WorldWideScience

Sample records for ceramics

  1. Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of abstracts and slides of papers presented at the NASA Lewis Structural Ceramics Workshop. Collectively, these papers depict the scope of NASA Lewis' structural ceramics program. The technical areas include monolithic SiC and Si3N4 development, ceramic matrix composites, tribology, design methodology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), fracture mechanics, and corrosion.

  2. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.)

  3. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  4. Ceramic Methyltrioxorhenium

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, R; Eickerling, G; Helbig, C; Hauf, C; Miller, R; Mayr, F; Krug von Nidda, H A; Scheidt, E W; Scherer, W; Herrmann, Rudolf; Troester, Klaus; Eickerling, Georg; Helbig, Christian; Hauf, Christoph; Miller, Robert; Mayr, Franz; Nidda, Hans-Albrecht Krug von; Scheidt, Ernst-Wilhelm; Scherer, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The metal oxide polymeric methyltrioxorhenium [(CH3)xReO3] is an unique epresentative of a layered inherent conducting organometallic polymer which adopts the structural motifs of classical perovskites in two dimensions (2D) in form of methyl-deficient, corner-sharing ReO5(CH3) octahedra. In order to improve the characteristics of polymeric methyltrioxorhenium with respect to its physical properties and potential usage as an inherentconducting polymer we tried to optimise the synthetic routes of polymeric modifications of 1 to obtain a sintered ceramic material, denoted ceramic MTO. Ceramic MTO formed in a solvent-free synthesis via auto-polymerisation and subsequent sintering processing displays clearly different mechanical and physical properties from polymeric MTO synthesised in aqueous solution. Ceramic MTO is shown to display activated Re-C and Re=O bonds relative to MTO. These electronic and structural characteristics of ceramic MTO are also reflected by a different chemical reactivity compared with its...

  5. Engineering ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bengisu, Murat

    2001-01-01

    This is a comprehensive book applying especially to junior and senior engineering students pursuing Materials Science/ Engineering, Ceramic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering degrees. It is also a reference book for other disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering. Important properties of most engineering ceramics are given in detailed tables. Many current and possible applications of engineering ceramics are described, which can be used as a guide for materials selection and for potential future research. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials, processing properties, characterization and applications of engineering ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  6. Ceramic glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a 2nd edition that contains new terms reflecting advances in high technology applications of ceramic materials. Definitions for terms which materials scientists, engineers, and technicians need to know are included

  7. Tailored ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In polyphase tailored ceramic forms two distinct modes of radionuclide immobilization occur. At high waste loadings the radionuclides are distributed through most of the ceramic phases in dilute solid solution, as indicated schematically in this paper. However, in the case of low waste loadings, or a high loading of a waste with low radionuclide content, the ceramic can be designed with only selected phases containing the radionuclides. The remaining material forms nonradioactive phases which provide a degree of physical microstructural isolation. The research and development work with polyphase ceramic nuclear waste forms over the past ten years is discussed. It has demonstrated the critical attributes which suggest them as a waste form for future HLW disposal. From a safety standpoint, the crystalline phases in the ceramic waste forms offer the potential for demonstrable chemical durability in immobilizing the long-lived radionuclides in a geologic environment. With continued experimental research on pure phases, analysis of mineral analogue behavior in geochemical environments, and the study of radiation effects, realistic predictive models for waste form behavior over geologic time scales are feasible. The ceramic forms extend the degree of freedom for the economic optimization of the waste disposal system

  8. Industrial ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having given the definition of the term 'ceramics', the author describes the different manufacturing processes of these compounds. These materials are particularly used in the fields of 1)petroleum industry (in primary and secondary reforming units, in carbon black reactors and ethylene furnaces). 2)nuclear industry (for instance UO2 and PuO2 as fuels; SiC for encapsulation; boron carbides for control systems..)

  9. Monolithic ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    A development history and current development status evaluation are presented for SiC and Si3N4 monolithic ceramics. In the absence of widely sought improvements in these materials' toughness, and associated reliability in structural applications, uses will remain restricted to components in noncritical, nonman-rated aerospace applications such as cruise missile and drone gas turbine engine components. In such high temperature engine-section components, projected costs lie below those associated with superalloy-based short-life/expendable engines. Advancements are required in processing technology for the sake of fewer and smaller microstructural flaws.

  10. Ceramic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved ceramic compositions useful for cutting tools and the like are described. They are composed of an essentially homogeneous admixture of sintered powders of an aluminum oxide base material with other refractories including zirconium oxide, titanium oxide, hafnium oxide, titanium nitride, zirconium nitride, and tungsten or molybdenum carbide. In addition to their common and improved properties of hardness and strength, many of these compositions may be made by simple cold-pressing and sintering procedures. This avoids the known drawbacks of conventional hot press production

  11. Environmental durability of ceramics and ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Dennis S.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the current understanding of the environmental durability of both monolithic ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites, with a view to the prospective development of methods for the characterization, prediction, and improvement of ceramics' environmental durability. Attention is given to the environmental degradation behaviors of SiC, Si3N4, Al2O3, and glass-ceramic matrix compositions. The focus of corrosion prevention in Si-based ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 is on the high and low sulfur fuel combustion-product effects encountered in heat engine applications of these ceramics; sintering additives and raw material impurities are noted to play a decisive role in ceramics' high temperature environmental response.

  12. Dental ceramics: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Shenoy Arvind; Shenoy Nina

    2010-01-01

    In the last few decades, there have been tremendous advances in the mechanical properties and methods of fabrication of ceramic materials. While porcelain-based materials are still a major component of the market, there have been moves to replace metal ceramics systems with all ceramic systems. Advances in bonding techniques have increased the range and scope for use of ceramics in dentistry. In this brief review, we will discuss advances in ceramic materials and fabrication techniques. Examp...

  13. Dental ceramics: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Arvind

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, there have been tremendous advances in the mechanical properties and methods of fabrication of ceramic materials. While porcelain-based materials are still a major component of the market, there have been moves to replace metal ceramics systems with all ceramic systems. Advances in bonding techniques have increased the range and scope for use of ceramics in dentistry. In this brief review, we will discuss advances in ceramic materials and fabrication techniques. Examples of the microstructure property relationships for these ceramic materials will also be addressed.

  14. Fatigue of dental ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; lawn, brian

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics

  15. Ceramic Laser Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Villalobos; Jasbinder Sanghera; Ishwar Aggarwal; Bryan Sadowski; Jesse Frantz; Colin Baker; Brandon Shaw; Woohong Kim

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers,...

  16. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  17. Antibacterial ceramic for sandbox. Sunabayo kokin ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, K. (Ishizuka Glass Co. Ltd. Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    Sands in sandboxes in parks have been called into question of being contaminated by colon bacilli and spawns from ascarides. This paper introduces an antibacterial ceramic for sandbox developed as a new material effective to help reduce the contamination. The ceramic uses natural sand as the main raw material, which is added with borax and silver to contain silver ions that have bacteria and fungus resistance and deodorizing effect. The ceramic has an average grain size ranging from 0.5 mm to 0.7 mm, and is so devised as to match specific gravity, grain size and shape of the sand, hence no separation and segregation can occur. The result of weatherability and antibacterial strength tests on sand for a sandbox mixed with the ceramic at 1% suggests that its efficacy lasts for about three years. Its actual use is under observation. Its efficacy has been verified in a test that measures a survival factor of spawns from dog ascardides contacted with aqueous solution containing the ceramic at 1%. Safety and sanitation tests have proved the ceramic a highly safe product that conforms to the food sanitation law. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  19. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  20. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  1. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  2. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  3. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  4. Defect production in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si3N4), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed

  5. Defect production in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AlN and Si3N4), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  6. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  7. Industrial ceramics - Properties, forming and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a general introduction to ceramics (definition, general properties, elaboration, applications, market data), this book address conventional ceramics (elaboration, material types), thermo-structural ceramics (oxide based ceramics, non-oxide ceramics, fields of application, functional coatings), refractory ceramics, long fibre and ceramic matrix composites, carbonaceous materials, ceramics used for filtration, catalysis and the environment, ceramics for biomedical applications, ceramics for electronics and electrical engineering (for capacitors, magnetic, piezoelectric, dielectric ceramics, ceramics for hyper-frequency resonators), electrochemical ceramics, transparent ceramics (forming and sintering), glasses, mineral binders. The last chapter addresses ceramics used in the nuclear energy sector: in nuclear fuels and fissile material, absorbing ceramics and shields, in the management of nuclear wastes, new ceramics for reactors under construction or for future nuclear energy

  8. Ceramic Solar Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Solar receiver uses ceramic honeycomb matrix to absorb heat from Sun and transfer it to working fluid at temperatures of 1,095 degrees and 1,650 degrees C. Drives gas turbine engine or provides heat for industrial processes.

  9. Light emitting ceramic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  10. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  11. Reinforcement of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the commercial field, greater reproduceability of ceramic materials was achieved by systematic process control of the steps in manufacture. By improvement of the microstructure design, the strength and toughness against tearing of the materials were increased. The articles give a survey of theoretical and experimental results in manufacture and of the composition of ceramics with reinforced structure. Preferred materials are zirconium-, aluminium- and yttrium oxide, silicon oxide and -nitride and titanium- and silicon carbide. (DG)

  12. Statistic><Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2008-01-01

    Co-organizer for and participant at the exhibition: Statistic><Ceramics The Röhsska Museum of Design and Decorative Arts; Gothenborg 5/2-16/3 2008 Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg 3/4-27/4 2008......Co-organizer for and participant at the exhibition: Statistic><Ceramics The Röhsska Museum of Design and Decorative Arts; Gothenborg 5/2-16/3 2008 Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg 3/4-27/4 2008...

  13. Selecting Ceramics - Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM OF PRESENTATION: To compare a number of materials for extracoronal restoration of teeth with particular reference to CAD-CAM ceramics. CASE DESCRIPTION AND TREATMENT CARRIED OUT: This paper will be illustrated using clinical examples of patients treated using different ceramic restorations to present the advantages and disadvantages and each technique. The different requirements of tooth preparation, impression taking and technical procedures of each system will be presented and compar...

  14. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2007-08-28

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  15. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  16. Piezoelectric Ceramics and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, I.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the piezoelectric effect in ceramics and presents a quantitative representation of this effect. Explains the processes involved in the manufacture of piezoelectric ceramics, the materials used, and the situations in which they are applied. (GS)

  17. Cooled Ceramic Turbine Vane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — N&R Engineering will investigate the feasibility of cooled ceramics, such as ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade concepts that can decrease specific...

  18. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  19. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  20. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  1. Ceramic vane drive joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Charles H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  2. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

    1993-12-14

    A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

  3. Barium zirconate base ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical corrosion at high temperatures is a serious problem in the refractory materials field, leading to degradation and bath contamination by elements of the refractory. The main objective of this work was to search for ceramics that could present higher resistance to chemical attack by aggressive molten oxides. The general behaviour of a ceramic material based on barium zirconate (Ba Zr O3) with the addition of different amounts of liquid phase former was investigated. The densification behaviour occurred during different heat treatments, as well as the microstructure development, as a function of the additives and their reactions with the main phase, were observed and are discussed. (author)

  4. Precision Finishing Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifano, T. G.; Blake, P. N.; Dow, T. A.; Scattergood, R. O.

    1987-01-01

    The manufacture of advanced ceramic components requires high accuracy and repeatibility in the control of the fabrication process. Surface finish in the nanometer range and excellent figure accuracy can be achieved if material can be removed from the surface without causing brittle fracture. To define the mechanism of "ductile" material removal, a series of experiments were initiated involving two processes: single-point diamond turning and diamond-wheel grinding. The results indicate that at small depths of cut, using stiff, well controlled machine tools, ceramic materials like silicon, silicon carbide, and germanium can be machined in a ductile regime.

  5. Prospects for nitrogen ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen ceramics are predominant materials for engine components, and non-automotive applications - particularly for wear parts and molten-metal handling - are also set to flourish. High temperature strength and toughness are now adequate although long-term oxidation resistance is still a problem. The ability to join sialon pieces to make large complex components greatly widens the field of applications. (orig.)

  6. Toward virtual ceramic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Genet, Martin; LADEVEZE, Pierre; LUBINEAU, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    A first step toward a multi-scale and multi-physic model --a virtual material-- for self-healing ceramic matrix composites is presented. Each mechanism --mechanical, chemical-- that act on the material's lifetime at a given scale --fibre, yarn-- is introduced in a single modeling framework, aimed at providing powerful prediction tools.

  7. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  8. Ceramic tubesheet design analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    A transport combustor is being commissioned at the Southern Services facility in Wilsonville, Alabama to provide a gaseous product for the assessment of hot-gas filtering systems. One of the barrier filters incorporates a ceramic tubesheet to support candle filters. The ceramic tubesheet, designed and manufactured by Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (EF&PM), is unique and offers distinct advantages over metallic systems in terms of density, resistance to corrosion, and resistance to creep at operating temperatures above 815{degrees}C (1500{degrees}F). Nevertheless, the operational requirements of the ceramic tubesheet are severe. The tubesheet is almost 1.5 m in (55 in.) in diameter, has many penetrations, and must support the weight of the ceramic filters, coal ash accumulation, and a pressure drop (one atmosphere). Further, thermal stresses related to steady state and transient conditions will occur. To gain a better understanding of the structural performance limitations, a contract was placed with Mallett Technology, Inc. to perform a thermal and structural analysis of the tubesheet design. The design analysis specification and a preliminary design analysis were completed in the early part of 1995. The analyses indicated that modifications to the design were necessary to reduce thermal stress, and it was necessary to complete the redesign before the final thermal/mechanical analysis could be undertaken. The preliminary analysis identified the need to confirm that the physical and mechanical properties data used in the design were representative of the material in the tubesheet. Subsequently, few exploratory tests were performed at ORNL to evaluate the ceramic structural material.

  9. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  10. Grain boundaries in ceramics and ceramic-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, D.R.; Wolf, D.

    1986-01-01

    Three interfaces exist: the crystal-crystal grain boundary in very pure single-phase ceramics, the crystal-glass-crystal grain boundary in most single-phase and polyphase ceramics, and the ceramic-metal interface. It is needed to correlate their structure and adhesion/failure. Methods for studying the bonding, interfacial structure, and fracture and adhesion are discussed, and recommendations are given. 42 refs. (DLC)

  11. Rheological Behaviour of Ceramic Inks for Direct Ceramic Inkjet Printing

    OpenAIRE

    P. Ponnambalam; Ramakrishnan, N.; P.K. Rajesh; K. Prakasan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, studies were made on the preparation of ceramic inks with: (i) alumina powderin ethyl alcohol and (ii) zirconia powder in ethyl alcohol at different volume fractions of ceramic.Different amounts (0.75-3.00 vol %) of an organic dispersant (oleic acid) were added to ceramicink containing 5 per cent of ceramic by volume in ethyl alcohol. The viscosities of the suspensionswere determined with Brookefield viscometer (model: DV-E), which is suitable for measuringthe viscosities of su...

  12. Ceramic Stereolithography: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics by Photopolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic stereolithography and related additive manufacturing methods involving photopolymerization of ceramic powder suspensions are reviewed in terms of the capabilities of current devices. The practical fundamentals of the cure depth, cure width, and cure profile are related to the optical properties of the monomer, ceramic, and photo-active components. Postpolymerization steps, including harvesting and cleaning the objects, binder burnout, and sintering, are discussed and compared with conventional methods. The prospects for practical manufacturing are discussed.

  13. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  14. CVD COATING OF CERAMIC LAYERS ON CERAMIC CUTTING TOOL MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Porat, R.

    1991-01-01

    When forming cutting tool materials based on ceramic components, one must take into considration the combination of wear resistance and mechanical properties which can withstand unfavorable cutting conditions at the same time maintaining high strength and fracture toughness. Ceramic cutting tools which are designed for machining at high cutting speeds and which have high strength and fracture toughness can be formed by applying a thin layer of ceramic materials on the substrate in order to in...

  15. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  16. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  17. Rheology of Superplastic Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Constitutive equation of rheglogy describing a phenomenological level of superplastic deformation as functional correlation between tensor components of stress and strain rate has been analyzed for the case of superplastic ceramic flow. Rheological properties of material are taken into account by means of scalar rheological coefficients of shear and volume viscosity, which are functions of temperature, effective stress (or strain rate) and density of material.

  18. Laser Micromachining of Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Sciti, Diletta; Bellosi, Alida

    2011-01-01

    Laser surface processing of ceramics is an area of considerable technological importance for several structural, tribological, optical and electronic applications. The laser beam behaves as a heat source that induces a temperature rise on the surface and within the bulk of the material. Depending on laser parameters and material characteristics, lasers can be used for fabricating microholes at designated locations, for cutting, scribing, for surface modifications In this work different types ...

  19. Engineering ceramics development in BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non-nuclear ceramics research and development activities in BARC encompass the oxides carbide and nitride of light elements. The major thrust areas have been towards development of engineering ceramics like alumina, zirconia, silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The present paper summarises the research activities regarding these ceramics especially on powder synthesis and shape fabrication by injection moulding, reaction-sintering and activated sintering. The stability of silicon carbide in oxygen containing atmosphere is highlighted. (orig.)

  20. The technical ceramics (second part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with ceramics used in the nuclear and the automotive industries. Concerning the nuclear sector, ceramics are particularly used in reactors, in the treatment of radioactive wastes and for the storage of the ultimate wastes. Details are given about the different ceramics used. In the automobile sector, aluminium is principally used for its lightness and cordierite, basic material of catalyst supports is especially used in the automobile devices of cleansing. (O.M.)

  1. Transparent Yb:YAG ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Hostasa, Jan; Esposito, Laura; Piancastelli, Andreana

    2011-01-01

    YAG ceramics doped with rare earth elements have been recently given a consistent attention as materials for various applications. The specific application depends on the doping element added. Addition of Yb is used for the production of active materials for solid state lasers, and YAG polycrystalline ceramics are promising materials for the replacement of single crystals, which are mostly used at present. The advantage of polycrystalline ceramics over single crystals are the lower fabricatio...

  2. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roode, M. van [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  3. Ion conductivity of nasicon ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nasiconss,Na1+XZr2SiXP3-XO12 o , X , 3, includes some of the best solid state sodium conductors known today. Compositions in the interval 1.6 , X , 2.6 show conductivities comparable to the best β double-prime-alumina ceramics. It is well known that the ion conductivity of β-alumina is strongly dependent on the texture of the ceramic. Here a similar behavior is reported for Nasicon ceramics. Ceramics of the bulk composition Na2.94Zr1.49Si2.20P0.80O10.85 were prepared by a gel method. The final ceramics consist of Nasicon crystals with x = 2.14 and a glass phase. The grain size and texture of the ceramics were controlled by varying the thermal history of the gel based raw materials and the sintering conditions. The room temperature resistivity of the resulting ceramics varies from 3.65*103 ohm cm to 1.23*103 ohm cm. Using the temperature comparison method and estimates of the area of grain boundaries in the ceramics, the resistivity of the Nasicon phase is estimated to be 225 ohm cm at 25 degrees C. B2O3- or Al2O3-doping of the glass bearing Nasicon ceramic lower the room temperature resistivity by a factor 2 to 5. The dopants do not substitute into the Nasicon phase in substantial amounts

  4. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  5. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  6. Lightweight high performance ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Stephen D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-02

    A sintered ceramic composition includes at least 50 wt. % boron carbide and at least 0.01 wt. % of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, the sintered ceramic composition being characterized by a density of at least 90% of theoretical density.

  7. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  8. Glass, Ceramics, and Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies of plutonium in glass and ceramics have taken place in the thirty years covered by this book. These studies have led to a substantial understanding, arising from fundamental research of actinides in solids and research and development in three technical fields: immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex and, most recently, the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities

  9. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  10. Fast Measurements Of Thermal Diffusivities Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marnell; Goldstein, Howard E.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature rises of samples compared with reference sample. Apparatus quickly measures thermal diffusivities of ceramics at high temperatures. Produces data on relative thermal diffusivities of as many as six ceramic specimens per hour. Thermal-diffusivity tester makes it easy to determine thermal diffusivities of ceramics. Pronounced effects of processing parameters on thermal properties of ceramics evaluated quickly.

  11. Wear prediction of ceramic-on-ceramic hip artificial joints

    OpenAIRE

    Askari, E; Flores, Paulo; Dabirrahmani, D.; Appleyard, R.

    2015-01-01

    Wear can influence the lifetime and performance of implants and has been found to be a key factor in primary failure of artificial hip joints. The present study aims to present a spatial multibody dynamic model to predict wear in ceramic-on-ceramic hip implants. The problem was formulated by developing a spatial multibody dynamic model of a hip prosthesis taking three-dimensional physiological loading and motion of the human body into account. Then, the Archard wear model was inte...

  12. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  13. Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1997-04-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  14. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  15. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  16. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  17. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  18. The ceramic gas electron multiplier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosson, Amir; Fleck, Ivor [Siegen University, Siegen (Germany); Collaboration: LCTPC-Deutschland-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) has been proven to fulfill the demands of high energy physics experiments. Effective gain and resistance to the electrical sparks are significant issues to be investigated. A new type of GEM, made out of ceramic, has been produced and results from measurements with this type of GEM are presented. Advantages of ceramic material are its very good stability versus change in temperature and its electrical properties. Using Ar-CO{sub 2}(80-20 %) gas mixture and a X-ray source, the gain of the ceramic GEMs is measured and compared with the one for CERN GEMs. These results assure the possibility of using the ceramic GEMs for high-luminosity experiments.

  19. Glass and ceramics. [lunar resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of glasses and ceramics can be produced from bulk lunar materials or from separated components. Glassy products include sintered regolith, quenched molten basalt, and transparent glass formed from fused plagioclase. No research has been carried out on lunar material or close simulants, so properties are not known in detail; however, common glass technologies such as molding and spinning seem feasible. Possible methods for producing glass and ceramic materials are discussed along with some potential uses of the resulting products.

  20. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  1. Batch compositions for cordierite ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, David L.

    1994-07-26

    Ceramic products consisting principally of cordierite and a method for making them are provided, the method employing batches comprising a mineral component and a chemical component, the mineral component comprising clay and talc and the chemical component consisting essentially of a combination of the powdered oxides, hydroxides, or hydrous oxides of magnesium, aluminum and silicon. Ceramics made by extrusion and firing of the batches can exhibit low porosity, high strength and low thermal expansion coefficients.

  2. Novel Synthesis of Ceramic Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.L.Choy

    2007-01-01

    1 Results There is an increasing demand for producing high performance ceramic films at a reduced cost. This paper describes an innovative and cost-effective method of producing nanostructured ceramic films based on Electrostatic Spray Assisted Vapour Deposition (ESAVD). ESAVD is a variant of chemical vapour deposition process which involves spraying atomised charged precursor droplets across an electric field where the precursor undergo decomposition and heterogeneous chemical reaction near the heat...

  3. Method for Waterproofing Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Hygroscopic ceramic materials which are difficult to waterproof with a silane, substituted silane or silazane waterproofing agent, such as an alumina containing fibrous, flexible and porous, fibrous ceramic insulation used on a reentry space vehicle, are rendered easy to waterproof if the interior porous surface of the ceramic is first coated with a thin coating of silica. The silica coating is achieved by coating the interior surface of the ceramic with a silica precursor converting the precursor to silica either in-situ or by oxidative pyrolysis and then applying the waterproofing agent to the silica coated ceramic. The silica precursor comprises almost any suitable silicon containing material such as a silane, silicone, siloxane, silazane and the like applied by solution, vapor deposition and the like. If the waterproofing is removed by e.g., burning, the silica remains and the ceramic is easily rewaterproofed. An alumina containing TABI insulation which absorbs more that five times its weight of water, absorbs less than 10 wt. % water after being waterproofed according to the method of the invention.

  4. Ferroelectric ceramics in a pyroelectric accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shchagin, A. V., E-mail: shchagin@kipt.kharkov.ua [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation); Miroshnik, V. S.; Volkov, V. I. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Oleinik, A. N. [Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    The applicability of polarized ferroelectric ceramics as a pyroelectric in a pyroelectric accelerator is shown by experiments. The spectra of X-ray radiation of energy up to tens of keV, generated by accelerated electrons, have been measured on heating and cooling of the ceramics in vacuum. It is suggested that curved layers of polarized ferroelectric ceramics be used as elements of ceramic pyroelectric accelerators. Besides, nanotubes and nanowires manufactured from ferroelectric ceramics are proposed for the use in nanometer-scale ceramic pyroelectric nanoaccelerators for future applications in nanotechnologies.

  5. Rheological Behaviour of Ceramic Inks for Direct Ceramic Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ponnambalam

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, studies were made on the preparation of ceramic inks with: (i alumina powderin ethyl alcohol and (ii zirconia powder in ethyl alcohol at different volume fractions of ceramic.Different amounts (0.75-3.00 vol % of an organic dispersant (oleic acid were added to ceramicink containing 5 per cent of ceramic by volume in ethyl alcohol. The viscosities of the suspensionswere determined with Brookefield viscometer (model: DV-E, which is suitable for measuringthe viscosities of suspensions accurately. These inks were deposited on a substrate to see theirspread. The sediment packing densities ( m of the resulting suspensions were calculated usingtheoretical models which can be related to the density that can be achieved in the final product.The highest sediment packing density was arrived at low viscosity values of the ink and occurredwhen 1 per cent of dispersant by volume was used for 5 per cent alumina content. For 5 percent zirconia content, 2 per cent of dispersant by volume gave a similar result. Experimentswere also conducted to find the value of m for different solid loadings (5-25 vol % of ceramicwith 1 per cent dispersant. It was observed that the sediment packing density and the apparentviscosities were increasing when solid loading concentrations were increased for both aluminaand zirconia-based inks. The optimum value of m and viscosity have been determined from thisstudy. The results of this preliminary study will be useful for further investigations on therheological behaviour of ceramic inks for direct ceramic inkjet printing.

