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Sample records for cerebellar mossy fibres

  1. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX....... Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon......)-sensitive fast Na(+) spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers...

  2. Quantal transmission at mossy fibre targets in the CA3 region of the rat hippocampus.

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    Lawrence, J Josh; Grinspan, Zachary M; McBain, Chris J

    2004-01-01

    Recent anatomical evidence that inhibitory interneurones receive approximately 10 times more synapses from mossy fibres than do principal neurones (Acsády et al. 1998) has led to the re-examination of the extent to which interneurones are involved in CA3 network excitability. Although many of the anatomical and physiological properties of mossy fibre-CA3 interneurone synapses have been previously described (Acsády et al. 1998; Tóth et al. 2000), an investigation into the quantal nature of transmission at this synapse has not yet been conducted. Here, we employed variance-mean (VM) analysis to compare the release probability, quantal size (q) and number of release sites (n) at mossy fibre target neurones in CA3. At six of seven interneurone synapses in which a high concentration of Ca2+ was experimentally imposed, the variance-mean relationship could be approximated by a parabola. Estimates of n were 1-2, and the weighted release probability in normal Ca2+ conditions ranged from 0.34 to 0.51. At pyramidal cell synapses, the variance-mean relationship approximated a linear relationship, suggesting that release probability was significantly lower. The weighted quantal amplitude was similar at interneurone synapses and pyramidal cell synapses, although the variability in quantal amplitude was larger at interneurone synapses. Mossy fibre transmission at CA3 interneurone synapses can be explained by a lower number of release sites, a broader range of release probabilities, and larger range of quantal amplitudes than at CA3 pyramidal synapses. Finally, quantal events on to interneurones elicited spike transmission, owing in part to the more depolarized membrane potential than pyramidal cells. These results suggest that although mossy fibre synapses on to pyramidal cells are associated with a larger number of release sites per synapse, the higher connectivity, higher initial release probability, and larger relative impact per quantum on to CA3 interneurones generate

  3. Cerebellar cortex granular layer interneurons in the macaque monkey are functionally driven by mossy fiber pathways through net excitation or inhibition.

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    Jean Laurens

    Full Text Available The granular layer is the input layer of the cerebellar cortex. It receives information through mossy fibers, which contact local granular layer interneurons (GLIs and granular layer output neurons (granule cells. GLIs provide one of the first signal processing stages in the cerebellar cortex by exciting or inhibiting granule cells. Despite the importance of this early processing stage for later cerebellar computations, the responses of GLIs and the functional connections of mossy fibers with GLIs in awake animals are poorly understood. Here, we recorded GLIs and mossy fibers in the macaque ventral-paraflocculus (VPFL during oculomotor tasks, providing the first full inventory of GLI responses in the VPFL of awake primates. We found that while mossy fiber responses are characterized by a linear monotonic relationship between firing rate and eye position, GLIs show complex response profiles characterized by "eye position fields" and single or double directional tunings. For the majority of GLIs, prominent features of their responses can be explained by assuming that a single GLI receives inputs from mossy fibers with similar or opposite directional preferences, and that these mossy fiber inputs influence GLI discharge through net excitatory or inhibitory pathways. Importantly, GLIs receiving mossy fiber inputs through these putative excitatory and inhibitory pathways show different firing properties, suggesting that they indeed correspond to two distinct classes of interneurons. We propose a new interpretation of the information flow through the cerebellar cortex granular layer, in which mossy fiber input patterns drive the responses of GLIs not only through excitatory but also through net inhibitory pathways, and that excited and inhibited GLIs can be identified based on their responses and their intrinsic properties.

  4. Up-regulation of GLT-1 severely impairs LTD at mossy fibre--CA3 synapses.

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    Omrani, Azar; Melone, Marcello; Bellesi, Michele; Safiulina, Victoria; Aida, Tomomi; Tanaka, Kohishi; Cherubini, Enrico; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2009-10-01

    Glutamate transporters are responsible for clearing synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space. By this action, they maintain low levels of ambient glutamate, thus preventing excitotoxic damage, and contribute to shaping synaptic currents. We show that up-regulation of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 by ceftriaxone severely impaired mGluR-dependent long-term depression (LTD), induced at rat mossy fibre (MF)-CA3 synapses by repetitive stimulation of afferent fibres. This effect involved GLT-1, since LTD was rescued by the selective GLT-1 antagonist dihydrokainate (DHK). DHK per se produced a modest decrease in fEPSP amplitude that rapidly regained control levels after DHK wash out. Moreover, the degree of fEPSP inhibition induced by the low-affinity glutamate receptor antagonist gamma-DGG was similar during basal synaptic transmission but not during LTD, indicating that in ceftriaxone-treated rats LTD induction did not alter synaptic glutamate transient concentration. Furthermore, ceftriaxone-induced GLT-1 up-regulation significantly reduced the magnitude of LTP at MF-CA3 synapses but not at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. Postembedding immunogold studies in rats showed an increased density of gold particles coding for GLT-1a in astrocytic processes and in mossy fibre terminals; in the latter, gold particles were located near and within the active zones. In both CEF-treated and untreated GLT-1 KO mice used for verifying the specificity of immunostaining, the density of gold particles in MF terminals was comparable to background levels. The enhanced expression of GLT-1 at release sites may prevent activation of presynaptic receptors, thus revealing a novel mechanism by which GLT-1 regulates synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  5. Coincidence detection of convergent perforant path and mossy fibre inputs by CA3 interneurons.

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    Calixto, Eduardo; Galván, Emilio J; Card, J Patrick; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2008-06-01

    We performed whole-cell recordings from CA3 s. radiatum (R) and s. lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) interneurons in hippocampal slices to examine the temporal aspects of summation of converging perforant path (PP) and mossy fibre (MF) inputs. PP EPSPs were evoked from the s. lacunosum-moleculare in area CA1. MF EPSPs were evoked from the medial extent of the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus. Summation was strongly supralinear when examining PP EPSP with MF EPSP in a heterosynaptic pair at the 10 ms ISI, and linear to sublinear at longer ISIs. This pattern of nonlinearities suggests that R and L-M interneurons act as coincidence detectors for input from PP and MF. Summation at all ISIs was linear in voltage clamp mode demonstrating that nonlinearities were generated by postsynaptic voltage-dependent conductances. Supralinearity was not detected when the first EPSP in the pair was replaced by a simulated EPSP injected into the soma, suggesting that the conductances underlying the EPSP boosting were located in distal dendrites. Supralinearity was selectively eliminated with either Ni2+ (30 microm), mibefradil (10 microm) or nimodipine (15 microm), but was unaffected by QX-314. This pharmacological profile indicates that supralinearity is due to recruitment of dendritic T-type Ca2+channels by the first subthreshold EPSP in the pair. Results with the hyperpolarization-activated (Ih) channel blocker ZD 7288 (50 microm) revealed that Ih restricted the time course of supralinearity for coincidently summed EPSPs, and promoted linear to sublinear summation for asynchronous EPSPs. We conclude that coincidence detection results from the counterbalanced activation of T-type Ca2+ channels and inactivation of Ih.

  6. Diurnal inhibition of NMDA-EPSCs at rat hippocampal mossy fibre synapses through orexin-2 receptors.

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    Perin, Martina; Longordo, Fabio; Massonnet, Christine; Welker, Egbert; Lüthi, Anita

    2014-10-01

    Diurnal release of the orexin neuropeptides orexin-A (Ox-A, hypocretin-1) and orexin-B (Ox-B, hypocretin-2) stabilises arousal, regulates energy homeostasis and contributes to cognition and learning. However, whether cellular correlates of brain plasticity are regulated through orexins, and whether they do so in a time-of-day-dependent manner, has never been assessed. Immunohistochemically we found sparse but widespread innervation of hippocampal subfields through Ox-A- and Ox-B-containing fibres in young adult rats. The actions of Ox-A were studied on NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission in acute hippocampal slices prepared around the trough (Zeitgeber time (ZT) 4-8, corresponding to 4-8 h into the resting phase) and peak (ZT 23) of intracerebroventricular orexin levels. At ZT 4-8, exogenous Ox-A (100 nm in bath) inhibited NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (NMDA-EPSCs) at mossy fibre (MF)-CA3 (to 55.6 ± 6.8% of control, P = 0.0003) and at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses (70.8 ± 6.3%, P = 0.013), whereas it remained ineffective at non-MF excitatory synapses in CA3. Ox-A actions were mediated postsynaptically and blocked by the orexin-2 receptor (OX2R) antagonist JNJ10397049 (1 μm), but not by orexin-1 receptor inhibition (SB334867, 1 μm) or by adrenergic and cholinergic antagonists. At ZT 23, inhibitory effects of exogenous Ox-A were absent (97.6 ± 2.9%, P = 0.42), but reinstated (87.2 ± 3.3%, P = 0.002) when endogenous orexin signalling was attenuated for 5 h through i.p. injections of almorexant (100 mg kg(-1)), a dual orexin receptor antagonist. In conclusion, endogenous orexins modulate hippocampal NMDAR function in a time-of-day-dependent manner, suggesting that they may influence cellular plasticity and consequent variations in memory performance across the sleep-wake cycle.

  7. Effect of varying the intensity and train frequency of forelimb and cerebellar mossy fiber conditioned stimuli on the latency of conditioned eye-blink responses in decerebrate ferrets.

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    Svensson, P; Ivarsson, M; Hesslow, G

    1997-01-01

    To study the role of the mossy fiber afferents to the cerebellum in classical eye-blink conditioning, in particular the timing of the conditioned responses, we compared the effects of varying a peripheral conditioned stimulus with the effects of corresponding variations of direct stimulation of the mossy fibers. In one set of experiments, decerebrate ferrets were trained in a Pavlovian eye-blink conditioning paradigm with electrical forelimb train stimulation as conditioned stimulus and electrical periorbital stimulation as the unconditioned stimulus. When stable conditioning had been achieved, the effect of increasing the intensity or frequency of the forelimb stimulation was tested. By increasing the intensity from 1 to 2 mA, or the train frequency from 50 to 100 Hz, an immediate decrease was induced in both the onset latency and the latency to peak of the conditioned response. If the conditioned stimulus intensity/frequency was maintained at the higher level, the response latencies gradually returned to preshift values. In a second set of experiments, the forelimb stimulation was replaced by direct train stimulation of the middle cerebellar peduncle as conditioned stimulus. Varying the frequency of the stimulus train between 50 and 100 Hz had effects that were almost identical to those obtained when using a forelimb conditioned stimulus. The functional meaning of the latency effect is discussed. It is also suggested that the results support the view that the conditioned stimulus is transmitted through the mossy fibers and that the mechanism for timing the conditioned response is situated in the cerebellum.

  8. Target-cell-dependent plasticity within the mossy fibre-CA3 circuit reveals compartmentalized regulation of presynaptic function at divergent release sites.

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    Pelkey, Kenneth A; McBain, Chris J

    2008-03-15

    Individual axons of central neurons innervate a large number of distinct postsynaptic targets belonging to divergent functional categories such as glutamatergic principal cells and inhibitory interneurons. While each bouton along a common axon should experience the same activity pattern in response to action potential firing within the parent presynaptic neuron, accumulating evidence suggests that neighbouring boutons contacting functionally distinct postsynaptic targets regulate their release properties independently, despite being separated by only a few microns. This target-cell-specific autonomy of presynaptic function can greatly expand the computational prowess of central axons to allow for precise coordination of large neuronal ensembles within a given circuit. An excellent example of target-cell-specific presynaptic mechanisms occurs in the CA3 hippocampus where mossy fibre (MF) axons of dentate gyrus granule cells target both principal cells and local circuit inhibitory interneurons via both anatomically and functionally specialized terminals. Of particular interest, mechanisms of both short- and long-term plasticity remain autonomous at these divergent release sites due to an anatomical and biochemical segregation of discrete molecular signalling cascades. Here we review roughly a decades worth of research on the MF-CA3 pathway to showcase the target-cell dependence of presynaptically expressed NMDA receptor-independent synaptic plasticity.

  9. Loss of protohaem IX farnesyltransferase in mature dentate granule cells impairs short‐term facilitation at mossy fibre to CA3 pyramidal cell synapses

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    Booker, Sam A.; Campbell, Graham R.; Mysiak, Karolina S.; Brophy, Peter J.; Kind, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Neurodegenerative disorders can exhibit dysfunctional mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity.Conditional deletion of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain of mitochondria, from hippocampal dentate granule cells in mice does not affect low‐frequency dentate to CA3 glutamatergic synaptic transmission.High‐frequency dentate to CA3 glutamatergic synaptic transmission and feedforward inhibition are significantly attenuated in cytochrome c oxidase‐deficient mice.Intact presynaptic mitochondrial function is critical for the short‐term dynamics of mossy fibre to CA3 synaptic function. Abstract Neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by peripheral and central symptoms including cognitive impairments which have been associated with reduced mitochondrial function, in particular mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV or cytochrome c oxidase activity. In the present study we conditionally removed a key component of complex IV, protohaem IX farnesyltransferase encoded by the COX10 gene, in granule cells of the adult dentate gyrus. Utilizing whole‐cell patch‐clamp recordings from morphologically identified CA3 pyramidal cells from control and complex IV‐deficient mice, we found that reduced mitochondrial function did not result in overt deficits in basal glutamatergic synaptic transmission at the mossy‐fibre synapse because the amplitude, input–output relationship and 50 ms paired‐pulse facilitation were unchanged following COX10 removal from dentate granule cells. However, trains of stimuli given at high frequency (> 20 Hz) resulted in dramatic reductions in short‐term facilitation and, at the highest frequencies (> 50 Hz), also reduced paired‐pulse facilitation, suggesting a requirement for adequate mitochondrial function to maintain glutamate release during physiologically relevant activity patterns. Interestingly, local inhibition was reduced, suggesting the effect

  10. Silent synapses, LTP, and the indirect parallel-fibre pathway: computational consequences of optimal cerebellar noise-processing.

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    John Porrill

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Computational analysis of neural systems is at its most useful when it uncovers principles that provide a unified account of phenomena across multiple scales and levels of description. Here we analyse a widely used model of the cerebellar contribution to sensori-motor learning to demonstrate both that its response to intrinsic and sensor noise is optimal, and that the unexpected synaptic and behavioural consequences of this optimality can explain a wide range of experimental data. The response of the Marr-Albus adaptive-filter model of the cerebellar microcircuit to noise was examined in the context of vestibulo-ocular reflex calibration. We found that, when appropriately connected, an adaptive-filter model using the covariance learning rule to adjust the weights of synapses between parallel fibres and Purkinje cells learns weight values that are optimal given the relative amount of signal and noise carried by each parallel fibre. This optimality principle is consistent with data on the cerebellar role in smooth pursuit eye movements, and predicts that many synaptic weights must be very small, providing an explanation for the experimentally observed preponderance of silent synapses. Such a preponderance has in its turn two further consequences. First, an additional inhibitory pathway from parallel fibre to Purkinje cell is required if Purkinje cell activity is to be altered in either direction from a starting point of silent synapses. Second, cerebellar learning tasks must often proceed via LTP, rather than LTD as is widely assumed. Taken together, these considerations have profound behavioural consequences, including the optimal combination of sensori-motor information, and asymmetry and hysteresis of sensori-motor learning rates.

  11. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

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    Katharine L Dobson

    Full Text Available Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission.Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20 Wistar rats.Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects.We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  12. The dentate mossy fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Zimmer, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Hippocampal mossy fibers are the axons of the dentate granule cells and project to hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and mossy cells of the dentate hilus (CA4) as well as a number of interneurons in the two areas. Besides their role in hippocampal function, studies of which are still evolving and t....... These features are the topic of this review, which will use the mossy fiber system of the rat as basis and reference in its aim to provide an up-to-date, yet historically based guide to students in the field...

  13. Cerebellar Mutism

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Of a series of 15 children operated for cerebellar tumor at University Hospital Rotterdam-Dijkzigt, The Netherlands, 5 developed “cerebellar mutism” and subsequent dysarthria after surgery, and 2 had mild speech problems.

  14. Altered cerebellar feedback projections in Asperger syndrome.

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    Catani, Marco; Jones, Derek K; Daly, Eileen; Embiricos, Nitzia; Deeley, Quinton; Pugliese, Luca; Curran, Sarah; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Declan G M

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that the biological basis of autism spectrum disorder includes cerebellar 'disconnection'. However, direct in vivo evidence in support of this is lacking. Here, the microstructural integrity of cerebellar white matter in adults with Asperger syndrome was studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance tractography. Fifteen adults with Asperger syndrome and 16 age-IQ-gender-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, tract-specific measurements of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were made within the inferior, middle, superior cerebellar peduncles and short intracerebellar fibres. No group differences were observed in mean diffusivity. However, people with Asperger syndrome had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the short intracerebellar fibres (pAsperger syndrome. The localised abnormalities in the main cerebellar outflow pathway may prevent the cerebral cortex from receiving those cerebellar feedback inputs necessary for a successful adaptive social behaviour.

  15. Regional difference in corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity in mossy fiber terminals innervating calretinin-immunoreactive unipolar brush cells in vestibulocerebellum of rolling mouse Nagoya.

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    Ando, Masahiro; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Jeong, Young-Gil; Takeda, Noriaki; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2005-11-23

    Unipolar brush cells (UBCs), a class of interneurons in the vestibulocerebellum, play roles in amplifying excitatory inputs from vestibulocerebellar mossy fibers. This study aimed to clarify whether corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-positive mossy fiber innervation of calretinin (CR)-positive UBCs was altered in rolling mouse Nagoya (RMN). The distribution and the number of CR-positive UBCs in the vestibulocerebellum were not different between RMN and control mice. Double immunofluorescence revealed that some CRF-positive mossy fiber terminals were in close apposition to CR-positive UBCs. In the lobule X of vermis, such mossy fiber terminals were about 5-fold greater in number in RMN than in controls. In contrast, the number of CRF-positive mossy fiber terminals adjoining CR-positive UBCs in the flocculus was not significantly different between RMN and controls. The results suggest increased number of CRF-positive mossy fiber terminals innervating CR-positive UBCs in the lobule X but not in the flocculus of RMN. CRF may alter CR-positive UBC-mediated excitatory pathways in the lobule X of RMN and may disturb functions of the lobule X such as cerebellar adaptation for linear motion of the head.

  16. Acute cerebellar ataxia

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    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  17. VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1 in glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses of the rat cerebellar cortex

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    Benagiano Vincenzo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of key SNARE proteins in glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses of the adult rat cerebellar cortex using light microscopy immunohistochemical techniques. Analysis was made of co-localizations of vGluT-1 and vGluT-2, vesicular transporters of glutamate and markers of glutamatergic synapses, or GAD, the GABA synthetic enzyme and marker of GABAergic synapses, with VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1. Results The examined SNARE proteins were found to be diffusely expressed in glutamatergic synapses, whereas they were rarely observed in GABAergic synapses. However, among glutamatergic synapses, subpopulations which did not contain VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1 were detected. They included virtually all the synapses established by terminals of climbing fibres (immunoreactive for vGluT-2 and some synapses established by terminals of parallel and mossy fibres (immunoreactive for vGluT-1, and for vGluT-1 and 2, respectively. The only GABA synapses expressing the SNARE proteins studied were the synapses established by axon terminals of basket neurons. Conclusion The present study supplies a detailed morphological description of VAMP-2, SNAP-25A/B and syntaxin-1 in the different types of glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses of the rat cerebellar cortex. The examined SNARE proteins characterize most of glutamatergic synapses and only one type of GABAergic synapses. In the subpopulations of glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses lacking the SNARE protein isoforms examined, alternative mechanisms for regulating trafficking of synaptic vesicles may be hypothesized, possibly mediated by different isoforms or homologous proteins.

  18. A computational study of synaptic mechanisms of partial memory transfer in cerebellar vestibulo-ocular-reflex learning.

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    Masuda, Naoki; Amari, Shun-ichi

    2008-04-01

    There is a debate regarding whether motor memory is stored in the cerebellar cortex, or the cerebellar nuclei, or both. Memory may be acquired in the cortex and then be transferred to the cerebellar nuclei. Based on a dynamical system modeling with a minimal set of variables, we theoretically investigated possible mechanisms of memory transfer and consolidation in the context of vestibulo-ocular reflex learning. We tested different plasticity rules for synapses in the cerebellar nuclei and took robustness of behavior against parameter variation as the criterion of plausibility of a model variant. In the most plausible scenarios, mossy-fiber nucleus-neuron synapses or Purkinje-cell nucleus-neuron synapses are plastic on a slow time scale and store permanent memory, whose content is passed from the cerebellar cortex storing transient memory. In these scenarios, synaptic strengths are potentiated when the mossy-fiber afferents to the nuclei are active during a pause in Purkinje-cell activities. Furthermore, assuming that mossy fibers create a limited variety of signals compared to parallel fibers, our model shows partial memory transfer from the cortex to the nuclei.

  19. Hilar mossy cells of the dentate gyrus: a historical perspective

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    Helen E Scharfman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The circuitry of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is unique compared to other hippocampal subfields because there are two glutamatergic principal cells instead of one: granule cells, which are the vast majority of the cells in the dentate gyrus, and the so-called ‘mossy cells.’ The distinctive appearance of mossy cells, the extensive divergence of their axons, and their vulnerability to excitotoxicity relative to granule cells has led to a great deal of interest in mossy cells. Nevertheless, there is no consensus about the normal functions of mossy cells and the implications of their vulnerability. There even seems to be some ambiguity about exactly what mossy cells are. Here we review initial studies of mossy cells, characteristics that define them, and suggest a practical definition to allow investigators to distinguish mossy cells from other hilar neurons even if all morphological and physiological information is unavailable due to technical limitations of their experiments. In addition, hypotheses are discussed about the role of mossy cells in the dentate gyrus network, reasons for their vulnerability and their implications for disease.

  20. Ethanol-Induced Cerebellar Ataxia: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms.

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    Dar, M Saeed

    2015-08-01

    The cerebellum is an important target of ethanol toxicity given that cerebellar ataxia is the most consistent physical manifestation of acute ethanol consumption. Despite the significance of the cerebellum in ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia (EICA), the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying EICA are incompletely understood. However, two important findings have shed greater light on this phenomenon. First, ethanol-induced blockade of cerebellar adenosine uptake in rodent models points to a role for adenosinergic A1 modulation of EICA. Second, the consistent observation that intracerebellar administration of nicotine in mice leads to antagonism of EICA provides evidence for a critical role of cerebellar nitric oxide (NO) in EICA reversal. Based on these two important findings, this review discusses the potential molecular events at two key synaptic sites (mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell (MGG synaptic site) and granule cell parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (GPP synaptic site) that lead to EICA. Specifically, ethanol-induced neuronal NOS inhibition at the MGG synaptic site acts as a critical trigger for Golgi cell activation which leads to granule cell deafferentation. Concurrently, ethanol-induced inhibition of adenosine uptake at the GPP synaptic site produces adenosine accumulation which decreases glutamate release and leads to the profound activation of Purkinje cells (PCs). These molecular events at the MGG and GPP synaptic sites are mutually reinforcing and lead to cerebellar dysfunction, decreased excitatory output of deep cerebellar nuclei, and EICA. The critical importance of PCs as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex suggests normalization of PC function could have important therapeutic implications.

  1. Mixed neurotransmission in the hippocampal mossy fibers

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    Agnieszka eMuenster-Wandowski

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampal mossy fibers (MFs, the axons of the granule cells of the dentate gyrus, innervate mossy cells and interneurons in the hilus on its way to CA3 where they innervate interneurons and pyramidal cells. Synapses on each target cell have distinct anatomical and functional characteristics. In recent years, the paradigmatic view of the MF synapses being only glutamatergic and, thus, excitatory has been questioned. Several laboratories have provided data supporting the hypothesis that the MFs can transiently release GABA during development and, in the adult, after periods of enhanced excitability. This transient glutamate-GABA co-transmission coincides with the transient expression of the machinery for the synthesis and release of GABA in the glutamatergic granule cells. Although some investigators have deemed this evidence controversial, new data has appeared with direct evidence of co-release of glutamate and GABA from single, identified MF boutons. However, this must still be confirmed by other groups and with other methodologies. A second, intriguing observation is that MF activation produced fast spikelets followed by excitatory postsynaptic potentials in a number of pyramidal cells, which, unlike the spikelets, underwent frequency potentiation and were strongly depressed by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. The spikelets persisted during blockade of chemical transmission and were suppressed by the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. These data is consistent with the hypothesis of mixed electrical-chemical synapses between MFs and some pyramidal cells. Dye coupling between these types of principal cells and ultrastructural studies showing the co-existence of AMPA receptors and connexin 36 in this synapse corroborate their presence. A deeper consideration of mixed neurotransmission taking place in this synapse may expand our search and understanding of communication channels between different regions of the mammalian CNS.

  2. The cerebellar Golgi cell and spatiotemporal organization of granular layer activity

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    Egidio eD‘Angelo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar granular layer has been suggested to perform a complex spatiotemporal reconfiguration of incoming mossy fiber signals. Central to this role is the inhibitory action exerted by Golgi cells over granule cells: Golgi cells inhibit granule cells through double feedforward and feedback inhibitory loops and generate a broad lateral inhibition that extends beyond the afferent synaptic field. This characteristic connectivity has recently been investigated in great detail and been correlated with specific functional properties of the neuron. These include theta-frequency pacemaking, network entrainment into coherent oscillations and phase resetting. Important advances have also been made in terms of determining the membrane and synaptic properties of the neuron, and clarifying the mechanisms of activation by input bursts. Moreover, voltage sensitive dye imaging and multi-electrode array recordings, combined with mathematical simulations based on realistic computational models, have improved our understanding of the impact of Golgi cell activity on granular layer circuit computations. These investigations have highlighted the critical role of Golgi cells in: generating dense clusters of granule cell activity organized in center-surround structures, implementing combinatorial operations on multiple mossy fiber inputs, regulating transmission gain and cut-off frequency, controlling spike timing and burst transmission, and determining the sign, intensity and extension of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay. This review considers recent advances in the field, highlighting the functional implications of Golgi cells for granular layer network computation and indicating new challenges for cerebellar research.

  3. Contribution of cerebellar sensorimotor adaptation to hippocampal spatial memory.

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    Jean-Baptiste Passot

    Full Text Available Complementing its primary role in motor control, cerebellar learning has also a bottom-up influence on cognitive functions, where high-level representations build up from elementary sensorimotor memories. In this paper we examine the cerebellar contribution to both procedural and declarative components of spatial cognition. To do so, we model a functional interplay between the cerebellum and the hippocampal formation during goal-oriented navigation. We reinterpret and complete existing genetic behavioural observations by means of quantitative accounts that cross-link synaptic plasticity mechanisms, single cell and population coding properties, and behavioural responses. In contrast to earlier hypotheses positing only a purely procedural impact of cerebellar adaptation deficits, our results suggest a cerebellar involvement in high-level aspects of behaviour. In particular, we propose that cerebellar learning mechanisms may influence hippocampal place fields, by contributing to the path integration process. Our simulations predict differences in place-cell discharge properties between normal mice and L7-PKCI mutant mice lacking long-term depression at cerebellar parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. On the behavioural level, these results suggest that, by influencing the accuracy of hippocampal spatial codes, cerebellar deficits may impact the exploration-exploitation balance during spatial navigation.

  4. High-pass filtering and dynamic gain regulation enhance vertical bursts transmission along the mossy fiber pathway of cerebellum

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    Jonathan Mapelli

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Signal elaboration in the cerebellum mossy fiber input pathway presents controversial aspects, especially concerning gain regulation and the spot-like (rather than beam-like appearance of granular-to-molecular layer transmission. By using voltage-sensitive dye (VSD imaging in rat cerebellar slices (Mapelli et al., 2010, we found that mossy fiber bursts optimally excited the granular layer above ~50 Hz and the overlaying molecular layer above ~100 Hz, thus generating a cascade of high-pass filters. NMDA receptors enhanced transmission in the granular, while GABA-A receptors depressed transmission in both the granular and molecular layer. Burst transmission gain was controlled through a dynamic frequency-dependent involvement of these receptors. Moreover, while high-frequency transmission was enhanced along vertical lines connecting the granular to molecular layer, no high-frequency enhancement was observed along the parallel fiber axis in the molecular layer. This was probably due to the stronger effect of Purkinje cell GABA-A receptor-mediated inhibition occurring along the parallel fibers than along the granule cell axon ascending branch. The consequent amplification of burst responses along vertical transmission lines could explain the spot-like activation of Purkinje cells observed following punctuate stimulation in vivo .

  5. Bilateral otogenic cerebellar abscesses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadkarni T

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An unusual presentation of bilateral otogenic cerebellar abscesses observed in two of our patients is reported. Both gave a history of otorrhoea, fever, headache, vomiting and had bilateral cerebellar signs and conductive hearing loss. The abscesses were detected on computerised tomography. X-rays revealed bilateral mastoiditis. The therapy followed was excision of abscesses, mastoidectomy and antibiotic therapy.

  6. Information processing and synaptic plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber terminals

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    Alesya eEvstratova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Granule cells of the dentate gyrus receive cortical information and they transform and transmit this code to the CA3 area via their axons, the mossy fibers. Structural and functional complexity of this network has been extensively studied at various organizational levels. This review is focused on the anatomical and physiological properties of the mossy fiber system. We will discuss the mechanism by which dentate granule cells process signals from single action potentials, short bursts and longer stimuli. Various parameters of synaptic interactions at different target cells such as quantal transmission, short- and long-term plasticity will be summarized. Different types of synaptic contacts formed by mossy fibers have unique sets of rules for information processing during different rates of granule cell activity. We will investigate the complex interactions between key determinants of information transfer between the dentate gyrus and the CA3 area of the hippocampus.

  7. Iatrogenic postoperative cerebellar cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Robin; Moscovici, Samuel; Wygoda, Marc; Eliahou, Ruth; Spektor, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    Cerebellar cyst is a known but uncommon entity. It is congenital in most cases, or may develop after brain parenchyma injuries or interventions. To our knowledge, de novo cerebellar cyst after extra-axial tumor excision, has not been described in the literature. We present the first reported case of a de novo cerebellar cyst developing in a 70-year-old woman following retrosigmoid craniotomy for vestibular schwannoma excision, and discuss the possible causes. Following cyst fenestration, there was no clinical or radiological evidence of a residual cyst.

  8. An integrator circuit in cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maex, Reinoud; Steuber, Volker

    2013-09-01

    The brain builds dynamic models of the body and the outside world to predict the consequences of actions and stimuli. A well-known example is the oculomotor integrator, which anticipates the position-dependent elasticity forces acting on the eye ball by mathematically integrating over time oculomotor velocity commands. Many models of neural integration have been proposed, based on feedback excitation, lateral inhibition or intrinsic neuronal nonlinearities. We report here that a computational model of the cerebellar cortex, a structure thought to implement dynamic models, reveals a hitherto unrecognized integrator circuit. In this model, comprising Purkinje cells, molecular layer interneurons and parallel fibres, Purkinje cells were able to generate responses lasting more than 10 s, to which both neuronal and network mechanisms contributed. Activation of the somatic fast sodium current by subthreshold voltage fluctuations was able to maintain pulse-evoked graded persistent activity, whereas lateral inhibition among Purkinje cells via recurrent axon collaterals further prolonged the responses to step and sine wave stimulation. The responses of Purkinje cells decayed with a time-constant whose value depended on their baseline spike rate, with integration vanishing at low ( 30 per s). The model predicts that the apparently fast circuit of the cerebellar cortex may control the timing of slow processes without having to rely on sensory feedback. Thus, the cerebellar cortex may contain an adaptive temporal integrator, with the sensitivity of integration to the baseline spike rate offering a potential mechanism of plasticity of the response time-constant.

  9. Eph receptors are involved in the activity-dependent synaptic wiring in the mouse cerebellar cortex.

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    Roberta Cesa

    Full Text Available Eph receptor tyrosine kinases are involved in many cellular processes. In the developing brain, they act as migratory and cell adhesive cues while in the adult brain they regulate dendritic spine plasticity. Here we show a new role for Eph receptor signalling in the cerebellar cortex. Cerebellar Purkinje cells are innervated by two different excitatory inputs. The climbing fibres contact the proximal dendritic domain of Purkinje cells, where synapse and spine density is low; the parallel fibres contact the distal dendritic domain, where synapse and spine density is high. Interestingly, Purkinje cells have the intrinsic ability to generate a high number of spines over their entire dendritic arborisations, which can be innervated by the parallel fibres. However, the climbing fibre input continuously exerts an activity-dependent repression on parallel fibre synapses, thus confining them to the distal Purkinje cell dendritic domain. Such repression persists after Eph receptor activation, but is overridden by Eph receptor inhibition with EphA4/Fc in neonatal cultured cerebellar slices as well as mature acute cerebellar slices, following in vivo infusion of the EphA4/Fc inhibitor and in EphB receptor-deficient mice. When electrical activity is blocked in vivo by tetrodotoxin leading to a high spine density in Purkinje cell proximal dendrites, stimulation of Eph receptor activation recapitulates the spine repressive effects of climbing fibres. These results suggest that Eph receptor signalling mediates the repression of spine proliferation induced by climbing fibre activity in Purkinje cell proximal dendrites. Such repression is necessary to maintain the correct architecture of the cerebellar cortex.

  10. Differential mechanisms of transmission and plasticity at mossy fiber synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Chris J

    2008-01-01

    The last few decades have seen the hippocampal formation at front and center in the field of synaptic transmission. However, much of what we know about hippocampal short- and long-term plasticity has been obtained from research at one particular synapse; the Schaffer collateral input onto principal cells of the CA1 subfield. A number of recent studies, however, have demonstrated that there is much to be learned about target-specific mechanisms of synaptic transmission by study of the lesser known synapse made between the granule cells of the dentate gyrus; the so-called mossy fiber synapse, and its targets both within the hilar region and the CA3 hippocampus proper. Indeed investigation of this synapse has provided an embarrassment of riches concerning mechanisms of transmission associated with feedforward excitatory and inhibitory control of the CA3 hippocampus. Importantly, work from a number of labs has revealed that mossy fiber synapses possess unique properties at both the level of their anatomy and physiology, and serve as an outstanding example of a synapse designed for target-specific compartmentalization of synaptic transmission. The purpose of the present review is to highlight several aspects of this synapse as they pertain to a novel mechanism of bidirectional control of synaptic plasticity at mossy fiber synapses made onto hippocampal stratum lucidum interneurons. It is not my intention to pour over all that is known regarding the mossy fiber synapse since many have explored this topic exhaustively in the past and interested readers are directed to other fine reviews (Henze et al., 2000; Urban et al., 2001; Lawrence and McBain, 2003; Bischofberger et al., 2006; Nicoll and Schmitz, 2005).

  11. A hippocampal interneuron associated with the mossy fiber system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, I; Frotscher, M

    2000-02-01

    Network properties of the hippocampus emerge from the interaction of principal cells and a heterogeneous population of interneurons expressing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To understand these interactions, the synaptic connections of different types of interneurons need to be elucidated. Here we describe a type of inhibitory interneuron of the hippocampal CA3 region that has an axon coaligned with the mossy fibers. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, in combination with intracellular biocytin filling, were made from nonpyramidal cells of the stratum lucidum under visual control. Mossy fiber-associated (MFA) interneurons generated brief action potentials followed by a prominent after-hyperpolarization. Subsequent visualization revealed an extensive axonal arbor which was preferentially located in the stratum lucidum of CA3 and often invaded the hilus. The dendrites of MFA interneurons were mainly located in the strata radiatum and oriens, suggesting that these cells are primarily activated by associational and commissural fibers. Electron microscopic analysis showed that axon terminals of MFA interneurons established symmetric synaptic contacts predominantly on proximal apical dendritic shafts, and to a lesser degree, on somata of pyramidal cells. Synaptic contacts were also found on GABAergic interneurons of the CA3 region and putative mossy cells of the hilus. Inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) elicited by MFA interneurons in simultaneously recorded pyramidal cells had fast kinetics (half duration, 3.6 ms) and were blocked by the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. Thus, MFA interneurons are GABAergic cells in a position to selectively suppress the mossy fiber input, an important requirement for the recall of memory traces from the CA3 network.

  12. A hippocampal interneuron associated with the mossy fiber system

    OpenAIRE

    Vida, Imre; Frotscher, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Network properties of the hippocampus emerge from the interaction of principal cells and a heterogeneous population of interneurons expressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To understand these interactions, the synaptic connections of different types of interneurons need to be elucidated. Here we describe a type of inhibitory interneuron of the hippocampal CA3 region that has an axon coaligned with the mossy fibers. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, in combination with intracellular biocytin f...

  13. Cerebellar anatomy as applied to cerebellar microsurgical resections

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    Alejandro Ramos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To define the anatomy of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles, demonstrating the surgical application of anatomic landmarks in cerebellar resections. METHODS: Twenty cerebellar hemispheres were studied. RESULTS: The majority of dentate nucleus and cerebellar peduncles had demonstrated constant relationship to other cerebellar structures, which provided landmarks for surgical approaching. The lateral border is separated from the midline by 19.5 mm in both hemispheres. The posterior border of the cortex is separated 23.3 mm from the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus; the lateral one is separated 26 mm from the lateral border of the nucleus; and the posterior segment of the dentate nucleus is separated 25.4 mm from the posterolateral angle formed by the junction of lateral and posterior borders of cerebellar hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS: Microsurgical anatomy has provided important landmarks that could be applied to cerebellar surgical resections.

  14. Frequency-dependent associative long-term potentiation at the hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, B E; Martinez, J L

    1994-10-25

    The mossy fiber-CA3 synapse displays an N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor-independent mu-opioid-receptor-dependent form of long-term potentiation (LTP) that is thought not to display cooperativity or associativity with coactive afferents. However, because mossy fiber LTP requires repetitive synaptic activity for its induction, we reevaluated cooperativity and associativity at this synapse by using trains of mossy fiber stimulation. Moderate-, but not low-, intensity trains induced mossy fiber LTP, indicating cooperativity. Low-intensity mossy fiber trains that were normally ineffective in inducing LTP could induce mossy fiber LTP when delivered in conjunction with trains delivered to commissural-CA3 afferents. Associative mossy fiber LTP also could be induced with single mossy fiber pulses when delivered with commissural trains in the presence of a mu-opioid-receptor agonist. Our findings suggest a frequency-dependent variation of Hebbian associative LTP induction that is regulated by the release of endogenous opioid peptides.

  15. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Autism

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    The size of the cerebellar hemisphere and vermal lobules was measured in ten autistic and eight normal control subjects at the Neuropsychology Research Laboratory, Children’s Hospital Research Center, and the Departments of Neurosciences and Radiology, School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, LaJolla.

  16. The brain-specific RasGEF very-KIND is required for normal dendritic growth in cerebellar granule cells and proper motor coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanehiro; Furuya, Asako; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Akagi, Takumi; Shinoda, Yo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Kazuki; Minami, Haruka; Sano, Yoshitake; Nakayama, Manabu

    2017-01-01

    Very-KIND/Kndc1/KIAA1768 (v-KIND) is a brain-specific Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor carrying two sets of the kinase non-catalytic C-lobe domain (KIND), and is predominantly expressed in cerebellar granule cells. Here, we report the impact of v-KIND deficiency on dendritic and synaptic growth in cerebellar granule cells in v-KIND knockout (KO) mice. Furthermore, we evaluate motor function in these animals. The gross anatomy of the cerebellum, including the cerebellar lobules, layered cerebellar cortex and densely-packed granule cell layer, in KO mice appeared normal, and was similar to wild-type (WT) mice. However, KO mice displayed an overgrowth of cerebellar granule cell dendrites, compared with WT mice, resulting in an increased number of dendrites, dendritic branches and terminals. Immunoreactivity for vGluT2 (a marker for excitatory presynapses of mossy fiber terminals) was increased in the cerebellar glomeruli of KO mice, compared with WT mice. The postsynaptic density around the terminals of mossy fibers was also increased in KO mice. Although there were no significant differences in locomotor ability between KO and WT animals in their home cages or in the open field, young adult KO mice had an increased grip strength and a tendency to exhibit better motor performance in balance-related tests compared with WT animals. Taken together, our results suggest that v-KIND is required for compact dendritic growth and proper excitatory synaptic connections in cerebellar granule cells, which are necessary for normal motor coordination and balance. PMID:28264072

  17. New supervised learning theory applied to cerebellar modeling for suppression of variability of saccade end points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Masahiko

    2013-06-01

    A new supervised learning theory is proposed for a hierarchical neural network with a single hidden layer of threshold units, which can approximate any continuous transformation, and applied to a cerebellar function to suppress the end-point variability of saccades. In motor systems, feedback control can reduce noise effects if the noise is added in a pathway from a motor center to a peripheral effector; however, it cannot reduce noise effects if the noise is generated in the motor center itself: a new control scheme is necessary for such noise. The cerebellar cortex is well known as a supervised learning system, and a novel theory of cerebellar cortical function developed in this study can explain the capability of the cerebellum to feedforwardly reduce noise effects, such as end-point variability of saccades. This theory assumes that a Golgi-granule cell system can encode the strength of a mossy fiber input as the state of neuronal activity of parallel fibers. By combining these parallel fiber signals with appropriate connection weights to produce a Purkinje cell output, an arbitrary continuous input-output relationship can be obtained. By incorporating such flexible computation and learning ability in a process of saccadic gain adaptation, a new control scheme in which the cerebellar cortex feedforwardly suppresses the end-point variability when it detects a variation in saccadic commands can be devised. Computer simulation confirmed the efficiency of such learning and showed a reduction in the variability of saccadic end points, similar to results obtained from experimental data.

  18. GABAergic cells are the major postsynaptic targets of mossy fibers in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acsády, L; Kamondi, A; Sík, A; Freund, T; Buzsáki, G

    1998-05-01

    Dentate granule cells communicate with their postsynaptic targets by three distinct terminal types. These include the large mossy terminals, filopodial extensions of the mossy terminals, and smaller en passant synaptic varicosities. We examined the postsynaptic targets of mossy fibers by combining in vivo intracellular labeling of granule cells, immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy. Single granule cells formed large, complex "mossy" synapses on 11-15 CA3 pyramidal cells and 7-12 hilar mossy cells. In contrast, GABAergic interneurons, identified with immunostaining for substance P-receptor, parvalbumin, and mGluR1a-receptor, were selectively innervated by very thin (filopodial) extensions of the mossy terminals and by small en passant boutons in both the hilar and CA3 regions. These terminals formed single, often perforated, asymmetric synapses on the cell bodies, dendrites, and spines of GABAergic interneurons. The number of filopodial extensions and small terminals was 10 times larger than the number of mossy terminals. These findings show that in contrast to cortical pyramidal neurons, (1) granule cells developed distinct types of terminals to affect interneurons and pyramidal cells and (2) they innervated more inhibitory than excitatory cells. These findings may explain the physiological observations that increased activity of granule cells suppresses the overall excitability of the CA3 recurrent system and may form the structural basis of the target-dependent regulation of glutamate release in the mossy fiber system.

  19. Presynaptic Modulation of the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-14

    0.19 pg Dyn B-LI/ at least 48 h after KA injection. Intracerebroventricular min/mg protein compared to 3.81 ± 0.26 pg Dyn B/min/ administration of KA...guinea pig hippocampal MF administration and colchioine-induced neurotoxicity. Proc. Natl. synaptosomes is selectively depressed by K, but not p Acad. Sci...Exp. Ther. 255:900-905. tamate exocytosis from rat hippocampal mossy fiber synaptosomes. 20. Perry, D. C., and Grimes, L. M. 1989. Administration of

  20. Genetics Home Reference: lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH) affects brain development, resulting in the brain ...

  1. The intracellular redox protein MICAL-1 regulates the development of hippocampal mossy fibre connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Battum, Eljo Y; Gunput, Rou-Afza F; Lemstra, Suzanne; Groen, Ewout J N; Yu, Ka Lou; Adolfs, Youri; Zhou, Yeping; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Yoshida, Yukata; Schachner, Melitta; Akhmanova, Anna; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Mical is a reduction-oxidation (redox) enzyme that functions as an unusual F-actin disassembly factor during Drosophila development. Although three Molecule interacting with CasL (MICAL) proteins exist in vertebrate species, their mechanism of action remains poorly defined and their role in vivo unk

  2. Dissociation between mossy fiber sprouting and rapid kindling with low-frequency stimulation of the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, L L; Mohapel, P; Jenkins, E M; Hannesson, D K; Corcoran, M E

    1998-01-19

    In an attempt to determine whether sprouting of mossy fibers is invariably correlated with kindling of seizures, we subjected rats to rapid kindling with long trains of low-frequency stimulation of the amygdala that resulted in development of generalized seizures within a mean of five stimulations. For comparison, we subjected other rats to conventional kindling with short trains of high-frequency stimulation of the amygdala that resulted in development of generalized seizures within a mean of 13 stimulations. We found no evidence of mossy fiber sprouting in the dentate gyrus of rats killed one day after completion of rapid kindling, as compared to yoked controls, although significant sprouting was seen in rats killed one day after completion of conventional kindling. When we examined tissue from rats killed 20 days after rapid kindling, however, we did find significant sprouting, suggesting that mossy fiber sprouting can be triggered by rapid kindling if sufficient survival time is allowed. The observed disparity between completion of rapid low-frequency kindling and detection of mossy fiber sprouting suggests that mossy fiber sprouting may be associated more with sustained survival time after neuronal activation than with kindling per se. Furthermore, the similar time course of conventional kindling and of mossy fiber sprouting obscures the determination of a causal role of mossy fiber sprouting in conventional kindling.

  3. Control of GABA release at single mossy fiber-CA3 connections in the developing hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria F Safiulina

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. While in adulthood MF, the axons of dentate gyrus granule cells release onto CA3 principal cells and interneurons glutamate, early in postnatal life they release GABA, which exerts into targeted cells a depolarizing and excitatory action. We found that GABAA-mediated postsynaptic currents (MF-GPSCs exhibited a very low probability of release, were sensitive to L-AP4, a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, and revealed short-term frequency-dependent facilitation. Moreover, MF-GPSCs were down regulated by presynaptic GABAB and kainate receptors, activated by spillover of GABA from MF terminals and by glutamate present in the extracellular medium, respectively. Activation of these receptors contributed to the low release probability and in some cases to synapses silencing. By pairing calcium transients, associated with network-driven giant depolarizing potentials or GDPs (a hallmark of developmental networks thought to represent a primordial form of synchrony between neurons, generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA with MF activation increased the probability of GABA release and caused the conversion of silent synapses into conductive ones suggesting that GDPs act as coincident detector signals for enhancing synaptic efficacy. Finally, to compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in adulthood or in postnatal development, respectively, a realistic model was constructed taking into account different biophysical properties of these synapses.

  4. Control of GABA Release at Mossy Fiber-CA3 Connections in the Developing Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiulina, Victoria F; Caiati, Maddalena D; Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Bisson, Giacomo; Migliore, Michele; Cherubini, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF)-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. While in adulthood MF, the axons of dentate gyrus granule cells release onto CA3 principal cells and interneurons glutamate, early in postnatal life they release GABA, which exerts into targeted cells a depolarizing and excitatory action. We found that GABA(A)-mediated postsynaptic currents (MF-GPSCs) exhibited a very low probability of release, were sensitive to L-AP4, a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, and revealed short-term frequency-dependent facilitation. Moreover, MF-GPSCs were down regulated by presynaptic GABA(B) and kainate receptors, activated by spillover of GABA from MF terminals and by glutamate present in the extracellular medium, respectively. Activation of these receptors contributed to the low release probability and in some cases to synapses silencing. By pairing calcium transients, associated with network-driven giant depolarizing potentials or GDPs (a hallmark of developmental networks thought to represent a primordial form of synchrony between neurons), generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA with MF activation increased the probability of GABA release and caused the conversion of silent synapses into conductive ones suggesting that GDPs act as coincident detector signals for enhancing synaptic efficacy. Finally, to compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in adulthood or in postnatal development, respectively, a realistic model was constructed taking into account different biophysical properties of these synapses.

  5. Falls in degenerative cerebellar ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Steijns, Janneke A G; Munneke, Marten; Kremer, Berry P H; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2005-01-01

    We retrospectively and prospectively assessed the frequency and characteristics of falls in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias. The results show that falls occur very frequently in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias and that these falls are serious and often lead to injuries or

  6. Adenosine gates synaptic plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kimberly A.; Nicoll, Roger A.; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2003-11-01

    The release properties of synapses in the central nervous system vary greatly, not only across anatomically distinct types of synapses but also among the same class of synapse. This variation manifests itself in large part by differences in the probability of transmitter release, which affects such activity-dependent presynaptic forms of plasticity as paired-pulse facilitation and frequency facilitation. This heterogeneity in presynaptic function reflects differences in the intrinsic properties of the synaptic terminal and the activation of presynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Here we show that the unique presynaptic properties of the hippocampal mossy fiber synapse are largely imparted onto the synapse by the continuous local action of extracellular adenosine at presynaptic A1 adenosine receptors, which maintains a low basal probability of transmitter release.

