline and alanine levels, but decreased N-acetyl-aspartate levels. Conventional MRI is adequate for typical types of meningiomas. However, the more atypical ones, in which even the histopathologic specimen may demonstrate characteristics of typical meningioma, could be easier diagnosed with advanced MRI techniques.

  4. Evaluation of Parkinson's disease using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Parkinson's disease. In the period from October 1999 to October 2002, 42 patients with parkinsonism were investigated using a 1.5 T MR equipment. Patients were divided into two groups: patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 26) and patients with atypical Parkinsonian syndrome (n = 16). The results were compared with a control group (n = 18). The following variables were evaluated: thickness of the mesencephalon compact pars, hypointense signal in the putamen, degree of brain atrophy, lesions in the mesencephalon, lesions in the white matter, and the presence of lesions in the posterior-lateral edge of the putamen. Statistical data analysis was carried out using the SPSS program. Results: The mean age was 58.2 years for the Parkinson's disease and control groups, and 60.5 years for the atypical Parkinsonian syndrome group. Patients with Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinsonian syndromes presented decreased thickness of the compact pars and a higher degree of signal hypointensity in the putamen. Cerebral atrophy was more prominent in the patients with atypical Parkinsonian syndrome. Lesions in mesencephalon and white matter were similar in both groups. The frequency of hyperintense signal in the posterior-lateral edge of the putamen was low within the studied population, although that could suggest multiple-system atrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging allows the detection of brain morphological changes that may help in the diagnosis of Parkinsonian syndromes. (author)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging findings after rectus femoris transfer surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, Garry E. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Asakawa, Deanna S.; Blemker, Silvia S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Delp, Scott L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    We describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of the knee flexor and extensor tendons after bilateral rectus femoris transfer and hamstring lengthening surgery in five patients (10 limbs) with cerebral palsy. Three-dimensional models of the path of the transferred tendon were constructed in all cases. MR images of the transferred and lengthened tendons were examined and compared with images from ten non-surgical subjects. The models showed that the path of the transferred rectus femoris tendon had a marked angular deviation near the transfer site in all cases. MR imaging demonstrated irregular areas of low signal intensity near the transferred rectus femoris and around the hamstrings in all subjects. Eight of the ten post-surgical limbs showed evidence of fluid near or around the transferred or lengthened tendons. This was not observed in the non-surgical subjects. Thus, MR imaging of patients with cerebral palsy after rectus femoris transfer and hamstring-lengthening surgery shows evidence of signal intensity and contour changes, even several years after surgery. (orig.)

  7. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic neuroanatomy of addictive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikov, M E; Shtark, M B

    2014-01-01

    Research into the cerebral patterns that govern the formation and development of addictive behavior is one of the most interesting goals of neurophysiology. Authors of contemporary papers on the matter define a number of symptoms that are all part of substance or non-substance dependence, each one of them leading to abnormalities in the corresponding system of the brain. During the last twenty years the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMR1) technology has been instrumental in locating such abnormalities, identifying specific parts of the brain that, when dysfunctional, may enhance addiction and cause its positive or negative symptoms. This article reviews fMRI studies aimed toward locating areas in the brain that are responsible for cognitive, emotional, and motivational dysfunction. Cerebral correlatives of impulsiveness, behavior control, and drug cravings are reviewed separately. The article also contains an overview of possibilities to further investigate the Selves of those dependent on substances, identify previously unknown diagnostic markers of substance dependence, and evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. The research under review in this article provides data that points to a special role of the nucleus caudatus as well as the nucleus accumbens, the thalamus, the insular cortex (IC), the anterior cingulate, prefrontal and orbitofrontal areas in psychological disorders that are part of substance dependence. General findings of the article are in accordance with contemporary models of addictive pattern. PMID:25729844

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging findings after rectus femoris transfer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of the knee flexor and extensor tendons after bilateral rectus femoris transfer and hamstring lengthening surgery in five patients (10 limbs) with cerebral palsy. Three-dimensional models of the path of the transferred tendon were constructed in all cases. MR images of the transferred and lengthened tendons were examined and compared with images from ten non-surgical subjects. The models showed that the path of the transferred rectus femoris tendon had a marked angular deviation near the transfer site in all cases. MR imaging demonstrated irregular areas of low signal intensity near the transferred rectus femoris and around the hamstrings in all subjects. Eight of the ten post-surgical limbs showed evidence of fluid near or around the transferred or lengthened tendons. This was not observed in the non-surgical subjects. Thus, MR imaging of patients with cerebral palsy after rectus femoris transfer and hamstring-lengthening surgery shows evidence of signal intensity and contour changes, even several years after surgery. (orig.)

  9. The diagnostic value of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the diagnosis and screening of intracranial vascular lesions. MRA was performed in 416 cases from November, 1992 to May 1993, using the General Electric Signa 1.5 T system. The three-dimensional time of flight (3D-TOF) and two-dimensional time of flight (2D-TOF) MRA findings of 7 cases (3 unruptured cerebral aneurysms, 2 occlusive vascular diseases, 1 Moya Moya disease and 1 arteriovenous malformation (AVM)) were compared with the findings of conventional angiography. The three cases of small unruptured aneurysms were detected by 3D-TOF MRA, which was considered to be the first choice for the screening of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. For the occlusive vascular diseases, 2D and 3D-TOF MRA were used to detect severe stenotic vessels. For the infant with Moya Moya disease, MRA was the best diagnostic modality. The abnormal vessels of the AVM were well visualized by using 3D-TOF MRA. Thus, MRA has an important value in noninvasive diagnostic and screening methods of intracranial vascular lesions. (author)

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  11. Standard magnetic resonance imaging is inadequate for patients with refractory focal epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    von Oertzen, J; Urbach, H; Jungbluth, S; Kurthen, M.; Reuber, M; Fernandez, G.; Elger, C.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with intractable epilepsy may benefit from epilepsy surgery especially if they have a radiologically demonstrable cerebral lesion. Dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols as performed at epilepsy surgery centres can detect epileptogenic abnormalities with great sensitivity and specificity. However, many patients with epilepsy are investigated with standard MRI sequences by radiologist outside epilepsy centres ("non-experts"). This study was undertaken to comp...

  12. Bioenergetic Measurements in Children with Bipolar Disorder: A Pilot 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sikoglu, Elif M.; J. Eric Jensen; Gordana Vitaliano; Liso Navarro, Ana A; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jean A. Frazier; Moore, Constance M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research exploring Bipolar Disorder (BD) phenotypes and mitochondrial dysfunction, particularly in younger subjects, has been insufficient to date. Previous studies have found abnormal cerebral pH levels in adults with BD, which may be directly linked to abnormal mitochondrial activity. To date no such studies have been reported in children with BD. Methods: Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (\\(^{31}\\)P MRS) was used to determine pH, phopshocreatine (PCr) and inorganic ph...

  13. Increased blood–brain barrier permeability in type II diabetes demonstrated by gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Starr, J; Wardlaw, J; Ferguson, K; MacLullich, A; Deary, I; Marshall, I

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with type II diabetes are at increased risk of cognitive impairment. The retinal and renal complications of diabetes follow microvascular damage permitting small arterioles to leak, hence the cerebral damage might also follow loss of blood–brain barrier (BBB) integrity. Magnetic resonance (MR) brain imaging with intravenous gadolinium (Gd) diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was used to identify increased BBB permeability.

  14. Physics of Magnetic Resonance. Chapter 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), a property of nuclei in a magnetic field where they are able to absorb applied radiofrequency (RF) energy and subsequently release it at a specific frequency, goes back many decades to the early 1900s. Physicist Isidor I. Rabi, fascinated by the work of Otto Stern and Walther Gerlach which demonstrated that particles have intrinsic quantum properties, delved into the magnetic properties of nuclei, and in 1938 Rabi discovered the phenomenon of NMR. Several years later, in 1946, Felix Bloch and Edward Purcell refined the methods and successfully measured the NMR signal from liquids and solids. For their discoveries, Rabi received the Nobel Prize for physics in 1944 and Bloch and Purcell in 1952. While Rabi, Bloch, Purcell and other physicists working in this field had laid the foundations, a major discovery that transformed the NMR phenomenon for imaging was not made until 1973, when Paul Lauterbur developed a method for spatially encoding the NMR signal by utilizing linear magnetic field gradients. About the same time, Peter Mansfield had also discovered a means of determining the spatial structure of solids by introducing a linear gradient across the object. The idea of applying magnetic field gradients to induce spatially varying resonance frequencies to resolve the spatial distribution of magnetization was a major milestone and the beginning of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For their work, Lauterbur and Mansfield were awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine in 2003. Since its discovery, MRI has quickly become one of the most important medical imaging devices available to physicians today. Unlike other imaging modalities, such as X ray and computed tomography, MRI does not involve ionizing radiation. MRI also offers superior soft tissue contrast that is not possible with other imaging modalities. Furthermore, in MRI, the desired level of image contrast among different tissues can often be precisely controlled

  15. 21 CFR 892.1000 - Magnetic resonance diagnostic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. 892.1000... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1000 Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. (a) Identification. A magnetic resonance diagnostic device is intended for general diagnostic...

