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Sample records for cercopithecidae

  1. Functional anatomy of the calcaneum and talus in Cercopithecinae (Mammalia, Primates, Cercopithecidae

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    Pina, M.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the species of the order Primates exist a huge variety of forms and habitats. This heterogeneity has encouraged the evolution and development of a great number of locomotor adaptations to different environments. Thus, nowadays there are both arboreal and terrestrial groups within the order. The subfamily Cercopithecinae present taxa with both kinds of locomotor behaviours, although the most of them are adapted to a ground life-style. This group probably has an arboreal ancestor and its radiation is relatively recent. Consequently, species belonged to this group present mixed features or sometimes not too much derived ones. Likewise, it is important the fact that the evolutionary history and phylogeny of the group could influence in some characteristics. Both the calcaneum and the talus are two of the largest bones of the foot and are good for inferring the kind of locomotion. For this reason, it has been used these two tarsal bones to study the morphology of eight species of cercopithecines and then deduce functional implications of the kind of locomotion.

    Dentro del orden Primates existe una gran variedad de especies distribuidas a lo largo de hábitats muy diversos. Dicha heterogeneidad ha fomentado la evolución y desarrollo de un gran número de adaptaciones locomotoras a los diferentes ambientes en los que habitan. Así, existen en la actualidad tanto grupos arborícolas como terrestres. La subfamilia Cercopithecinae agrupa una serie de taxones que representan ambos comportamientos locomotores, aunque la mayoría de las especies están adaptadas a una vida en el suelo. Se supone que este grupo desciende de un ancestro arborícola y que su radiación es relativamente reciente. En consecuencia, las especies de este grupo presentan características mixtas o poco derivadas en algunas ocasiones. Asimismo, es importante tener en cuenta la influencia que la herencia filogenética puede tener sobre alguno de estos rasgos. El calcáneo y el astrágalo son dos de los huesos más grandes del pie y ambos son buenos indicadores del tipo de locomoción. Por este motivo, se han utilizado estos dos tarsales para llevar a cabo el estudio de la morfología de ocho especies de cercopitecoideos, de tal manera que luego se ha podido hacer una serie de inferencias funcionales en cuanto al tipo de locomocón de las mismas.

  2. The evolution of molar occlusion in the Cercopithecidae and early Catarrhines.

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    Kay, R F

    1977-03-01

    Those Eocene prosimians which are possible catarrhine ancestors have four blade-like crests on each lower molar. Each crest shears in sequence across two upper molar crests. Occluding crests are concavely curved to hold the foods being sheared. Each of two medial lower molar crests bordering the principal crushing surface shear past single upper molar crests at about the same time the lateral lower molar crests contact the second rank of upper molar crests. Grinding and crushing areas are restricted to hypoconid, trigonid, and protocone surfaces. Oligocene catarrhine molars have increased crushing-grinding capacities and maintained but modify their shearing. As the crushing surface of the protocone expands and a crushing hypocone is added, the "second rank" upper molar shearing crests are functionally reduced. At the same time medial crests are increasingly emphasized so that the total shearing capacity remains virtually unchanged. Marginal shearing blades are straight edged; leading edges of occluding blades are set at different angles to the occlusal plane so that blades contact at only one point at any given time. Early Primates have separate crushing basins surrounded by shearing blades. Catarrhines tend to link explanding crushing surfaces anteroposteriorly into a continuous surface between all molars. A cladistic analysis based on both new and previously recognized characters indicates that: 1. Apidium may be more closely related to Aegyptopithecus than to Parapithecus; 2. cercopithecids are derived from a Parapithecus-related stock; 3. Oreopithecus could equally well have come from an Apidium or Aegyptopithecus stock.