  6. Performance of Ceramics in Severe Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Fox, Dennis S.; Smialek, James L.; Deliacorte, Christopher; Lee, Kang N.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramics are generally stable to higher temperatures than most metals and alloys. Thus the development of high temperature structural ceramics has been an area of active research for many years. While the dream of a ceramic heat engine still faces many challenges, niche markets are developing for these materials at high temperatures. In these applications, ceramics are exposed not only to high temperatures but also aggressive gases and deposits. In this chapter we review the response of ceramic materials to these environments. We discuss corrosion mechanisms, the relative importance of a particular corrodent, and, where available, corrosion rates. Most of the available corrosion information is on silicon carbide (SIC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) monolithic ceramics. These materials form a stable film of silica (SO2) in an oxidizing environment. We begin with a discussion of oxidation of these materials and proceed to the effects of other corrodents such as water vapor and salt deposits. We also discuss oxidation and corrosion of other ceramics: precurser derived ceramics, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), ceramics which form oxide scales other than silica, and oxide ceramics. Many of the corrosion issues discussed can be mitigated with refractory oxide coatings and we discuss the current status of this active area of research. Ultimately, the concern of corrosion is loss of load bearing capability. We discuss the effects of corrosive environments on the strength of ceramics, both monolithic and composite. We conclude with a discussion of high temperature wear of ceramics, another important form of degradation at high temperatures.

  7. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  8. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  9. Antiferroelectric Shape Memory Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Uchino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiferroelectrics (AFE can exhibit a “shape memory function controllable by electric field”, with huge isotropic volumetric expansion (0.26% associated with the AFE to Ferroelectric (FE phase transformation. Small inverse electric field application can realize the original AFE phase. The response speed is quick (2.5 ms. In the Pb0.99Nb0.02[(Zr0.6Sn0.41-yTiy]0.98O3 (PNZST system, the shape memory function is observed in the intermediate range between high temperature AFE and low temperature FE, or low Ti-concentration AFE and high Ti-concentration FE in the composition. In the AFE multilayer actuators (MLAs, the crack is initiated in the center of a pair of internal electrodes under cyclic electric field, rather than the edge area of the internal electrodes in normal piezoelectric MLAs. The two-sublattice polarization coupling model is proposed to explain: (1 isotropic volume expansion during the AFE-FE transformation; and (2 piezoelectric anisotropy. We introduce latching relays and mechanical clampers as possible unique applications of shape memory ceramics.

  10. Panel report on high temperature ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolet, T C [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Fundamental research is reported concerning high temperature ceramics for application in turbines, engines, batteries, gasifiers, MHD, fuel cells, heat exchangers, and hot wall combustors. Ceramics microstructure and behavior are included. (FS)

  11. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  12. Development of advanced ceramics at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has a long history of developing ceramics for nuclear fission and fusion applications. AECL is now applying its multidisciplinary materials R and D capabilities, including unique capabilities in ceramic processing and nondestructive evaluation, to develop advanced ceramic materials for commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an overview of the facilities and programs associated with the development of advanced ceramics at AECL

  13. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appr...

  14. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  15. Insights on Ceramics as Dental Materials. Part I: Ceramic Material Types in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, GW; Matinlinna, JP

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics are widely used biomaterials in prosthetic dentistry due to their attractive clinical properties. They are aesthetically pleasing with their color, shade and luster, and they are chemically stable. The main constituents of dental ceramic are Si-based inorganic materials, such as feldspar, quartz, and silica. Traditional feldspar-based ceramics are also referred to as "Porcelain". The crucial difference between a regular ceramic and a dental ceramic is the proportion of feldspar, quar...

  16. Thermoluminescence properties of AlN ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Christensen, P.; Agersnap Larsen, N.; Berzina, B.

    The paper describes thermoluminescence (TL) properties of AlN:Y2O3 ceramics irradiated with ionising radiation. A high TL sensitivity of AlN:Y2O3 ceramics to radiation encouraged a study of the AlN ceramics for application as a dosimetric material. The paper presents experimental data on: glow...

  17. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klima, S.J.; Baaklini, G.Y.; Abel, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented on research and development of techniques for nondestructive evaluation and characterization of advanced ceramics for heat engine applications. Highlighted in this review are Lewis Research Center efforts in microfocus radiography, scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM), and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). The techniques were evaluated by applying them to research samples of green and sintered silicon nitride and silicon carbide in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars containing seeded voids. Probabilities of detection of voids were determined for diameters as small as 20 microns for microfucus radiography, SLAM, and SAM. Strengths and limitations of the techniques for ceramic applications are identified. Application of ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic microstructures is also discussed.

  19. Innovative processing of ceramic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of high-temperature superconducting yttrium barium cuprate has changed the way we think about ceramics. It has broadened the perception and the definition of ceramic materials, and has attracted new workers from other fields such as chemistry, physics, and engineering, adding to the diversity of techniques used for synthesis and characterization. The authors are seeking to synthesize ceramics in a near-single-crystal configuration. They want to create a new class of material that may have wide-ranging applications, from sensors to optoelectronic devices to superconductive cables. This article I describes their approaches and some of preliminary results. A superconducting magnetic bearing and a high-current superconducting cable are possible applications of this work

  20. Ceramic materials testing and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilfinger, K. R., LLNL

    1998-04-30

    Certain refractory ceramics (notably oxides) have desirable properties suitable for the construction of ceramic waste containers for long term use in nuclear waste disposal applications. In particular, they are far less prone to environmental corrosion than metals under realistic repository conditions. The aqueous corrosion rates of oxides such as magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl{sub 2}0{sub 4}) and alumina (Al{sub 2}0{sub 4}) fall in the range of a few millimeters per million years. Oxide ceramics are also not likely to be subject to microbiologically influenced corrosion, which apparently can attack most, if not all, of the available engineering metals. Ceramics have a reputation for poor mechanical performance and large, impermeable objects are not easily fabricated by most current fabrication methods. As a result, the most promising approach for incorporating ceramics in large waste packages appears to be to apply a high density ceramic coating to a supporting metallic structure. Ceramic coatings 2048 applied by a thermal spray technique can be made effectively seamless and provide a method for final closure of the waste package while maintaining low average temperatures for the entire assembly. The corrosion resistance of the ceramic should prevent or delay water penetration to the underlying metal, which will in turn provide most of the mechanical strength and toughness required by the application. In this way, the major concerns regarding the ceramic coating become ensuring it is impervious to moisture, its adherence and its resistance to mechanical stresses during handling or resulting from rock fall in the repository. Without water, electrochemical corrosion and microbiologically influenced corrosion processes are considered impossible, so a complete coating should protect the metal vessels for far longer than the current design requirements. Even an imperfect coating should extend the life of the package, delaying the onset and reducing the severity of

  1. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  2. Ceramic catalyst materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  3. Chemical characterization of marajoara ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the elemental concentration of Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in 204 fragments of Marajoara archaeological ceramics, of which 156 were provided by the Archaeology and Ethnology Museum of Sao Paulo University (MAE) and 48 were provided by Dr. Denise Pahl Schaan, Marajo Museum curator. Also, 9 contemporary ceramics produced and marketed at Marajo Island were analyzed. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analyses were performed in 8 archaeological samples and 1 contemporary sample in order to identify the burning temperature of the samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed in 13 archaeological samples and 2 contemporary samples for the investigation of their mineralogical composition. Mahalanobis distance was used for the study of outlier while modified filter was used for the study of the temper added to the ceramic paste. Result interpretation was performed using cluster analysis, principal components analysis and discriminant analysis. Procrustes analysis was used for variable selection and it showed that the Ce, Fe, Eu, Hf, K and Th variables are adequate for the characterization of the analyzed samples. The comparative study among the archaeological and contemporary ceramics showed the arrangement of two well-defined and close groups for the archaeological samples and a third, distant group for the contemporary ones. This result indicates that the archaeological and contemporary ceramics differ in their composition. EPR and XRD analysis were inconclusive for the differentiation of archaeological and contemporary ceramics. (author)

  4. Transport properties of HTSC ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the combined influence of high pressures and silver doping it is possible to increase the critical current of yttrium metal-ceramics up to 104A/cm2 at T=77 K2 in a self-magnetic field; at T=4,2 K currents up to 2 103 A/cm2 have been realized in a 3 T field. The ideas being developed of metal-ceramics as a Josephson medium together with pressure as a perfectly operated parameter in the experiment were found to be extremely effective in the analysis of the results. 90 refs.; 5 figs

  5. Ceramic components for MHD electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, D.D.

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf/sub x/In/sub y/A/sub z/O/sub 2/ where x = 0.1 to 0.4, y = 0.3 to 0.6, z = 0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  6. Electrospinning of ceramic nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Benjamin M.

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) nanofibers of diameters as low as 20 nm are fabricated. The fibers were produced through the electrostatic spinning of the preceramic poly(carbomethylsilane) with pyrolysis to ceramic. A new technique was used where the preceramic was blended with polystyrene (PS) and, subsequent to electrospinning, was exposed to UV to crosslink the PS and prevent fibers flowing during pyrolysis. Electrospun SiC fibers were characterized by FTIR, TGA-DTA, SEM, TEM, XRD, and SAED. Fibers were shown to be polycrystalline and nanograined with alpha-SiC 15R polytype being dominant, where commercial fiber production methods form beta-SiC 3C. Pyrolysis of the bulk polymer blend to SiC produced alpha-SiC 15R as the dominant polytype with larger grains showing that electrospinning nanofibers affects resultant crystallinity. Fibers produced were shown to have a core-shell structure of an oxide scale that was variable by pyrolysis conditions. Metal oxide powders (chromium oxide, cobalt oxide, iron oxide, silicon oxide, tantalum oxide, titanium oxide, tungsten oxide, vanadium oxide, and zirconium oxide), were converted to metal carbide powders and metal nitride powders by the process of carbothermal reduction (CTR). Synthetic pitch was explored as an alternative to graphite which is a common carbon source for CTR. It was shown via characterization with XRD that pitch performs as well and in some cases better than graphite and is therefore a viable alternative in CTR. Conversion of metal oxide powders with pitch led to conversion of sol-gel based metal oxide nanofibers produced by electrospinning. Pitch was soluble in the solutions xv that were electrospun allowing for intimate contact between the sol-gel and the carbon source for CTR. This method became a two step processing method to produce metal carbide and nitride nanofibers: first electrospin sol-gel based metal oxide nanofibers and subsequently pyrolize them in the manner of CTR to transform them. Results indicate

  7. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; Thomas W. Eagar; Harold R. Larson; Raymundo Arroyave; X.-D Zhou; Y.-W. Shin; H.U. Anderson; Nigel Browning; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2003-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the initial studies on newer compositions and also includes newer approaches to address various materials issues such as in metal-ceramic sealing. The current quarter's research has also focused on developing a comprehensive reliability model for predicting the structural behavior of the membranes in realistic conditions. In parallel to industry provided compositions, models membranes have been evaluated in varying environment. Of importance is the behavior of flaws and generation of new flaws aiding in fracture. Fracture mechanics parameters such as crack tip stresses are generated to characterize the influence of environment. Room temperature slow crack growth studies have also been initiated in industry provided compositions. The electrical conductivity and defect chemistry of an A site deficient compound (La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}) was studied. A higher conductivity was observed for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} than that of La{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}FeO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}FeO{sub 3}. Defect chemistry analysis showed that it was primarily contributed by a higher carrier concentration in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. Moreover, the ability for oxygen vacancy generation is much higher in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} as well, which indicates a lower bonding strength between Fe-O and a possible higher catalytic activity for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. The program continued to investigate the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previous report listed initial measurements on a sample of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-x} prepared in-house by Praxair. Subsequently, a second sample of powder from a larger batch of sample were characterized and compared

  8. High temperature ceramics for automobile gas turbines. Part 2: Development of ceramic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, P.; Koehler, M.; Rottenkolber, P.

    1978-01-01

    The development of ceramic components for automobile gas turbine engines is described with attention given to the steady and unsteady thermal conditions the ceramics will experience, and their anti-corrosion and strain-resistant properties. The ceramics considered for use in the automobile turbines include hot-pressed Si3N4, reaction-sintered, isostatically pressed Si3N4, hot-pressed SiC, reaction-bonded SiC, and glass ceramics. Attention is given to the stress analysis of ceramic structures and the state of the art of ceramic structural technology is reviewed, emphasizing the use of ceramics for combustion chambers and ceramic shrouded turbomachinery (a fully ceramic impeller).

  9. Natural Radioactivity in Ceramic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramics are one of the most important types of the industrial building materials. The raw materials of the ceramic are made of a mixture of clay, feldspar, silica, talc kaolin minerals together with zirconium silicates (ZrSiO4).The ceramic raw materials and the final products contain naturally occurring radionuclide mainly U-238 and, Th-232 series, and the radioactive isotope of potassium K-40. Six raw ceramic samples were obtained from the Aracemco Company at Egypt together with a floor tile sample (final product) for measuring radioactive concentration levels., The activity of the naturally U-238, Th-232, and K-40 were determined as (Bq/kg) using gamma spectroscopy (Hyperactive pure germanium detector). Concentration of U and Th were determined in (ppm) using spectrophotometer technique by Arsenazo 111 and Piridy l-Azo -Resorcinol (PAR) indicators. Sequential extraction tests were carried out in order to determine the quantity of the radionuclide associated with various fractions as exchangeable, carbonate, acid soluble and in the residue. The results evaluated were compared to the associated activity indices (AI) that were defined by former USSR and West Germany

  10. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  11. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  12. Properties Research of Ceramic Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Żółkiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the method of full mould the polystyrene model, which fills the mould cavity in the course of filling by the liquid metal is subjected tothe influence of high temperature and passes from the solid, through the liquid, to the gaseous state. During this process solid and gaseousproducts of thermal decomposition of polystyrene patterns occur. The kinetics of this process is significantly influenced by the gasificationtemperature, density and mass of the polystyrene patterns. One of the basic parameters is the amount and rate of gas from the polystyrenemodel during its thermal decomposition. Specific properties of ceramic layer used for lost foam castings are required. To ensure optimalprocess flow of metal in the form proper permeability of the ceramic layer is needed.To ensure optimal conditions for technological casting method EPS patterns are tested and determined are the technological parametersand physical-chemical process in: material properties of the pattern, properties of the ceramic layer applied to the pattern, pattern gasification kinetics pouring processIn the course of the research the characteristics of polystyrene and ceramic layer were determined.

  13. Thermal shock resistant ceramic insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specification is given for thermal shock resistant cermet insulators which contain 0.1 to 20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. They are prepared by (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, the metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide the desired cermet insulator. Examples of the ceramics include BN, B4C, ZrO2, WO3, BeO, Y2O3, TaO, the lanthanide oxides, the oxides of uranium, the oxides of thorium, the oxides of niobium. Examples of the metal precursor include TaHsub(0.5), UH3, ZrH2, ThH2, W(CO)6, ReCl3, WO3 MoO3. (author)

  14. Superplastic forming of ceramic insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, T. G.; Wittenauer, J. P.; Wadsworth, J.

    1992-01-01

    Superplasticity has been demonstrated in many fine-grained structural ceramics and ceramic composites, including yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (YTZP), alumina, and Al2O3-reinforced zirconia (Al2O3/YTZ) duplex composites and SiC-reinforced Si3N4. These superplastic ceramics obviously offer the potential benefit of forming net shape or near net shape parts. This could be particularly useful for forming complicated shapes that are difficult to achieve using conventional forming techniques, or require elaborate, subsequent machining. In the present study, we successfully demonstrated the following: (1) superplastic 3Y-TXP and 20 percent Al2O3/YTZ composite have for the first time been successfully deformed into hemispherical caps via a biaxial gas-pressure forming technique; (2) no experimental difficulty was encountered in applying the required gas pressures and temperatures to achieve the results, thus, it is certain that higher rates of deformation than those presented in this study will be possible by using the current test apparatus at higher temperatures and pressures; and (3) an analytical model incorporating material parameters, such as variations during forming in the strain rate sensitivity exponent and grain growth-induced strain hardening, is needed to model accurately and therefore precisely control the biaxial gas-pressure forming of superplastic ceramics. Based on the results of this study, we propose to fabricate zirconia insulation tubes by superplastic extrusion of zirconia polycrystal. This would not only reduce the cost, but also improve the reliability of the tube products.

  15. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  16. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  17. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  18. KROME Ceramics: color management system for the ceramics industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital Decoration Systems, SL (DIGIT-S) with Unicer, SL, has implemented a system to improve and optimize the process of decorating by inkjet printing for ceramic industry. It provides a comprehensive solution, KROME Ceramics, to improve the cost effectiveness of product and process through the implementation of a working system based on the control of digital decoration process and the synchronization of all elements that make up the decorative modules, including the creation of a work flow, management of files that are generated during the process, a correct color management system, and of course, optimizing and evaluating ink jet inks integrating all elements involved: Lighting, Computer, Software, Monitor, Plotter, Paper, Ink, Ink jet, Body's, Enamels and Oven. (Author)

  19. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  20. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.; Fox, Dennis; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Robinson, R. Craig; Bansal, Narottam

    2004-01-01

    One key factor that limits the performance of current gas turbine engines is the temperature capability of hot section structural components. Silicon-based ceramics, such as SiC/SiC composites and monolithic Si3N4, are leading candidates to replace superalloy hot section components in the next generation gas turbine engines due to their excellent high temperature properties. A major stumbling block to realizing Si-based ceramic hot section components is the recession of Si-based ceramics in combustion environments due to the volatilization of silica scale by water vapor. An external environmental barrier coating (EBC) is the most promising approach to preventing the recession. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3A12O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit the durability and temperature capability of current EBCs. Research is underway to develop EBCs with longer life and enhanced temperature capability. Understanding key issues affecting the performance of current EBCs is necessary for successful development of advanced EBCs. These issues include stress, chemical compatibility, adherence, and water vapor stability. Factors that affect stress are thermal expansion mismatch, phase stability, chemical stability, elastic modulus, etc. The current understanding on these issues will be discussed.

  1. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia-ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal-ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis

  2. High Strain Rate Compression Testing of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenthal, W. R. (William R.)

    2005-01-01

    The compressive deformation and failure behavior of ceramics and ceramic-metal composites for armor applications has been studied as a function of strain rate at Los Alamos National Laboratory since the late 1980s. High strain rate ({approx}10{sup 3} s{sup -1}) uniaxial compression loading can be achieved using the Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, but special methods must be used to obtain valid strength results. This paper reviews these methods and the limitations of the Kolsky-SHPB technique for this class of materials. The Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky-SHPB) technique was originally developed to characterize the mechanical behavior of ductile materials such as metals and polymers where the results can be used to develop strain-rate and temperature-dependent constitutive behavior models that empirically describe macroscopic plastic flow. The flow behavior of metals and polymers is generally controlled by thermally-activated and rate-dependent dislocation motion or polymer chain motion in response to shear stresses. Conversely, the macroscopic mechanical behavior of dense, brittle, ceramic-based materials is dominated by elastic deformation terminated by rapid failure associated with the propagation of defects in the material in response to resolved tensile stresses. This behavior is usually characterized by a distribution of macroscopically measured failure strengths and strains. The basis for any strain-rate dependence observed in the failure strength must originate from rate-dependence in the damage and fracture process, since uniform, uniaxial elastic behavior is rate-independent (e.g. inertial effects on crack growth). The study of microscopic damage and fracture processes and their rate-dependence under dynamic loading conditions is a difficult experimental challenge that is not addressed in this paper. The purpose of this paper is to review the methods that have been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to

  3. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  4. Silsesquioxane-derived ceramic fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, F. I.; Farmer, S. C.; Terepka, F. M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Fibers formed from blends of silsesquioxane polymers were characterized to study the pyrolytic conversion of these precursors to ceramics. The morphology of fibers pyrolyzed to 1400 C revealed primarily amorphous glasses whose conversion to beta-SiC is a function of both blend composition and pyrolysis conditions. Formation of beta-SiC crystallites within the glassy phase is favored by higher than stoichiometric C/Si ratios, while carbothermal reduction of Si-O bonds to form SiC with loss of SiO and CO occurs at higher methyl/phenylpropyl silsesquioxane (lower C/Si) ratios. As the carbothermal reduction is assumed to be diffusion controlled, the fibers can serve as model systems to gain understanding of the silsesquioxane pyrolysis behavior, and therefore are useful in the development of polysilsesquioxane-derived ceramic matrices and coatings as well.

  5. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  6. Hot isostatic pressing of ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, K.

    1985-01-01

    A mixture containing glass 70 to 95 and BN or B4C powder (0.1-10 microns) 5 to 30 vol. % is used as a secondary pressure medium in hot isostatic pressing of ceramics. Thus, Pyrex beads were mixed with 15% vol. BN powder (average diameter 2 microns), fused at 1400 deg for 2 h, cooled, crushed, and put into a graphite crucible. A Si3N4 sintered body was embedded in the powder, heated in vacuum at 1200 deg for 2 h, treated in a hot isostatic press furnace at 1700 deg and 1000 atm. for 1 h, and cooled to give a Si3N4 ceramic. It was easily separated from the crucible.

  7. GRAIN BOUNDARIES IN POLYPHASE CERAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, D

    1985-01-01

    The majority of polyphase ceramics contain a residual glass phase at their grain boundaries. The stability of these phases, particularly at the two-grain boundaries, is of significance since they affect the properties of the material as a whole. Drawing analogies with soap films, the stability of a continuous intergranular phase is considered in terms of the balance between the capillarity and disjoining pressures. The individual components to the disjoining pressures are discussed. It is arg...

  8. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation

    OpenAIRE

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative t...

  9. Luminescent ceramics for LED conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raukas, M.; Wei, G.; Bergenek, K.; Kelso, J.; Zink, N.; Zheng, Y.; Hannah, M.; Stough, M.; Wirth, R.; Linkov, A.; Jermann, F.; Eisert, D.

    2011-03-01

    Many LED-based applications would benefit from more efficient and/or high lumen output devices that enable usage in both white and single color illumination schemes. In the present article we briefly review the materials research history leading to optical ceramic converters and discuss their typical characteristics. Recently demonstrated high performance values in terms of efficacy and external quantum efficiency in orange (amber) spectral region are described.

  10. Tantalum-Based Ceramics for Refractory Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel; DiFiore, Robert; Kalvala, Victor

    2006-01-01

    A family of tantalum-based ceramics has been invented as ingredients of high-temperature composite insulating tiles. These materials are suitable for coating and/or permeating the outer layers of rigid porous (foam-like or fibrous) ceramic substrates to (1) render the resulting composite ceramic tiles impervious to hot gases and (2) enable the tiles to survive high heat fluxes at temperatures that can exceed 3,000 F ( 1,600 C).

  11. Graded Structures for All-ceramic Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Y.; Chai, H.; Lawn, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    One failure mode of all-ceramic restorations is radial cracking at the cementation surface, from occlusally induced flexure of the stiffer ceramic layer(s) on the softer dentin underlayer. We hypothesize that such failure may be substantially mitigated by an appropriate grading of elastic modulus through the ceramic thickness. In this study, we fabricated graded structures by infiltrating glass into zirconia plates, with resulting diminished modulus in the outer surfaces. The plates were then...

  12. Tensile Properties of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 409, - (2009), s. 168-175. ISSN 1013-9826. [Fractography of Advanced Ceramics /3./. Stará Lesná, 07.09.2008-10.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0724; GA ČR GD106/05/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : tensile test * ceramics foam * open porosity * tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  13. Ceramic Materials and Color in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Volpato, Claudia; Fredel, Márcio; Philippi, Analúcia; PETTER, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of metal ceramic crowns, clinicians and researchers have been looking for a restorative system that can associate beauty, strength and durability, but without the presence of a metallic infrastructure. Indeed, dental ceramics are materials that come aesthetically closest to natural teeth. With the improvement of ceramic systems, it has been possible to combine the excellent aesthetic characteristics of this material with a considerable resistance to fracture. It is impe...

  14. Advanced ceramics: the present and the perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development in the Brazilian and international areas of advanced ceramics is described, emphasizing its economic perspectivas and industrial applications. Results obtained by national institutions are reviewed, mainly in the context of those that pioneered the required high technology in this ceramic field. The rapid growth of the interest for those special materials, made more evident by ample information related to the superconducting ceramics great pontential for important practical applications, is one of the most significant characteristics of the area. (author)

  15. Ceramic vacuum tubes for geothermal well logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    Useful design data acquired in the evaluation of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of a 500/sup 0/C instrumentation amplifier are presented. The general requirements for ceramic vacuum tubes are discussed for application to the development of high temperature well logs. Commercially available tubes are described and future contract activities that specifically relate to ceramic vacuum tubes are detailed. Supplemental data are presented in the appendix.

  16. Timing Resistive Plate Chambers with Ceramic Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Laso Garcia, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the development of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) with ceramic electrodes. The use of ceramic composites, Si3N4/SiC, opens the way for the application of RPCs in harsh radiation environments. Future Experiments like the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt will need new RPCs with high rate capabilities and high radiation tolerance. Ceramic composites are specially suited for this purpose due to th...