  16. Soft x-ray resonant magnetic diffraction.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkins, S. B.; Hatton, P. D.; Roper, M.D.; Prabhakaran, D.; Boothroyd, A. T.

    2003-01-01

    We have conducted the first soft x-ray diffraction experiments from a bulk single crystal, studying the bilayer manganite La22xSr12xMn2O7 with x 0:475 in which we were able to access the (002) Bragg reflection using soft x rays. The Bragg reflection displays a strong resonant enhancement at the LIII and LII manganese absorption edges. We demonstrate that the resonant enhancement of the magnetic diffraction of the (001) is extremely large, indeed so large that it exceeds that of t...

  17. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance contains three articles which review quite fundamentally different aspects of coherent spectroscopy. An enormous variety of effects can be observed when optical and spin resonances are coupled, usually by a combination of radio frequency and laser irradiation. The first article reviews these effects and pays particular attention to developing a theoretical framework which is as similar as possible for the optical and spin cases. Subsequent articles examine deuterium relaxation in molecular solids, and the spatiotemporal growth of multiple spin coheren

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... and predicting the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  19. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in Malformations of Cortical Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widjaja, ED.; Wilkinson, I.D.; Griffiths, P.D. [Academic Section of Radiolog y, Univ. of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    Background: Malformations of cortical development vary in neuronal maturity and level of functioning. Purpose: To characterize regional relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and difference in first moment transit time (TTfm) in polymicrogyria and cortical tubers using magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging. Material and Methods: MR imaging and dynamic T2*-weighted MR perfusion imaging were performed in 13 patients with tuberous sclerosis complex, 10 with polymicrogyria, and 18 controls with developmental delay but no macroscopic brain abnormality. Regions of interest were placed in cortical tubers or polymicrogyric cortex and in the contralateral normal-appearing side in patients with malformations. In 'control' subjects, regions of interest were placed in the frontal and parietal lobes in both hemispheres. The rCBV and TTfm of the tuber/contralateral side (rCBVRTSC and TTFMTSC) as well as those of the polymicrogyria/contralateral side (rCBVRPMG and TTFMPMG) were assessed. The right-to-left asymmetry of rCBV and TTfm in the control group was also assessed (rCBVRControls and TTFMControls). Results: There was no significant asymmetry between right and left rCBV or TTfm (P>0.05) in controls. There was significant reduction in rCBVRTSC compared to rCBVRControls (P<0.05), but no significant difference in TTFMTSC compared to TTFMControls (P>0.05). There were no significant differences between rCBVRPMG and rCBVRControls (P>0.05) or TTFMPMG and TTFMControls (P>0.05). Conclusion: Our findings imply that cerebral blood volume of polymicrogyria is similar to normal cortex, but there is reduced cerebral blood volume in cortical tubers. The lower rCBV ratio of cortical tubers may be related to known differences in pathogenetic timing of the underlying abnormalities during brain development or the presence of gliosis.

  20. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10-3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  1. Modeling the diffusion magnetic resonance imaging signal inside neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bloch-Torrey partial differential equation (PDE) describes the complex transverse water proton magnetization due to diffusion-encoding magnetic field gradient pulses. The integral of the solution of this PDE yields the diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) signal. In a complex medium such as cerebral tissue, it is difficult to explicitly link the dMRI signal to biological parameters such as the cellular geometry or the cellular volume fraction. Studying the dMRI signal arising from a single neuron can provide insight into how the geometrical structure of neurons influences the measured signal. We formulate the Bloch-Torrey PDE inside a single neuron, under no water exchange condition with the extracellular space, and show how to reduce the 3D simulation in the full neuron to a 3D simulation around the soma and 1D simulations in the neurites. We show that this latter approach is computationally much faster than full 3D simulation and still gives accurate results over a wide range of diffusion times

  2. Thin layer and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of this text, magnetometers with sensitive elements in the form of thin cylindrical ferromagnetic layers are described. These layers are anisotropic, uniaxial, C orientated and single domains. In the second part of the text, the principles of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer realized at the LETI are presented. This instrument is accurate, of high efficiency, and isotropic. Very small variations in magnetic field intensity (10-7 oersteds) can be detected with a 1Hz pass band at zero frequency

  3. High speed functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, A M

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated by reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to October 2001. This thesis documents the implementation and application of a novel high-speed imaging technique, the multi-slice, echo shifted, echo planar imaging technique. This was implemented on the Nottingham 3 T imaging system, for functional magnetic resonance imaging. The technique uses echo shifting over the slices in a multi-slice echo planar imaging acquisition scheme, making the echo time longer than the repetition time per slice. This allows for rapid volumar sampling of the blood oxygen level dependent effect in the human brain. The new high-speed technique was used to investigate the variability of measuring the timing differences between haemodynamic responses, at the same cortical location, to simple cued motor tasks. The technique was also used in an investigation into motor cortex functional connect...

  4. Magnetic resonance tomography of the penis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic resonance tomogram visualises the corpus spongiosum, the corpora cavernosa, the fascia penis profunda, the septum and the dorsal vein of the penis. These structures can be separated from the skin and from the glans penis. Changes of shape are still the essential criteria of assessment. At present it does not seem possible to be able to differentiate between diseased and healthy area if the connective tissue structures of the penis (e.g. in induratio penis plastica) do not show any change of shape. Compared with other imaging methods, imaging on different levels offers advantages, and so does the simultaneous imaging of the structures of the penis, of its environment and of the adjacent organs. We can assume that the magnetic resonance tomogram will supply essential additional information for clinical diagnosis and practice in conditions like induratio penis plastica, intersexuality, tumours of the prostate gland, and in postoperative follow-up, for example after surgery for priapism. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of tuberculous spinal infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of 15 cases of tuberculous (TB) spinal infection were reviewed. The commonest site was the lumbar spine (53.3%) often with three or more contiguous vertebrae involved (47%). Destruction of the vertebral body and the presence of paraspinal soft-tissue masses were noted in 73.3%. Posterior element abnormalities, which is a significant finding, were seen in 40%, a slightly lower incidence rate than in other reported series. Epidural disease (53.3%) and disc abnormalities (73%) were more frequent than was realized. The role of intravenous contrast is discussed. Intravenous gadolinium is useful because it increases diagnostic confidence by characterizing and delineating the disease process, detects reactivation in old and healed TB, helps in treatment management and may prove valuable in monitoring therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging should be considered to be the imaging modality of choice for patients with suspected tuberculous spinal infection. 17 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  6. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavieille, J.; Amalric, R.; Stanoyevitch, J.F.; Hopf, M.A.; Antipoff, G.M.; Roux, H.

    1986-11-01

    The authors report their experience with magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology, established on more than 250 examinations. The method seems interesting for the study of discal and somatic spine diseases, and especially for the evaluation of tumor extension, the diagnosis of herniated disc, the diagnosis of spondylodiscitis, the exploration of the cervico-occipital joint. As compared to tomodensitometry, this method presents at the same time advantages and drawbacks. Peripherally, magnetic resonance imaging is useful for the exploration of bony tumors and evaluation of their extension. It gives excellent images of the knees and the hips where it seems to improve the results of tomodensitometry and bony scintigraphy in the diagnosis of osteonecrosis. It is likely that advances will broaden the scope of the indications and capabilities of this method.

  7. Quality assurance in magnetic resonance spectroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic clinical evaluation of metabolic changes in the human body has distinct advantages over Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), CT and Nuclear Medicine, as it allows early detection of disease and monitoring of therapeutic processes through repeated procedures. To ensure reliable and reproducible results for spectroscopic examinations, the quality of MRS system should be controlled. Apart from the instrumental contribution in spectroscopic examinations, there are number of other variables such as tissue state and patient motion, severely affecting the image quality. The subject and instrumental contributions to the spectrum are closely related in MRS than in rest of medical imaging. Instrumental contribution in the quality of spectrum has been measured and presented

  8. Caroli's disease: magnetic resonance imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to describe the main aspects of MR imaging in Caroli's disease. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study was performed in nine patients with Caroli's disease. Bile duct abnormalities, lithiasis, dot signs, hepatic enhancement, renal abnormalities, and evidence of portal hypertension were evaluated. Three MR imaging patterns of Caroli's disease were found. In all but two patients, MR imaging findings were sufficient to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, MR imaging provided information about the severity, location, and extent of liver involvement. This information was useful in planning the best therapeutic strategy. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study is a good screening tool for Caroli's disease. Direct cholangiography should be reserved for confirming doubtful cases. (orig.)