  7. Ionotropic receptors at hippocampal mossy fibers: roles in axonal excitability, synaptic transmission, and plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz, Arnaud J.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2013-01-01

    Dentate granule cells process information from the enthorinal cortex en route to the hippocampus proper. These neurons have a very negative resting membrane potential and are relatively silent in the slice preparation. They are also subject to strong feed-forward inhibition. Their unmyelinated axon or mossy fiber ramifies extensively in the hilus and projects to stratum lucidum where it makes giant en-passant boutons with CA3 pyramidal neurons. There is compelling evidence that mossy fiber bo...

  8. Molecular mechanisms governing competitive synaptic wiring in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahiko

    2008-03-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) play a principal role in motor coordination and motor learning. To fulfill these functions, PCs receive and integrate two types of excitatory inputs, climbing fiber (CF) and parallel fiber (PF). CFs are projection axons from the inferior olive, and convey error signals to PCs. On the other hand, PFs are T-shaped axons of cerebellar granule cells, and convey sensory and motor information carried through the pontocerebellar and spinocerebellar mossy fiber pathways. The most remarkable feature of PC circuits is the highly territorial innervation by these two excitatory afferents. A single climbing CF powerfully and exclusively innervates proximal PC dendrites, whereas hundreds of thousands of PFs innervate distal PC dendrites. Recent studies using gene-manipulated mice have been elucidating that the PC circuitry is formed and maintained by molecular mechanisms that fuel homosynaptic competition among CFs and heterosynaptic competition between CFs and PFs. GluRdelta2 (a PC-specific glutamate receptor) and precerebellin or Cbln1 (a granule cell-derived secretory protein) cooperatively work for selective strengthening of PF-PC synapses, and prevent excessive distal extension of CFs that eventually causes multiple innervation at distal dendrites. In contrast, P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, which mediate Ca2+ influx upon CF activity, selectively strengthen the innervation by a single main CF, and expel PFs and other CFs from proximal dendrites that it innervates. Therefore, we now understand that owing to these mechanisms, territorial innervation by CFs and PFs is properly structured and mono-innervation by CFs is established. Several key issues for future study are also discussed.

  9. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  10. Complex partial seizures: cerebellar metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore, W.H.; Fishbein, D.; Deitz, M.; Baldwin, P.

    1987-07-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) with (/sup 18/F)2-deoxyglucose to study cerebellar glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) and the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in 42 patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), and 12 normal controls. Mean +/- SD patient LCMRglu was 6.9 +/- 1.8 mg glucose/100 g/min (left = right), significantly lower than control values of 8.5 +/- 1.8 (left, p less than 0.006), and 8.3 +/- 1.6 (right, p less than 0.02). Only four patients had cerebellar atrophy on CT/MRI; cerebellar LCMRglu in these was 5.5 +/- 1.5 (p = 0.054 vs. total patient sample). Patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism or EEG foci did not have lateralized cerebellar hypometabolism. Patients receiving phenytoin (PHT) at the time of scan and patients with less than 5 years total PHT exposure had lower LCMRglu, but the differences were not significant. There were weak inverse correlations between PHT level and cerebellar LCMRglu in patients receiving PHT (r = -0.36; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1), as well as between length of illness and LCMRglu (r = -0.22; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Patients with complex partial seizures have cerebellar hypometabolism that is bilateral and due only in part to the effect of PHT.

  11. Electrophysiological Monitoring of Injury ProgressionIn the Rat Cerebellar Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan eOrdek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The changes of excitability in affected neural networks can be used as a marker to study the temporal course of traumatic brain injury (TBI. The cerebellum is an ideal platform to study brain injury mechanisms at the network level using the electrophysiological methods. Within its crystalline morphology, the cerebellar cortex contains highly organized topographical subunits that are defined by two main inputs, the climbing and mossy fibers. Here we demonstrate the use of cerebellar evoked potentials (EPs mediated through these afferent systems for monitoring the injury progression in a rat model of fluid percussion injury (FPI. A mechanical tap on the dorsal hand was used as a stimulus, and EPs were recorded from the paramedian lobule (PML of the posterior cerebellum via multi-electrode arrays (MEA. Post-injury evoked response amplitudes (EPAs were analyzed on a daily basis for one week and compared with pre-injury values. We found a trend of consistently decreasing EPAs in all nine animals, losing as much as 72±4% of baseline amplitudes measured before the injury. Notably, our results highlighted two particular time windows; the first 24 hours of injury in the acute period and day-3 to day-7 in the delayed period where the largest drops (~50% and 24% were observed in the EPAs. In addition, cross-correlations of spontaneous signals between electrode pairs declined (from 0.47±0.1 to 0.35±0.04, p<0.001 along with the EPAs throughout the week of injury. In support of the electrophysiological findings, immunohistochemical analysis at day-7 post-injury showed detectable Purkinje cell loss at low FPI pressures and more with the largest pressures used. Our results suggest that sensory evoked potentials recorded from the cerebellar surface can be a useful technique to monitor the course of cerebellar injury and identify the phases of injury progression even at mild levels.

  12. Spatial, contextual and working memory are not affected by the absence of mossy fiber long-term potentiation and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensbroek, R.A.; Kamal, A.; Baars, A.M.; Verhage, M.; Spruijt, B.M.

    2003-01-01

    The mossy fibers of the hippocampus display NMDA-receptor independent long-term plasticity. A number of studies addressed the role of mossy fiber long-term plasticity in memory, but have provided contrasting results. Here, we have exploited a genetic model, the rab3A null-mutant, which is characteri

  13. Cognition and Emotion in Cerebellar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cerebral cortical “association” areas important for thought, reasoning, motivation, memory and feelings. Damage to the non-motor ... tolerance. Psychosocial interaction may be impaired, particularly in children with cerebellar damage. Dementia is uncommon in cerebellar ...

  14. Fibre-Optic Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Saxena

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparative study of mechanical, ring-laser and fibre-optic gyroscopes has been made. The single mode fibre-optic gyroscope having a large number of turns of the optical fibre in the spool, replacing He-Ne gas laser by a GaAs laser diode, there by reducing the noise level, and using fully integrated fibre-optics, works out to be the best in the final analysis, for safe navigation and homing of the guided missiles.

  15. Fibre illumination system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Source: EP2426402A The invention relates to a fibre illumination module and system for the collection and delivery of daylight for illumination purposes. The fibre illumination module comprises a plurality of collector elements, each collector element comprising an input fibre having a first end......-directional arrangement. The fibre illumination system comprises a fibre illumination module of the above-mentioned type. By the invention, daylight may be exploited for the illumination of remote interior spaces of buildings in order to save energy, and improve the well-being of users in both housing and working...

  16. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  17. Cerebellar Zones: A Personal History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Voogd (Jan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar zones were there, of course, before anyone noticed them. Their history is that of young people, unhindered by preconceived ideas, who followed up their observations with available or new techniques. In the 1960s of the last century, the circumstances were fortunate because thr

  18. Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, P.D. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Acad. Dept. of Radiol.; Blaser, S.; Armstrong, D.; Chuang, S.; Harwood-Nash, D. [Division of Neuroradiology, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Humphreys, R.P. [Division of Neurosurgery, The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    We review the presentation, imaging findings and outcome in 18 children with cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVM). This group is of particular interest because of the reported poor outcome despite modern imaging and neurosurgical techniques. All children had CT and 15 underwent catheter angiography at presentation. Several of the children in the latter part of the study had MRI. Of the 18 children, 17 presented with a ruptured AVM producing intracranial haemorrhage. The remaining child presented with temporal lobe epilepsy and was shown to have temporal, vermian and cerebellar hemisphere AVM. This child had other stigmata of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. Three other children had pre-existing abnormalities of possible relevance. One had a vascular malformation of the cheek and mandible, one a documented chromosomal abnormality and another a midline cleft upper lip and palate. Six of the 17 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM died within 7 days of the ictus. Vascular pathology other than an AVM was found in 10 of the 14 children with a ruptured cerebellar AVM who had angiography: 4 intranidal aneurysms, 5 venous aneurysms and 2 cases of venous outflow obstruction (one child having both an aneurysm and obstruction). The severity of clinical presentation was directly related to the size of the acute haematoma, which was a reasonable predictor of outcome. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 23 refs.

  19. Long-term rearrangements of hippocampal mossy fiber terminal connectivity in the adult regulated by experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Ivan; Gogolla, Nadine; Alberi, Stefano; Santos, Alexandre Ferrao; Muller, Dominique; Caroni, Pico

    2006-06-01

    We investigated rearrangements of connectivity between hippocampal mossy fibers and CA3 pyramidal neurons. We found that mossy fibers establish 10-15 local terminal arborization complexes (LMT-Cs) in CA3, which exhibit major differences in size and divergence in adult mice. LMT-Cs exhibited two types of long-term rearrangements in connectivity in the adult: progressive expansion of LMT-C subsets along individual dendrites throughout life, and pronounced increases in LMT-C complexities in response to an enriched environment. In organotypic slice cultures, subsets of LMT-Cs also rearranged extensively and grew over weeks and months, altering the strength of preexisting connectivity, and establishing or dismantling connections with pyramidal neurons. Differences in LMT-C plasticity reflected properties of individual LMT-Cs, not mossy fibers. LMT-C maintenance and growth were regulated by spiking activity, mGluR2-sensitive transmitter release from LMTs, and PKC. Thus, subsets of terminal arborization complexes by mossy fibers rearrange their local connectivities in response to experience and age throughout life.

  20. Plasticity-dependent, full detonation at hippocampal mossy fiber–CA3 pyramidal neuron synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyleta, Nicholas P; Borges-Merjane, Carolina; Jonas, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mossy fiber synapses on CA3 pyramidal cells are 'conditional detonators' that reliably discharge postsynaptic targets. The 'conditional' nature implies that burst activity in dentate gyrus granule cells is required for detonation. Whether single unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) trigger spikes in CA3 neurons remains unknown. Mossy fiber synapses exhibit both pronounced short-term facilitation and uniquely large post-tetanic potentiation (PTP). We tested whether PTP could convert mossy fiber synapses from subdetonator into detonator mode, using a recently developed method to selectively and noninvasively stimulate individual presynaptic terminals in rat brain slices. Unitary EPSPs failed to initiate a spike in CA3 neurons under control conditions, but reliably discharged them after induction of presynaptic short-term plasticity. Remarkably, PTP switched mossy fiber synapses into full detonators for tens of seconds. Plasticity-dependent detonation may be critical for efficient coding, storage, and recall of information in the granule cell–CA3 cell network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17977.001 PMID:27780032

  1. Conditions and constraints for astrocyte calcium signaling in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, Martin D; Kracun, Sebastian; Lu, Xiao-Hong; Shih, Tiffany; Jackson-Weaver, Olan; Tong, Xiaoping; Xu, Ji; Yang, X William; O'Dell, Thomas J; Marvin, Jonathan S; Ellisman, Mark H; Bushong, Eric A; Looger, Loren L; Khakh, Baljit S

    2014-04-16

    The spatiotemporal activities of astrocyte Ca²⁺ signaling in mature neuronal circuits remain unclear. We used genetically encoded Ca²⁺ and glutamate indicators as well as pharmacogenetic and electrical control of neurotransmitter release to explore astrocyte activity in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway. Our data revealed numerous localized, spontaneous Ca²⁺ signals in astrocyte branches and territories, but these were not driven by neuronal activity or glutamate. Moreover, evoked astrocyte Ca²⁺ signaling changed linearly with the number of mossy fiber action potentials. Under these settings, astrocyte responses were global, suppressed by neurotransmitter clearance, and mediated by glutamate and GABA. Thus, astrocyte engagement in the fully developed mossy fiber pathway was slow and territorial, contrary to that frequently proposed for astrocytes within microcircuits. We show that astrocyte Ca²⁺ signaling functionally segregates large volumes of neuropil and that these transients are not suited for responding to, or regulating, single synapses in the mossy fiber pathway.

  2. Extracellular proteolysis in structural and functional plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiera, Grzegorz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2015-01-01

    Brain is continuously altered in response to experience and environmental changes. One of the underlying mechanisms is synaptic plasticity, which is manifested by modification of synapse structure and function. It is becoming clear that regulated extracellular proteolysis plays a pivotal role in the structural and functional remodeling of synapses during brain development, learning and memory formation. Clearly, plasticity mechanisms may substantially differ between projections. Mossy fiber synapses onto CA3 pyramidal cells display several unique functional features, including pronounced short-term facilitation, a presynaptically expressed long-term potentiation (LTP) that is independent of NMDAR activation, and NMDA-dependent metaplasticity. Moreover, structural plasticity at mossy fiber synapses ranges from the reorganization of projection topology after hippocampus-dependent learning, through intrinsically different dynamic properties of synaptic boutons to pre- and postsynaptic structural changes accompanying LTP induction. Although concomitant functional and structural plasticity in this pathway strongly suggests a role of extracellular proteolysis, its impact only starts to be investigated in this projection. In the present report, we review the role of extracellular proteolysis in various aspects of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that among perisynaptic proteases, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system, β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and metalloproteinases play a crucial role in shaping plastic changes in this projection. We discuss recent advances and emerging hypotheses on the roles of proteases in mechanisms underlying mossy fiber target specific synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

  3. Extracellular proteolysis in structural and functional plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz eWiera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain is continuously altered in response to experience and environmental changes. One of the underlying mechanisms is synaptic plasticity, which is manifested by modification of synapse structure and function. It is becoming clear that regulated extracellular proteolysis plays a pivotal role in the structural and functional remodeling of synapses during brain development, learning and memory formation. Clearly, plasticity mechanisms may substantially differ between projections. Mossy fiber synapses onto CA3 pyramidal cells display several unique functional features, including pronounced short-term facilitation, a presynaptically expressed LTP that is independent of NMDAR activation, and NMDA-dependent metaplasticity. Moreover, structural plasticity at mossy fiber synapses ranges from the reorganization of projection topology after hippocampus-dependent learning, through intrinsically different dynamic properties of synaptic boutons to pre- and postsynaptic structural changes accompanying LTP induction. Although concomitant functional and structural plasticity in this pathway strongly suggests a role of extracellular proteolysis, its impact only starts to be investigated in this projection. In the present report, we review the role of extracellular proteolysis in various aspects of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that among perisynaptic proteases, tPA/plasmin system, β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 and metalloproteinases play a crucial role in shaping plastic changes in this projection. We discuss recent advances and emerging hypotheses on the roles of proteases in mechanisms underlying mossy fiber target specific synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

  4. Differential mechanisms of transmission at three types of mossy fiber synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, K; Suares, G; Lawrence, J J; Philips-Tansey, E; McBain, C J

    2000-11-15

    The axons of the dentate gyrus granule cells, the so-called mossy fibers, innervate their inhibitory interneuron and pyramidal neuron targets via both anatomically and functionally specialized synapses. Mossy fiber synapses onto inhibitory interneurons were comprised of either calcium-permeable (CP) or calcium-impermeable (CI) AMPA receptors, whereas only calcium-impermeable AMPA receptors existed at CA3 principal neuron synapses. In response to brief trains of high-frequency stimuli (20 Hz), pyramidal neuron synapses invariably demonstrated short-term facilitation, whereas interneuron EPSCs demonstrated either short-term facilitation or depression. Facilitation at all CI AMPA synapses was voltage independent, whereas EPSCs at CP AMPA synapses showed greater facilitation at -20 than at -80 mV, consistent with a role for the postsynaptic unblock of polyamines. At pyramidal cell synapses, mossy fiber EPSCs possessed marked frequency-dependent facilitation (commencing at stimulation frequencies >0.1 Hz), whereas EPSCs at either type of interneuron synapse showed only moderate frequency-dependent facilitation or underwent depression. Presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) decreased transmission at all three synapse types in a frequency-dependent manner. However, after block of presynaptic mGluRs, transmission at interneuron synapses still did not match the dynamic range of EPSCs at pyramidal neuron synapses. High-frequency stimulation of mossy fibers induced long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD), or no change at pyramidal neuron synapses, interneuron CP AMPA synapses, and CI AMPA synapses, respectively. Induction of LTP or LTD altered the short-term plasticity of transmission onto both pyramidal cells and interneuron CP AMPA synapses by a mechanism consistent with changes in release probability. These data reveal differential mechanisms of transmission at three classes of mossy fiber synapse made onto distinct targets.

  5. Cerebellar ataxia and functional genomics : Identifying the routes to cerebellar neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to motor dysfunction, balance problems, and limb and gait ataxia. These include among others, the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive cerebellar ataxias such as Fried

  6. Nonsurgical cerebellar mutism (anarthria) in two children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewasingh, Leena D; Kadhim, Hazim; Christophe, Catherine; Christiaens, Florence J; Dan, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism (anarthria) is a well-described complication of posterior fossa tumor resection. It is accompanied by a characteristic behavior including irritability and autistic features. This syndrome is typically reversible within days to months. Underlying pathophysiology is unknown. We describe two children who presented with a similar clinical finding after nonsurgical cerebellar involvement, hemolytic-uremic syndrome in one and cerebellitis in the other. Postmortem pathologic findings in the first patient indicated cerebellar ischemic necrosis. Single-photon emission computed tomography in the second patient revealed diffuse cerebellar hypoperfusion with no supratentorial abnormalities, refuting a phenomenon of diaschisis between cerebellar and frontal connections. These findings confirm that this clinical syndrome may occur in a nonsurgical, nontraumatic context. They are consistent with recent integrative hypotheses explaining cerebellar anarthria.

  7. Mineral fibres and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J C

    1984-04-01

    A synthesis is presented of the salient findings to date from laboratory and epidemiological research, on the health effects of asbestos and other natural and man-made mineral fibres. Experimental evidence suggests that all mineral fibres are capable of causing fibrosis and malignancy, with chrysotile at least as pathogenic as other fibres. However, penetration, retention and phagocytosis are affected by size and shape and reactivity and durability by physico-chemical properties. Thus it is not surprising that in man the results of exposure vary considerably with fibre type and industrial process. A considerable body of evidence suggests that chrysotile has seldom, if ever, caused peritoneal mesothelioma and that the great majority of pleural mesotheliomas are also attributable to crocidolite or amosite. Without more reliable information on intensity and duration of exposure by fibre type, the epidemiological evidence on this point cannot be wholly conclusive. There are stronger grounds from a limited number of cohort studies for believing that in relation to estimated exposure, the risk of lung cancer has been much higher in textile plants than in fibre production or in the manufacture of friction products, with asbestos-cement plants somewhere in between. The data on man-made fibre production remains equivocal. It is concluded that attempts to regulate asbestos without regard for fibre type, although perhaps adequate for lung cancer and fibrosis, may do little to reduce the risk of mesothelioma. The search for safe fibre substitutes for asbestos will remain difficult until the parameters of pathogenicity are better understood.

  8. SALIENT FEATURES OF BAMBOO FIBRE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subrata; Das

    2007-01-01

    Bamboo fibre is a regenerated cellulosic fibre produced from bamboo.Starchy pulp is produced from bamboo stems and leaves through a process of alkaline hydrolysis and multi- phase bleaching.Further chemical processes produce bamboo fibre.

  9. SALIENT FEATURES OF BAMBOO FIBRE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subrata Das

    2007-01-01

    @@ Bamboo fibre is a regenerated cellulosic fibre produced from bamboo. Starchy pulp is produced from bamboo stems and leaves through a process of alkaline hydrolysis and multiphase bleaching. Further chemical processes produce bamboo fibre.

  10. Similar cation channels mediate protection from cerebellar exitotoxicity by exercise and inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Shani; Ofek, Keren; Barbash, Shahar; Meiri, Hanoch; Kovalev, Eugenia; Greenberg, David Samuel; Soreq, Hermona; Shoham, Shai

    2012-03-01

    Exercise and inherited factors both affect recovery from stroke and head injury, but the underlying mechanisms and interconnections between them are yet unknown. Here, we report that similar cation channels mediate the protective effect of exercise and specific genetic background in a kainate injection model of cerebellar stroke. Microinjection to the cerebellum of the glutamatergic agonist, kainate, creates glutamatergic excito\\xE2\\x80\\x90toxicity characteristic of focal stroke, head injury or alcoholism. Inherited protection and prior exercise were both accompanied by higher cerebellar expression levels of the Kir6.1 ATP-dependent potassium channel in adjacent Bergmann glia, and voltage-gated KVbeta2 and cyclic nucleotide-gated cation HCN1 channels in basket cells. Sedentary FVB/N and exercised C57BL/6 mice both expressed higher levels of these cation channels compared to sedentary C57BL/6 mice, and were both found to be less sensitive to glutamate toxicity. Moreover, blocking ATP-dependent potassium channels with Glibenclamide enhanced kainate-induced cell death in cerebellar slices from the resilient sedentary FVB/N mice. Furthermore, exercise increased the number of acetylcholinesterase-positive fibres in the molecular layer, reduced cerebellar cytokine levels and suppressed serum acetylcholinesterase activity, suggesting anti-inflammatory protection by enhanced cholinergic signalling. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that routine exercise and specific genetic backgrounds confer protection from cerebellar glutamatergic damages by similar molecular mechanisms, including elevated expression of cation channels. In addition, our findings highlight the involvement of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in insult-inducible cerebellar processes. These mechanisms are likely to play similar roles in other brain regions and injuries as well, opening new venues for targeted research efforts.

  11. Crossed cerebral - cerebellar diaschisis : MRI evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available MRI, done later in life, in two patients with infantile hemiplegia syndrome showed significant volume loss in the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the side of the affected cerebrum. The cerebellar volume loss seemed to correlate with the degree of volume loss in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. These observations provide morphological evidence of the phenomenon of crossed cerebral-cerebellar diaschisis (CCD. Functional neuroimaging studies in support of the concept of CCD has been critically reviewed.

  12. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias : the current state of affairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, S.; van de Warrenburg, B. P. C.; Willemsen, M. A. A. P.; Cluitmans, M.; Scheffer, H.; Kremer, B. P.; Knoers, N. V. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Among the hereditary ataxias, autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCAs) encompass a diverse group of rare neurodegenerative disorders in which a cerebellar syndrome is the key clinical feature. The clinical overlap between the different cerebellar ataxias, the occasional atypical phenotypes, an

  13. Genetics Home Reference: VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description VLDLR -associated cerebellar hypoplasia is an inherited condition that affects the development ...

  14. [Peripheral neuropathies associated with hereditary cerebellar ataxias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheim, M; Tranchant, C

    2011-01-01

    Inherited cerebellar ataxias constitute a complicated and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders affecting the cerebellum and/or spinocerebellar tract, spinal cord and peripheral nerves. A peripheral neuropathy is frequently seen in inherited cerebellar ataxias although it rarely reveals the disease. Moreover, the peripheral neuropathy is helpful for the diagnostic procedure and contributes to the functional prognosis of the disease. Thus, electroneuromyography is essential in the algorithm for the diagnosis of inherited cerebellar ataxias, as well as brain MRI (looking especially for cerebellar atrophy) and the assessment of several biomarkers (alpha-foetoprotein, vitamin E, albumin, LDL cholesterol, lactic acid, phytanic acid).

  15. High Threshold, Proximal Initiation, and Slow Conduction Velocity of Action Potentials in Dentate Granule Neuron Mossy Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Kress, Geraldine J.; Dowling, Margaret J.; Meeks, Julian P.; Mennerick, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Dentate granule neurons give rise to some of the smallest unmyelinated fibers in the mammalian CNS, the hippocampal mossy fibers. These neurons are also key regulators of physiological and pathophysiological information flow through the hippocampus. We took a comparative approach to studying mossy fiber action potential initiation and propagation in hippocampal slices from juvenile rats. Dentate granule neurons exhibited axonal action potential initiation significantly more proximal than CA3 ...

  16. Differential regulation of BDNF, synaptic plasticity and sprouting in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway of male and female rats

    OpenAIRE

    SCHARFMAN, HELEN E.; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have described potent effects of BDNF, 17β-estradiol or androgen on hippocampal synapses and their plasticity. Far less information is available about the interactions between 17β-estradiol and BDNF in hippocampus, or interactions between androgen and BDNF in hippocampus. Here we review the regulation of BDNF in the mossy fiber pathway, a critical part of hippocampal circuitry. We discuss the emerging view that 17β-estradiol upregulates mossy fiber BDNF synthesis in the adult fem...

  17. Influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on pathfinding of dentate granule cell axons, the hippocampal mossy fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura Makoto; Tamura Naohiro; Ikeda Takamitsu; Koyama Ryuta; Ikegaya Yuji; Matsuki Norio; Yamada Maki K

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Mossy fibers, the dentate granule cell axons, are generated throughout an animal's lifetime. Mossy fiber paths and synapses are primarily restricted to the stratum lucidum within the CA3 region. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin family protein that activates Trk neurotrophin receptors, is highly expressed in the stratum lucidum in an activity-dependent manner. The addition of a Trk neurotrophin receptor inhibitor, K252a, to cultured hippocampal slices induced a...

  18. Differential regulation of BDNF, synaptic plasticity and sprouting in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway of male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E; MacLusky, Neil J

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have described potent effects of BDNF, 17β-estradiol or androgen on hippocampal synapses and their plasticity. Far less information is available about the interactions between 17β-estradiol and BDNF in hippocampus, or interactions between androgen and BDNF in hippocampus. Here we review the regulation of BDNF in the mossy fiber pathway, a critical part of hippocampal circuitry. We discuss the emerging view that 17β-estradiol upregulates mossy fiber BDNF synthesis in the adult female rat, while testosterone exerts a tonic suppression of mossy fiber BDNF levels in the adult male rat. The consequences are interesting to consider: in females, increased excitability associated with high levels of BDNF in mossy fibers could improve normal functions of area CA3, such as the ability to perform pattern completion. However, memory retrieval may lead to anxiety if stressful events are recalled. Therefore, the actions of 17β-estradiol on the mossy fiber pathway in females may provide a potential explanation for the greater incidence of anxiety-related disorders and post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) in women relative to men. In males, suppression of BDNF-dependent plasticity in the mossy fibers may be protective, but at the 'price' of reduced synaptic plasticity in CA3. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'BDNF Regulation of Synaptic Structure, Function, and Plasticity'.

  19. Influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on pathfinding of dentate granule cell axons, the hippocampal mossy fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Makoto; Tamura, Naohiro; Ikeda, Takamitsu; Koyama, Ryuta; Ikegaya, Yuji; Matsuki, Norio; Yamada, Maki K

    2009-01-31

    Mossy fibers, the dentate granule cell axons, are generated throughout an animal's lifetime. Mossy fiber paths and synapses are primarily restricted to the stratum lucidum within the CA3 region. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin family protein that activates Trk neurotrophin receptors, is highly expressed in the stratum lucidum in an activity-dependent manner. The addition of a Trk neurotrophin receptor inhibitor, K252a, to cultured hippocampal slices induced aberrant extension of mossy fibers into ectopic regions. BDNF overexpression in granule cells ameliorated the mossy fiber pathway abnormalities caused by a submaximal dose of K252a. A similar rescue was observed when BDNF was expressed in CA3 pyramidal cells, most notably in mossy fibers distal to the expression site. These findings are the first to clarify the role of BDNF in mossy fiber pathfinding, not as an attractant cue but as a regulator, possibly acting in a paracrine manner. This effect of BDNF may be as a signal for new fibers to fasciculate and extend further to form synapses with neurons that are far from active BDNF-expressing synapses. This mechanism would ensure the emergence of new independent dentate gyrus-CA3 circuits by the axons of new-born granule cells.

  20. Influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on pathfinding of dentate granule cell axons, the hippocampal mossy fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mossy fibers, the dentate granule cell axons, are generated throughout an animal's lifetime. Mossy fiber paths and synapses are primarily restricted to the stratum lucidum within the CA3 region. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a neurotrophin family protein that activates Trk neurotrophin receptors, is highly expressed in the stratum lucidum in an activity-dependent manner. The addition of a Trk neurotrophin receptor inhibitor, K252a, to cultured hippocampal slices induced aberrant extension of mossy fibers into ectopic regions. BDNF overexpression in granule cells ameliorated the mossy fiber pathway abnormalities caused by a submaximal dose of K252a. A similar rescue was observed when BDNF was expressed in CA3 pyramidal cells, most notably in mossy fibers distal to the expression site. These findings are the first to clarify the role of BDNF in mossy fiber pathfinding, not as an attractant cue but as a regulator, possibly acting in a paracrine manner. This effect of BDNF may be as a signal for new fibers to fasciculate and extend further to form synapses with neurons that are far from active BDNF-expressing synapses. This mechanism would ensure the emergence of new independent dentate gyrus-CA3 circuits by the axons of new-born granule cells.

  1. Fibre reinforced polymer nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlasveld, D.P.N.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis the results are described of the research on a combination of two types of composites: thermoplastic nanocomposites and continuous fibre composites. In this three-phase composite the main reinforcing phase are continuous glass or carbon fibres, and the matrix consists of a polyamide 6

  2. Chalcogenide Fibre Displacement Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Fibre optic technology offers the possibility for developing of a variety of physical sensors for a wide range of physical parameters. The main...integrating sphere. The use of chalcogenide rather quartz fibre optic highly increases the Sensitivity of the sensor. Experimental set-up, transmission characteristics and technical parameters are presented.

  3. Photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Sanchez Bjarklev, Araceli

    Photonic crystal fibres represent one of the most active research areas today in the field of optics. The diversity of applications that may be addressed by these fibres and their fundamental appeal, by opening up the possibility of guiding light in a radically new way compared to conventional...... optical fibres, have spun an interest from almost all areas of optics and photonics. The aim of this book is to provide an understanding of the different types of photonic crystal fibres and to outline some of the many new and exciting applications that these fibres offer. The book is intended for both...... readers with a general interest in photonic crystals, as well as for scientists who are entering the field and desire a broad overview as well as a solid starting point for further specialized stuides. Teh book, therefore, covers bothe general aspects such as the link from classical optics to photonic...

  4. On defining dietary fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Jonathan W

    2003-02-01

    Establishing a definition for dietary fibre has historically been a balance between nutrition knowledge and analytical method capabilities. While the most widely accepted physiologically-based definitions have generally been accurate in defining the dietary fibre in foods, scientists and regulators have tended, in practice, to rely on analytical procedures as the definitional basis in fact. As a result, incongruities between theory and practice have resulted in confusion regarding the components that make up dietary fibre. In November 1998 the president of the American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC) appointed an expert scientific review committee and charged it with the task of reviewing and, if necessary, updating the definition of dietary fibre. The committee was further charged with assessing the state of analytical methodology and making recommendations relevant to the updated definition. After due deliberation, an updated definition of dietary fibre was delivered to the AACC Board of Directors for consideration and adoption (Anon, 2000; Jones 2000b). The updated definition includes the same food components as the historical working definition used for approximately 30 years (a very important point, considering that the majority of the research of the past 30 years delineating the positive health effects of dietary fibre is based on that working definition). However, the updated definition more clearly delineates the make-up of dietary fibre and its physiological functionality. As a result, relatively few changes will be necessary in analytical methodology. Current methodologies, in particular AACC-approved method of analysis 32-05 (Grami, 2000), Association of Official Analytical Chemists' official method of analysis 985.29 (Horwitz, 2000a) or AACC 32-07 (Grami, 2000) Association of Official Analytical Chemists 991.43 (Horwitz, 2000a) will continue to be sufficient and used for most foods. A small number of additional methods will be necessary to

  5. In vivo BDNF modulation of adult functional and morphological synaptic plasticity at hippocampal mossy fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Palacio-Schjetnan, Andrea; Escobar, Martha L

    2008-11-07

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a key regulator and mediator of long-term synaptic modifications related to learning and memory maintenance. Our previous studies show that application of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) sufficient to elicit LTP at the dentate gyrus (DG)-CA3 pathway produces mossy fiber structural modifications 7 days after tetanic stimulation. In the present study, we show that acute intrahippocampal microinfusion of BDNF induces a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy in the DG-CA3 projection of anesthetized adult rats. Furthermore, we show that BDNF functional modifications in synaptic efficacy are accompanied by a presynaptic structural long-lasting reorganization at the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway. These findings support the idea that BDNF plays an important role as synaptic messenger of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the adult mammalian brain, in vivo.

  6. The clinical presentation of preterm cerebellar haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Ecury-Goossen (Ginette); J. Dudink (Jeroen); M. Leguin (Maarten); M. Feijen-Roon (Monique); S. Horsch (Sandra); P. Govaert (Paul)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this study was to evaluate clinical symptoms and findings on cranial ultrasound (CUS) in preterm infants with cerebellar haemorrhage through retrospective analysis of all preterm infants with a postnatal CUS or MRI diagnosis of cerebellar haemorrhage admitted in a tertia

  7. Surviving mossy cells enlarge and receive more excitatory synaptic input in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Thamattoor, Ajoy K; LeRoy, Christopher; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    Numerous hypotheses of temporal lobe epileptogenesis have been proposed, and several involve hippocampal mossy cells. Building on previous hypotheses we sought to test the possibility that after epileptogenic injuries surviving mossy cells develop into super-connected seizure-generating hub cells. If so, they might require more cellular machinery and consequently have larger somata, elongate their dendrites to receive more synaptic input, and display higher frequencies of miniature excitatory synaptic currents (mEPSCs). To test these possibilities pilocarpine-treated mice were evaluated using GluR2-immunocytochemistry, whole-cell recording, and biocytin-labeling. Epileptic pilocarpine-treated mice displayed substantial loss of GluR2-positive hilar neurons. Somata of surviving neurons were 1.4-times larger than in controls. Biocytin-labeled mossy cells also were larger in epileptic mice, but dendritic length per cell was not significantly different. The average frequency of mEPSCs of mossy cells recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin and bicuculline was 3.2-times higher in epileptic pilocarpine-treated mice as compared to controls. Other parameters of mEPSCs were similar in both groups. Average input resistance of mossy cells in epileptic mice was reduced to 63% of controls, which is consistent with larger somata and would tend to make surviving mossy cells less excitable. Other intrinsic physiological characteristics examined were similar in both groups. Increased excitatory synaptic input is consistent with the hypothesis that surviving mossy cells develop into aberrantly super-connected seizure-generating hub cells, and soma hypertrophy is indirectly consistent with the possibility of axon sprouting. However, no obvious evidence of hyperexcitable intrinsic physiology was found. Furthermore, similar hypertrophy and hyper-connectivity has been reported for other neuron types in the dentate gyrus, suggesting mossy cells are not unique in this regard. Thus

  8. GABA and Glutamate are not colocalized in mossy fiber terminals of developing rodent hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Guoxiang; Zhang, Lei; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Arroyo, Edguardo; Elkind, Jaclynn; Kundu, Suhali; Johnson, Brian; Smith, Colin J.; Cohen, Noam A.; Grady, Sean M.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that, in the developing rodent hippocampus, mossy fiber terminals release GABA together with glutamate. Here, we used transgenic glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67)-GFP expressing mice and multi-label immunohistochemistry to address whether glutamatergic and GABAergic markers are colocalized. We demonstrate that in the dentate gyrus, interneurons positive for GABA/GAD are sparsely distributed along the edge of the hilus, in a different pattern than the densely pack...

  9. Multiple forms of long-term synaptic plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses onto interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Galván, Emilio J; Cosgrove, Kathleen E.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) pathway originates from the dentate gyrus granule cells and provides a powerful excitatory synaptic drive to neurons in the dentate gyrus hilus and area CA3. Much of the early work on the MF pathway focused on its electrophysiological properties, and ability to drive CA3 pyramidal cell activity. Over the last ten years, however, a new focus on the synaptic interaction between granule cells with inhibitory interneurons has emerged. These data have revealed an i...

  10. Bidirectional Hebbian Plasticity at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses on CA3 Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Galván, Emilio J; Calixto, Eduardo; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2008-01-01

    Hippocampal area CA3 is critically involved in the formation of non-overlapping neuronal subpopulations (“pattern separation”) to store memory representations as distinct events. Efficient pattern separation relies on the strong and sparse excitatory input from the mossy fibers (MF) to pyramidal cells and feed-forward inhibitory interneurons. However, MF synapses on CA3 pyramidal cells undergo LTP, which, if unopposed, will degrade pattern separation as MF activation will now recruit addition...

  11. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  12. Cerebellar stroke-manifesting as mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Jagadesan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed.

  13. The bihemispheric posterior inferior cerebellar artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, Sean P. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Neurosurgery, Boston, MA (United States); Ozanne, Augustin; Alvarez, Hortensia; Lasjaunias, Pierre [Service de Neuroradiologie Diagnostic et Therapeutique, Hopital de Bicetre-Universite Paris-sud Orsay (France)

    2005-11-01

    Rarely, a solitary posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) will supply both cerebellar hemispheres. We report four cases of this variant. We present a retrospective review of clinical information and imaging of patients undergoing angiography at our institution to identify patients with a bihemispheric PICA. There were four patients: three males and one female. One patient presented with a ruptured arteriovenous malformation, and one with a ruptured aneurysm. Two patients had normal angiograms. The bihemispheric PICA was an incidental finding in all cases. The bihemispheric vessel arose from the dominant left vertebral artery, and the contralateral posterior inferior cerebellar artery was absent or hypoplastic. In all cases, contralateral cerebellar supply arose from a continuation of the ipsilateral PICA distal to the choroidal point and which crossed the midline dorsal to the vermis. We conclude that the PICA may supply both cerebellar hemispheres. This rare anatomic variant should be considered when evaluating patients with posterior fossa neurovascular disease. (orig.)

  14. Moiré Fibre Bragg Grating Written on Strained Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙磊; 冯新焕; 刘艳格; 张伟刚; 袁树忠; 开桂云; 董孝义

    2004-01-01

    Moiré fibre Bragg gratings are made in a single mode fibre and a polarization-maintaining fibre respectively, using an excimer KrF laser and a phase mask. Two gratings are written at the same location of the optical fibre. The wavelength spacing can be finely tuned from 0 to 1.86nm by straining the optical fibre during UV illumination.

  15. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detects mossy fiber sprouting in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malheiros, Jackeline M.; Polli, Roberson S.; Paiva, Fernando F.; Longo, Beatriz M.; Mello, Luiz E.; Silva, Afonso C.; Tannús, Alberto; Covolan, Luciene

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose Mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) is a frequent finding following status epilepticus (SE). The present study aimed to test the feasibility of using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) to detect MFS in the chronic phase of the well-established pilocarpine (Pilo) rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Methods To modulate MFS, cycloheximide (CHX), a protein synthesis inhibitor, was co-administered with Pilo in a sub-group of animals. In vivo MEMRI was performed 3 months after induction of SE and compared to the neo-Timm histological labeling of zinc mossy fiber terminals in the dentate gyrus (DG). Key findings Chronically epileptic rats displaying MFS as detected by neo-Timm histology had a hyperintense MEMRI signal in the DG, while chronically epileptic animals that did not display MFS had minimal MEMRI signal enhancement compared to non-epileptic control animals. A strong correlation (r = 0.81, P<0.001) was found between MEMRI signal enhancement and MFS. Significance This study shows that MEMRI is an attractive non-invasive method to detect mossy fiber sprouting in vivo and can be used as an evaluation tool in testing therapeutic approaches to manage chronic epilepsy. PMID:22642664

  16. Prenatal alcohol exposure inducing the apoptosis of mossy cells in hippocampus of SMS2-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai; Wu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoqing; Deng, Jiexin; Ma, Zhanyou; Fan, Wenjuan; He, Weiya; Deng, Jinbo

    2015-11-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis through the ceramide pathway, sphingomyelin synthase 2 knockout (SMS2-/-) mice were used to make the prenatal alcohol exposure model, and the role of ceramide regulation on alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis was studied in the offspring. Initially the levels of serum sphingomyelin (SM) were detected with enzymatic method in P0 pups after alcohol exposure in parents. Then the apoptosis of mossy cells in the offspring hippocampus was investigated after prenatal alcohol exposure with immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assay. Finally the expression of activated Caspase 8 and activated Caspase 3 in the offspring hippocampus was detected with Western blot analysis. Our results showed that SM levels were down-regulated in a dose-dependent manner (palcohol exposure in wild-type (WT) and SMS2-/- pups. However, SM levels of serum in SMS2-/- pups were significantly lower than that in WT pups (palcohol-induced neuroapoptosis. In both WT pups and SMS2-/- pups, the number of apoptotic mossy cells in the hippocampus increased after prenatal alcohol exposure in a dose dependent manner (palcohol exposure, consistent with results from TUNEL assay and immunocytochemistry. Our study suggests that mossy cells may be the easily attacked cells for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), and ceramide is involved in the alcohol-induced neural apoptosis. The mechanism probably lies in the accumulated ceramide in SMS2 mice, and the increase of activated Caspase 8 and Caspase 3 promotes alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis.

  17. Absence of hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting in transgenic mice overexpressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, X; Suri, C; Knusel, B; Noebels, J L

    2001-05-01

    Excess neuronal activity upregulates the expression of two neurotrophins, nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in adult hippocampus. Nerve growth factor has been shown to contribute the induction of aberrant hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, however the role of prolonged brain-derived neurotrophic factor exposure is uncertain. We examined the distribution and plasticity of mossy fibers in transgenic mice with developmental overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Despite 2--3-fold elevated BDNF levels in the hippocampus sufficient to increase the intensity of neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity in interneurons, no visible changes in mossy fiber Timm staining patterns were observed in the inner molecular layer of adult mutant hippocampus compared to wild-type mice. In addition, no changes of the mRNA expression of two growth-associated proteins, GAP-43 and SCG-10 were found. These data suggest that early and persistent elevations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in granule cells are not sufficient to elicit this pattern of axonal plasticity in the hippocampus.

  18. POLARISATION PRESERVING OPTICAL FIBRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    A micro-structured optical fibre having a cladding comprising a number of elements having a non-circular cross-section. Each element has at least one part extending outside a circle having the same cross-sectional area as the element. These extending parts are directed in the same direction....... This cladding structure provides polarisation preserving properties to the optical fibre. Optical fibres using this technology may have claddings with elements placed non-periodically as well as in a two-dimensional periodic lattice - such as cladding providing Photonic Band Gap (PBG) effects....

  19. Fibre illumination system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    the proximal end of the collection optics into the first end of the input fibre, each collector element having a principal axis for the collection of light defining an optical axis of the collector element. The optical axes of the collector elements are arranged in a radially outward pointing multi......Source: EP2426402A The invention relates to a fibre illumination module and system for the collection and delivery of daylight for illumination purposes. The fibre illumination module comprises a plurality of collector elements, each collector element comprising an input fibre having a first end...... and a second end, and a collection optics, the collection optics being configured to receive light incident on a distal end of the collection optics, to transfer at least partially the incident light to a proximal end of the collection optics, and to couple at least partially the transferred light from...

  20. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and plasticity in the infrapyramidal bundle of the mossy fiber projection: I. Co-regulation by activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt eRömer

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Besides the massive plasticity at the level of synapses, we find in the hippocampus of adult mice and rats two systems with very strong macroscopic structural plasticity: adult neurogenesis, that is the lifelong generation of new granule cells, and dynamic changes in the mossy fibers linking the dentate gyrus to area CA3. In particular the anatomy of the infrapyramidal mossy fiber tract (IMF changes in response to a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic stimuli. Because mossy fibers are the axons of granule cells, the question arises whether these two types of plasticity are linked. Using immunohistochemistry for markers associated with axonal growth and POMC-GFP mice to visualize the postmitotic maturation phase of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, we found that newly generated mossy fibers preferentially but not exclusively contribute to the IMF. The neurogenic stimulus of an enriched environment increased the volume of the IMF. In addition, the IMF grew with a time course consistent with axonal outgrowth from the newborn neurons after the induction of neurogenic seizures using kainate,.These results indicate that two aspects of plasticity in the adult hippocampus, mossy fiber size and neurogenesis, are related and may share underlying mechanisms. In a second, related study (Krebs et al., Frontiers in Neurogenesis ##reference## we have addressed the question of whether there is a shared genetics underlying both traits.

  1. Synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimuli in Purkinje cells in mouse cerebellar cortex Crus II in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ping Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sensory stimuli evoke responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs via the mossy fiber-granule cell pathway. However, the properties of synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimulation in cerebellar PCs are unknown. The present study investigated the synaptic responses of PCs in response to an air-puff stimulation on the ipsilateral whisker pad in urethane-anesthetized mice. METHODS AND MAIN RESULTS: Thirty-three PCs were recorded from 48 urethane-anesthetized adult (6-8-week-old HA/ICR mice by somatic or dendritic patch-clamp recording and pharmacological methods. Tactile stimulation to the ipsilateral whisker pad was delivered by an air-puff through a 12-gauge stainless steel tube connected with a pressurized injection system. Under current-clamp conditions (I = 0, the air-puff stimulation evoked strong inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs in the somata of PCs. Application of SR95531, a specific GABA(A receptor antagonist, blocked IPSPs and revealed stimulation-evoked simple spike firing. Under voltage-clamp conditions, tactile stimulation evoked a sequence of transient inward currents followed by strong outward currents in the somata and dendrites in PCs. Application of SR95531 blocked outward currents and revealed excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs in somata and a temporal summation of parallel fiber EPSCs in PC dendrites. We also demonstrated that PCs respond to both the onset and offset of the air-puff stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicated that tactile stimulation induced asynchronous parallel fiber excitatory inputs onto the dendrites of PCs, and failed to evoke strong EPSCs and spike firing in PCs, but induced the rapid activation of strong GABA(A receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the somata and dendrites of PCs in the cerebellar cortex Crus II in urethane-anesthetized mice.

  2. Facial stimulation induces long-term depression at cerebellar molecular layer interneuron–Purkinje cell synapses in vivo in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Lai eQiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar long-term synaptic plasticity has been proposed to provide a cellular mechanism for motor learning. Numerous studies have demonstrated the induction and mechanisms of synaptic plasticity at parallel fiber–Purkinje cell (PF–PC, parallel fiber–molecular layer interneurons (PF–MLI and mossy fiber–granule cell (MF–GC synapses, but no study has investigated sensory stimulation-evoked synaptic plasticity at MLI–PC synapses in the cerebellar cortex of living animals. We studied the expression and mechanism of MLI–PC GABAergic synaptic plasticity induced by a train of facial stimulation in urethane-anesthetized mice by cell-attached recordings and pharmacological methods. We found that 1 Hz, but not a 2 Hz or 4 Hz, facial stimulation induced a long-term depression (LTD of GABAergic transmission at MLI–PC synapses, which was accompanied with a decrease in the stimulation-evoked pause of spike firing in PCs, but did not induce a significant change in the properties of the sensory-evoked spike events of MLIs. The MLI–PC GABAergic LTD could be prevented by blocking cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptors, and could be pharmacologically induced by a CB1 receptor agonist. Additionally, 1 Hz facial stimulation delivered in the presence of a metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1 antagonist, JNJ16259685, still induced the MLI–PC GABAergic LTD, whereas blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors during 1 Hz facial stimulation abolished the expression of MLI–PC GABAergic LTD. These results indicate that sensory stimulation can induce an endocannabinoid (eCB-dependent LTD of GABAergic transmission at MLI–PC synapses via activation of NMDA receptors in cerebellar cortical Crus II in vivo in mice. Our results suggest that the sensory stimulation-evoked MLI–PC GABAergic synaptic plasticity may play a critical role in motor learning in animals.

  3. Cerebellar Involvement in Ataxia and Generalized Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kros (Lieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The work described in this thesis was performed in order to elucidate the role of different cerebellar modules in ataxia and generalized epilepsy using various techniques including in vivo electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacological interventions, immunohistology a

  4. Synchrony and neural coding in cerebellar circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Person

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum regulates complex movements and is also implicated in cognitive tasks, and cerebellar dysfunction is consequently associated not only with movement disorders, but also with conditions like autism and dyslexia. How information is encoded by specific cerebellar firing patterns remains debated, however. A central question is how the cerebellar cortex transmits its integrated output to the cerebellar nuclei via GABAergic synapses from Purkinje neurons. Possible answers come from accumulating evidence that subsets of Purkinje cells synchronize their firing during behaviors that require the cerebellum. Consistent with models predicting that coherent activity of inhibitory networks has the capacity to dictate firing patterns of target neurons, recent experimental work supports the idea that inhibitory synchrony may regulate the response of cerebellar nuclear cells to Purkinje inputs, owing to the interplay between unusually fast inhibitory synaptic responses and high rates of intrinsic activity. Data from multiple laboratories lead to a working hypothesis that synchronous inhibitory input from Purkinje cells can set the timing and rate of action potentials produced by cerebellar nuclear cells, thereby relaying information out of the cerebellum. If so, then changing spatiotemporal patterns of Purkinje activity would allow different subsets of inhibitory neurons to control cerebellar output at different times. Here we explore the evidence for and against the idea that a synchrony code defines, at least in part, the input-output function between the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. We consider the literature on the existence of simple spike synchrony, convergence of Purkinje neurons onto nuclear neurons, and intrinsic properties of nuclear neurons that contribute to responses to inhibition. Finally, we discuss factors that may disrupt or modulate a synchrony code and describe the potential contributions of inhibitory synchrony to other motor

  5. Cerebellar mutism: review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Sehested, Astrid; Juhler, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention.......Cerebellar mutism is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. This article reviews current status with respect to incidence, anatomical substrate, pathophysiology, risk factors, surgical considerations, treatment options, prognosis and prevention....