  3. The Lion-tailed Macaque Macaca silenus (Primates: Cercopithecidae: conservation history and status of a flagship species of the tropical rainforests of the Western Ghats, India

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    M. Singh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Lion-tailed Macaque (Macaca silenus is a threatened species inhabiting the rainforests of the Western Ghats mountain range in southern India. Once assessed to be less than a thousand individuals remaining in the wild habitats, the population is now estimated to be between 3000 and 3500 individuals. However, the rainforest habitats of the species are highly fragmented. During the past three decades or less, the population of this species has severely declined due to habitat degradation and illegal hunting in several areas of its occurrence. In situ conservation programs included notification of certain areas as Lion-tailed Macaque conservation regions. Several captive breeding programs have been initiated in order to have a viable captive population of the species. However, the analysis reveals that both in situ and ex situ conservation programs have not achieved the desired success and the species is even more endangered than it was a few decades ago. In this article, we discuss these conservation programs and suggest further measures for effective conservation of Lion-tailed Macaques.

  4. 78 FR 16292 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

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    2013-03-14

    .... Families: Cebidae Cercopithecidae Felidae (does not include jaguar, margay or ocelot) Hominidae Hylobatidae... include jaguar, margay or ocelot) Hominidae Lemuridae Lorisidae Rhinocerotidae Tapiridae...

  5. 78 FR 34118 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

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    2013-06-06

    ... Felidae (does not include Jaguar, Ocelot, or Margay) Hominidae Lemuridae Crocodylidae Species Black... Cercopithecidae Cervidae Cheirogaleidae Daubentoniidae Equidae Felidae (does not include jaguar, margay or...

  6. 78 FR 23286 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

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    2013-04-18

    ... Cervidae Equidae Felidae (does not include jaguar, ocelot or margay) Lemuridae Mustelidae (does not include... period. Families Cercopithecidae Felidae (does not include jaguar, margay or ocelot) Hylobatidae... Bovidae Equidae Felidae (does not include jaguar, margay or ocelot) Hominidae Hylobatidae...

  7. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

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    Sonia eEmperador

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative.Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal.In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, these species also carry a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA.

  8. Systematic morphology and evolutionary anatomy of the autonomic cardiac nervous system in the lesser apes, gibbons (hylobatidae).

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    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Thorington, Richard W; Kunimatsu, Yutaka; Whatton, James F

    2008-08-01

    We examined the morphology of the autonomic cardiac nervous system (ACNS) on 20 sides of 10 gibbons (Hylobatidae) of three genera, and we have inferred the evolution of the anatomy of the primate ACNS. We report the following. (1) Several trivial intraspecific and interspecific variations are present in gibbons, but the general arrangement of the ACNS in gibbons is consistent. (2) Although the parasympathetic vagal cardiac nervous system is extremely consistent, the sympathetic cardiac nervous system, such as the composition of the sympathetic ganglia and the range of origin of the sympathetic cardiac nerves, exhibit topographical differences among primates. (3) The vertebral ganglion, seldom observed in the Old World monkeys (Cercopithecidae), was consistently present in gibbons as well as in humans. (4) There are fewer thoracic ganglia contributing to the cervicothoracic ganglion in humans than in gibbons and in gibbons than in Old World monkeys. (5) The superior cardiac nerve originating from the superior cervical ganglion, rarely observed in Old World monkeys but commonly observed in humans, was present in 13 of 20 sides (65%), mostly on the left. Accordingly, the ACNS morphology exhibits evolutionary changes within the primate lineage. These evolutionary differences between Old World monkeys, gibbons, and humans are most parsimoniously interpreted as resulting from regular changes in the lineages leading from their common ancestor to the extant species that we dissected. They include the reduction in the number of thoracic ganglia contributing to the cervicothoracic ganglion and the expansion of the range of the cardiac nervous origin.