  17. High temperature fracture of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of fracture mechanisms and methods of lifetime prediction in ceramic materials. Techniques of lifetime prediction are based on the science of fracture mechanics. Application of these techniques to structural ceramics is limited by our incomplete understanding of fracture mechanisms in these materials, and by the occurrence of flaw generation in these materials at elevated temperatures. Research on flaw generation and fracture mechanisms is recommended as a way of improving the reliability of structural ceramics

  18. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report. DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  19. Improved ceramic heat exchange material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccollister, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    Improved corrosion resistant ceramic materials that are suitable for use as regenerative heat exchangers for vehicular gas turbines is reported. Two glass-ceramic materials, C-144 and C-145, have superior durability towards sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate compared to lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) Corning heat exchange material 9455. Material C-144 is a leached LAS material whose major crystalline phase is silica keatite plus mullite, and C-145 is a LAS keatite solid solution (S.S.) material. In comparison to material 9455, material C-144 is two orders of magnitude better in dimensional stability to sulfuric acid at 300 C, and one order of magnitude better in stability to sodium sulfate at 1000 C. Material C-145 is initially two times better in stability to sulfuric acid, and about one order of magnitude better in stability to sodium sulfate. Both C-144 and C-145 have less than 300 ppm delta L/L thermal expansion from ambient to 1000 C, and good dimensional stability of less than approximately 100 ppm delta L/L after exposure to 1000 C for 100 hours. The glass-ceramic fabrication process produced a hexagonal honeycomb matrix having an 85% open frontal area, 50 micrometer wall thickness, and less than 5% porosity.

  20. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  1. Ceramic dentures manufactured with ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werelius, Kristian; Weigl, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Conventional manufacturing of individual ceramic dental prosthesis implies a handmade metallic framework, which is then veneered with ceramic layers. In order to manufacture all-ceramic dental prosthesis a CAD/CAM system is necessary due to the three dimensional shaping of high strength ceramics. Most CAD/CAM systems presently grind blocks of ceramic after the construction process in order to create the prosthesis. Using high-strength ceramics, such as Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIP)-zirconia, this is limited to copings. Anatomically shaped fixed dentures have a sculptured surface with small details, which can't be created by existing grinding tools. This procedure is also time consuming and subject to significant loss in mechanical strength and thus reduced survival rate once inserted. Ultra-short laser pulses offer a possibility in machining highly complex sculptured surfaces out of high-strength ceramic with negligible damage to the surface and bulk of the ceramic. In order to determine efficiency, quality and damage, several laser ablation parameters such as pulse duration, pulse energy and ablation strategies were studied. The maximum ablation rate was found using 400 fs at high pulse energies. High pulse energies such as 200μJ were used with low damage in mechanical strength compared to grinding. Due to the limitation of available laser systems in pulse repetition rates and power, the use of special ablation strategies provide a possibility to manufacture fully ceramic dental prosthesis efficiently.

  2. Carbon nanofillers for machining insulating ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Malek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of ceramics in emerging applications is principally limited by the final machining process necessary for producing microcomponents with complex geometries. The addition of carbon nanotubes greatly enhances the electrical properties of insulating ceramics allowing electrical discharge machining to be used to manufacture intricate parts. Meanwhile other properties of the ceramic may be either preserved or even improved. For the first time, a silicon nitride/carbon nanotubes microgear is electrically discharge machined with a remarkably high material removal rate, low surface roughness, and low tool wear. This offers unprecedented opportunities for the manufacture of complicated ceramic parts by adding carbon nanotubes for new engineering and biomedical applications.

  3. Review of glass ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass ceramics are being considered for the immobilization of nuclear wastes to obtain a waste form with improved properties relative to glasses. Improved impact resistance, decreased thermal expansion, and increased leach resistance are possible. In addition to improved properties, the spontaneous devitrification exhibited in some waste-containing glasses can be avoided by the controlled crystallization after melting in the glass-ceramic process. The majority of the glass-ceramic development for nuclear wastes has been conducted at the Hahn-Meitner Institute (HMI) in Germany. Two of their products, a celsian-based (BaAl3Si2O8) and a fresnoite-based (Ba2TiSi2O8) glass ceramic, have been studied at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A basalt-based glass ceramic primarily containing diopsidic augite (CaMgSi2O6) has been developed at PNL. This glass ceramic is of interest since it would be in near equilibrium with a basalt repository. Studies at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in Japan have favored a glass-ceramic product based upon diopside (CaMgSi2O6). Compositions, processing conditions, and product characterization of typical commercial and nuclear waste glass ceramics are discussed. In general, glass-ceramic waste forms can offer improved strength and decreased thermal expansion. Due to typcially large residual glass phases of up to 50%, there may be little improvement in leach resistance

  4. Ceramic-Metal Interfaces in Multilayer Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell, John; Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Andersen, Bjørn;

    1996-01-01

    quality and strength of this interface. In the case of a weak ceramic-metal interface, delaminations will occur under severe working conditions.Work has been carried out on a commercial PZT type ceramic and various types of Pt electrode paste. The present study involves characterization of the interface......Multilayer actuators consist of a number of piezoelectric or electrostrictive ceramic layers, separated by thin metal electrodes. Thus, the ceramic-metal interface plays an even more important role than for bulk piezoceramics. The performance and durability of the actuator depends closely on the...

  5. Ceramic-Metal Interfaces in Multilayer Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell, John; Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Andersen, Bjørn; James, Andrew S.

    1996-01-01

    Multilayer actuators consist of a number of piezoelectric or electrostrictive ceramic layers, separated by thin metal electrodes. Thus, the ceramic-metal interface plays an even more important role than for bulk piezoceramics. The performance and durability of the actuator depends closely on the...... quality and strength of this interface. In the case of a weak ceramic-metal interface, delaminations will occur under severe working conditions.Work has been carried out on a commercial PZT type ceramic and various types of Pt electrode paste. The present study involves characterization of the interface...

  6. Measurement of Emissivity of Porous Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    BÜYÜKALACA, Orhan

    1998-01-01

    In this study, measurements of spectral and total emissivities of seven different porous ceramic materials and one ceramic fibre material are reported. Measurements were made for wavelength range from 1.2 µm to 20 µm and temperature range from 200 °C to 700 °C. It was found that total emissivity increases with increase of pore size but decreases with increase of temperature. The results showed all the porous ceramic materials tested to be much better than ceramic fibre in terms of total em...

  7. Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrow, S. Marvin (Kingston, TN); Rexford, Donald (Pattersonville, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  8. Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Morrow, S.M.; Rexford, D.

    1999-12-07

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt is disclosed. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  9. Ceramic vacuum tubes for geothermal well logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R.D.

    1977-01-12

    The results of investigations carried out into the availability and suitability of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of logging tools for geothermal wells are summarized. Design data acquired in the evaluation of ceramic vacuum tubes for the development of a 500/sup 0/C instrumentation amplifier are presented. The general requirements for ceramic vacuum tubes for application to the development of high temperature well logs are discussed. Commercially available tubes are described and future contract activities that specifically relate to ceramic vacuum tubes are detailed. Supplemental data is presented in the appendix. (MHR)

  10. Boron-containing neutron shielding building ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data are presented on the composition of raw materials as well as on the properties and chemical composition of finished products of ceramics intended for neutron shielding. It is shown that 0.8 % content of B2O3 in bricks of ceramic mass proposed halves neutron radiation from the source of 106 neutr·s-1 close rate compared to bricks of boron free ceramic mass. Results of tests on water absorption and compression strength make it possible to recommend new ceramics to be used as tiles and facade building materials

  11. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Ritzberger; Elke Apel; Wolfram Höland; Arnd Peschke; Volker M. Rheinberger

    2010-01-01

    The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical) and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate...

  12. Vitreous ceramic waste form for waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitreous ceramic waste forms are being developed to complement glass waste forms in supporting DOE's environmental restoration efforts. The vitreous ceramics are composed of various metal oxide crystalline phases embedded in a silicate glass matrix. The vitreous ceramics are appropriate final waste forms for waste streams that contain large amounts of scrap metals and elements with low solubilities in glass, and have low-flux contents. Homogeneous glass waste forms are appropriate for wastes with sufficient fluxes and low metal contents. Therefore, utilization of both glass and vitreous ceramics waste forms will make vitrification technology applicable to the treatment of a much larger range of radioactive and mixed wastes. The controlled crystallization in vitreous ceramics resulted in formation of durable crystalline phases and durable residual glass matrix. The durable crystalline phases in vitreous ceramics included Ca3(PO4)2, magnetite (Fe2+Ni,Mn)Fe3+2O4, hibonite Ca(Al,Fe,Zr,Cr)12O19, baddeyelite ZrO2, zirconolite CaZrTi,O, and corundum Al2O3, which are thermodynamically more stable than normal glasses and are also less soluble in water than glasses. The durable glassy matrix in vitreous ceramics is due to the enrichment of silica and alumina during the crystallization process of vitreous ceramic formation. The vitreous ceramics showed exceptional long-term chemical durability and the processability of vitreous ceramics were also demonstrated at both bench- and pilot-scale. This paper briefly describes the use of vitreous ceramics for treating sample mixed wastes with high contents of either Cr, Fe, Zr, and Al, or alkalis

  13. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. I n order to achieve these objectives, NAC, a leading U.S. advanced ceramics component manufacturer, assembled a multidisciplinary, vertically integrated team. This team included: a major diesel engine builder, Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC); a corporate ceramics research division, SGIC's Northboro R and D Center; intelligent processing system developers, BDM Federal/MATSYS; a furnace equipment company, Centorr/Vacuum Industries; a sintering expert, Wittmer Consultants; a production OEM, Deco-Grand; a wheel manufacturer and grinding operation developer, Norton Company's Higgins Grinding Technology Center (HGTC); a ceramic machine shop, Chand Kare Technical Ceramics; and a manufacturing cost consultant, IBIS Associates. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration

  14. Sintering of TiB2 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Swiatek

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Titanium diborides (TiB2 ceramic is particularly interesting because it exhibits high elastic modulus and hardness as well as high thermal conductivity. The interest in TiB2 ceramic increased enormously due to these properties but applications seem to be limited due to difficulties during densification process. In the experiment the TiB2 compacts was obtained using HP-HT method. The aim of this study is to work out and optimize the sintering densification process of TiB2 ceramics.Design/methodology/approach: The high temperature-high pressure (HT-HP Bridgman type apparatus was used for densification method of TiB2 powder. Ceramics were sintered at pressure of 7.2 ± 0.2 GPa and temperature at 1500-2300ºC ± 50ºC. The duration of sintering was 60 seconds. In order to investigate the structure changes, the optical and scanning electron microscope was used. Mechanical properties were determined by Vickers hardness. Young modulus measurements were carried out using ultrasonic method.Findings: The TiB2 ceramics was obtained without using sintering agents. The properties and structure of TiB2 ceramics strongly depend on conditions of sintering process. The application of the temperature of 1500ºC±50ºC and pressure of 7.2 ± 0.2 GPa and time of 60 seconds permits to obtain the TiB2 ceramics without cracks.Practical implications: The TiB2 ceramic might be used for production of composites. From a practical position it is important to optimize the sintering densification of TiB2 ceramic.Originality/value: The TiB2 ceramics were formed using HP-HT technique without the use of additives. This method of sintering for TiB2 ceramics is original one.T7

  15. SHEAR BOND STRENGTHS BETWEEN CERAMIC CORES AND VENEERING CERAMICS OF DENTAL BI-LAYERED CERAMIC SYSTEMS AND THE SENSITIVITY TO THERMOCYCLING

    OpenAIRE

    SUN TING, BDS, DDS; SHAO LONQUAN, DDS, MS; DENG BIN, DDS, MS; WEN NING, DDS, MS

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength between various commercial ceramic core materials and veneering ceramics of dental bi-layered ceramic combinations and the effect of thermocycling. The shear bond strength of four dental bi-layered ceramic combinations (white Cercon, yellow Cercon, white Lava, yellow Lava, IPS E.max) were tested. Metal ceramic combinations were conducted as a control group. Half of each group was subjected to thermocycling. All specimens were ther...

  16. Improving the strength of ceramics by controlling the interparticle forces and rheology of the ceramic suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Y P

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the modification of the interparticle forces of colloidal ceramic particles in aqueous suspensions in order to improve the microstructural homogeneity, and hence the reliability and mechanical performances, of subsequently formed ceramic compacts. A concentrated stable fine ceramic powder suspension has been shown to be able to generate a higher density of a ceramic product with better mechanical, and also electrical, electrochemical and optical, properties of the ceramic body. This is because in a colloidally stable suspension there are no aggregates and so defect formation, which is responsible for the ceramic body performance below its theoretical maximum, is reduced. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to form a well dispersed ceramic suspension by ensuring the interparticle forces between the particles are repulsive, with as a high a loading with particles as possible. By examining the rheological behaviour and the results of Atomic Force Microscope, the dispersion ...

  17. Prestresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Aboushelib; A.J. Feilzer; N. de Jager; C.J. Kleverlaan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: A general trend in all ceramic systems is to use veneering ceramics of slightly lower thermal expansion coefficients compared with that of the framework resulting in a positive mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient (+ΔTEC). The concept behind this TEC mismatch is to generate compre

  18. Oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is given on the published works to study oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials in the last years. In the first part methods are described for the measurement of oxygen diffusion coefficients and in the second part the published reports on oxygen diffusion in glasses, ceramic and other oxides are discussed. The most important results are summarized in different tables. (author)

  19. Progress in Joining Ceramics to Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The research and development of joining methods of ceramics to metals, especially brazing, diffusion bonding and partial transition liquid phase bonding, were introduced. Some opinions were put forward. For new composites emerging, it is necessary to develop new joining methods, particularly in the field of high temperature technique for joining ceramics to superalloys.

  20. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti (

  1. Yellow cake to ceramic uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This overview article first reviews the processes for converting uranium ore concentrates to ceramic uranium dioxide at the Port Hope Refinery of Eldorado Resources Limited. In addition, some of the problems, solutions, thoughts and research direction with respect to the production and properties of ceramic UO2 are described

  2. Synthesis and characterization of biomorphic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biotemplating represents a recently developed technology for manufacturing of biomorphous ceramics from naturally grown plant structures. This approach allows the production of ceramic materials with cellular structure, where the microstructural features of the ceramic product are similar to the native plant. After processing, the biomorphic ceramic exhibits directed pore morphology in the micrometer range. Biomorphic SiC fibers were produced from bamboo by carbothermal reduction of SiO2 originally present in the bamboo structure. Bamboo pieces were heated up to 1500 deg C in argon to promote the reaction between carbon and silica. Biomorphic alumina, mullite and zirconia ceramics were manufactured via the sol-gel route by repeated infiltration of low viscous oxide precursors (sols) into rattan, pine and bamboo structures. The raw samples were pyrolyzed at 800 deg C in nitrogen for 1h and subsequently annealed at 1550 deg C in air. The microstructure and physical properties of the biomorphic ceramics were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high temperature-XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosimetry and picnometry. Thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) was performed on the infiltrated samples in order to evaluate the reactions and the total weight loss during the thermal process. The mechanical properties were evaluated by compressive strength tests. In contrast to conventional processed ceramic foam of similar porosity, the microstructure highly porous biomorphic ceramics shows uniaxial pore morphology with anisotropic properties. These properties are favorable for applications in catalyst support, filters or low-density heat insulation structures, or as biomaterials. (author)

  3. Ceramic Technology. Art Education: 6688.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaccio, Louis M.

    For information on the Visual Arts Education Curriculum of which this is one course, see SO 007 721. In this course students study ceramic material, form, and decoration, historically and technically, and demonstrate competencies in preparing clay bodies and ceramic glazes. Course content is outlined in those areas. Special sections of the guide…

  4. New ceramic materials; Nuevos materiales ceramicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-07-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  5. Light scattering in glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Glass-ceramic materials with microstructures comprised of dispersed nanocrystallites in a residual glass matrix show promise for many new technological applications. In particular, transparent glass-ceramics offer low thermal expansion and stability, in addition to the prospect of novel non-linear optical properties that can arise from the nanocrystallites. Good transparency requires low optical scattering and low atomic absorption. Light scattering in the glass-ceramic arises primarily from the glass-crystallite interface. The attenuation due to scattering (turbidity) will depend upon the difference in refractive index of the two phases and the size and distribution of nanocrystallites in the glass. Here we consider models of glass-ceramic structure formation and look at scattering in these model structures to increase our understanding of the transparency of glass-ceramics

  6. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  7. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  8. Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Knitter; W Bauer

    2003-02-01

    Fabrication of micropatterned ceramics or ceramic microparts make high demands on the precision and resolution of the moulding process. As finishing of miniaturised or micropatterned ceramic components is nearly impossible, shaping has to be done by a replication step in the green, unfired state. To avoid high tooling costs in product development, a rapid prototyping process chain has been established that enables rapid manufacturing of ceramic microcomponents from functional models to small lot series within a short time. This process chain combines the fast and inexpensive supply of master models by rapid prototyping with accurate and flexible ceramic manufacturing by low-pressure injection moulding. Besides proper feedstock preparation and sufficient small grain size, the quality of the final components is mainly influenced by the quality of the master model. Hence, the rapid prototyping method must be carefully selected to meet the requirements of the component to be fabricated.

  9. Cadmium tungstate ceramics for application as scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work is the production of cadmium tungstate scintillator ceramics (CdWO4 - CWO). The route of production employed was the solid state synthesis. Before the calcination, the precursors cadmium oxide and tungsten oxide were homogenized in an agate mortar. Bismuth oxide was used in the production of doped ceramics with 1% in mol of bismuth, in order to improve de efficiency of the scintillators. Since there is a possibility of Cd2+ loss at temperatures above 1000 deg C, ceramics with 1% of cadmium oxide excess were also produced. The crystalline phase was obtained after two calcination, according to X-Ray diffraction results. For the characterization, radioluminescence measurements were performed under β and X-radiation. Images of the surface of the sintered ceramic were registered by Atomic Force Microscopy. The density of ceramics bodies was calculated by the Archimedes' method and compared with the theoretical density (7.99 g/cm3). (author)

  10. Some nanostructural features in ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, S L

    1987-12-01

    Nanostructural features in some ceramics have been discussed and reviewed. Based on our research results and recent published investigations, many topics, such as grain, grain boundary, interface film, grain boundary engineering, microcrack, microdomain, nanodomain, domain boundary, and phase transformation, etc., have been dealt with; and many materials, such as Si3N4, beta''-Al2O3, MgO, SiC, (Hg, Cd) Te, BNN, ZrO2, PLZT, CdSe, Ca10(PO4)6, (OH)2, etc., have been involved. The results are important to understand the relation between the structure and property of materials and to improve the materials' technology. PMID:3505597

  11. Corrosion of ceramic matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Scanu, T.; Colomban, Ph.

    1993-01-01

    Air stable ceramic matrix composites are promising for thermostructural applications such as aircraft engine parts. Turbine parts are subject to both sulphuric acid and sodium molten salts corrosion due to sulphate traces in engine fuel and to the NaCl air content. The chemical stability is a very important criterion but this point has not received much attention to date. We report here a study of acidic and sodium corrosion of various aluminosilicate matrices : LAS matrices (Li2OAl2O32-6SiO2...

  12. Building ceramic based on sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöke, A.-M.; Muntean, M.; Dumitrescu, O.; Bartalis, I.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the rapid evolution in the last decade of science and engineering materials, development of new advanced materials, particularly in construction, we must find solutions, namely, new performed materials, with functional and aesthetic qualities. In recent years, there have been made alternative attempts to reuse various types of wastes, including the incorporation of products in ceramic clay. This theme concerning the achievement of some durable, economic and ecological materials represents a high-level preoccupation in this domain, the problems related to the ecosystem being permanent issues of the century.

  13. Building ceramic based on sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the rapid evolution in the last decade of science and engineering materials, development of new advanced materials, particularly in construction, we must find solutions, namely, new performed materials, with functional and aesthetic qualities. In recent years, there have been made alternative attempts to reuse various types of wastes, including the incorporation of products in ceramic clay. This theme concerning the achievement of some durable, economic and ecological materials represents a high-level preoccupation in this domain, the problems related to the ecosystem being permanent issues of the century

  14. Classification and shaping of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conjunction with the MATERIAUX 2006 Conference, the Federation francaise des materiaux (French Federation of Materials) via the Societe Francaise du vide (French Association of Manufacturer's of Products Under Vacuum or SFV) has published a vade-mecum listing a significant amount of general information about raw materials. Members of the GFC (Groupe francais des ceramiques) have written the pages dedicated to ceramics (pages 32 to 41). We shall publish some extracts of the publication throughout 2007, and finish this overview with a chapter on carbons. (authors)

  15. Properties of ceramic candle filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontius, D.H.

    1995-06-01

    The mechanical integrity of ceramic filter elements is a key issue for hot gas cleanup systems. To meet the demands of the advanced power systems, the filter components must sustain the thermal stresses of normal operations (pulse cleaning), of start-up and shut-down conditions, and of unanticipated process upsets such as excessive ash accumulation without catastrophic failure. They must also survive the various mechanical loads associated with handling and assembly, normal operation, and process upsets. For near-term filter systems, these elements must survive at operating temperatures of 1650{degrees}F for three years.

  16. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  17. Radiopaque strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram eHöland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals, was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2 – Al2O3 – Y2O3 – SrO – Na2O – K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O – P2O5 – F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: a Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6 , b Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4 c Sr5(PO43F – pollucite, CsAlSiO4 , and nano-sized NaSrPO4, d Sr5(PO43F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4.The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needlelike morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needlelike Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism.The formation of leucite, pollucite and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  18. Sintering kinetics of YAG ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄毅华; 江东亮; 张景贤; 陈忠明; 林庆玲; 黄政仁

    2014-01-01

    Solid state reactive (SSR) sintering kinetics was observed for YAG ceramics. There were two densification stages in sin-tering process due to its reaction. After the first stage, samples began to expand, then, the second densification stage began. At a heat-ing rate of 10 ºC/min, the sample warped down and warped back to straight. The apparent activation energy of the first densification process was about 522 kJ/mol for the initial shrinkage of Al2O3 and Y2O3 mixed powder green-body, which increased in the follow-ing process due to the solid state reaction. In the second densification stage, synthesis reaction of YAG still worked. Green-bodies processed with higher heating rate got more shrinkage at the same temperature than lower heating rate green bodies. And its kinetic field diagram was abnormal, compared with that of other reported ceramics, such as Al2O3. It was found that the reaction of YAG provided positive effect to the sintering driving force. The apparent activation energy for densification of SSR YAG sintered in ArH5 atmosphere was 855 kJ/mol at temperature holding sintering. And the apparent activation energy for grain growth was 1053 kJ/mol.

  19. Novel ceramics for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was found in a simulated body fluid (SBF) that functional groups such as Si-OH, Ti-OH, Zr-OH, Ta-OH, Nb-OH, COOH and PO4H2 are effective for the apatite nucleation. On the basis of these findings, it was shown that NaOH- and heat-treated titanium, its alloys and tantalum, a H3PO4-treated zirconia ceramics and CaO, SiO2 glass-treated poly(ethylene terephthalate) form the bonelike apatite on their surfaces in SBF. Among them, NaOH- and heat-treated titanium, its alloys and tantalum were confirmed to form the apatite on their surfaces in vivo and bond to living bone through the apatite layer. Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 glass microspheres were early shown to be effective for in situ radiotherapy of cancers. Recently, pure Y2O3 and YPO4 polycrystalline microspheres with high chemical durabilities were successfully prepared by high-frequency plasma method. They are expected to be more effective for the radiotherapy. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  20. Custom fabrication of reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Gopi Naveen; Sasikala, C.; Mutukumar, B.; Dhanasekar, N.

    2016-01-01

    A method of formulating a reinforcement lithium disilicate ceramic ingot was proposed. The ceramic ingot was broken manually with a mallet to finer particles. The sectioned ingot is ball milled along with 10% of nano zirconia by weight to obtain the desired powder. The reinforced powder is condensed in a 5 ml disposable syringe by powder slurry technique. The compacted ceramic were sintered at 900°C to obtain ceramic ingots. The reinforced ceramic ingots were used in pressable ceramic machines to obtain the desired advantages of zirconia reinforcement and pressable ceramic system.

  1. Experimental study of interface defeat in confined ceramic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experimental studies by Hauver et al. reveal that the ballistic performance of ceramic targets depends entirely on how the ceramic is confined in a composite target. If the ceramic confinement is preserved, the penetrator is consumed by lateral flow at the ceramic-cover plate interface; this mechanism is known as interface defeat. A number of variables are important in achieving optimum ballistic performance. The most relevant are: shock attenuation through the use of an attenuator plate, ceramic-cover plate interface, ceramic confinement pre-stress, ceramic-back surface interface properties, and shear localization sensitivity of the cover plate and penetrator materials. In this work several diagnostic tools are used to gain insight of the ballistic performance of ceramic targets. Stress histories produced at the cover plate-ceramic interface and ceramic-back plate interface are recorded with in-material gauges. Velocity measurements, at the back plate free surface, are recorded with velocity interferometry

  2. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buyakova, S., E-mail: sbuyakova@ispms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, S. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science RAS (Russian Federation); Sablina, T. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science RAS (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO{sub 2}(MgO), ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2} powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO{sub 2} grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  3. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyakova, S.; Sablina, T.; Kulkov, S.

    2015-11-01

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO2(MgO), ZrO2(Y2O3) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO2 powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO2 grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  4. Ceramic restoration repair: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Araújo Raposo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The esthetic and functional rehabilitation of patients with multiple missing teeth can be performed with several techniques and materials. Ceramic restorations provide reliable masticatory function and good esthetics. However, fracture can occur in some cases due to their brittle behavior. In some cases, the replacement of an extensive prosthesis is a problem due to the high treatment cost. In this paper, two cases are presented, in which fractures occurred in extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures, and their replacement was not possible. Ceramic repair was chosen and the sequences of treatment with and without presence of the ceramic fragment are also discussed. The cases illustrate that, in some situations, fractured metal-ceramic partial dentures can be successfully repaired when prosthetic replacement is not a choice. Prosthodontists must use alternatives that allow a reliable repair to extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures. Surface preparation of the ceramic with hydrofluoric acid in conjunction with a silane coupling agent is essential for a predictable bonding of composite resin. The repair performed with composite resin is an esthetic and functional alternative when extensive fixed partial dentures cannot be replaced.