  6. Enhanced mossy fiber sprouting and synapse formation in organotypic hippocampal cultures following transient domoic acid excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gómez, Anabel; Tasker, R Andrew

    2014-05-01

    We have previously reported evidence of BDNF upregulation and increased neurogenesis in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC) after a transient excitotoxic injury to the hippocampal CA1 area induced by low concentrations of the AMPA/kainate receptor agonist domoic acid (DOM). The changes observed in OHSC were consistent with observations in vivo, where low concentrations of DOM administered to rats during perinatal development caused increased BDNF and TrkB expression in the resulting adult animals. The in vivo low dose-DOM treatment also results in permanent alterations in hippocampal structure and function, including abnormal formation of dentate granule cell axons projecting to area CA3 (mossy fiber sprouting). Our objective in the current study is to determine if low concentrations of DOM induce mossy fiber sprouting and/or synaptogenesis in OHSC in order to facilitate future studies on the mechanisms of structural hippocampal plasticity induced by DOM. We report herein that application of a low concentration of DOM (2 μM) for 24 h followed by recovery induced a significant increase in the expression of the mossy fiber marker ZnT3 that progressed over time in culture. The DOM insult (2 μM, 24 h) also resulted in a significant upregulation of both the presynaptic marker synaptophysin and the postsynaptic marker PSD-95. All of the observed effects were fully antagonized by co-administration of the AMPA/kainate antagonists CNQX or NBQX but only partly by the NMDA antagonist CPP and not by the calcium channel blocker nifedipine. We conclude that exposure of OHSC to concentrations of DOM below those required to induce permanent neurotoxicity can induce a progressive change in hippocampal structure that can effectively model DOM effects in vivo.

  7. Presynaptic α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors enhance hippocampal mossy fiber glutamatergic transmission via PKA activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qing; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed widely in the CNS, and mediate both synaptic and perisynaptic activities of endogenous cholinergic inputs and pharmacological actions of exogenous compounds (e.g., nicotine and choline). Behavioral studies indicate that nicotine improves such cognitive functions as learning and memory. However, the mechanism of nicotine's action on cognitive function remains elusive. We performed patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons to determine the effect of nicotine on mossy fiber glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We found that nicotine in combination with NS1738, an α7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator, strongly potentiated the amplitude of evoked EPSCs (eEPSCs), and reduced the EPSC paired-pulse ratio. The action of nicotine and NS1738 was mimicked by PNU-282987 (an α7 nAChR agonist), and was absent in α7 nAChR knock-out mice. These data indicate that activation of α7 nAChRs was both necessary and sufficient to enhance the amplitude of eEPSCs. BAPTA applied postsynaptically failed to block the action of nicotine and NS1738, suggesting again a presynaptic action of the α7 nAChRs. We also observed α7 nAChR-mediated calcium rises at mossy fiber giant terminals, indicating the presence of functional α7 nAChRs at presynaptic terminals. Furthermore, the addition of PNU-282987 enhanced action potential-dependent calcium transient at these terminals. Last, the potentiating effect of PNU-282987 on eEPSCs was abolished by inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). Our findings indicate that activation of α7 nAChRs at presynaptic sites, via a mechanism involving PKA, plays a critical role in enhancing synaptic efficiency of hippocampal mossy fiber transmission.

  8. TwoB or not twoB: differential transmission at glutamatergic mossy fiber-interneuron synapses in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischofberger, Josef; Jonas, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Mossy fiber (MF) synapses are key stations for flow of information through the hippocampal formation. A major component of the output of the MF system is directed towards inhibitory interneurons. Recent studies have revealed that the functional properties of MF-interneuron synapses differ substantially from those of MF-CA3 pyramidal neuron synapses. Mossy-fiber-interneuron synapses in the stratum lucidum represent a continuum of functional subtypes, in which the subunit composition of postsynaptic AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors appears to be regulated in a coordinated manner.

  9. Area CA3 interneurons receive two spatially segregated mossy fiber inputs

    OpenAIRE

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E.; Galvan, Emilio J.; Meriney, Stephen D.; Barrionuevo, German

    2010-01-01

    Area CA3 receives two extrinsic excitatory inputs, the mossy fibers (MF) and the perforant path (PP). Interneurons with somata in str. lacunosum moleculare (L-M) of CA3 modulate the influence of the MF and PP on pyramidal cell activity by providing strong feed-forward inhibitory influence to pyramidal cells. Here we report that L-M interneurons receive two separate MF inputs, one to the dorsal dendrites from the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus (MFSDG), and a second to ventral dendri...

  10. Multibeam Fibre Laser Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    The appearance of the high power high brilliance fibre laser has opened for new possibilities in laser materials processing. In laser cutting this laser has demonstrated high cutting performance compared to the dominating cutting laser, the CO2-laser. However, quality problems in fibre-laser...... cutting have until now limited its application in metal cutting. In this paper the first results of proof-of-principle studies applying a new approach (patent pending) for laser cutting with high brightness short wavelength lasers will be presented. In the approach, multi beam patterns are applied...... to control the melt flow out of the cut kerf resulting in improved cut quality in metal cutting. The beam patterns in this study are created by splitting up beams from 2 single mode fibre lasers and combining these beams into a pattern in the cut kerf. The results are obtained with a total of 550 W of single...

  11. Optical fibre line failure detecting

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Feng

    2013-01-01

    With the development of modern communications, in order to meet the needs of social development and technological progress the optical fibre communications has become the main communication medium for its high reliability and security. Fibre-optic cable is the channel for signal transmission. It is an important component in the entire fibre-optic network. Once the fibre-optic cable fault happened, the entire communication system would be impacted seriously. When fault occurs, it is important ...

  12. Bilateral Cerebellar Cortical Dysplasia without Other Malformations: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Seok; Ahn Kook Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Sun Jin; Park, Jeong Mi [Catholic University Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Recent advances in MRI have revealed congenital brain malformations and subtle developmental abnormalities of the cerebral and cerebellar cortical architecture. Typical cerebellar cortical dysplasia as a newly categorized cerebellar malformation, has been seen in patients with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Cerebellar cortical dysplasia occurs at the embryonic stage and is often observed in healthy newborns. It is also incidentally and initially detected in adults without symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, cerebellar dysplasia without any related disorders is very rare. We describe the MRI findings in one patient with disorganized foliation of both cerebellar hemispheres without a related disorder or syndrome

  13. Fibre Optics in Undersea Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Talwar

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Role of optical fibres for underwater communication cables and hydrophones is discussed. The fibre optics cables provide an excellent solution to the historical bandwidth-diameter problems of conventional coaxial cables.Fibre optic hydrophones are found to have many more advantages apart from high sensitivity and large dynamic range, over the classical sound sensors used in underwater work.

  14. Single-mode optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Cancellieri, G

    1991-01-01

    This book describes signal propagation in single-mode optical fibres for telecommunication applications. Such description is based on the analysis of field propagation, considering waveguide properties and also some of the particular characteristics of the material fibre. The book covers such recent advances as, coherent transmissions; optical amplification; MIR fibres; polarization maintaining; polarization diversity and photon counting.

  15. Orientational Distribution of Fibres in Sheared Fibre Suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KU Xiao-Ke; LIN Jian-Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Motion of fibres in sheared fibre suspensions is simulated numerically by using the lattice Boltzmann method. The orientational distributions of the fibres are presented for different Reynolds numbers, Stokes numbers, shear rate and fibre aspect ratio. Some computational results are compared with the experimental data of pipe Bow, and the qualitative agreement is achieved. The results show that the orientational distributions are greatly affected by the Reynolds numbers, while relatively insensitive to the fibre aspect ratio. The Stokes number and shear rate have obvious influence on the orientation distribution.

  16. Changes in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuit in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Peng; An, Jie; Tan, Xin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2017-01-11

    Currently, 422 million adults suffer from diabetes worldwide, leading to tremendous disabilities and a great burden to families and society. Functional and structural MRIs have demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibit abnormalities in brain regions in the cerebral cortex. However, the changes of cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients remains unclear. In the current study, diffusion tensor imaging deterministic tractography and statistical analysis were employed to investigate abnormal cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients. This is the first study to investigate the altered cerebellar anatomical connectivity in T2DM patients. Decreased anatomical connections were found in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuits of T2DM patients, providing valuable new insights into the potential neuro-pathophysiology of diabetes-related motor and cognitive deficits.

  17. In vivo BDNF modulation of hippocampal mossy fiber plasticity induced by high frequency stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schjetnan, Andrea Gómez-Palacio; Escobar, Martha L

    2012-01-01

    Changes in synaptic efficacy and morphology have been proposed as mechanisms underlying learning and memory processes. In our previous studies, high frequency stimulation (HFS) sufficient to induce LTP at the hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) pathway, leads to MF synaptogenesis, in a prominent contralateral form, at the stratum oriens of hippocampal CA3 area. Recently we reported that acute intrahippocampal microinfusion of BDNF induces a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy at the MF projection accompanied by a structural reorganization at the CA3 area within the stratum oriens region in a prominent ipsilateral form. It is considered that the capacity of synapses to express plastic changes is itself subject to variation dependent on previous experience. Here we used intrahippocampal microinfusion of BDNF to analyze its effects on functional and structural synaptic plasticity induced by subsequent mossy fiber HFS sufficient to induce LTP in adult rats, in vivo. Our results show that BDNF modifies the ability of the MF pathway to present LTP by HFS. Moreover BDNF modified the structural reorganization pattern produced by HFS, presenting a balanced bilateral appearance. Microinfusion of K252a blocks the functional and morphological effects produced by BDNF, revealing that the BDNF modulation is dependent on its TrkB receptor activation. These findings support the idea that BDNF actions modify subsequent synaptic plasticity; a homeostatic mechanism thought to be essential for synaptic integration among prolonged temporal domains in the adult mammalian brain.

  18. Two Loci of expression for long-term depression at hippocampal mossy fiber-interneuron synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Saobo; McBain, Chris J

    2004-03-03

    Two distinct forms of long-term depression (LTD) exist at mossy fiber synapses between dentate gyrus granule cells and hippocampal CA3 stratum lucidum interneurons. Although induction of each form of LTD requires an elevation of postsynaptic intracellular Ca2+, at Ca2+-impermeable AMPA receptor (CI-AMPAR) synapses, induction is NMDA receptor (NMDAR) dependent, whereas LTD at Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptor (CP-AMPAR) synapses is NMDAR independent. However, the expression locus of either form of LTD is not known. Using a number of criteria, including the coefficient of variation, paired-pulse ratio, AMPA-NMDA receptor activity, and the low-affinity AMPAR antagonist gamma-D-glutamyl-glycine, we demonstrate that LTD expression at CP-AMPAR synapses is presynaptic and results from reduced transmitter release, whereas LTD expression at CI-AMPAR synapses is postsynaptic. The N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-AP2-clathrin adaptor protein 2 inhibitory peptide pep2m occluded LTD expression at CI-AMPAR synapses but not at CP-AMPAR synapses, confirming that CI-AMPAR LTD involves postsynaptic AMPAR trafficking. Thus, mossy fiber innervation of CA3 stratum lucidum interneurons occurs via two parallel systems targeted to either Ca2+-permeable or Ca2+-impermeable AMPA receptors, each with a distinct expression locus for long-term synaptic plasticity.

  19. Gating of long-term potentiation by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the cerebellum input stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Prestori

    Full Text Available The brain needs mechanisms able to correlate plastic changes with local circuit activity and internal functional states. At the cerebellum input stage, uncontrolled induction of long-term potentiation or depression (LTP or LTD between mossy fibres and granule cells can saturate synaptic capacity and impair cerebellar functioning, which suggests that neuromodulators are required to gate plasticity processes. Cholinergic systems innervating the cerebellum are thought to enhance procedural learning and memory. Here we show that a specific subtype of acetylcholine receptors, the α7-nAChRs, are distributed both in cerebellar mossy fibre terminals and granule cell dendrites and contribute substantially to synaptic regulation. Selective α7-nAChR activation enhances the postsynaptic calcium increase, allowing weak mossy fibre bursts, which would otherwise cause LTD, to generate robust LTP. The local microperfusion of α7-nAChR agonists could also lead to in vivo switching of LTD to LTP following sensory stimulation of the whisker pad. In the cerebellar flocculus, α7-nAChR pharmacological activation impaired vestibulo-ocular-reflex adaptation, probably because LTP was saturated, preventing the fine adjustment of synaptic weights. These results show that gating mechanisms mediated by specific subtypes of nicotinic receptors are required to control the LTD/LTP balance at the mossy fibre-granule cell relay in order to regulate cerebellar plasticity and behavioural adaptation.

  20. Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolaou, N.; Karagianni, L.; Sarakiniatti, M.V.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0533 Innovation & Sustainability. Fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) have been used in many applications over the years, from new construction to retrofitting. They are lightweight, no-corrosive, exhibit high specific strength and specific sti

  1. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  2. Modelling of photonic crystal fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    In the presenta ph.d. work a theoretical study of aspects of modelling photonic crystal fibres was carried out. Photonic crystal fibres form a class of optical waveguides where guidance is no longer provided by a difference in refractive index between core and cladding. Instead, guidance...... is provided by an arrangement of air-holes running along the length of the fibre. Depending on the geometry of the fibre, the guiding mechanism may be either arising from the formation of a photonic bandgap in the cladding structure (photonic bandgap fibre), or by an effect resembling total internal...... modes in contiguous fibre segments curved at different radii. Overall microbend loss is expressed as a statistical mean of mismatch losses. Extending a well proven, established formula for macrobending losses in stop index fibres, we provide an estimate of macrobend losses in an air-guiding photonic...

  3. A Specific Role for Hippocampal Mossy Fiber's Zinc in Rapid Storage of Emotional Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccom, Johnatan; Halley, Hélène; Daumas, Stéphanie; Lassalle, Jean Michel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the specific role of zinc present in large amounts in the synaptic vesicles of mossy fibers and coreleased with glutamate in the CA3 region. In previous studies, we have shown that blockade of zinc after release has no effect on the consolidation of spatial learning, while zinc is required for the consolidation of contextual fear…

  4. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  5. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  6. Correlated alterations in serotonergic and dopaminergic modulations at the hippocampal mossy fiber synapse in mice lacking dysbindin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Dysbindin-1 (dystrobrevin-binding protein 1, DTNBP1 is one of the promising schizophrenia susceptibility genes. Dysbindin protein is abundantly expressed in synaptic regions of the hippocampus, including the terminal field of the mossy fibers, and this hippocampal expression of dysbindin is strongly reduced in patients with schizophrenia. In the present study, we examined the functional role of dysbindin in hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synaptic transmission and its modulation using the sandy mouse, a spontaneous mutant with deletion in the dysbindin gene. Electrophysiological recordings were made in hippocampal slices prepared from adult male sandy mice and their wild-type littermates. Basic properties of the mossy fiber synaptic transmission in the mutant mice were generally normal except for slightly reduced frequency facilitation. Serotonin and dopamine, two major neuromodulators implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, can potentiate mossy fiber synaptic transmission probably via an increase in cAMP levels. Synaptic potentiation induced by serotonin and dopamine was very variable in magnitude in the mutant mice, with some mice showing prominent enhancement as compared with the wild-type mice. In addition, the magnitude of potentiation induced by these monoamines significantly correlated with each other in the mutant mice, indicating that a subpopulation of sandy mice has marked hypersensitivity to both serotonin and dopamine. While direct activation of the cAMP cascade by forskolin induced robust synaptic potentiation in both wild-type and mutant mice, this forskolin-induced potentaition correlated in magnitude with the serotonin-induced potentiation only in the mutant mice, suggesting a possible change in coupling of receptor activation to downstream signaling. These results suggest that the dysbindin deficiency could be an essential genetic factor that causes synaptic hypersensitivity to dopamine and serotonin. The altered

  7. A probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarsen, K.M. van; Kleinnijenhuis, M.; Jbabdi, S.; Sotiropoulos, S.N.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Cappellen van Walsum, A.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and their connectivity are gaining attraction, due to the important role the cerebellum plays in cognition and motor control. Atlases of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei are used to locate regions of interest in clinical and neuroscience studi

  8. Rhythmic finger tapping reveals cerebellar dysfunction in essential tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijink, A. W. G.; Broersma, M.; van der Stouwe, A. M. M.; van Wingen, G. A.; Groot, P. F. C.; Speelman, J. D.; Maurits, N. M.; van Rootselaar, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebellar circuits are hypothesized to play a central role in the pathogenesis of essential tremor. Rhythmic finger tapping is known to strongly engage the cerebellar motor circuitry. We characterize cerebellar and, more specifically, dentate nucleus function, and neural correlates of

  9. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  10. Paraneoplastic cerebellar dysfunction in Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Sazzad Manir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL manifests as acute/sub-acute nature. We report a case of 21 yr old male presented with acute cerebellar signs along with underlying HL.MRI brain was normal. CSF study was unremarkable. Patient was treated with six cycles of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. Neurological manifestations remarkably improved along with complete resolution of underlying HL. Anti-cancer therapy of underlying HL is the main strategy of treating associated PCD.

  11. Non-Linear Fibres for Widely Tunable Femtosecond Fibre Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard

    This Ph.D. thesis investigates how intramodal and intermodal nonlinear processes in few-moded fibres can be used to generate light sources at wavelengths outside the spectral gain-bands of rare-earth-doped opticalfibres. The design of two specialty few-moded fibres for use in a widely tunable...... femtosecond fibre laser is presented. The two fibres are used to facilitate the shifting of a soliton in a cascade configuration from the ytterbium gain-band and to a wavelength of 1280 nm. The temporal pulse duration is on a femtosecond scale with a pulse energy of 5 nJ. The experimentally observed soliton...... self-frequency shift and thereby the outcome of the experimental demonstration of the widely tunable femtosecond fibre laser is shown to depend highly on the chirped of the input pulse into the first few-moded fibre in the cascade setup. Furthermore, an alternative splicing process, with a combination...

  12. Vulnerability of mossy fiber targets in the rat hippocampus to forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M; Buzsáki, G

    1993-09-01

    Much of the work on forebrain ischemia in the hippocampus has focused on the phenomenon of delayed neuronal death in CA1. It is established that dentate granule cells and CA3 pyramidal cells are resistant to ischemia. However, much less is known about interneuronal involvement in CA3 or ischemic injury in the dentate hilus other than the fact that somatostatin neurons in the latter lose their immunoreactivity. We combined two sensitive methods--heat-shock protein (HSP72) immunocytochemistry and a newly developed Gallyas silver stain for demonstrating impaired cytoskeletal elements--to investigate the extent of ischemic damage to CA3 and the dentate hilus using the four-vessel-occlusion model for inducing forebrain ischemia. HSP72-like immunoreactivity was induced in neuronal populations previously shown to be vulnerable to ischemia. In addition, a distinct subset of interneurons in CA3 was also extremely sensitive to ischemia, even more so than the CA1 pyramidal cells. These neurons are located in the stratum lucidum of CA3 and possess a very high density of dendritic spines. In silver preparations, they were among the first to be impregnated as "dark" neurons, before CA1 pyramidal cells; microglial reaction was also initiated first in the stratum lucidum of CA3. Whereas CA1 damage was most prominent in the septal half of the hippocampus, hilar and CA3 interneuronal damage had a more extensive dorsoventral distribution. Our results also show a far greater extent of damage in hilar neurons than previously reported. At least four hilar cell types were consistently compromised: mossy cells, spiny fusiform cells, sparsely spiny fusiform cells, and long-spined multipolar cells. A common denominator of the injured neurons in CA3 and the hilus was the presence of spines on their dendrites, which in large part accounted for the far greater number of mossy fiber terminals they receive than their non-spiny neighbors. We suggest that the differential vulnerability of neuronal

  13. Fibre composite in driveline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, W.

    1989-03-01

    Apart from the geometric degrees of freedom of classical material, fibre composites as material for cardan shafts offer two further free parameters to the design engineer: The fiberment winding angle and the ratio of carbon and glass fibres. This results in a large scope of characteristics in terms of flexibility and torsion. In many cases it is therefore possible to use a one-piece shaft instead of a two-piece shaft, and a specific harmonization of the vibration characteristics of the driveline can be realized. In comparison with shafts made out of steel, mass is reduced by 40-50%, the moment of inertia of the mass by 35-40%. The Composite shaft fulfils the requirements of the performance specifications typical of the components concerned both in terms of engineering and efficiency.

  14. Fibre-optical microendoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, M; Bao, H; Kang, H

    2014-04-01

    Microendoscopy has been an essential tool in exploring micro/nano mechanisms in vivo due to high-quality imaging performance, compact size and flexible movement. The investigations into optical fibres, micro-scanners and miniature lens have boosted efficiencies of remote light delivery to sample site and signal collection. Given the light interaction with materials in the fluorescence imaging regime, this paper reviews two classes of compact microendoscopy based on a single fibre: linear optical microendoscopy and nonlinear optical microendoscopy. Due to the fact that fluorescence occurs only in the focal volume, nonlinear optical microendoscopy can provide stronger optical sectioning ability than linear optical microendoscopy, and is a good candidate for deep tissue imaging. Moreover, one-photon excited fluorescence microendoscopy as the linear optical microendoscopy suffers from severe photobleaching owing to the linear dependence of photobleaching rate on excitation laser power. On the contrary, nonlinear optical microendoscopy, including two-photon excited fluorescence microendoscopy and second harmonic generation microendoscopy, has the capability to minimize or avoid the photobleaching effect at a high excitation power and generate high image contrast. The combination of various nonlinear signals gained by the nonlinear optical microendoscopy provides a comprehensive insight into biophenomena in internal organs. Fibre-optical microendoscopy overcomes physical limitations of traditional microscopy and opens up a new path to achieve early cancer diagnosis and microsurgery in a minimally invasive and localized manner.

  15. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  16. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  17. Case of subacute cerebellar degeneration associated with pleocytosis and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Hiide; Anezaki, Toshiharu; Takashima, Noriko; Inuzuka, Takashi; Miyatake, Tadashi

    1988-02-01

    A 44 year old woman was healthy until January 3, 1986, when she had headache. On January 9, she developed gait ataxia and dysarthria. Cerebellar ataxia worsened rapidly. Aftar a week she could not sit without support and her consciousness was disturbed. Corticosteroid was administrated and consciousness proved alert, but cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria remained unchanged. The patient was found carcinoma of the lung in August 1986. Characteristic features of clinical and laboratory findings of this patient are acute progression, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis of 1,064/3 cells (860 mononuclear cell, 204 polymorphonuclear cell), and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning. Though the mechanism of acute cerebellar degeneration is still uncertained, inflammatory process was supported to exist in cerebellum of this case.

  18. Subcellular fractionation on Percoll gradient of mossy fiber synaptosomes: evoked release of glutamate, GABA, aspartate and glutamate decarboxylase activity in control and degranulated rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, P; Ben-Ari, Y; Roisin, M P

    1994-05-02

    Using discontinuous density gradient centrifugation in isotonic Percoll sucrose, we have characterized two subcellular fractions (PII and PIII) enriched in mossy fiber synaptosomes and two others (SII and SIII) enriched in small synaptosomes. These synaptosomal fractions were compared with those obtained from adult hippocampus irradiated at neonatal stage to destroy granule cells and their mossy fibers. Synaptosomes were viable as judged by their ability to release aspartate, glutamate and GABA upon K+ depolarization. After irradiation, compared to the control values, the release of glutamate and GABA was decreased by 57 and 74% in the PIII fraction, but not in the other fractions and the content of glutamate, aspartate and GABA was also decreased in PIII fraction by 62, 44 and 52% respectively. These results suggest that mossy fiber (MF) synaptosomes contain and release glutamate and GABA. Measurement of the GABA synthesizing enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase, exhibited no significant difference after irradiation, suggesting that GABA is not synthesized by this enzyme in mossy fibers.

  19. Involvement of Lipid Metabolism in Chemical Transmission Processes at Mossy Fiber Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-24

    glutamate release from synaptosomes. Neurochemical Research 16:35-41. 6. Dorman, R.V. 1991 ’GF , synthesis in isolated cerebellar glomeruli: effects of...ac’umulat ion of t; - • {in h ippo-ampa I mo•-sv t ibr nerve end• i ngs. Neurochemical Research 18: 1231 1237. I0. Sep parovic-, D. ind I)Dorman, ..V

  20. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Dysmorphia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toelle, Sandra P; Poretti, Andrea; Weber, Peter; Seute, Tatjana; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Unidentified bright objects (UBO) and tumors are well-known cerebellar abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Literature reports on malformative cerebellar anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), however, are scant. We retrospectively studied the clinical and neuroimaging findings of 5 patients with NF1 (4 females, age 6 to 29 years at last follow-up) and cerebellar anomalies. Cerebellar symptoms on neurological examination were mild or even not evident whereas learning disabilities were more or less pronounced in four patients. Two patients had cerebellar hypoplasia (diffusely enlarged cerebellar interfoliar spaces) and three cerebellar dysmorphias involving mainly one cerebellar hemisphere. In NF1, malformative cerebellar anomalies are rare (estimated prevalence of about 1%), but most likely underestimated and easily overlooked, because physicians tend to focus on more prevalent, obvious, and well-known findings such as optic pathway gliomas, other tumors, and UBO. This kind of cerebellar anomaly in NF1 has most likely a malformative origin, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. The individual clinical significance is difficult to determine. We suggest that cerebellar anomalies should be systematically evaluated in neuroimaging studies of NF1 patients.

  1. Climbing fiber signaling and cerebellar gain control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ohtsuki (Gen); C. Piochon (Claire); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe physiology of climbing fiber signals in cerebellar Purkinje cells has been studied since the early days of electrophysiology. Both the climbing fiber-evoked complex spike and the role of climbing fiber activity in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje

  2. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneghetti, G; Vorstrup, S; Mickey, B

    1984-01-01

    depression was evident in five patients with severe hemispheric low flow areas, which correlated with large, hypodense lesions on the computerized tomographic scan. In a sixth patient with a small, deep infarct, a transient crossed cerebellar low flow was observed, while the clinical symptoms persisted...... in the infarcted hemisphere, in which a period of relative hyperemia is frequently seen....

  3. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  4. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  5. Cerebellar endocannabinoids: retrograde signaling from purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaggi, Païkan

    2015-06-01

    The cerebellar cortex exhibits a strikingly high expression of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1), the cannabinoid binding protein responsible for the psychoactive effects of marijuana. CB1 is primarily found in presynaptic elements in the molecular layer. While the functional importance of cerebellar CB1 is supported by the effect of gene deletion or exogenous cannabinoids on animal behavior, evidence for a role of endocannabinoids in synaptic signaling is provided by in vitro experiments on superfused acute rodent cerebellar slices. These studies have demonstrated that endocannabinoids can be transiently released by Purkinje cells and signal at synapses in a direction opposite to information transfer (retrograde). Here, following a description of the reported expression pattern of the endocannabinoid system in the cerebellum, I review the accumulated in vitro data, which have addressed the mechanism of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling and identified 2-arachidonoylglycerol as the mediator of this signaling. The mechanisms leading to endocannabinoid release, the effects of CB1 activation, and the associated synaptic plasticity mechanisms are discussed and the remaining unknowns are pointed. Notably, it is argued that the spatial specificity of this signaling and the physiological conditions required for its induction need to be determined in order to understand endocannabinoid function in the cerebellar cortex.

  6. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma: a case-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Sreedhar Babu

    Full Text Available Cerebellar liponeurocytoma is a rare cerebellar neoplasm of adults with advanced neuronal / neurocytic and focal lipomatous differentiation, a low proliferative potential and a favorable clinical prognosis corresponding to World Health Organization grade I or II. Only a few cases have been described in the literature (approximately 20 cases by different names. A 48-years old female, presented with history of headache and dizziness associated with neck pain; restricted neck movements, drop attacks and occasional regurgitation of food since one year. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a right cerebellar mass lesion. Gross total resec- tion of the tumour was accomplished through a suboccipital craniotomy. The excised tissue was diagnosed as cerebellar liponeurocytoma, a rare entity, based on histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry. The morphological appearance of this neoplasm can be confused with that of oligodendroglioma, neurocytoma, ependymoma, medulloblastoma, solid hemangioblastoma and metastatic carcinomas etc., with unpredictable prognosis, which require postoperative radiotherapy, hence the importance of accurately diagnosing this rare neoplasm. This tumour should be added to the differential diagnosis of mass lesions of the posterior fossa.

  7. Cerebellar cortical inhibition and classical eyeblink conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Shaowen; Chen, Lu; Kim, Jeansok J; Thompson, Richard F

    2002-02-01

    The cerebellum is considered a brain structure in which memories for learned motor responses (e.g., conditioned eyeblink responses) are stored. Within the cerebellum, however, the relative importance of the cortex and the deep nuclei in motor learning/memory is not entirely clear. In this study, we show that the cerebellar cortex exerts both basal and stimulus-activated inhibition to the deep nuclei. Sequential application of a gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) agonist and a noncompetitive GABA(A)R antagonist allows selective blockade of stimulus-activated inhibition. By using the same sequential agonist and antagonist methods in behaving animals, we demonstrate that the conditioned response (CR) expression and timing are completely dissociable and involve different inhibitory inputs; although the basal inhibition modulates CR expression, the conditioned stimulus-activated inhibition is required for the proper timing of the CR. In addition, complete blockade of cerebellar deep nuclear GABA(A)Rs prevents CR acquisition. Together, these results suggest that different aspects of the memories for eyeblink CRs are encoded in the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar deep nuclei.

  8. Localization of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor to Distinct Terminals of Mossy Fiber Axons Implies Regulation of Both Excitation and Feedforward Inhibition of CA3 Pyramidal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Danzer, Steve C.; McNamara, James O.

    2004-01-01

    Hippocampal dentate granule cells directly excite and indirectly inhibit CA3 pyramidal cells via distinct presynaptic terminal specializations of their mossy fiber axons. This mossy fiber pathway contains the highest concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the CNS, yet whether BDNF is positioned to regulate the excitatory and/or inhibitory pathways is unknown. To localize BDNF, confocal microscopy of green fluorescent protein transgenic mice was combined with BDNF immunoh...

  9. Perinatal Cerebellar Injury in Human and Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Biran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar injury is increasingly recognized through advanced neonatal brain imaging as a complication of premature birth. Survivors of preterm birth demonstrate a constellation of long-term neurodevelopmental deficits, many of which are potentially referable to cerebellar injury, including impaired motor functions such as fine motor incoordination, impaired motor sequencing and also cognitive, behavioral dysfunction among older patients. This paper reviews the morphogenesis and histogenesis of the human and rodent developing cerebellum, and its more frequent injuries in preterm. Most cerebellar lesions are cerebellar hemorrhage and infarction usually leading to cerebellar abnormalities and/or atrophy, but the exact pathogenesis of lesions of the cerebellum is unknown. The different mechanisms involved have been investigated with animal models and are primarily hypoxia, ischemia, infection, and inflammation Exposure to drugs and undernutrition can also induce cerebellar abnormalities. Different models are detailed to analyze these various disturbances of cerebellar development around birth.

  10. The tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin extracellular proteolytic system regulates seizure-induced hippocampal mossy fiber outgrowth through a proteoglycan substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y P; Siao, C J; Lu, W; Sung, T C; Frohman, M A; Milev, P; Bugge, T H; Degen, J L; Levine, J M; Margolis, R U; Tsirka, S E

    2000-03-20

    Short seizure episodes are associated with remodeling of neuronal connections. One region where such reorganization occurs is the hippocampus, and in particular, the mossy fiber pathway. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we show here a critical role in vivo for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), an extracellular protease that converts plasminogen to plasmin, to induce mossy fiber sprouting. We identify DSD-1-PG/phosphacan, an extracellular matrix component associated with neurite reorganization, as a physiological target of plasmin. Mice lacking tPA displayed decreased mossy fiber outgrowth and an aberrant band at the border of the supragranular region of the dentate gyrus that coincides with the deposition of unprocessed DSD-1-PG/phosphacan and excessive Timm-positive, mossy fiber termini. Plasminogen-deficient mice also exhibit the laminar band and DSD- 1-PG/phosphacan deposition, but mossy fiber outgrowth through the supragranular region is normal. These results demonstrate that tPA functions acutely, both through and independently of plasmin, to mediate mossy fiber reorganization.

  11. Multiplicative gain modulation arising from inhibitory synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Bampasakis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurons use the rate of action potentials to encode sensory variables. This makes the output rate as a function of input, also known as input-output (I–O relationship, a core computational function in neuronal processing. The introduction, or increase, of a modulatory input, can transform this function in multiple ways: additive transformations result in a shift, and multiplicative transformations in a change of slope of the I–O relationship. This slope change is known as gain modulation, and it can implement important forms of neural computation such as coordinate transformations. Gain modulation can be found in a wide range of brain systems, including the cerebellum, where it can be enabled by synaptic plasticity at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. We use a realistic, conductance based, multi-compartmental model of a cerebellar nucleus (CN neuron, to investigate the determinants of gain modulation mediated by synaptic plasticity. In particular, we are interested in the effect of short term depression (STD at the inhibitory synapse from Purkinje cells (PCs to CN neurons. Considering the inhibitory PC input as the driving input, we compare the I–O relationship of the CN neuron in the presence and absence of STD for 20 Hz of excitatory synaptic input from mossy fibers (MFs, and find that STD introduces a gain change, changing the slope of the I–O function. We then proceed to compare the transformation performed by the increase of the modulatory input from 20 to 50 Hz, in the presence and absence of STD. We find that the presence of STD in the inhibitory synapse introduces a multiplicative component in the transformation performed by the excitatory input, an effect that persists for different levels of STD, and various combinations of regularity and synchronicity in the input.

  12. Applications for carbon fibre recovered from composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering; Liu, Z.; Turner, TA; Wong, KH

    2016-07-01

    Commercial operations to recover carbon fibre from waste composites are now developing and as more recovered fibre becomes available new applications for recovered fibre are required. Opportunities to use recovered carbon fibre as a structural reinforcement are considered involving the use of wet lay processes to produce nonwoven mats. Mats with random in-plane fibre orientation can readily be produced using existing commercial processes. However, the fibre volume fraction, and hence the mechanical properties that can be achieved, result in composites with limited mechanical properties. Fibre volume fractions of 40% can be achieved with high moulding pressures of over 100 bar, however, moulding at these pressures results in substantial fibre breakage which reduces the mean fibre length and the properties of the composite manufactured. Nonwoven mats made from aligned, short carbon fibres can achieve higher fibre volume fractions with lower fibre breakage even at high moulding pressure. A process for aligning short fibres is described and a composite of over 60% fibre volume fraction has been manufactured at a pressures up to 100 bar with low fibre breakage. Further developments of the alignment process have been undertaken and a composite of 46% fibre volume fraction has been produced moulded at a pressure of 7 bar in an autoclave, exhibiting good mechanical properties that compete with higher grade materials. This demonstrates the potential for high value applications for recovered carbon fibre by fibre alignment.

  13. Properties of hemp fibre polymer composites - An optimisation of fibre properties using novel defibration methods and fibre characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Characterization of hemp fibres was carried out with fibres obtained with low handling damage and defibration damage to get an indication of how strong cellulose based fibres that can be produced from hemp. Comparison was made with hemp yarn producedunder traditional conditions where damage...... obtained by steam explosion of hemp fibres prior defibrated with pectin degrading enzymes. The S2 layer in the fibre wall of the hemp fibres consisted of1-4 cellulose rich and lignin poor concentric layers constructed of ca. 100 nm thick lamellae. The microfibril angle showed values in the range 0......-10° for the main part of the S2-layer and 70-90° for the S1-layer. The microfibrils that are mainly parallelwith the fibre axis explain the high fibre stiffness, which in defibrated hemp fibres reached 94 GPa. The defibrated hemp fibres had higher fibre stiffness (88-94 GPa) than hemp yarn (60 GPa), which...

  14. Microstructured Optical Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    complete PBGs, which reflects light incident from air or vacuum. Such structures may be used as cladding structures in optical fibres, where light is confined and thereby guided in a hollow core region. In addition, the present invention relates to designs for ultra low-loss PBG waveguiding structures......The present invention relates to a new class of optical waveguides, in which waveguiding along one or more core regions is obtained through the application of the Photonic Bandgap (PBG) effect. The invention further relates to optimised two-dimensional lattice structures capable of providing...

  15. Analysis of glass fibre sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2014-01-01

    . Soxhlet extraction was used to extract components of the sizing from the glass fibres. The glass fibres, their extracts and coated glass plates were analysed by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis combined with a mass spectrometer (TGA-MS), and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR...

  16. A probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baarsen, K M; Kleinnijenhuis, M; Jbabdi, S; Sotiropoulos, S N; Grotenhuis, J A; van Cappellen van Walsum, A M

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and their connectivity are gaining attraction, due to the important role the cerebellum plays in cognition and motor control. Atlases of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei are used to locate regions of interest in clinical and neuroscience studies. However, the white matter that connects these relay stations is of at least similar functional importance. Damage to these cerebellar white matter tracts may lead to serious language, cognitive and emotional disturbances, although the pathophysiological mechanism behind it is still debated. Differences in white matter integrity between patients and controls might shed light on structure-function correlations. A probabilistic parcellation atlas of the cerebellar white matter would help these studies by facilitating automatic segmentation of the cerebellar peduncles, the localization of lesions and the comparison of white matter integrity between patients and controls. In this work a digital three-dimensional probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter is presented, based on high quality 3T, 1.25mm resolution diffusion MRI data from 90 subjects participating in the Human Connectome Project. The white matter tracts were estimated using probabilistic tractography. Results over 90 subjects were symmetrical and trajectories of superior, middle and inferior cerebellar peduncles resembled the anatomy as known from anatomical studies. This atlas will contribute to a better understanding of cerebellar white matter architecture. It may eventually aid in defining structure-function correlations in patients with cerebellar disorders.

  17. Reticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrevy, Christel

    Pour faire face à la crise économique la conception de papier à valeur ajoutée est développée par les industries papetières. Le but de se projet est l'amélioration des techniques actuelles de réticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques de la pâte à papier visant à produire un papier plus résistant. En effet, lors des réactions de réticulation traditionnelles, de nombreuses liaisons intra-fibres se forment ce qui affecte négativement l'amélioration anticipée des propriétés physiques du papier ou du matériau produit. Pour éviter la formation de ces liaisons intra-fibres, un greffage sur les fibres de groupements ne pouvant pas réagir entre eux est nécessaire. La réticulation des fibres par une réaction de « click chemistry » appelée cycloaddition de Huisgen entre un azide et un alcyne vrai, catalysée par du cuivre (CuAAC) a été l'une des solutions trouvée pour remédier à ce problème. De plus, une adaptation de cette réaction en milieux aqueux pourrait favoriser son utilisation en milieu industriel. L'étude que nous désirons entreprendre lors de ce projet vise à optimiser la réaction de CuAAC et les réactions intermédiaires (propargylation, tosylation et azidation) sur la pâte kraft, en milieu aqueux. Pour cela, les réactions ont été adaptées en milieu aqueux sur la cellulose microcristalline afin de vérifier sa faisabilité, puis transférée à la pâte kraft et l'influence de différents paramètres comme le temps de réaction ou la quantité de réactifs utilisée a été étudiée. Dans un second temps, une étude des différentes propriétés conférées au papier par les réactions a été réalisée à partir d'une série de tests papetiers optiques et physiques. Mots Clés Click chemistry, Huisgen, CuAAC, propargylation, tosylation, azidation, cellulose, pâte kraft, milieu aqueux, papier.

  18. A toolbox to visually explore cerebellar shape changes in cerebellar disease and dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor control and is also involved in cognitive processes. Cerebellar function is specialized by location, although the exact topographic functional relationship is not fully understood. The spinocerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause regional atrophy in the cerebellum, yielding distinct motor and cognitive problems. The ability to study the region-specific atrophy patterns can provide insight into the problem of relating cerebellar function to location. In an effort to study these structural change patterns, we developed a toolbox in MATLAB to provide researchers a unique way to visually explore the correlation between cerebellar lobule shape changes and function loss, with a rich set of visualization and analysis modules. In this paper, we outline the functions and highlight the utility of the toolbox. The toolbox takes as input landmark shape representations of subjects' cerebellar substructures. A principal component analysis is used for dimension reduction. Following this, a linear discriminant analysis and a regression analysis can be performed to find the discriminant direction associated with a specific disease type, or the regression line of a specific functional measure can be generated. The characteristic structural change pattern of a disease type or of a functional score is visualized by sampling points on the discriminant or regression line. The sampled points are used to reconstruct synthetic cerebellar lobule shapes. We showed a few case studies highlighting the utility of the toolbox and we compare the analysis results with the literature.

  19. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.; Babin, Sergey A.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim; Podivilov, Evgenii V.

    2014-09-01

    The concept of random lasers exploiting multiple scattering of photons in an amplifying disordered medium in order to generate coherent light without a traditional laser resonator has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This research area lies at the interface of the fundamental theory of disordered systems and laser science. The idea was originally proposed in the context of astrophysics in the 1960s by V.S. Letokhov, who studied scattering with “negative absorption” of the interstellar molecular clouds. Research on random lasers has since developed into a mature experimental and theoretical field. A simple design of such lasers would be promising for potential applications. However, in traditional random lasers the properties of the output radiation are typically characterized by complex features in the spatial, spectral and time domains, making them less attractive than standard laser systems in terms of practical applications. Recently, an interesting and novel type of one-dimensional random laser that operates in a conventional telecommunication fibre without any pre-designed resonator mirrors-random distributed feedback fibre laser-was demonstrated. The positive feedback required for laser generation in random fibre lasers is provided by the Rayleigh scattering from the inhomogeneities of the refractive index that are naturally present in silica glass. In the proposed laser concept, the randomly backscattered light is amplified through the Raman effect, providing distributed gain over distances up to 100 km. Although an effective reflection due to the Rayleigh scattering is extremely small (˜0.1%), the lasing threshold may be exceeded when a sufficiently large distributed Raman gain is provided. Such a random distributed feedback fibre laser has a number of interesting and attractive features. The fibre waveguide geometry provides transverse confinement, and effectively one-dimensional random distributed feedback leads to the generation

  20. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  1. An update on Spino-cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banashree Mondal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dominantly inherited ataxias, also known as Spino-cerebellar ataxias (SCAs, are rapidly expanding entities. New mutations are being identified at remarkable regularity. Recent awareness of molecular abnormalities in SCAs has addressed some of the long sought questions, but gaps in knowledge still exist. Three major categories of SCAs, according to molecular mechanisms, have evolved over recent few years: Polyglutamate expansion ataxia, non-coding zone repeat ataxia, and ataxia due to conventional mutation. Using the fulcrum of these mechanisms, the article provides an update of SCAs. Shared and specific clinical features, genetic abnormalities, and possible links between molecular abnormalities and cerebellar degeneration have been discussed. Emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms of polyglutamate toxicity.

  2. Cerebellar Dysfunction in a Patient with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando; Abdul, Waheed; Eivaz-Mohammadi, Sahar; Foscue, Christopher; Gongireddy, Srinivas; Syed, Amer

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old AIDS patient with a CD4 T-cell count of 114/mm(3) was admitted with cerebellar symptoms of left CN XI weakness, wide-based gait with left-sided dysmetria, abnormal heel-knee-shin test, and dysdiadochokinesia. MRI showed region of hyperintensity in the left inferior cerebellar hemisphere involving the cortex and underlying white matter. Serological tests for HSV1, HSV2, and syphilis were negative. Her CSF contained high protein content and a WBC of 71/mm(3), predominantly lymphocytes. The CSF was also negative for cryptococcal antigen and VDRL. CSF culture did not grow microbes. CSF PCR assay was negative for HSV1 and HSV2 but was positive for JC virus (1,276 copies). The most likely diagnosis is granule cell neuronopathy (GCN), which can only be definitively confirmed with biopsy and immunohistochemistry.

  3. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  4. Memory consolidation in the cerebellar cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Kellett

    Full Text Available Several forms of learning, including classical conditioning of the eyeblink, depend upon the cerebellum. In examining mechanisms of eyeblink conditioning in rabbits, reversible inactivations of the control circuitry have begun to dissociate aspects of cerebellar cortical and nuclear function in memory consolidation. It was previously shown that post-training cerebellar cortical, but not nuclear, inactivations with the GABAA agonist muscimol prevented consolidation but these findings left open the question as to how final memory storage was partitioned across cortical and nuclear levels. Memory consolidation might be essentially cortical and directly disturbed by actions of the muscimol, or it might be nuclear, and sensitive to the raised excitability of the nuclear neurons following the loss of cortical inhibition. To resolve this question, we simultaneously inactivated cerebellar cortical lobule HVI and the anterior interpositus nucleus of rabbits during the post-training period, so protecting the nuclei from disinhibitory effects of cortical inactivation. Consolidation was impaired by these simultaneous inactivations. Because direct application of muscimol to the nuclei alone has no impact upon consolidation, we can conclude that post-training, consolidation processes and memory storage for eyeblink conditioning have critical cerebellar cortical components. The findings are consistent with a recent model that suggests the distribution of learning-related plasticity across cortical and nuclear levels is task-dependent. There can be transfer to nuclear or brainstem levels for control of high-frequency responses but learning with lower frequency response components, such as in eyeblink conditioning, remains mainly dependent upon cortical memory storage.

  5. Observations on Hippocampal Mossy Cells in Mink (Neovison vison) with Special Reference to Dendrites Ascending to the Granular and Molecular Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstad, Jan Sigurd; Osen, Kirsten K.; Scharfman, Helen E.; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Blackstad, Theodor W.; Leergaard, Trygve B.

    2017-01-01

    Detailed knowledge about the neural circuitry connecting the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex is necessary to understand how this system contributes to spatial navigation and episodic memory. The two principal cell types of the dentate gyrus, mossy cells and granule cells, are interconnected in a positive feedback loop, by which mossy cells can influence information passing from the entorhinal cortex via granule cells to hippocampal pyramidal cells. Mossy cells, like CA3 pyramidal cells, are characterized by thorny excrescences on their proximal dendrites, postsynaptic to giant terminals of granule cell axons. In addition to disynaptic input from the entorhinal cortex and perforant path via granule cells, mossy cells may also receive monosynaptic input from the perforant path via special dendrites ascending to the molecular layer. We here report qualitative and quantitative descriptions of Golgi-stained hippocampal mossy cells in mink, based on light microscopic observations and three-dimensional reconstructions. The main focus is on the location, branching pattern, and length of dendrites, particularly those ascending to the granular and molecular layers. In mink, the latter dendrites are more numerous than in rat, but fewer than in primates. They form on average 12% (and up to 29%) of the total dendritic length, and appear to cover the terminal fields of both the lateral and medial perforant paths. In further contrast to rat, the main mossy cell dendrites in mink branch more extensively with distal dendrites encroaching upon the CA3 field. The dendritic arbors extend both along and across the septotemporal axis of the dentate gyrus, not conforming to the lamellar pattern of the hippocampus. The findings suggest that the afferent input to the mossy cells becomes more complex in species closer to primates. PMID:26286893

  6. Computed tomography in hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, T.; Maki, Y.; Ono, Y.; Yoshizawa, T.; Tsuboi, K. (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1981-11-01

    Fourteen cases of cerebellar hemorrhage were analysed from the point of CT-scan, and the following results were obtained. 1. The number of cases of cerebellar hemorrhage forms 4.4% of that of total intracranial hemorrhage. 2. Most of the cerebellar hematomas extend upward. Downward extension is rare. 3. In acute dead cases hematomas are 5 cm or more in diameter and lie over bilateral hemispheres with the extension to third or fourth ventricles in CT-scans. 4. Slowly progressive cases are detriorated by the secondary hydrocephalus. 5. In mild cases hematomas are 3cm or less in diameter on CT-scans and the hematoma evacuation is not indicated for these cases. 6. The shunt operation alone is sufficient for the life saving of the slowly progressive cases, but the hematoma evacuation is indicated in these cases if the functional prognosis is taken into consideration. 7. Immediate hematoma evacuation together with the ventricular drainage is considered to be effective for the life saving of the acute fulminant cases.