  9. Female pelvic anatomy: magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of magnetic resonance imaging was evaluated in this study. Conventional imaging methods like sonography and X-ray computerised tomography generally provide accurate data. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be very suitable for studying the pelvis because it has the capacity to produce direct multidirectional images. By recording alterations in T1 and T2 values, it provides a wide range of information. A 1.5 T imaging system was used. Pulse sequences used always included T1 and T2 weighted spin-echo scans. The T2 scan was performed in the best plane for the organ of interest. The comparison between these different acquisitions provides good tissue differentiation. Results of 73 studies are exposed

  10. Antiferromagnetic resonance excitation by terahertz magnetic field resonantly enhanced with split ring resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excitation of antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) in a HoFeO3 crystal combined with a split ring resonator (SRR) is studied using terahertz (THz) electromagnetic pulses. The magnetic field in the vicinity of the SRR is induced by the incident THz electric field component and excites spin oscillations that correspond to the AFMR, which are directly probed by the Faraday rotation of the polarization of a near-infrared probe pulse. The good agreement of the temperature-dependent magnetization dynamics with the calculation using the two-lattice Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation confirms that the AFMR is excited by the THz magnetic field, which is enhanced at the SRR resonance frequency by a factor of 20 compared to the incident magnetic field.

  11. [Magnetic resonance in AIDS-related encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi, G F; Di Biasi, C; D'Agostino, A; Trasimeni, G; Melone, A

    1995-12-01

    Fifty-eight patients with AIDS disease were studied with MR imaging in the aim of detecting the grade of brain involvement. The examinations were performed with a 1.5 Tesla magnet. Thirty-seven showed white matter lesion (63.5%), twenty-five patients showed cerebral atrophy (43%), in eight patients the MR appearance was consistent with toxoplasmosis infection (13.5%), two patients showed a linfoma (3.4%) and two patients micrococcosis (3.4%). Seventeen out of the thirty-seven patients with white matter disease showed focal well circumscribed lesion (46%), while twenty showed diffuse involvement. Between the twenty-five patients with cerebral atrophy, twelve showed a prevalence of the cortical involvement and eight a subcortical atrophy. In five patients a concomitant, cortical and subcortical atrophy was found. Between the eight patients with neurotoxolesion and two of them a widespread encephalitis picture. The MR appearance of the two limphomas was that of periventricular, space occupying, masses. In two patients with micrococcis a nodular aspect of leptomeningeal lesions was found. PMID:8681504

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear magnetic resonance techniis described that allows simultaneous temperature determination and spectral acquisition. The technique employs a modification of the lock circuit of a varian xl-100 spectrometer which permits accurate measurement of the difference in resonance frequency between a primary lock nucleus and another , secondary, nucleus. The field stabilization function of the main lock circuit is not compromised. A feedback signal having a frequency equal to the frequency difference is substituted for the normal power supply in the spectrometer's existing radio frequency transmitter to modulate that transmitter. Thus, the transmitter's radio frequency signal is enhanced in a frequency corresponding to the resonance peak of the secondary nucleus. Determination of the frequency difference allows the determination of temperature without interference with the observed spectrum. The feedback character of the circuit and the presence of noise make the circuit self-activating

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging for acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is characterized by acute chemical injury of the pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissue. The increased frequency of death in acute pancreatitis is directly correlated with the degree and progress of pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, the occurrence of some local complications in acute pancreatitis, such as pancreatic hemorrhage, peripancreatic abscess or large pseudocyst, and pseudoaneurysm, could influence the choice of treatment for these patients. Magnetic resonance...

  14. Methods for interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Vahala, Erkki

    2002-01-01

    This thesis has as its central aim to demonstrate, develop, discuss and promote new methods and technology for improving interventional low field magnetic resonance imaging. The work addresses problems related to accurate localization of minimally invasive surgical tools by describing novel devices and improvements to prior art techniques, such as optical tracking. In addition to instrument guidance, ablative treatment of liver tumours is discussed in connection with low field temperature mea...

  15. Modelling Strategies for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Sidaros, Karam; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis collects research done on several models for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging (fMRI) data. Several extensions for unsupervised factor analysis type decompositions including explicit delay modelling as well as handling of spatial and temporal smoothness and generalisations to higher order arrays are considered. Additionally, an application of the natural conjugate prior for supervised learning in the general linear model to efficiently incorporate prior in...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up ...

  17. Magnetic resonance in diagnosis of ureterocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Humberto do; Hachul, Mauricio; Macedo Junior, Antonio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Div. de Urologia]. E-mail: humbertojr1@aol.com

    2003-05-15

    Ultrasonography is the main non-invasive technique for screening of ureterocele, but presents some difficulties for its diagnosis. Other supplementary diagnostic methods have the disadvantage of being invasive or using ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) has a high sensitivity for diagnosing urinary tract malformations in adults and children. We report one case of ureterocele in a 1-year old child with the purpose of presenting its diagnosis through MR. (author)

  18. Magnetic resonance in diagnosis of ureterocele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonography is the main non-invasive technique for screening of ureterocele, but presents some difficulties for its diagnosis. Other supplementary diagnostic methods have the disadvantage of being invasive or using ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) has a high sensitivity for diagnosing urinary tract malformations in adults and children. We report one case of ureterocele in a 1-year old child with the purpose of presenting its diagnosis through MR. (author)

  19. Fundamental physics of magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafana, T

    1988-07-01

    Although similar to computerized tomography, in that cross-sectional images are produced, the physical principles underlying magnetic resonance are entirely different. The MRI process, as commonly implemented, involves the excitation of hydrogen nuclei and the analysis of how these nuclei recover to the original equilibrium steady states that they had prior to excitation. This article discusses that process, that is, preparatory alignment, RF excitation, relaxation and signal measurement, and spatial localization. PMID:3380941

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance in Kondo lattice systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curro, Nicholas J.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has emerged as a vital tool to explore the fundamental physics of Kondo lattice systems. Because nuclear spins experience two different hyperfine couplings to the itinerant conduction electrons and to the local f moments, the Knight shift can probe multiple types of spin correlations that are not accessible via other techniques. The Knight shift provides direct information about the onset of heavy electron coherence and the emergence of the heavy electron fluid.

  1. Relaxation measurements by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial resolution of magnetic resonance imaging can be greatly enhanced by replacing the coil antenna (or cavity) with a scanning force microscope. We describe how this mechanical detection can be applied to the measurement of both the transverse and longitudinal relaxation inside a micron-size volume. The measurement procedure and analysis is detailed for the case of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic spin systems. (authors)

  2. Polyorchidism: Sonographic and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oner, A. Y.; Sahin, C.; Pocan, S.; Kizilkaya, E. [Gazi Univ. School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Polyorchidism is a rare congenital anomaly frequently associated with maldescent testis, hernia, and torsion. Reports in the literature show an increased risk of testicular malignancy in the presence of polyorchidism. This entity has characteristic sonographic features and the diagnosis is often made on the basis of sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging might also be used for the diagnosis, but is more helpful in cases associated with cryptorchism or neoplasia. A conservative approach is the treatment of choice in uncomplicated cases.

  3. Polyorchidism: Sonographic and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyorchidism is a rare congenital anomaly frequently associated with maldescent testis, hernia, and torsion. Reports in the literature show an increased risk of testicular malignancy in the presence of polyorchidism. This entity has characteristic sonographic features and the diagnosis is often made on the basis of sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging might also be used for the diagnosis, but is more helpful in cases associated with cryptorchism or neoplasia. A conservative approach is the treatment of choice in uncomplicated cases

  4. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Huijun; Wang Jinnan; Li Rui; Ferguson Marina S; Kerwin William S; Dong Li; Canton Gador; Hatsukami Thomas S; Yuan Chun

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) of the carotid vessel wall is one promi...

  5. Myocardial tissue tagging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Bluemke David A; Osman Nael F; Cheng Susan; Shehata Monda L; Lima João AC

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is currently the gold standard for assessing both global and regional myocardial function. New tools for quantifying regional function have been recently developed to characterize early myocardial dysfunction in order to improve the identification and management of individuals at risk for heart failure. Of particular interest is CMR myocardial tagging, a non-invasive technique for assessing regional function that provides a detailed and compreh...

  6. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Bradlow William M; R Gibbs J Simon; Mohiaddin Raad H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension represents a group of conditions characterized by higher than normal pulmonary artery pressures. Despite improved treatments, outcomes in many instances remain poor. In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in patients with pulmonary hypertension. This technique offers certain advantages over other imaging modalities since it is well suited to the assessment of the right ventricle and the proximal pu...