  9. Seed size selection by olive baboons.

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    Kunz, Britta Kerstin; Linsenmair, Karl Eduard

    2008-10-01

    Seed size is an important plant fitness trait that can influence several steps between fruiting and the establishment of a plant's offspring. Seed size varies considerably within many plant species, yet the relevance of the trait for intra-specific fruit choice by primates has received little attention. Primates may select certain seed sizes within a species for a number of reasons, e.g. to decrease indigestible seed load or increase pulp intake per fruit. Olive baboons (Papio anubis, Cercopithecidae) are known to select seed size in unripe and mature pods of Parkia biglobosa (Mimosaceae) differentially, so that pods with small seeds, and an intermediate seed number, contribute most to dispersal by baboons. We tested whether olive baboons likewise select for smaller ripe seeds within each of nine additional fruit species whose fruit pulp baboons commonly consume, and for larger seeds in one species in which baboons feed on the seeds. Species differed in fruit type and seed number per fruit. For five of these species, baboons dispersed seeds that were significantly smaller than seeds extracted manually from randomly collected fresh fruits. In contrast, for three species, baboons swallowed seeds that were significantly longer and/or wider than seeds from fresh fruits. In two species, sizes of ingested seeds and seeds from fresh fruits did not differ significantly. Baboons frequently spat out seeds of Drypetes floribunda (Euphorbiaceae) but not those of other plant species having seeds of equal size. Oral processing of D. floribunda seeds depended on seed size: seeds that were spat out were significantly larger and swallowed seeds smaller, than seeds from randomly collected fresh fruits. We argue that seed size selection in baboons is influenced, among other traits, by the amount of pulp rewarded per fruit relative to seed load, which is likely to vary with fruit and seed shape.

  10. Predomination and New Genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in Captive Nonhuman Primates in Zoos in China: High Genetic Diversity and Zoonotic Significance

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    Karim, Md Robiul; Dong, Haiju; Li, Tongyi; Yu, Fuchang; Li, Dezhong; Zhang, Longxian; Li, Junqiang; Wang, Rongjun; Li, Shouyi; Li, Xiaofeng; Rume, Farzana Islam; Ning, Changshen

    2015-01-01

    To appreciate the genetic diversity and zoonotic implications of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in nonhuman primates (NHPs) in zoos, we genotyped E. bieneusi in captive NHPs in seven zoos located at six major cities in China, using ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-based PCR and sequence analyses. A total of 496 fecal specimens from 36 NHP species under nine families were analyzed and E. bieneusi was detected in 148 (29.8%) specimens of 25 NHP species from six families, including Cercopithecidae (28.7%), Cebidae (38.0%), Aotidae (75.0%), Lemuridae (26.0%), Hylobatidae (50.0%) and Hominidae (16.2%) (P = 0.0605). The infection rates were 29.0%, 15.2%, 18.2%, 37.3%, 29.2%, 37.7% and 44.8% in Shijiazhuang Zoo, Wuhan Zoo, Taiyuan Zoo, Changsha Wild Animal Zoo, Beijing Zoo, Shanghai Zoo and Shanghai Wild Animal Park, respectively (P = 0.0146). A total of 25 ITS genotypes were found: 14 known (D, O, EbpC, EbpA, Type IV, Henan-IV, BEB6, BEB4, Peru8, PigEBITS5, EbpD, CM1, CM4 and CS-1) and 11 new (CM8 to CM18). Genotype D was the most prevalent one (40/148), followed by CM4 (20/148), CM1 (15/148), O (13/148), CM16 (13/148), EbpC (11/148). Of them, genotypes D, EbpC, CM4 and O were widely distributed in NHPs (seen in 9 to 12 species) whereas genotypes CM1 and CM16 were restricted to one to three NHP species. In phylogenetic analysis, 20 genotypes (121/148, 81.8%), excluding genotypes BEB4, BEB6, CM9, CM4 and CM18, belonged to group 1 with zoonotic potential. New genotype CM9 clustered in group 2 with BEB4 and BEB6. The remaining two genotypes CM4 and CM18 formed new cluster (group 9) in between two other genotypic clusters found in primates. The findings of high diversity in E. bieneusi genotypes and their zoonotic potentiality concluded the importance of captive NHPs as reservoir hosts for human microsporidiosis. PMID:25705879

  11. Predomination and new genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in captive nonhuman primates in zoos in China: high genetic diversity and zoonotic significance.