  7. The microvasculature of the human cerebellar meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Hiroko; Akima, Michiko; Hatori, Tsutomu; Nagayama, Tadashi; Zhang, Zean; Ihara, Fumie

    2002-12-01

    The vascular architecture of the human cerebellar meninges was investigated. The surface meninges were poor in vasculature. In the sulci, the meninges were highly vascular but had few capillaries. The venous blood vessels gave long side branches at right angles to the parent vessels in a cruciform pattern, running horizontally along the cerebellar sulci. They were situated at the origin of the secondary or tertiary sulci. Anastomoses between these horizontal branches gave a crosshatched appearance. Short branches often extended to the bases of the sulci, terminating in T-shaped bifurcations with numerous tiny branches, like the roots of a tree. The arteries ran perpendicular to venous branches which were parallel to each other exclusively along the sagittal plane. These arteries bifurcated to straddle the horizontally running veins at the origin of the secondary or tertiary sulci. They gave off many small branches like teeth of a fork from each artery in the secondary or tertiary sulci after they bifurcated to straddle the venous branches and penetrated the cerebellar cortex at the bases of sulci. These fork-like ramifications in the bases of the sulci were most likely responsible for the ready development of pronounced ischemic state. They might also play an important role in the occurrence of ischemic damage at the bases of sulci in cases of severe generalized ischemia.

  8. Emotional disorders in patients with cerebellar damage – case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Siuda, Katarzyna; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Starowicz-Filip, Anna; Tereszko,Anna; Dudek, Dominika

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Growing number of research shows the role of the cerebellum in the regulation of affect. Lesions of the cerebellum can lead to emotional disregulation, a significant part of the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome. The aim of this article is to analyze the most recent studies concerning the cerebellar participation in emotional reactions and to present three cases: two female and one male who suffered from cerebellar damage and presented post-traumatic affective and personality chang...

  9. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Anila M; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  10. Acute bilateral cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branches of posterior inferior cerebellar arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurer, G; Sahin, G; Cekirge, S; Tan, E; Saribas, O

    2001-10-01

    The most frequent type of cerebellar infarcts involved the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and superior cerebellar artery territories but bilateral involvement of lateral or medial branches of PICA is extremely rare. In this report, we present a 55-year-old male who admitted to hospital with vomiting, nausea and dizziness. On examination left-sided hemiparesia and ataxic gait were detected. Infarct on bilateral medial branch of PICA artery territories was found out with cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and 99% stenosis of the left vertebral artery was found out with digital subtraction arteriography. The patient was put on heparin treatment. After 3 weeks, his complaints and symptoms had disappeared except for mild gait ataxia.

  11. [Small fibre neuropathy: knowledge is power].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeijmakers, J.G.; Bakkers, M.; Blom, E.W.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Merkies, I.S.; Faber, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Small fibre neuropathy is a neuropathy of the small non-myelinated C-fibres and myelinated Adelta-fibres. Clinically, an isolated small fibre neuropathy is distinguished by sensory and autonomic symptoms, with practically no abnormalities on neurological examination other than possible distorted pai

  12. Dispersion properties of photonic crystal fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Dridi, Kim;

    1998-01-01

    Approximate dispersion and bending properties of all-silica two-dimensional photonic crystal fibres are characterised by the combination of an effective-index model and classical analysis tools for optical fibres. We believe for the first time to have predicted the dispersion properties of photonic...... crystal fibres. The results strongly indicate that these fibres have potential applications as dispersion managing components...

  13. Properties of hemp fibre polymer composites - An optimisation of fibre properties using novel defibration methods and fibre characterisation

    OpenAIRE

    Thygesen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Characterization of hemp fibres was carried out with fibres obtained with low handling damage and defibration damage to get an indication of how strong cellulose based fibres that can be produced from hemp. Comparison was made with hemp yarn producedunder traditional conditions where damage is unavoidable. The mild defibration was performed by degradation of the pectin and lignin rich middle lamellae around the fibres by cultivation of the mutated white rot fungus Phlebia radiata Cel 26. Fibr...

  14. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. St. J.; Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic `space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of `numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  15. Wetting of flexible fibre arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprat, C; Protière, S; Beebe, A Y; Stone, H A

    2012-02-23

    Fibrous media are functional and versatile materials, as demonstrated by their ubiquity both in natural systems such as feathers and adhesive pads and in engineered systems from nanotextured surfaces to textile products, where they offer benefits in filtration, insulation, wetting and colouring. The elasticity and high aspect ratios of the fibres allow deformation under capillary forces, which cause mechanical damage, matting self-assembly or colour changes, with many industrial and ecological consequences. Attempts to understand these systems have mostly focused on the wetting of rigid fibres or on elastocapillary effects in planar geometries and on a fibre brush withdrawn from an infinite bath. Here we consider the frequently encountered case of a liquid drop deposited on a flexible fibre array and show that flexibility, fibre geometry and drop volume are the crucial parameters that are necessary to understand the various observations referred to above. We identify the conditions required for a drop to remain compact with minimal spreading or to cause a pair of elastic fibres to coalesce. We find that there is a critical volume of liquid, and, hence, a critical drop size, above which this coalescence does not occur. We also identify a drop size that maximizes liquid capture. For both wetting and deformation of the substrates, we present rules that are deduced from the geometric and material properties of the fibres and the volume of the drop. These ideas are applicable to a wide range of fibrous materials, as we illustrate with examples for feathers, beetle tarsi, sprays and microfabricated systems.

  16. Tapered optical fibres for sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martan, Tomas; Kanka, Jiri; Kasik, Ivan; Matejec, Vlastimil

    2008-11-01

    Recently, optical fibre tapers have intensively been investigated for many applications e.g. in telecommunications, medicine and (bio-) chemical sensing. The paper deals with enhancement of evanescent-field sensitivity of the solid-core microstructured fibre with steering-wheel air-cladding. Enhancement of a performance of the microstructured fibre is based on reduction of fibre core diameter down to narrow filament by tapering thereby defined part of light power is guided by an evanescent wave traveling in axial cladding air holes. The original fibre structure with outer diameter of 125 µm was reduced 2×, 2.5×, 3.33×, and 4× for increasing relatively small intensity overlap of guided core mode at wavelength of 1.55 μm with axial air holes. The inner structures of tapered microstructured fibre with steering-wheel aircladding were numerically analyzed and mode intensity distributions were calculated using the FDTD technique. Analyzed fiber tapers were prepared by constructed fibre puller employing 'flame brush technique'.

  17. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic ‘space’, cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of ‘numerical experiments’ based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069771

  18. Cerebellar ataxia as the presenting manifestation of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arav-Boger, Ravit; Crawford, Thomas; Steere, Allen C; Halsey, Neal A

    2002-04-01

    A 7-year-old boy from suburban Baltimore who presented with cerebellar ataxia and headaches was found by magnetic resonance imaging to have multiple cerebellar enhancing lesions. He had no history of tick exposure. He was initially treated with steroids for presumptive postinfectious encephalitis. Lyme disease was diagnosed 10 weeks later after arthritis developed. Testing of the cerebrospinal fluid obtained at the time cerebellar ataxia was diagnosed revealed intrathecal antibody production to Borrelia burgdorferi. Treatment with intravenous antibiotics led to rapid resolution of persistent cerebellar findings.

  19. Pitch discrimination in cerebellar patients: evidence for a sensory deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Lawrence M; Petacchi, Augusto; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Bower, James M

    2009-12-15

    In the last two decades, a growing body of research showing cerebellar involvement in an increasing number of nonmotor tasks and systems has prompted an expansion of speculations concerning the function of the cerebellum. Here, we tested the predictions of a hypothesis positing cerebellar involvement in sensory data acquisition. Specifically, we examined the effect of global cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory sensory function by means of a pitch discrimination task. The just noticeable difference in pitch between two tones was measured in 15 healthy controls and in 15 high functioning patients afflicted with varying degrees of global cerebellar degeneration caused by hereditary, idiopathic, paraneoplastic, or postinfectious pancerebellitis. Participants also performed an auditory detection task assessing sustained attention, a test of verbal auditory working memory, and an audiometric test. Patient pitch discrimination thresholds were on average five and a half times those of controls and were proportional to the degree of cerebellar ataxia assessed independently. Patients and controls showed normal hearing thresholds and similar performance in control tasks in sustained attention and verbal auditory working memory. These results suggest there is an effect of cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory function. The findings are consistent with other recent demonstrations of cerebellar-related sensory impairments, and with robust cerebellar auditorily evoked activity, confirmed by quantitative meta-analysis, across a range of functional neuroimaging studies dissociated from attention, motor, affective, and cognitive variables. The data are interpreted in the context of a sensory hypothesis of cerebellar function.

  20. Aligned flax fibre/polylactate composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Lilholt, Hans; Thygesen, Anders;

    2008-01-01

    The potential of biocomposites in engineering applications is demonstrated by using aligned flax fibre/polylactate composites as a materials model system. The failure stress of flax fibres is measured by tensile testing of single fibres and fibre bundles. For both fibre configurations, it is found...... that failure stress is decreased by increasing the tested fibre volume. Based on two types of flax fibre preforms: carded sliver and unidirectional non-crimp fabric, aligned flax fibre/polylactate composites were fabricated with variable fibre content. The volumetric composition and tensile properties...... of the composite were measured. For composites with a fibre content of 37 % by volume, stiffness is about 20 GPa and failure stress is about 180 MPa. The tensile properties of the composites are analysed with a modified rule of mixtures model, which includes the effect of porosity. The experimental results...

  1. Resonance modes in optical fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余寿绵; 余恬

    2002-01-01

    The weakly nonlinear boundary value problem of wave propagation in an optical fibre (for the transverse electric mode, for example) is formulated and a modified linear solution is obtained. It is shown that a self-consistent theory of fibre optics should be weakly nonlinear. The mode of critical refraction that does not exist in the linear theory is obtained, showing that it is a mode consisting of resonance modes. It is shown that the signal carriers in a long fibre are of resonance modes, not normal modes. Some experimental data are given for comparison with the theoretical predictions, and the agreement seems satisfactory.

  2. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-04-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres in mammalian muscle spindles.

  3. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    OpenAIRE

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-01-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres...

  4. Area CA3 interneurons receive two spatially segregated mossy fiber inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E; Galván, Emilio J; Meriney, Stephen D; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-09-01

    Area CA3 receives two extrinsic excitatory inputs, the mossy fibers (MF), and the perforant path (PP). Interneurons with somata in str. lacunosum moleculare (L-M) of CA3 modulate the influence of the MF and PP on pyramidal cell activity by providing strong feed-forward inhibitory influence to pyramidal cells. Here we report that L-M interneurons receive two separate MF inputs, one to the dorsal dendrites from the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus (MF(SDG)), and a second to ventral dendrites from the str. lucidum (MF(SL)). Responses elicited from MF(SDG) and MF(SL) stimulation sites have strong paired-pulse facilitation, similar DCG-IV sensitivity, amplitude, and decay kinetics but target spatially segregated domains on the interneuron dendrites. These data demonstrate that certain interneuron subtypes are entrained by two convergent MF inputs to spatially separated regions of the dendritic tree. This anatomical arrangement could make these interneurons considerably more responsive to the excitatory drive from dentate granule cells. Furthermore, temporal summation is linear or slightly sublinear between PP and MF(SL) but supralinear between PP and MF(SDG). This specific boosting of the excitatory drive to interneurons from the SDG location may indicate that L-M interneurons could be specifically involved in the processing of the associational component of the recognition memory.

  5. Multiple forms of long-term synaptic plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses on interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Emilio J; Cosgrove, Kathleen E; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2011-04-01

    The hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) pathway originates from the dentate gyrus granule cells and provides a powerful excitatory synaptic drive to neurons in the dentate gyrus hilus and area CA3. Much of the early work on the MF pathway focused on its electrophysiological properties, and ability to drive CA3 pyramidal cell activity. Over the last ten years, however, a new focus on the synaptic interaction between granule cells and inhibitory interneurons has emerged. These data have revealed an immense heterogeneity of long-term plasticity at MF synapses on various interneuron targets. Interestingly, these studies also indicate that the mechanisms of MF long-term plasticity in some interneuron subtypes may be more similar to pyramidal cells than previously appreciated. In this review, we first define the synapse types at each of the interneuron targets based on the receptors present. We then describe the different forms of long-term plasticity observed, and the mechanisms underlying each form as they are currently understood. Finally we highlight various open questions surrounding MF long-term plasticity in interneurons, focusing specifically on the induction and maintenance of LTP, and what the functional impact of persistent changes in efficacy at MF-interneuron synapses might be on the emergent properties of the inhibitory network dynamics in area CA3. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Synaptic Plasticity & Interneurons'.

  6. Mossy fiber synaptic transmission: communication from the dentate gyrus to area CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, David B; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Communication between the dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA3 of the hippocampus proper is transmitted via axons of granule cells--the mossy fiber (MF) pathway. In this review we discuss and compare the properties of transmitter release from the MFs onto pyramidal neurons and interneurons. An examination of the anatomical connectivity from DG to CA3 reveals a surprising interplay between excitation and inhibition for this circuit. In this respect it is particularly relevant that the major targets of the MFs are interneurons and that the consequence of MF input into CA3 may be inhibitory or excitatory, conditionally dependent on the frequency of input and modulatory regulation. This is further complicated by the properties of transmitter release from the MFs where a large number of co-localized transmitters, including GABAergic inhibitory transmitter release, and the effects of presynaptic modulation finely tune transmitter release. A picture emerges that extends beyond the hypothesis that the MFs are simply "detonators" of CA3 pyramidal neurons; the properties of synaptic information flow from the DG have more subtle and complex influences on the CA3 network.

  7. Area CA3 interneurons receive two spatially segregated mossy fiber inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E.; Galvan, Emilio J.; Meriney, Stephen D.; Barrionuevo, German

    2009-01-01

    Area CA3 receives two extrinsic excitatory inputs, the mossy fibers (MF) and the perforant path (PP). Interneurons with somata in str. lacunosum moleculare (L-M) of CA3 modulate the influence of the MF and PP on pyramidal cell activity by providing strong feed-forward inhibitory influence to pyramidal cells. Here we report that L-M interneurons receive two separate MF inputs, one to the dorsal dendrites from the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus (MFSDG), and a second to ventral dendrites from the str. lucidum (MFSL). Responses elicited from MFSDG and MFSL stimulation sites have strong paired-pulse facilitation, similar DCG-IV sensitivity, amplitude, and decay kinetics but target spatially segregated domains on the interneuron dendrites. These data demonstrate that certain interneuron subtypes are entrained by two convergent MF inputs to spatially separated regions of the dendritic tree. This anatomical arrangement could make these interneurons considerably more responsive to the excitatory drive from dentate granule cells. Furthermore, temporal summation is linear or slightly sublinear between PP and MFSL but supralinear between PP and MFSDG. This specific boosting of the excitatory drive to interneurons from the SDG location may indicate that L-M interneurons could be specifically involved in the processing of the associational component of the recognition memory. PMID:19830814

  8. Specific disruption of hippocampal mossy fiber synapses in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Scott A; Raam, Tara; Antonios, Joseph K; Bushong, Eric A; Koo, Edward H; Ellisman, Mark H; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2014-01-01

    The earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by deficits in memory and cognition indicating hippocampal pathology. While it is now recognized that synapse dysfunction precedes the hallmark pathological findings of AD, it is unclear if specific hippocampal synapses are particularly vulnerable. Since the mossy fiber (MF) synapse between dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 regions underlies critical functions disrupted in AD, we utilized serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM) to analyze MF microcircuitry in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). FAD mutant MF terminal complexes were severely disrupted compared to control - they were smaller, contacted fewer postsynaptic spines and had greater numbers of presynaptic filopodial processes. Multi-headed CA3 dendritic spines in the FAD mutant condition were reduced in complexity and had significantly smaller sites of synaptic contact. Significantly, there was no change in the volume of classical dendritic spines at neighboring inputs to CA3 neurons suggesting input-specific defects in the early course of AD related pathology. These data indicate a specific vulnerability of the DG-CA3 network in AD pathogenesis and demonstrate the utility of SBEM to assess circuit specific alterations in mouse models of human disease.

  9. Specific disruption of hippocampal mossy fiber synapses in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Wilke

    Full Text Available The earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD are characterized by deficits in memory and cognition indicating hippocampal pathology. While it is now recognized that synapse dysfunction precedes the hallmark pathological findings of AD, it is unclear if specific hippocampal synapses are particularly vulnerable. Since the mossy fiber (MF synapse between dentate gyrus (DG and CA3 regions underlies critical functions disrupted in AD, we utilized serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM to analyze MF microcircuitry in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD. FAD mutant MF terminal complexes were severely disrupted compared to control - they were smaller, contacted fewer postsynaptic spines and had greater numbers of presynaptic filopodial processes. Multi-headed CA3 dendritic spines in the FAD mutant condition were reduced in complexity and had significantly smaller sites of synaptic contact. Significantly, there was no change in the volume of classical dendritic spines at neighboring inputs to CA3 neurons suggesting input-specific defects in the early course of AD related pathology. These data indicate a specific vulnerability of the DG-CA3 network in AD pathogenesis and demonstrate the utility of SBEM to assess circuit specific alterations in mouse models of human disease.

  10. Deconstructing complexity: serial block-face electron microscopic analysis of the hippocampal mossy fiber synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Scott A; Antonios, Joseph K; Bushong, Eric A; Badkoobehi, Ali; Malek, Elmar; Hwang, Minju; Terada, Masako; Ellisman, Mark H; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2013-01-09

    The hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) terminal is among the largest and most complex synaptic structures in the brain. Our understanding of the development of this morphologically elaborate structure has been limited because of the inability of standard electron microscopy techniques to quickly and accurately reconstruct large volumes of neuropil. Here we use serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM) to surmount these limitations and investigate the establishment of MF connectivity during mouse postnatal development. Based on volume reconstructions, we find that MF axons initially form bouton-like specializations directly onto dendritic shafts, that dendritic protrusions primarily arise independently of bouton contact sites, and that a dramatic increase in presynaptic and postsynaptic complexity follows the association of MF boutons with CA3 dendritic protrusions. We also identify a transient period of MF bouton filopodial exploration, followed by refinement of sites of synaptic connectivity. These observations enhance our understanding of the development of this highly specialized synapse and illustrate the power of SBEM to resolve details of developing microcircuits at a level not easily attainable with conventional approaches.

  11. A specific role for hippocampal mossy fiber's zinc in rapid storage of emotional memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccom, Johnatan; Halley, Hélène; Daumas, Stéphanie; Lassalle, Jean Michel

    2014-04-16

    We investigated the specific role of zinc present in large amounts in the synaptic vesicles of mossy fibers and coreleased with glutamate in the CA3 region. In previous studies, we have shown that blockade of zinc after release has no effect on the consolidation of spatial learning, while zinc is required for the consolidation of contextual fear conditioning. Although both are hippocampo-dependent processes, fear conditioning to the context implies a strong emotional burden. To verify the hypothesis that zinc could play a specific role in enabling sustainable memorization of a single event with a strong emotional component, we used a neuropharmacological approach combining a glutamate receptor antagonist with different zinc chelators. Results show that zinc is mandatory to allow the consolidation of one-shot memory, thus being the key element allowing the hippocampus submitted to a strong emotional charge to switch from the cognitive mode to a flashbulb memory mode. Individual differences in learning abilities have been known for a long time to be totally or partially compensated by distributed learning practice. Here we show that contextual fear conditioning impairments due to zinc blockade can be efficiently reduced by distributed learning practice.

  12. Studies on the development of mossy zinc electrodeposits from flowing alkaline electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mc Vay, L.

    1991-07-01

    The initiation and characteristics of mossy zinc electrodeposits have been investigated. Batteries with zinc electrodes are candidates for electric vehicle applications; however, this electrode is prone to form non-compact deposits that contribute to capacity loss and battery failure. Moss is deposited when the current density is far from the limiting current. This morphology first appears only after the bulk deposit is approximately 1 {mu}m thick. In this investigation, the effects of flow rate (Re=0--4000), current density (0--50 mA/cm{sup 2}), concentration of the electroactive species (0.25 and 0.5 M), and the concentration of supporting electrolyte (3, 6, and 12 M) on the initiation of moss were examined. The rotating concentric cylinder electrode was employed for most of the experiments; and a flow channel was used to study the development of morphology. After the experiment, the deposit was characterized using microscopic, x-ray diffraction, and profilometric techniques. 94 refs., 72 figs.

  13. NeuroD2 regulates the development of hippocampal mossy fiber synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Scott A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assembly of neural circuits requires the concerted action of both genetically determined and activity-dependent mechanisms. Calcium-regulated transcription may link these processes, but the influence of specific transcription factors on the differentiation of synapse-specific properties is poorly understood. Here we characterize the influence of NeuroD2, a calcium-dependent transcription factor, in regulating the structural and functional maturation of the hippocampal mossy fiber (MF synapse. Results Using NeuroD2 null mice and in vivo lentivirus-mediated gene knockdown, we demonstrate a critical role for NeuroD2 in the formation of CA3 dendritic spines receiving MF inputs. We also use electrophysiological recordings from CA3 neurons while stimulating MF axons to show that NeuroD2 regulates the differentiation of functional properties at the MF synapse. Finally, we find that NeuroD2 regulates PSD95 expression in hippocampal neurons and that PSD95 loss of function in vivo reproduces CA3 neuron spine defects observed in NeuroD2 null mice. Conclusion These experiments identify NeuroD2 as a key transcription factor that regulates the structural and functional differentiation of MF synapses in vivo.

  14. Extreme Silica Optical Fibre Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Cook

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A regenerated optical fibre Bragg grating that survives temperature cycling up to 1,295°C is demonstrated. A model based on seeded crystallisation or amorphisation is proposed.

  15. Natural Fibre-Reinforced Biofoams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bergeret

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Starches and polylactic acids (PLAs represent the main biobased and biodegradable polymers with potential industrial availability in the next decades for “bio” foams applications. This paper investigates the improvement of their morphology and properties through processing and materials parameters. Starch foams were obtained by melt extrusion in which water is used as blowing agent. The incorporation of natural fibres (hemp, cellulose, cotton linter, sugarcane, coconut in the starch foam induced a density reduction up to 33%, a decrease in water absorption, and an increase in mechanical properties according to the fibre content and nature. PLA foams were obtained through single-screw extrusion using of a chemical blowing agent that decomposed at the PLA melting temperature. A void content of 48% for PLA and 25% for cellulose fibre-reinforced PLA foams and an improvement in mechanical properties were achieved. The influence of a fibre surface treatment was investigated for both foams.

  16. Connectorization of fibre Bragg grating sensors recorded in microstructured polymer optical fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang, A.; Saez-Rodriguez, D.; Nielsen, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    We describe te production and characterization of FC/PC connectorised fibre Bragg grating sensors in polymer fibre. Sensors were recorded in few-moded and single mode microstructured fibre composed of poly (methyl methacrylate).......We describe te production and characterization of FC/PC connectorised fibre Bragg grating sensors in polymer fibre. Sensors were recorded in few-moded and single mode microstructured fibre composed of poly (methyl methacrylate)....

  17. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation effects on saccade adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Avila (Eric); J.N. van der Geest (Jos); S. Kengne Kamga (Sandra); M.C. Verhage (M. Claire); O. Donchin (Opher); M.A. Frens (Maarten)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSaccade adaptation is a cerebellar-mediated type of motor learning in which the oculomotor system is exposed to repetitive errors. Different types of saccade adaptations are thought to involve distinct underlying cerebellar mechanisms. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) induc

  18. Drug-induced cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Kerstens, F.G.; Maas, R.P.P.W.M.; Harmark, L.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebellar ataxia can be induced by a large number of drugs. We here conducted a systemic review of the drugs that can lead to cerebellar ataxia as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed (1966 to January 2014) and EMB

  19. Cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidich, M.J.; Walker, M.T.; Han, G. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Gottardi-Littell, N.R. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chandler, J.P. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2004-10-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) occurring in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The histomorphology of this uncommon glial (astrocytic) neoplasm is discussed. The occurrence of this tumor within the posterior fossa is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a cerebellar PXA in a patient with NF1. (orig.)

  20. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Zhenyu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Lin, Zhanmin; Ten Brinke, Michiel M; Boele, Henk-Jan; Potters, Jan-Willem; Ruigrok, Tom J H; Hoebeek, Freek E; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in classical

  1. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocker, Laurens J.L. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kliniek Sint-Jan Radiologie, Brussels (Belgium); Compter, A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Worp, H.B. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Luijten, P.R.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are a newly recognised entity associated with atherothromboembolic cerebrovascular disease and worse physical functioning. We aimed to investigate the relationship of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia and with vascular risk factors. We evaluated the MR images of 46 patients with a recent vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke and a symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis ≥50 % from the Vertebral Artery Stenting Trial (VAST) for the presence of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities ≤1.5 cm. At inclusion in VAST, data were obtained on age, sex, history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, and vascular risk factors. Adjusted risk ratios were calculated with Poisson regression analyses for the relation between cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vascular risk factors. Sixteen out of 46 (35 %) patients showed cerebellar cortical infarct cavities on the initial MRI, and only one of these 16 patients was known with a previous vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke. In patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia, risk factor profiles of patients with cerebellar cortical infarct cavities were not different from patients without these cavities. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are seen on MRI in as much as one third of patients with recently symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis. Since patients usually have no prior history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, cerebellar cortical infarct cavities should be added to the spectrum of common incidental brain infarcts visible on routine MRI. (orig.)

  2. Molecular markers of neuronal progenitors in the embryonic cerebellar anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Daniver; Hatten, Mary E

    2006-11-22

    The cerebellum, like the cerebrum, includes a nuclear structure and an overlying cortical structure. Experiments in the past decade have expanded knowledge beyond the traditional function of the cerebellum to include critical roles in motor learning and memory and sensory discrimination. The initial steps in cerebellar development depend on inductive signaling involving FGF and Wnt proteins produced at the mesencephalic/metencephalic boundary. To address the issue of how individual cerebellar cell fates within the cerebellar territory are specified, we examined the expression of transcription factors, including mammalian homologues of LIM homeodomain-containing proteins, basic helix-loop-helix proteins, and three amino acid loop-containing proteins. The results of these studies show that combinatorial codes of transcription factors define precursors of the cerebellar nuclei, and both Purkinje cells and granule neurons of the cerebellar cortex. Examination of gene expression patterns in several hundred lines of Egfp-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mice in the GENSAT Project revealed numerous genes with restricted expression in cerebellar progenitor populations, including genes specific for cerebellar nuclear precursors and Purkinje cell precursors. In addition, we identified patterns of gene expression that link granule and Purkinje cells to their precerebellar nuclei. These results identify molecular pathways that offer new insights on the development of the nuclear and cortical structures of the cerebellum, as well as components of the cerebellar circuitry.

  3. Cerebellar vermis plays a causal role in visual motion discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Renzi, Chiara; Casali, Stefano; Silvanto, Juha; Vecchi, Tomaso; Papagno, Costanza; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-09-01

    Cerebellar patients have been found to show deficits in visual motion discrimination, suggesting that the cerebellum may play a role in visual sensory processing beyond mediating motor control. Here we show that triple-pulse online transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over cerebellar vermis but not over the cerebellar hemispheres significantly impaired motion discrimination. Critically, the interference caused by vermis TMS on motion discrimination did not depend on an indirect effect of TMS over nearby visual areas, as demonstrated by a control experiment in which TMS over V1 but not over cerebellar vermis significantly impaired orientation discrimination. These findings demonstrate the causal role of the cerebellar vermis in visual motion processing in neurologically normal participants.

  4. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picerni, Eleonora; Petrosini, Laura; Piras, Fabrizio; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Cutuli, Debora; Chiapponi, Chiara; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional, and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). High resolution T1-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18-59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM) or White Matter (WM) volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD), and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA) were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty.

  5. Aging-induced Seizure-related Changes to the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Pathway in Forebrain Specific BDNF Overexpressing Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Kate L; Goodman, Jeffrey H; Chadman, Kathryn K; McCloskey, Daniel P

    2011-08-01

    Aging confers an increased risk for developing seizure activity, especially within brain regions that mediate learning and synaptic plasticity. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family that has an important role in regulating growth and development of the nervous system. BDNF is upregulated after pharmacological seizure induction and this upregulation contributes to enhanced excitability of the hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 pathway, which is accompanied by neuropeptide Y (NPY) upregulation. Mice overexpressing a BDNF transgene in forebrain neurons provide an avenue for understanding the role of neurotrophic support in the aged hippocampus. In this study BDNF transgenic (TG) mice were utilized to determine whether increased BDNF expression through genetic manipulation resulted in age-related changes in hippocampal excitability and NPY expression. Spontaneous behavioral seizures were observed in TG mice, but not WT mice, past 5 months of age and the severity of behavioral seizures increased with age. Electrophysiological investigation of hippocampal CA3 activity indicated that slices from aged TG mice (86%), but not age-matched WT mice, or young TG mice, showed epileptiform activity in response to either repeated paired pulse or high frequency (tetanic) stimulation. Electrophysiological results were supported by the observation of robust ectopic NPY immunoreactivity in hippocampal mossy fibers of most aged TG mice (57%), which was absent in age-matched WT mice and young TG mice. The results from this study indicate that forebrain restricted BDNF overexpression produces age-related changes in hyperexcitability and NPY immunoreactivity in mossy fiber-CA3 pathway. Together, these data suggest that the capability for BDNF to promote epileptogenesis is maintained, and may be enhanced, in the aging hippocampus.

  6. Dietary Restriction reduces hippocampal neurogenesis and granule cell neuron density without affecting the density of mossy fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Miranda C; Fannon-Pavlich, McKenzie J; Mysore, Karthik K; Dutta, Rahul R; Ongjoco, Alexandria T; Quach, Leon W; Kharidia, Khush M; Somkuwar, Sucharita S; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2017-03-08

    The hippocampal formation undergoes significant morphological and functional changes after prolonged caloric and dietary restriction (DR). In this study we tested whether prolonged DR results in deleterious alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis, density of granule cell neurons and mossy fibers, all of which support plasticity in the dentate gyrus. Young adult animals either experienced free access to food (control condition), or every-other-day feeding regimen (DR condition) for 3 months. The number of Ki-67 cells and 28-day old 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) cells were quantified in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus to determine the effect of DR on cellular proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells in the anatomically defined regions of the dentate gyrus. The density of granule cell neurons and synaptoporin were also quantified to determine the effect of DR on granule cell neurons and mossy fiber projections in the dentate gyrus. Our results show that DR increases cellular proliferation and concurrently reduces survival of newly born neurons in the ventral dentate gyrus without effecting the number of cells in the dorsal dentate gyrus. DR reduced density of granule cell neurons in the dorsal dentate gyrus. These alterations in the number of granule cell neurons did not affect mossy fiber density in DR animals, which was visualized as no differences in synaptoporin expression. Our findings demonstrate that granule cell neurons in the dentate gyrus are vulnerable to chronic DR and that the reorganization of granule cells in the dentate gyrus subregions is not producing concomitant alterations in dentate gyrus neuronal circuitry with this type of dietary restriction.

  7. Delayed kindling development after rapidly recurring seizures: relation to mossy fiber sprouting and neurotrophin, GAP-43 and dynorphin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmér, E; Kokaia, M; Kokaia, Z; Ferencz, I; Lindvall, O

    1996-03-11

    Development of kindling and mossy fiber sprouting, and changes of gene expression were studied after 40 seizures produced during about 3 h by electrical stimulation every 5 min in the ventral hippocampus. As assessed by 5 test stimulations, enhanced responsiveness was present already after 6-24 h but from 1 week post-seizure increased gradually up to 4 weeks without additional stimuli. Sprouting of mossy fibers in the dentate gyrus was demonstrated only at 4 weeks with Timm's staining. In situ hybridization showed a transient increase (maximum at 2 h) of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), TrkB and TrkC mRNA levels and reduction (maximum at 12-24 h) of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) mRNA expression in dentate granule cells after the seizures. In addition, BDNF mRNA levels were elevated in CA1 and CA3 regions, amygdala and piriform cortex. Marked increases of mRNA for growth-associated protein (GAP-43), with maximum expression at 12-24 h, were observed in dentate granule cells and in amygdala-piriform cortex. Dynorphin mRNA levels showed biphasic changes in dentate granule cells with an increase at 2 h followed by a decrease at 24 h. No long-term alterations of gene expression were observed. These findings indicate that increased responsiveness develops rapidly after recurring seizures but that the kindled state is reached gradually in about 4 weeks. Mossy fiber sprouting occurs in parallel to epileptogenesis and may play a causative role. Short-term changes of neurotrophin and Trk, GAP-43 and dynorphin mRNA levels and the assumed alterations of the corresponding proteins could trigger structural rearrangements underlying kindling but might also contribute to the initial increase of seizure susceptibility.

  8. Carbon nanotubes for ultrafast fibre lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernysheva Maria

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs possess both remarkable optical properties and high potential for integration in various photonic devices. We overview, here, recent progress in CNT applications in fibre optics putting particular emphasis on fibre lasers. We discuss fabrication and characterisation of different CNTs, development of CNT-based saturable absorbers (CNT-SA, their integration and operation in fibre laser cavities putting emphasis on state-of-the-art fibre lasers, mode locked using CNT-SA. We discuss new design concepts of high-performance ultrafast operation fibre lasers covering ytterbium (Yb, bismuth (Bi, erbium (Er, thulium (Tm and holmium (Ho-doped fibre lasers.

  9. Carbon nanotubes for ultrafast fibre lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Rozhin, Aleksey; Fedotov, Yuri; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; Kobtsev, Sergey M.; Dianov, Evgeny M.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess both remarkable optical properties and high potential for integration in various photonic devices. We overview, here, recent progress in CNT applications in fibre optics putting particular emphasis on fibre lasers. We discuss fabrication and characterisation of different CNTs, development of CNT-based saturable absorbers (CNT-SA), their integration and operation in fibre laser cavities putting emphasis on state-of-the-art fibre lasers, mode locked using CNT-SA. We discuss new design concepts of high-performance ultrafast operation fibre lasers covering ytterbium (Yb), bismuth (Bi), erbium (Er), thulium (Tm) and holmium (Ho)-doped fibre lasers.

  10. Practical Hydrogen Loading of Air Silica Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm;

    2005-01-01

    A method for hydrogen-loading air-silica optical fibres has been developed allowing out-diffusion times comparable to standard step-index fibres. Examples of the first grating written in Ge-doped air-silica fibres using a 266nm UV-laser are shown.......A method for hydrogen-loading air-silica optical fibres has been developed allowing out-diffusion times comparable to standard step-index fibres. Examples of the first grating written in Ge-doped air-silica fibres using a 266nm UV-laser are shown....

  11. Strength of Concrete Containing Basalt Fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvez Imraan Ansari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparative study of effect of basalt fibre on compressive and split tensile strength of M40 grade concrete. The basalt fibre was mixed in concrete by (0.5%, 1%, and 1.5% of its total weight of cement in concrete. Results indicated that the strength increases with increase of basalt fibre content up to 1.0% beyond that there is a reduction in strength on increasing basalt fibre. The results show that the concrete specimen with 1.0% of basalt fibre gives better performance when it compared with 0.5%and 1.5% basalt fibre mix in concrete specimens.

  12. Disorganized foliation of unilateral cerebellar hemisphere as cerebellar cortical dysplasia in patients with recurrent seizures: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We present a rare case of abnormal foliation for one cerebellar hemisphere on MR imaging, showing vertically-oriented folia. Foliation of contralateral cerebellar hemisphere and other structures in the posterior fossa were normal, and the patient has no neurologic deficits. This rare and unique abnormality is considered a kind of developmental error of the cerebellum.

  13. Critical involvement of postsynaptic protein kinase activation in LTP at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses on CA3 interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Galván, Emilio J; Cosgrove, Kathleen E.; Mauna, Jocelyn C.; Card, J. Patrick; Thiels, Edda; Meriney, Stephen D.; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) synapses on area CA3 lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) interneurons are capable of undergoing a Hebbian form of NMDAR-independent LTP induced by the same type of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) that induces LTP at MF synapses on pyramidal cells. LTP of MF input to L-M interneurons occurs only at synapses containing mostly calcium impermeable (CI)-AMPARs. Here, we demonstrate that HFS-induced LTP at these MF-interneuron synapses requires postsynaptic activation of protei...

  14. High affinity group III mGluRs regulate mossy fiber input to CA3 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E; Meriney, Stephen D; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2011-12-01

    Stratum lacunosum-moleculare interneurons (L-Mi) in hippocampal area CA3 target the apical dendrite of pyramidal cells providing feedforward inhibition. Here we report that selective activation of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) 4/8 with L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphnobytyric acid (L-AP4; 10 μM) decreased the probability of glutamate release from the mossy fiber (MF) terminals synapsing onto L-Mi. Consistent with this interpretation, application of L-AP4 in the presence of 3 mM strontium decreased the frequency of asynchronous MF EPSCs in L-Mi. Furthermore, the dose response curve showed that L-AP4 at 400 μM produced no further decrease in MF EPSC amplitude compared with 20 μM L-AP4, indicating the lack of mGluRs 7 at these MF terminals. We also found that one mechanism of mGluRs 4/8-mediated inhibition of release is linked to N-type voltage gated calcium channels at MF terminals. Application of the group III mGluR antagonist MSOP (100 μM) demonstrated that mGluRs 4/8 are neither tonically active nor activated by low and moderate frequencies of activity. However, trains of stimuli to the MF at 20 and 40 Hz delivered during the application of MSOP revealed a relief of inhibition of transmitter release and an increase in the overall probability of action potential firing in the postsynaptic L-Mi. Interestingly, the time to first action potential was significantly shorter in the presence of MSOP, indicating that mGluR 4/8 activation delays L-Mi firing in response to MF activity. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the timing and probability of action potentials in L-Mi evoked by MF synaptic input is regulated by the activation of presynaptic high affinity group III mGluRs.

  15. Bidirectional Hebbian plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses on CA3 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Emilio J; Calixto, Eduardo; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2008-12-24

    Hippocampal area CA3 is critically involved in the formation of nonoverlapping neuronal subpopulations ("pattern separation") to store memory representations as distinct events. Efficient pattern separation relies on the strong and sparse excitatory input from the mossy fibers (MFs) to pyramidal cells and feedforward inhibitory interneurons. However, MF synapses on CA3 pyramidal cells undergo long-term potentiation (LTP), which, if unopposed, will degrade pattern separation because MF activation will now recruit additional CA3 pyramidal cells. Here, we demonstrate MF LTP in stratum lacunosum-moleculare (L-M) interneurons induced by the same stimulation protocol that induces MF LTP in pyramidal cells. This LTP was NMDA receptor (NMDAR) independent and occurred at MF Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptor synapses. LTP was prevented by with voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell soma during high-frequency stimulation (HFS), intracellular injections of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA (20 mm), or bath applications of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nimodipine (10 microm). We propose that MF LTP in L-M interneurons preserves the sparsity of pyramidal cell activation, thus allowing CA3 to maintain its role in pattern separation. In the presence of the mGluR1alpha antagonist LY367385 [(S)-(+)-a-amino-4-carboxy-2-methylbenzeneacetic acid] (100 microm), the same HFS that induces MF LTP in naive slices triggered NMDAR-independent MF LTD. This LTD, like LTP, required activation of the L-type Ca(2+) channel and also was induced after blockade of IP(3) receptors with heparin (4 mg/ml) or the selective depletion of receptor-gated Ca(2+) stores with ryanodine (10 or 100 microm). We conclude that L-M interneurons are endowed with Ca(2+) signaling cascades suitable for controlling the polarity of MF long-term plasticity induced by joint presynaptic and postsynaptic activities.

  16. Target-Dependent Compartmentalization of the Corelease of Glutamate and GABA from the Mossy Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Emilio J; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2017-01-18

    The mossy fibers (MFs) corelease glutamate and GABA onto pyramidal cells of CA3 during development, until the end of the third postnatal week. However, the major target cells of the MF are the interneurons of CA3. Therefore, it has been shown that the interneurons of the hilus and stratum lucidum receive this dual monosynaptic input on MF stimulation. Because the plasticity of glutamatergic transmission from the different terminals of the MF is target specific, we here asked whether the corelease of glutamate and GABA was also subjected to a target-dependent compartmentalization. We analyzed the occurrence and plasticity of MF simultaneous glutamatergic-GABAergic signaling onto interneurons of the different strata of CA3 in rats during the third postnatal week. We show the coexistence of time-locked, glutamate receptor and GABA receptor-mediated mono synaptic responses evoked by MF stimulation in interneurons from stratum lucidum and stratum radiatum, but not in interneurons from stratum lacunosum-moleculare. As expected from the transmission of MF origin, MF GABAergic responses were depressed by the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. Strikingly, while MF glutamatergic responses underwent LTD, the simultaneous MF GABAergic responses of stratum lucidum interneurons, but not of stratum radiatum interneurons, displayed a Hebbian form of LTP that was mimicked by PKC activation. PKA activation potentiated MF glutamatergic responses of stratum radiatum interneurons, whereas in stratum lucidum interneurons only GABAergic responses were potentiated. We here disclose that the corelease of glutamate and GABA, as well as their plasticity are compartmentalized in a target-dependent manner, showing counterbalanced compensatory plasticity of two neurotransmitters released by different terminals of the same pathway.

  17. Cerebellar ependymal cyst in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss-Fluehmann, G; Konar, M; Jaggy, A; Vandevelde, M; Oevermann, A

    2008-11-01

    An 11-week-old, male, Staffordshire Bull Terrier had a history of generalized ataxia and falling since birth. The neurologic findings suggested a localization in the cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed. In all sequences the area of the cerebellum was almost replaced by fluid isointense to cerebrospinal fluid. A complete necropsy was performed after euthanasia. Histologically, the lesion was characterized by extensive loss of cerebellar tissue in both hemispheres and vermis. Toward the surface of the cerebellar defect, the cavity was confined by ruptured and folded membranes consisting of a layer of glial fibrillary acidic (GFAP)-positive glial cells covered multifocally by epithelial cells. Some of these cells bore apical cilia and were cytokeratin and GFAP negative, supporting their ependymal origin. The histopathologic features of our case are consistent with the diagnosis of an ependymal cyst. Its glial and ependymal nature as demonstrated by histopathologic and immunohistochemical examination differs from arachnoid cysts, which have also been reported in dogs. The origin of these cysts remains controversial, but it has been suggested that they develop during embryogenesis subsequent to sequestration of developing neuroectoderm. We speculate that the cyst could have been the result of a pre- or perinatal, possibly traumatic, insult because hemorrhage, and tissue destruction had occurred. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ependymal cyst in the veterinary literature.

  18. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  19. Fibre concentrations and size distributions of airborne fibres in several European man-made mineral fibre plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgson, J; Ottery, J; Cherrie, J W; Harrison, G E

    1980-01-01

    Although the nominal diameters of fibres produced in the glass and rock wool industries are usually 6-15 micrometers, these products contain a small proportion of respirable fibres (less than 3 micrometers diameter). Particular significance has been attached to the biological risk arising from the long (greater than 10 micrometers), fine (less than 1 micrometers) fibres. Therefore, the medical research sponsored by the Joint European Medical Research Board into the effects of man-made fibres on health has included detailed environmental studies on both the exposure levels to respirable fibres and the fibre size distributions at the European plants selected for epidemiological work. This paper summarizes the results obtained so far. The size distributions (length and diameter) of the airborne man-made mineral fibres are compared with similar data previously reported for airborne asbestos fibres.

  20. Vestibular and cerebellar contribution to gaze optimality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, Murat; Glasauer, Stefan; Lehnen, Nadine

    2014-04-01

    Patients with chronic bilateral vestibular loss have large gaze variability and experience disturbing oscillopsia, which impacts physical and social functioning, and quality of life. Gaze variability and oscillopsia in these patients are attributed to a deficient vestibulo-ocular reflex, i.e. impaired online feedback motor control. Here, we assessed whether the lack of vestibular input also affects feed-forward motor learning, i.e. the ability to choose optimal movement parameters that minimize variability during active movements such as combined eye-head gaze shifts. A failure to learn from practice and reshape feed-forward motor commands in response to sensory error signals to achieve appropriate movements has been proposed to explain dysmetric gaze shifts in patients with cerebellar ataxia. We, therefore, assessed the differential roles of both sensory vestibular information and the cerebellum in choosing optimal movement kinematics. We have previously shown that, in the course of several gaze shifts, healthy subjects adjust the motor command to minimize endpoint variability also when movements are experimentally altered by an increase in the head moment of inertia. Here, we increased the head inertia in five patients with chronic complete bilateral vestibular loss (aged 45.4±7.1 years, mean±standard deviation), nine patients with cerebellar ataxia (aged 56.7±12.6 years), and 10 healthy control subjects (aged 39.7±6.3 years) while they performed large (75° and 80°) horizontal gaze shifts towards briefly flashed targets in darkness and, using our previous optimal control model, compared their gaze shift parameters to the expected optimal movements with increased head inertia. Patients with chronic bilateral vestibular loss failed to update any of the gaze shift parameters to the new optimum with increased head inertia. Consequently, they displayed highly variable, suboptimal gaze shifts. Patients with cerebellar ataxia updated some movement parameters to

  1. Thermal analysis of bicomponent fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, J.I. [Room I-320-D, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Malaga, Plaza El Ejido, s/n, 29013-Malaga (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    A one-dimensional model of amorphous bicomponent spun fibres derived from the use of perturbation methods based on the slenderness ratio is presented. The model accounts for gravitational, surface tension, axial heat conduction, viscous dissipation and the nonlinear dependence of the dynamic viscosity law on temperature, but does not consider latent heat effects and the radial gradients of temperature and assumes Newtonian rheology. Studies on the effects of the thermal parameters on the compound fibre's geometry and solidification have been performed, and show that the activation energy of the dynamic viscosity laws have a paramount effect on the fibre's cooling, shape, and axial stresses on the core and sheath. In particular, it is shown that, when the activation energy of the viscosity law for the core is higher than that for the sheath, the axial stresses on the core are monotonic functions of the distance along the fibre and higher than those on the sheath, whereas those in the latter may exhibit a nonmonotonic behavior as functions of the thermal conductivity, heat losses and thermal inertia. Despite its limitations, the model presented here represents an improvement over available one-dimensional models for non-isothermal compound or bicomponent fibres. (author)

  2. Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fibre Comprising a Fibre Grating in the Cladding and its Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    An optical fibre is provided having a fibre cladding around a longitudinally extending optical propagation core. The cladding has a reflection region of a varying refractive index in the longitudinal direction.......An optical fibre is provided having a fibre cladding around a longitudinally extending optical propagation core. The cladding has a reflection region of a varying refractive index in the longitudinal direction....

  3. Exposure assessment for airborne man-made mineral fibres: the role of fibre dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, F S

    1993-08-01

    Environmental exposures to man-made mineral fibres (MMMF) typically contain fibres which are polydisperse with respect to fibre dimensions. Fibre dimensions may influence their biological action through effects on: the efficiency of transport to target tissues; the residence time in target tissues; and the biological activity of fibres in contact with target cells. This variability of biological activity vs fibre dimensions should be accounted for when assessing exposure for epidemiological studies of the risk of cancer in subjects exposed to MMMF. In order to provide insight into the influence of fibre dimensions on the potential carcinogenicity of MMMF, this paper reviews literature concerning the sites of lung tumours, regional fibre deposition, biological effects of fibres in in vivo and in vitro systems, dissolution rates of fibres and rates of physiological clearance of inhaled particles. Tumorigenicity of fibres in contact with target tissue appears to be primarily a function of fibre length, whereas both fibre diameter and fibre length may affect the penetration of fibres through the respiratory tract as well as their residence time in target tissues. A methodology is presented to use this information to compute estimates of biologically effective exposure from the joint distribution of fibre lengths and diameters found in an environmental exposure.

  4. Underwater Acoustic Sensing with Optical Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Rampal

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of optical fibres for the detection of acoustic pressure underwater has been discussed with particular reference to the recent literature on the development of fibre optic hydrophones.

  5. Photonic-crystal fibre: Mapping the structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    The demonstration of real-time and non-destructive Doppler-assisted tomography of the internal structure of photonic-crystal fibres could aid the fabrication of high-quality fibres with enhanced performance....