  7. Quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance for molecular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lanza Gregory M; Caruthers Shelton D; Winter Patrick M; Wickline Samuel A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) molecular imaging aims to identify and map the expression of important biomarkers on a cellular scale utilizing contrast agents that are specifically targeted to the biochemical signatures of disease and are capable of generating sufficient image contrast. In some cases, the contrast agents may be designed to carry a drug payload or to be sensitive to important physiological factors, such as pH, temperature or oxygenation. In this review, examp...

  8. Noise and filtration in magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    McVeigh, E. R.; Henkelman, R.M.; Bronskill, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Noise in two-dimensional Fourier transform magnetic resonance images has been investigated using noise power spectra and measurements of standard deviation. The measured effects of averaging, spatial filtering, temporal filtering, and sampling have been compared with theoretical calculations. The noise of unfiltered images is found to be white, as expected, and the choice of the temporal filter and sampling interval affects the noise in a manner predicted by sampling theory. The shapes of the...

  9. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choon; Hua; Thng; Tong; San; Koh; David; J; Collins; Dow; Mu; Koh

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies quantify the microcirculatory status of liver parenchyma and liver lesions, and can be used for the detection of liver metastases, assessing the effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapy, evaluating tumor viability after anticancer therapy or ablation, and diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and its severity. In this review, we discuss the basic concepts of perfusion MRI using tracer kinetic modeling, the common kinetic models applied for analyses, the MR scanning t...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Elastography: Inversions in Bounded Media

    OpenAIRE

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P.; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J; Glaser, Kevin J.; Araoz, Philip A; Ehman, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of quantifying and spatially resolving the shear stiffness of soft tissues by visualization of synchronized mechanical wave displacement fields. However, MRE inversions generally assume that the measured tissue motion consists primarily of shear waves propagating in a uniform, infinite medium. This assumption is not valid in organs such as the heart, eye, bladder, skin, fascia, bone and spinal cord in which the s...

  11. "PALPATION BY IMAGING": MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Pei-yi Gao

    2006-01-01

    Elasticity is an important physical property of human tissues.There is a tremendous difference in elasticity between normal and pathological tissues.Noninvasive evaluation of the elasticity of human tissues would be valuable for clinical practice.Magnetic resonance elastography(MRE)is a recently developed noninvasive imaging technique that can directly visualize and quantitatively measure tissue elasticity.This article reviewed the MRE technique and its current status.

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2010-01-01

    The integration of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with cognitive and affective neuroscience paradigms enables examination of the brain systems underlying the behavioral deficits manifested in schizophrenia; there have been a remarkable increase in the number of studies that apply fMRI in neurobiological studies of this disease. This article summarizes features of fMRI methodology and highlights its application in neurobehavioral studies in schizophrenia. Such work has helped elu...

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging - a pictorial review

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Dahya; Spottiswoode, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is a powerful problem-solving tool and arguably offers the most comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function, as well as the opportunity of rebuilding the bridge between cardiologists and radiologists. The role of CMR-trained imaging physicists is also valuable, and many CMR centres harmoniously incorporate these three sub-specialty fields. This paper comprises an overview of several CMR techniques, outlining both the strengths...

  14. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging - a pictorial review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Dahya

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR is a powerful problem-solving tool and arguably offers the most comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function, as well as the opportunity of rebuilding the bridge between cardiologists and radiologists. The role of CMR-trained imaging physicists is also valuable, and many CMR centres harmoniously incorporate these three sub-specialty fields. This paper comprises an overview of several CMR techniques, outlining both the strengths and limitations of the modality.

  15. Applications of Magnetic Resonance in Model Systems: Cancer Therapeutics1

    OpenAIRE

    Evelhoch, Jeffrey L.; Gillies, Robert J; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Koutcher, Jason A; Maxwell, Ross J.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Raghunand, Natarajan; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Ross, Brian D.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2000-01-01

    The lack of information regarding the metabolism and pathophysiology of individual tumors limits, in part, both the development of new anti-cancer therapies and the optimal implementation of currently available treatments. Magnetic resonance [MR, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)] provides a powerful tool to assess many aspects of tumor metabolism and pathophysiology. Moreover, since this information ca...

  16. SQUID-detected magnetic resonance imaging in microtesla magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe studies of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of liquid samples at room temperature in microtesla magnetic fields. The nuclear spins are prepolarized in a strong transient field. The magnetic signals generated by the precessing spins, which range in frequency from tens of Hz to several kHz, are detected by a low-transition temperature dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) coupled to an untuned, superconducting flux transformer configured as an axial gradiometer. The combination of prepolarization and frequency-independent detector sensitivity results in a high signal-to-noise ratio and high spectral resolution (∼1 Hz) even in grossly inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In the NMR experiments, the high spectral resolution enables us to detect the 10-Hz splitting of the spectrum of protons due to their scalar coupling to a 31P nucleus. Furthermore, the broadband detection scheme combined with a non-resonant field-reversal spin echo allows the simultaneous observation of signals from protons and 31P nuclei, even though their NMR resonance frequencies differ by a factor of 2.5. We extend our methodology to MRI in microtesla fields, where the high spectral resolution translates into high spatial resolution. We demonstrate two-dimensional images of a mineral oil phantom and slices of peppers, with a spatial resolution of about 1 mm. We also image an intact pepper using slice selection, again with 1-mm resolution. In further experiments we demonstrate T1-contrast imaging of a water phantom, some parts of which were doped with a paramagnetic salt to reduce the longitudinal relaxation time T1. Possible applications of this MRI technique include screening for tumors and integration with existing multichannel SQUID systems for brain imaging

  17. Relationships of magnetic resonance imaging characters and clinic presentations of children cerebral palsy%儿童脑性瘫痪MRI特征与临床表现的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莹; 王海宝; 余永强; 徐丽艳; 陈玉萍

    2014-01-01

    目的通过分析脑性瘫痪( CP)患儿磁共振表现与其类型、粗大运动功能分级( GMFCS)及出生胎龄的关系,探讨MRI在小儿CP临床诊断中的价值。方法收集143例CP患儿的临床和MRI资料,回顾性分析其间相关性。结果MRI表现为室周白质损伤(PWMI)52例,弥漫性脑损伤31例,脑发育异常19例,局灶性脑血管意外11例,正常24例,无法分类性病变6例。不同类型MRI表现的GMFCS分布差异有统计学意义(χ2=87.974,P =0.000, Fisher 精确检验)。 PWMI的患儿中,早产儿多见,且主要为双瘫及偏瘫, GMFCSⅠ~Ⅲ级较多。弥漫性脑损伤中,四肢瘫及不随意运动型常见,GMFCS多为重度障碍。脑发育异常及局灶性脑血管意外足月儿多见,GMFCS显示为前者重度障碍多见,后者轻度障碍多见。结论 CP患儿MRI表现与CP类型、GM-FCS、出生胎龄有密切关系,对CP的早期诊断及预后评估有重要价值。%Objective To explore the valuation of MRI in clinic diagnosis of children cerebral palsy( CP) by tes-ting relationships between types of CP, gross motor function( GMFCS) ,gestational age at birth and MRI findings of the brain. Methods The clinic and MRI data were collected and their correlations were analyzed. Results A-mong 143 cases of cerebral palsy,52 cases were periventricular white matter injury( PWMI) ,31 cases were diffusive encephalopathy,19 cases were brain malformations,11 cases were focal cerebral vascular accident,24 cases were normal and 6 cases were unclassifiable. Distributions of GMFCS were significantly different among various neuroim-aging findings(χ2 =87.974,P=0.000,Fisher exact test). For PWMI, preterm infants were mainly involved with spastic diplegia or spastic hemiplegia, and GMFCS levels wereⅠ~Ⅲ. Diffusive encephalopathy was most com-monly shown in dyskinetic CP and spastic quadriplegia,and GMFCS levels were Ⅳ~Ⅴ. Brain malformations and focal cerebral vascular accident were common in term infant

  18. Electro-mechanical resonant magnetic field sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor, which is termed as an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore, a high Q fundamental mode of frequency f1. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type by using for the elastic element, a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light-emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001 G for an applied magnetic field of ∼1 G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of ∼10-100 by a more sensitive measurement of the elastic element motion and by having the element in vacuum to reduce the drag force

  19. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy in malformations of cortical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celi Santos Andrade

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Malformations of cortical development (MCD result from disruptions in the dynamic process of cerebral corticogenesis and are important causes of epilepsy, motor deficits and cognitive impairment. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate phospholipids metabolism in vivo in a series of patients with epilepsy and MCD. Methods Thirty-seven patients with MCD and 31 control subjects were studied using three-dimensional phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS at a 3.0 T scanner. Quantification methods were applied to the following resonances: phosphoethanolamine (PE, phosphocholine (PC, glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE, glycerophosphocholine (GPC, inorganic phosphate (Pi, phosphocreatine (PCr, and a-, b-, and g-adenosine triphosphate (ATP. The magnesium (Mg2+ levels and pH were calculated based on PCr, Pi and b-ATP chemical shifts. Results Compared to controls, the MCD lesions exhibited lower pH values and higher Mg2+ levels (p<0.05. The lesions also presented significant reduction of GPC and PDE, and an increased PME/PDE ratio. The otherwise normal appearing parenchyma also demonstrated lower pH values in the frontoparietal cortex and bilateral centrum semiovale. Conclusions Our data support the idea that metabolic impairments occur in the lesions of MCD, with propagation to remote normal appearing parenchyma. The results also suggest that there are membrane turnover disturbances in MCD lesions.