  5. Review of micromachining of ceramics by etching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.T.TING; K.A.ABOU-EL-HOSSEIN; H.B.CHUA

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been an enormous surge in interest in ceramic materials and, as a result, there have been significant advances in their development and applications. Their inherent properties, such as capability of operating at temperatures far above metals, high level of hardness and toughness, low coefficient of thermal expansion and high thermal conductivity rendered ceramics to be one of the leading engineering materials. Many research works have been conducted in the past few years on machining of advanced ceramics using different processing methods in order to obtain a better surface roughness, higher material removal rate and improved tool life. Micromachining using chemical etching is one of those methods that do not involve the problem of tool life and direct tool-work piece contact. However, only a few research works have been done on micromachining of ceramics using chemical etching. Hence, study of chemical machining of advanced ceramics is still needed as the process has found wide application in the industry because of its relative low operating costs. In this work, we summarize the recent progresses in machining of different types of advanced ceramics, material processing methods such as wet etching and dry etching, and finally the prospects for control of material removal rate and surface quality in the process of ceramic micromachining.

  6. Ceramic coating on ceramic with metallic bond coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishitake, K.; Era, H.; Otsubo, F.; Sonoda, T.

    1997-09-01

    The change in structure and adhesion strength of the interface by heating in air has been investigated for a plasma- sprayed alumina coating on a ceramic substrate with a 50Ni- 50Cr alloy bond coating. A veined structure composed of NiO, NiCr 2O4, and NiAl2O4 oxides grew from the bond coating into cracks or pores in the top coating and the alumina substrate after heating at 1273 K for 20 h in air. The NiAl2O4 spinel may have formed by the oxidization of nickel, which subsequently reacted with the alumina coating or the substrate. The mechanism of the penetration of the spinel oxides into the cracks or pores is not clear. The adhesion strength of the coating is increased to about 15 MPa after heating at 1273 K for 20 h in air, compared to an as- sprayed coating strength of only 1.5 MPa.

  7. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  8. Manufacturing of superconductive silver/ceramic composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifi, Behrouz; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Eriksen, Morten;

    2000-01-01

    . After the mechanical deformation the tapes are heat treated at approximately 835C whereby the powder-cores by phase diffusion and grain growth are converted into superconducting, ceramic fibres. The geometry, density and texture of the powder cores before heat treatment is essential for the quality and......Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium, and...

  9. Rietveld analysis of ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were collected from three titanate waste forms - a calcine powder, a prototype ceramic without waste, and a ceramic containing 10 wt% JW-A simulated waste - and interpreted quantitatively using the Rietveld method. The calcine consisted of fluorite, pyrochlore, rutile, and amorphous material. The prototype waste form contained rutile, hollandite, zirconolite and perovskite. The phase constitution of the JW-A ceramic was freudenbergite, loveringite, hollandite, zirconolite, perovskite and baddeleyite. Procedures for the collection of X-ray data are described, as are assumptions inherent in the Rietveld approach. A selection of refined crystal data are presented

  10. Properties of textile grade ceramic fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of textile grade ceramic fibers has sparked great interest for applications in composite reinforcement and high temperature insulation. This paper summarizes the properties of various small diameter textile grade ceramic fibers currently available. Room temperature mechanical and electrical properties of the fibers are discussed for three cases: ambient conditions, after heat aging in argon, and after heat aging in wet air. Dow Corning (R) HPZ Ceramic Fiber, a silicon nitride type fiber, is shown to have improved retention of mechanical and electrical properties above 1200 C

  11. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, George T., II; Hansen; Jeffrey S.; Oden; Laurance L.; Turner; Paul C.; Ochs; Thomas L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  12. Porous ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Munch, Etienne; Franco, Jaime; Deville, Sylvain; Hunger, Phillip; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2008-03-15

    This work compares two novel techniques for the fabrication of ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering with complex porosity: robocasting and freeze casting. Both techniques are based on the preparation of concentrated ceramic suspensions with suitable properties for the process. In robocasting, the computer-guided deposition of the suspensions is used to build porous materials with designed three dimensional (3-D) geometries and microstructures. Freeze casting uses ice crystals as a template to form porous lamellar ceramic materials. Preliminary results on the compressive strengths of the materials are also reported.

  13. Rietveld analysis of ceramic nuclear waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.J. [Univ. of South Australia, Ingle Farm (Australia); Mitamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were collected from three titanate waste forms - a calcine powder, a prototype ceramic without waste, and a ceramic containing 10 wt% JW-A simulated waste - and interpreted quantitatively using the Rietveld method. The calcine consisted of fluorite, pyrochlore, rutile, and amorphous material. The prototype waste form contained rutile, hollandite, zirconolite and perovskite. The phase constitution of the JW-A ceramic was freudenbergite, loveringite, hollandite, zirconolite, perovskite and baddeleyite. Procedures for the collection of X-ray data are described, as are assumptions inherent in the Rietveld approach. A selection of refined crystal data are presented.

  14. How much of what is wear of THRs with ceramic-on-ceramic articulation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, A. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Lab. fuer Biomechanik und Experimentelle Orthopaedie

    2001-07-01

    The evaluation of the wear data for ceramic on ceramic explants is restricted to dimensional methods. Based on the maxima of the sphericity-deviations and on either the macroscopically worn areas or on an empirical relation to mass-loss in simulator tests different wear volume estimations are presented and compaired to volumes derived from preliminary CMM measures. Analysing ceramic particulate from serum lubricated tests was dominated by isolation artifacts. (orig.)

  15. Effect of Ceramic Surface Treatments After Machine Grinding on the Biaxial Flexural Strength of Different CAD/CAM Dental Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Bagheri, Hossein; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Aghajani, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different ceramic surface treatments after machining grinding on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of machinable dental ceramics with different crystalline phases. Materials and Methods: Disk-shape specimens (10mm in diameter and 1.3mm in thickness) of machinable ceramic cores (two silica-based and one zirconia-based ceramics) were prepared. Each type of the ceramic surfaces was then randomly treated (n=15) with different treatments as ...

  16. Archaeometric study of Amazon ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is no evidence of urban civilization in Brazilian prehistory; most inhabitants lived in tribal organization, probably with regional economic integration among several independent tribes. There are few evidences of seasonal migrations between the coast and the inland of southern Brazil. Some specialized horticulturists competed among themselves but other groups lived more isolatedly and probably peacefully, in the upper interfluvial regions. The chiefdom system is supposed to have existed only along the Amazon River. In this region, some pottery makers may have been specialized craftsmen and finest ceramics, that should have been exported from one village/region to another, can be found. In this study we tested some limited possibilities in three different cultural and regional contexts to see if application of analytic analysis in economically and politically 'simple' societies should give any results. (author)

  17. Surface characterization of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years several techniques have become available to characterize the structure and chemical composition of surfaces of ceramic materials. These techniques utilize electron scattering and scattering of ions from surfaces. Low-energy electron diffraction is used to determine the surface structure, Auger electron spectroscopy and other techniques of electron spectroscopy (ultraviolet and photoelectron spectroscopies) are employed to determine the composition of the surface. In addition the oxidation state of surface atoms may be determined using these techniques. Ion scattering mass spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry are also useful in characterizing surfaces and their reactions. These techniques, their applications and the results of recent studies are discussed. 12 figures, 52 references, 2 tables

  18. Nanocrystalline magnetic alloys and ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Pal; D Chakravorty

    2003-02-01

    Magnetic properties of materials in their nanocrystalline state have assumed significance in recent years because of their potential applications. A number of techniques have been used to prepare nanocrystalline magnetic phases. Melt spinning, high energy ball milling, sputtering, glassceramization and molecular beam epitaxy are some of the physical methods used so far. Among the chemical methods, sol-gel and co-precipitation routes have been found to be convenient. Ultrafine particles of both ferro- and ferrimagnetic systems show superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature. Coercivity $(H_c)$ and maximum energy product $(BH)_{\\text{max}}$ of the magnetic particles can be changed by controlling their sizes. The present paper reviews all these aspects in the case of nanocrystalline magnetic systems — both metallic and ceramics.

  19. Cellular ceramics in combustion environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuessel, Alexander; Boettge, Daniela; Adler, Joerg; Marschallek, Felix; Michaelis, Alexander [Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Cellular materials have become increasingly interesting for applications in combustion environments. Improvements like high power efficiency and low emissions are the main targets of technological development in combustion processes. However, despite scientific and technical success in developing new or improved burner concepts over recent years, a lot of problems remain to be solved in the field of materials science: due to the high power density of the burners the materials are subjected to high loads in terms of thermal shock, temperature and corrosion, especially in so-called porous burner technology. This article shows some examples of research and development strategies and results in developing improved cellular ceramics. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Nondestructive evaluation of sintered ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Klima, Stanley J.; Sanders, William A.

    1988-01-01

    Radiography and several acoustic and thermoacoustic microscopy techniques are investigated for application to structural ceramics for advanced heat engines. A comparison is made of the results obtained from the use of scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), and thermoacoustic microscopy (TAM). These techniques are evaluated on research samples of green and sintered monolithic silicon nitrides and silicon carbides in the form of modulus-of-rupture (MOR) bars containing deliberately introduced flaws. Strengths and limitations of the techniques are described, with the emphasis being on statistics of detectability of flaws that constitute potential fracture origins. Further, it is shown that radiographic evaluation and guidance helped develop uniform high-density Si3N4 MOR bars with improved four-point flexural strength (875, 544, and 462 MPa at room temperature, 1200 C, 1370 C, respectively) and reduced scatter in bend strength.

  1. Manufacturing of planar ceramic interconnects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, B.L.; Coffey, G.W.; Meinhardt, K.D.; Armstrong, T.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The fabrication of ceramic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and separator plates for electrochemical separation devices has been a perennial challenge facing developers. Electrochemical vapor deposition (EVD), plasma spraying, pressing, tape casting and tape calendering are processes that are typically utilized to fabricate separator plates or interconnects for the various SOFC designs and electrochemical separation devices. For sake of brevity and the selection of a planar fuel cell or gas separation device design, pressing will be the only fabrication technique discussed here. This paper reports on the effect of the characteristics of two doped lanthanum manganite powders used in the initial studies as a planar porous separator for a fuel cell cathode and as a dense interconnect for an oxygen generator.

  2. CERAMIC WASTE FORM DATA PACKAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2014-06-13

    The purpose of this data package is to provide information about simulated crystalline waste forms that can be used to select an appropriate composition for a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) proof of principle demonstration. Melt processing, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal analysis information was collected to assess the ability of two potential candidate ceramic compositions to be processed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CCIM and to guide processing parameters for the CCIM operation. Given uncertainties in the CCIM capabilities to reach certain temperatures throughout the system, one waste form designated 'Fe-MP' was designed towards enabling processing and another, designated 'CAF-5%TM-MP' was designed towards optimized microstructure. Melt processing studies confirmed both compositions could be poured from a crucible at 1600{degrees}C although the CAF-5%TM-MP composition froze before pouring was complete due to rapid crystallization (upon cooling). X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the crystalline nature and phase assemblages of the compositions. The kinetics of melting and crystallization appeared to vary significantly between the compositions. Impedance spectroscopy results indicated the electrical conductivity is acceptable with respect to processing in the CCIM. The success of processing either ceramic composition will depend on the thermal profiles throughout the CCIM. In particular, the working temperature of the pour spout relative to the bulk melter which can approach 1700{degrees}C. The Fe-MP composition is recommended to demonstrate proof of principle for crystalline simulated waste forms considering the current configuration of INL's CCIM. If proposed modifications to the CCIM can maintain a nominal temperature of 1600{degrees}C throughout the melter, drain, and pour spout, then the CAF-5%TM-MP composition should be considered for a proof of principle demonstration.

  3. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  4. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  5. Bioactivity of mica/apatite glass ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The bioactivity of mica/apatite glass ceramic composites, including the in vitro behavior in simulated body fluid and the histological appearance of the interface between the mica/apatite glass ceramics and the rabbit mandible defect in vivo under a dynamic condition. The results show that biological apatite layer forms on the surface of the mica/apatite glass ceramics after 1 d of immersion in the simulated body fluid, and becomes dense after 14 d. In vivo tests indicate that bone formation occurs after implantation for 14 d, and strong bonding of bone to the implant occurs after 42 d. No aseptic loosening occurs during 42 d of implantation. The finding shows that mica/apatite glass ceramics have good bioactivity and osteoconductivity for constructing bone graft, and can be promising for biomedical application.

  6. Simplex Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Blisk Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Matt; McConnaughey, Helen V. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the testing and demonstration of the Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Blisk. Also discussed are material damping, fatigue life, damage to trailing edges, performance, unsteady blade loading, and stress.

  7. Preparation of biomorphic SiC ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egelja A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new method for producing non-oxide ceramic using wood as a template. SiC with a woodlike microstructure has been prepared by carbothermal reduction reactions of Tilia wood/TEOS composite at 1873K. The porous carbon preform was infiltrated with TEOS (Si(OC2H54, as a source of silica, without pressure at 298K. The morphology of resulting porous SiC ceramics, as well as the conversion mechanism of wood to SiC ceramics, have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD. Obtained SiC ceramics consists of β-SiC with traces of α-SiC.

  8. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Zak C; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H; Jacobsen, Alan J; Carter, William B; Schaedler, Tobias A

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging. PMID:26721993

  9. Preparation and properties of dental zirconia ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Y2O3-stabilized tetragonal zireonia polyerystalline (Y-TZP) ceramics with high-performance were prepared for dental application by use of the micro-emulsion and two-step sintering method.The crystal phase,morphology,and microstructure of the reaction products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).XRD results show that the ceramics mainly consist of tetragonal zirconia.Physical and mechanical properties test results show that the bending strength,fracture toughness,and the density of full sintered Y-TZP ceramics are llS0 MPa,5.53 crown machined with this material by CAD/CAM system exhibits a verisimilitude configuration and the material's expansion coefficient well matches that of the glaze.These results further indicate that the product can be used as a promising new ceramic material

  10. Actively Cooled Ceramic Composite Nozzle Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I Project demonstrated the capability of the Pyrowave? manufacturing process to produce fiber-reinforced ceramics (FRCs) with integral metal features,...

  11. Etching and microstructure of engineering ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, S.G. (Cookson Group Technology Center, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Little, J.A.; King, J.E. (Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy)

    1995-01-01

    Engineering ceramics are often difficult to prepare metallographically because of their hardness, wear resistance, and chemical inertness. Two silicon carbides, a silicon nitride and a sialon, are prepared and etched using several different techniques. The most efficient methods are identified.

  12. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed

  13. Photon CT scanning of advanced ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced ceramic materials are being developed for high temperature applications in advanced heat engines and high temperature heat recovery systems. Small size flaws (10 - 200 μm) and small nonuniformities in density distributions (0.1 -2%) present as long-range density gradients, are critical in most ceramics and their detection is of crucial importance. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging provides a means of obtaining a precise two-dimensional density map of a cross section through an object from which accurate information about small flaws and small density gradients can be obtained. With the use of high energy photon sources high contrast CT images can be obtained for both low and high density ceramics. In the present paper we illustrate the applicability of the photon CT technique to the examination of advanced ceramics. CT images of sintered alumina tiles are presented from which data on high-density inclusions, cracks and density gradients have been extracted

  14. Faience: the ceramic technology of ancient Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Faiences are ancient Egyptian ceramic materials, considered as "high-tech" products. The paper discussed the method by which the faiences were produced and the application of SEM and Raman spectroscopy to their analysis

  15. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Zak C.; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H.; Jacobsen, Alan J.; Carter, William B.; Schaedler, Tobias A.

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging.

  16. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  17. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  18. Impurity phases in beryllium oxide ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Turnaev, S. K.; Bitsoev, G. D.; Kil'govatov, G. M.; Kiiko, V. S.

    2013-01-01

    An x-ray spectrographic method with an electron probe and a scanning electron microscope are used to study industrial ceramic specimen surface composition, distinguished by presence of a different color for both the main part, and impurity phases. BeO-ceramic specimens, having a visually differing color, are conditionally separated into three types. In reflected electron microphotographs impurities are distinguished qualitatively with respect to electrical conductivity. Iron impurity is invar...

  19. Hollow sphere ceramic particles for abradable coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hollow sphere ceramic flame spray powder is disclosed. The desired constituents are first formed into agglomerated particles in a spray drier. Then the agglomerated particles are introduced into a plasma flame which is adjusted so that the particles collected are substantially hollow. The hollow sphere ceramic particles are suitable for flame spraying a porous and abradable coating. The hollow particles may be selected from the group consisting of zirconium oxide and magnesium zirconate

  20. Measurement of radiant properties of ceramic foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental facility is described for the measurement of the normal spectral and total emissivity and transmissivity of semi-transparent materials in the temperature range of 600 C to 1200 C. The set-up was used for the measurement of radiation properties of highly porous ceramic foam which is used in low NOx radiant burners. Emissivity and transmissivity data were measured and are presented for coated and uncoated ceramic foam of different thicknesses. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of some ceramic clays from Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    1993-01-01

    This reports details the technical evaluation of ceramic clays collected during visits to Zambia in 1990 and 1991 by the author (Clive Mitchell). The clay samples included: Choma kaolin (Southern Province), Twapia kaolin (Copperbelt Province), Kapiri Mposhi kaolin (Central Province), Masenche clay (Northern Province), Leula clay, Misenga clay and Chikankata clay (Southern Province). The Choma kaolin was asessed to be an excellent source of ceramic-grade kaolin. The Twapia and Kapiri Mposhi ka...

  2. Impregnation of ceramic membranes by anatase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacík, M.; Hofman, R.; Mastný, L.; Šrank, Z.; Brožek, Vlastimil

    Praha: MAXDORF,s.r.o, 2004 - (Nitsch, K.; Rodová, M.), s. 64-65 ISBN 80-7345-032-1. [Joint Seminar Development in Material Science Research and Education /14th./. Lednice (CZ), 31.08.2004-03.09.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : ceramic membranes, anatase impregnation, photocatalytic properties Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  3. Tensile properties of open cell ceramic foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bertolla, Luca; Dlouhý, Ivo; Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2013), s. 106-113. ISSN 1338-1660. [FRACTOGRAPHY 2012. Stará Lesná, 21.10.2012-24.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/1821 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 - GLACERCO Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : tension test * cellular materials * ceramics Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  4. Low temperature synthesis of porous silicate ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Méndez Enríquez Y.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Impregnation of a polyurethane sponge with kaolin, feldspar, silica, fusible glass slurry followed by temperature treatment in air in the temperature range 800-1000 0 C leads to the formation of aluminosilicate ceramics with a set pore size. The low-temperature synthesis of porous ceramics is based on the stage-by-stage formation of low-temperature eutectics and thermodestruction of polyurethane sponge.

  5. CERAMIC RESTORATION REPAIR: REPORT OF TWO CASES

    OpenAIRE

    Luís Henrique Araújo Raposo; Natália Antunes Neiva; Gisele Rodrigues da Silva; Hugo Lemes Carlo; Adérito Soares da Mota; Célio Jesus do Prado; Carlos José Soares

    2009-01-01

    The esthetic and functional rehabilitation of patients with multiple missing teeth can be performed with several techniques and materials. Ceramic restorations provide reliable masticatory function and good esthetics. However, fracture can occur in some cases due to their brittle behavior. In some cases, the replacement of an extensive prosthesis is a problem due to the high treatment cost. In this paper, two cases are presented, in which fractures occurred in extensive metal-ceramic fixed pa...

  6. Literature search for ceramic vacuum tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, W.

    1977-01-12

    The NTIS and Engineering Index files were searched for citations relating to Ceramic and/or Metal Electron Tubes and High Temperature Electronics. A total of 24 citations were found relating directly to ceramic tubes and 24 to high temperature electronics. A search for electron tubes in general was examined for high temperature applications and 39 were obtained. Computer printouts of the abstracts are included in appendices. (MHR)

  7. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Future Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    With growing trend toward higher temperature capabilities, lightweight, and multifunctionality, significant advances in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be required for future aerospace applications. The presentation will provide an overview of material requirements for future aerospace missions, and the role of ceramics and CMCs in meeting those requirements. Aerospace applications will include gas turbine engines, aircraft structure, hypersonic and access to space vehicles, space power and propulsion, and space communication.

  8. Ceramic technology for the investment casting industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the ceramic shell system used in investment casting is described along with a number of other ceramic related techniques which have led to the establishment of the process at the forefront of metal forming technology. A number of raw material requirements are examined along with improvements in property measurement techniques at the system's operating temperature. The shells were investigated using x-ray diffraction. 13 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Study on Low Resistance PTC Ceramic Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The low resistance PTC ceramic thermistor material with excellent eleectrical properties are successfully fabricated by raw materials at industrial range made in our country on the study of its composition expression and fabrication process by using the addition of Nb, La, Y, Ta , microstructure regulator BN and ASTL phase .The composition and its fabrication method are studied.The relation of electrical properties of the PTC ceramic material to its composition expression and its related electrical properties are discussed.

  10. Tensile Behaviour of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řehořek, Lukáš; Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2009), s. 237-241. ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821; GA ČR GD106/09/H035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Tensile test * Ceramics foam * Open porosity * Tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.649, year: 2009

  11. Surface micromachining of unfired ceramic sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Rheaume, Jonathan M.; Pisano, Albert P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface micromachining techniques including photolithography and both wet and dry etching have been directly applied to an unfired sheet of yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic material. Reversible bonding methods were investigated for affixing unfired ceramic samples to silicon handle wafers in order to perform photolithography. Three types of photoresist were investigated. Thin film photoresist allowed a line-width feature size of 8 μm to be obtained. Thick film photoresist exhib...

  12. Ceramic matrix reinforced by BN nanofillers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašiarová, M.; Tatarko, P.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Dlouhý, Ivo

    Košice : Slovak Silicate Society - ASSTS, 2015, s. 33-36. ISBN 978-80-553-2122-6. [International conference Preparation of Ceramics Materials /11./. Herľany (SK), 09.06.2015-11.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK155 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : 3Y-TZP zirconia * boron nitride nanotubes * spark plasma sintering Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  13. Strengthening of steels by ceramic phases

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yujie

    2013-01-01

    Production of ceramic reinforced thin sheet steel composites for automotive application with low density, high elastic modulus and strength is the aim of current study. Within this work, potential of various ceramic phases and possible processing routes were studied, summarized and compared through literature research. Laboratory production of TiC, TiB2 and Fe2B reinforced steel composites through conventional melting-casting route, twin roller route and powder metallurgy method were carried ...

  14. Additive manufacturing of porous ceramic structures

    OpenAIRE

    Zocca, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This doctoral thesis describes the additive manufacturing of porous structures starting from preceramic mixtures. Preceramic polymers are a class of inorganic polymers which can be converted to a ceramic with high yield. The use of a preceramic polymer has been explored in this work with the double aim of providing the desired ceramic phases and of facilitating the shaping processes. The work is divided in three parts. In a first project, the powder-based three-dimensional printing technol...

  15. Ceramics for Dental Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Holloway

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past forty years, the technological evolution of ceramics for dental applications has been remarkable, as new materials and processing techniques are steadily being introduced. The improvement in both strength and toughness has made it possible to expand the range of indications to long-span fixed partial prostheses, implant abutments and implants. The present review provides a state of the art of ceramics for dental applications.

  16. Ceramic augmentation of the lower jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunte, M; Strunz, V

    1977-11-01

    Atrophy of the lower jaw is essentially a manifestation of vertical bone resorption and must be treated in a compensatory manner. Animal experiments have shown the value of the bioactive glass ceramic Ceravital as a bone replacement material. After box-shaped or step-shaped osteotomies, we perform interpositional plastic operations with glass ceramic in order to augment the atrophied human lower jaw. Results, advantages and dangers of the method are shown in 12 patients. PMID:271190

  17. Ceramics in Restorative and Prosthetic DENTISTRY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. Robert

    1997-08-01

    This review is intended to provide the ceramic engineer with information about the history and current use of ceramics in dentistry, contemporary research topics, and potential research agenda. Background material includes intra-oral design considerations, descriptions of ceramic dental components, and the origin, composition, and microstructure of current dental ceramics. Attention is paid to efforts involving net-shape processing, machining as a forming method, and the analysis of clinical failure. A rationale is presented for the further development of all-ceramic restorative systems. Current research topics receiving attention include microstructure/processing/property relationships, clinical failure mechanisms and in vitro testing, wear damage and wear testing, surface treatments, and microstructural modifications. The status of the field is critically reviewed with an eye toward future work. Significant improvements seem possible in the clinical use of ceramics based on engineering solutions derived from the study of clinically failed restorations, on the incorporation of higher levels of "biomimicry" in new systems, and on the synergistic developments in dental cements and adhesive dentin bonding.