  6. Biopersistence of man-made vitreous fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhle, H; Bellmann, B

    1995-10-01

    Methods for the determination of biodurability of man-made vitreous fibres are reviewed. For mineral wools the first step was the preparation of respirable fibre fractions. Fibres were administered to rats by inhalation or by intratracheal instillation. After serial sacrifice their lungs were digested by low-temperature ashing or by hypochlorite. The total number of fibres per lung and the distributions of length and diameter were analysed by electron microscopy. This resulted in a bivariate distribution of fibres at the various sacrifice dates. If the logarithm of the number of fibres decreased approximately linearly with time after exposure then the elimination kinetics of fibres can be characterized by a half-time. The half-times were compared between various experiments with rats exposed to mineral wool samples. In summary good agreement was found for the elimination of fibres after long-term inhalation and intratracheal instillation whereas shorter half-times were found after short-term inhalation.

  7. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  8. Wavelength Filters in Fibre Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Venghaus, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    Wavelength filters constitute an essential element of fibre-optic networks. This book gives a comprehensive account of the principles and applications of such filters, including their technological realisation. After an introductory chapter on wavelength division multiplexing in current and future fibre optic networks follows a detailed treatment of the phase characteristics of wavelength filters, a factor frequently neglected but of significant importance at high bit rates. Subsequent chapters cover three-dimensional reflection of gratings, arrayed waveguide gratings, fibre Bragg gratings, Fabry-Perot filters, dielectric multilayer filters, ring filters, and interleavers. The book explains the relevant performance parameters, the particular advantages and shortcomings of the various concepts and components, and the preferred applications. It also includes in-depth information on the characteristics of both commercially available devices and those still at the R&D stage. All chapters are authored by inter...

  9. Fibre Optics In Coal Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Paul

    1984-08-01

    Coal mines have a number of unique problems which affect the use of fibre optic technology. These include a potentially explosive atmosphere due to the evolution of methane from coal, and a dirty environment with no cleaning facilities readily available. Equipment being developed by MRDE to allow the exploitation of optical fibres underground includes: A hybrid electrical/fibre optic connector for the flexible power trailing cable of the coal-face shearer; An Intrinsically Safe (IS) pulsed laser transmitter using Frequency Shift Key (FSK) data modulation; An IS Avalanche Photo Diode Receiver suitable for pulsed & continuous wave optical signals; A mine shaft and roadway cable/ connector system incorporating low loss butt-splices and preterminated demountable connectors.

  10. Fatal remote cerebellar hemorrhage after supratentorial unruptured aneurysm surgery in patient with previous cerebellar infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eun-Jeong; Park, Jung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is a rare complication of supratentorial and spinal surgeries, seldom requiring intervention but occasionally causing significant morbidity or even mortality. Although a number of theories have been proposed, the exact pathophysiology of RCH remains incompletely understood. Patient concerns: We present a 62-year-old patient with RCH encountered following surgical clipping of an unruptured middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysm in a patient with previous cerebellar infarction. Lessons: It is extremely rare, but sometimes, RCH can be life-threatening. It is necessary to check the patient's general condition, underlying diseases and medical history. And controlled drainage of the CSF seems to be most important. Arachnoidplasty may be a consideration and the position of the drain string might have to be carefully determined. PMID:28121936

  11. Photonic crystal fibres and effective index approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riishede, Jesper; Libori, Stig E. Barkou; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard;

    2001-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibres are investigated with an effective index approach. The effective index of both core and cladding is found to be wavelength dependent. Accurate modelling must respect the rich topology of these fibres.......Photonic crystal fibres are investigated with an effective index approach. The effective index of both core and cladding is found to be wavelength dependent. Accurate modelling must respect the rich topology of these fibres....

  12. Ductility Performance of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    S. Eswari; P.N. Raghunath; Suguna, K

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a study on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete. The influence of fibre content on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete specimens having different fibre volume fractions was investigated. The parameters of investigation included modulus of rupture, ultimate load, service load, ultimate and service load deflection, crack width, energy ductility and deflection ductility. A total of 27 specimens, 100×100×500 mm, were tested to...

  13. Optical Fibre Based Frequency Shifters Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-28

    A fibre optic frequency shifter can be used to replace the Bragg cell acousto-optic modulator, currently used to generate low frequency optical...carriers, in fibre optic communications and sensor systems. This new form of frequency shifter, being an all fibre device, in which the propagating optical...large number of workers in recent years, (for example references [2-81 and those contained therein). The main elements of a fibre - optic frequency

  14. Optimal Extraction of Fibre Optic Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sharp, R

    2009-01-01

    We report an optimal extraction methodology, for the reduction of multi-object fibre spectroscopy data, operating in the regime of tightly packed (and hence significantly overlapping) fibre profiles. The routine minimises crosstalk between adjacent fibres and statistically weights the extraction to reduce noise. As an example of the process we use simulations of the numerous modes of operation of the AAOmega fibre spectrograph and observational data from the SPIRAL Integral Field Unit at the Anglo-Australian Telescope.

  15. Local fibred right adjoints are polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Anders; Kock, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense......For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense...

  16. Fibre Optic Communication Key Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Grote, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The book gives an in-depth description of the key devices of current and next generation fibre optic communication networks. In particular, the book covers devices such as semiconductor lasers, optical amplifiers, modulators, wavelength filters, and detectors but the relevant properties of optical fibres as well. The presentations include the physical principles underlying the various devices, the technologies used for the realization of the different devices, typical performance characteristics and limitations, and development trends towards more advanced components are also illustrated. Thus the scope of the book spans relevant principles, state-of-the-art implementations, the status of current research and expected future components.

  17. Friction and wear of human hair fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James; Johnson, Simon A.; Avery, Andrew R.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental study of the tribological properties of hair fibres is reported, and the effect of surface treatment on the evolution of friction and wear during sliding. Specifically, orthogonally crossed fibre/fibre contacts under a compressive normal load over a series of 10 000 cycle studies are investigated. Reciprocating sliding at a velocity of 0.4 mm s-1, over a track length of 0.8 mm, was performed at 18 °C and 40%-50% relative humidity. Hair fibres retaining their natural sebum were studied, as well as those stripped of their sebum via hexane cleaning, and hair fibres conditioned using a commercially available product. Surface topography modifications resulting from wear were imaged using scanning electron microscopy and quantified using white light interferometry. Hair fibres that presented sebum or conditioned product at the fibre/fibre junction exhibited initial coefficients of friction at least 25% lower than those that were cleaned with hexane. Coefficients of friction were observed to depend on the directionality of sliding for hexane cleaned hair fibres after sufficient wear cycles that cuticle lifting was present, typically on the order 1000 cycles. Cuticle flattening was observed for fibre/fibre junctions exposed to 10 mN compressive normal loads, whereas loads of 100 mN introduced substantial cuticle wear and fibre damage.

  18. Lissencephaly with brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia and congenital cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumansour, Iman S; Wrogemann, Jens; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Salman, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Classical lissencephaly may be associated with cerebellar hypoplasia and when significant cerebellar abnormalities occur, defects in proteins encoded by TUBA1A, RELN, and very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) genes have been reported. We present a neonate with a severe neurologic phenotype associated with hypotonia, oropharyngeal incoordination that required a gastric tube for feeding, intractable epilepsy, and congenital cataracts. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed classical lissencephaly, ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, globular and vertical hippocampi, and severe cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia. She died at 6 weeks of age. No specific molecular diagnosis was made. This likely represents a previously undescribed genetic lissencephaly syndrome.

  19. Occurrence of crossed cerebellar diaschisis in cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hartmann, A.; Friedrich, G.; Froescher, M.; Reichmann, K.; Reske, S.N.; Knopp, R.

    1984-10-01

    In 31 patients with completed stroke (n = 30) or PRIND (n = 1) a brain SPECT with /sup 123/I-labeled amphetamines was performed. In 14 (= 45%) of the respective patients - suffering from long-lasting hemiplegia - crossed cerebellar diaschisis was present. The interval between onset of the disease and time of examination varied between 1 week and 7 years. On the other hand, patients without crossed cerebellar diaschisis did not, with one exception, suffer from hemiplegia. It is likely that this phenomenon is caused by the reduction of spino-cerebellar stimuli due to the paresis of the respective extremities.

  20. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Sassi, Samia; Mizouni, Habiba; Nabli, Fatma; Kallel, Lamia; Kefi, Mounir; Hentati, Fayçal

    2010-01-01

    Venous infarction in the cerebellum has been reported only rarely, probably because of the abundant venous collateral drainage in this region. Bilateral occipital infarction is a rare cause of visual loss in cerebral venous thrombosis. We describe a 50-year-old woman with a history of ulcerative colitis who developed acute cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness. She had bilateral cerebellar and occipital lesions related to sigmoid venous thrombosis and achieved complete recovery with anticoagulation therapy. Cerebral venous thrombosis should be considered in cases of simultaneous cerebellar and occipital vascular lesions.

  1. Mechanical processing of bast fibres: The occurrence of damage and its effect on fibre structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hänninen, Tuomas; Thygesen, Anders; Mehmood, Shahid

    2012-01-01

    Currently, separation processes used for natural fibres for composite reinforcing textiles cause a significant amount of damage to the fibres. Microscopic analysis showed that industrially processed flax (Linum usitassimium L.) fibres contained significantly more defects than green or retted ones...... to heterogeneous reactivity. Analogous findings were observed in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) fibre damaged in the laboratory under controlled conditions, emphasising the need to develop extraction and separation processes that minimise mechanical damage to the fibres....

  2. Occupational ceramic fibres dermatitis in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, M; Wojtczak, J

    2000-07-01

    Recently, the use of asbestos has been considerably limited in Poland, with the simultaneous increase in the manufacture, processing and application of man-made mineral fibres, which includes ceramic fibres. The aims of this study were (1) to assess the type and frequency of dermal changes caused by the irritant activity of ceramic fibres among workers at the plants that manufacture packing and insulation products; and (2) to compare the irritant activity of Polish-made L-2 and L-3 ceramic fibres with that of the Thermowool ceramic fibres made in England. Workers (n = 226) who were exposed to ceramic fibres underwent dermatological examination. Patch tests with the standard allergen set, together with samples of the fibres L-2, L-3, and Thermowool fibres, were applied to all the workers. It has been shown that the Polish-made L-2 and L-3 fibres differed from Thermowool fibres in that the L-2 and L-3 fibres contained zirconium and were coarser. The proportion of filaments with diameters above 3 microns was 11.1% in the L-3 fibre and 6.3% in the L-2 fibre samples. The Thermowool fibre did not contain filaments thicker than 3 microns. Evident dermal changes, resulting from strong irritant activity of the fibres, were detected in 109 (48.2%) of the workers examined. Irritant contact dermatitis acuta (maculae, sometimes papulae and small crusts on the upper extremities, trunk, and lower extremities), disappearing after 2-3 days, was found in 50 (22.1%) workers. Irritant contact dermatitis chronica (diffuse permanent erythema with numerous telangiectasiae on the lateral portions of the face and neck, on the trunk, behind the auricles) was detected in 40 (17.7%) workers. The remaining 19 (8.4%) workers had both types of dermal change. All examined workers complained of very strong itching. The results of the patch tests confirmed the irritant activity of the ceramic fibres. Erythema without oedema, persisting for up to 96 h, appeared at the places where the fibres had

  3. A cerebellar learning model of vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation in wild-type and mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopath, Claudia; Badura, Aleksandra; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-05-21

    Mechanisms of cerebellar motor learning are still poorly understood. The standard Marr-Albus-Ito theory posits that learning involves plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses under control of the climbing fiber input, which provides an error signal as in classical supervised learning paradigms. However, a growing body of evidence challenges this theory, in that additional sites of plasticity appear to contribute to motor adaptation. Here, we consider phase-reversal training of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), a simple form of motor learning for which a large body of experimental data is available in wild-type and mutant mice, in which the excitability of granule cells or inhibition of Purkinje cells was affected in a cell-specific fashion. We present novel electrophysiological recordings of Purkinje cell activity measured in naive wild-type mice subjected to this VOR adaptation task. We then introduce a minimal model that consists of learning at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells with the help of the climbing fibers. Although the minimal model reproduces the behavior of the wild-type animals and is analytically tractable, it fails at reproducing the behavior of mutant mice and the electrophysiology data. Therefore, we build a detailed model involving plasticity at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells' synapse guided by climbing fibers, feedforward inhibition of Purkinje cells, and plasticity at the mossy fiber to vestibular nuclei neuron synapse. The detailed model reproduces both the behavioral and electrophysiological data of both the wild-type and mutant mice and allows for experimentally testable predictions.

  4. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  5. Increased excitability and altered action potential waveform in cerebellar granule neurons of the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Maria M; Garden, Claire L P

    2012-07-17

    Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by intellectual disability and impaired motor control. Lack of coordinated movement, poor balance, and unclear speech imply dysfunction of the cerebellum, which is known to be reduced in volume in DS. The principal cause of the smaller cerebellum is a diminished number of granule cells (GCs). These neurons form the 'input layer' of the cerebellar cortex, where sensorimotor information carried by incoming mossy fibers is transformed before it is conveyed to Purkinje cells and inhibitory interneurons. However, it is not known how processing of this information is affected in the hypogranular cerebellum that characterizes DS. Here we explore the possibility that the electrical properties of the surviving GCs are changed. We find that in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, GCs have a higher input resistance at voltages approaching the threshold for firing, which causes them to be more excitable. In addition, they fire narrower and larger amplitude action potentials. These subtly modified electrical properties may result in atypical transfer of information at the input layer of the cerebellum.

  6. Classically conditioned postural reflex in cerebellar patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, F P; Lachauer, S; Maschke, M; Timmann, D

    2004-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare postural responses to repetitive platform-evoked perturbations in cerebellar patients with those of healthy subjects using a classical conditioning paradigm. The perturbations consisted of tilting of the platform (unconditioned stimulus: US) at random time intervals, preceded by an auditory signal that represented the conditioning stimulus (CS). Physiological reactions were recorded biomechanically by measuring the vertical ground forces, yielding the center of vertical pressure (CVP), and electrophysiologically by EMG measurements of the main muscle groups of both legs. The recording session consisted of a control section with US-alone trials, a testing section with paired stimuli and a brief final section with US-alone trials. Healthy control subjects were divided into those establishing conditioned responses (CR) in all muscles tested (strategy I) and those with CR in the gastrocnemius muscles only (strategy II), suggesting an associative motor-related process is involved. Patients with a diffuse, non-localized disease were almost unable to establish CR. This was also true for a patient with a focal surgical lesion with no CR on the affected side but who, simultaneously, showed an essentially normal CR incidence on the intact side. During US-alone trials healthy controls exhibited a remarkable decay of the UR amplitude due to a non-associative motor-related process such as habituation. The decay was most prominent in the paired trials section. In contrast, patients showed no significant differences in the UR amplitude throughout the entire recording session. Analysis of the CVP supported the electrophysiological findings, showing CR in the controls only. The differences between the responses of control subjects and those of the cerebellar patients imply strongly that the cerebellum is involved critically in controlling associative and non-associative motor-related processes.

  7. Localization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to distinct terminals of mossy fiber axons implies regulation of both excitation and feedforward inhibition of CA3 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzer, Steve C; McNamara, James O

    2004-12-15

    Hippocampal dentate granule cells directly excite and indirectly inhibit CA3 pyramidal cells via distinct presynaptic terminal specializations of their mossy fiber axons. This mossy fiber pathway contains the highest concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the CNS, yet whether BDNF is positioned to regulate the excitatory and/or inhibitory pathways is unknown. To localize BDNF, confocal microscopy of green fluorescent protein transgenic mice was combined with BDNF immunohistochemistry. Approximately half of presynaptic granule cell-CA3 pyramidal cell contacts were found to contain BDNF. Moreover, enhanced neuronal activity virtually doubled the percentage of BDNF-immunoreactive terminals contacting CA3 pyramidal cells. To our surprise, BDNF was also found in mossy fiber terminals contacting inhibitory neurons. These studies demonstrate that mossy fiber BDNF is poised to regulate both direct excitatory and indirect feedforward inhibitory inputs to CA3 pyramdal cells and reveal that seizure activity increases the pool of BDNF-expressing granule cell presynaptic terminals contacting CA3 pyramidal cells.

  8. Target-cell specificity of kainate autoreceptor and Ca2+-store-dependent short-term plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ricardo; Lalic, Tatjana; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Capogna, Marco; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2008-12-03

    Presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs) modulate transmission between dentate granule cells and CA3 pyramidal neurons. Whether presynaptic KARs affect other synapses made by granule cell axons [mossy fibers (MFs)], on hilar mossy cells or interneurons, is not known. Nor is it known whether glutamate release from a single MF is sufficient to activate these receptors. Here, we monitor Ca(2+) in identified MF boutons traced from granule cell bodies. We show that a single action potential in a single MF activates both presynaptic KARs and Ca(2+) stores, contributing to use-dependent facilitation at MF-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. Rapid local application of kainate to the giant MF bouton has no detectable effect on the resting Ca(2+) but facilitates action-potential-evoked Ca(2+) entry through a Ca(2+) store-dependent mechanism. Localized two-photon uncaging of the Ca(2+) store receptor ligand IP(3) directly confirms the presence of functional Ca(2+) stores at these boutons. In contrast, presynaptic Ca(2+) kinetics at MF synapses on interneurons or mossy cells are insensitive to KAR blockade, to local kainate application or to photolytic release of IP(3). Consistent with this, postsynaptic responses evoked by activation of a single MF show KAR-dependent paired-pulse facilitation in CA3 pyramidal cells, but not in interneurons or mossy cells. Thus, KAR-Ca(2+) store coupling acts as a synapse-specific, short-range autoreceptor mechanism.

  9. An internal model architecture for novelty detection: implications for cerebellar and collicular roles in sensory processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R Anderson

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is thought to implement internal models for sensory prediction, but details of the underlying circuitry are currently obscure. We therefore investigated a specific example of internal-model based sensory prediction, namely detection of whisker contacts during whisking. Inputs from the vibrissae in rats can be affected by signals generated by whisker movement, a phenomenon also observable in whisking robots. Robot novelty-detection can be improved by adaptive noise-cancellation, in which an adaptive filter learns a forward model of the whisker plant that allows the sensory effects of whisking to be predicted and thus subtracted from the noisy sensory input. However, the forward model only uses information from an efference copy of the whisking commands. Here we show that the addition of sensory information from the whiskers allows the adaptive filter to learn a more complex internal model that performs more robustly than the forward model, particularly when the whisking-induced interference has a periodic structure. We then propose a neural equivalent of the circuitry required for adaptive novelty-detection in the robot, in which the role of the adaptive filter is carried out by the cerebellum, with the comparison of its output (an estimate of the self-induced interference and the original vibrissal signal occurring in the superior colliculus, a structure noted for its central role in novelty detection. This proposal makes a specific prediction concerning the whisker-related functions of a region in cerebellar cortical zone A(2 that in rats receives climbing fibre input from the superior colliculus (via the inferior olive. This region has not been observed in non-whisking animals such as cats and primates, and its functional role in vibrissal processing has hitherto remained mysterious. Further investigation of this system may throw light on how cerebellar-based internal models could be used in broader sensory, motor and cognitive

  10. Strength of Concrete Containing Basalt Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the comparative study of effect of basalt fibre on compressive and split tensile strength of M40 grade concrete. The basalt fibre was mixed in concrete by (0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%) of its total weight of cement in concrete. Results indicated that the strength increases with increase of basalt fibre content up to 1.0% beyond that there is a reduction in strength on increasing basalt fibre. The results show that the concrete specimen with 1.0% of basalt fibre gives be...

  11. Threshold temperature optical fibre sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiewicz, K. A.; Musial, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to manufacture a threshold temperature sensor based on a biconical optical fibre taper. The presented sensor employs the influence of variable state of concentration of some isotropic materials like wax or paraffin. Application of the above- mentioned materials is an attempt to prove that there is a possibility to obtain a low-cost, repeatable and smart sensor working as an in-line element. Optical fibre taper was obtained from a standard single mode fibre (SMF28®) by using a low pressure gas burner technique. The diameter of the manufactured tapers was 6.0 ± 0.5 μm with the length of elongation equal to 30.50 ± 0.16 mm. The applied technology allowed to produce tapers with the losses of 0.183 ± 0.015 dB. Application of materials with different temperature transition points made it possible to obtain the threshold work at the temperatures connected directly with their conversion temperature. External materials at the temperatures above their melting points do not influence the propagation losses. For each of them two types of the protection area and position of the optical fibre taper were applied.

  12. Cool application for Optical Fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    In a new first for CERN, optical fibres have been put on test to measure very low temperatures. If these tests prove successful, this new technology could lead to important cost-saving changes in the way the temperatures of superconducting magnets are measured. There was excitement in the air last March when the team led by Walter Scandale and Luc Thévenaz tested very low temperature measurement using optical fibres. This spring in CERN's Cryogenics lab an idea was put to the test as a new kind of low-temperature thermometry using optical fibres was tested down to 2 Kelvin (around 300 degrees below room temperature), and the first results are looking good. Optical fibres are well known for their ability to carry large amounts of data around the world, but it is less well known that they can be used for measuring temperatures. The intuition that they might be able to measure very low temperatures - such as those of the LHC magnets - came to the attention of CERN's Walter Scandale at the Optical Fi...

  13. A PHOTONIC BAND GAP FIBRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    An optical fibre having a periodicidal cladding structure provididing a photonic band gap structure with superior qualities. The periodical structure being one wherein high index areas are defined and wherein these are separated using a number of methods. One such method is the introduction...

  14. Mineral fibre persistence and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J C

    1998-10-01

    Epidemiological research during the past 40 years has demonstrated with increasing clarity that amphibole asbestos fibres--crocidolite, amosite and tremolite--are more carcinogenic than chrysotile. A smaller number of well-controlled studies using lung burden analyses, while adding to the specificity of this conclusion, have shown that amphibole fibres also differ from chrysotile in being far more durable and biopersistent in lung tissue. Analyses of mesothelioma and lung cancer in a large cohort of Canadian chrysotile miners and millers have recently shown that the low-level presence of fibrous tremolite in these mines, rather than the chrysotile, may well be responsible. The high risk of lung cancer, but not of mesothelioma, in the chrysotile textile industry remains anomalous and cannot be explained in this way. These various findings are directly relevant to the choice of the experimental methods which should be used for screening man-made fibres for industrial use. Although it is clear that biopersistence is a major determinant of cancer risk in animals, and perhaps also in man, other factors affecting the biological activity of mineral fibres may also be important.

  15. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  16. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Broersma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results expand on previous findings of bilateral cerebellar involvement in ET. We have identified specific areas in the bilateral somatomotor regions of the cerebellum: lobules V, VI and VIII.

  17. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens J.L. De Cocker, MD

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns.

  18. Anomalous cerebellar anatomy in Chinese children with dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hui eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia (DD claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia.

  19. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K.; Korogi, Y.; Tomiguchi, S.; Takahashi, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine (Japan); Okajima, T. [Dept. of Neurology, Johnan Hospital, Maihara, Johnan-mochi (Japan); Sato, H. [Dept. of Neurology, Minamata City General Hospital and Medical Centre (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99 m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part. (orig.)

  20. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, K; Korogi, Y; Tomiguchi, S; Takahashi, M; Okajima, T; Sato, H

    2001-04-01

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part.

  1. Elastic fibres in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Andrew K; Simpson, Andreja; Steer, Ruth; Cain, Stuart A; Kielty, Cay M

    2013-08-20

    Elastic fibres are insoluble components of the extracellular matrix of dynamic connective tissues such as skin, arteries, lungs and ligaments. They are laid down during development, and comprise a cross-linked elastin core within a template of fibrillin-based microfibrils. Their function is to endow tissues with the property of elastic recoil, and they also regulate the bioavailability of transforming growth factor β. Severe heritable elastic fibre diseases are caused by mutations in elastic fibre components; for example, mutations in elastin cause supravalvular aortic stenosis and autosomal dominant cutis laxa, mutations in fibrillin-1 cause Marfan syndrome and Weill-Marchesani syndrome, and mutations in fibulins-4 and -5 cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa. Acquired elastic fibre defects include dermal elastosis, whereas inflammatory damage to fibres contributes to pathologies such as pulmonary emphysema and vascular disease. This review outlines the latest understanding of the composition and assembly of elastic fibres, and describes elastic fibre diseases and current therapeutic approaches.

  2. Characterisation of Natural Fibre Reinforcements and Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard K. Cullen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent EU directives (e.g., ELV and WEEE have caused some rethinking of the life cycle implications of fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites. Man-made reinforcement fibres have significant ecological implications. One alternative is the use of natural fibres as reinforcements. The principal candidates are bast (plant stem fibres with flax, hemp, and jute as the current front runners. The work presented here will consider the characterisation of jute fibres and their composites. A novel technique is proposed for the measurement of fibre density. The new rule of mixtures, extended for noncircular cross-section natural fibres, is shown to provide a sensible estimate for the experimentally measured elastic modulus of the composite.

  3. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation in neurological disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrucci, Roberta; Bocci, Tommaso; Cortese, Francesca; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with neurological diseases, including dementia, epilepsy, post-stroke dysfunctions, movement disorders, and other pathological conditions. Because of this technique’s ability to modify cerebellar excitability without significant side effects, cerebellar tDCS is a new, interesting, and powerful tool to induce plastic modifications in the cerebellum. In this report, we review...

  4. Oxidative Stress in Autism: Elevated Cerebellar 3-nitrotyrosine Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Sajdel-Sulkowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that oxidative stress and/or mercury compounds play an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. This study compared for the first time the cerebellar levels of the oxidative stress marker 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT, mercury (Hg and the antioxidant selenium (Se levels between control and autistic subjects. Tissue homogenates were prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors from the frozen cerebellar tissue of control (n=10; mean age, 15.5 years; mean PMI, 15.5 hours and autistic (n=9; mean age 12.1 years; mean PMI, 19.3 hours subjects. The concentration of cerebellar 3-NT, determined by ELISA, in controls ranged from 13.69 to 49.04 pmol g-1 of tissue; the concentration of 3-NT in autistic cases ranged from 3.91 to 333.03 pmol g-1 of tissue. Mean cerebellar 3-NT was elevated in autism by 68.9% and the increase was statistically significant (p=0.045. Cerebellar Hg, measured by atomic absorption spectrometry ranged from 0.9 to 35 pmol g-1 tissue in controls (n=10 and from 3.2 to 80.7 pmol g-1 tissue in autistic cases (n=9; the 68.2% increase in cerebellar Hg was not statistically significant. However, there was a positive correlation between cerebellar 3-NT and Hg levels (r=0.7961, p=0.0001. A small decrease in cerebellar Se levels in autism, measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy, was not statistically significant but was accompanied by a 42.9% reduction in the molar ratio of Se to Hg in the autistic cerebellum. While preliminary, the results of the present study add elevated oxidative stress markers in brain to the growing body of data reflecting greater oxidative stress in autism.

  5. Characterisation of Flax Fibres and Flax Fibre Composites. Being cellulose based sources of materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslan, Mustafa

    that currently have the largest market share for composite applications. However, the most critical limitation in the use of cellulosic fibre composites for structural applications is the lack of well described fibre properties, in particular, the tensile strength. This is due to variations in fibre morphology...... of the internal cell wall structures. This is in contrast to the crack growth in brittle ceramic and glass fibres. Moreover, two typical stress-strain curves (linear and non-linear) measured for the flax fibres were found to be correlated with the amount of defected region in the fibres. The defects are induced...... a similar microstructure at low fibre weight fractions. However, when the fibre content is increased, a difference in porosity content can be observed from the composite cross sections. The nominal tensile strength of the unidirectional flax fibre/LPET composites is measured in the range 180 to 340 MPa...

  6. Proprioceptive Localization Deficits in People With Cerebellar Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Heidi M; Therrien, Amanda S; Bastian, Amy J

    2017-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that an important function of the cerebellum is predicting the state of the body during movement. Yet, the extent of cerebellar involvement in perception of limb state (i.e., proprioception, specifically limb position sense) has yet to be determined. Here, we investigated whether patients with cerebellar damage have deficits when trying to locate their hand in space (i.e., proprioceptive localization), which is highly important for everyday movements. By comparing performance during passive robot-controlled and active self-made multi-joint movements, we were able to determine that some cerebellar patients show improved precision during active movement (i.e., active benefit), comparable to controls, whereas other patients have reduced active benefit. Importantly, the differences in patient performance are not explained by patient diagnosis or clinical ratings of impairment. Furthermore, a subsequent experiment confirmed that active deficits in proprioceptive localization occur during both single-joint and multi-joint movements. As such, it is unlikely that localization deficits can be explained by the multi-joint coordination deficits occurring after cerebellar damage. Our results suggest that cerebellar damage may cause varied impairments to different elements of proprioceptive sense. It follows that proprioceptive localization should be adequately accounted for in clinical testing and rehabilitation of people with cerebellar damage.

  7. Relationship between the cerebellar function and cerebellar atrophy in Minamata disease. Investigations using body balance analyzer and MR imaging method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okajima, Toru [Johnan Hospital, Minami, Kumamoto (Japan); Ikeda, Osamu; Sannomiya, Kunihiro; Korogi, Yukinori; Uchino, Makoto

    1995-11-01

    Interrelations between the cerebellar function and cerebellar atrophy were studied in the cases with Minamata disease and spinocerebellar degeneration and in the healthy subjects. For evaluation of the cerebellar function, the statokinesigraph (SKG) was recorded and the shifting length (L-SKG) and moving area (A-SKG) of postural sway were obtained using body balance analyzer. Cerebellar atrophy was evaluated by the rostrocaudal and ventrodorsal diameters of whole vermis and the total area of upper and lower parts (area-UL) of vermis on the midsagittal plane of MR imaging. It was disclosed that there was significant correlation between the L-SKG and the measurement of rostrocaudal diameter as well as the area-UL of vermis through the patients with Minamata disease and the healthy subjects. When added the patients with spinocerebellar degeneration, the significant correlation was not obtainable probably because of the progressive processes of the disease. (author).

  8. Cerebellar Ataxia and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariño, Helena; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Blanco, Yolanda; Martínez-Hernández, Eugenia; Sabater, Lidia; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Rouco, Idoia; Bataller, Luis; Dalmau, Josep O.; Saiz, Albert; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current clinical and immunologic knowledge on cerebellar ataxia (CA) with glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibodies (GAD65-Abs) is based on case reports and small series with short-term follow-up data. OBJECTIVE To report the symptoms, additional antibodies, prognostic factors, and long-term outcomes in a cohort of patients with CA and GAD65-Abs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study and laboratory investigations at a center for autoimmune neurologic disorders among 34 patients with CA and GAD65-Abs, including 25 with long-term follow-up data (median, 5.4 years; interquartile range, 3.1-10.3 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of clinicoimmunologic features and predictors of response to immunotherapy. Immunochemistry on rat brain, cultured neurons, and human embryonic kidney cells expressing GAD65, GAD67, α1-subunit of the glycine receptor, and a repertoire of known cell surface autoantigens were used to identify additional antibodies. Twenty-eight patients with stiff person syndrome and GAD65-Abs served as controls. RESULTS The median age of patients was 58 years (range, 33-80 years); 28 of 34 patients (82%) were women. Nine patients (26%) reported episodes of brainstem and cerebellar dysfunction or persistent vertigo several months before developing CA. The clinical presentation was subacute during a period of weeks in 13 patients (38%). Nine patients (26%) had coexisting stiff person syndrome symptoms. Systemic organ-specific autoimmunities (type 1 diabetes mellitus and others) were present in 29 patients (85%). Twenty of 25 patients with long-term follow-up data received immunotherapy (intravenous immunoglobulin in 10 and corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin or other immunosuppressors in 10), and 7 of them (35%) improved. Predictors of clinical response included subacute onset of CA (odds ratio [OR], 0.50; 95% CI, 0.25-0.99; P = .047) and prompt immunotherapy (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99; P = .01). Similar

  9. MRI with fibre tracking in Cogan congenital oculomotor apraxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlini, Laura [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria I. [University Hospital of Geneva, Neuroradiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Haller, Raoul de [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Ophthalmology, Geneva (Switzerland); Rilliet, Benedict [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Neurosurgery, Geneva (Switzerland); Fluss, Joel [University Hospital of Geneva, Pediatric Neurology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    Congenital ocular motor apraxia (COMA) occasionally shares with Joubert syndrome (JS) and related disorders (JSRDs) a peculiar malformation, the 'molar tooth sign' (MTS). In JSRDs, the absence of superior cerebellar peduncles (SCP) decussation is reported. To investigate whether COMA demonstrates similar abnormal axonal pathways. Eight healthy age-matched controls, three children with clinical COMA and one child with clinical JSRD underwent examination with a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), colour-coded fractional anisotropy maps and three-dimensional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography of the cerebellorubral network were analyzed. On DTI cartography, the 'red dot' originally supposed to represent the SCP decussation in the midbrain was present in controls as well in those with COMA but absent in the single case with JS. In none of the subjects including controls was 3-D FT able to depict the SCP decussation. When seeded, the red dot resulted in the ventral tegmental decussation (VTD). It was normal in controls and in patients with COMA but was absent in our single patient with JSRD. MTS was identified in alla patients with COMA and in the patient with JSRD. MTS can be present in both COMA and JSRD but the underlying anatomy depicted by fibre tracking is distinct. The main difference is the integrity of the VTD in COMA. (orig.)

  10. Structural investigation of Mimosa pudica Linn fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, S. R.; Pattojoshi, P.; Tiwari, T. N.; Mallick, B.

    2016-12-01

    Sensitive plant (Mimosa pudica Linn.) fibre is a natural fibre with electrically conductive property. Because of its electro-active sensing nature, it has been found very interesting among physicists, chemists, biologists, material scientists and technologists. So far as our knowledge is concerned; there is no report on the X-ray structure of M. pudica fibre using diffraction technique. In the present report, the M. pudica fibre has been extracted from the stem of the herb by sinking the stem in 10% NaOH solution for one week. The diffraction pattern of the fibre is found out to be cellulose-I. The effect of the fibre structure and its orientation due to different mounting have been investigated using X-ray diffraction technique. The I max of cellulose-I has been observed along (002) and (10overline{1)} for the perpendicular and parallel mounting of the native-fibre, respectively. Full width at half maxima of the diffraction profile turns out to be decreased with fibre orientation. Dimension of crystallite size D hkl estimated in the perpendicular mounting D_{hkl}^{ bot } is more as compared to that of the parallel mounting D_{hkl}^{{^{allel } }} . The smallest crystallite sizes observed in both parallel and perpendicular mounting are 18.78 and 30.78 Å respectively. It is expected that the present study may help to analyse the X-ray diffraction of fibre materials in general and natural fibres in particular.

  11. Fundamentals of fibre-reinforced soil engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Sanjay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This book is intended to serve as a one-stop reference on fibre-reinforced soils. Over the past 30-35 years, the engineering behaviour of randomly distributed/oriented fibre-reinforced soil, also called simply fibre-reinforced soil, has been investigated in detail by researchers and engineers worldwide. Waste fibres (plastic waste fibres, old tyre fibres, etc.) create disposal and environmental problems. Utilization of such fibres in construction can help resolve these concerns. Research studies and some field applications have shown that the fibres can be utilized in large quantities in geotechnical and civil engineering applications in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner. This book covers a complete description of fibres, their effects when included within a soil or other similar materials such as the fly ash, and their field applications. It gives a detailed view of fibre-reinforced soil engineering. The book will be useful to students, professional, and researchers alike, and can also ser...

  12. Dynamic control of presynaptic Ca(2+) inflow by fast-inactivating K(+) channels in hippocampal mossy fiber boutons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, J R; Jonas, P

    2000-12-01

    Analysis of presynaptic determinants of synaptic strength has been difficult at cortical synapses, mainly due to the lack of direct access to presynaptic elements. Here we report patch-clamp recordings from mossy fiber boutons (MFBs) in rat hippocampal slices. The presynaptic action potential is very short during low-frequency stimulation but is prolonged up to 3-fold during high-frequency stimulation. Voltage-gated K(+) channels in MFBs inactivate rapidly but recover from inactivation very slowly, suggesting that cumulative K(+) channel inactivation mediates activity-dependent spike broadening. Prolongation of the presynaptic voltage waveform leads to an increase in the number of Ca(2+) ions entering the terminal per action potential and to a consecutive potentiation of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents at MFB-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. Thus, inactivation of presynaptic K(+) channels contributes to the control of efficacy of a glutamatergic synapse in the cortex.

  13. Fibre optic communication key devices

    CERN Document Server

    Grote, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    The book gives an in-depth description of key devices of current and next generation fibre optic communication networks. Devices treated include semiconductor lasers, optical amplifiers, modulators, wavelength filters and other passives, detectors, all-optical switches, but relevant properties of optical fibres and network aspects are included as well. The presentations include the physical principles underlying the various devices, technologies used for their realization, typical performance characteristics and limitations, but development trends towards more advanced components are also illustrated. This new edition of a successful book was expanded and updated extensively. The new edition covers among others lasers for optical communication, optical switches, hybrid integration, monolithic integration and silicon photonics. The main focus is on Indium phosphide-based structures but silicon photonics is included as well. The book covers relevant principles, state-of-the-art implementations, status of curren...

  14. Imaging calcium waves in cerebellar Bergmann glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beierlein, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes methods for recording synaptically evoked Ca(2+) waves from individual Bergmann glia (BG) in slices of cerebellar cortex. Unlike protoplasmic, star-shaped astrocytes, whose thin processes pose a serious challenge to stable Ca(2+) measurements, BG are large radial cells, with several main processes that run over distances of several hundred micrometers toward the pia and ensheathe thousands of parallel fiber (PF) synapses. Stimulation of PF synapses with brief bursts can trigger long-lasting Ca(2+) responses in BG processes, which can be reliably recorded using a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. This protocol was developed to enable measurements of Ca(2+) waves in individual BG loaded with a high-affinity Ca(2+) indicator such as Fura-2 for up to 2 h. Because BG recorded in slices rarely display spontaneous (i.e., tetrodotoxin [TTX]-sensitive) or intrinsic Ca(2+) transients, Ca(2+) waves can be evoked repeatedly and reliably, which permits quantitative studies using pharmacological tools. Fluorescence measurements obtained using CCD technology offer a straightforward means of characterizing the mechanisms and potential functional consequences of widespread and long-lasting, store-mediated Ca(2+) increases in astrocytes.

  15. Electrophysiological mapping of novel prefrontal - cerebellar pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Watson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Whilst the cerebellum is predominantly considered a sensorimotor control structure, accumulating evidence suggests that it may also subserve non motor functions during cognition. However, this possibility is not universally accepted, not least because the nature and pattern of links between higher cortical structures and the cerebellum are poorly characterized. We have therefore used in vivo electrophysiological methods in anaesthetized rats to directly investigate connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex (prelimbic subdivision, PrL and the cerebellum. Stimulation of deep layers of PrL evoked distinct field potentials in the cerebellar cortex with a mean latency to peak of approximately 35ms. These responses showed a well-defined topography, and were maximal in lobule VII of the contralateral vermis (a known oculomotor centre; they were not attenuated by local anesthesia of the overlying M2 motor cortex, though M2 stimulation did evoke field potentials in lobule VII with a shorter latency. Single-unit recordings showed that prelimbic cortical stimulation elicits complex spikes in lobule VII Purkinje cells, indicating transmission via a previously undescribed cerebro-olivocerebellar pathway. Our results therefore establish a physiological basis for communication between PrL and the cerebellum. The role(s of this pathway remain to be resolved, but presumably relate to control of eye movements and/or distributed networks associated with integrated prefrontal cortical functions.

  16. Sudden stopping in patients with cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Mariano; Conte, Carmela; Casali, Carlo; Ranavolo, Alberto; Mari, Silvia; Di Fabio, Roberto; Perrotta, Armando; Coppola, Gianluca; Padua, Luca; Monamì, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Stopping during walking, a dynamic motor task frequent in everyday life, is very challenging for ataxic patients, as it reduces their gait stability and increases the incidence of falls. This study was conducted to analyse the biomechanical characteristics of upper and lower body segments during abrupt stopping in ataxic patients in order to identify possible strategies used to counteract the instability in the sagittal and frontal plane. Twelve patients with primary degenerative cerebellar ataxia and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were studied. Time-distance parameters, dynamic stability of the centre of mass, upper body measures and lower joint kinematic and kinetic parameters were analysed. The results indicate that ataxic patients have a great difficulty in stopping abruptly during walking and adopt a multi-step stopping strategy, occasionally with feet parallel, to compensate for their inability to coordinate the upper body and to generate a well-coordinated lower limb joint flexor-extensor pattern and appropriate braking forces for progressively decelerating the progression of the body in the sagittal plane. A specific rehabilitation treatment designed to improve the ability of ataxic patients to transform unplanned stopping into planned stopping, to coordinate upper body and to execute an effective flexion-extension pattern of the hip and knee joints may be useful in these patients in order to improve their stopping performance and prevent falls.

  17. Abnormal cerebellar volume in acute and remitted major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depping, Malte S; Wolf, Nadine D; Vasic, Nenad; Sambataro, Fabio; Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal cortical volume is well-documented in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but cerebellar findings have been heterogeneous. It is unclear whether abnormal cerebellar structure relates to disease state or medication. In this study, using structural MRI, we investigated cerebellar volume in clinically acute (with and without psychotropic treatment) and remitted MDD patients. High-resolution structural MRI data at 3T were obtained from acute medicated (n=29), acute unmedicated (n=14) and remitted patients (n=16). Data from 29 healthy controls were used for comparison purposes. Cerebellar volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Patients with an acute MDD episode showed increased volume of left cerebellar area IX, and this was true for both medicated and unmedicated individuals (pvolume. In remitted, but not in acutely ill patients, area IX volume was significantly associated with measures of depression severity, as assessed by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD). In addition, area IX volume in remitted patients was significantly related to the duration of antidepressant treatment. In acutely ill patients, no significant relationships were established using clinical variables, such as HAMD, illness or treatment duration and number of depressive episodes. The data suggest that cerebellar area IX, a non-motor region that belongs to a large-scale brain functional network with known relevance to core depressive symptom expression, exhibits abnormal volume in patients independent of clinical severity or medication. Thus, the data imply a possible trait marker of the disorder. However, given bilaterality and an association with clinical scores at least in remitted patients, the current findings raise the possibility that cerebellar volume may be reflective of successful treatment as well.

  18. Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starowicz-Filip, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to describe a case of the patient with cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS, characterize the role of cerebellum in the regulation of cognitive functions and present theprocedure of neuropsychological diagnosis useful in indicating the specific cognitive and emotional problems in patients with cerebellar damage.Case report. A 41- year old man with an ischemic cerebellar stroke of its right hemisphere manifested the neuropsychological symptoms typical for the frontal damage: euphoric mood, disorganized behavior,lack of criticism and mental plasticity, tendency to shorten the personal distance, problems with mistake correction. In neuropsychological diagnosis we used following methods: Raven Progressive Matrices Test, Mini Mental Stage Examination (MMSE, Trail Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Stroop Interference Test, Word Fluency Test, Auditory Verbal Learning Test by Łuria, Benton Visual Retention Test, Digit Span.Results. Analyzing the obtained results we observed the significant decrease of all executive functions: planning, abstract thinking, cognitive flexibility, adaptation to new situations as well as memory impairments and changes in emotional and behavioral state similar to frontal syndrome. The whole of impairments including the typical cerebellar symptoms (ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria,hypotonia create the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome CCAS with leading role of dysexecutive syndrome.Conclusions. The cerebellum takes part in the regulation of cognitive functions. The cerebellar damages can imitate the emotional- cognitive problems of patients after frontal damages what additionally stress the functional link between these two brain structures. Patient’s with cerebellar damages should have neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric diagnosis and care.

  19. A cerebellar neuroprosthetic system: computational architecture and in vivo experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan eHerreros Alonso

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Emulating the input-output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuro-prosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model's inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuro-prosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step towards replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuro-prosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuro-prosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step towards the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term

  20. Cerebellar development in the absence of Gbx function in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chen-Ying; Kemp, Hilary A; Moens, Cecilia B

    2014-02-01

    The midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) is a well-known organizing center during vertebrate brain development. The MHB forms at the expression boundary of Otx2 and Gbx2, mutually repressive homeodomain transcription factors expressed in the midbrain/forebrain and anterior hindbrain, respectively. The genetic hierarchy of gene expression at the MHB is complex, involving multiple positive and negative feedback loops that result in the establishment of non-overlapping domains of Wnt1 and Fgf8 on either side of the boundary and the consequent specification of the cerebellum. The cerebellum derives from the dorsal part of the anterior-most hindbrain segment, rhombomere 1 (r1), which undergoes a distinctive morphogenesis to give rise to the cerebellar primordium within which the various cerebellar neuron types are specified. Previous studies in the mouse have shown that Gbx2 is essential for cerebellar development. Using zebrafish mutants we show here that in the zebrafish gbx1 and gbx2 are required redundantly for morphogenesis of the cerebellar primordium and subsequent cerebellar differentiation, but that this requirement is alleviated by knocking down Otx. Expression of fgf8, wnt1 and the entire MHB genetic program is progressively lost in gbx1-;gbx2- double mutants but is rescued by Otx knock-down. This rescue of the MHB genetic program depends on rescued Fgf signaling, however the rescue of cerebellar primordium morphogenesis is independent of both Gbx and Fgf. Based on our findings we propose a revised model for the role of Gbx in cerebellar development.

  1. Orientation distribution of fibres in a channel flow of fibre suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Jian-Zhong; Li Jun; Zhang Wei-Feng

    2005-01-01

    The orientation and concentration distributions of fibres in laminar and turbulent channel flows are investigated numerically. The obtained results are in good agreement with the experimental data. In the laminar flow regime, more fibres orient to the flow direction as the Reynolds number increases. The shear rate of fluid around a fibre plays an important role in determining the orientation distribution of fibres, while the fibre density and the fibre aspect-ratio have marginal influence on the orientation distribution. In the turbulent regime, the orientation distribution of fibres becomes more homogeneous with the increase of Reynolds number, and the concentration profile is flatter than that in the laminar regime. The fluctuating intensity of fibre velocity in the downstream direction is larger than that in the lateral directions.

  2. Electrospun cerium nitrate/polymer composite fibres:synthesis, characterization and fibre-division model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Meng-Meng; Long Yun-Ze; Yin Hong-Xing; Zhang Zhi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Cerium (III)nitrate/poly(vinylpyrrolidone)(Ce(NO3)3/PVP)composite fibres have been prepared by electrospinning. After calcining the composite fibres in air at 500℃, CeO2 nanowires were obtained. The characterizations of the as-spun composite fibres and resultant nanowires have been carried out by a scanning electron microscope (SEM),an infrared spectrometer, an x-ray diffractometer and a fluorescence spectrophotometer. Interestingly, some unusual ribbon-like or twin fibres were observed besides the common fibres with circular or elliptic cross sections. We developed a fibre-division model resulting from Coulomb repulsion and solvent vaporization to interpret the formation of the ribbona or twin fibres, which has been confirmed by the SEM studies. Our results also indicate that the formation of the ribbons or twin fibres is less dependent on operation voltage and work distance.

  3. Interfacial Adhesion Characteristics of Kenaf Fibres Subjected to Different Polymer Matrices and Fibre Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Nirmal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at determining the interfacial adhesion strength (IAS of kenaf fibres using different chemical treatments in hydrochloric (HCl and sodium hydroxide (NaOH with different concentrations. Single fibre pullout tests (SFPT were carried out for both untreated and treated fibres partially embedded into three different polymer matrices; polyester, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU as reinforcement blocks and tested under dry loading conditions. The study revealed that kenaf fibres treated with 6% NaOH subjected to polyester, epoxy, and PU matrices exhibits excellent IAS while poor in acidic treatment. The effect of SFPT results was mainly attributed to chemical composition of the fibres, types of fibre treatments, and variation in resin viscosities. By scanning electron microscopy examination of the material failure morphology, the fibres experienced brittle and ductile fibre breakage mechanisms after treatment with acidic and alkaline solutions.

  4. Muscle fibre type and aetiology of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, A J; Marbut, M M; Round, J M

    1990-04-07

    Proportions of slow (type 1) muscle fibres of the vastus lateralis and percentage body fat were measured in 11 healthy sedentary men. The proportion of slow muscle fibres was inversely related to fatness; at least 40% of the variability in fatness may be related to variation in muscle fibre type. Metabolic evidence in 50 men, provided by the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during cycle ergometry, indicated that fatter men (or, in the subset of 11 men, those with a low proportion of slow muscle fibres) combusted less fat during work at 100 W than did lean men (or those with a high proportion of slow fibres). The effects of fitness and of body size were excluded in the analysis. The evidence supports the hypothesis that muscle fibre type is an aetiological factor for obesity.