  20. First national meeting of magnetic resonance and hyperfine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Works performed at CNEA's: Magnetic Resonance Division; Moessbauer Spectroscopy; Solid State Physics Division; Nuclear magnetic Resonance Laboratory and Theoretical Physics Group; Mossbauer Spectroscopy Group; Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance; Physics and Materials Group; Perturbed Angular Correlation and Moessbauer Spectroscopy and Physics Department. (M.E.L.)

  1. Cerebral Metabolic Alterations in Rats With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, Nicole; Yuen, Natalie; Anderson, Steven E; Tancredi, Daniel J.; O'Donnell, Martha E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cerebral edema is a life-threatening complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children. Recent data suggest that cerebral hypoperfusion and activation of cerebral ion transporters may be involved, but data describing cerebral metabolic alterations during DKA are lacking. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We evaluated 50 juvenile rats with DKA and 21 normal control rats using proton and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). MRS measured cerebral intracellular pH and ratio...

  2. Magnetic stimulation of muscle evokes cerebral potentials in assessment of paraspinal muscle spasm.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Objectlve: To assess the muscle spasm by magnetic stimulation of muscle evokes cerebral potentials (MMSEP). Methods: Paraspinal MMSEP and function assessment was recorded in detail before and after treat-

  3. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca eLizarbe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI, Blood oxygenation level dependent contrast (BOLD and Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI have revealed Mn2+accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks, becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging method based on the detecting signal from hydrogen nuclei of water molecules and fat. Performances of MRI are continuously increasing, and its domains of investigation of the human body are growing in both morphological and functional study. MRI also allows It also performing advanced management of tumours especially in the brain, by combining anatomical information (morphological MRI), functional (diffusion, perfusion and BOLD contrast) and metabolic (tissue composition in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). The MRI techniques have an important role in cancerology. These techniques allow essential information for the diagnosis and answering therapist's questions before, during or after the treatment. The MR allows clarifying the localization of expanding processes, the differential diagnosis between brain tumour and a lesion confined by another structural aspect, the diagnosis of the tumoral aspect of a lesion, the histological ranking in case of glial tumour and the extension of its localization as well as the therapeutic follow-up (pre-therapeutic and post-therapeutics assessments). A better combination between the morphological, functional and metabolic studies, as well as integrating new technical developments, especially while using a multichannel bird cage coils the 3T magnet and suitable computing software, would allow significant improvements of the exploration strategies and management of brain tumors.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging. Handbook and atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a diagnostic imaging tool relies on the generation of magnetic fields, whereas the computerized tomography (CT) uses X-radiation. The fundamental principle of MRI is the magnetic resonance of paramagnetic atomic nuclei. These nuclei, as e.g. protons (= hydrogen nuclei), are aligned in required orientation by application of a strong magnetic field. Upon simultaneous application of an electromagnetic high-frequency field perpendicular to the axis of the basic magnetic field, and in response to periodical changing of the electromagnetic field at a given frequency, the originally aligned paramagnetic nuclei are forced into a movement similar to that of a ''whipping top''. When the resonance frequency is shut off, the nuclei return to their former, aligned positions, inducing a weak signal in a coil. The series of signals generated by multiple repetition of this process of excitation of nuclei and their return to aligned rest is used as input to a specific computer for computing the 3D image. Thus images can be generated of the target body area from different angles and in different planes by varying the magnetic fields applied. Other than with the CT method, imaging of the various selected planes with MRI must not be done consecutively but is done in one scanning run (for a set of images of about 20 planes). The signal that is received by the coil is determined by the proton density in the volume compartment scanned, and by the relaxation times T1 and T2, which are the times needed by the nuclei to return to aligned rest. The relaxation times in turn are determined by the bonding states of the molecules and thus yield the significant information describing the actual physical and chemical properties of the body tissues scanned. So MRI yields sectional or ''sliced'' images of the body region of interest, as well as information describing tissue type and properties. Today, almost exclusively protons are used for MRI, as hydrogen is a

  6. Nanodiamond graphitization: a magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the high-temperature nanodiamond-to-onion transformation. 1H, 13C NMR and EPR spectra of the initial nanodiamond samples and those annealed at 600, 700, 800 and 1800 ° C were measured. For the samples annealed at 600 to 800 ° C, our NMR data reveal the early stages of the surface modification, as well as a progressive increase in sp2 carbon content with increased annealing temperature. Such quantitative experimental data were recorded for the first time. These findings correlate with EPR data on the sensitivity of the dangling bond EPR line width to air content, progressing with rising annealing temperature, that evidences consequent graphitization of the external layers of the diamond core. The sample annealed at 1800 ° C shows complete conversion of nanodiamond particles into carbon onions. (paper)

  7. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzaro, Nicolas; Ruchotzke, William; Belding, Amanda; Cardellino, Jeremy; Blomberg, Erick; McCullian, Brendan; Bhallamudi, Vidya; Pelekhov, Denis; Hammel, P. Chris

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) membranes are commercially-available, versatile structures that have a variety of applications. Although most commonly used as the support structure for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies, membranes are also ultrasensitive high-frequency mechanical oscillators. The sensitivity stems from the high quality factor Q 106 , which has led to applications in sensitive quantum optomechanical experiments. The high sensitivity also opens the door to ultrasensitive force detection applications. We report force detection of electron spin magnetic resonance at 300 K using a Si3N4 membrane with a force sensitivity of 4 fN/√{ Hz}, and a potential low temperature sensitivity of 25 aN/√{ Hz}. Given membranes' sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiN membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument that has superior spatial resolution to conventional NMR.

  8. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed

  9. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY... the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and approaches to mitigate risks. The overall goal is...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic...

  10. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep S Hedgire

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, prostate cancer has an incidence rate of 3.9 per 100,000 men and is responsible for 9% of cancer-related mortality. It is the only malignancy that is diagnosed with an apparently blind technique, i.e., transrectal sextant biopsy. With increasing numbers of high-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI equipment being installed in India, the radiologist needs to be cognizant about endorectal MRI and multiparametric imaging for prostate cancer. In this review article, we aim to highlight the utility of multiparamteric MRI in prostate cancer. It plays a crucial role, mainly in initial staging, restaging, and post-treatment follow-up.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory, quadrennial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This quadrennial report of the nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory gives an overview of the main activities. Among the different described activities, only one is interesting for the INIS database: it concerns the Solid NMR of cements used for radioactive wastes storage. In this case, the NMR is used to characterize the structure of the material and the composition, structure and kinetics of formation of the alteration layer which is formed at the surface of concrete during water leaching conditions. The NMR methodology is given. (O.M.)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric airway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the pediatric airway is often complex and may require multiple imaging techniques and invasive procedures. We performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the airway in 34 children with clinical evidence of chronic airway obstruction and compared MR findings with those obtained by surgery and/or endoscopy. MR diagnoses included vascular compression in 15 patients, primary tracheomalacic states in 12 patients, and mediastinal masses in 4 patients. Findings were normal for 3 patients. The MR findings were in agreement with the endoscopic findings in 25 to 28 cases and in agreement with the surgical findings in 21 to 21 cases. (orig./GDG)

  13. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has become an important tool to study in vivo certain biochemical aspects of brain disorders. In the last decade this technique has been applied to the in vivo investigation of pathophysiological aspects of psychiatric disorders, extending knowledge of the related brain alterations. This review will focus on providing some background to clarify technical and biochemical issues and it will describe the studies that have been performed in schizophrenia. The results will be framed in a more general context to highlight what we have learned and what remains to be understood from the application of this technique to schizophrenia

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance in clinical cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas; Kumar; Rodrigo; Bagur

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, cardiac magnetic resonance(CMR) has transformed from a research tool to a widely used diagnostic method in clinical cardiology. This method can now make useful, unique contributions to the work-up of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Advantages of CMR, compared to other imaging methods, include very high resolution imaging with a spatial resolution up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm in plane, a large array of different imaging sequences to provide in vivo tissue characterization, and radiationfree imaging. The present manuscript highlights the relevance of CMR in the current clinical practice and new perspectives in cardiology.