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    Md Robiul Karim

    Full Text Available To appreciate the genetic diversity and zoonotic implications of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in nonhuman primates (NHPs in zoos, we genotyped E. bieneusi in captive NHPs in seven zoos located at six major cities in China, using ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS-based PCR and sequence analyses. A total of 496 fecal specimens from 36 NHP species under nine families were analyzed and E. bieneusi was detected in 148 (29.8% specimens of 25 NHP species from six families, including Cercopithecidae (28.7%, Cebidae (38.0%, Aotidae (75.0%, Lemuridae (26.0%, Hylobatidae (50.0% and Hominidae (16.2% (P = 0.0605. The infection rates were 29.0%, 15.2%, 18.2%, 37.3%, 29.2%, 37.7% and 44.8% in Shijiazhuang Zoo, Wuhan Zoo, Taiyuan Zoo, Changsha Wild Animal Zoo, Beijing Zoo, Shanghai Zoo and Shanghai Wild Animal Park, respectively (P = 0.0146. A total of 25 ITS genotypes were found: 14 known (D, O, EbpC, EbpA, Type IV, Henan-IV, BEB6, BEB4, Peru8, PigEBITS5, EbpD, CM1, CM4 and CS-1 and 11 new (CM8 to CM18. Genotype D was the most prevalent one (40/148, followed by CM4 (20/148, CM1 (15/148, O (13/148, CM16 (13/148, EbpC (11/148. Of them, genotypes D, EbpC, CM4 and O were widely distributed in NHPs (seen in 9 to 12 species whereas genotypes CM1 and CM16 were restricted to one to three NHP species. In phylogenetic analysis, 20 genotypes (121/148, 81.8%, excluding genotypes BEB4, BEB6, CM9, CM4 and CM18, belonged to group 1 with zoonotic potential. New genotype CM9 clustered in group 2 with BEB4 and BEB6. The remaining two genotypes CM4 and CM18 formed new cluster (group 9 in between two other genotypic clusters found in primates. The findings of high diversity in E. bieneusi genotypes and their zoonotic potentiality concluded the importance of captive NHPs as reservoir hosts for human microsporidiosis.

  12. [The first ray of the hand and the foot in the primates (II). Functional anatomy].

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    Kuhlmann, J-N

    2008-08-01

    To study the articular amplitude of the first ray of both hands and feet using passive mobilisation, either on fresh human cadavers or on living primates after anesthesia (namely eight pongidae, 15 cercopithecidae, two platirrhinii, eight lemuroidae, three daubentonidae, two loridae and two galagonidae). Plans slightly parasagittal and parafrontal have been chosen to obtain the maximum dorsal and palmar or plantar inclinations and the maximum lateral and medial inclinations. The pronosupination of the first ray has been evaluated in relation of these plans and alike for the hand of the simian primates on the plan of the concavity and the convexity of trapezial surface. The results have been compared with these obtained in the man. The pronosupination of the first ray, so denominated by analogy with the pronosupination of the fore-arm is the movement which allows the pulp of the thumb or of the hallux to look now forward or now backward in order to be opposed at the other fingers during the pollici- or the hallucidigital pinch. It can be considered like "effective" unless if there is rotation around the longitudinal axis of its metacarpus (or metatarsus). The prosimian primates had great and sensibly similar circular amplitude of their first metacarpus and first metatarsus, which reached more than 90 degrees in all the directions. It allowed a pronosupination of 90 degrees, but this was only "apparent" because it has been obtained by the alone combined action of the two orthogonal axes at the basis of the ray by simple effect of cardan joint. The anthropoids had only limited circular amplitude, not exceeding 45 degrees. It was associated with an "effective" pronosupination according to a longitudinal axis. The rotation reached 90 degrees. It was produced around the point of anchorage made up by the medial ligaments for the trapezometacarpal articulation and the lateral ligaments for the cuneometatarsal. This movement was possible because of the peculiar relief of