  18. Thick highly textured (Bi, Pb)-2223 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dense (Bi, Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10+x ceramics textured by sinter-forging exhibit superconducting properties among the best for polycrystalline bulk 2223 materials. Investigations showed that the deformation during the sinter-forging process is mainly responsible for the grain alignment of the ceramics. A sharp texture can only be obtained after a strong deformation from the starting cold-pressed powder to the final thin forged disc. To obtain thick ceramics, several thin and highly identically textured discs were linked together by an additional short sinter-forging step. Microscopic observations showed that the interface between the discs disappeared after the hot treatment. Transport critical current measurements performed at 77 K through bars of different sizes confirm that, through an equal texture, the critical current density (JCT = 10,000 A cm-2) is nearly constant with the shape of the bar section: thin or thick, narrow or wide. A ceramic composed of many stacked and sinter-forged discs allowed resistivity and JCT to be measured along the sinter-forging axis. Low anisotropic ratios confirmed the strong link between the thin discs and a very homogeneous whole ceramic. This shape processing of bulk 2223 ceramics is thus attractive for the fabrication of current leads and limiters with high capabilities. (author)

  19. High Temperature Wear of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, C.

    2005-01-01

    It was initially hypothesized that advanced ceramics would exhibit favorable high te- friction and wear properties because of their high hot hardness and low achievable surface roughness welding observed in metals does not occur in ceramics. More recent tribological studies of many nitride, carbide, oxide and composite ceramics, however, have revealed that ceramics often exhibit high friction and wear in non-lubricated, high temperature sliding contacts. A summary is given to measure friction and wear factor coefficients for a variety of ceramics from self mated ceramic pin-on-disk tests at temperatures from 25 to up to 1200 C. Observed steady state friction coefficients range from about 0.5 to 1.0 or above. Wear factor coefficients are also very high and range from about to 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -2) cubic millimeters per N-m. By comparison, oil lubricated steel sliding results in friction coefficients of 0.1 or less and wear factors less than 10(exp -9) cubic millimeters per N-m.

  20. Marginal Strength of Collarless Metal Ceramic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikka Swati

    2010-01-01

    fracture strength at margins of metal ceramic crowns cemented to metal tooth analogs. Crowns evaluated with different marginal configurations, shoulder and shoulder bevel with 0 mm, 0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 1.5 mm, were selected. Methods. Maxillary right canine typhodont tooth was prepared to receive a metal ceramic crown with shoulder margin. This was duplicated to get 20 metal teeth analogs. Then the same tooth was reprepared to get shoulder bevel configuration. These crowns were then cemented onmetal teeth analogs and tested for fracture strength atmargin on an Instron testing machine. A progressive compressive load was applied using 6.3 mm diameter rod with crosshead speed of 2.5 mm per minute. Statisticaly analysis was performed with ANOVA, Student's “t” test and “f” test. Results. The fracture strength of collarless metal ceramic crowns under study exceeded the normal biting force. Therefore it can be suggested that collarless metal ceramic crowns with shoulder or shoulder bevel margins up to 1.5 mm framework reduction may be indicated for anteriormetal ceramic restorations. Significance. k Collarless metal ceramic crowns have proved to be successful for anterior fixed restorations. Hence, it may be subjected to more clinical trials.

  1. Expected radiation effects in plutonium immobilization ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A., LLNL

    1997-09-01

    The current formulation of the candidate ceramic for plutonium immobilization consists primarily of pyrochlore, with smaller amounts of hafnium-zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite or perovskite. At a plutonium loading of 10.5 weight %, this ceramic would be made metamict (amorphous) by radiation damage resulting from alpha decay in a time much less than 10,000 years, the actual time depending on the repository temperature as a function of time. Based on previous experimental radiation damage work by others, it seems clear that this process would also result in a bulk volume increase (swelling) of about 6% for ceramic that was mechanically unconfined. For the candidate ceramic, which is made by cold pressing and sintering and has porosity amounting to somewhat more than this amount, it seems likely that this swelling would be accommodated by filling in the porosity, if the material were tightly confined mechanically by the waste package. Some ceramics have been observed to undergo microcracking as a result of radiation-induced anisotropic or differential swelling. It is unlikely that the candidate ceramic will microcrack extensively, for three reasons: (1) its phase composition is dominated by a single matrix mineral phase, pyrochlore, which has a cubic crystal structure and is thus not subject to anisotropic swelling; (2) the proportion of minor phases is small, minimizing potential cracking due to differential swelling; and (3) there is some flexibility in sintering process parameters that will allow limitation of the grain size, which can further limit stresses resulting from either cause.

  2. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  3. Manganese-alumina-ceramic glass eliminates rigid controls necessary in bonding metals to ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollar, E. L.

    1968-01-01

    Matrix of manganese-alumino-silicate glass simplifies the processes of metallizing alumina ceramics. Because the manganese in the glass is preoxidized to the 2 plus state by firing in nitrogen, the ceramic can be metallized in dry hydrogen. Lengthening the firing time permits a lower metallizing temperature.

  4. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders : A comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazar, Dolores R. R.; Bottino, Marco C.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. (1) To synthesize 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. Methods.

  5. Ceramic and metal-ceramic nanostructures obtained by reactive ball milling

    OpenAIRE

    Secondi, J; R. Yavari

    1993-01-01

    We review ceramic and metal-ceramic nanostructures obtained by ball milling. We then report on the formation of titanium nitride by ball milling elemental titanium powder under nitrogen gas and on TiN-copper nanocomposites produced by ball milling a CuTi alloy under N2 gas.

  6. Strategies for fracture toughness, strength and reliability optimisation of ceramic-ceramic laminates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šestáková, L.; Bermejo, R.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Danzer, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 6 (2011), s. 613-626. ISSN 1862-5282 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Ceramic laminates * Layered ceramics * Residual stress * Fracture toughness * Threshold strength Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.830, year: 2011

  7. Ceramic Foams from Pre-Ceramic Polymer Routes for Reusable Acreage Thermal Protection System Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Chien, Jennifer; Schaeffler, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: Motivation. Current light weight insulation. Advantages of preceramic-polymer-derived ceramic foams. Rigid insulation materials. Tailor foam microstructures. Experimental approach. Results: sacrificial materials, sacrificial fillers. Comparison of foam microstructures. Density of ceramic foams. Phase evolution and properties: oxidation behavior. mechanical properties, aerothermal performance. Impact damage of microcellular foams. Conclusions.

  8. Ceramic to metal attachment system. [Ceramic electrode to metal conductor in MHD generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, D.D.

    1983-06-10

    A composition and method are described for attaching a ceramic electrode to a metal conductor. A layer of randomly interlocked metal fibers saturated with polyimide resin is sandwiched between the ceramic electrode and the metal conductor. The polyimide resin is then polymerized providing bonding.

  9. Evaluation of the reuse of glass and ceramic blocks in the development of a ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ceramic industry has enormous potential to absorb wastes. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing leftovers ceramic blocks, from construction and, with shards of glass in the development of a ceramic product. The ceramic pieces were prepared with different compositions of glass by the method of pressing conformation and heating at 1000 and 1100 deg C. The conformed pieces were tested for linear shrinkage, water absorption, porosity, and tensile strength. The techniques for characterization were X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, the results show that the ceramic material produced has a high flexural strength and low values of water absorption. (author)

  10. Development in laser peening of advanced ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pratik; Smith, Graham C.; Waugh, David G.; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Laser peening is a well-known process applicable to surface treat metals and alloys in various industrial sectors. Research in the area of laser peening of ceramics is still scarce and a complete laser-ceramic interaction is still unreported. This paper focuses on laser peening of SiC ceramics employed for cutting tools, armor plating, dental and biomedical implants, with a view to elucidate the unreported work. A detailed investigation was conducted with 1064nm Nd:YAG ns pulse laser to first understand the surface effects, namely: the topography, hardness, KIc and the microstructure of SiC advanced ceramics. The results showed changes in surface roughness and microstructural modification after laser peening. An increase in surface hardness was found by almost 2 folds, as the diamond footprints and its flaws sizes were considerably reduced, thus, enhancing the resistance of SiC to better withstand mechanical impact. This inherently led to an enhancement in the KIc by about 42%. This is attributed to an induction of compressive residual stress and phase transformation. This work is a first-step towards the development of a 3-dimensional laser peening technique to surface treat many advanced ceramic components. This work has shown that upon tailoring the laser peening parameters may directly control ceramic topography, microstructure, hardness and the KIc. This is useful for increasing the performance of ceramics used for demanding applications particularly where it matters such as in military. Upon successful peening of bullet proof vests could result to higher ballistic strength and resistance against higher sonic velocity, which would not only prevent serious injuries, but could also help to save lives of soldiers on the battle fields.

  11. Proton-conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, L.R.; Coffey, G.W.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Single-cell solid oxide fuel cells were constructed using strontium cerate as the electrolyte and their performance tested. Like certain zirconates, hafnates, and tantalates, the cerate perovskites are among a class of solid electrolytes that conduct protons at elevated temperatures. Depending on the temperature and chemical environment, these ceramics also support electronic and oxygen ion currents. A maximum power output of {approx}100 mW per cm{sup 2} electrolyte surface area was obtained at 900{degrees}C using 4% hydrogen as the fuel and air as the oxidant. A series of rare earth/ceria/zirconia were prepared and their electrical properties characterized. Rare earth dopants included ytterbia, yttria, terbia, and europia. Ionic conductivities were highest for rare earth/ceria and rare earth zirconia compositions; a minimum in ionic conductivity for all series were found for equimolar mixtures of ceria and zirconia. Cerium oxysulfide is of interest in fossil energy applications because of its high chemical stability and refractory nature. An alternative synthesis route to preparing cerium oxysulfide powders has been developed using combustion techniques.

  12. Corrosion of ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanu, T. (ONERA-OM, 92 Chatillon (France) LASIR, CNRS, 94 Thiais (France)); Colomban, P. (ONERA-OM, 92 Chatillon (France) LASIR, CNRS, 94 Thiais (France))

    1993-11-01

    Air stable ceramic matrix composites are promising for thermostructural applications such as aircraft engine parts. Turbine parts are subject to both sulphuric acid and sodium molten salts corrosion due to sulphate traces in engine fuel and to the NaCl air content. The chemical stability is a very important criterion but this point has not received much attention to date. We report here a study of acidic and sodium corrosion of various aluminosilicate matrices : LAS matrices (Li[sub 2]OAl[sub 2]O[sub 3]2-6SiO[sub 2],nP[sub 2]O[sub 5]) in the amorphous, [beta] eucryptite and [beta] spodumene forms, BAS matrix (BaOAl[sub 2]O[sub 3]2SiO[sub 2]) in the form of monoclinic and hexagonal celsian, NASICON matrix (Na[sub 3]Zr[sub 2]Si[sub 2]PO[sub 12]) and mullite matrix. Microstructure damages and ion exchange have been analysed by X-ray diffraction, IR absorption, scanning electron microscopy and Raman microprobe. Drastic corrosion is observed for [beta] spodumene containing composites with the formation of strong hydrogen bond or with the cell expansion due to Li/Na[sup +] exchange. Medium acidic attack occurs for glassy LAS, [beta] eucryptite, BAS and NASICON matrix composites. On the other hand, [beta] eucryptite, NASICON and monoclinic celsian resist to alkaline melts. Mullite matrix composites are never corroded. (orig.).

  13. Corrosion of ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air stable ceramic matrix composites are promising for thermostructural applications such as aircraft engine parts. Turbine parts are subject to both sulphuric acid and sodium molten salts corrosion due to sulphate traces in engine fuel and to the NaCl air content. The chemical stability is a very important criterion but this point has not received much attention to date. We report here a study of acidic and sodium corrosion of various aluminosilicate matrices : LAS matrices (Li2OAl2O32-6SiO2,nP2O5) in the amorphous, β eucryptite and β spodumene forms, BAS matrix (BaOAl2O32SiO2) in the form of monoclinic and hexagonal celsian, NASICON matrix (Na3Zr2Si2PO12) and mullite matrix. Microstructure damages and ion exchange have been analysed by X-ray diffraction, IR absorption, scanning electron microscopy and Raman microprobe. Drastic corrosion is observed for β spodumene containing composites with the formation of strong hydrogen bond or with the cell expansion due to Li/Na+ exchange. Medium acidic attack occurs for glassy LAS, β eucryptite, BAS and NASICON matrix composites. On the other hand, β eucryptite, NASICON and monoclinic celsian resist to alkaline melts. Mullite matrix composites are never corroded. (orig.)

  14. Properties of Ceramic Candle Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal-fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems require ceramic candle filter elements which can withstand the mechanical, thermal, and chemical environment of hot gas cleanup applications. These systems demand filter elements to sustain the thermal stresses of normal operations (pulse cleaning), of start-up and shut-down conditions, and of unanticipated process upsets such as excessive ash accumulation without catastrophic failure. The filter elements must also survive the mechanical loads associated with handling and assembly, normal operation, and process upsets. Objectives of the test program at Southern Research are as follows: (1) Provide material characterization to develop an understanding of the physical, mechanical, and thermal behavior of hot gas filter materials. (2) Develop a material property data base from which the behavior of materials in the hot gas cleanup environment may be predicted. (3) Perform testing and analysis of filter elements after exposure to actual operating conditions to determine the effects of the thermal and chemical environments in hot gas filtration on material properties. (4) Explore the glass-like nature of the matrix material

  15. Rolling Contact Fatigue of Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Wang, W. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Wang, Y. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Hadfield, M. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Kanematsu, W. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan; Kirkland, Timothy Philip [ORNL; Jadaan, Osama M. [University of Wisconsin, Platteville

    2006-09-01

    High hardness, low coefficient of thermal expansion and high temperature capability are properties also suited to rolling element materials. Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) has been found to have a good combination of properties suitable for these applications. However, much is still not known about rolling contact fatigue (RCF) behavior, which is fundamental information to assess the lifetime of the material. Additionally, there are several test techniques that are employed internationally whose measured RCF performances are often irreconcilable. Due to the lack of such information, some concern for the reliability of ceramic bearings still remains. This report surveys a variety of topics pertaining to RCF. Surface defects (cracks) in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and their propagation during RCF are discussed. Five methods to measure RCF are then briefly overviewed. Spalling, delamination, and rolling contact wear are discussed. Lastly, methods to destructively (e.g., C-sphere flexure strength testing) and non-destructively identify potential RCF-limiting flaws in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls are described.

  16. High temperature ceramic interface study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Monolithic SiC and Si3N4 are susceptible to contact stress damage at static and sliding interfaces. Transformation-toughened zirconia (TTZ) was evaluated under sliding contact conditions to determine if the higher material fracture toughness would reduce the susceptibility to contact stress damage. Contact stress tests were conducted on four commercially available TTZ materials at normal loads ranging from 0.455 to 22.7 kg (1 to 50 pounds) at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1204C (2200 F). Static and dynamic friction were measured as a function of temperature. Flexural strength measurements after these tests determined that the contact stress exposure did not reduce the strength of TTZ at contact loads of 0.455, 4.55, and 11.3 kg (1, 10, and 25 pounds). Prior testing with the lower toughness SiC and Si3N4 materials resulted in a substantial strength reduction at loads of only 4.55 and 11.3 kg (10 and 25 pounds). An increase in material toughness appears to improve ceramic material resistance to contact stress damage. Baseline material flexure strength was established and the stress rupture capability of TTZ was evaluated. Stress rupture tests determined that TTZ materials are susceptible to deformation due to creep and that aging of TTZ materials at elevated temperatures results in a reduction of material strength.

  17. ANL-1(A) - Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section includes the following papers: Development of Nondestructive Evaluation Methods for Structural Ceramics; Effects of Flaws on the Fracture Behavior of Structural Ceramics; Design, Fabrication, and Interface Characterization of Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites; Development of Advanced Fiber-Reinforced Ceramics; Modeling of Fibrous Preforms for CVD Infiltration; NDT of Advanced Ceramic Composite Materials; Joining of Silicon Carbide Reinforced Ceramics; Superconducting Film Fabrication Research; Short Fiber Reinforced Structural Ceramics; Structural Reliability and Damage Tolerance of Ceramic Composites for High-Temperature Applications; Fabrication of Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration; Characterization of Fiber-CVD Matrix interfacial Bonds; Microwave Sintering of Superconducting Ceramics; Improved Ceramic Composites Through Controlled Fiber-Matrix Interactions; Evaluation of Candidate Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells; Ceramic Catalyst Materials: Hydrous Metal Oxide Ion-Exchange Supports for Coal Liquefaction; and Investigation of Properties and Performance of Ceramic Composite Components

  18. Element Partitioning in Glass-Ceramic Designed for Actinides Immobilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Glass-ceramics were designed for immobilization of actinides. In order to immobilizing more wastes in the matrix and to develop the optimum formulation for the glass-ceramic, it is necessary to study the

  19. Development of high-density ceramic composites for ballistic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of ceramic composites for ballistic application has been generally developed with ceramics of low density, between 2.5 and 4.5 g/cm2. These materials have offered good performance in defeating small-caliber penetrators, but can suffer time-dependent degradation effects when thicker ceramic tiles are needed to defeat modem, longer, heavy metal penetrators that erode rather than break up. This paper addresses the ongoing development, fabrication procedures, analysis, and ballistic evaluation of thinner, denser ceramics for use in armor applications. Nuclear Metals Incorporated (NMI) developed a process for the manufacture of depleted uranium (DU) ceramics. Samples of the ceramics have been supplied to the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) as part of an unfunded cooperative study agreement. The fabrication processes used, characterization of the ceramic, and a ballistic comparison between the DU-based ceramic with baseline Al2O3 will be presented

  20. A new bio-active glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1960 fine ceramics such as alumina have been used side by side with metallic materials for bone and joint replacement. They have high mechanical strength and are free from corrosion problem faced by metals. However they don't bond to the natural living bone and hence are called bio-inactive. This was followed by the development of bio-active glasses and glass-ceramics which bond to the natural bone but have low mechanical strength. In the present work a new bio-active glass-ceramic, based on CaO-SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 3/-MgO composition, has been developed which has mechanical strength compared to that of a bio-inactive glass ceramic and also bonds strongly to the natural bone. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals wollastanite and apatite phases in the glass ceramic. A new bio-active cement has also been developed which can be used to join broken pieces of bone or by itself at a filler. (author)

  1. Performance study of the ceramic THGEM

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Jia-Qing; Hu, Tao; Lu, Jun-Guang; Zhou, Li; Qu, Guo-Pu; Cai, Xiao; Niu, Shun-Li; Chen, Hai-Tao

    2014-01-01

    The THGEMs based on ceramic substrate were developed successfully for neutron and single photon detection. The influences on thermal neutron scattering and the internal radioactivity of both ceramic and FR-4 substrates were studied and compared. The ceramic THGEMs are homemade of 200 um hole diameter, 600 um pitch, 200 um thickness, 80 um rim, and 50 mm*50 mm sensitive area. The FR-4 THGEMs with the same geometry were used for the reference. The gas gain, energy resolution and gain stability were measured in different gas mixtures by using the 5.9 keV X-rays. The maximum gain of single layer ceramic THGEM reaches 6*104 and 1.5*104 at Ne+CH4 = 95:5 and Ar+i-C4H10 = 97:3, respectively. The energy resolution is better than 24%. The good gain stability was obtained during more than 100 hour continuous test at Ar+CO2 = 80:20. By using the 239Pu source, the alpha deposited energy spectrum and gain curve of ceramic THGEM were measured.

  2. Preparation and Structure of Rainbow Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Xing

    2003-01-01

    Rainbow piezoelectric ceramics are a new type of stress-biased, oxide-reduced composite ferroelectric ceramics, which have a special dome structure. The have shown excellent properties such as ultra-high displacement under an applied electric field and enhanced load-bearing capability. In this article, their manufacture,structures and properties were discussed in detail by combining experiments and theory analysis. The resuts show that the optimal conditions for producing Rainbow samples from PLZT ceramics were determined to be 900℃ for 1 to 1.5 hours. A number of different phases have been found in the reduced layer of Rainbow ceramics by XRD analyses . The phases found include metallic lead and other oxide phases , such cs PbO , ZrO2 and TiO2 . The original PLZT phase was not observed. The reduced layer was transgranularly fractured while the unreduced ceramic was intergranularly fractured. Two kinds of fracture types can be seen at the interface , which denotes the different degrees of reduction. It is shown that the Pb grains ( about 0.2 μm ) constitute a continuous phase in the reduced layer, which accounts for the good electrical condnctivity.

  3. Smart Energy Materials of PZT Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Okayasu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the material properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT ceramics, the domain-switching characteristics and electric power generation characteristics have been investigated during loading and unloading by using various experimental techniques. Furthermore, the influence of oscillation condition on the electrical power generation properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT piezoelectric ceramics has been investigated. It is found that the power generation is directly attributed to the applied load and wave mode. The voltage rises instantly to the maximum level under square-wave mode, although the voltage increases gradually under triangular-wave mode. After this initial increase, there is a rapid fall to zero, followed by generation of increasingly negative voltage as the applied load is removed for all wave modes. Variation of the electric voltage is reflected by the cyclic loading at higher loading frequencies. On the basis of the obtained experimental results for the wave modes, the electrical power generation characteristics of PZT ceramics are proposed, and the voltages generated during loading and unloading are accurately estimated. The electric generation value is decrease with increasing the cyclic number due to the material failure, e.g., domain switching and crack. The influence of domain switching on the mechanical properties PZT piezoelectric ceramics is clarified, and 90 degree domain switching occurs after the load is applied to the PZT ceramic directly. Note that, in this paper, our experimental results obtained in our previous works were introduced [1,2].

  4. Microstructure Analysis of Thermally Etched Alumina Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fudurić Jelača, M.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ceramography is the art and science of preparation, examination, and evaluation of ceramic microstructures. Microstructure is the structure level approximately 0.1 to 100 μ m between the wavelength of visible light and the resolution limit of the naked eye. The microstructure includes most grains, secondary phases, grain boundaries, pores, microcracks, hardness microindentations. Investigation and evaluation of ceramic microstructure is very important because a number of mechanical, optical, thermal, electrical and other properties of ceramics are significantly affected by the microstructure. The techniques for ceramographic preparation are divided into five parts: sawing, mounting, grinding, polishing and etching.In this paper a method for preparation of a cold isostatically pressed high purity alumina ceramics (α-Al2O3 is described. Microstructure analysis of prepared ceramics was performed by means of optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Porosity is determined on the polished sample; grain size is measured after thermal etching. The mean grain diameter is determined by means of lineal-intercept method, circular-intercept method and image analysis.

  5. Proceedings of better ceramics through chemistry V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of chemical principles and practices to ceramic processing has mushroomed during the past decade, and the Materials Research Society's Better Ceramic Through Chemistry symposia have chronicled this growth biennially. The papers in the current volume were presented at the symposium Better Ceramics Through Chemistry V of the Materials Research Society Spring Meeting on April 27-May 1, 1992. Financial support was provided by Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Gelest Inc., the Office of Naval Research, and Radiant Technology Inc. As in the previous Better Ceramics Through Chemistry symposia, published as MRS Symposium Volumes 32, 73, 121, and 180, the present volume has as its focus sol-gel processing of oxide ceramics. In addition, however, considerable space is devoted to recent advances in related systems such as metal nitrides, carbides, and borides, polymer precursors, and cement composite materials, as well as other synthesis techniques such as chemical vapor deposition, aerosol routes and electrochemical processing. The volume is designed to provide both a retrospective and a preliminary view of exciting new results of mutual interest to ceramists and chemists

  6. Simulation and performance study of ceramic THGEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jia-Qing; Xie, Yu-Guang; Hu, Tao; Lu, Jun-Guang; Zhou, Li; Qu, Guo-Pu; Cai, Xiao; Niu, Shun-Li; Chen, Hai-Tao

    2015-06-01

    THGEMs based on a ceramic substrate have been successfully developed for neutron and single photon detection. The influences on thermal neutron scattering and internal radioactivity of both ceramic and FR-4 substrates were studied and compared. The ceramic THGEMs are homemade, of 200 μm hole diameter, 600 μm pitch, 200 μm thickness, 80 μm rim, and 50 mm×50 mm sensitive area. FR-4 THGEMs with the same geometry were used as a reference. The gas gain, energy resolution and gain stability were measured in different gas mixtures using 5.9 keV X-rays. The maximum gain of a single layer ceramic THGEM reaches 6×104 and 1.5×104 at Ne+CH4=95:5 and Ar + i-C4H10 = 97:3, respectively. The energy resolution is better than 24%. Good gain stability was obtained during a more than 100 hour continuous test in Ar+CO2 = 80:20. By using a 239Pu source, the alpha deposited energy spectrum and gain curve of the ceramic THGEM were measured. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205173) and State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (H9294206TD)

  7. Survey of ceramic machining in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Blau, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This report is a compilation of four subcontract reports provided by B. P. Bandyopadhyay who, while a visiting professor at Toyohashi University in Japan, conducted a survey of ceramic machining technology in that country from January 1 through December 31, 1992. Various aspects of machining technology were surveyed: types of parts being produced, types of ceramic materials being used, the nature of current ceramic machining research and development, and types of machine tools. The four separate reports compiled here were originally provided in a narrative, chronological form, and some of the information has been reorganized into topical areas for this compilation. This report is organized into three sections: The first describes ten ceramic machining research and development organizations and provides a reference list of their current technical publications; the second, two major trade shows; and the third, several other products and commercial developments noted during the course of Bandyopadhyay`s stay in Japan. An Appendix lists key individuals who are currently conducting ceramic machining research in Japan.

  8. Design of LTCC-based Ceramic Structure for Chemical Microreactor

    OpenAIRE

    D. Belavic; Hrovat, M.; G. Dolanc; Santo Zarnik, M.; Holc, J.; Makarovic, K.

    2012-01-01

    The design of ceramic chemical microreactor for the production of hydrogen needed in portable polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is presented. The microreactor was developed for the steam reforming of liquid fuels with water into hydrogen. The complex three-dimensional ceramic structure of the microreactor includes evaporator(s), mixer(s), reformer and combustor. Low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology was used to fabricate the ceramic structures with buried cavities and...

  9. Removing and Recovering Phosphate from Poultry Wastewater Using Amorphous Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Youhui Xie; Qin Li; Xianzhi Zhao; Yi Luo; Yangming Wang; Xiangwei Peng; Qigui Wang; Jian Su; Yin Lu

    2014-01-01

    A novel and effective technique for phosphate from poultry wastewater was developed using amorphous ceramics. Amorphous ceramics, which showed high performance for phosphate removal and recovery from poultry wastewater, were synthesized using unlimitedly available, inexpensive materials such as silica fume and lime. Dissolved phosphate in poultry wastewater can be deposited as a solid on the surface of amorphous ceramics. Phosphate content on the surface of amorphous ceramics could reach 14.2...