  16. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd;

    2011-01-01

    Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings o...... and selling a common product. Results reveal a significantly stronger activation in the amygdala while consumers estimate selling prices versus buying prices, suggesting that loss aversion is associated with the processing of negative emotion. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  17. Magnetic resonance aspects in ulnar styloid nonunion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulnar syloid process nonunion fractures are common, although isolated fractures may not be recognized and become a persistent wrist pain. Most time the fractures are asymptomatic. It is important , in symptomatic patients, the characterization of the lesion and the commitment of other structures that compose distal radio-ulnar joint for proper treatment. The classification is based on radio-ulnar joint stability. We report wrist magnetic resonance images from two patients, each one with one type of nonunion classification, which is based in anatomic findings and treatment options. (author)

  18. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe the method of 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neuroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Murata, Hideaki; Ito, Haruhide; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kadoya, Masumi; Suzuki, Masayuki.

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen patients with acoustic neuroma were studied on a 1.5T superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Acoustic neuromas appeared as lower signal intensity than the surrounding brain stem on T1 weighted image (W.I.), and as higher signal intensity on T2 W.I.. Axial and coronal sections of T1 W.I. were very useful in observing the tumor in the auditory canal and in investigating the anatomical relations of the tumor and the surrounding structures. MR imaging is very excellent examination to make early diagnosis of the acoustic neuroma and preoperative anatomical evaluation.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of cystic ovarian tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied 48 cases of cystic ovarian tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with 0.15 T resistive system and examined the ability of qualitative diagnosis by means of signal intensities and caluculated T1 values. MRI supposed to discriminate among various kinds of cystic ovarian tumors in most cases, especially dermoid cysts, endometrial cysts and cystadenomas. MRI has lots of merits which other imaging methods cannot offer, though it takes a long scan time and high cost at the present time. It plays an important role in the diagnosis of cystic ovarian tumors. (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in Kimura's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although early diagnosis of Kimura's disease, a rare chronic inflammatory disorder most commonly presenting with asymmetric swelling in the head and neck region, is helpful in avoiding unnecessary diagnostic tests and starting prompt treatment, only a few reports emphasized radiological findings in detail. Magnetic resonance imaging findings showing the infiltrative nature of the disease and diffuse loss of fat tissue even in nonpalpable normally appearing regions of the head and neck in a young man with Kimura's disease are presented in this report. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chosa, Hirofumi; Yamano, Kouichirou; Ihara, Fumitoshi; Ueda, Yoshiaki; Maekawa, Masayuki; Tokuhisa, Ginichirou; Kuwano, Tadashi; Kamo, Yoshi; Nomura, Shigeharu (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Forty-three patients operated for cervical myelopathy were examined with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cord compression was demonstrated directly on the sagittal image in cases of cervical disc herniation, cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. Herniated disc material was seen positive on axial image. But factors of cord compression in cases of cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. were not clearly confirmed, so additional examinations such as myelogram, tomogram and CT was needed. (author).

  3. Magnetic Resonance Signal Processing in Medical Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulka, J.; Gescheidtová, E.; Bartušek, Karel

    Saint Gilles: IARIA, 2012, s. 148-153. ISBN 978-1-61208-184-7. [GlobeNet 2012: ICN 2012, ICONS 2012, VisGra 2012, DBKDA 2012. Saint Gilles (RE), 29.02.2012-05.03.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR GAP102/11/0318 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : magnetic resonance * biomedical image processing * image segmentation * level set * active countour * edge analysis * noise suppression * volumetry Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  4. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-five magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were performed in 18 patients with proven endometriosis. MRI findings were analyzed and compared with laparoscopic or surgical findings; MRI accurately demonstrated ovarian endometrial cysts as well as ectopic foci of endometriosis. Adhesions may be also suggested. Contrary to laparoscopy, MRI easily depicts both deep lesions and endometrial implants under the peritoneum. Consequently, MRI appears as an useful adjunct to laparoscopy for initial diagnosis before starting a medical treatment and above all as the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of the answer to treatment, avoiding iterative and often adhesions limited laparoscopies. (author). 7 refs.; 9 figs

  6. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  7. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodne, D.; Quinn, S.F.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  9. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD project...... regard to optimal sampling strategy for detecting motion in four different anatomies on two different MRI scanner brands. A fully implemented interactive real-time MRI system was exploited in a group of healthy fetuses and proved its eligibility as an alternative diagnostic tool for fetal imaging...

  10. Indications for fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indications to perform fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are composed of common ones related to methodological problems of ultrasound (US) assessment (such as for instance hydramnios) and special ones. The latter are related to MR capability of high-resolution soft tissue contrast and an extended field of view that allows visualization of the whole fetus, even in later stages of pregnancy. The most important indications include confirmation of US findings, work-up of malformations with respect to individual prognosis and genetic background, differentiation between acquired conditions and malformations, visualization of pathologies that have to be treated surgically immediately after birth, and morphological changes of the placenta. (orig.)

  11. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging: methods and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the introduction of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) into prenatal diagnostics, advances in coil technology and development of ultrafast sequences have further enhanced this technique. At present numerous sequences are available to visualize the whole fetus with high resolution and image quality, even in late stages of pregnancy. Taking into consideration the special circumstances of examination and adjusting sequence parameters to gestational age, fetal anatomy can be accurately depicted. The variety of sequences also allows further characterization of fetal tissues and pathologies. Fetal MRI not only supplies additional information to routine ultrasound studies, but also reveals fetal morphology and pathology in a way hitherto not possible. (orig.)

  12. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Liquids and Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper outlines the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance, trying wherever possible to compare and contrast the method with that of slow neutron scattering as a technique for studying the properties of condensed phases and especially of molecular and atomic motions. It is emphasized that this is not a review of nmr for an expert audience but has a pedagogical aim. It is hoped to give persons with a main interest in neutron scattering some appreciation of the scope and limitations of the nmr method. This is illustrated by recent results on one substance which covers many but by no means all of the important points. (author)

  14. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  15. Quantitative evaluation of the changes of brain metabolits in rats with focal cerebral ischemia by using 1H magnetic resonance spectrum%1H磁共振波谱对局灶性脑缺血大鼠脑内代谢物变化的定量评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周仁兰; 谢鹏; 罗天友; 吕发金; 牟君; 王运良

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain metabolic abnormality can be observed after cerebral ischemia.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of biochemical metabolism of rats with focal cerebral ischemia with 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in order to reflect the metabolite abnormalities of rats during cerebral ischemic recovery phase.DESIGN: Randomized controlled study.SETTING: Departments of Neurology and department of Radiology of First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University.MATERIALS: The experiment was conducted at the Radiological Department of First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University from April to July 2004. Totally 24 adult Wistar rats with clean grade were randomly divided into three groups, namely: control group, sham operation group and cerebral ischemia group, with 8 rats in each group.METHODS: The focal cerebral ischemic model was established by occluding the right internal carotid artery in cerebral ischemia group and the filament were just inserted into the internal carotid artery not into the middle cerebral artery in sham operation group, nothing was done except for anesthetizing in the control group. 1H MRS was performed within the area of cerebral infarction and the homologous area of the contralateral hemisphere using 1.5T GE signa Highspeed MRI spectrometer in cerebral ischemic and shamed operation group at the following time point of 30 minutes, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 hours, 3, 7, 15 days, 1 and 2 months after cerebral ischemia, and in the control group at the same time point.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes of lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), choline and creatine in infarct hemisphere and contralateral hemisphere.RESULTS: Totally 24 rats were selected in the study, but two died of anesthesia in sham operation group and four of serious brain edema in cerebral ischemia group, only 18 rats entered the final analysis with 8 in normal control group, 6 in sham operation group and 4 in cerebral isThe marked increase in NAA, choline and

  16. Magnetism and homogenization of micro-resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Kohn, Robert V

    2007-01-01

    Arrays of cylindrical metal micro-resonators embedded in a dielectric matrix were proposed by Pendry, et. al., in 1999 as a means of creating a microscopic structure that exhibits strong bulk magnetic behavior at frequencies not realized in nature. This behavior arises for H-polarized fields in the quasi-static regime, in which the scale of the micro-structure is much smaller than the free-space wavelength of the fields. We carry out both formal and rigorous two-scale homogenization analyses, paying special attention to the appropriate method of averaging, which does not involve the usual cell averages. We show that the effective magnetic and dielectric coefficients obtained by means of such averaging characterize a bulk medium that, to leading order, produces the same scattering data as the micro-structured composite.