  5. Continuous jute fibre reinforced laminated paper composite and reinforcement-fibre free paper laminate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B B Verma

    2009-12-01

    Plastic bags create a serious environmental problem. The proposed jute fibre reinforced laminated paper composite and reinforcement-fibre free paper laminate may help to combat the war against this pollutant to certain extent. The paper laminate, without reinforcement fibre, exhibited a few fold superiority in tensile properties than single paper strip. The studies further show that an appreciable improvement in tensile properties can be achieved by introducing continuous jute fibre in paper laminates.

  6. THERMAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON CERAMIC FIBRES

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, S.; Lundberg, R.; Carlsson, R.

    1986-01-01

    Fibre insulations in kilns in the ceramic industry were investigated. Cristobalite and mullite are the main crystalline phases found in Al2O3-SiO2 fibres. The amount of the crystalline phases formed depends on the chemical composition and firing temperature. Condensation of ZnO-vapours from the glaze and formation of ZnAl2O4 were found in a Saffil fibre at a temperature of 930°C.

  7. Upregulation of cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity after motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Breakspear, Michael; Hinder, Mark; Summers, Jeffery J

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between the cerebellum and primary motor cortex are crucial for the acquisition of new motor skills. Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that learning motor skills is associated with subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The neuronal processes underlying the motor-learning-induced plasticity are not well understood. Here, we investigate changes in functional connectivity in source-reconstructed electroencephalography (EEG) following the performance of a single session of a dynamic force task in twenty young adults. Source activity was reconstructed in 112 regions of interest (ROIs) and the functional connectivity between all ROIs was estimated using the imaginary part of coherence. Significant changes in resting-state connectivity were assessed using partial least squares (PLS). We found that subjects adapted their motor performance during the training session and showed improved accuracy but with slower movement times. A number of connections were significantly upregulated after motor training, principally involving connections within the cerebellum and between the cerebellum and motor cortex. Increased connectivity was confined to specific frequency ranges in the mu- and beta-bands. Post hoc analysis of the phase spectra of these cerebellar and cortico-cerebellar connections revealed an increased phase lag between motor cortical and cerebellar activity following motor practice. These findings show a reorganization of intrinsic cortico-cerebellar connectivity related to motor adaptation and demonstrate the potential of EEG connectivity analysis in source space to reveal the neuronal processes that underpin neural plasticity.

  8. Development of the cerebellar cortex in the mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangshu Cheng; Jin Du; Dongming Yu; Qiying Jiang; Yanqiu Hu; Lei Wang; Mingshan Li; Jinbo Deng

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum is a highly conserved structure in the central nervous system of vertebrates, and is involved in the coordination of voluntary motor behavior. Supporting this function, the cerebellar cortex presents a layered structure which requires precise spatial and temporal coordination of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis events. The formation of the layered structure in the developing cerebellum remains unclear. The present study investigated the development of the cerebellar cortex. The results demonstrate that the primordium of the cerebellum comprises the ependymal, mantle, and marginal layers at embryonic day 12 (E12). Subsequently, the laminated cerebellar cortex undergoes cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, and at about postnatal day 0 (P0), the cerebellar cortex presents an external granular layer, a molecular layer, a Purkinje layer, and an internal granular layer. The external granular layer is thickest at P6/7 and disappears at P20. From P0 to P30, the internal granular cells and the Purkinje cells gradually differentiate and develop until maturity. Apoptotic neurons are evident in the layered structure in the developing cerebellar cortex. The external granular layer disappears gradually because of cell migration and apoptosis. The cells of the other layers primarily undergo differentiation, development, and apoptosis.

  9. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  10. Cerebellar network plasticity: from genes to fast oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheron, G; Servais, L; Dan, B

    2008-04-22

    The role of the cerebellum has been increasingly recognized not only in motor control but in sensory, cognitive and emotional learning and regulation. Purkinje cells, being the sole output from the cerebellar cortex, occupy an integrative position in this network. Plasticity at this level is known to critically involve calcium signaling. In the last few years, electrophysiological study of genetically engineered mice has demonstrated the topical role of several genes encoding calcium-binding proteins (calretinin, calbindin, parvalbumin). Specific inactivation of these genes results in the emergence of a fast network oscillation (ca. 160 Hz) throughout the cerebellar cortex in alert animals, associated with ataxia. This oscillation is produced by synchronization of Purkinje cells along the parallel fiber beam. It behaves as an electrophysiological arrest rhythm, being blocked by sensorimotor stimulation. Pharmacological manipulations showed that the oscillation is blocked by GABA(A) and NMDA antagonists as well as gap junction blockers. This cerebellar network oscillation has also been documented in mouse models of human conditions with complex developmental cerebellar dysfunction, such as Angelman syndrome and fetal alcohol syndrome. Recent evidence suggests a relationship between fast oscillation and cerebellar long term depression (LTD). This may have major implications for future therapeutic targeting.

  11. Abaca fibre reinforced PP composites and comparison with jute and flax fibre PP composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abaca fibre reinforced PP composites were fabricated with different fibre loadings (20, 30, 40, 50wt% and in some cases 35 and 45 wt%. Flax and jute fibre reinforced PP composites were also fabricated with 30 wt% fibre loading. The mechanical properties, odour emission and structure properties were investigated for those composites. Tensile, flexural and Charpy impact strengths were found to increase for fibre loadings up to 40 wt% and then decreased. Falling weight impact tests were also carried out and the same tendency was observed. Owing to the addition of coupling agent (maleated polypropylene -MAH-PP, the tensile, flexural and falling weight impact properties were found to increase in between 30 to 80% for different fibre loadings. When comparing jute and flax fibre composites with abaca fibre composites, jute fibre composites provided best tensile properties but abaca fibre polypropylene composites were shown to provide best notch Charpy and falling weight impact properties. Odours released by flax fibre composites were smaller than jute and abaca fibre composites.

  12. A novel photonic crystal fibre switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Hermann, D.S.; Broeng, Jes

    2003-01-01

    A new thermo-optic fibre switch is demonstrated, which utilizes the phase transitions of a thermochromic liquid crystal inside a photonic crystal fibre. We report an extinction ratio of 60 dB and an insertion loss of 1 dB.......A new thermo-optic fibre switch is demonstrated, which utilizes the phase transitions of a thermochromic liquid crystal inside a photonic crystal fibre. We report an extinction ratio of 60 dB and an insertion loss of 1 dB....

  13. A validation of the fibre orientation and fibre length attrition prediction for long fibre-reinforced thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; van Haag, J.; Schöngart, M.

    2015-05-01

    To improve the mechanical performance of polymeric parts, fibre reinforcement has established in industrial applications during the last decades. Next to the widely used Short Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (SFT) the use of Long Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (LFT) is increasingly growing. Especially for non-polar polymeric matrices like polypropylene (PP), longer fibres can significantly improve the mechanical performance. As with every kind of discontinuous fibre reinforcement the fibre orientations (FO) show a high impact on the mechanical properties. On the contrary to SFT where the local fibre length distribution (FLD) can be often neglected, for LFT the FLD show a high impact on the material's properties and has to be taken into account in equal measure to the FOD. Recently numerical models are available in commercial filling simulation software and allow predicting both the local FOD and FLD in LFT parts. The aim of this paper is to compare i.) the FOD results and ii) the FLD results from available orientation- and fibre length attrition-models to those obtained from experimental data. The investigations are conducted by the use of different injection moulded specimens made from long glass fibre reinforced PP. In order to determine the FOD, selected part sections are examined by means of Computed Tomographic (CT) analyses. The fully three dimensional measurement of the FOD is then performed by digital image processing using grey scale correlation. The FLD results are also obtained by using digital image processing after a thermal pyrolytic separation of the polymeric matrix from the fibres. Further the FOD and the FLD are predicted by using a reduced strain closure (RSC) as well as an anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure model (ARD-RSC) and Phelps-Tucker fibre length attrition model implemented in the commercial filling software Moldflow, Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA.

  14. A validation of the fibre orientation and fibre length attrition prediction for long fibre-reinforced thermoplastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; Haag, J. van; Schöngart, M. [Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) at RWTH Aachen University, Pontstr. 49, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    To improve the mechanical performance of polymeric parts, fibre reinforcement has established in industrial applications during the last decades. Next to the widely used Short Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (SFT) the use of Long Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (LFT) is increasingly growing. Especially for non-polar polymeric matrices like polypropylene (PP), longer fibres can significantly improve the mechanical performance. As with every kind of discontinuous fibre reinforcement the fibre orientations (FO) show a high impact on the mechanical properties. On the contrary to SFT where the local fibre length distribution (FLD) can be often neglected, for LFT the FLD show a high impact on the material’s properties and has to be taken into account in equal measure to the FOD. Recently numerical models are available in commercial filling simulation software and allow predicting both the local FOD and FLD in LFT parts. The aim of this paper is to compare i.) the FOD results and ii) the FLD results from available orientation- and fibre length attrition-models to those obtained from experimental data. The investigations are conducted by the use of different injection moulded specimens made from long glass fibre reinforced PP. In order to determine the FOD, selected part sections are examined by means of Computed Tomographic (CT) analyses. The fully three dimensional measurement of the FOD is then performed by digital image processing using grey scale correlation. The FLD results are also obtained by using digital image processing after a thermal pyrolytic separation of the polymeric matrix from the fibres. Further the FOD and the FLD are predicted by using a reduced strain closure (RSC) as well as an anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure model (ARD-RSC) and Phelps-Tucker fibre length attrition model implemented in the commercial filling software Moldflow, Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA.

  15. Cerebellar hemorrhage after embolization of ruptured vertebral dissecting aneurysm proximal to PICA including parent artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Tamase

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some complications related to vertebral artery occlusion by endovascular technique have been reported. However, cerebellar hemorrhage after vertebral artery occlusion in subacute phase is rare. In this report, we describe a patient who showed cerebellar hemorrhage during hypertensive therapy for vasospasm after embolization of a vertebral dissecting aneurysm. Case Description: A 56-year-old female with a ruptured vertebral dissecting aneurysm proximal to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery developed cerebellar hemorrhage 15 days after embolization of the vertebral artery, including the dissected site. In this patient, the preserved posterior inferior cerebellar artery fed by retrograde blood flow might have been hemodynamically stressed during hypertensive and antiplatelet therapies for subarachnoid hemorrhage, resulting in cerebellar hemorrhage. Conclusion: Although cerebellar hemorrhage is not prone to occur in the nonacute stage of embolization of the vertebral artery, it should be taken into consideration that cerebellar hemorrhage may occur during hypertensive treatment.

  16. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Buendía, Angel M., E-mail: buendia@uv.es [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Benjamin Franklin 17, 46380 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain); Climent, Verónica [Lafarge Cementos, Polígono Sepes, Isaac Newton s/n, 46500 Sagunto, Valencia (Spain); Guillem, Celia [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in the mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.

  17. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding either 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β-events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α-events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β-events lie upstream of α-events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify inter-mitotic times for β-events on a per-cell basis in post-natal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereological studies. PMID:25668568

  18. Electrical Characterization of Silicon Cores from Glass-Cladded Fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Lapointe, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor core fibres represent an emerging technology with potential applications in many areas, including photovoltaics and optical transmission. Recent advances in fibre manufacturing techniques has allowed long, continuous silicon core fibres to be produced in commercial draw towers. The effect of the molten core fibre fabrication method on the electrical properties of silicon cores from glass-clad fibres have been studied. Fibres with core diameters ranging from 60 to 300 µm wer...

  19. Cerebellar Development and Autism Spectrum Disorder in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Maria; Sahin, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with the genetic disease tuberous sclerosis complex present with autism spectrum disorder. Although a number of studies have investigated the link between autism and tuberous sclerosis complex, the etiology of autism spectrum disorder in these patients remains unclear. Abnormal cerebellar function during critical phases of development could disrupt functional processes in the brain, leading to development of autistic features. Accordingly, the authors review the potential role of cerebellar dysfunction in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorder in tuberous sclerosis complex. The authors also introduce conditional knockout mouse models of Tsc1 and Tsc2 that link cerebellar circuitry to the development of autistic-like features. Taken together, these preclinical and clinical investigations indicate the cerebellum has a profound regulatory role during development of social communication and repetitive behaviors.

  20. An unusual cause of adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Ramshekhar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of sporadic adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism. A 40-year-old unmarried man presented with progressive ataxia and dysarthria along with complaints of non-development of secondary sexual characteristics and erectile dysfunction. There were complaints of intermittent diarrhea. Clinical examination revealed a pan-cerebellar syndrome with features of hypoandrogenism. No eye movement abnormalities were evident. There were signs of malabsorption. Investigations confirmed the presence of auto-antibodies found in celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy confirmed the same. Hypoandrogenism was postulated to be due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism which has been mentioned in a few patients of celiac disease. However, the pattern seen in our patient was of a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This is probably secondary to an autoimmune hypophysitis seen in some patients in the absence of other clinical manifestations. Autoantibody testing should be a diagnostic necessity in any adult with a sporadic cerebellar ataxia.

  1. Postponed sowing does not alter the fibre/wood ratio or fibre extractability of fibre hemp (Cannabis sativa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhuis, W.; Struik, P.C.; Dam, van J.E.G.; Stomph, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    Because hemp is a short-day plant, postponing the sowing date might be a suitable strategy to obtain shorter and smaller plants around flowering, when primary fibres are 'ripe' enough to be harvested. Smaller plants can be processed on existing flax scutching and hackling lines and might have fibre

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor but not vesicular zinc promotes TrkB activation within mossy fibers of mouse hippocampus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgager, Jeffrey; Huang, Yang Zhong; Mcnamara, James O

    2014-12-01

    The neurotrophin receptor, TrkB receptor tyrosine kinase, is critical to central nervous system (CNS) function in health and disease. Elucidating the ligands mediating TrkB activation in vivo will provide insights into its diverse roles in the CNS. The canonical ligand for TrkB is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A diversity of stimuli also can activate TrkB in the absence of BDNF, a mechanism termed transactivation. Zinc, a divalent cation packaged in synaptic vesicles along with glutamate in axons of mammalian cortical neurons, can transactivate TrkB in neurons and heterologous cells in vitro. Yet the contributions of BDNF and zinc to TrkB activation in vivo are unknown. To address these questions, we conducted immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the hippocampal mossy fiber axons and boutons using an antibody selective for pY816 of TrkB, a surrogate measure of TrkB activation. We found that conditional deletion of BDNF resulted in a reduction of pY816 in axons and synaptic boutons of hippocampal mossy fibers, thereby implicating BDNF in activation of TrkB in vivo. Unexpectedly, pY816 immunoreactivity was increased in axons but not synaptic boutons of mossy fibers in ZnT3 knockout mice that lack vesicular zinc. Marked increases of BDNF content were evident within the hippocampus of ZnT3 knockout mice and genetic elimination of BDNF reduced pY816 immunoreactivity in these mice, implicating BDNF in enhanced TrkB activation mediated by vesicular zinc depletion. These findings support the conclusion that BDNF but not vesicular zinc activates TrkB in hippocampal mossy fiber axons under physiological conditions.

  3. Actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in slices from rats with spontaneous seizures and mossy fiber sprouting in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, H E; Goodman, J H; Sollas, A L

    1999-07-01

    This study examined the acute actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the rat dentate gyrus after seizures, because previous studies have shown that BDNF has acute effects on dentate granule cell synaptic transmission, and other studies have demonstrated that BDNF expression increases in granule cells after seizures. Pilocarpine-treated rats were studied because they not only have seizures and increased BDNF expression in granule cells, but they also have reorganization of granule cell "mossy fiber" axons. This reorganization, referred to as "sprouting," involves collaterals that grow into novel areas, i.e., the inner molecular layer, where granule cell and interneuron dendrites are located. Thus, this animal model allowed us to address the effects of BDNF in the dentate gyrus after seizures, as well as the actions of BDNF on mossy fiber transmission after reorganization. In slices with sprouting, BDNF bath application enhanced responses recorded in the inner molecular layer to mossy fiber stimulation. Spontaneous bursts of granule cells occurred, and these were apparently generated at the site of the sprouted axon plexus. These effects were not accompanied by major changes in perforant path-evoked responses or paired-pulse inhibition, occurred only after prolonged (30-60 min) exposure to BDNF, and were blocked by K252a. The results suggest a preferential action of BDNF at mossy fiber synapses, even after substantial changes in the dentate gyrus network. Moreover, the results suggest that activation of trkB receptors could contribute to the hyperexcitability observed in animals with sprouting. Because human granule cells also express increased BDNF mRNA after seizures, and sprouting can occur in temporal lobe epileptics, the results may have implications for understanding temporal lobe epilepsy.

  4. Activity-Dependent Release of Endogenous BDNF From Mossy Fibers Evokes a TRPC3 Current and Ca2+ Elevations in CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Yong LI; Calfa, Gaston; Inoue, Takafumi; Amaral, Michelle D.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of neuronal structure and function in the hippocampus. However, the majority of studies to date have relied on the application of recombinant BDNF. We herein report that endogenous BDNF, released via theta burst stimulation of mossy fibers (MF), elicits a slowly developing cationic current and intracellular Ca2+ elevations in CA3 pyramidal neurons with the same pharmacological profile of the...

  5. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_Cortex [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons mm9 DNase-seq Neural Cerebellar granule... neurons SRX685885,SRX685882,SRX685880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellar_granule_neurons.bed ...

  10. Polarisation effects in twin-core fibre: Application for mode locking in a fibre laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobach, I A; Kablukov, S I; Podivilov, Evgenii V; Babin, Sergei A; Apolonski, A A

    2012-09-30

    We report the first measurements of the longitudinal power distribution in a twin-core optical fibre at different input light polarisations. Experimental evidence is presented that, because of the difference in birefringence between the cores, the power in them depends on which core the beam is launched into. Experimental data are interpreted in terms of a modified polarisation model for mode coupling in twin-core fibres which takes into account the birefringence of the cores. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time the use of the polarisation properties of a twincore fibre for mode locking in a fibre laser. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  11. Multicore optical fibre and fibre-optic delay line based on it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, O. N.; Astapovich, M. S.; Belkin, M. E.; Semjonov, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The first switchable fibre-optic delay line based on a 1300-{\\text{m}}-long multicore optical fibre has been fabricated and investigated. We have obtained signal delay times of up to 45 \\unicode{956}{\\text{s}} at 6.43-\\unicode{956}{\\text{s}} intervals. Sequential signal propagation through the cores of the multicore optical fibre makes it possible to reduce the fibre length necessary for obtaining a predetermined delay time, which is important for reducing the weight and dimensions of devices based on the use of fibre-optic delay lines.

  12. Cerebellar diaschisis in pontine infractions: a report of five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, Yoshiyasu [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine; Ayada, Yoshihide [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine; Izumi, Yoshinari [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine; Ichihara, Sin-Ichiro [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine; Hosomi, Naohisa [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine; Ohkawa, Motoomi [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Matsuo, Hirohide [Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Second Dept. of Internal Medicine

    1995-05-01

    We evaluate regional cerebral and cerebellar perfusion to prove the occurrence and follow the persistence of crossed cerebellar diaschisis in infratentorial pontine infarction. Six consecutive patients exhibiting mild hemiparetic symptoms or a heavy feeling in the head (mean age 65 years; four women, two men) and diagnosed as having pontine infarction by magnetic resonance imaging were sugjected to evaluation. Lesions due to infarction were located at the upper basis pontis in five partients and the upper tegmentum pontis in one, and medially at the paramedian portion in four and laterally in two. Regional cerebral and cerebellar perfusion was evaluated semiquantitatively by iodine-123 N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) single-photon emission tomography (SPET); this was done during the acute stage in five cases (mean time after onset: 0.7 months) and during the chronic stage in three (mean time after onset: 14.8 months) Significant asymmetry in cerebellar perfusion, which was reduced in the contralateral or ipsilateral cerebellar hemisphere, was demonstrated semiquantitatively in four cases during the acute stage and in one during the chronic stage, as compared with normal controls. This asymmetry continued to the chronic stage (6.5 and 33.0 months) in two cases, while no patient showed any significant asymmetries in cerebral perdusion in any region of interest in either SPET study. The pontine lesion may damage the pyramidal tract and corticocerebellar pathway, and interruption of the cerebrocerebellar pontine circuits may be regarded as the cause of the crossed cerebellar diaschisis observed in five of the six reported patients with pontine infarction. (orig.)

  13. Cerebellar substrates for error correction in motor conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, M A; Allen, M T; Myers, C E; Thompson, R F

    2001-11-01

    The authors evaluate a mapping of Rescorla and Wagner's (1972) behavioral model of classical conditioning onto the cerebellar substrates for motor reflex learning and illustrate how the limitations of the Rescorla-Wagner model are just as useful as its successes for guiding the development of new psychobiological theories of learning. They postulate that the inhibitory pathway that returns conditioned response information from the cerebellar interpositus nucleus back to the inferior olive is the neural basis for the error correction learning proposed by Rescorla and Wagner (Gluck, Myers, & Thompson, 1994; Thompson, 1986). The authors' cerebellar model expects that behavioral processes described by the Rescorla-Wagner model will be localized within the cerebellum and related brain stem structures, whereas behavioral processes beyond the scope of the Rescorla-Wagner model will depend on extracerebellar structures such as the hippocampus and related cortical regions. Simulations presented here support both implications. Several novel implications of the authors' cerebellar error-correcting model are described including a recent empirical study by Kim, Krupa, and Thompson (1998), who verified that suppressing the putative error correction pathway should interfere with the Kamin (1969) blocking effect, a behavioral manifestation of error correction learning. The authors also discuss the model's implications for understanding the limits of cerebellar contributions to associative learning and how this informs our understanding of hippocampal function in conditioning. This leads to a more integrative view of the neural substrates of conditioning in which the authors' real-time circuit-level model of the cerebellum can be viewed as a generalization of the long-term memory module of Gluck and Myers' (1993) trial-level theory of cerebellar-hippocampal interaction in motor conditioning.

  14. Emotional disorders in patients with cerebellar damage – case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siuda, Katarzyna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Growing number of research shows the role of the cerebellum in the regulation of affect. Lesions of the cerebellum can lead to emotional disregulation, a significant part of the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome. The aim of this article is to analyze the most recent studies concerning the cerebellar participation in emotional reactions and to present three cases: two female and one male who suffered from cerebellar damage and presented post-traumatic affective and personality change. Method: The patients’ neuropsychological examination was performed with Raven’s Progressive Matrices Test – standard version, Trial Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Auditory Verbal Learning Test by Łuria, Benton Visual Retention Test, Verbal Fluency Test, Stroop Interference Test, Attention and Perceptivity Test (Test Uwagi i Spostrzegawczości TUS, Frontal Behavioral Inventory (FBI. Results: The review of the literature suggest cerebellar participation, especially teh vermis and paravermial regions, in the detection, integration and filtration of emotional information and in regulation of autonomic emotional responses. In the described patients we observed: oversensitivity, irritability, impulsivity and self-neglect. The man and the woman with right-sided lesions presented similar symptoms: rigidity of thought, stubbornness, lack of criticism, jocular and inappropriate behavior. The woman with left-sided cerebellar lesion was adynamic, apathic and passive, she presented emotional blunting, social isolation, lack of interests and motivation, general cognitive slowdown. Conclusions: Both the analyzed research and the described cases indicate the connection between the cerebellum and emotion regulation. The symptoms presented by the described patients were most probably a consequence of damaged cerebellar projections to subcortical structures (the limbic system and frontal areas. The diversification of symptoms depending on the localization

  15. Choline Uptake by Glomerular Synapses Isolated from Bovine Cerebellar Vermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    28 034 UNCLASSIFIED -7t. holing uptake by glomerular aynapaea isolated from bovine cerebellar venni - . 1) N1 IrRRIAN.E L NfISINndwr EtIIOMAS86 .t...w. -%FAt~Jr~a~etn 0,oAAM TX78215-5301 IL’SAJ) A-xpid ( kaolin 22nd. 19W5) hh.lhoac-anln uplake -ainalnnn 177 DIOMIDICAL DmIVIIN,~ F-5’. . Brain...Research. 366 (1986) 401-404 401 Elsevier BRE 21387 Choline uptake by glomerular synapses isolated from bovine cerebellar vermis D.M. TERRIAN, E.L

  16. Inside the Thompson laboratory during the "cerebellar years" and the continuing cerebellar story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavond, D G; Wikgren, J; Nokia, M S

    2011-02-01

    This paper is based on the talk by one of the authors (DL) given at the symposium for the retirement of RF Thompson (RF Thompson: A bridge between 20th and 21st century neuroscience). We first make some informal observations of the historical times and research conditions in the Thompson laboratory when the cerebellum was found to play a critical role in eye lid classical conditioning, the "cerebellar years". These conditions influenced our collaborative international program on the phenomenon known as "transfer of training" or "savings". Our research shows that the appearance of "savings" is an artifact of the order of testing, and depends upon the functioning of the contralateral interpositus nucleus (IPN) in a way that is complementary to the role of the IPN in normal eyelid classical conditioning.

  17. Influence of fibre volume fraction and temperature on fatigue life of glass fibre reinforced plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wegener

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fibre volume fraction and temperature on fatigue life of continuous glass fibre reinforced plastics is investigated in detail. The physical causes of the two effects on the slope of the S-N-curve in fibre direction at R = 0.1 are researched and can be explained with help of micrographs. A new phenomenological approach is presented to model both effects in fibre dominated laminates with different stacking sequences using only the static ultimate strength as an input. Static and fatigue tests of different layups and fibre volume fractions are performed at different temperatures to validate the fatigue life predictions. Additionally it is derived that there is an optimal fibre volume fraction regarding a minimum damage sum. This fibre volume fraction is dependent on a given loading spectra and can be calculated using the phenomenological model.

  18. Innovations with protein nano-fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der E.

    2006-01-01

    Proteins in solution can form objects of various shapes. One fascinating possibility is the formation of fibres with a length up to micrometers, but with a thickness of a few nanometers, therefore referring to them as nano-fibres. Many proteins show this behaviour under the appropriate conditions. G

  19. Selective filling of Photonic Crystal Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian; Noordegraaf, Danny; Sørensen, Thorkild

    2005-01-01

    A model for calculating the time necessary for filling one or more specific holes in a photonic crystal fibre is made. This model is verified for water, and its enabling potential is illustrated by a polymer application. Selective filling of the core in an air-guide photonic crystal fibre is demo...

  20. Fibre optic cables for the ALICE experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    These thin fibres will transmit the signal received in detectors at the ALICE experiment when it starts up with the LHC in 2008. The analogue signals produced in the detectors are first converted into digital pulse, which are transported in light down such fibres. Computers then read this digital signal to produce the final set of data.

  1. Winding of fibre composites; Vikling af fiberkompositter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lystrup, Aage

    2006-01-01

    Within the project 'Storage of hydrogen in advanced high pressure vessels' under the PSO-R AND D 2005 program one of the tasks is to describe the technology, which is used for manufacturing of fibre reinforced pressure vessels. Fibre reinforced pressure vessels for high pressures are manufactured by winding structural load bearing fibres around a mandrel or an internal liner. There are two different types of cylindrical pressure vessels: 1) Cylinders with thick metal liner, where only the cylindrical part is over wrapped with hoop windings, and 2) cylinders with a thin metal or polymer liner, where both the cylindrical part and the end domes are over wrapped with more layers with different fibre orientations (helical and hoop windings). This report describes the fundamental principles for filament winding of fibre reinforced polymer composites. After a short introduction to the advanced fibre composites, their properties and semi-raw materials used for fibre composites, the focus is on the process parameters, which have influence on the material quality of filament wound components. The report is both covering winding of fibre reinforced thermo-setting polymers as well as thermoplastic polymers, and there are references to vendors of filament winding machines, accessory equipment and computer software for design and manufacturing of filament wound components. (au)

  2. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Nielsen, Laila

    1997-01-01

    (capillary water uptake) is used, involving an in-situ method and a laboratory method. Three different concrete qualities as well as steel fibres (ZP) and polypropylene fibres (PP) are used. Results of the durability tests on cracked FRC-beams are compared to results for uncracked FRC-beams and beams without...

  3. Fibre positioning algorithms for the WEAVE spectrograph

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terrett, David L.; Lewis, Ian J.; Dalton, Gavin; Abrams, Don Carlos; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Middleton, Kevin; Trager, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field optical spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. It is a multi-object "pick and place" fibre fed spectrograph with more than one thousand fibres, similar in concept to the Australian Astronomical Observ

  4. Cotton fibre cross-section properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    From a structural perspective the cotton fibre is a singularly discrete, elongated plant cell with no junctions or inter-cellular boundaries. Its form in nature is essentially unadulterated from the field to the spinning mill where its cross-section properties, as for any textile fibre, are central ...

  5. Multifunctional Carbon Fibre Tapes for Automotive Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncherry, V.; Potluri, P.; Fernando, A.

    2016-11-01

    Cabon fibre composites are used where mechanical performance such as strength, stiffness and impact properties at low density is a critical parameter for engineering applications. Carbon fibre flat tape is one material which is traditionally used to manufacture three-dimensional composites in this area. Modifying the carbon fibre tape to incorporate other functions such as stealth, electromagnetic interference, shielding, de-icing, self-repair, energy storage, allows us to create multi-functional carbon fibre tape. Researchers have been developing such material and the technology for their manufacture in order to produce multifunctional carbon fibre based components more economically and efficiently. This paper presents the manufacturing process of a metallised carbon fibre material for a chopped fibre preforming process that uses electromagnets for preforming instead of traditional suction airflow fibre deposition. In addition, the paper further presents mechanical and magneto-static modelling that is carried out to investigate the bending properties of the material produced and its suitability for creating 3D preforms.

  6. Strength variability of single flax fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslan, Mustafa; Chinga-Carrasco, G.; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2011-01-01

    (linear and nonlinear) of the fibres are found to be correlated with the amount of defects. The linear stress–strain curves tend to show a higher tensile strength, a higher Young’s modulus, and a lower strain to failure than the nonlinear curves. Finally, the fibres are found to fracture by a complex...

  7. Thermally induced structural changes in Nomex fibres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anjana Jain; Kalyani Vijayan

    2002-08-01

    Thermally aged Nomex fibres manifest several residual effects viz. reduction in X-ray crystallinity, weight loss and deterioration in tensile characteristics. Surface damages in the form of longitudinal openings, holes, material deposits etc have also been observed. Based on the data from thermally exposed fibres, the time needed for states of zero tensile strength and modulus have been predicted.

  8. low pump power photonic crystal fibre amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristian G.; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2003-01-01

    Designs of low pump power optical amplifiers, based on photonic crystal fibres are presented. The potential of these fibre amplifiers is investigated, and it is demonstrated that such amplifiers may deliver gains of more than 15 dB at 1550 nm with less than 1 mW of optical pump power....

  9. The development of fibre optic microbend sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsthuis, W.H.G.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Investigations concerning the development of a fibre optic pressure sensor are reported. The phenomenon of light power attenuation in a periodically deformed graded index fibre has been studied theoretically. It appears that available theories are not suited to describe this attenuation process in t

  10. Microstructural characterization of stone wool fibre network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapelle, Lucie; Brøndsted, Povl; Kusano, Yukihiro;

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of fibrous network as complex as stone wool materials requires a relevant description of their microstructure and architecture. In this study, different methods have been proposed to characterize the fibre orientation, diameter and length of fibres as well...

  11. Insertion of optic fibre for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The MicroJET system uses high pressure to carefully put the optical fibres into their protective tubes. These fibres are vital for rapid data transfer, but are also very delicate and, if damanged, may not work at the required efficiency. Similiar methods are used to install cables for the telecommunications industry.

  12. Image analysis of insulation mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, H; Lee, T; Jeulin, D; Hanton, D; Hobbs, L W

    2000-12-01

    We present two methods for measuring the diameter and length of man-made vitreous fibres based on the automated image analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. The fibres we want to measure are used in materials such as glass wool, which in turn are used for thermal and acoustic insulation. The measurement of the diameters and lengths of these fibres is used by the glass wool industry for quality control purposes. To obtain reliable quality estimators, the measurement of several hundred images is necessary. These measurements are usually obtained manually by operators. Manual measurements, although reliable when performed by skilled operators, are slow due to the need for the operators to rest often to retain their ability to spot faint fibres on noisy backgrounds. Moreover, the task of measuring thousands of fibres every day, even with the help of semi-automated image analysis systems, is dull and repetitive. The need for an automated procedure which could replace manual measurements is quite real. For each of the two methods that we propose to accomplish this task, we present the sample preparation, the microscope setting and the image analysis algorithms used for the segmentation of the fibres and for their measurement. We also show how a statistical analysis of the results can alleviate most measurement biases, and how we can estimate the true distribution of fibre lengths by diameter class by measuring only the lengths of the fibres visible in the field of view.

  13. Fibre Distribution in Friction-spun Yarns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Oyondi Nganyi; YU Chong-wen

    2006-01-01

    According to the yarn forming characteristics in friction spinning, the arrangement of fed sliver is designed, to get the desired fiber distribution in the resultant yarn. On the base of that, the relation between the theoretical fibre distribution and the actual fibre distribution is analyzed by use of electron microscope.

  14. Recent advances in poled optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pruneri, V.; Margulis, W.; Myrén, N.;

    2005-01-01

    A second-order nonlinearity can be induced in optical fibres through poling. We describe accomplishments of the EU project GLAMOROUS in making low-cost high performance electrooptic and nonlinear optical fibre- and waveguide-based components. In particular a comparison with more traditional...

  15. Postural Ataxia in Cerebellar Downbeat Nystagmus: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive and Vestibular Signals and Cerebellar Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmchen, Christoph; Kirchhoff, Jan-Birger; Göttlich, Martin; Sprenger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Background The cerebellum integrates proprioceptive, vestibular and visual signals for postural control. Cerebellar patients with downbeat nystagmus (DBN) complain of unsteadiness of stance and gait as well as blurred vision and oscillopsia. Objectives The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of visual input, gaze eccentricity, vestibular and proprioceptive input on the postural stability in a large cohort of cerebellar patients with DBN, in comparison to healthy age-matched control subjects. Methods Oculomotor (nystagmus, smooth pursuit eye movements) and postural (postural sway speed) parameters were recorded and related to each other and volumetric changes of the cerebellum (voxel-based morphometry, SPM). Results Twenty-seven patients showed larger postural instability in all experimental conditions. Postural sway increased with nystagmus in the eyes closed condition but not with the eyes open. Romberg’s ratio remained stable and was not different from healthy controls. Postural sway did not change with gaze position or graviceptive input. It increased with attenuated proprioceptive input and on tandem stance in both groups but Romberg’s ratio also did not differ. Cerebellar atrophy (vermal lobule VI, VIII) correlated with the severity of impaired smooth pursuit eye movements of DBN patients. Conclusions Postural ataxia of cerebellar patients with DBN cannot be explained by impaired visual feedback. Despite oscillopsia visual feedback control on cerebellar postural control seems to be preserved as postural sway was strongest on visual deprivation. The increase in postural ataxia is neither related to modulations of single components characterizing nystagmus nor to deprivation of single sensory (visual, proprioceptive) inputs usually stabilizing stance. Re-weighting of multisensory signals and/or inappropriate cerebellar motor commands might account for this postural ataxia. PMID:28056109

  16. Dyslexic Children Show Atypical Cerebellar Activation and Cerebro-Cerebellar Functional Connectivity in Orthographic and Phonological Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoxia; Li, Le; Zhang, Manli; Yang, Xiujie; Tian, Mengyu; Xie, Weiyi; Lu, Yao; Liu, Li; Bélanger, Nathalie N; Meng, Xiangzhi; Ding, Guosheng

    2017-04-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have found atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia in either motor-related tasks or language tasks. However, studies investigating atypical cerebellar activation in individuals with dyslexia have mostly used tasks tapping phonological processing. A question that is yet unanswered is whether the cerebellum in individuals with dyslexia functions properly during orthographic processing of words, as growing evidence shows that the cerebellum is also involved in visual and spatial processing. Here, we investigated cerebellar activation and cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity during word processing in dyslexic readers and typically developing readers using tasks that tap orthographic and phonological codes. In children with dyslexia, we observed an abnormally higher engagement of the bilateral cerebellum for the orthographic task, which was negatively correlated with literacy measures. The greater the reading impairment was for young dyslexic readers, the stronger the cerebellar activation was. This suggests a compensatory role of the cerebellum in reading for children with dyslexia. In addition, a tendency for higher cerebellar activation in dyslexic readers was found in the phonological task. Moreover, the functional connectivity was stronger for dyslexic readers relative to typically developing readers between the lobule VI of the right cerebellum and the left fusiform gyrus during the orthographic task and between the lobule VI of the left cerebellum and the left supramarginal gyrus during the phonological task. This pattern of results suggests that the cerebellum compensates for reading impairment through the connections with specific brain regions responsible for the ongoing reading task. These findings enhance our understanding of the cerebellum's involvement in reading and reading impairment.

  17. Simulation of complex phenomena in optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Allington-Smith, Jeremy; Lemke, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Optical fibres are essential for many types of highly-multiplexed and precision spectroscopy. The success of the new generation of multifibre instruments under construction to investigate fundamental problems in cosmology, such as the nature of dark energy, requires accurate modellisation of the fibre system to achieve their signal-to-noise goals. Despite their simple construction, fibres exhibit unexpected behaviour including non-conservation of Etendue (Focal Ratio Degradation; FRD) and modal noise. Furthermore, new fibre geometries (non-circular or tapered) have become available to improve the scrambling properties that, together with modal noise, limit the achievable SNR in precision spectroscopy. These issues have often been addressed by extensive tests on candidate fibres and their terminations but these are difficult and time-consuming. Modelling by ray-tracing and wave analysis is possible with commercial software packages but these do not address the more complex features, in particular FRD. We use a...

  18. Metal-coated Bragg grating reflecting fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorovskiy, Yu. K.; Butov, O. V.; Kolosovskiy, A. O.; Popov, S. M.; Voloshin, V. V.; Vorob'ev, I. L.; Vyatkin, M. Yu.

    2017-03-01

    High-temperature optical fibres (OF) with fibre Bragg gratings (FBG) arrays written over a long length and in-line metal coating have been made for the first time. The optical parameters of the FBG arrays were tested by the optical frequency domain reflectometer (OFDR) method in a wide temperature range, demonstrating no degradation in reflection at heating up to 600 °C for a fibre with Al coating. The mechanical strength of the developed fibre was practically the same as "ordinary" OF with similar coating, showing the absence of the influence of FBG writing process on fibre strength. Further experiments are necessary to evaluate the possibility of further increases in the operational temperature range.

  19. Preserved Glucose Metabolism of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei in a Case of Multiple System Atrophy with Predominant Cerebellar Ataxia: F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Dae Kwon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar glucose metabolism of multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C is known to be decreased but is not defined among areas of cerebellum. We encountered a 54-year-old man who developed dizziness and progressive ataxia followed by urinary incontinence and orthostatic hypotension, all of those symptoms progressed relentlessly and the symptoms responded poorly to levodopa therapy. Visual analysis and statistical parametric mapping analysis of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed hypometabolism of both cerebellar hemisphere, severe at cortical area, and pons. There was clear sparing of deep cerebellar nuclei. Our report, as we know, shows the first case of preserved glucose metabolism of deep cerebellar nuclei relative to cerebellar cortex in an MSA-C patient.

  20. Effects of fibre content on mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of short carbon fibre reinforced geopolymer matrix composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tiesong Lin; Dechang Jia; Meirong Wang; Peigang He; Defu Liang

    2009-02-01

    Geopolymer matrix composites reinforced with different volume fractions of short carbon fibres (Cf/geopolymer composites) were prepared and the mechanical properties, fracture behaviour and microstructure of as-prepared composites were studied and correlated with fibre content. The results show that short carbon fibres have a great strengthening and toughening effect at low volume percentages of fibres (3.5 and 4.5 vol.%). With the increase of fibre content, the strengthening and toughening effect of short carbon fibres reduce, possibly due to fibre damage, formation of high shear stresses at intersect between fibres and strong interface cohesion of fibre/matrix under higher forming pressure. The property improvements are primarily based on the network structure of short carbon fibre preform and the predominant strengthening and toughening mechanisms are attributed to the apparent fibre bridging and pulling-out effect.

  1. Role of Calcium in Cerebellar Learning and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Gao (Zhenyu)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe cerebellum, which means little brain in Latin, occupies most of the posterior cranial fossa and connects with the dorsal brainstem (Kandel et al., 2000). The cerebellar cortex is one of the most foliated brain structures, which accounts for 10% of the total volume and over half of th

  2. Reevaluating the Role of LTD in Cerebellar Motor Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schonewille (Martijn); Z. Gao (Zhenyu); H.J. Boele (Henk-Jan); M.F. Vinueza Veloz (Maria); W.E. Amerika; A. Šimek (Antonia); M.T.G. Jeu (Marcel); J. Steinberg (Jordan); K. Takamiya (Kogo); F.E. Hoebeek (Freek); D. Linden (David); R. Huganir (Richard); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractLong-term depression at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses (PF-PC LTD) has been proposed to be required for cerebellar motor learning. To date, tests of this hypothesis have sought to interfere with receptors (mGluR1) and enzymes (PKC, PKG, or αCamKII) necessary for induction of PF-PC

  3. Cerebellar Control of Locomotion in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Vinueza Veloz (Maria)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Modern neuroscience is paving the way for new insight into cerebellar functions including the control of cognitive, autonomic and emotional processes. Yet, how the cerebellum contributes to complex motor behaviors, such as locomotion, is still only partially understood.

  4. Is a Cerebellar Deficit the Underlying Cause of Reading Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irannejad, Shahrzad; Savage, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether children with dyslexia differed in their performance on reading, phonological, rapid naming, motor, and cerebellar-related tasks and automaticity measures compared to reading age (RA)-matched and chronological age (CA)-matched control groups. Participants were 51 children attending mainstream English elementary…

  5. Very Preterm Birth, Cerebellar Development and Neuropsychological Outcome in Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar volumes were measured on structural MRI at adolescence and adulthood in 65 preterm individuals (born before 33 weeks’ gestation, and a term-born comparison group, in a study at King’s College, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and University College, London; and Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea.

  6. Early Cerebellar Network Shifting in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, M I; Gomez, C M; Chen, E E; Shereen, A; Solodkin, A

    2016-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant degenerative disease, is characterized by diplopia, gait ataxia, and incoordination due to severe progressive degeneration of Purkinje cells in the vestibulo- and spinocerebellum. Ocular motor deficits are common, including difficulty fixating on moving objects, nystagmus and disruption of smooth pursuit movements. In presymptomatic SCA6, there are alterations in saccades and smooth-pursuit movements. We sought to assess functional and structural changes in cerebellar connectivity associated with a visual task, hypothesizing that gradual changes would parallel disease progression. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data during a passive smooth-pursuit task in 14 SCA6 patients, representing a range of disease duration and severity, and performed a cross-sectional comparison of cerebellar networks compared with healthy controls. We identified a shift in activation from vermis in presymptomatic individuals to lateral cerebellum in moderate-to-severe cases. Concomitantly, effective connectivity between regions of cerebral cortex and cerebellum was at its highest in moderate cases, and disappeared in severe cases. Finally, we noted structural differences in the cerebral and cerebellar peduncles. These unique results, spanning both functional and structural domains, highlight widespread changes in SCA6 and compensatory mechanisms associated with cerebellar physiology that could be utilized in developing new therapies.

  7. Long-Term Sequelae after Cerebellar Astrocytoma Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The long-term effects on neurologic, neuropsychological, and behavioral functioning in a consecutive series of 23 children treated surgically for cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma without additional radio- and chemotherapy are determined in a study at Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, and other medical centers.

  8. [Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias in the Netherlands: a national inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a comprehensive estimate of the number of Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA) families and patients and thus estimate the minimal prevalence of ADCA in the Netherlands. Furthermore, to observe the relative frequency of SCA mutations and to study genotype-phenotyp

  9. Mapping the development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamling, Kyla R; Tobias, Zachary J C; Weissman, Tamily A

    2015-11-01

    The cells that comprise the cerebellum perform a complex integration of neural inputs to influence motor control and coordination. The functioning of this circuit depends upon Purkinje cells and other cerebellar neurons forming in the precise place and time during development. Zebrafish provide a useful platform for modeling disease and studying gene function, thus a quantitative metric of normal zebrafish cerebellar development is key for understanding how gene mutations affect the cerebellum. To begin to quantitatively measure cerebellar development in zebrafish, we have characterized the spatial and temporal patterning of Purkinje cells during the first 2 weeks of development. Differentiated Purkinje cells first emerged by 2.8 days post fertilization and were spatially patterned into separate dorsomedial and ventrolateral clusters that merged at around 4 days. Quantification of the Purkinje cell layer revealed that there was a logarithmic increase in both Purkinje cell number as well as overall volume during the first 2 weeks, while the entire region curved forward in an anterior, then ventral direction. Purkinje cell dendrites were positioned next to parallel fibers as early as 3.3 days, and Purkinje cell diameter decreased significantly from 3.3 to 14 days, possibly due to cytoplasmic reappropriation into maturing dendritic arbors. A nearest neighbor analysis showed that Purkinje cells moved slightly apart from each other from 3 to 14 days, perhaps spreading as the organized monolayer forms. This study establishes a quantitative spatiotemporal map of Purkinje cell development in zebrafish that provides an important metric for studies of cerebellar development and disease.

  10. Cerebellar Damage Produces Selective Deficits in Verbal Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravizza, Susan M.; Mccormick, Cristin A.; Schlerf, John E.; Justus, Timothy; Ivry, Richard B.; Fiez, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebellum is often active in imaging studies of verbal working memory, consistent with a putative role in articulatory rehearsal. While patients with cerebellar damage occasionally exhibit a mild impairment on standard neuropsychological tests of working memory, these tests are not diagnostic for exploring these processes in detail. The…

  11. Cerebellar rTMS disrupts predictive language processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Elise; Morgan, Blaire E.; Olson, Andrew C.; Meyer, Antje S.; Miall, R. Chris

    2012-01-01

    Summary The human cerebellum plays an important role in language, amongst other cognitive and motor functions [1], but a unifying theoretical framework about cerebellar language function is lacking. In an established model of motor control, the cerebellum is seen as a predictive machine, making short-term estimations about the outcome of motor commands. This allows for flexible control, on-line correction, and coordination of movements [2]. The homogeneous cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex suggests that similar computations occur throughout the structure, operating on different input signals and with different output targets [3]. Several authors have therefore argued that this ‘motor’ model may extend to cerebellar nonmotor functions [3–5], and that the cerebellum may support prediction in language processing [6]. However, this hypothesis has never been directly tested. Here, we used the ‘Visual World’ paradigm [7], where on-line processing of spoken sentence content can be assessed by recording the latencies of listeners' eye movements towards objects mentioned. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was used to disrupt function in the right cerebellum, a region implicated in language [8]. After cerebellar rTMS, listeners showed delayed eye fixations to target objects predicted by sentence content, while there was no effect on eye fixations in sentences without predictable content. The prediction deficit was absent in two control groups. Our findings support the hypothesis that computational operations performed by the cerebellum may support prediction during both motor control and language processing. PMID:23017990

  12. Neurophysiological evidence for cerebellar dysfunction in primary focal dystonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teo, J.T.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Schneider, S.A.; Rothwell, J.C.; Bhatia, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that there may be functional and structural changes in the cerebellum of patients with adult onset primary focal dystonia. The aim of this study was to establish whether there is any neurophysiological indicator of abnormal cerebellar function, using the classic eyeblin

  13. Cerebro-cerebellar interactions underlying temporal information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Kenji; Hanakawa, Takashi; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2010-12-01

    The neural basis of temporal information processing remains unclear, but it is proposed that the cerebellum plays an important role through its internal clock or feed-forward computation functions. In this study, fMRI was used to investigate the brain networks engaged in perceptual and motor aspects of subsecond temporal processing without accompanying coprocessing of spatial information. Direct comparison between perceptual and motor aspects of time processing was made with a categorical-design analysis. The right lateral cerebellum (lobule VI) was active during a time discrimination task, whereas the left cerebellar lobule VI was activated during a timed movement generation task. These findings were consistent with the idea that the cerebellum contributed to subsecond time processing in both perceptual and motor aspects. The feed-forward computational theory of the cerebellum predicted increased cerebro-cerebellar interactions during time information processing. In fact, a psychophysiological interaction analysis identified the supplementary motor and dorsal premotor areas, which had a significant functional connectivity with the right cerebellar region during a time discrimination task and with the left lateral cerebellum during a timed movement generation task. The involvement of cerebro-cerebellar interactions may provide supportive evidence that temporal information processing relies on the simulation of timing information through feed-forward computation in the cerebellum.