  10. Structural and electromechanical properties of bismuth-strontium titanate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bismuth-strontium titanate ceramics were obtained by conventional sinterization method (without orientation of grains - OF) and hot-forging (with oriented grains - HF). The physics, dielectrics and plutocracies properties these ceramics were compared. At piezoelectric characterization, the Kt values were higher in ceramics obtained by hot-forging (HF) when compared to ceramics obtained by OF, which indicates the high anisotropy of these materials. (author)

  11. Studies and Properties of Ceramics with High Thermal Conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The sintering technology of the AlN ceramics power were discussed. It is discussed that the compound sintering aids is consistent with the enhancement of the the thermal conductivity of AlN ceramics, and sintering technics is helped to the improvement of density. It is analyzed how to sinter machinable AlN ceramics with high thermal conductivity. And the microstructure of compound ceramics based on AlN was studied.

  12. Dental ceramics and the molar crown testing ground

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, P.; Dianne E. Rekow

    2004-01-01

    All ceramic crowns are highly esthetic restorations and their popularity has risen with the demand for life-like and cosmetic dentistry. Recent ceramic research has concentrated on developing a fundamental understanding of ceramic damage modes as influenced by microstructure. Dental investigations have elucidated three damage modes for ceramic layers in the 0.5-2 mm thickness using point contacts that duplicate tooth cuspal radii; classic Hertzian cone cracking, yield (pseudo-plastic behavior...

  13. AC Complex Impedance Analysis of Doped Strontium Titanate Multifunctional Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Doped SrTiO3 capacitor-varistor multifunctional ceramics were fabricated by a single sintering process. AC compleximpedance analysis was performed to investigate electrical features ofgrains and grain boundaries for both as-reducedceramic and reoxidized ceramics. The results showed that the as-reduced ceramic exhibited inductive response athigh frequencies above 2 MHz, which is attributed to the contribution of electron behavior in semiconducting grains.The high frequency inductive response disappeared in impedance plots of reoxidized ceramics.

  14. Frictional Resistance of Three Types of Ceramic Brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Claire L; Khaled Khalaf

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To investigate the static frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface in two recently introduced bracket systems and compare them to conventional ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems. Three variables were considered including the bracket system, archwire type and archwire angulation. Material and Methods Four bracket systems were tested in vitro: Self ligating ceramic, ceramic with metal slot and module, conventional ceramic with module and convention...

  15. Radiation induced optical centres in magnesium aluminate spinel ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There were investigated the optical absorption centers formation in magnesium aluminate spinel ceramics under irradiation with UV-light, X-, and gamma-rays. The lithium fluoride doped ceramics were produced by using hot-pressing technology. It was revealed that generation by irradiation changes in optical absorption spectra can be used for detection of invisible point defects in prepared ceramics, their distribution through the bulk of spinel disk, and predict the behavior of ceramics in different radiation fields.

  16. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  17. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  18. Study of Different Ceramic Substrates Technologies under High Temperature Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, L.; KHATIR,Z; Lefebvre, S.; Bontemps, S.

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the behaviour of ceramic substrates for power semiconductor packaging purpose under extremely high temperature cycles. The paper presents experimental results on different test vehicles including different technological ceramic substrates under very high temperature cycles. Test vehicles have been realised by APT Europe. They include different ceramic materials soldered on AlSiC base plate, DCB with AlN and Al2O3 ceramic substrates with and without dimples and different ...

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Yb - doped YAG Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Hostasa, Jan; Esposito, Laura; Alderighi, Daniele; Pirri, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Rare-earth doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramics are among the most widely produced transparent ceramics for laser applications. Yb:YAG ceramics are an interesting IR laser material [1], which allows significantly higher doping compared to the generally more used Nd:YAG [2,3]. This work presents the preparation of polycrystalline Yb:YAG ceramics with dopant concentration from 0 up to 20 at.% via solid state reactive sintering. Samples were prepared via cold isostatic pressing of spray ...

  20. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  1. Ceramic hot plate and method for its manufacture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhoek, M.J.; Van den Heuvel, R.C.; Kelder, E.M.; Schoonman, J.

    2000-01-01

    The subject is a hot plate comprising at least one cooking zone of ceramic material to be located above a heat source of a cooking range. The cooking zone consists of a ceramic material exhibiting a Mott transition. The material exhibiting a Mott transition may consist of a primary ceramic material,

  2. Ceramic tile glazes: design, trends and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfredini, T. [Modena Univ. (Italy). Faculty of Engineering

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this lecture is to describe the state of the art of glazes for applications in ceramic tile industry. A glaze for application in ceramic tile industry must satisfy certain requirements, which may be divided into two large groups, one in relation to its preparation and industrial utilisation and the other specific of the product utilisation. In order to design glaze compositions certain aspects must be taken into account. Viscosity and surface tension of the melt matching the body requirements, linear thermal expansion, nucleation and crystal growth processes occurring during firing, durability and optical properties must be designed and adjusted in the industrial practice. Glass-ceramic systems are the more suitable compositions for innovative glazes for fast firing of wall and floor tiles. (orig.)

  3. LAMP Joining between Ceramic and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Nishimoto, Kouji; Katayama, Seiji

    Joining of dissimilar materials is necessary and important from a manufacturing viewpoint. Therefore, the authors have developed a new laser direct joining method between a metal and a plastic which is named Laser Assisted Metal and Plastic (LAMP) joining method. In this research, LAMP joining was applied to join silicon nitride Si3N4 ceramic and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) engineering plastic, although metal was replaced by ceramic. The tensile shear strength of obtained joints was 3100 N at the maximum, which was strong enough to elongate a PET base plate of 2 mm in thickness and 30 mm in width. Moreover, transmission electron microscopes (TEM) observation demonstrates that the ceramic and the plastic are tightly bonded on atomic or molecular sized level.

  4. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  5. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  6. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-02-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  7. Characterization of some bioglass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElBatal, H.A.; Azooz, M.A.; Khalil, E.M.A.; Soltan Monem, A.; Hamdy, Y.M

    2003-06-26

    Controlled crystallization were carried out to convert some selected bioglasses to their corresponding bioglass-ceramics. Nucleation and crystallization regimes were carried out by parameters obtained from diloatometric measurement and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The formed crystalline phases were identified using X-ray diffraction investigation. Complete surface analyses were performed utilizing scanning electron microscopy. Also, the infrared reflection spectroscopy of the bioglass-ceramics were measured before and after immersion for prolonged times in simulated body fluid and the results were compared with the same behavior for the parent bioglasses. Experimental results indicate the formation of two main crystalline phases of sodium calcium silicate beside three other crystalline phases formed according to the change in the bioglass composition, namely, calcium sodium borate, calcium phosphate and calcium silicate. The bioactivity rate determined by the infrared reflection spectroscopy revealed slight retardation with the bioglass-ceramics except in the bioglasses containing high SiO{sub 2} content.

  8. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  9. Dissolution of tailored ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolution experiments on polyphase, high alumina tailored ceramic nuclear waste forms developed for the chemical immobilization of Savannah River Plant nuclear waste are described. Three forms of leach tests have been adopted; bulk samples conforming to the Materials Characterization Center Static Leach Test (MCC-1), a powdered sample leach test, and a leach test performed on transmission electron microscope thin foil samples. From analysis of these tests the crystalline phases that preferentially dissolve on leaching and the product phases formed are identified and related to the tailoring and processing schemes used in forming the ceramics. The thin foil sample leaching enables the role of intergranular amorphous phases as short-circuit leaching paths in polyphase ceramics to be investigated

  10. Interfacing design and making of Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2014-01-01

    as a pattern of circles, which size and 3d inner pattern are reflecting the position and speed of the hand. The second level has to do with realizing the modules in ceramics by 3d printing directly in porcelain with a RapMan printer that coils up the 3d shape in layers....... and Aesthetics in the conference. Digital technology as 3D printing with ceramic allows to bridge from the digital design environment to fabrication. At the same time novel digital means can create new interfaces between the human, space and the material. Here advances in 3d motion capture technology and sensors...... investigates the idea of an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics and is working on two levels. One which has to do with a digital interactive system that responds on the movement of the hands; at a certain distance the user’s hands appear on a monitor screen...

  11. Experiences with Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding ma....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....... material can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. SoundShaping is based on a generic audio feature extraction system and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used. Moreover, 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules...

  12. Experiences with voice to design ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding ma....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....... material can be transformed and utilised in the use of digital technologies. SoundShaping is based on a generic audio feature extraction system and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used. Moreover, 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules...

  13. Use of uranium in ceramic tableware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the radiological implications of using uranium in ceramic tableware to produce different hues in the glaze. An estimate of the skin dose due to beta emissions from the surface glaze is included. Because of adverse publicity and the threat of regulatory controls, manufacturers no longer use uranium as a color additive in tableware. However, radioactive dishes as well as other ceramics are still available in antique shops as collectors's items. The authors concluded the levels of radioactive material in ceramic tableware are not considered hazardous. However, such exposures are clearly avoidable and of no benefit to the public. Therefore, the use of such products should be avoided as unnecessary exposure to radioactive materials

  14. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

  15. Trace elements in ancient ceramics: Pt.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last period of Tong Dynasty, Jingdezhen began its production of ceramics. During the Song Dynasty, the ceramic industry greatly developed and produced fine white ware at Hutian. In the Yuan Dynastry, Hutian became the centre of production making the world famous blue and white wares. Here are reported results of analyses of ancient porcelians of Hutian in Jiangdezhen by reactor neutron activation analysis. The results show that the patterns of eight rare earth elements are apparently different for products in different periods, indicating that methods for producing ceramics or kinds of clay used were different. The contents of some other trace elements such as hafnium, tantalum, thorium and uranium show the same regularity in difference of composition also

  16. Cathodoluminescence of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tb, Ce, Eu activated oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with the composition SiO2 · Al2O3 · Li2O · LaF3 have been studied by cathodoluminescence (CL). We compared CL intensities and decay times of the Tb, Ce, Eu activated glass-ceramic samples and observed that the Tb activated sample has the most intense luminescence, but the Ce activated sample has the shortest decay times. Induced optical absorption and thermostimulated luminescence have been observed after X-ray irradiation of samples. -- Highlights: ►We have studied Tb, Ce and Eu activated oxyfluoride glass-ceramics. ► Ce activated sample has the fastest cathodoluminescence decay times. ► X-ray excited luminescence shows, that Tb activated sample is the most intense. ► Intensity of Tb activated sample is 10 times smaller than intensity of CsI(Tl)

  17. Ceramic application for regenerative burner system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D.B.; Park, B.H.; Kim, Y.W.; Bae, W.S. [RIST, Pohang (Korea)

    1999-05-01

    Recently, regenerative burner system was developed and begins to be gradually used for better energy savings. Compared to conventional burner system, the regenerative one has the several merits such as higher fuel efficiency, light weight of apparatus, low harmful toxic gas and homogeneous heating zone, etc. The regenerative material, a very important component of the new regenerative burner system should possess the properties of low specific density, higher surface area and high specific heat capacity. Ceramics is the best regenerative material because of stable mechanical properties even at high temperature and better thermal properties and excellent chemical stability. In this study, alumina ball, alumina tube, 3-D ceramic foam and honeycomb as regenerative materials were tested and evaluated. The computer simulation was conducted and compared to the result of field test. This paper is aimed to introduce a new application of ceramics at high temperature. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Compatibility problems with beryllium in ceramic blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compatibility of beryllium with structural materials (316L austenitic steel and 1.4914 martensitic steel) and with tritium breeding ceramics (lithium aluminate or silicate) has been studied in contact tests between 550 C and 700 C and for durations reaching 3000 hours. Beryllium-ceramic interaction is negligeable in all the temperature range with aluminate and up to 600 C with silicates. On the other hand, noticeable interaction is observed between beryllium and 316L steel at 580 C and above. Beryllium interaction with 1.4914 steel is visible only at 650 C and above and its amplitude is lower than 316L steel one. In these two cases, the superficial layer is brittle, and adherent to the steel. Comparison between beryllium - 0.4 wt% calcium alloy and beryllium at 700 C shows that interaction with steels or ceramics is qualitatively the same but slightly weaker. (author). 6 refs.; 6 figs.; 3 tabs

  19. Activation of consolidation processes of alumina ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrenin, S. V.; Zenin, B. S.; Tayukin, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    The methods for activating sintering ceramics based on Al2O3 by mechanical activation in the planetary mill, by adding in the mixture of nanopowders (NP) Al, Al2O3, and submicron powder TiO2, and by applying the technology of spark plasma sintering (SPS) are developed. It has been shown that adding the nanopowder up to 20 wt. % Al2O3 in a coarse powder α-Al2O3 activates the sintering process resulting in increased density and hardness of the sintered alumina ceramics. Substantial effect of increasing density of alumina ceramics due to adding the submicron powder TiO2 in the compound of initial powder mixtures has been established.

  20. On the ballistic response of comminuted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results have strongly suggested that the ballistic-resistance of different comminuted ceramics is similar, independent of the original strength of the material. In particular, experimental work focused on the ballistic response of such materials has suggested that ballistic response is largely controlled by shattered material morphology. Consequently, it has been postulated that control of the nature of ceramic fragmentation should provide a potential route to optimise post-impact ballistic resistance. In particular, such an approach would open up a route to control in multi-hit capabilities. Here, ballistic tests into pre-formed 'fragmented-ceramic' analogues assembled from compacted alumina powders with two differing morphologies were conducted. Strong hints of a morphology-based contribution to ballistic resistance were apparent, although there was insufficient fidelity in the experimental data set to categorically identify the nature of this contribution.

  1. Novel polymer derived ceramic hard materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaindl, A.; Lehner, W.; Greil, P. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Mater. Sci.; Kim, D.J. [Sung Kyun Kwan Univ., Dept. of Materials Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Manufacturing, microstructure and properties of novel ceramic hard materials derived from polymer/reactive filler mixtures were investigated. Carbide forming metal powders of Mo were used as fillers to react with the carbon bearing decomposition products of polymethylsiloxanes during pyrolysis in nitrogen atmosphere. Microcrystalline composites with the filler reaction product Mo{sub 2}C embedded in an amorphous SiOC-matrix could be formed with complex geometry due to near-netshape polymer/ceramic conversion. Depending on the filler and the pyrolysis conditions ceramic hard materials with Vickers hardness up to 10 GPa, fracture toughness of 5.1 MPa{radical}(m), a flexural strength of 330 MPa and a Youngs modulus of 280 GPa were obtained. (orig.) 8 refs.

  2. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, S.; Nair, Balakrishnan G.; Small, Troy; Heck, Brian

    2011-09-06

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  3. Development of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Improvement in the high-pressure turbopumps, both fuel and oxidizer, in the Space Shuttle main engine were considered. The operation of these pumps is limited by temperature restrictions of the metallic components used in these pumps. Ceramic materials that retain strength at high temperatures and appear to be promising candidates for use as turbine blades and impellers are discussed. These high strength materials are sensitive to many related processing parameters such as impurities, sintering aids, reaction aids, particle size, processing temperature, and post thermal treatment. The specific objectives of the study were to: (1) identify and define the processing parameters that affect the properties of Si3N4 ceramic materials, (2) design and assembly equipment required for processing high strength ceramics, (3) design and assemble test apparatus for evaluating the high temperature properties of Si3N4, and (4) conduct a research program of manufacturing and evaluating Si3N4 materials as applicable to rocket engine applications.

  4. Radiation damage in multiphase ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Danju [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2575 (United States); Patel, Maulik K.; Usov, Igor O. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Toiammou, Moidi; Monnet, Isabelle [CIMAP, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Pivin, Jean Claude [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris Sud, UMR 8609, Bat. 108, 91405 Orsay (France); Porter, John R. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5050 (United States); Mecartney, Martha L., E-mail: martham@uci.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2575 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Abstract: Four-phase ceramic composites containing 3 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (3Y-TZP), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and LaPO{sub 4} were synthesized as model materials representing inert matrix fuel with enhanced thermal conductivity and decreased radiation-induced microstructural damage with respect to single-phase UO{sub 2}. This multi-phase concept, if successful, could be applied to design advanced nuclear fuels which could then be irradiated to higher burn-ups. 3Y-TZP in the composite represents a host (fuel) phase with the lowest thermal conductivity and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the high thermal conductivity phase. The role of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and LaPO{sub 4} was to stabilize the structure under irradiation. The radiation response was evaluated by ion irradiation at 500 °C with 10 MeV Au ions and at 800 °C with 92 MeV Xe ions, to simulate damage due to primary knock-on atoms and fission fragments, respectively. Radiation damage and microstructural changes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy and computational modeling. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} stabilized ZrO{sub 2} and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases exhibit high amorphization resistance and remain stable when irradiated with both Au and Xe ions. A monoclinic-to-tetragonal phase transformation, however, is promoted by Xe and Au ion irradiation in 3Y-TZP. The LaPO{sub 4} monazite phase appears to melt, dewet the other phases, and recrystallize under Au irradiation, but does not change under Xe irradiation.

  5. SHEAR BOND STRENGTHS BETWEEN CERAMIC CORES AND VENEERING CERAMICS OF DENTAL BI-LAYERED CERAMIC SYSTEMS AND THE SENSITIVITY TO THERMOCYCLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN TING, BDS, DDS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength between various commercial ceramic core materials and veneering ceramics of dental bi-layered ceramic combinations and the effect of thermocycling. The shear bond strength of four dental bi-layered ceramic combinations (white Cercon, yellow Cercon, white Lava, yellow Lava, IPS E.max were tested. Metal ceramic combinations were conducted as a control group. Half of each group was subjected to thermocycling. All specimens were thereafter subjected to a shear force. The initial mean shear bond strength values in MPa ± S.D were 28.02 ± 3.04 for White Cercon Base/Cercon Ceram Kiss, 27.54 ± 2.20 for Yellow Cercon Base/Cercon Ceram Kiss, 28.43 ± 2.13for White Lava Frame/Lava Ceram, 27.36 ± 2.25 for Yellow Lava Frame/Lava Ceram, 47.10 ± 3.77 for IPS E.max Press/IPS E.max Ceram and 30.11 ± 2.15 for metal ceramic control. The highest shear strength was recorded for IPS E.max Press/IPS E.max Ceram before and after thermocycling. The mean shear bond strength values of five other combinations were not significantly different (P < 0.05. Lithium-disilicate based combinations produced the highest core-veneer bonds that overwhelmed the metal ceramic combinations. Thermocycling had no effect on the core-veneer bonds. The core-veneer bonds of zirconia based combinations were not weakened by the addition of coloring pigments.

  6. Sothi-Siswal Ceramic Assemblage: A Reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Garge

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Harappan evidences in Chautan valley has a unique ceramic tradition. In the light of recent plethora of knowledge as well as against the background of the studies conducted by A. Ghosh, J.S. Nigam, Katy Frenchman, Suraj Bhan & Madhu Bala, we will have to not only reclassify the Sothi-Siswal ceramic assemblage but also alter basic nomenclatures and concepts involve in it. It will give us deep insight in to the process of evolution of Early Harappan cultures vis-à-vis the dynamic of regional cultural complexes.

  7. Tritium transport in lithium ceramics porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, S.W.; Ambrose, V.

    1991-12-31

    A random network model has been utilized to analyze the problem of tritium percolation through porous Li ceramic breeders. Local transport in each pore channel is described by a set of convection-diffusion-reaction equations. Long range transport is described by a matrix technique. The heterogeneous structure of the porous medium is accounted for via Monte Carlo methods. The model was then applied to an analysis of the relative contribution of diffusion and convective flow to tritium transport in porous lithium ceramics. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Tritium transport in lithium ceramics porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, S.W.; Ambrose, V.

    1991-01-01

    A random network model has been utilized to analyze the problem of tritium percolation through porous Li ceramic breeders. Local transport in each pore channel is described by a set of convection-diffusion-reaction equations. Long range transport is described by a matrix technique. The heterogeneous structure of the porous medium is accounted for via Monte Carlo methods. The model was then applied to an analysis of the relative contribution of diffusion and convective flow to tritium transport in porous lithium ceramics. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Tritium transport in lithium ceramics porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A random network model has been utilized to analyze the problem of tritium percolation through porous Li ceramic breeders. Local transport in each pore channel is described by a set of convection-diffusion-reaction equations. Long range transport is described by a matrix technique. The heterogeneous structure of the porous medium is accounted for via Monte Carlo methods. The model was then applied to an analysis of the relative contribution of diffusion and convective flow to tritium transport in porous lithium ceramics. 15 refs., 4 figs

  10. Integrated ceramic electrode for warm liquid calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe the design and construction of a warm liquid media ionization cell to instrument the very forward collider region of the Superconducting Super Collider. This structure consists of an integrated ceramic electrode which combines the functions of mechanical support, anode charge collection, and high voltage feedthrough all into one unit. High internal electric fields and corresponding fast electron drift velocities are in principle achievable through flat, uniform metalization onto a pure ceramic substrate. A procedure to control electron affinic surface contamination below the parts-per-billion (ppb) level is described using an ultra-sensitive mass spectrometer

  11. Applications of sol gel ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sol gel method is a chemical technique in which polycrystalline ceramic films are fabricated from a solution of organometallic precursors. The technique is attractive for many industrial applications because it is a simple (films are processed in air), flexible (can be used to coat complex geometries) and cost effective (does not require expensive equipment) process. In addition, dense, high quality coatings can be achieved at much lower temperatures than is generally required for sintering bulk ceramics. In this paper the conventional sol gel method and the new datec process are reviewed and potential applications of sol gel coatings in automotive, aerospace, petrochemical, nuclear and electronic industries are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Fracture Toughness Prediction for MWCNT Reinforced Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the development of a micromechanics model to predict fracture toughness of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramic composites to guide future experimental work for this project. The modeling work described in this report includes (i) prediction of elastic properties, (ii) development of a mechanistic damage model accounting for matrix cracking to predict the composite nonlinear stress/strain response to tensile loading to failure, and (iii) application of this damage model in a modified boundary layer (MBL) analysis using ABAQUS to predict fracture toughness and crack resistance behavior (R-curves) for ceramic materials containing MWCNTs at various volume fractions.

  13. Electrochemical Codeposition of Ceramic Nanocomposite Films

    OpenAIRE

    Toledano, Reut; Okner, Regina; Mandler, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A novel method for deposition of ceramic nanocomposite films has been developed. This approach allows controlling the exact composition of the deposit, e.g., Cu-TiO2, Au-SiO2 and should enable the formation of a wide variety of coatings such as graded films, catalysts etc, in a straightforward approach. Sol-gel films are traditionally deposited via spin-coating, dip-coating or spraying. We describe a single step electrochemical deposition method for the preparation of ceramic nanocomposite fi...

  14. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  15. A randomized controlled clinical trial of 3-unit posterior zirconia–ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDP) with layered or pressed veneering ceramics: 3-year results

    OpenAIRE

    Naenni, Nadja; Bindl, Andreas; Sax, Caroline; Hämmerle, Christoph; Sailer, Irena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was to test whether or not posterior zirconia-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with pressed veneering ceramic exhibit less chipping than FDPs with layered veneering ceramics

  16. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section

  17. Compressive properties of open-cell ceramic foams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-yan; FU Yi-ming; ZENG Xiao-ming

    2006-01-01

    The compressive experiments of two kinds of ceramic foams were completed. The results show that the behavior of ceramic foams made by organic filling method is anisotropic. The stress-strain responses of ceramic foams made by sponge-replication show isotropy and strain rate dependence. The struts brittle breaking of net structure of this ceramic foam arises at the weakest defects of framework or at the part of framework,which causes the initiation and expanding of cracks. The compressive strength of ceramic foam is dependent on the strut size and relative density of foams.

  18. Reliability Estimation for Single-unit Ceramic Crown Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Lekesiz, H.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of a survival prediction method for the assessment of ceramic dental restorations. For this purpose, fast-fracture and fatigue reliabilities for 2 bilayer (metal ceramic alloy core veneered with fluorapatite leucite glass-ceramic, d.Sign/d.Sign-67, by Ivoclar; glass-infiltrated alumina core veneered with feldspathic porcelain, VM7/In-Ceram Alumina, by Vita) and 3 monolithic (leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic, Empress, and ProCAD, by Ivo...

  19. Tough hybrid ceramic-based material with high strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes a tough and strong hybrid ceramic material consisting of platelet-like zirconium compounds and metal. A mixture of boron carbide and excess zirconium powder was heated to 1900 °C using a liquid-phase reaction sintering technique to produce a platelet-like ZrB2-based hybrid ceramic bonded by a thin zirconium layer. The platelet-like ZrB2 grains were randomly present in the as-sintered hybrid ceramic. Relative to non-hybrid ceramics, the fracture toughness and flexural strength of the hybrid ceramic increased by approximately 2-fold.