  17. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been employed as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to improve sensitivity and accuracy in diagnosis. In addition, these contrast agents are potentially combined with other therapeutic compounds or near infrared bio-imaging (NIR) fluorophores to obtain...... theranostic or dual imaging purposes, respectively. There were two main types of MRI contrast agent that were synthesized during this PhD project including fluorine containing nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles. In regard of fluorine containing nanoparticles, there were two types contrast agent...... cancer cells for cancer diagnosis in MRI. F127-Folate coated SPION were stable in various types of suspension medium for over six months. They could specifically target folate receptor of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo thus enhancing the contrast in MRI T2/T2* weighted images. These are preliminary...

  18. Enhancement of magnetic resonance imaging with metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Slobozhanyuk, A P; Raaijmakers, A J E; Berg, C A T van den; Kozachenko, A V; Dubrovina, I A; Melchakova, I V; Kivshar, Yu S; Belov, P A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the cornerstone technique for diagnostic medicine, biology, and neuroscience. This imaging method is highly innovative, noninvasive and its impact continues to grow. It can be used for measuring changes in the brain after enhanced neural activity, detecting early cancerous cells in tissue, as well as for imaging nanoscale biological structures, and controlling fluid dynamics, and it can be beneficial for cardiovascular imaging. The MRI performance is characterized by a signal-to-noise ratio, however the spatial resolution and image contrast depend strongly on the scanner design. Here, we reveal how to exploit effectively the unique properties of metasurfaces for the substantial improvement of MRI efficiency. We employ a metasurface created by an array of wires placed inside the MRI scanner under an object, and demonstrate a giant enhancement of the magnetic field by means of subwavelength near-field manipulation with the metasurface, thus strongly increasing the scanner sen...

  19. Magnetic Resonance and Brain Function. Approaches from Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade of this millennium, while, on the one hand, the international scientific community has focused with increasing endeavour on the research about the great unknown of the mechanism and the pathologies of the human brain, on the other hand, the NMR community has achieved some important results, which should widely affect, in the future, the possibility of understanding the function and disfunction of the human brain. In the early 1980's, the beginning of the application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to the morphological study of the brain in vivo, has played an extraordinary role, which, since then, placed MRI in a leading position among the methodologies used for investigation and diagnostics of the Central Nervous System. In the 1990s, the objective of finding new means, based on MRI, capable of giving functional and metabolic information, with the highest possible space resolution, drove the scientists towards different approaches. Among these, the first one to generate a breakthrough in the localization of specific cerebral functions was the Blood Oxygen Level Development (BOLD) MRI. A very wide range of applications followed the discovery of BOLD imaging. Still, this method gives an indirect information of the localization of functions, via the variation of oxygen release and deoxyhemoglobin formation. Of course, a high-resolution spatial distribution of the metabolites, crucial to brain function, would give a deeper insight into the occurring processes. This finality is aimed at by the Double Magnetic Resonance methods, which are developing new procedures able to detect some metabolites with increasing sensitivity and resolution. A third new promising approach to functional MRI should derive from the use of hyperpolarized, opens a series of potential applications to the study of brain function

  20. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of dural sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to diagnose dural sinus thrombosis. However, the representative appearance of dural sinus thrombosis on diffusion-weighted MRI has not been established. This study was aimed at determining whether cytotoxic or vasogenic edema is more predominant in the affected cerebral parenchyma and assessing the time courses and prognosis of dural sinus thrombosis lesion. The studies on sixteen patients with dural sinus thrombosis who underwent diffusion-weighted MRI were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnosis was confirmed by digital subtraction angiography in 11 patients and magnetic resonance angiography in five patients. Diffusion-weighted images with echo-planar imaging were obtained using two or three b values, with the highest b value of up to 1,000 s/mm2. A region of interest was placed on an area of abnormal signal intensity to calculate apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). Nine of the 16 patients had lesions with an increased ADC, whereas, three of these nine patients also had lesions with a decreased ADC. Among 11 patients who underwent initial MRI within 7 days of their last episode, eight had lesions with an increased ADC, of whom three had lesions mixed with both decreased and increased ADC areas. Follow-up studies of these three patients revealed the development of hemorrhagic infarction in two and subcortical hemorrhage in one. Vasogenic edema develops more predominantly and earlier in dural sinus thrombosis, though cytotoxic edema was also associated with the pathological changes in the early phase. Decrease of ADC value is presumed to reflect severe pathological conditions and indicate possible future development of infarction or hemorrhage. (orig.)

  1. Plasmon coupling of magnetic resonances in an asymmetric gold semishell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Kong, Yan; Liu, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The generation of magnetic dipole resonances in metallic nanostructures is of great importance for constructing near-zero or even negative refractive index metamaterials. Commonly, planar two-dimensional (2D) split-ring resonators or relevant structures are basic elements of metamaterials. In this work, we introduce a three-dimensional (3D) asymmetric Au semishell composed of two nanocups with a face-to-face geometry and demonstrate two distinct magnetic resonances spontaneously in the visible–near infrared optical wavelength regime. These two magnetic resonances are from constructive and destructive hybridization of magnetic dipoles of individual nanocups in the asymmetric semishell. In contrast, complete cancellation of magnetic dipoles in the symmetric semishell leads to only a pronounced electric mode with near-zero magnetic dipole moment. These 3D asymmetric resonators provide new ways for engineering hybrid resonant modes and ultra-high near-field enhancement for the design of 3D metamaterials.

  2. Hybrid resonant phenomenon in a metamaterial structure with integrated resonant magnetic material

    OpenAIRE

    Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R.; Baena, Juan D.

    2008-01-01

    We explore the hybridization of fundamental material resonances with the artificial resonances of metamaterials. A hybrid structure is presented in the waveguide environment that consists of a resonant magnetic material with a characteristic tuneable gyromagnetic response that is integrated into a complementary split ring resonator (CSRR) metamaterial structure. The combined structure exhibits a distinct hybrid resonance in which each natural resonance of the CSRR is split into a lower and up...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging.

  4. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance In Adults With Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Partington, Sara L.; Valente, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Increasing numbers of adults with congenital heart disease are referred for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Knowledge of the congenital heart anatomy, prior surgical interventions, and the development of an imaging focus for each individual patient plays a crucial role when performing a successful cardiac magnetic resonance imaging examination. The following manuscript focuses on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging considerations of three specific conotruncal congenital heart lesions: tetr...

  5. Imaging cerebral haemorrhage with magnetic induction tomography: numerical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new electromagnetic imaging modality which has the potential to image changes in the electrical conductivity of the brain due to different pathologies. In this study the feasibility of detecting haemorrhagic cerebral stroke with a 16-channel MIT system operating at 10 MHz was investigated. The finite-element method combined with a realistic, multi-layer, head model comprising 12 different tissues, was used for the simulations in the commercial FE package, Comsol Multiphysics. The eddy-current problem was solved and the MIT signals computed for strokes of different volumes occurring at different locations in the brain. The results revealed that a large, peripheral stroke (volume 49 cm3) produced phase changes that would be detectable with our currently achievable instrumentation phase noise level (17 m°) in 70 (27%) of the 256 exciter/sensor channel combinations. However, reconstructed images showed that a lower noise level than this, of 1 m°, was necessary to obtain good visualization of the strokes. The simulated MIT measurements were compared with those from an independent transmission-line-matrix model in order to give confidence in the results

  6. Imaging cerebral haemorrhage with magnetic induction tomography: numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolgharni, M; Ledger, P D; Armitage, D W; Holder, D S; Griffiths, H

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new electromagnetic imaging modality which has the potential to image changes in the electrical conductivity of the brain due to different pathologies. In this study the feasibility of detecting haemorrhagic cerebral stroke with a 16-channel MIT system operating at 10 MHz was investigated. The finite-element method combined with a realistic, multi-layer, head model comprising 12 different tissues, was used for the simulations in the commercial FE package, Comsol Multiphysics. The eddy-current problem was solved and the MIT signals computed for strokes of different volumes occurring at different locations in the brain. The results revealed that a large, peripheral stroke (volume 49 cm(3)) produced phase changes that would be detectable with our currently achievable instrumentation phase noise level (17 m degrees ) in 70 (27%) of the 256 exciter/sensor channel combinations. However, reconstructed images showed that a lower noise level than this, of 1 m degrees , was necessary to obtain good visualization of the strokes. The simulated MIT measurements were compared with those from an independent transmission-line-matrix model in order to give confidence in the results. PMID:19491437

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, P T; Wright, R M; Hanigan, W C