  14. Fear conditioning-related changes in cerebellar Purkinje cell activities in goldfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Masayuki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fear conditioning-induced changes in cerebellar Purkinje cell responses to a conditioned stimulus have been reported in rabbits. It has been suggested that synaptic long-term potentiation and the resulting increases in firing rates of Purkinje cells are related to the acquisition of conditioned fear in mammals. However, Purkinje cell activities during acquisition of conditioned fear have not been analysed, and changes in Purkinje cell activities throughout the development of conditioned fear have not yet been investigated. In the present study, we tracked Purkinje cell activities throughout a fear conditioning procedure and aimed to elucidate further how cerebellar circuits function during the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear. Methods Activities of single Purkinje cells in the corpus cerebelli were tracked throughout a classical fear conditioning procedure in goldfish. A delayed conditioning paradigm was used with cardiac deceleration as the conditioned response. Conditioning-related changes of Purkinje cell responses to a conditioned stimulus and unconditioned stimulus were examined. Results The majority of Purkinje cells sampled responded to the conditioned stimulus by either increasing or decreasing their firing rates before training. Although there were various types of conditioning-related changes in Purkinje cells, more than half of the cells showed suppressed activities in response to the conditioned stimulus after acquisition of conditioned fear. Purkinje cells that showed unconditioned stimulus-coupled complex-spike firings also exhibited conditioning-related suppression of simple-spike responses to the conditioned stimulus. A small number of Purkinje cells showed increased excitatory responses in the acquisition sessions. We found that the magnitudes of changes in the firing frequencies of some Purkinje cells in response to the conditioned stimulus correlated with the magnitudes of the conditioned

  15. Knowledge about dietary fibre: a fibre study framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiné, Raquel P F; Ferreira, Manuela; Correia, Paula; Duarte, João; Leal, Marcela; Rumbak, Ivana; Barić, Irena C; Komes, Drazenka; Satalić, Zvonimir; Sarić, Marijana M; Tarcea, Monica; Fazakas, Zita; Jovanoska, Dijana; Vanevski, Dragoljub; Vittadini, Elena; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Szűcs, Viktória; Harangozó, Júlia; El-Kenawy, Ayman; El-Shenawy, Omnia; Yalçın, Erkan; Kösemeci, Cem; Klava, Dace; Straumite, Evita

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this work was to study the degree of knowledge about dietary fibre (DF), as influenced by factors such as gender, level of education, living environment or country. For this, a descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken on a non-probabilistic sample of 6010 participants from 10 countries in different continents (Europe, Africa and America). The results showed that the participants revealed on average a positive but still low global level of knowledge, which alerts for the need to take some actions to further inform the population about DF and its role as a component of a healthy diet. The results also indicated differences between genders, levels of education, living environments and countries. The highest level of knowledge was revealed by the participants from female gender, with higher education and living in urban areas. Concerning the country, the best informed were the participants from Romania, followed by those from Portugal and Turkey while the least informed were from Egypt.

  16. Anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction with sudden deafness and vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takenobu; Nakayasu, Hiroyuki; Doi, Mitsuru; Fukada, Yasuyo; Hayashi, Miwa; Suzuki, Takeo; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2006-12-01

    We report a patient with anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction, which manifested as profound deafness, transient vertigo, and minimal cerebellar signs. We suspect that ischaemia of the left internal auditory artery, which originates from the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, caused the deafness and transient vertigo. A small lesion in the middle cerebellar peduncle in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory and no lesion in the dentate nucleus in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory are thought to explain the minimal cerebellar signs despite the relatively large size of the infarction. Thus a relatively large infarction of the vertebral-basilar territory can manifest as sudden deafness with vertigo. Neuroimaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, is strongly recommended for patients with sudden deafness and vertigo to exclude infarction of the vertebral-basilar artery territory.

  17. Post-Plasmodium vivax malaria cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis: A new form of delayed cerebellar ataxia or cerebellar variant of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav M Kasundra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM is commonly seen after viral and bacterial infections, immunization, and Plasmodium falciparum (PF malaria. Plasmodium vivax (PV rarely causes ADEM. We report a 14-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset bilateral cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis, 2 weeks after recovery from PV. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral cerebellar hyperintensities suggestive of ADEM. No specific viral etiology was found on cerebrospinal fluid examination. Patient responded well to treatment without any sequelae. Thus, PV too is an important cause of ADEM along with PF. Two of the previously reported cases had co-infection with falciparum malaria. The only other two reported cases, as also this patient, are from Asia. A geographical or racial predisposition needs to be evaluated. Also, a possibility of post-PV delayed cerebellar ataxia, which is classically described post-PF infection, may be considered as it may be clinically, radiologically, and prognostically indistinguishable from a milder presentation of ADEM.

  18. Comparison of Acoustic Characteristics of Date Palm Fibre and Oil Palm Fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamyaa Abd ALRahman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated and compared the acoustic characteristics of two natural organic fibres: date palm fibre and oil palm fibre, these materials eligible for acoustical absorption. During the processing stage, both fibre sheets are treated with latex. The two fibres are compressed after latex treatment Circular samples (100 mm in diameter and 28 mm, based on the measurement tube requirements are cut out of the sheets. The density of the date palm fibre sheet is 150 kg/m3 for a 50 mm thickness and 130 kg/m3 for a 30 mm thickness. In contrast, the density of oil palm fibre is 75 kg/m3 for a 50 mm thickness and 65 kg/m3 for a 30 mm thickness. An impedance tube was used to test the thicknesses of both samples based on international standards. The results show that the date palm fibre exhibits two Acoustic Absorption Coefficient (AAC peaks: 0.93 at 1356 Hz and 0.99 at 4200-4353 Hz for the 50-mm-thick sample. In contrast, the 30-mm-thick sample has a single AAC peak of 0.83 at 2381.38-2809.38 Hz. However, the 50-mm-thick oil palm fibre has an AAC peak of 0.75 at 1946.88-2178.13 Hz and the 30-mm-thick oil palm fibre has an acoustic absorption coefficient peak 0.59 at 3225-3712.5 Hz. Thus, the date palm fibre has a higher acoustic absorption coefficient for high and low frequencies than does oil palm fibre. Both fibres are promising for use as sound absorber materials to protect against environmental noise pollution.

  19. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Human Cerebellar Pathways and their Interplay with Cerebral Macrostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer eKeser

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar white matter connections to the central nervous system are classified functionally into the spinocerebellar, vestibulocerebellar, and cerebrocerebellar subdivisions. The Spinocerebellar (SC pathways project from spinal cord to cerebellum, whereas the vestibulocerebellar (VC pathways project from vestibular organs of the inner ear. Cerebrocerebellar connections are composed of feed forward and feedback connections between cerebrum and cerebellum including the cortico-ponto-cerebellar (CPC pathways being of cortical origin and the dentate-rubro-thalamo-cortical (DRTC pathway being of cerebellar origin. In this study we systematically quantified the whole cerebellar system connections using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI. Ten right-handed healthy subjects (7 males and 3 females, age range 20-51 years were studied. DT-MRI data were acquired with a voxel size = 2mm x 2mm x 2 mm at a 3.0 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The DT-MRI data were prepared and analyzed using anatomically-guided deterministic tractography methods to reconstruct the SC, DRTC, fronto-ponto-cerebellar (FPC, parieto-ponto-cerebellar (PPC, temporo-ponto-cerebellar (TPC and occipito-ponto-cerebellar (OPC. The DTI-attributes or the cerebellar tracts along with their cortical representation (Brodmann areas were presented in standard Montréal Neurological Institute space. All cerebellar tract volumes were quantified and correlated with volumes of cerebral cortical, subcortical gray matter (GM, cerebral white matter (WM and cerebellar GM, and cerebellar WM. On our healthy cohort, the ratio of total cerebellar GM-to-WM was ~ 3.29 ± 0.24, whereas the ratio of cerebral GM-to-WM was approximately 1.10 ± 0.11. The sum of all cerebellar tract volumes is ~ 25.8 ± 7.3 mL, or a percentage of 1.52 ± 0.43 of the total intracranial volume.

  20. Cerebellar motor learning: when is cortical plasticity not enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Porrill

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical Marr-Albus theories of cerebellar learning employ only cortical sites of plasticity. However, tests of these theories using adaptive calibration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR have indicated plasticity in both cerebellar cortex and the brainstem. To resolve this long-standing conflict, we attempted to identify the computational role of the brainstem site, by using an adaptive filter version of the cerebellar microcircuit to model VOR calibration for changes in the oculomotor plant. With only cortical plasticity, introducing a realistic delay in the retinal-slip error signal of 100 ms prevented learning at frequencies higher than 2.5 Hz, although the VOR itself is accurate up to at least 25 Hz. However, the introduction of an additional brainstem site of plasticity, driven by the correlation between cerebellar and vestibular inputs, overcame the 2.5 Hz limitation and allowed learning of accurate high-frequency gains. This "cortex-first" learning mechanism is consistent with a wide variety of evidence concerning the role of the flocculus in VOR calibration, and complements rather than replaces the previously proposed "brainstem-first" mechanism that operates when ocular tracking mechanisms are effective. These results (i describe a process whereby information originally learnt in one area of the brain (cerebellar cortex can be transferred and expressed in another (brainstem, and (ii indicate for the first time why a brainstem site of plasticity is actually required by Marr-Albus type models when high-frequency gains must be learned in the presence of error delay.

  1. Cerebellar and pontine tegmental hypermetabolism in miller-fisher syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Kyrong; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) has been considered as a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), a type of acute immune neuropathies involving peripheral nerve system. Unlike GBS, presence of cerebellar type ataxia and supranuclear ophthalmioplesia in MFS suggests additional involvement of the central nervous system. To determine involvement of the central nervous system in MFS, we investigated the cerebral metabolic abnormalities in patients with MFS using FDG PET. Nine patients who were diagnosed as MFS based on acute ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia without other identifiable causes participated in this study. In six patients, serum antibodies possibly related with symptom of MFS (anti- GQ1b or anti-GM1) were detected at the time of the study. With the interval of 25 26 days (range: 3-83 days) from the symptom on set, brain FDG PET were underwent in patients and compared with those from healthy controls. In group analysis comparing with healthy controls, FDG PET of patients revealed increased metabolism in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and the thalamus. In contrast, the occipital cortex showed decreased metabolism. Individual analyses disclosed hypermetabolism in the cerebellar vermis or hemispheres in 5, and in the pontine tegmentum in 2 of the 9 patients. We also found that the cerebellar vermian hypermetabolism was inversely correlated with the interval between from the symptom on set to PET study. Moreover, follow-up PET of a patient demonstrated that cerebellar hypermetabolism decreased markedly with an improvement of the ophthalmoplegia and ataxia. These findings indicate an involvement of the central nervous system in MFS and suggest an antibody-associated acute inflammatory process as a mechanism of this disorder.

  2. GDNF-induced cerebellar toxicity: A brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Matthias; Mohr, Erich; Fibiger, H Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant-methionyl human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is known for its neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and primate models of Parkinson's disease (PD). When administered locally into the putamen of Parkinsonian subjects, early clinical studies showed its potential promise as a disease-modifying agent. However, the development of GDNF for the treatment of PD has been significantly clouded by findings of cerebellar toxicity after continuous intraputamenal high-dose administration in a 6-month treatment/3-month recovery toxicology study in rhesus monkeys. Specifically, multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss affecting 1-21% of the cerebellar cortex was observed in 4 of 15 (26.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5-52.4%) animals treated at the highest dose level tested (3000μg/month). No cerebellar toxicity was observed at lower doses (450 and 900μg/month) in the same study, or at similar or higher doses (up to 10,000μg/month) in subchronic or chronic toxicology studies testing intermittent intracerebroventricular administration. While seemingly associated with the use of GDNF, the pathogenesis of the cerebellar lesions has not been fully understood to date. This review integrates available information to evaluate potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a consolidated assessment of the findings. While other explanations are considered, the existing evidence is most consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of GDNF into cerebrospinal fluid during chronic infusions into the putamen down-regulates GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF generates the observed lesions. The implications of these findings for clinical studies with GDNF are discussed.

  3. Long lasting cerebellar alterations after perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanille, Verónica; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Rivière, Stéphanie; Logica, Tamara; Kölliker, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco; Castilla, Rocío

    2015-07-01

    The developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to injury before, at and after birth. Among possible insults, hypoxia suffered as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia (PA) exhibits the highest incidence levels and the cerebellar circuitry appears to be particularly susceptible, as the cellular makeup and the quantity of inputs change quickly during days and weeks following birth. In this work, we have used a murine model to induce severe global PA in rats at the time of birth. Short-term cerebellar alterations within this PA model have been previously reported but whether such alterations remain in adulthood has not been conclusively determined yet. For this reason, and given the crucial cerebellar role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain, the aim of our work is to unveil long-term cerebellum histomorphology following a PA insult. Morphological and cytological neuronal changes and glial reaction in the cerebellar cortex were analyzed at postnatal 120 (P120) following injury performed at birth. As compared to control, PA animals exhibited: (1) an increase in molecular and granular thickness, both presenting lower cellular density; (2) a disarrayed Purkinje cell layer presenting a higher number of anomalous calbindin-stained cells. (3) focal swelling and marked fragmentation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in Purkinje cell dendrites and, (4) an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in Bergmann cells and the granular layer. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PA produces long-term damage in cellular histomorphology in rat cerebellar cortex which could be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive deficits observed in both animals and humans.

  4. Fatigue damage propagation in unidirectional glass fibre reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Alzamora Guzman, Vladimir Joel; Østergaard, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    Damage progression in unidirectional glass fibre reinforced composites exposed to tension fatigue is investigated, and a quantitative explanation is given for the observed stiffness loss. The stiffness degradation during fatigue is directly related to fibre breaks in the load-carrying axial fibre...... needs further attention and understanding in order to improve the fatigue life-time of glass fibre reinforced composites....

  5. Comparison of two novel approaches to model fibre reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radtke, F.K.F.; Simone, A.; Sluys, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present two approaches to model fibre reinforced concrete. In both approaches, discrete fibre distributions and the behaviour of the fibre-matrix interface are explicitly considered. One approach employs the reaction forces from fibre to matrix while the other is based on the partition of unity f

  6. Coherent Beam Combination of Two Polarization Maintaining Ytterbium Fibre Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jing; XIAO Rui; JIANG Zong-Fu; CHENG Xiang-Ai; SHU Bai-Hong; CHEN Jin-Bao; LIU Ze-Jin

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate coherent beam combination of fibre laser beams by phase locking. Phase noise of a polarization maintaining ytterbium fibre amplifier is inspected with a fibre interferometer. In a feed back control loop, two fibre polarization maintaining ytterbium amplifiers are phase locked and coherent combined when the phase noise is properly controlled by a LiNO3 phase modulator.

  7. Ductility Performance of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Eswari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a study on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete. The influence of fibre content on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete specimens having different fibre volume fractions was investigated. The parameters of investigation included modulus of rupture, ultimate load, service load, ultimate and service load deflection, crack width, energy ductility and deflection ductility. A total of 27 specimens, 100×100×500 mm, were tested to study the above parameters. The specimens incorporated 0.0 to 2.0% volume fraction of polyolefin and steel fibres in different proportions. The ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete specimens was compared with that of plain concrete. The test results show that addition of 2.0% by volume of hybrid fibres improves the ductility performance appreciably. An adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy based model has been proposed to predict the ductility performance characteristics. A reasonably close agreement has been obtained between the experimental and predicted results.

  8. Ceramic fibres for the automotive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryatt, J.

    1985-01-01

    The outstanding thermal, physical and chemical properties of ceramic fibres make them a noticeable contender for inclusion in engineered systems to satisfy such performance demands. A wide range of fibres and fibre-based products are available which exhibit such characteristics as high temperature continuous service ability (1600/sup 0/C if required), low thermal conductivity, excellent resistance to chemical attack (including reducing conditions), good acoustic performance at all temperatures and good resistance to vibration. They are also lightweight, fireproof and incombustible. Ceramic fibres should really be referred to as refractory fibres as they are based on combinations of high purity alumina and silica. Two groups of products exist. The most common have a continuous-use temperature of 1260/sup 0/C. These fibres are characterized by an alumina content of 40-50% but refractoriness and temperature use limit can be increased to about 1400/sup 0/C by modifying the basic chemistry. This generally involves increasing the alumina content to as much as 62% or adding chromia or zirconia to the basic mix. The second and less common group of fibres is characterized by both chemistry and crystal morphology. Chemistry is biased towards a high alumina content (over 70%), while production routes are designed to yield as high a crystal phase (and so enhanced high temperature stability) as possible.

  9. Wnt signaling mediates experience-related regulation of synapse numbers and mossy fiber connectivities in the adult hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolla, Nadine; Galimberti, Ivan; Deguchi, Yuichi; Caroni, Pico

    2009-05-28

    We investigated how experience regulates the structure of a defined neuronal circuit in adult mice. Enriched environment (EE) produced a robust and reversible increase in hippocampal stratum lucidum synapse numbers, mossy fiber terminal (LMT) numbers, and spine plus synapse densities at LMTs, whereas a distinct mechanism depending on Rab3a promoted LMT volume growth. In parallel, EE increased postsynaptic CA3 pyramidal neuron Wnt7a/b levels. Inhibiting Wnt signaling through locally applied sFRP-1 suppressed the effects of EE on synapse numbers and further reduced synapse numbers in control mice. Wnt7 applied to CA3 mimicked the effects of EE on synapse and LMT numbers. CA3 Wnt7a/b levels were enhanced by excitatory activity and reduced by sFRP-1. Synapse numbers and Wnt7a/b levels peaked in mice aged 6-12 months; a decline in aged mice was reversed by EE. Therefore, behavioral experience specifically regulates adult global stratum lucidum synapse numbers and hippocampal network structure through Wnt signaling.

  10. Altered Connectivity and Synapse Maturation of the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Pathway in a Mouse Model of the Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharkowski, F; Frotscher, Michael; Lutz, David; Korte, Martin; Michaelsen-Preusse, Kristin

    2017-01-10

    The Fragile X syndrome (FXS) as the most common monogenetic cause of cognitive impairment and autism indicates how tightly the dysregulation of synapse development is linked to cognitive deficits. Symptoms of FXS include excessive adherence to patterns that point to compromised hippocampal network formation. Surprisingly, one of the most complex hippocampal synapses connecting the dentate gyrus (DG) to CA3 pyramidal neurons has not been analyzed in FXS yet. Intriguingly, we found altered synaptic function between DG and CA3 in a mouse model of FXS (fmr1 knockout [KO]) demonstrated by increased mossy fiber-dependent miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequency at CA3 pyramidal neurons together with increased connectivity between granule cells and CA3 neurons. This phenotype is accompanied by increased activity of fmr1 KO animals in the marble burying task, detecting repetitive and obsessive compulsive behavior. Spine apparatus development and insertion of AMPA receptors is enhanced at postsynaptic thorny excrescences (TEs) in fmr1 KO mice. We report age-dependent alterations in TE morphology and in the underlying actin dynamics possibly linked to a dysregulation in profilin1 expression. TEs form detonator synapses guiding CA3 network activity. Thus, alterations described here are likely to contribute substantially to the impairment in hippocampal function and therefore to the pathogenesis of FXS.

  11. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1, which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans.

  12. A Study in Physical and Mechanical Properties of Hemp Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Shahzad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the experiments undertaken to evaluate various physical and mechanical properties of hemp fibres. The study of these properties is vital for comparison with similar properties of synthetic fibres and for assessing hemp fibres’ suitability for use as reinforcement in composite materials. The properties of hemp fibres were found to be good enough to be used as reinforcement in composite materials. However, the issues of relatively high moisture content of fibres, variability in fibre properties, and relatively poor fibre/matrix interfacial strength were identified as factors that can reduce the efficiency with which these fibres can be utilised.

  13. Methodology for characterisation of glass fibre composite architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Larsen, J.B.; Østergaard, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    of the fibres. The information is used for different analyses to investigate and characterise the fibre architecture. As an example, the methodology is applied to glass fibre reinforced composites with varying fibre contents. The different fibre volume fractions (FVFs) affect the number of contact points per......The present study outlines a methodology for microstructural characterisation of fibre reinforced composites containing circular fibres. Digital micrographs of polished cross-sections are used as input to a numerical image processing tool that determines spatial mapping and radii detection...... fibre, the communal fibre distance and the local FVF. The fibre diameter distribution and packing pattern remain somewhat similar for the considered materials. The methodology is a step towards a better understanding of the composite microstructure and can be used to evaluate the interconnection between...

  14. Rare-Earth Doped Photonic Crystal Fibre Lasers and Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristian G.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, a theoretical and numerical study of the use of rare-earthdoped photonic crystal fibres as optical amplifiers and lasers, has been performed. Photonic crystal fibres or microstructured optical fibres is a new kind of optical fibre in which the cladding region typically consist...... of a periodic microstructure, resulting in a fibre with very different properties compared to conventional optical fibres. The properties of photonic crystals fibres are described, with focus on the advantages this technology provides compared to conventional fibres, within the area of optical amplification....... The thesis also presents the basic properties of optical amplification, and describes the numerical model developed to model the behaviour of lasers and amplifiers based on photonic crystal fibres. The developed numerical tools are then used to investigate specific applications of photonic crystal fibres...

  15. Nonlinear microstructured polymer optical fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frosz, Michael Henoch

    . The combination of a small core size and zero-dispersion wavelength at the operating wavelength of widely available femtosecond Ti:sapphire lasers led to an extensive research in supercontinuum generation and other nonlinear effects in PCFs. It is crucial for the efficiency of many nonlinear mechanisms...... that the pump laser wavelength is close to the zero-dispersion wavelength and that the core size is small. Recently, work in fabricating PCFs from materials other than silica has intensified. One of the advantages of using alternative materials can be a higher inherent material nonlinearity, which...... to accurately obtain a small core size while maintaining small structural variations during fibre drawing. This talk will give a presentation of how the mPOFs are fabricated and the route to obtaining nonlinear effects in them....

  16. The coupling performance of photonic crystal fibres in fibre stellar interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corbett, J.; Dabirian, A.; Butterley, T.;

    2006-01-01

    Large mode area (LMA), single-mode photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) have the potential to provide significant instrumental advantages in fibre stellar interferometry, due to their broadband attenuation spectrum, endlessly single-moded performance and very large core size. We investigate the theoret......Large mode area (LMA), single-mode photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) have the potential to provide significant instrumental advantages in fibre stellar interferometry, due to their broadband attenuation spectrum, endlessly single-moded performance and very large core size. We investigate...... the theoretical performance of coupling the telescope point spread function directly into LMA PCFs. We find that a single LMA fibre can replace as many as three step-index fibres for atmospheric seeing characterized by D-T/r(o) >= 2 with approximately the same coupling performance and a slower feed from...

  17. Silica holey fibres: fabrication and nonlinear effects

    OpenAIRE

    Belardi, W.; Monro, T.M.; Lee, J.H.; Yusoff, Z.; Price, J.H.V.; Malinowski, A.; Piper, A; Richardson, D J

    2002-01-01

    Holey fibres (HFs) [1] have emerged as a novel class of optical fibres which can provide completely new optical properties, such as endlessly single mode operation and novel dispersion properties as anomalous dispersion below 1.3µm, broadband flat dispersion and highly normal dispersion at 1.55µm. Moreover by changing the HF parameters (i.e. hole and core size), it is possible to fabricate HFs with an effective area so high as 800µm2 or so low as approximately 1µm2 [2]. A holey fibre perform ...

  18. Analysing the nanoporous structure of aramid fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauw, Brian Richard; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Mortensen, Kell;

    2010-01-01

    After consideration of the applicability of classical methods, a novel analysis method for the characterization of fibre void structures is presented, capable of fitting the entire anisotropic two-dimensional scattering pattern to a model of perfectly aligned, polydisperse ellipsoids. It is tested...... for validity against the computed scattering pattern for a simulated nanostructure, after which it is used to fit the scattering from the void structure of commercially available heat-treated poly(p-phenylene terephtalamide) fibre and its as-spun precursor fibre. The application shows a reasonable fit...

  19. Fibre Optic Protection System for Concrete Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.S.Leng; A.Hameed; D.Winter; R.A.Barnes; G.C.Mays; G.F.Fernando

    2006-01-01

    The design concepts, modelling and implementation of various fibre optic sensor protection systems for development in concrete structures were investigated. Design concepts and on-site requirements for surface-mounted and embedded optical fibre sensor in concrete were addressed. Finite element (FE) modelling of selected sensor protection systems in strain-transfer efficiency from the structure to the sensing region was also studied. And experimental validation of specified sensor protection system was reported. Results obtained indicate that the protection system for the sensors performs adequately in concrete environment and there is very good correlation between results obtained by the protected fibre optic sensors and conventional electrical resistance strain gauges.

  20. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS): A Novel Approach to Understanding Cerebellar Function in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J; Edwards, Dylan J; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar-motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar-thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions.

  1. Polymerizing the fibre between bacteria and host cells: the biogenesis of functional amyloid fibres

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid fibres are proteinaceous aggregates associated with several human diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s and Creutzfeldt Jakob’s. Disease-associated amyloid formation is the result of proteins that misfold and aggregate into β sheet-rich fibre polymers. Cellular toxicity is readily associated with amyloidogenesis, although the molecular mechanism of toxicity remains unknown. Recently, a new class of ‘functional’ amyloid fibres was discovered that demonstrates that amyloids can ...

  2. Strength Evaluation of Steel-Nylon Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Maniram Kumar; Er. Ankush Khadwal

    2014-01-01

    When fibres like steel, glass, polypropylene, nylon, carbon, aramid, polyester, jute, etc are mixed with concrete known as fibre reinforced concrete. To overcome the deficiencies of concrete; fibres are added to improve the performance of concrete. In this research hybrid reinforced concrete is made by using steel and nylon 6 fibres. The inclusion of both steel and nylon 6 fibres are used in order to combine the benefits of both fibers; structural improvements provided by stee...

  3. Physiology, morphology and detailed passive models of guinea-pig cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, M; Segev, I; Yarom, Y

    1994-01-01

    1. Purkinje cells (PCs) from guinea-pig cerebellar slices were physiologically characterized using intracellular techniques. Extracellular caesium ions were used to linearize the membrane properties of PCs near the resting potential. Under these conditions the average input resistance, RN, was 29 M omega, the average system time constant, tau 0, was 82 ms and the average cable length, LN, was 0.59. 2. Three PCs were fully reconstructed following physiological measurements and staining with horseradish peroxidase. Assuming that each spine has an area of 1 micron 2 and that the spine density over the spiny dendrites is ten spines per micrometre length, the total membrane area of each PC is approximately 150,000 microns 2, of which approximately 100,000 microns 2 is in the spines. 3. Detailed passive cable and compartmental models were built for each of the three reconstructed PCs. Computational methods were devised to incorporate globally the huge number of spines into these models. In all three cells the models predict that the specific membrane resistivity, Rm, of the soma is much lower than the dendritic Rm (approximately 500 and approximately 100,000 omega cm2 respectively). The specific membrane capacitance, Cm, is estimated to be 1.5-2 muF cm-2 and the specific cytoplasm resistivity, Ri, is 250 omega cm. 4. The average cable length of the dendrites according to the model is 0.13 lambda, suggesting that under caesium conditions PCs are electrically very compact. Brief somatic spikes, however, are expected to attenuate 30-fold when spreading passively into the dendritic terminals. A simulated 200 Hz train of fast, 90 mV somatic spikes produced a smooth 12 mV steady depolarization at the dendritic terminals. 5. A transient synaptic conductance increase, with a 1 nS peak at 0.5 ms and a driving force of 60 mV, is expected to produce approximately 20 mV peak depolarization at the spine head membrane. This EPSP then attenuates between 200- and 900-fold into the soma

  4. Yb3+-Doped Double-Clad Fibre Laser Based on Fibre Bragg Grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范万德; 付圣贵; 张强; 宁鼎; 李丽君; 王志; 袁树忠; 董孝义

    2003-01-01

    A novel Yb3+-doped double-clad fibre laser based on a double-clad fibre Bragg grating is presented. The fibre Bragg grating, as the output mirror, has been formed in Yb3+-doped double-clad fibre with the phase-mask method. When the input pump power is 2.8 W, the maximum laser output power is 570mW, with < 0.2 nm in line-width at the wavelength of 1.058μm, over 40dB signal-to-noise ratio and 24% slope efficiency.

  5. ELASTICITY of SHORT FIBRE REINFORCED POLYAMIDE: MORPHOLOGICAL AND NUMERICAl ANALYSIS OF FIBRE ORIENTATION EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cosmi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behaviour of injection moulded short fibre reinforced polymers depends upon fibre orientation, as shown in experiments conducted with notched specimens injected through different injection gates. The different fatigue behaviour is mainly related to the different local elastic properties, as determined by the different fibre orientation patterns, resulting into different strain distributions. In order to quantify the relationship between fibre orientation and elastic constants, the Cell Method was applied to volumes extracted from the specimens, reconstructed by micro-tomography.

  6. Synchronously pumped picosecond all-fibre Raman laser based on phosphorus-doped silica fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtsev, Sergey; Kukarin, Sergey; Kokhanovskiy, Alexey

    2015-07-13

    Reported for the first time is picosecond-range pulse generation in an all-fibre Raman laser based on P₂O₅-doped silica fibre. Employment of phosphor-silicate fibre made possible single-cascade spectral transformation of pumping pulses at 1084 nm into 270-ps long Raman laser pulses at 1270 nm. The highest observed fraction of the Stokes component radiation at 1270 nm in the total output of the Raman laser amounted to 30%. The identified optimal duration of the input pulses at which the amount of Stokes component radiation in a ~16-m long phosphorus-based Raman fibre converter reaches its maximum was 140-180 ps.

  7. Polarisation effects in twin-core fibre: Application for mode locking in a fibre laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobach, I. A.; Kablukov, S. I.; Podivilov, Evgenii V.; Babin, Sergei A.; Apolonski, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    We report the first measurements of the longitudinal power distribution in a twin-core optical fibre at different input light polarisations. Experimental evidence is presented that, because of the difference in birefringence between the cores, the power in them depends on which core the beam is launched into. Experimental data are interpreted in terms of a modified polarisation model for mode coupling in twin-core fibres which takes into account the birefringence of the cores. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time the use of the polarisation properties of a twincore fibre for mode locking in a fibre laser.

  8. Abnormality in cerebellar blood flow in solo vertigo patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahori, Takeshi [Shakaihoken Takaoka Hospital, Toyama (Japan); Nishijima, Michiharu; Endo, Shunro; Takaku, Akira

    1997-03-01

    Little is known about the blood flow of the vertebrobasilar system as a cause of vertigo and dizziness. We used Xe-CT to study cerebellar blood flow in 53 patients who ranged in age from 35 to 85 years. The patients were divided into two groups. One of them was the vertigo group that comprised 28 patients with rotatory sensation, and the other, the non-vertigo group of 25 patients with a sensation other than rotation. At the stage of severe symptoms, there was decreased cerebellar blood flow in all patients of both, the vertigo and the non-vertigo groups, and a decrease in the bilateral cerebellar hemisphere was observed in five patients and in a unilateral hemisphere in three patients of the vertigo group. By comparison, in the non-vertigo group, unilateral decrease of cerebellar blood flow was observed in only one patient, and a bilateral decrease in five. At the stage of severe symptoms, the mean regional cerebellar blood flow was 40.5{+-}8.0 ml/100 g/min (n=16 sides) in the vertigo group and 45.3{+-}9.5 ml/100 g/min (n=12 sides) in the non-vertigo group. At the stage of moderate symptoms, blood flow image was normal in four of 14 vertigo patients and in seven of 12 non-vertigo patients. The mean regional blood flow was 47.8{+-}8.6 ml/100 g/min (n=28 sides) in the vertigo group and 47.1{+-}5.1 ml/100 g/min (n=24 sides) in the non-vertigo group. At the asymptomatic stage, a high proportion of normal blood flow images (nine of 16 vertigo patients and 10 of 10 non-vertigo patients) was observed. The mean regional cerebellar blood flow was 51.6{+-}10.7 ml/100 g/min (n=32 sides) in the vertigo group and 52.8{+-}8.5 ml/100 g/min (n=20 sides) in the non-vertigo group. This study demonstrates that a unilateral or bilateral decrease in blood flow of the vertebrobasilar system may cause vertigo and dizziness. It also shows that Xe-CT of the cerebellum may be a valuable examination modality for the diagnosis and treatment of vertigo and dizziness. (author)

  9. Step index fibre using laser interferometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Hamed

    2014-03-01

    model is suggested to describe the fringe shift which occurs due to the phase variations of cladded glass fibre introduced between the two plates of the liquid wedge interferometer illuminated with a He–Ne laser. The fringe shift of the phase object which appears in the denominator of the Airy distribution formula of the multiple beam interference is represented in the harmonic term. An experiment is conducted using liquid wedge interferometer where the step index glass fibre of a nearly quadratic thickness variation is introduced between the two plates of the interferometer. The obtained fringe shift shows a good agreement with the proposed quadratic model. The Matlab code is written to plot the interferometer fringes comprising the shift of the step index fibre. Secondly, recognition of elliptical fibres is outlined using tomographic imaging. Finally, results and concluding remarks are given.

  10. Central Tracking Detector Based on Scintillating Fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Scintillating fibres form a reasonable compromise for central tracking detectors in terms of price, resolution, response time, occupancy and heat production. \\\\ \\\\ New fluorescents with large Stokes shifts have been produced, capable of working without wavelength shifters. Coherent multibundles have been developed to achieve high packing fractions. Small segments of tracker shell have been assembled and beam tests have confirmed expectations on spatial resolution. An opto-electronic delay line has been designed to delay the track patterns and enable coincidences with a first level trigger. Replacement of the conventional phosphor screen anode with a Si pixel chip is achieved. This tube is called ISPA-tube and has already been operated in beam tests with a scintillating fibres tracker. \\\\ \\\\ The aim of the proposal is to improve hit densities for small diameter fibres by increasing the fraction of trapped light, by reducing absorption and reflection losses, by reflecting light at the free fibre end, and by inc...

  11. Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Poeggel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

  12. Polarisation control of DFB fibre lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varming, Poul; Philipsen, Jacob Lundgreen; Berendt, Martin Ole;

    1998-01-01

    The polarisation properties of a distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser are investigated. It is shown experimentally that the birefringence of the UV induced phase-shift is the dominating effect controlling the polarisation properties of the laser...

  13. Design Methods for Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The present paper describes the outline of a research project on Fibre Reinforced Concrete (FRC) currently being carried out in Denmark under the supervision of Danish Council of Technology, Danish Technical Research Council and Danish Natural Science Research Counsil....

  14. Optical fibres bringing the LHC into focus

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    New components are being added to CERN's optical fibre network, which will transport the torrents of data produced by the LHC. 1500 kilometres of cables will be installed in the tunnels and at ground level.

  15. Chinese Market for Fibres and Cables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This article presents a summary of Chinese market of optical fibres and cables based on the development of the optical communications industry. Analysis shows that the market will keep growing for sometime in the future.

  16. Efficacité comparée de deux méthodes de maîtrise de la reproduction de la brebis Djalonké, variété 'Mossi'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boly, H.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrous Synchronisation in Djalonke, var. 'Mossi' Ewes : Comparison of Hormonal Treatment and Ram Effect. Zootechnical (ram effect and hormonal (Fluoro Gestone Acetate or FGA, and Pregnant Mare Serum Gonodotropin or PMSG methods on estrous and parturition synchronisation were tested on 24 Djalonke var. 'Mossi' ewes. The use of ram jumping combined with plasma progesterone assay showed that the zootechnical method using male effect provides better estrous synchronisation (4.8 + 2.2 days for estrous delay and better gathering of parturition (within 8 days. The hormonal method by FGA + PMSG provide good estrous synchronisation (3.1 + 20days but lead to a weak lam-bing gathering (within 21 days. After hormonal induction of estrous, a lower fertility was observed and seems to be related to the doses of FGA and PMSG with were relatively high for these small format of Djalonke var. 'Mossi' breed.

  17. Fibre-optic sensors in health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazia Mignani, Anna; Baldini, Francesco

    1997-05-01

    Biomedical fibre-optic sensors are attractive for the measurement of physical, chemical and biochemical parameters and for spectral measurements directly performed on the patient. An overview of fibre-optic sensors for in vivo monitoring is given, with particular attention paid to the advantages that these sensors are able to offer in different application fields such as cardiovascular and intensive care, angiology, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, oncology, neurology, dermatology and dentistry.

  18. Photonic crystal fibres in the market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Laurila, Marko; Noordegraaf, Danny;

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) emerged as a research topic in the mid 1990'ies [1]. Today, 15 years later, these fibres are increasing deployed in various commercial markets. Here, we will address three of these markets; medical imaging, materials processing and sensors. We will describe how...... the PCFs provide radical improvements and illustrate the strong diversity in the evolution of PCFs to serve these different markets....

  19. Angiogenic effect induced by mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonari, Damiano; Campopiano, Antonella; Ramires, Deborah; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Tomasetti, Marco; Curini, Roberta; Valentino, Matteo; Santarelli, Lory; Amati, Monica

    2011-10-09

    Due to the toxic effect of asbestos, other materials with similar chemical-physical characteristics have been introduced to substitute it. We evaluate the angiogenic effect of certain asbestos substitute fibres such as glass fibres (GFs), ceramic fibres (CFs) and wollastonite fibres (WFs) and then compare angiogenic responses to those induced by crocidolite asbestos fibres (AFs). An in vitro model using human endothelial cells in small islands within a culture matrix of fibroblasts (Angio-Kit) was used to evaluate vessel formation. The release of IL-6, sIL-R6, IL-8, VEGF-A and their soluble receptors, sVEGFR-1, sVEGFR-2, was determined in the conditioning medium of Angio-Kit system after fibre treatment. ROS formation and cell viability were evaluated in cultured endothelial cells (HUVEC). To evaluate the involvement of intracellular mechanisms, EGFR signalling, ROS formation and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) pathway were then inhibited by incubating HUVEC cells with AG1478, NAC and PDTC respectively, and the cytokine and growth factor release was analyzed in the culture medium after 7 days of fibre incubation. Among the mineral fibres tested, WFs markedly induced blood vessel formation which was associated with release of IL-6 and IL-8, VEGF-A and their soluble receptors. ROS production was observed in HUVEC after WFs treatment which was associated with cell cytotoxicity. The EGFR-induced ERK phosphorylation and ROS-mediated NFκB activation were involved in the cytokine and angiogenic factor release. However, only the EGFR activation was able to induce angiogenesis. The WFs are potential angiogenic agents that can induce regenerative cytokine and angiogenic factor production resulting in the formation of new blood vessels.

  20. Dynamic response analysis of DFB fibre lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yujun, Qian; Varming, Poul; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard

    1998-01-01

    We present a model for relative intensity noise (RIN) in DFB fibre lasers which predicts measured characteristics accurately. Calculation results implies that the RIN decreases rapidly with stronger Bragg grating and higher pump power. We propose here a simplified model based on three spatially...... independent rate equations to describe the dynamic response of erbium doped DFB fibre lasers on pump power fluctuations, using coupled-mode theory to calculate the steady-state hole-burning of the erbium ion inversion...

  1. Force focusing in confined fibres and sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Victor; Cerda, Enrique [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago, Av. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Witten, T A; Liang Tao [James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: t-witten@uchicago.edu

    2008-07-07

    A thin fibre or sheet curled into a circular container has a detached region whose shape and force ratios are independent of material properties and container radius. We compute this shape and compare it with experiments. The discrete forces acting at either end of the detached region have a ratio that depends only on the length of the fibre or sheet relative to the circle radius. We calculate this force ratio in three regimes of circle radius. (fast track communication)

  2. Fibre positioning algorithms for the WEAVE spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrett, David L.; Lewis, Ian J.; Dalton, Gavin; Abrams, Don Carlos; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Middleton, Kevin; Trager, Scott C.

    2014-07-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field optical spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. It is a multi-object "pick and place" fibre fed spectrograph with more than one thousand fibres, similar in concept to the Australian Astronomical Observatory's 2dF1 instrument with two observing plates, one of which is observing the sky while other is being reconfigured by a robotic fibre positioner. It will be capable of acquiring more than 10000 star or galaxy spectra a night. The WEAVE positioner concept uses two robots working in tandem in order to reconfigure a fully populated field within the expected 1 hour dwell-time for the instrument (a good match between the required exposure times and the limit of validity for a given configuration due to the effects of differential refraction). This presents additional constraints and complications for the software that determines the optimal path from one configuration to the next, particularly given the large number of fibre crossings implied by the 1000 fibre multiplex. This paper describes the algorithms and programming techniques used in the prototype implementations of the field configuration tool and the fibre positioner robot controller developed to support the detailed design of WEAVE.

  3. Criticality and isostaticity in fibre networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broedersz, Chase P.; Mao, Xiaoming; Lubensky, Tom C.; Mackintosh, Frederick C.

    2011-12-01

    Disordered fibre networks are the basis of many man-made and natural materials, including structural components of living cells and tissue. The mechanical stability of such networks relies on the bending resistance of the fibres, in contrast to rubbers, which are governed by entropic stretching of polymer segments. Although it is known that fibre networks exhibit collective bending deformations, a fundamental understanding of such deformations and their effects on network mechanics has remained elusive. Here we introduce a lattice-based model of fibrous networks with variable connectivity to elucidate the roles of single-fibre elasticity and network structure. These networks exhibit both a low-connectivity rigidity threshold governed by fibre-bending elasticity and a high-connectivity threshold governed by fibre-stretching elasticity. Whereas the former determines the true onset of network rigidity, we show that the latter exhibits rich zero-temperature critical behaviour, including a crossover between various mechanical regimes along with diverging strain fluctuations and a concomitant diverging correlation length.

  4. Economics Of Optical Fibre Transmission Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, W. J.

    1983-08-01

    Optical fibre as a telecommunication transmission medium has become one of the most significant developments so far of the digital era. A major contributory factor to the availability of optical fibre transmission systems has been the outstanding progress in the technology of manufacturing high quality glass fibre having relatively low attenuation and broad bandwidths. This and other achievements has enabled manufacturers in the United Kingdom to develop a range of optical fibre cables and transmission equipment for operation over short and long distances at the CCITT recommended digital hierarchical rates of 2, 8, 34 and 140Mbit/s which have been adopted by British Telecom (BT) for modernisation to an all digital transmission network. These optical fibre systems are now becoming increasingly price and performance competitive with conventional technology in many parts of telecommunications networks. In the British Telecom (BT) network the 140Mbit/s optical fibre systems are now economically competitive with equivalent systems on coaxial cable and microwave radio. The economics of 8 and 34Mbit/s systems are not yet sufficiently attractive, compared with 2Mbit/s digital line systems on pair type copper cables, for large scale use in rural and local distribution networks and are presently only justified on cost in and around large cities. As system costs decrease large applications are predicted particularly in support of future high speed data, cable television and visual information services.

  5. Hippocampus modulates the behaviorally-sensitizing effects of nicotine in a rat model of novelty-seeking: potential role for mossy fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Amrinder S; Hall, Penny; Ma, Zhiyuan; Tao, Rui; Isgor, Ceylan

    2007-01-01

    Present experiments investigate interactions between a rat model of the novelty-seeking phenotype and psychomotor sensitization to nicotine (NIC) in adolescence, and the potential role of hippocampal mossy fibers in mediating the behaviorally-sensitizing effects of NIC. Outbred rats were phenotype-screened as high-responders (HR; locomotor reactivity to novelty score ranking in the upper third of the population) or low-responders (LR; locomotor reactivity to novelty score ranking in the lower third of the population). In Experiment 1, both phenotypes were trained with four NIC injections (at 3-d intervals on postnatal days 33-44), and lidocaine microinfusion was used to temporarily inactivate the hippocampal hilus at each NIC injection. Systemic saline and microinjection of artificial cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) were used as controls. During NIC training, lidocaine inactivation caused augmented locomotor response to NIC in HRs compared to LRs irrespective of injection days. Following 1 week of abstinence, all animals were challenged with a low dose of NIC. During challenge, previously NIC/CSF trained LRs and HRs were divided into two; one half receiving lidocaine inactivation of the hippocampal hilus and the other half receiving CSF control microinjection. Only HRs showed behavioral sensitization to the challenge dose of NIC, which was enhanced with lidocaine inactivation. In Experiment 2, a single NIC exposure was found sufficient to induce sensitization to the challenge dose of NIC in HRs, and concurrently an enlarged supra-pyramidal mossy fiber (SP-MF) terminal field. The increase in the SP-MF volume in HRs was greater with repeated NIC training. In both single and repeated NIC training cases, a significant positive morphobehavioral correlation was observed between challenge NIC-induced locomotion and the SP-MF terminal field volume. These findings suggest that the HR hippocampal mossy fibers are vulnerable to neuroadaptive alterations induced by NIC, which may

  6. Emergence of spatial behavioral function and associated mossy fiber connectivity and c-Fos labeling patterns in the hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comba, Rachel; Gervais, Nicole; Mumby, Dave; Holahan, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Improvement on spatial tasks is observed during a late, postnatal developmental period (PND18 - PND24).  The purpose of the current work was 1) to determine whether the emergence of spatial-behavioral function was based on the ability to generate appropriate behavioral output; 2) to assess whether mossy fiber connectivity patterns preceded the emergence of spatial-behavioral function; 3) to explore functional changes in the hippocampus to determine whether activity in hippocampal networks occurred in a training-dependent or developmentally-dependent fashion.  To these ends, male, Long Evans rats were trained on a spatial water or dry maze task for one day (PND16, PND18 or PND20) then euthanized.  Training on these 2 tasks with opposing behavioral demands (swimming versus exploration) was hypothesized to control for behavioral topology.  Only at PND20 was there evidence of spatial-behavioral function for both tasks.  Examination of synaptophysin staining in the CA3 region (i.e., mossy fiber projections) revealed enhanced connectivity patterns that preceded the emergence of spatial behavior.  Analysis of c-Fos labeling (functional changes) revealed developmentally-dependent increases in c-Fos positive cells in the dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1 regions whereas training-dependent increases were noted in the CA3 and CA1 regions for the water-maze trained groups.  Results suggest that changes in mossy fiber connectivity in association with enhanced hippocampal functioning precede the emergence of spatial behavior observed at PND20.  The combination of neuroanatomical and behavioural results confirms the hypothesis that this time represents a sensitive period for hippocampal development and modification and the emergence of spatial/ cognitive function.

  7. A Study Of Sporadic Adult Onset Degenerative Cerebellar Ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha K K

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four cases of sporadic olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA of adult onset were studied over a period of two years. Results suggest that this disorder has its usual onset in the 5th and 6th decade of life with a male: female ratio of 2:1. It manifests clinically with gait ataxia in all, dysarthria, other cerebellar signs and autonomic involvement in vast majority. There were features of basal ganglia involvement in some. No known identifiable environmental cause was found and genetically they are quite distinct from the known autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias though sporadic occurrence in recessive inheritance or a de novo mutation could not be ruled out completely, but it is unlikely.

  8. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Solanki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis.

  9. Cerebellar deficits and hyperactivity in mice lacking Smad4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong-Xing; Zhao, Mingrui; Li, Dan; Shimazu, Kazuhiro; Sakata, Kazuko; Deng, Chu-Xia; Lu, Bai

    2003-10-24

    Smad4 is a central mediator of TGF-beta signals, which are known to play essential roles in many biological processes. Using a Cre-loxP approach to overcome early embryonic lethality, we have studied functions of TGF-beta/Smad4 signals in the central nervous system (CNS). No obvious deficits were detected in mice carrying the targeted disruption of Smad4 in the CNS. The overall morphology of the hippocampus appeared normal. There was no change in the proliferation of neuronal precursor cells, nor in several forms of synaptic plasticity. In contrast, deletion of Smad4 resulted in a marked decrease in the number of cerebellar Purkinje cells and parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Accompanied by the abnormality in the cerebellum, mutant mice also exhibited significantly increased vertical activity. Thus, our study reveals an unexpected role for Smad4 in cerebellar development and in the control of motor function.

  10. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis demonstrated by SPECT in hemiplegic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Nara, Takahiro; Nozaki, Hidetsugu; Fukushima, Kiyomi (Saitama Children' s Medical Center, Iwatsuki (Japan)); Imai, Masayuki; Kumagai, Koumei; Maekawa, Kihei

    1991-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) in twenty five children with hemiplegia were studied using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-I-123-iodoamphetamine. Seven of twenty-five patients had cerebral palsy, and the others were impaired by acquired brain injury between ten months and fourteen years of age. CCD was demonstrated in five patients (20%), who were impaired by acquired brain injury after seven years of age. CCD could never be detected in patients with cerebral palsy. Ipsilateral cerebellar diaschisis was also demonstrated in two patients with cerebral palsy and three with early acquired brain injury before three years of age. It is suggested that diaschisis presents itself as a different form in a contralateral and ipsilateral cerebellum before three years of age from a form which presents after seven years of age. (author).