  20. Coating of ceramic powders by chemical vapor deposition techniques (CVD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New ceramic materials with selected advanced properties can be designed by coating of ceramic powders prior to sintering. By variation of the core and coating material a large number of various powders and ceramic materials can be produced. Powders which react with the binder phase during sintering can be coated with stable materials. Thermal expansion of the ceramic materials can be adjusted by varying the coating thickness (ratio core/layer). Electrical and wear resistant properties can be optimized for electrical contacts. A fluidized bed reactor will be designed which allow the deposition of various coatings on ceramic powders. (author)

  1. Novel approach for high resultion TEM studies of ceramic-ceramic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic coatings on oxides can be studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), with minimal sample preparation, if the substrate consists of nonporous particles of simple geometric shape. Interfaces suitable for end-on examination by HRTEM can be readily obtained without any necessity for ion-beam thinning. All the interface orientations that are thermodynamically stable are available for examination from a single sample. This technique is of general applicability and can be used for studies of metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic interfaces. The authors have examined the nature of boron nitride interfaces with oxides such as MgO, TiO2 and Al2O3 and find that BN appears to wet the oxide surface and form tough, adherent coatings. The hexagonal crystalline BN grows with the (0001) planes always being locally parallel to the oxide surface in every instance

  2. Micro-separation in vitro produces clinically relevant wear of ceramic-ceramic total hip replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevelos, J.; Fisher, J. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Mechanical Engineering; Ingham, E. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Div. of Microbiology; Doyle, C. [Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Newbury (United Kingdom); Streicher, R. [Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Kilchberg (Switzerland); Nevelos, A. [Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    Typical clinical wear rates for well-positioned first generation ceramic-ceramic total hip arthroplasties (THAs) were of the order of 1-5 mm{sup 3}/year. This wear took the form of a 'stripe' of worn area on the heads with an Ra of approximately 0.1 {mu}m. As-manufactured unworn areas have an average Ra of 0.005 {mu}m Ra. This wear pattern has not been recorded following standard simulator testing with typical wear rates of less than 0.1 mm{sup 3} per million cycles. Therefore new material combinations for ceramic-ceramic total hip arthroplasty cannot be validated using standard hip simulator testing methods. However, recent fluoroscopy studies have shown that the head and cup of total hip replacements can separate during normal gait. This separation would lead to rim contact upon heel strike as shown in Figure 1. (orig.)

  3. Ceramic Inlays: Effect of Mechanical Cycling and Ceramic Type on Restoration-dentin Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, F Z; Kleverlaan, C J; da Silva, L H; Feilzer, A J; Cesar, P F; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max Press; IPS e.Max CAD; Vita PM9; Vita Mark II; and Vita VM7) and the mechanical cycling factor (with and without [100 N, 2 Hz, 1.2×10(6) cycles]). The inlays were adhesively cemented, and all of the specimens were cut into microbars (1×1 mm, nontrimming method), which were tested under microtensile loading. The failure mode was classified and contact angle, roughness, and microtopographic analyses were performed on each ceramic surface. The mechanical cycling had a significant effect (p=0.0087) on the bond strength between dentin and IPS e.max Press. The Vita Mark II group had the highest bond strength values under both conditions, with mechanical cycling (9.7±1.8 MPa) and without (8.2±1.9 MPa), while IPS e.Max CAD had the lowest values (2.6±1.6 and 2.2±1.4, respectively). The adhesive failure mode at the ceramic/cement interface was the most frequent. Vita Mark II showed the highest value of average roughness. IPS e.max Press and Vita Mark II ceramics presented the lowest contact angles. In conclusion, the composition and manufacturing process of ceramics seem to have an influence on the ceramic surface and resin cement bond strength. Mechanical cycling did not cause significant degradation on the dentin and ceramic bond strength under the configuration used. PMID:27455117

  4. Frictional Resistance of Three Types of Ceramic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the static frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface in two recently introduced bracket systems and compare them to conventional ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems. Three variables were considered including the bracket system, archwire type and archwire angulation. Material and Methods: Four bracket systems were tested in vitro: Self ligating ceramic, ceramic with metal slot and module, conventional ceramic with module and conventional metal with module. A specially constructed jig and an Instron testing machine were used to measure the static frictional resistance for 0.014 inches round and 0.018 x 0.025 inches rectangular stainless steel wires at 0° and 7° angulations. Main outcome measures: static frictional force at the bracket/archwire interface; recorded and measured in units of force (Newtons. Results: Self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems generated significantly less static frictional resistance than conventional ceramic bracket systems with the wire at both angulations (P < 0.05. Changing the wire from 0.014 round to 0.018 x 0.025 rectangular wire significantly increased frictional forces for metal slot ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems (P < 0.01. Increasing wire angulation significantly increased frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface for all four types of bracket systems tested (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Compared to conventional ceramic, self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems should give improved clinical performance, matching that of conventional metal brackets.

  5. Leaching behavior of glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokken, R. O.

    1981-11-01

    Glass ceramic waste forms were investigated as alternatives to borosilicate glasses for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. Three glass ceramic systems were investigated, including basalt, celsian, and fresnoite, each containing 20 wt percent simulated high-level waste calcine. Static leach tests were performed on seven glass ceramic materials and one parent glass (before recrystallization). Samples were leached at 90 C for 3 to 28 days in deionized water and silicate water. The results, expressed in normalized elemental mass loss, show comparable releases from celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics. Basalt glass ceramics demonstrated the lowest normalized elemental losses with a nominal release less than 2 grams per square meter when leached in polypropylene containers. The releases from basalt glass ceramics when leached in silicate water were nearly identical with those in deionized water. The overall leachability of celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics was improved when silicate water was used as the leachant.

  6. Lightweight Ceramic Composition of Carbon Silicon Oxygen and Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Lightweight, monolithic ceramics resistant to oxidation in air at high temperatures are made by impregnating a porous carbon preform with a sol which contains a mixture of tetraethoxysilane, dimethyldiethoxysilane and trimethyl borate. The sol is gelled and dried on the carbon preform to form a ceramic precursor. The precursor is pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form the ceramic which is made of carbon, silicon, oxygen and boron. The carbon of the preform reacts with the dried gel during the pyrolysis to form a component of the resulting ceramic. The ceramic is of the same size, shape and form as the carbon precursor. Thus, using a porous, fibrous carbon precursor, such as a carbon felt, results in a porous, fibrous ceramic. Ceramics of the invention are useful as lightweight tiles for a reentry spacecraft.

  7. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  8. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved

  9. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, G. D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin M.; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James C.

    2014-02-03

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (~1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  10. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, Gordon; Crum, Jarrod; Turo, Laura; Riley, Brian; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James

    2014-05-01

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1-5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  11. Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms for immobilizing ICPP high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms have been consolidated from simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant wastes by hot isostatic pressing calcined waste and chemical additives by 10000C or less. The ceramic forms can contain over 70 wt% waste with densities ranging from 3.5 to 3.85 g/cm3, depending upon the formulation. Major phases are CaF2, CaZrTi207, CaTiO3, monoclinic ZrO2, and amorphous intergranular material. The relative fraction of the phases is a function of the chemical additives (TiO2, CaO, and SiO2) and consolidation temperature. Zirconolite, the major actinide host, makes the ceramic forms extremely leach resistant for the actinide simulant U238. The amorphous phase controls the leach performance for Sr and Cs which is improved by the addition of SiO2. Glass-ceramic forms were also consolidated by HIP at waste loadings of 30 to 70 wt% with densities of 2.73 to 3.1 g/cm3 using Exxon 127 borosilicate glass frit. The glass-ceramic forms contain crystalline CaF2, Al203, and ZrSi04 (zircon) in a glass matrix. Natural mineral zircon is a stable host for 4+ valent actinides. 17 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  12. Wear characteristics of polished and glazed lithium disilicate ceramics opposed to three ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Kodaira, Akihisa; Okamura, Kentaro; Matsumura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the wear characteristics of a heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic material opposed to feldspathic porcelain, a lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and zirconia materials. Ceramic plate specimens were prepared from feldspathic porcelain (EX-3 nA1B), lithium disilicate glass ceramics (e.max CAD MO1/C14), and zirconia (Katana KT 10) and then ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens were fabricated from heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramic (e.max press LT A3) and then glazed or polished. A sliding wear testing apparatus was used for wear testing. Wear of glazed rods was greater than that of polished rods when they were abraded with ground zirconia, ground porcelain, polished porcelain, or polished lithium disilicate ceramics. For both glazed and polished rods, wear was greater when the rods were abraded with ground plates. The findings indicate that application of a polished surface rather than a glazed surface is recommended for single restorations made of heat-pressed lithium disilicate material. In addition, care must be taken when polishing opposing materials, especially those used in occlusal contact areas. (J Oral Sci 58, 117-123, 2016). PMID:27021548

  13. Support Services for Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.

    2000-06-06

    built to simulate the Kellogg entrained-bed gasifier in use at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville facility, but at 1/10 of the firing rate. At the exit of the unit is a large candle filter vessel typically operated at approximately 1000 F (540 C) in which coupons of materials can be inserted to test their resistance to gasifier ash and gas corrosion. The system also has ports for testing of hydrogen separation membranes that are suitably contained in a pressure housing. In addition, NETL is operating the combustion and environmental research facility (CERF). In recent years, the 0.5 MMBtu/hr (0.5 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) CERF has served as a host for exposure of over 60 ceramic and alloy samples at ambient pressure as well as at 200 psig (for tubes). Samples have been inserted in five locations covering 1700-2600 F (930-1430 C), with exposures exceeding 1000 hours. In the present program, the higher priority metals are to be tested at 1500-1600 F (820-870 C) in one CERF location and near 1800-2000 F (980-1090 C) at other locations to compare results with those from the EERC tests.

  14. The corrosion of ceramic-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic matrix composites could replace existing metals and alloys in aircraft, naval engine parts or heat exchanged systems because of their low density and high thermostability. These composites are promising materials for long-life applications if the metastable state of the composite is preserved during the synthesis and on working atmospheres without deletorious evolution of the fibre, the matrix and of the fibre-matrix interface. The review begins with a brief recall on the corrosion of ceramics able to be used in composites (SiC, Si3N4, AlN, BN, aluminosilicates, C). The main sources of corrosion in combustion environment (proton, sodium ion) are discussed. A comparison is made with long-term corrosion at room-temperature. Examples of the different corrosion mechanisms observed for Nicalon NLM202 fibre glass-ceramic or ceramic (LAS, CAS, celsian, cordierite, Al2TiO5, mullite, Nasicon) matrix composites developed at ONERA are presented : ion exchange, grain boundary dissolution, fluxing, favourable and unfavourable fibre-matrix reaction, enhanced corrosion by prior fibre-matrix reaction. (orig.)

  15. The corrosion of ceramic-matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colomban, P. [ONERA, Chatillon (France)]|[CNRS, LASIR, Thiais (France)

    1997-12-31

    Ceramic matrix composites could replace existing metals and alloys in aircraft, naval engine parts or heat exchanged systems because of their low density and high thermostability. These composites are promising materials for long-life applications if the metastable state of the composite is preserved during the synthesis and on working atmospheres without deletorious evolution of the fibre, the matrix and of the fibre-matrix interface. The review begins with a brief recall on the corrosion of ceramics able to be used in composites (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, AlN, BN, aluminosilicates, C). The main sources of corrosion in combustion environment (proton, sodium ion) are discussed. A comparison is made with long-term corrosion at room-temperature. Examples of the different corrosion mechanisms observed for Nicalon NLM202 fibre glass-ceramic or ceramic (LAS, CAS, celsian, cordierite, Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}, mullite, Nasicon) matrix composites developed at ONERA are presented : ion exchange, grain boundary dissolution, fluxing, favourable and unfavourable fibre-matrix reaction, enhanced corrosion by prior fibre-matrix reaction. (orig.) 39 refs.

  16. Samanid ceramics and neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarpay, G.; Frierman, J.D.; Asaro, F.

    1977-08-29

    Glazed pottery known as ''Afrasiyab'' and ''Nishapur'' wares (early Islamic ceramics) are generally attributed to the Samanid dynasty (819-1005). The clay composition of Samanid wares and discarded kiln items found in situ were analyzed by NAA and the elemental composition compared with that of other sherds. 7 figures, 1 table. (DLC)

  17. Nano-ceramics and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alex; Simpson, Randall; Landingham, Richard; Reibold, Robert A.

    2006-08-08

    Disclosed herein is a method to produce ceramic materials utilizing the sol-gel process. The methods enable the preparation of intimate homogeneous dispersions of materials while offering the ability to control the size of one component within another. The method also enables the preparation of materials that will densify at reduced temperature.

  18. Method of producing ceramic fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the evaporation procedure the UO2-ceramic powder, possible to sinter, is mixed with epoxy resin pellets or UO2-gel-pellets and compacted at a pressure between 700 and 2800 kg/cm2. After sintering at 12000 up to 16500C the pellets show a uniform porosity. (RW)

  19. Graded structures for all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Chai, H; Lawn, B R

    2010-04-01

    One failure mode of all-ceramic restorations is radial cracking at the cementation surface, from occlusally induced flexure of the stiffer ceramic layer(s) on the softer dentin underlayer. We hypothesize that such failure may be substantially mitigated by an appropriate grading of elastic modulus through the ceramic thickness. In this study, we fabricated graded structures by infiltrating glass into zirconia plates, with resulting diminished modulus in the outer surfaces. The plates were then bonded to a polymeric base and subjected to flexure by contact loading until fracture. Comparison of infiltrated specimens with non-infiltrated controls showed a significant increase in the fracture loads, by a factor of nearly 2. Finite element analysis revealed the cause of increase in the load-bearing capacity to be diminished tensile stresses within the lower-modulus graded zone, corresponding to an increase in material strength. The results confirmed that suitably graded structures can be highly beneficial in the design of next-generation all-ceramic restorations. PMID:20200413

  20. Using the Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer...

  1. Optical ceramics for fast scintillator materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nikl, Martin; Yanagida, T.; Yagi, H.; Yanagitani, T.; Mihóková, Eva; Yoshikawa, A.

    New York: Nova Science Publishers, 2013 - (Roa Rovira, J.; Rubi, M.), s. 127-176 ISBN 9781624177293 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12150; GA AV ČR KAN300100802 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillators * ceramics * oxides * halides * nanocomposites Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  2. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  3. Environmental performance of ceramic tiles: Improvement proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic tile is one of the most widely used materials in construction. Due to the increased demand for environmentally responsible construction and the ever more restrictive environmental requirements derived from the legislation, there is a need for a tool to enable the environmental behaviour of such material to be evaluated. By the application of the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology, this study is focused on calculating indicators capable of measuring the environmental behaviour of ceramic tiles. Taking the production of 1 m2 of ceramic as a functional unit, the aim was to perform a life cycle inventory that covers all the stages from mining the red clay and atomising it to glaze manufacture and the production of the ceramic tiles and their delivery to customers. Next, the stages/materials/processes that have the greatest impact were identified, and a series of improvements were proposed with a view to enhancing the energetic efficiency of the firing process and minimising the emissions into the atmosphere, while at the same time reducing the noise pollution resulting from the pressing process. The environmental and economic feasibility of such a improvements was also studied.

  4. Bismuth titanate ceramics obtained by hot forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, bismuth titanate samples were obtained from powder calcined at 800 deg C for 24 h through conventional sintering (OF) and hot-forging (HF) methods. The plate-like morphology grains were observed in ceramics obtained in both process. Samples produced by HF showed higher grain orientation, ≅ 90%. (author)

  5. Using the Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede Hansen, Flemming; Jensen, Kristoffer

    SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer...

  6. Study of ceramics sintering under high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic study was made on high pressure sintering of ceramics in order to obtain materials with controlled microstructure, which are not accessible by conventional methods. Some aspects with particular interest were: to achieve very low porosity, with fine grains; to produce dispersed metastable and denser phases which can act as toughening agents; the study of new possibilities for toughening enhancement. (author)

  7. Lutetium oxide-based transparent ceramic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeley, Zachary; Cherepy, Nerine; Kuntz, Joshua; Payne, Stephen A.

    2016-01-19

    In one embodiment, a transparent ceramic of sintered nanoparticles includes gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with europium having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YEu.sub.YO.sub.3, where X is any value within a range from about 0.05 to about 0.45 and Y is any value within a range from about 0.01 to about 0.2, and where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm. In another embodiment, a transparent ceramic scintillator of sintered nanoparticles, includes a body of sintered nanoparticles including gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with a rare earth activator (RE) having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YRE.sub.YO.sub.3, where RE is selected from the group consisting of: Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy, where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm.

  8. Segmentation and grain size of ceramics:

    OpenAIRE

    Arnould, Xavier; Chartier, Thierry; Chermant, Jean-Louis; Chermant, Liliane; Coster, Michel; Elmoataz, Abder

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents some methods to automatically extract the grain boundariesof materials in order to develop an automatic method to determine the grain size and morphological parameters of ceramic materials. Results are presented in the case of sintered cerine (Ce02) materials.

  9. Natural radioactivity of some metals and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural radioactivity of commonly used metals as aluminium, iron, steel and lead as well as special metals as tantalum and molybdene was determined. Also ceramic materials as bricks and its components and dental powders were analyzed. The results are discussed in view of dose committment for the population. (Author)

  10. Three-dimensionally Perforated Calcium Phosphate Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics were produced by compression molding using a special mold followed by sintering. The porous calcium phosphate ceramics have three-dimensional and penetrated open pores380-400μm in diameter spaced at intervals of 200μm. The layers of the linear penetration pores alternately lay perpendicular to pore direction. The porosity was 59%-65% . The Ca/P molar ratios of the porous calcium phosphate ceramics range from 1.5 to 1.85. A binder containing methyl cellulose was most effective for preparing the powder compact among vinyl acetate, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, stearic acid, methyl cellulose and their mixtures. Stainless steel, polystyrene, nylon and bamboo were used as the long columnar male dies for the penetrated open pores. When polystyrene, nylon and bamboo were used as the long columnar male dies, the dies were burned out during the sintering process. Using stainless steel as the male dies with the removal of the dies before heat treatment resulted in a higher level of densification of the calcium phosphate ceramic.

  11. Dielectric silicone elastomers with mixed ceramic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiubianu, George, E-mail: george.stiubianu@icmpp.ro [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Bele, Adrian; Cazacu, Maria; Racles, Carmen; Vlad, Stelian [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Ignat, Mircea [National R& D Institute for Electrical Engineering ICPE-CA Bucharest, Splaiul Unirii 313, District 3, Bucharest 030138 (Romania)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Composite ceramics nanoparticles (MCN) with zirconium dioxide and lead zirconate. • Dielectric elastomer films wDith PDMS matrix and MCN as dielectric filler. • Hydrophobic character—water resistant and good flexibility specific to siloxanes. • Increased value of dielectric constant with the content of MCN in dielectric films. • Increased energy output from uniaxial deformation of the dielectric elastomer films. - Abstract: A ceramic material consisting in a zirconium dioxide-lead zirconate mixture has been obtained by precipitation method, its composition being proved by wide angle X-ray powder diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average diameter of the ceramic particles ranged between 50 and 100 nm, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy images. These were surface treated and used as filler for a high molecular mass polydimethylsiloxane-α,ω-diol (Mn = 450,000) prepared in laboratory, the resulted composites being further processed as films and crosslinked. A condensation procedure, unusual for polydimethylsiloxane having such high molecular mass, with a trifunctional silane was approached for the crosslinking. The effect of filler content on electrical and mechanical properties of the resulted materials was studied and it was found that the dielectric permittivity of nanocomposites increased in line with the concentration of ceramic nanoparticles.

  12. A Ceramic Heat Exchanger for Solar Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson Jr., C.; Stacy, L.

    1985-01-01

    Design intended for high-temperature service. Proposed ceramic-tube and header heat exchangers used for solar-concentrating collector operating in 25- to 150-KW power range at temperatures between 2,000 degrees and 3,000 degrees F (1,095 degrees and 1,650 degrees C).

  13. Making Ceramic Reference Specimens Containing Seeded Voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Klima, Stanley J.; Roth, Don J.

    1994-01-01

    Internal and surface voids of known sizes incorporated into silicon carbide and silicon nitride ceramic reference specimens at prescribed locations. Specimens used to demonstrate sensitivity and resolution in nondestructive examination techniques like scanning laser acoustic microscopy and x-radiography, and to assist in establishing proper examination procedures.

  14. Samanid ceramics and neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazed pottery known as ''Afrasiyab'' and ''Nishapur'' wares (early Islamic ceramics) are generally attributed to the Samanid dynasty (819-1005). The clay composition of Samanid wares and discarded kiln items found in situ were analyzed by NAA and the elemental composition compared with that of other sherds. 7 figures, 1 table

  15. MECHANICAL STRENGTH OF HIGHLY POROUS CERAMICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBORN, IC; SANTEN, A; HOEKSTRA, HD; DEHOSSON, JTM; Born, I.C. van den

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical strength of highly porous ceramics in terms of the Weibull and Duxbury-Leath distributions. More than 1000 side-crushing strength tests on silica-catalyst carriers of various particle sizes have been performed in series. Within a series, preparation conditions we

  16. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  17. Calculation of the ceramics Weibull parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fuis, Vladimír; Návrat, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 58, - (2011), s. 642-647. ISSN 2010-376X. [International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedicine 2011. Bali, 26.10.2011-28.10.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : biomaterial parameters * Weibull statistics * ceramics Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics http://www.waset.org/journals/waset/v58/v58-132.pdf

  18. Preliminary Study of Fly Ash Ceramic Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary study of ceramic production process from two components ofwhich are fly ash and feldspar has been done. Aluminosilicate substancecontained in the fly ash is a basic material a former ceramic body, if itfired at the temperature of 1000 oC forms mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2). Mulliteis a refractory material which is very stable at the temperature changing.This experiment studies the ceramic production process of two componentsnamely fly ash with particle size of oC.Steps of processes are making paste of fly ash and feldspar, making of greenpellets, and firing of pellets, physical analysis of ceramic including volumedecrease, lost ignition, porosity, density, water sorption, compressivestrength. The experiment result at firing temperature of 1000 oC were shownthat best composition at the weight ratio of fly ash to feldspar are 60/40and 50/50. It physical characteristic respectively are decrease of volume0.54 and 0.69 %, lost ignition = 11.98 and 11.78 %, porosity = 0.159 and0.155, density = 2.05 and 2.06 g/cm3, water sorption = 18.96 and 18.36 %,compressive strength = 24.82 and 24.79 kN/mm2. (author)

  19. Safety status of HTGR structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to assess the safety status of structural ceramics proposed for use in an HTGR. In this report the mechanical and physical properties of the proposed structural ceramics are reviewed, and the current design and material specifications are discussed. Potential safety problem areas are identified. Analytical models for creep deformation, devitrification, compatibility, fatigue, and thermal insulation stability are based on published work in the literature. The predictions made are generally based upon extrapolations to HTGR conditions. The data indicate that creep deformation in silicon nitride and alumina ceramics is acceptable if the purity and composition are properly controlled. Devitrification and creep in fused silica used in the core support structure and the thermal barrier system could be excessive. Thermodynamic data indicate that silicon nitride will be incompatible with the graphite seat used in the design. Under normal reactor operating conditions, or during start-up and shutdown, static fatigue and thermal shock effects in all three members of the core support structural ceramics could cause reductions in safety factors

  20. Stress rupture in metals and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of nucleation and growth of cavities in grain boundaries in metals and ceramics are reviewed. A stress and time condition for nucleation is derived and it is suggested that the junctions of three interfaces such as those formed between inclusions and grain boundaries are the most probable sites for nucleation. Growth of cavities by diffusion also leads to a stress and time condition for failure. Both grain boundary and surface diffusion enter into the fracture equation. In metals, cavities can also grow by power law creep for which a strain and strain rate condition for fracture is obtained. In those ceramic materials, which contain a glass phase in the grain boundaries, the fracture process is dominated by the viscous flow of the glass and the formation of cavities in the glass phase. There is considerable opportunity for new micro-mechanical-modelling and experimental work in ceramic materials which could lead to the design of new ceramics with unusual properties such as superplasticity. In metals, the influence of environment, multiaxial stresses, and notches on cavitation are recommended as topics for further research

  1. Fission reactor irradiation of candidate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of eleven candidate ceramics (MgO. xAl2O3 in five forms, and Al2O3, Si3N4 and SiC in two forms each) have been sent to the EBR-II fission reactor for neutron irradiation testing. EBR-II is being used because of its high neutron flux and the absence of thermal neutrons which cause undesirable nuclear reactions with 14N. The four families of ceramics selected for inclusion have all shown acceptable performance in irradiation tests carried out by the LASL Ceramics Program or by others. The present study will in some cases yield results at temperatures not yet investigated, and in others will allow the evaluation of forms of these ceramics never before irradiated. Samples will be irradiated at 675 and 825 K to approx. 2.4 x 1022 n/cm2 (E/sub n/ > 0.1 MeV), after which changes in electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties will be determined

  2. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C Kong

    2010-07-01

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  3. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  4. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ritzberger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate high translucency, preferable optical/mechanical properties and an application as dental inlays, onlays and crowns. Based on an improvement of the mechanical parameters, specially the strength and toughness, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramics are used as crowns; applying a procedure to machine an intermediate product and producing the final glass-ceramic by an additional heat treatment. Small dental bridges of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were fabricated using a molding technology. ZrO2 ceramics show high toughness and strength and were veneered with fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. Machining is possible with a porous intermediate product.

  5. Reitveld refinement study of PLZT ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bavbande, D. V.; Bafna, V. H.; Mohan, D.; Kothiyal, G. P. [Glass and Advanced Ceramics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Mishra, R. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2013-02-05

    PLZT ceramics of composition Pb{sub 0.93}La{sub 0.07}(Zr{sub 0.60}Ti{sub 0.40})O{sub 3}, have been milled for 6hrs and 24hrs were prepared by solid state synthesis route. The 6hrs milled and 24hrs milled samples are represented as PLZT-6 and PLZT-24 ceramics respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern was recorded at room temperature. The XRD pattern has been analyzed by employing Rietveld refinement method. Phase identification shows that all the peaks observed in PLZT-6 and PLZT-24 ceramics could be indexed to P4mm space group with tetragonal symmetry. The unit cell parameters of 6hrs milled PLZT ceramics are found to be a=b=4.0781(5)A and c=4.0938(7)A and for 24hrs milled PLZT ceramics unit cell parameters are a=b=4.0679(4)A and c=4.1010(5)A . The axial ratio c/a and unit cell volume of PLZT-6 are 1.0038 and 68.09(2)A{sup 3} respectively. In PLZT-24 samples, the axial ratio c/a value is 1.0080 which is little more than that of the 6hr milled PLZT sample whereas the unit cell volume decrease to 67.88 (1) A{sup 3}. An average crystallite size was estimated by using Scherrer's formula. Dielectric properties were obtained by measuring the capacitance and tand loss using Stanford LCR meter.