    1989-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 30 patients following spinal injury (SI). Spin-echo sequences and surface coils were used for all patients. Plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomography (CT), and MRI were compared for the delineation of bone, disc, and ligament injury, measurement of sagittal spinal canal diameter and subluxation, epidural hematoma, and spinal cord structure. Myelography or intrathecal contrast-enhanced CT were not performed on any of these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging accurately delineated intraspinal pathology in two of four patients with acute penetrating SI, and was normal in the other two patients. In 16 patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, MRI was superior to CT for visualizing injuries to discs, ligaments, and the spinal cord, while CT was superior to MRI in characterizing bony injury. Computed tomography and MRI provided similar measurements of subluxation in six of six patients and of sagittal spinal canal diameter in three of four patients. In ten patients with chronic SI, MRI demonstrated post-traumatic cysts, myelomalacia, spinal cord edema, and the presence or absence of spinal cord compression. In patients with acute penetrating SI and chronic SI, MRI provided comprehensive clinical information. In patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, the information obtained by MRI complemented the data given by plain radiographs and CT, allowing clinical decisions to be made without the need of invasive imaging modalities. PMID:2711244

  8. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  10. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as an imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental Magnetic Resonance (MR) system with 4 tesla flux density was set up. For that purpose a data acquisition system and RF coils for resonance frequencies up to 170 MHz were developed. Methods for image guided spectroscopy as well as spectroscopic imaging focussing on the nuclei 1H and 13C were developed and tested on volunteers and selected patients. The advantages of the high field strength with respect to spectroscopic studies were demonstrated. Developments of a new fast imaging technique for the acquisition of scout images as well as a method for mapping and displaying the magnetic field inhomogeneity in-vivo represent contributions to the optimisation of the experimental procedure in spectroscopic studies. Investigations on the interaction of RF radiation with the exposed tissue allowed conclusions regarding the applicability of MR methods at high field strengths. Methods for display and processing of multi-dimensional spectroscopic imaging data sets were developed and existing methods for real-time image synthesis were extended. Results achieved in the field of computer aided analysis of MR images comprised new techniques for image background detection, contour detection and automatic image interpretation as well as knowledge bases for textural representation of medical knowledge for diagnosis. (orig.) With 82 refs., 3 tabs., 75 figs

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  12. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical application in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) provides a non-invasive method of studying metabolism in vivo. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) defines neuro chemistry on a regional basis by acquiring a radiofrequency signal with chemical shift from one or many voxels or volumes previously selected on MRI. The tissue's chemical environment determines the frequency of a metabolite peak in an MRS spectrum. Candidates for MRS include: 1H, 31P, 13C, 23Na, 7Li, 19F, 14N, 15N, 17O, 39K The most commonly studied nuclei are 1H and 31P. This lecture is focused on Proton (1H) Spectroscopy. Proton MRS can be added on to conventional MR imaging protocols. It can be used to serially monitor biochemical changes in tumors, stroke, epilepsy, metabolic disorders, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases.The MR spectra do not come labeled with diagnoses. They require interpretation and should always be correlated with the MR images before making a final diagnosis. As a general rule, the single voxel, short TE technique is used to make the initial diagnosis, because the signal-to-noise is high and all metabolites are represented. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are used to further characterize different regions of a mass and to assess brain parenchyma around or adjacent to the mass. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are also used to assess response to therapy and to search for tumor recurrence. Each metabolite appears at a specific ppm, and each one reflects specific cellular and biochemical processes

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging will not replace echocardiography as the simplest and most definitive method of establishing a noninvasive diagnosis in young patients with congenital cardiac malformations, nor will it replace radionuclide angiography for relatively noninvasive detection and quantitation of cardiac shunts. Magnetic resonance imaging is a complementary noninvasive imaging procedure that can answer some questions left in doubt by echocardiography (mainly extracardiac artery and vein assessments) or radionuclide angiography and used as a preferred follow-up imaging method in certain clinical circumstances. In addition, MRI can be a first-line modality for cardiovascular imaging in older patients in whom adequate echo windows are not available. Angiocardiography remains necessary to provide vital physiological data, i.e., chamber pressures, shunt volumes, oxygen saturations, and pulmonary vascular resistance; however, MRI could negate some follow-up catheterizations in appropriate clinical circumstances. High-resolution proton MRI tomography should ultimately permit the accurate evaluation of ventricular volumes, myocardial mass, and the assessment of regional wall motion and ejection fractions. Paramagnetic substances such as manganese ion may ultimately provide a basis for myocardial perfusion imaging. The potential for MRI evaluation of tissue characterization, noninvasive blood-flow measurements, and myocardial metabolism assessment in intriguing and awaits clinical evaluation

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of prostatic cancer is histological. Apart from rectal examination, only imaging techniques allow evaluation of the extension of the cancer. Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with a Magniscan 5000 (Thomson C.G.R., France) apparatus. Three types of sequences were used: a short RT sequence (30/500, a multi-echo sequence with a long RT (40/2500) and echo gradient sequences (12 scans in less than 3 minutes). The MRI study of the pelvis is favoured by the abundance of fat which gives good contrast, spontaneous visualization of the vessels and the presence of the bladder with a high signal for urine in T2. This provides a very good anatomical study in three planes. In prostatic cancer, the study of the long sequence signal reveals heterogeneity of the prostatic signal on the second echo, but this is a non-specific variation. The staging of prostatic cancer is facilitated by scans in three planes. Different examples are presented in relation to various stages of the disease. Three clinical cases demonstrate that Magnetic Resonance may become an important element in the choice of treatment

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  17. General review of magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-28

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing "virtual palpation", MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration. PMID:26834944

  18. Magnetic resonance epidurography with gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe MRI epidurography as a new imaging tool. Five volunteers and one patient were investigated with MR epidurography after injection of 20 ml Gd-DPTA solution (1 : 250/1 ml Gd-DPTA/250 ml normal saline). Magnetic resonance epidurography is possible. With fat-suppression techniques, the contrast between Gd-DPTA solution in the epidural space and surrounding soft tissue proved adequate. Using the multiplanar capability of MRI with MR epidurography coronal and sagittal projections similar to conventional epidurography, axial slices comparable to CT epidurography can be obtained. Magnetic resonance epidurography is superior to conventional and CT epidurography. Presently, due to high costs as compared with conventional and CT epidurography, MRI is not suitable for the routine monitoring of peridural catheters, but it may have a place in the future with decreasing costs for MRI and for the evaluation of patients with spine pathology, especially in describing epidural processes. (orig.) (orig.)

  19. Influence of rotating magnetic field on cerebral infarction volume, cerebral edema and free radicals metabolism after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohong Liu; Zhiqiang Zhang; Lixin Zhang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has shown that magnetic field can improve blood circulation, decrease blood viscosity, inhibit free radicals, affect Ca2+ flow in nerve cells, control inflammatory and immunological reaction, and accelerate nerve cell regeneration. In addition, protective effect of magnetic field, which acts as an iatrophysics, on ischemic brain tissues has been understood gradually.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of rotating magnetic field (RMF) on volume of cerebral infarction,cerebral edema and metabolism of free radicals in rats after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal study.SETTING: Rehabilitation Center of disabled children, Liaoniang; Department of Rehabilitation, the Second Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University; Department of Rehabilitation Physiotherapy, the First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University.MATERIALS: A total of 70 healthy Wistar rats aged 18-20 weeks of both genders were selected and randomly divided into 3 groups: sham operation group with 12 rats, control group with 20 rats and treatment group with 38 rats. The treatment group included 4 time points: immediate reperfusion with 6 ones, 6-hour reperfusion with 20 ones, 12-hour reperfusion with 6 ones and 18-hour reperfusion with 6 rats. Main instruments were detailed as follows: magnetic head of rotating magnetic device was 6 cm in diameter; magnetic induction intensity at the surface of magnetic head was 0.25 T in silence; the maximal magnetic induction intensity was 0.09 T at the phase of rotation; the average rotating speed was 2500 r per minute.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the China Medical University in March 2003. Focal cerebral ischemic animal models were established with modified Longa's method. Operation was the same in the sham operation, but the thread was inserted as 10 mm. Neurologic impairment was assessed with 5-rating method to screen out cases. Those survivals with grade 1 and grade 2 after ischemia for 2

  20. Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance examination of female reproductive tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful method of investigating the relationship between metabolism and function in living tissues. We present evidence that the phosphorus 31 spectra of myometrium and placenta are functions of physiologic state and gestational age. Specific spectroscopic abnormalities are observed in association with disorders of pregnancy and gynecologic diseases. Our results suggest that noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy examinations may sometimes be a useful addition to magnetic resonance imaging examinations, and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biopsy specimens could become a cost-effective method of evaluating certain biochemical abnormalities