  11. Abnormal ocular motility with brainstem and cerebellar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlow, T J; Bicknell, J M

    1978-01-01

    The disorders of ocular motility seen in association with brainstem or cerebellar disorders may point to rather specific anatomical or pathological correlations. Pontine gaze palsy reflects involvement of the pontine paramedian reticular formation. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia signifies a lesion in the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Skew deviation may result from a lesion anywhere in the posterior fossa. Ocular bobbing typically results from a pontine lesion. The Sylvian aqueduct syndrome is characteristic of involvement in the upper midbrain-pretectal region, usually a pinealoma. Cerebellar lesions may be manifested by gaze paresis, skew deviation, disturbances of saccadic or smooth pursuit movements, ocular myoclonus, or several characteristic forms of nystagmus. Familiarity with these disorders may be of great help to the physician dealing with a patient with a possible posterior fossa lesion.

  12. Correlation between vestibular habituation and postural recovery in cerebellar patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, H; Caffa, C; Macadar, O

    1992-01-01

    Vestibular habituation was studied in normal subjects and in patients with cerebellar disease using a stimulation paradigm proposed in this paper. Six caloric stimuli were repeated daily in the same ear during six days and electronystagmographic responses at the beginning and the end of that period were compared. The normal behaviour was a clear reduction of the response across time. Two groups of cerebellar patients were identified by their ability to recover from positional imbalance after treatment. Compensated patients responded to repeated caloric stimulation in the same way as normal subjects. Conversely, uncompensated patients increased their response after the stimulation paradigm. The role played by the cerebellum in vestibular plasticity is discussed together with the observed correlation between vestibular habituation and the ability for postural recovery to occur.

  13. Cerebellar damage impairs internal predictions for sensory and motor function

    OpenAIRE

    Therrien, Amanda S.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is connected to cerebral areas that subserve a range of sensory and motor functions. In this review, we summarize new literature demonstrating deficits in visual perception, proprioception, motor control, and motor learning performance following cerebellar damage. In particular, we highlight novel results that together suggest a general role of the cerebellum in estimating and predicting movement dynamics of the body and environmental stimuli. These findings agree with the hypo...

  14. Hereditary lissencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in Churra lambs

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Pérez, Valentín; Suárez-Vega, Aroa; Fuertes, M.; Benavides, Julio; Delgado, L.; Ferreras, Mª del Carmen; Arranz, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Lissencephaly is a rare developmental brain disorder in veterinary and human medicine associated with defects in neuronal migration leading to a characteristic marked reduction or absence of the convolutional pattern of the cerebral hemispheres. In many human cases the disease has a genetic basis. In sheep, brain malformations, mainly cerebellar hypoplasia and forms of hydrocephalus, are frequently due to in utero viral infections. Although breed-related malformations of t...

  15. Degenerative cerebellar diseases and differential diagnoses; Degenerative Kleinhirnerkrankungen und Differenzialdiagnosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reith, W.; Roumia, S.; Dietrich, P. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Cerebellar syndromes result in distinct clinical symptoms, such as ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, intention tremor and eye movement disorders. In addition to the medical history and clinical examination, imaging is particularly important to differentiate other diseases, such as hydrocephalus and multi-infarct dementia from degenerative cerebellar diseases. Degenerative diseases with cerebellar involvement include Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy as well as other diseases including spinocerebellar ataxia. In addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging investigations are also helpful for the differentiation. Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted sequences can sometimes show a signal increase in the pons as a sign of degeneration of pontine neurons and transverse fibers in the basilar part of the pons. The imaging is particularly necessary to exclude other diseases, such as normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), multi-infarct dementia and cerebellar lesions. (orig.) [German] Klinisch imponieren Kleinhirnsyndrome durch Ataxie, Dysarthrie, Dysmetrie, Intentionstremor und Augenbewegungsstoerungen. Neben der Anamnese und klinischen Untersuchung ist die Bildgebung v. a. wichtig um andere Erkrankungen wie Hydrozephalus und Multiinfarktdemenz von degenerativen Kleinhirnerkrankungen zu differenzieren. Zu den degenerativen Erkrankungen mit Kleinhirnbeteiligung gehoeren der Morbus Parkinson, die Multisystematrophie sowie weitere Erkrankungen einschliesslich der spinozerebellaeren Ataxien. Neben der MRT sind auch nuklearmedizinische Untersuchungen zur Differenzierung hilfreich. Axiale Fluid-attenuated-inversion-recovery(FLAIR)- und T2-gewichtete Sequenzen koennen mitunter eine Signalsteigerung im Pons als Ausdruck einer Degeneration der pontinen Neuronen und transversalen Bahnen im Brueckenfuss zeigen. Die Bildgebung ist aber v. a. notwendig, um andere Erkrankungen wie Normaldruckhydrozephalus

  16. Acute cerebellar ataxia: A neurological manifestation in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddametla Shravan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the bite of an infected female anopheles mosquito presents with varied clinical manifestations. Neurological manifestations include headaches, confusion, convulsions, hemiplegia, ataxia, cerebral palsy, cortical blindness, and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. We are presenting a case report of acute cerebellar ataxia in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with fever and positive for Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria antibodies.

  17. Phenytoin-induced cerebellar atrophy in an epileptic boy

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    Nithin Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is an important health problem due to its high prevalence and potential for causing long-term morbidity. It is commonly treated in children with phenytoin sodium. It has wide pharmacokinetic variability and a narrow therapeutic range that leads to toxicity. Here, we report a case of phenytoin-induced cerebellar atrophy in a 16-year-old epileptic boy who presented to the hospital with a viral infection.

  18. Successful treatment of isolated cerebellar cysticercosis with albendazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱利平; 石尧忠; 潘孝彰; 莫凌; 翁心华

    2003-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic disease of the central nervous system (CNS) found world-wide.1 NCC is the most common cause of parasitic infection of CNS in China. Patients with NCC are treated successfully with chemotherapy. However, isolated cystic lesions sited in the cerebellum are usually treated by direct surgical excision as a primary therapeutic modality.2 We present here a case of isolated cerebellar vermis cysticercosis successfully treated with albendazole.

  19. Patterns of regional cerebellar atrophy in genetic frontotemporal dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Bocchetta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: There appears to be a differential pattern of cerebellar atrophy in the major genetic forms of FTD, being relatively spared in GRN, localized to the lobule VIIa-Crus I in the superior-posterior region of the cerebellum in C9orf72, the area connected via the thalamus to the prefrontal cortex and involved in cognitive function, and localized to the vermis in MAPT, the ‘limbic cerebellum’ involved in emotional processing.

  20. Cerebellar Herniation after Lumbar Puncture in Galactosemic Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Kalay

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral edema resulting in elevated intracranial pressure is a well-known complication of galactosemia. Lumbar puncture was performed for the diagnosis of clinically suspected bacterial meningitis. Herniation of cerebral tissue through the foramen magnum is not a common problem in neonatal intensive care units because of the open fontanelle in infants. We present the case of a 3-week-old infant with galactosemia who presented with signs of cerebellar herniation after lumbar puncture.

  1. [Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Juan Oscar Alarcón; de Andrade, Guilherme Cabral

    2002-12-01

    The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA) syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  2. Distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Francisco Salomão

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 7-year-old boy presenting with recurrent episodes of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm (PICA, successfully operated, is reported.' The low incidence of intracranial aneurysms in the first decade of life and the rare occurrence of distal PICA aneurysms are unusual features of this case. The theories regarding the origin of intracranial berry aneurysms are discussed.

  3. Patient adaptable cerebellar retractor system: Use in posterior fossa surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Borghei-Razavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new patient adaptable dual use soft tissue spreader and cerebellar retractor system designed for use during surgery of the posterior fossa is described. We found that this new retractor design allowed for excellent exposure, plus greater freedom and dexterity during the posterior fossa surgery. This novel instrument is an improvement over the existing instrument, because it provided more force/power transmission from pins/connectors to the brain spatula via the shorter flexible arm.

  4. Control of Spike Transfer at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses In Vivo by GABAA and GABAB Receptor-Mediated Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Stefano; Griguoli, Marilena; Malézieux, Meryl; Grosjean, Noëlle; Carta, Mario; Mulle, Christophe

    2017-01-18

    Despite extensive studies in hippocampal slices and incentive from computational theories, the synaptic mechanisms underlying information transfer at mossy fiber (mf) connections between the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 neurons in vivo are still elusive. Here we used an optogenetic approach in mice to selectively target and control the activity of DG granule cells (GCs) while performing whole-cell and juxtacellular recordings of CA3 neurons in vivo In CA3 pyramidal cells (PCs), mf-CA3 synaptic responses consisted predominantly of an IPSP at low stimulation frequency (0.05 Hz). Upon increasing the frequency of stimulation, a biphasic response was observed consisting of a brief mf EPSP followed by an inhibitory response lasting on the order of 100 ms. Spike transfer at DG-CA3 interneurons recorded in the juxtacellular mode was efficient at low presynaptic stimulation frequency and appeared insensitive to an increased frequency of GC activity. Overall, this resulted in a robust and slow feedforward inhibition of spike transfer at mf-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. Short-term plasticity of EPSPs with increasing frequency of presynaptic activity allowed inhibition to be overcome to reach spike discharge in CA3 PCs. Whereas the activation of GABAA receptors was responsible for the direct inhibition of light-evoked spike responses, the slow inhibition of spiking activity required the activation of GABAB receptors in CA3 PCs. The slow inhibitory response defined an optimum frequency of presynaptic activity for spike transfer at ∼10 Hz. Altogether these properties define the temporal rules for efficient information transfer at DG-CA3 synaptic connections in the intact circuit.

  5. Ectopic growth of hippocampal mossy fibers in a mutated GAP-43 transgenic mouse with impaired spatial memory retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, Matthew R; Honegger, Kyle S; Routtenberg, Aryeh

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study, it was shown that transgenic mice, designated G-NonP, forget the location of a water maze hidden platform when tested 7 days after the last training day (Holahan and Routtenberg (2008) Hippocampus 18:1099-1102). The memory loss in G-NonP mice might be related to altered hippocampal architecture suggested by the fact that in the rat, 7 days after water maze training, there is discernible mossy fiber (MF) growth (Holahan et al. (2006) Hippocampus 16:560-570; Rekart et al. (2007) Learn Mem 14:416-421). In the present report, we studied the distribution of the MF system within the hippocampus of naïve, untrained, G-NonP mouse. In WT mice, the MF projection was restricted to the stratum lucidum of CA3 with no detectable MF innervation in distal stratum oriens (dSO). In G-NonP mice, in contrast, there was an ectopic projection terminating in the CA3 dSO. Unexpectedly, there was nearly a complete loss of immunostaining for the axonal marker Tau1 in the G-NonP transgenic mice in the MF terminal fields indicating that transgenesis itself leads to off-target consequences (Routtenberg (1996) Trends Neurosci 19:471-472). Because transgenic mice overexpressing nonmutated, wild type GAP-43 do not show this ectopic growth (Rekart et al., in press) and the G-NonP mice overexpress a mutated form of GAP-43 precluding its phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC), the possibility exists that permanently dephosphorylated GAP-43 disrupts normal axonal fasciculation which gives rise to the ectopic growth into dSO.

  6. Potential implications of a monosynaptic pathway from mossy cells to adult-born granule cells of the dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eScharfman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus (DG is important to many aspects of hippocampal function, but there are many aspects of the DG that are incompletely understood. One example is the role of mossy cells (MCs, a major DG cell type that is glutamatergic and innervates the primary output cells of the DG, the granule cells (GCs. MCs innervate the GCs as well as local circuit neurons that make GABAergic synapses on GCs, so the net effect of MCs on GCs - and therefore the output of the DG - is unclear.Here we first review fundamental information about MCs and the current hypotheses for their role in the normal DG and in diseases that involve the DG. Then we review previously published data which suggest that MCs are a source of input to a subset of GCs that are born in adulthood (adult-born GCs. In addition, we discuss the evidence that adult-born GCs may support the normal inhibitory 'gate' functions of the DG, where the GCs are a filter or gate for information from the entorhinal cortical input to area CA3. The implications are then discussed in the context of seizures and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. In TLE, it has been suggested that the DG inhibitory gate is weak or broken and MC loss leads to insufficient activation of inhibitory neurons, causing hyperexcitability. That idea was called the dormant basket cell hypothesis. Recent data suggest that loss of normal adult-born GCs may also cause disinhibition, and seizure susceptibility. Therefore, we propose a reconsideration of the dormant basket cell hypothesis with an intervening adult-born GC between the MC and basket cell and call this hypothesis the dormant immature granule cell hypothesis.

  7. Lovastatin modulates glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathway and inhibits mossy fiber sprouting after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

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    Chun-Yao Lee

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to assay the effect of lovastatin on the glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β and collapsin responsive mediator protein-2 (CRMP-2 signaling pathway and mossy fiber sprouting (MFS in epileptic rats. MFS in the dentate gyrus (DG is an important feature of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and is highly related to the severity and the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures. However, the molecular mechanism of MFS is mostly unknown. GSK-3β and CRMP-2 are the genes responsible for axonal growth and neuronal polarity in the hippocampus, therefore this pathway is a potential target to investigate MFS. Pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus animal model was taken as our researching material. Western blot, histological and electrophysiological techniques were used as the studying tools. The results showed that the expression level of GSK-3β and CRMP-2 were elevated after seizure induction, and the administration of lovastatin reversed this effect and significantly reduced the extent of MFS in both DG and CA3 region in the hippocampus. The alteration of expression level of GSK-3β and CRMP-2 after seizure induction proposes that GSK-3β and CRMP-2 are crucial for MFS and epiletogenesis. The fact that lovastatin reversed the expression level of GSK-3β and CRMP-2 indicated that GSK-3β and CRMP-2 are possible to be a novel mechanism of lovatstain to suppress MFS and revealed a new therapeutic target and researching direction for studying the mechanism of MFS and epileptogenesis.

  8. Successfull management of a life threatening cerebellar haemorrhage following spine surgery - a case report -.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Belaïd, Hayat; Aldea, Sorin

    2009-06-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhages are rare life-threatening complications following spine surgery that present challenges for their diagnostic and their therapeutic management. Their patho-physiology remains unclear.We report a case of a life-threatening cerebellar haemorrhage secondary to an occult dural tear following a planned L5-S1 laminectomy. The patient was treated with emergent external ventriculostomy following by a posterior fossa decompressive craniectomy. Cerebellar haemorrhages have to be suspected systematically when unexpected neurological signs occur after spine surgery since their rapid management lead to favourable outcomes. The present imaging findings allow us proposing that cerebellar haemorrhages result primarily from superior cerebellar venous stretching and tearing, and that cerebellar infarction and swelling occur secondarily.

  9. The effect of fibre content, fibre size and alkali treatment to Charpy impact resistance of Oil Palm fibre reinforced composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri, Muhamad; Mahzan, Shahruddin

    2016-11-01

    In this research, the effect of fibre content, fibre size and alkali treatment to the impact resistance of the composite material have been investigated, The composite material employs oil palm fibre as the reinforcement material whereas the matrix used for the composite materials are polypropylene. The Oil Palm fibres are prepared for two conditions: alkali treated fibres and untreated fibres. The fibre sizes are varied in three sizes: 5mm, 7mm and 10mm. During the composite material preparation, the fibre contents also have been varied into 3 different percentages: 5%, 7% and 10%. The statistical approach is used to optimise the variation of specimen determined by using Taguchi method. The results were analyzed also by the Taguchi method and shows that the Oil Palm fibre content is significantly affect the impact resistance of the polymer matrix composite. However, the fibre size is moderately affecting the impact resistance, whereas the fibre treatment is insignificant to the impact resistance of the oil palm fibre reinforced polymer matrix composite.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of cerebellar ataxias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Takase, Sadao; Mochizuki, Hiroshi; Kogure, Kyuya; Yamada, Kenji; Hishinuma, Takashi; Matsuzawa, Taiju.

    1987-11-01

    Radiological evaluation in order to quantitatively analyse the size of structures in the posterior fossa using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in the patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD). The subjects consisted of 17 patients including 11 OPCA (olivopontocerebellar atrophy)-type and 6 LCCA (late cortical cerebellar atrophy)-type SCD patients, and their disease was in the initial phase. Using a mid-line sagittal view, quantitative measurements of the cerebellum, pons and the medulla oblongata were performed. In the OPCA-type SCD patients, the area, and the longitudinal and anteroposterior diameters of the cerebellar vermis, the area and the anteroposterior diameter of the pons, the height of the fourth ventricle, and the anteroposterior diameter of the medulla oblongata were significantly smaller than those of normal subjects. In the LCCA-type SCD patients, only the area and the anteroposterior diameter of the cerebellar vermis were smaller than those of the normal. As a result, MRI is useful in the diagnosis of SCD, and in the differential diagnosis between the OPCA-type and the LCCA-type SCDs.

  11. Behavior modification after inactivation of cerebellar dentate nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Todd C; Villatoro, Lee; Arneson, Tom; Ahuja, Brittany; Voss, Stephanie; Swain, Rodney A

    2012-08-01

    Effort-based decision making occurs when subjects are given a choice between a reward available at a high response cost and a reward available at a low response cost and is altered in individuals with disorders such as autism or particular patterns of brain injury. The current study explored the relationship between effort-based decision making and reinforcement characteristics in the T maze. This was done using both normal animals and animals with bilateral inactivation of the cerebellar dentate nuclei. Rats chose between alternatives in which one arm contained high-density reinforcement (HR) and the other arm contained low-density reinforcement (LR). During training, the HR arm was obstructed and the point at which the animal no longer worked for reinforcement (breaking point) was determined. The cerebellar dentate nuclei were then transiently inactivated and once again breaking points were assessed. The results indicated that inactivation of the dentate nucleus disrupted effort-based decision making. Additionally, altering both the palatability and the magnitude of the reinforcement were assessed in an attempt to reestablish the original preinactivation breaking point. It was hypothesized that an increase in the strength or magnitude of the reinforcement would promote an increase in the breaking point of the animal even when the cerebellum was inactivated. The results indicated that with both strategies animals effectively reestablished original breaking points. The results of this study will inform the current literature regarding the modification of behavior after brain injury and further the understanding of the behavioral deficits associated with cerebellar dysfunction.

  12. β-Catenin is critical for cerebellar foliation and lamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wen

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has a conserved foliation pattern and a well-organized layered structure. The process of foliation and lamination begins around birth. β-catenin is a downstream molecule of Wnt signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in tissue organization. Lack of β-catenin at early embryonic stages leads to either prenatal or neonatal death, therefore it has been difficult to resolve its role in cerebellar foliation and lamination. Here we used GFAP-Cre to ablate β-catenin in neuronal cells of the cerebellum after embryonic day 12.5, and found an unexpected role of β-catenin in determination of the foliation pattern. In the mutant mice, the positions of fissure formation were changed, and the meninges were improperly incorporated into fissures. At later stages, some lobules were formed by Purkinje cells remaining in deep regions of the cerebellum and the laminar structure was dramatically altered. Our results suggest that β-catenin is critical for cerebellar foliation and lamination. We also found a non cell-autonomous role of β-catenin in some developmental properties of major cerebellar cell types during specific stages.

  13. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice.

  14. Sustained Reduction of Cerebellar Activity in Experimental Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Rijkers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental evidence suggests a role for the cerebellum in seizure control, while no data are available on cerebellar activity between seizures. We hypothesized that interictal regional activity of the deep cerebellar nuclei is reduced in epilepsy and tested this in an animal model by using ΔFosB and cytochrome oxidase (COX (immunohistochemistry. The expression of these two markers of neuronal activity was analysed in the dentate nucleus (DN, interpositus nucleus (IN, and fastigial nucleus (FN of the cerebellum of fully amygdala kindled rats that were sacrificed 48 hours after their last seizure. The DN and FN of kindled rats exhibited 25 to 29% less ΔFosB immunopositive cells than their respective counterpart in sham controls (P<0.05. COX expression in the DN and FN of kindled animals was reduced by 32 to 33% compared to respective control values (P<0.05. These results indicate that an epileptogenic state is characterized by decreased activity of deep cerebellar nuclei, especially the DN and FN. Possible consequences may include a decreased activation of the thalamus, contributing to further seizure spread. Restoration of FN activity by low frequency electrical stimulation is suggested as a possible treatment option in chronic epilepsy.

  15. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibodies - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Anand; Opal, Puneet

    2016-08-01

    The ataxic syndrome associated with Anti-Yo antibody, or Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA1), is the most common variant of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The typical presentation involves the subacute development of pancerebellar deficits with a clinical plateau within 6 months. The vast majority of cases have been reported in women with pelvic or breast tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is often normal in the early stages, with cerebellar atrophy seen later. The underlying mechanism is believed to be an immunological reaction to cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2 (CDR2), a protein usually found in the cerebellum that is ectopically produced by tumor cells. Although both B- and T-cell abnormalities are seen, there is debate about the relative importance of the autoantibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the neuronal loss. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities, primarily elevated protein, lymphocytic pleocytosis, and oligoclonal bands, are common in the early stages. The low prevalence of this condition has not allowed for large-scale randomized controlled trials. Immunotherapies, such as steroids, intravenous immune globulins, and plasma exchange, have been extensively used in managing this condition, with limited success. Although some reports indicate benefit from antitumor therapies like surgery and chemotherapy, this has not been consistently observed. The prognosis for anti-Yo PCD is almost uniformly poor, with most patients left bedridden. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology and provide evidence-based treatment options.

  16. The Changeable Nervous System: Studies On Neuroplasticity In Cerebellar Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seil, Fredrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Circuit reorganization after injury was studied in a cerebellar culture model. When cerebellar cultures derived from newborn mice were exposed at explantation to a preparation of cytosine arabinoside that destroyed granule cells and oligodendrocytes and compromised astrocytes, Purkinje cells surviving in greater than usual numbers were unensheathed by astrocytic processes and received twice the control number of inhibitory axosomatic synapses. Purkinje cell axon collaterals sprouted and many of their terminals formed heterotypical synapses with other Purkinje cell dendritic spines. The resulting circuit reorganization preserved inhibition in the cerebellar cortex. Following this reorganization, replacement of the missing granule cells and glia was followed by a restitution of the normal circuitry. Most of these developmental and reconstructive changes were not dependent on neuronal activity, the major exception being inhibitory synaptogenesis. The full complement of inhibitory synapses did not develop in the absence of neuronal activity, which could be mitigated by application of exogenous TrkB receptor ligands. Inhibitory synaptogenesis could also be promoted by activity-induced release of endogenous TrkB receptor ligands or by antibody activation of the TrkB receptor. PMID:24933693

  17. Inpatient Rehabilitation Performance of Patients with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jack B.; Raj, Vishwa S.; Asher, Arash; Lee, Jay; Guo, Ying; Konzen, Benedict S.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional improvement of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Design Retrospective Review Setting Three tertiary referral based hospitals. Interventions Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, laboratory, medical and functional data. Main Outcome Measure Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Participants Cancer rehabilitation inpatients admitted to three different cancer centers with a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (n=7). Results All 7 patients were white females. Median age was 62. Primary cancers included ovarian carcinoma (2), small cell lung cancer (2), uterine carcinoma (2), and invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Mean admission total FIM score was 61.0 (SD=23.97). Mean discharge total FIM score was 73.6 (SD=29.35). The mean change in total FIM score was 12.6 (p=.0018). The mean length of rehabilitation stay was 17.1 days. The mean total FIM efficiency was 0.73. 5/7 (71%) patients were discharged home. 1/7 (14%) was discharged to a nursing home. 1/7 (14%) transferred to the primary acute care service. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the functional performance of a group of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Despite the poor neurologic prognosis associated with this syndrome, these patients made significant functional improvements on inpatient rehabilitation. When appropriate, inpatient rehabilitation should be considered. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:25051460

  18. Morphology and biomechanical properties of cerebellar arteries in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Fomkina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal was to analyze the variability of a number of morphometric and biomechanical parameters of cerebellar arteries in adults aged 20-74 years. Material and Methods ― 179 samples of cerebellar arteries, obtained by autopsy of adults without acute cerebrovascular pathology have been studied; 24 preparations of arterial complexes «arterial circle – cerebral arteries» from scientific collection of Human Anatomy Department of Saratov State Medical University (Saratov, Russia have been also investigated. Research methods were: preparation, microscopy, experiments on uniaxial longitudinal stretching at a tensile testing machine Tira Test 28005 (TIRA GmbH, Germany. We studied outer diameter, angle of divergence, overall strength and maximal relative deformation of superior (SCA, anterior inferior (AICA and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries (PICA. Results and Conclusion ― It was revealed that SCA was characterized by the largest diameter and angle of divergence, the most strength and extensibility. AICA and PICA had no significant differences of the studied parameters. It was noted that AICA originated in the lower third part of basilar artery 1.5 times more likely than in the middle third part of this artery.

  19. Magnesium Coated Bioresorbable Phosphate Glass Fibres: Investigation of the Interface between Fibre and Polyester Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioresorbable phosphate glass fibre reinforced polyester composites have been investigated as replacement for some traditional metallic orthopaedic implants, such as bone fracture fixation plates. However, composites tested revealed loss of the interfacial integrity after immersion within aqueous media which resulted in rapid loss of mechanical properties. Physical modification of fibres to change fibre surface morphology has been shown to be an effective method to improve fibre and matrix adhesion in composites. In this study, biodegradable magnesium which would gradually degrade to Mg2+ in the human body was deposited via magnetron sputtering onto bioresorbable phosphate glass fibres to obtain roughened fibre surfaces. Fibre surface morphology after coating was observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM. The roughness profile and crystalline texture of the coatings were determined via atomic force microscope (AFM and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, respectively. The roughness of the coatings was seen to increase from 40±1 nm to 80±1 nm. The mechanical properties (tensile strength and modulus of fibre with coatings decreased with increased magnesium coating thickness.

  20. Hybrid RSOA and fibre raman amplified long reach feeder link for WiMAX-on-fibre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaya Fernández, Ferney Orlando; Martinez, Javier; Yu, Xianbin;

    2009-01-01

    A distributed fibre Raman amplified long reach optical access feeder link using a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier in the remote base station is experimentally demonstrated for supporting WiMAXover- fibre transmission. The measured values for the error vector magnitude for quadrature ph...

  1. Estimation of Single-fibre Tensile Properties from the Bundle Tensile Curve of Polyester Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于伟东

    2004-01-01

    Fibre bundle tensile curves can be used to characterise fibre processing properties and end-use performance directly and to predict single-fibre properties in theory. In this paper, the tensile behaviour of polyester fibre-bundles has been analysed in characteristic values and diagramming. The characteristic distributions which include the symmetry distribution on right part, SRBS′ (e), on left part, SLBS′(e) and the curve on base-line modification, MBS′ (e),based on the modulus distribution, BS′ (e), as well as the frequency density function of broken fibres, B′ (e), have been derived from the tail of bundle tensile curves. The theoretical and measured results show that the most important curves are MBS′ ( e ) and B′ ( e ) and can be used to estimate the breaking-extension distribution of single fibres. Especially for MBS′(e), the modulus distribution can accurately characterize single-fibre tensile properties and is no limitation as the calculation of B′(e) because the bundle specific stress Y(e) of no fibre breaking at extension e should be found at first.

  2. Strength Evaluation of Steel-Nylon Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maniram Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available When fibres like steel, glass, polypropylene, nylon, carbon, aramid, polyester, jute, etc are mixed with concrete known as fibre reinforced concrete. To overcome the deficiencies of concrete; fibres are added to improve the performance of concrete. In this research hybrid reinforced concrete is made by using steel and nylon 6 fibres. The inclusion of both steel and nylon 6 fibres are used in order to combine the benefits of both fibers; structural improvements provided by steel fibers and the resistance to plastic shrinkage improvements provided by nylon fibers. So the aim of this project is to investigate the mechanical properties (compressive strength, flexure strength and split tensile strength of hybrid fiber reinforced concrete under compression, flexure & tension. The total volume of fibre was taken 0.75 % of total volume of concrete. In this experimental work, four different concrete mix proportions were casted with fibres and one mix without fibres. Four different mix combinations of steel- nylon 6 fibres were 100-00%, 75-25%, 50-50% and 25-75%. Superplasticizer was used in all mixes to make concrete more workable. The results shown that compressive, split tensile and flexural strength of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete increase by increasing quantity of steel and nylon 6 fibres. The increase in compressive and tensile strength due to incorporation of steel fibre is greater than that of using nylon fibre. For the nylon 6 fibres, adding more fibres into the concrete has a limited improvement on splitting tensile strength. Inclusion of nylon 6 fibres along with steel fibres results in considerable improvement in flexural strength as compared to solo steel fibre.

  3. D fibre antenna for microcellular communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatti, Ajaz

    2003-07-01

    Over the years, optical fibre sensors have been developed for many application areas. With the recent growth of microcellular communication systems this area has great economic potential. Therefore with this in mind one promising application for a new optical fibre sensor system is in the detection of Radio Frequency/Electric Fields (RF/EF). By constructing such a sensor from totally dielectric materials, it could be used as an antenna for receiving radio frequency transmissions without distorting or disturbing the field lines since there are no metallic components to reflect or transmit radio frequency energy. One of the key issues in the realisation of Radio-over-Fibre (RoF) architecture is the development of an effective means of generating and transmitting the radio subcarrier. The simplest method for the optical generation of radio signals, for transmission through an optical network is to directly modulate the light source with the received RF signal. Direct modulation of the laser can lead to a number of problems such as relative intensity noise (RIN), chirp and intermodulation distortion (IMD). A novel approach as described in this thesis, for generating an externally modulated optical signal would be to use an optical antenna comprising of a piezoelectric polymer coated D-fibre configured within a Mach-Zehnder interferometer to phase modulate the lightwave with a received RF electrical signal. One of the primary advantages of the D-fibre antenna over conventional antennae is its ability to serve a dual purpose. First it can be used to directly detect the RF signal, and secondly it provides a convenient means for modulating the light within the fibre thus bypassing the need for directly modulating the laser. The work presented in this thesis forms a comprehensive study on the design and modelling of a novel all-optical antenna using D-shaped optical fibre for use in next generation RoF networks. For the first time Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used

  4. Study of the behaviour of the fibre Bragg grating fabricated with cladding mode suppression fibre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新华; 吕昌贵; 崔一平

    2003-01-01

    One effective method for suppression of coupling from guided optical modes into cladding modes in an optical fibre Bragg grating is to use cladding mode suppression fibre.In this specially engineered fibre,the grating is written into the core and the inner cladding,both of which are photosensitive.A theory is presented in this paper to analyse the spectral characteristics of this kind of gratings.A fibre Bragg grating was experimentally fabricated with this kind of photosensitive fibre(PS-RMS-50 from StockerYale).It is shown both theoretically and experimentally that such gratings exhibit strong suppression of the coupling between core mode and cladding mode.The experimental result is in good agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  5. Polarisation maintaining fibre with pure silica core and two depressed claddings for fibre optic gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatov, A. M.; Kurbatov, R. A.; Voloshin, V. V.; Vorob'ev, I. L.; Kolosovsky, A. O.

    2016-12-01

    Polarisation maintaining (PM) fibre is described with pure silica core and two depressed claddings for fibre optic gyro (FOG) sensing coil. Detailed mathematical simulation is presented by supermodes method, which is extremely necessary for such fibre. Simulation is fulfilled by frequency domain finite difference method (FDFDM), taking into account all details of realistic index profile with stress applying parts, while the leakage/bend loss occur in the region with complex index, surrounding the fibre. Cutoff and small bend loss are theoretically predicted and experimentally measured with excellent agreement between theory and experiment. Polarisation maintaining ability is measured in the form of conventional h-parameter (7.1·10-6 1/m) for 90-μm diameter fibre with birefringence value only 3.9·10-4.

  6. Hemp fibres: Enzymatic effect of microbial processing on fibre bundle structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Liu, Ming; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of microbial pretreatment on hemp fibres were evaluated after microbial retting using the white rot fungi Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Phlebia radiata Cel 26 and water retting. Based on chemical composition, P. radiata Cel 26 showed the highest selectivity for pectin and lignin...... degradation and lowest cellulose loss (14%) resulting in the highest cellulose content (78.4%) for the treated hemp fibres. The pectin and lignin removal after treatment with P. radiata Cel 26 were of the order 82% and 50%, respectively. Aligned epoxy-matrix composites were made from hemp fibres defibrated...... hemp fibres were badly impregnated due to porosity caused by surface impurities such as epidermis and other pectin rich plant cells. The pectin and lignin mainly located in the outer part of the fibres were assumed to be extracted and degraded by pectinase and peroxidase enzymes produced by the fungi....

  7. Effects of Polarization-Maintaining Fibre Degrading on Precision of Fibre Optic Gyroscopes in Radiation Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Wen; LIU De-Wen; LIU Yang; YI Xiao-Su; CONG Lin

    2008-01-01

    @@ In the space environment, the precision of fibre optic gyroscopes (FOGs) degrades because of space radiation.Photonic components of FOGs axe affected by radiation, especially the polaxization-maintaining (PM) fibre coil.In relation to the space radiation environment characteristic, we have carried out a series of radiation experiments on a PM fibre coil with 60Co radiation source at different dose rates. Based on the experimental results, the formula between the PM-fibre loss and radiation dose rata is built, and the relation between the precision of FOG and radiation dose is obtained accordingly. The results strongly show that the precision of our FOG degrades owing to the attenuation of the polarization-maintaining fibre, which provides theoretical foundation for the radiation-resistant design of the FOG.

  8. Fibre Bragg Grating and Long Period Grating Sensors in Polymer Optical Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundalo, Ivan-Lazar

    of applications and pushing the limits. The first part of the work focuses on the fabrication of FBGs in polymer optical fibres. FBGs are a periodic perturbation of the refractive index of the optical fibre core which act as a wavelength specific reflector. The fibres used are made of Polymethyl methacrylate......, strain duration, increasing number of cycles, and it decreases with relaxation duration. For strains up to 0.9%, fast relaxing ΔΛfast range takes no less than 65% of the total strain range. Increase in ΔΛslow due to cyclic straining and relaxing seems to reach an equilibrium value, suggesting that ΔΛslow...... which translates the outside pressure into strain on the fibre. The transducer consisted of a 3Dprinted skeleton through which the fibre is pulled. A latex material is then wrapped around it and all the holes were sealed in order to prevent the air from leaking out. The pod transducer was tested...

  9. SELECTIVE EFFECTS OF DATURA STRAMONIUM ON THE GRANULAR PARALLEL FIBRES AND PURKINJE CELLS OF THE CEREBELLUM IN WISTAR RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Ekanem

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Datura stramonium (DS is a tropical ubiquitous shrub which is often used to increase intoxication in some beverages and is also freely used as a hallucinogen. It is a depressant of the central nervous system, yet commonly smoked in like manner tobacco. The present study investigated changes induced by intoxication with DS on the purkinje cells and parallel fibres of the cerebellum in Wistar rats to further elucidate the effects of this drug on cerebellar structure. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on both male and female Wistar rats (200-250 g. They were placed into three batches and four groups were derived from each batch, with eight animals per group. Ethanolic dried seed extract of DS was diluted in normal saline and administered intraperitoneally (I.P. at a dose of 750mg/kg and given to the treatment groups: once in batch 1, twice in batch 2, twelve hourly and thrice in batch 3, eight hourly per day respectively for 4 weeks, while the control groups received an equivalent of normal saline. The rats were euthanized and sections of the cerebellum were histologically processed in all groups. Silver impregnation stain for degenerating axons and neurons was used to elucidate the actions of DS on purkinje cells and the parallel fibres of the cerebellum. Results: The result of IP administration of DS extract (750 mg/kg given three times daily to the treated rats showed significant histological changes, which included atrophy of the parallel fibres but no significant changes in the purkinje cells of the cerebellum. Conclusions: Intoxication of DS seed as a result of excessive ingestion may have a selective degenerative effect on the parallel fibres of the granule cells of the cerebellum while the purkinje cells are spared; the implication being motor dysfunction.

  10. Microanalytical investigation of fibre-reinforced ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, B.; Grathwohl, G.

    1989-03-01

    Microanalytical investigations have been made on samples of ceramic fibres (SiC fibres, (Nicalon) C fibre coated with TiN) and fibre-reinforced ceramics (SiC-and glass-matrices). High resolution Auger electron spectroscopy (HRAES), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy were employed for these examinations. Analysis was best performed with HRAES on account of its lateral and depth resolution. Some of the problems involved in this technique are discussed e.g. electron beam effects. AES depth profiles of ceramic fibres are reported and compared with the surface analysis of fibres in the composites after being broken in situ.

  11. Voronoi cells, fractal dimensions and fibre composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerscales, J.; Guild, F. J.; Pearce, N. R. L.; Russell, P. M.

    2001-02-01

    The use of fibre-reinforced polymer matrix composite materials is growing at a faster rate than the gross domestic product (GDP) in many countries. An improved understanding of their processing and mechanical behaviour would extend the potential applications of these materials. For unidirectional composites, it is predicted that localized absence of fibres is related to longitudinal compression failure. The use of woven reinforcements permits more effective manufacture than for unidirectional fibres. It has been demonstrated experimentally that compression strengths of woven composites are reduced when fibres are clustered. Summerscales predicted that clustering of fibres would increase the permeability of the reinforcement and hence expedite the processing of these materials. Commercial fabrics are available which employ this concept using flow-enhancing bound tows. The net effect of clustering fibres is to enhance processability whilst reducing the mechanical properties. The effects reported above were qualitative correlations. To improve the design tools for reinforcement fabrics we have sought to quantify the changes in the micro/meso-structure of woven reinforcement fabrics. Gross differences in the appearance of laminate sections are apparent for different weave styles. The use of automated image analysis is essential for the quantification of subtle changes in fabric architecture. This paper considers Voronoi tessellation and fractal dimensions for the quantification of the microstructures of woven fibre-reinforced composites. It reviews our studies in the last decade of the process-property-structure relationships for commercial and experimental fabric reinforcements in an attempt to resolve the processing vs. properties dilemma. A new flow-enhancement concept has been developed which has a reduced impact on laminate mechanical properties.

  12. Latest developments in silica fibre luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D. A.; Abdul S, S. F.; Jafari, S. M.; Alanazi, A. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Amouzad M, G. [University of Malaya, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Lightwave Research Group, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Addul R, H. A.; Mizanur R, A. K. M.; Zubair, H. T.; Begum, M.; Yusoff, Z.; Omar, N. Y. M. [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, 2010 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Maah, M. J. [University of Malaya, Department of Chemistry, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Collin, S. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 OLW Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mat-Sharif, K. A.; Muhd-Yassin, S. Z.; Zulkifli, M. I., E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.uk [Telekom Malaysia Research and Development Sdn Bhd., 63000 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Using tailor made sub-mm diameter doped-silica fibres, we are carrying out luminescence dosimetry studies for a range of situations, including thermoluminescence (Tl)investigations on a liquid alpha source formed of {sup 223}RaCl (the basis of the Bayer Health care product Xofigo), the Tl response to a 62 MeV proton source and Tl response to irradiation from an {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. In regard to the former, in accord with the intrinsic high linear energy transfer (Let) and short path length (<100 um) of the α-particles in calcified tissue, the product is in part intended as a bone-seeking radionuclide for treatment of metastatic cancer, offering high specificity and efficacy. The Tl yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibres has been investigated including for photonic crystal fibre un collapsed, flat fibres and single mode fibres, these systems offering many advantages over conventional passive dosimetry types. In particular, one can mention comparable and even superior sensitivity, an effective atomic number Z{sub eff} of the silica dosimetric material close to that of bone, and the glassy nature of the fibres offering the additional advantage of being able to place such dosimeters directly into liquid environments. Finally we review the use of our tailor made fibres for on-line radioluminescence measurements of radiotherapy beams. The outcome from these various lines of research is expected to inform development of doped fiber radiation dosimeters of versatile utility, ranging from clinical applications through to industrial studies and environmental evaluations. (Author)

  13. Congenital Cerebellar Mixed Germ Cell Tumor Presenting with Hemorrhage in a Newborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Mok; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, So Young; Park, Won Soon; Jang, Yun Sil; Shin, Hyung Jin; Suh, Yeon Lim [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    We report here on a neonate with congenital cerebellar mixed germ cell tumor, and this initially presented as cerebellar hemorrhage. Postnatal cranial ultrasonography revealed an echogenic cerebellar mass that exhibited the signal characteristics of hemorrhage rather than tumor on MR images. The short-term follow-up images also suggested a resolving cerebellar hemorrhage. One month later, the neonate developed vomiting. A second set of MR images demonstrated an enlarged mass that exhibited changed signal intensity at the same site, which suggested a neoplasm. Histological examination after the surgical resection revealed a mixed germ cell tumor.

  14. Metalinguistic deficits in patients with cerebellar dysfunction: empirical support for the dysmetria of thought theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guell, Xavier; Hoche, Franziska; Schmahmann, Jeremy D

    2015-02-01

    The cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) includes disruption of linguistic processing such as verbal fluency, verbal working memory, grammar, and speech perception. We set out to examine linguistic capabilities in patients with cerebellar lesions to determine which domains are spared and which impaired and to evaluate the underlying cognitive structure of these deficits. Forty-four patients with cerebellar disease were compared to 40 healthy controls on the Oral Sentence Production Test (OSPT) which assesses production of sentences with correct syntactic structure and semantic quality. Twenty-five of these cerebellar patients and 25 controls received the Test of Language Competence-Expanded (TLC-E) that assesses metalinguistic ability. The OSPT failed to reveal differences between patients and controls. In contrast, all cerebellar patients were impaired on each of the four TLC-E subtests. Differences between isolated cerebellar and complex cerebrocerebellar patients were nonsignificant. These results confirm and extend prior observations of the TLC-E in patients with cerebellar lesions and suggest three separate but related language impairments following cerebellar dysfunction: (1) disruption in automatic adjustment of intact grammatical and semantic abilities to a linguistic context in sentence production, (2) disruption in automatic adjustment to a linguistic context in sentence interpretation, and (3) disruption of cognitive processes essential for linguistic skills, such as analysis and sequential logical reasoning. These findings are consistent with the unifying framework of the universal cerebellar transform and the dysmetria of thought theory and provide new insights into the nature of the cognitive impairments in patients with the CCAS.

  15. Medical management of cerebellar abscess: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ryan C; Dodson, Sean C; Rosen, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    A large abscess of the posterior fossa often warrants surgical intervention. We report a case of a 50-year-old male presenting with a cerebellar abscess measuring 2.8 cm x 1.6 cm located in the left cerebellar hemisphere at the level of the middle cerebellar peduncle that was treated conservatively and successfully with antibiotics. Therapeutic management options are discussed in regards to this case specifically as well as a review of the literature. This case illustrates the successful medical management of a cerebellar abscess of otogenic origin in an adult, a unique result in terms of abscess size and age of the patient.

  16. Influence of the Testing Gage Length on the Strength, Young's Modulus and Weibull Modulus of Carbon Fibres and Glass Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Claudio Pardini

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibres and glass fibres are reinforcements for advanced composites and the fiber strength is the most influential factor on the strength of the composites. They are essentially brittle and fail with very little reduction in cross section. Composites made with these fibres are characterized by a high strength/density ratio and their properties are intrisically related to their microstructure, i.e., amount and orientation of the fibres, surface treatment, among other factors. Processing parameters have an important role in the fibre mechanical behaviour (strength and modulus. Cracks, voids and impurities in the case of glass fibres and fibrillar misalignments in the case of carbon fibres are created during processing. Such inhomogeneities give rise to an appreciable scatter in properties. The most used statistical tool that deals with this characteristic variability in properties is the Weibull distribution. The present work investigates the influence of the testing gage length on the strength, Young's modulus and Weibull modulus of carbon fibres and glass fibres. The Young's modulus is calculated by two methods: (i ASTM D 3379M, and (ii interaction between testing equipment/specimen The first method resulted in a Young modulus of 183 GPa for carbon fibre, and 76 GPa for glass fibre. The second method gave a Young modulus of 250 GPa for carbon fibre and 50 GPa for glass fibre. These differences revelead differences on how the interaction specimen/testing machine can interfere in the Young modulus calculations. Weibull modulus can be a tool to evaluate the fibre's homogeneity in terms of properties and it is a good quality control parameter during processing. In the range of specimen gage length tested the Weibull modulus for carbon fibre is ~ 3.30 and for glass fibres is ~ 5.65, which indicates that for the batch of fibres tested, the glass fibre is more uniform in properties.

  17. Plant fibre composites - porosity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Thygesen, Anders; Lilholt, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Plant fibre composites contain typically a relatively large amount of porosity which influences their performance. A model, based on a modified rule of mixtures, is presented to include the influence of porosity on the composite stiffness. The model integrates the volumetric composition of the co......Plant fibre composites contain typically a relatively large amount of porosity which influences their performance. A model, based on a modified rule of mixtures, is presented to include the influence of porosity on the composite stiffness. The model integrates the volumetric composition...... of the composites with their mechanical properties. The fibre weight fraction is used as an independent parameter to calculate the complete volumetric composition. A maximum obtainable stiffness of the composites is calculated at a certain transition fibre weight fraction, which is characterised by a best possible...... combination of high fibre volume fraction and low porosity. The model is validated with experimental data from the literature on several types of composites. A stiffness diagram is presented to demonstrate that the calculations can be used for tailoring and design of composites with a given profile...

  18. Dissociation of CA3 pyramidal cells with attached, functional, identified mossy fiber and interneuronal boutons for studying glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Jesús Q; Reyes, Sebastián; Pérez-Guzmán, José A; Elías-Viñas, David; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2012-07-15

    Pyramidal cells of CA3 area receive glutamatergic signals from the mossy fibers (MFs), perforant path and collaterals of other pyramidal cells, as well as GABAergic inputs from interneurons. In hippocampal slices, an extracellular stimulation electrode is often used to activate the MFs, with the disadvantage of possibly activating fibers other than MFs. We set-up a preparation that allows the analysis of the glutamatergic input from identified, giant MF boutons as well as of GABAergic inputs from boutons of interneurons on single CA3 pyramidal cells. Mossy fiber boutons were labeled by exposing hippocampal slices to a zinc-reactive fluorescent dye, or by injecting a fluorescent dye in the granule cell layer and allowing its transport along the MFs to their terminals in CA3 area. After conducting an enzyme-free, mechanical dissociation of CA3 area, we obtained pyramidal cells containing fluorescent, giant MF boutons attached to their apical dendrites, as well as boutons of interneuronal origin. Whole cell recordings were then performed, whereby synaptic responses could be evoked by selective stimulation of the identified boutons. The synaptic currents evoked by stimulation of MF boutons, unlike those evoked by stimulation of interneuronal boutons, underwent strong frequency potentiation and were depressed by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, which are characteristics of transmission of MF origin. Combination of fluorophores can be used to label different tracts/boutons allowing the study of the different characteristics of neurotransmitter release from a variety of sources on single target cells.

  19. One hour of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus is sufficient to develop chronic epilepsy in mice, and is associated with mossy fiber sprouting but not neuronal death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Lin Chen; Hang-Feng Feng; Xue-Xia Mao; Qing Ye; Ling-Hui Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Determining the minimal duration of status epilepticus (SE) that leads to the development of subsequent spontaneous seizures (i.e.,epilepsy) is important,because it provides a critical time-window for seizure intervention and epilepsy prevention.In the present study,male ICR (Imprinting Control Region) mice were injected with pilocarpine to induce acute seizures.SE was terminated by diazepam at 10 min,30 min,1 h,2 h and 4 h after seizure onset.Spontaneous seizures occurred in the 1,2 and 4 h SE groups,and the seizure frequency increased with the prolongation of SE.Similarly,the Morris water maze revealed that the escape latency was significantly increased and the number of target quadrant crossings was markedly decreased in the 1,2 and 4 h SE groups.Robust mossy fiber sprouting was observed in these groups,but not in the 10 or 30 min group.In contrast,Fluoro-Jade B staining revealed significant cell death only in the 4 h SE group.The incidence and frequency of spontaneous seizures were correlated with Timm score (P =0.004) and escape latency (P =0.004).These data suggest that SE longer than one hour results in spontaneous motor seizures and memory deficits,and spontaneous seizures are likely associated with robust mossy fiber sprouting but not neuronal death.

  20. Special Polymer Optical Fibres and Devices for Photonic Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang-Ding Peng

    2003-01-01

    Remarkable progresses have been made in developing special polymer optical fibres and devices for photonic applications in recent years. This presentation will mainly report on the development of electro-optic, photosensitive and photorefractive polymer optical fibres and related devices.