  6. KROME Ceramics: color management system for the ceramics industry; KROME: Ceramics Sistema de gestion del color para la industra ceramica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Luque, J.; Pla, O.; Selvi, S.

    2013-05-01

    Digital Decoration Systems, SL (DIGIT-S) with Unicer, SL, has implemented a system to improve and optimize the process of decorating by inkjet printing for ceramic industry. It provides a comprehensive solution, KROME Ceramics, to improve the cost effectiveness of product and process through the implementation of a working system based on the control of digital decoration process and the synchronization of all elements that make up the decorative modules, including the creation of a work flow, management of files that are generated during the process, a correct color management system, and of course, optimizing and evaluating ink jet inks integrating all elements involved: Lighting, Computer, Software, Monitor, Plotter, Paper, Ink, Ink jet, Body's, Enamels and Oven. (Author)

  7. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets

  8. A comparison between the effect of All-Ceramic and metal-ceramic restorations on the plaque accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezatollah Jalalian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Tooth crowning often leads to changes in periodontal index through changes in emergence profile zone. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of metal-ceramic with that ofAll-Ceramic restorations on the plaque a accumulation.   Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, we used 102 teeth covered with metal-ceramic and all-ceramic restorations. Before and after crowning, plaque index (PI and gingival indexes (MGl were measured. Data were analyzed using covariance (ANCOVA test.   Results: Measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD in PFM Group prior to crowning were (1.96±0.38 and (1.45±0.48, respectively. In metal-ceramic restorations group, six months after crowning, measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD were (1.22±0.49 and (1.82±0.61, respectively. Measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD in All-Ceramic Group prior to crowning were (1.22±0.52 and (1.25±0.29, respectively. In All-Ceramic, six months after crowning, measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD were (0.88±0.51 and (1.43±0.50, respectively. ANOVA test showed statistical significance difference between metal-ceramic and All-Ceramic Groups in Indexes (P<0.001.   Conclusion: Metal-ceramic and All-Ceramic crowns were associated with inflammatory changes in gingival. Metal-ceramic restorations were associated with higher inflammatory indexes compared with All-Ceramic crowns.

  9. Current Issues with Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental barrier coating (EBC) for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 ceramics is an emerging field as the application of silicon-based ceramics in the gas turbine engine hot section is on the horizon, both for aero and industrial gas turbines. EBC is an enabling technology for silicon-based ceramics because these materials without an EBC cannot be used in combustion environments due to rapid surface recession. Significant progress in EBC development has been made during the last decade through various government-sponsored programs. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit temperature capability of current EBCs to about 1350 C for long-term applications. There is a need for higher temperature EBCs as the temperature capability of silicon-based ceramics continue to increase. Therefore, research is underway to develop EBCs with improved temperature capability compared to current EBCs. The current status and issues with the advanced EBC development efforts will be discussed.

  10. PREFACE: 3rd International Congress on Ceramics (ICC3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niihara, Koichi; Ohji, Tatsuki; Sakka, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Early in 2005, the American Ceramic Society, the European Ceramic Society and the Ceramic Society of Japan announced a collaborative effort to provide leadership for the global ceramics community that would facilitate the use of ceramic and glass materials. That effort resulted in an agreement to organize a new biennial series of the International Congress on Ceramics, convened by the International Ceramic Federation (ICF). In order to share ideas and visions of the future for ceramic and glass materials, the 1st International Congress on Ceramics (ICC1) was held in Canada, 2006, under the organization of the American Ceramic Society, and the 2nd Congress (ICC2) was held in Italy, 2008, hosted by the European Ceramic Society. Organized by the Ceramic Society of Japan, the 3rd Congress (ICC3) was held in Osaka, Japan, 14-18 November 2010. Incorporating the 23rd Fall Meeting of the Ceramic Society of Japan and the 20th Iketani Conference, ICC3 was also co-organized by the Iketani Science and Technology Foundation, and was endorsed and supported by ICF, Asia-Oceania Ceramic Federation (AOCF) as well as many other organizations. Following the style of the previous two successful Congresses, the program was designed to advance ceramic and glass technologies to the next generation through discussion of the most recent advances and future perspectives, and to engage the worldwide ceramics community in a collective effort to expand the use of these materials in both conventional as well as new and exciting applications. ICC3 consisted of 22 voluntarily organized symposia in the most topical and essential themes of ceramic and glass materials, including Characterization, design and processing technologies Electro, magnetic and optical ceramics and devices Energy and environment related ceramics and systems Bio-ceramics and bio-technologies Ceramics for advanced industry and safety society Innovation in traditional ceramics It also contained the Plenary Session and the

  11. Ceramic materials for fission and fusion nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general survey on the ceramics for nuclear applications is presented. For the fission nuclear reactor, the ceramics materials are almost totally used as fuel e.g. (U,Pu)O2; other types of ceramics, e.g. Uranium-Plutonium carbide and nitride, have been investigated as potential nuclear fuels. The (U,Pu)N compound is to be the fuel for the space nuclear power reactor in the U.S.A. For the fusion nuclear reactor, the ceramics should be the fundamental materials for many components: first wall, breeder, RF heating systems, insulant and shielding parts, etc. In recent years many countries are involved on the research and development of ceramic compounds with the principal purpose of being used in the fusion powerplant (year 2010-2020 ?). An effort has been even made to verify if it is possible to use more ceramic components in the fission nuclear plant (probably differntly disigned) to improve the safety level

  12. [Multiply upconversion emission in oxyfluoride ceramics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Si-guo; Yang, Xiao-liang; Liu, Zhen-wei

    2003-02-01

    Oxyfluoride ceramics with the host composition of SiO2 and PbF2 have been prepared. X-ray diffraction analysis of the ceramics revealed that fluoride type beta-PbF2 solid solution regions are precipitated in the glass matrix. Rare earth ions in the beta-PbF2 solid solution show highly efficient upconversion performance due to the very small multi-phonon relaxation rates. Eight upconversion emission bands whose central wavelength are 846, 803, 665, 549, 523, 487, 456 and 411 nm have been observed when the sample was excited with 930 nm diode light. Four possible energy transfer processes between Er3+ and Yb3+ cause the electronic population of high energy level of Er3+ and realize the abound upconversion luminescence bands. PMID:12939954

  13. Electrical resistivity measurements in superconducting ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical resistivity measurements have been done in (Y, Ba, Cu, O) - and (Y, A1, Ba, Cu, O) - based superconducting ceramics. The sintered specimens were prepared by applying gold electrodes and winding on the non-metalized part with a copper strip to be immersed in liquid nitrogen for cooling. The resistivity measurements have been done by the four-probe method. A copper-constantan or chromel-alumel thermocouple inserted between the specimen and the copper cold finger has been used for the determination of the critical temperature Tc. Details of the experimental set-up and resistivity versus temperature plots in the LNT-RT range for the superconducting ceramics are the major contributions of this communication. (author)

  14. Radiation effects in ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on alpha-decay event damage (a particle and recoil-nucleus) that results in atomic-scale disorder which causes changes in the molar volume, corrosion rate, stored energy, mechanical properties, and macrostructure of ceramics. These changes particularly of volume and corrosion rate, have critical implications for the long-term durability of nuclear waste forms, such as the polyphase. Ti-based ceramic Synroc. This paper reviews data on actinide-bearing (U and Th) phases of great age (>100 m.y.) found in nature and compares these results to observation on actinide-doped phases (Pu and Cm) of nearly equivalent α-decay doses. Of particular interest is evidence for annealing of radiation damage effects over geologic periods of time under ambient conditions

  15. Synthesis of biomorphaus SiC-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egelja Adela D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbothermal reduction processing of partially mineralized fir (Abies alba samples was used to obtain highly-porous SiC ceramics with cellular structure. The infiltration of TEOS (tetraetilortosilikat, Si(OC2H54 as a silica source, was conducted in order to carry out the mineralization process. Synthesis of the SiC was achieved with a C/SiO2 replica annealing at 1723 K in Ar atmosphere. The obtained samples were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS. The experimental results revealed that the hierarchical bimorphous wood structure was preserved even after high-temperature treatment. Microstructural characterization of the ceramics revealed the presence of the P-SiC phase and traces of the a-SiC phase.

  16. Modelling of Tape Casting for Ceramic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud

    if it is possible to vary the relevant properties (e.g. electrical, electrochemical, or magnetic) in a controlled manner along the extent of the component. Such composites in which ceramic layers of different composition and/or microstructure are combined provide a new and intriguing dimension to the field......, there is still only very limited insight into the processes determining the final properties of such components. Hence, the aim of the present PhD project is to obtain the required knowledge basis for the optimized processing of multi-material functional ceramics components. Recent efforts in the domain....... The slurry passes beneath a knife edge (doctor blade) as the carrier surface advances along a supporting table. The solvents evaporate to leave a relatively dense flexible sheet that may be stored on rolls or stripped from the carrier in a continuous process. Today, multilayers are achieved by laminating...

  17. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M.A.

    1994-05-03

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

  18. Electrical resistivity measurements in superconducting ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical resistivity measurements have been done in (Y,Ba,Cu,O)- and (Y,Al,Ba,Cu,O)-based superconducting ceramics. The sintered specimens were prepared by applying gold electrodes and winding on the non-metalized part with a copper strip to be immersed in liquid nitrogen for cooling. The resistivity measurements have been done by the four-probe method. A copper constantan or chromel-alumel thermocouple inserted between the specimen and the copper cold finger has been used for the determination of the critical temperature Tc. Details of the experimental set-up and resistivity versus temperature plots in the LNT-RT range for the superconducting ceramics are the major contributions of this communication. (author)

  19. Translucency of Dental Ceramic, Post and Bracket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Keun Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Translucency of dental ceramics, esthetic posts and orthodontic brackets was reviewed. Translucency parameter (TP and contrast ratio (CR are generally used for translucency evaluation. For the evaluation of translucency, two criteria such as the translucency of human teeth (TP = 15–19, 1 mm thick and the visual perceptibility threshold for the translucency difference (∆CR > 0.07 or ∆TP > 2 were used. In ceramics, translucency differences were in the perceptible range depending on the type of material and the thickness. However, variations caused by the difference in the required thickness for each layer by the material and also by the measurement protocols should be considered. As to the translucency of esthetic posts, a significant difference was found among the post systems. Translucency was influenced by the bracket composition and brand, and the differences by the brand were visually perceptible.

  20. Ceramic onlay for endodontically treated mandibular molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopadevi Garlapati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of endodontically treated teeth is important for the success of endodontic treatment. In full coverage restorations, maximum amount of tooth structure is compromised, so as to conserve the amount of tooth structure partial coverage restorations, can be preferred. This case report is on fabrication of a conservative tooth colored restoration for an endodontically treated posterior tooth. A 22-year-old male patient presented with pain in the mandibular left first molar. After endodontic treatment, composite material was used as postendodontic restoration. The tooth was then prepared to receive a ceramic onlay and bonded with self-adhesive universal resin cement. Ceramic onlay restoration was periodically examined up to 2 years.

  1. Manufacturing of ceramic cutting blades by PIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rak, Z.S.; Snijders, G. [ECN Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    1997-09-01

    Ceramic cutting blades of differing size and thickness varying between 0.15-0.60 mm are manufactured by powder injection moulding (PIM) using a feedstock based on the yttria partially stabilised zirconia (TZ-3YS) powder and polyacetal-based system. The injection process ensures a high production efficiency, and is followed by a short catalytic debinding process (1 -3 h) at the temperatures of 105-115C. The sintered blades are machined to the final thickness, and if necessary, undergo an additional heat treatment in reducing conditions to improve the mechanical properties of the product. The influence of the manufacturing procedure on the quality of the final product is discussed. A comparison of the degree of densification, micro-structure and mechanical properties of ceramic knives manufactured by PIM, uniaxial pressing and tape casting is reviewed. 11 refs.

  2. Lithium reprocessing technology for ceramic breeders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Saito, Minoru; Tatenuma, Katuyashi; Kainose, Mitsuru

    1995-03-01

    Lithium ceramics have been receiving considerable attention as tritium breeding materials for fusion reactors. Reprocessing technology development for these materials is proposed to recover lithium, as an effective use of resources and to remove radioactive isotopes. Four potential ceramic breeders (Li 2O, LiAlO 2, Li 2ZrO 3 and Li 4SiO 4) were prepared in order to estimate their dissolution properties in water and various acids (HCl, HNO 3, H 2SO 4, HF and aqua regia). The dissolution rates were determined by comparing the weight of the residue with that of the starting powder (the weight method). Recovery properties of lithium were examined by the precipitation method.

  3. Photorefraction demonstrations using electrooptic PLZT ceramics modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozolinsh, Maris; Hanstorp, Dag

    2003-11-01

    PLZT ceramics electrooptic (EO) modulator was designed for demonstrations and student's laboratory works to study photorefraction using Ar+ laser (λ = 514 nm). PLZT element had an aperture of 1.5 x 8 mm2 and thickness of 1.5 mm. Reading of recorded patterns was realized by applying to the element the biasing electric field. The most efficient writing took place for ceramics composition PLZT 8.75/65/35. The total intensity of two writing beams was up to 300 mW, the applied electric field during writing -- up to 20 kV/cm. The diffraction efficiency depended on the applied biasing reading electric field EBR. For the reading He-Ne laser the diffraction efficiency η ~ 0.48 was obtained at the bias field values EBR = 13 kV/cm. The simplicity of the modulator alignment and writing and reading processes promote the use of such modulators in the teaching process.

  4. Production of ceramics from coal fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angjusheva Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense ceramics are produced from fly ash from REK Bitola, Republic of Macedonia. Four types of fly ash from electro filters and one from the collected zone with particles < 0.063 mm were the subject of this research. Consolidation was achieved by pressing (P= 133 MPa and sintering (950, 1000, 1050 and 11000C and heating rates of 3 and 100/min. Densification was realized by liquid phase sintering and solid state reaction where diopside [Ca(Mg,Al(Si,Al2O6] was formed. Ceramics with optimal properties (porosity 2.96±0.5%, bending strength - 47.01±2 MPa, compressive strength - 170 ±5 MPa was produced at 1100ºC using the heating rate of 10ºC/min.

  5. Superconductive ceramics obtained with sol gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several sol gel routes have been considered, studied and developed to produce large quantities of granulates which can be processed to obtain ceramics having good superconducting characteristics. In the considered process a mixture of commercial nitrates is atomized, at room temperature, in a solution 1:1 of Primene JMT and Benzene and a pale blue gel of the starting elements is suddently formed. The granulates obtained are free flowing, very reactive and well suited for pressing. For their intrinsic characteristics they could be very good precursors for the production of large quantities of superconductive ceramics in different forms. The precipitated gel is dried, calcinated, pressed in the form of cylindrical pellets which are sintered up to 960 degrees C. No griding or different thermal treatments are needed. The sintered material has low electric resistence, shows a clear Meissner effect and has a transition temperature of between 91 and 95 K

  6. Ceramic component manufacturing process development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S.

    1996-09-30

    Ceramic materials are well suited for applications where temperature, wear, and corrosion resistance are necessary. The toughness and wear resistance properties that make ceramics desirable, also make fabrication of parts difficult. The objective of this CRADA was to increase the grinding efficiency on Ceradyne Incorporated silicon nitride. This was to be accomplished through optimization of grinding wheel life and increasing silicon nitride material removal rates. Experiments were conducted to determine the relationship between grinding parameters, wheel wear, and material removal rates. Due to excessive, unexplained variation in the experimental results, a consistent relationship between the selected grinding parameters and wheel wear could not be established. Maximum material removal rates were limited by spindle and table drive power. Additional experiments were conducted to evaluate high speed grinding. When compared to conventional grinding speeds, the material removal rates using high speed grinding (13,000 SFM) increased by a factor of five to ten with no degradation of fracture strength.

  7. Efficient photoemission from robust ferroelectric ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscolo, I. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan, (Italy); Castellano, M.; Catani, L.; Ferrario, M.; Tazzioli, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy); Giannessi, L. [ENEA, Frascati, Rome (Italy). Centro Ricerche Elettronica

    1999-07-01

    Experimental results on photoemission by ferroelectric ceramic disks, with a possible interpretation, are presented. Two types of lead zirconate titanate lanthanum doped, PLZT, ceramics have been used for tests. 25 ps light pulses of 532 and 355 nm were used for excitation. The intensity ranged within the interval 0.1-3 GW/cm{sup 2}. The upper limit of the intensity was established by the damage threshold tested by the onset of ion emission. At low value of the intensity the yield was comparable at the two wavelengths. At the highest intensity of green light the emitted charge was 1 nC per 10 mm{sup 2}, but it was limited by the space charge effect. In fact, the applied field was only 20 kV/cm, allowed both by the mechanical design of the apparatus and the poor vacuum, 10{sup -4} mbar. No surface processing was required. The measurement of the electron pulse length under way.

  8. a Plutonium Ceramic Target for Masha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, P. A.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Kenneally, J. M.; Wild, J. F.; Stoyer, M. A.; Patin, J. B.; Lougheed, R. W.; Ebbinghaus, B. B.; Landingham, R. L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Yeremin, A. V.; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2005-09-01

    We are currently developing a plutonium ceramic target for the MASHA mass separator. The MASHA separator will use a thick plutonium ceramic target capable of tolerating temperatures up to 2000 °C. Promising candidates for the target include oxides and carbides, although more research into their thermodynamic properties will be required. Reaction products will diffuse out of the target into an ion source, where they will then be transported through the separator to a position-sensitive focal-plane detector array. Experiments on MASHA will allow us to make measurements that will cement our identification of element 114 and provide for future experiments where the chemical properties of the heaviest elements are studied.

  9. Development of ceramic-free antenna feeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have proposed a ceramics-free antenna feeder line employing a ridged waveguide as a local support for IC antenna of next-generation tokamaks. One fourth mock-up model of the all metal waveguide designed for the ITER ICRF system is fabricated and electrical characteristics of the model including the coaxial line - waveguide converter are measured. Power reflection coefficient of the model including the coax-waveguide converter to the input coaxial line is estimated to be less than 15% below the cut-off frequency of 107 MHz and less than 3% above the cut-off frequency. It is found that this ceramics-free antenna support employing a ridged waveguide is quite available for IC antenna of next-generation tokamaks. (author)

  10. Corrosion Issues for Ceramics in Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Opila, Elizabeth; Nickel, Klaus G.

    2004-01-01

    The requirements for hot-gas-path materials in gas turbine engines are demanding. These materials must maintain high strength and creep resistance in a particularly aggressive environment. A typical gas turbine environment involves high temperatures, rapid gas flow rates, high pressures, and a complex mixture of aggressive gases. Over the past forty years, a wealth of information on the behavior of ceramic materials in heat engine environments has been obtained. In the first part of the talk we summarize the behavior of monolithic SiC and Si3N4. These materials show excellent baseline behavior in clean, oxygen environments. However the aggressive components in a heat engine environment such as water vapor and salt deposits can be quite degrading. In the second part of the talk we discuss SiC-based composites. The critical issue with these materials is oxidation of the fiber coating. We conclude with a brief discussion of future directions in ceramic corrosion research.

  11. Thermal diffusivity of neutron-irradiated ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen candidate ceramics (eleven oxides and three nitrides) were irradiated in EBR-II to dose between 0.3 and 2.3 x 10 22 n/cm2 (E/sub n/ > 0.1 MeV) at 925, 1015, and 1100 K. Thermal diffusivity (which is approximately proportional to thermal conductivity) was subsequently measured at room temperature by a xenon flash technique. Diffusivity usually decreased sharply as a function of fluence at low doses, but tended toward saturation at higher doses. In most cases lower irradiation temperatures resulted in greater degradations in thermal diffusivity. The magnitude of reduction varied greatly with the ceramic tested, ranging from single-crystal MgAl2O4 (approx. 3%) to polycrystalline silicon oxynitride (93%). In most materials tested the reductions were great enough to raise thermal stresses significantly in low temperature, high thermal flux applications

  12. Development of mica glass-ceramic glazes

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Maximina; Rincón López, Jesús María; Acosta, Anselmo

    2004-01-01

    The effect of iron content on crystallization of a mica glaze as coating for fast firing stoneware substrates has been investi¬gated. Measurements by differential thermal analysis (DTA) combined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have shown the development of preferential crystal orientation in the mica glass-ceramic glaze. By com¬parison with amorphous and partly crystalline glazes, an enhancement of the mechanical properties of coatings with aligned and inte...

  13. Mapping ceramics research and its evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Deville, Sylvain; Stevenson, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    We show here how a simple data mining of bibliographic records can be used to follow and help understand the evolution of a research domain, at a level that cannot be captured by reading individual papers in a field of this size. We illustrate the approach by investigating 43 years of research on ceramic materials, covered by 253k bibliographic records. The patterns of keywords used reveal the trends and the evolution of research ideas and priorities within the field. Simple, interactive tool...

  14. Potential of innovative ceramics for turbine applications.

    OpenAIRE

    Jankoviak, A.; Valle, R.; Parlier, M.

    2013-01-01

    Improving the thermal efficiency of aircraft gas turbines and of thermal power generation systems is of great interest for industry. Despite the various studies performed to increase their heat-resistance, the use of nickel-based superalloys at temperatures beyond 1150°C will be difficult. For higher temperatures, new high temperature structural materials are required. In this context, ceramics offer many advantages compared to Ni-based superalloys: a lower density and a better resistance to ...

  15. Joining ceramics to metals using metallic foam

    OpenAIRE

    Shirzadi, A. A.; Zhu, Y.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2008-01-01

    A general method for brazing ceramics to metals using a compliant metallic foam as a buffer layer has been developed. Using stainless steel foams, bonds between alumina and 316 stainless steel with shear strengths up to 33 MPa have been achieved. The resultant ductility enhances the resistance of the joint to thermal cycling; AlN-Inconel 600 bonds exhibited good thermal shock resistance. Alumina - stainless steel bonds withstood more that 60 thermal cycles between 200 and 800°C in air.

  16. Rendering mortars with incorporation of ceramic aggregates

    OpenAIRE

    Mª Rosário Veiga; João Silva; Jorge Brito

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the experimental evaluation of the water-related performance of rendering mortars with incorporation of recycled products is presented, based on three different research vectors: addition of fine recycled aggregates; reduction of the cement content (with simultaneous addition of fines); and replacement of sand with recycled material, with the same overall grading curve. The material presented here as recyclable is brick waste from the ceramics and construction industries.

  17. Fabrication of Bulk Nanocrystalline Ceramic Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chráska, Tomáš; Neufuss, Karel; Dubský, Jiří; Ctibor, Pavel; Klementová, Mariana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, 5-6 (2008), s. 872-877. ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300430651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : thermal spraying * nanocrystalline composites * wear Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2008

  18. Metal ceramic fixed partial denture: fracture resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Piloto, P. A. G.; Alves, Ana; Correia, A.; Campos, J.C. Reis; Fernandes, J.C. Sampaio; Vaz, M.A.P.; Viriato, Nuno

    2010-01-01

    Partially encased beam is a steel-concrete composite structure, made-up with a hot rolled profile and filled with concrete between flanges. Such structural element improves load-bearing capacity at elevated temperatures. Metal ceramic Fixed Partial Dentures (FPD) are suitable to increase fracture resistance presenting higher clinical longevity. This type of prosthesis is mainly used when a great number of teeth replacements are needed. The FPD under analysis is defined by a metallic infra...

  19. Joining of ultra-high temperature ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestroni, Laura; Sciti, Diletta; Esposito, Laura; Glaeser, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, ultra-high temperature ceramics raised renewed interest after the first studies in the 60's. Thanks to their high melting point, superior to any group of materials, and to their set of interesting physical and engineering properties, they find application in aerospace industry, propulsion field, as cladding materials in generation IV nuclear reactors and solar absorbers in novel HT CSP systems. Recent efforts were devoted to the achievement of high strength and toughness m...

  20. Stereolithography of SiOC Ceramic Microcomponents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Erika; Cattaldo, Marco; Franchin, Giorgia; Schwentenwein, Martin; Homa, Johannes; Brusatin, Giovanna; Colombo, Paolo

    2016-01-13

    The first example of the fabrication of complex 3D polymer-derived-ceramic structures is presented with micrometer-scale features by a 3D additive manufacturing (AM) technology, starting with a photosensitive preceramic precursor. Dense and crack-free silicon-oxycarbide-based microparts with features down to 200 μm are obtained after pyrolysis at 1000 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere. PMID:26545292

  1. Literature Review of Polymer Derived Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Reuben James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs), also known as preceramic polymers, are valuable coating agents that are used to produce surface barriers on substrates such as stainless steel. These barriers protect against a multitude of environmental threats, and have been used since their research and development in 19772. This paper seeks to review and demonstrate the remarkable properties and versatility that PDCs have to offer, while also giving a brief overview of the processing techniques used today.

  2. Polymer-Ceramic Bionanocomposites for Dental Application

    OpenAIRE

    Jung-Hwan Lee; Hae-Won Kim; Seog-Jin Seo

    2016-01-01

    Multiphasic bionanocomposites have been highlighted in the biotechnology field since they have offered mechanical flexibility during operation. This interest has been increased mainly through polymer/ceramic/metal manipulation techniques and modifications in formulation. Recently, a number of studies on bionanocomposites have been examined due to their favorable mechanical properties and cellular activities when compared to the neat polymers or polymer blends. This paper critically reviews re...

  3. Solidification analysis of AMMCs with ceramic particles

    OpenAIRE

    J. Sleziona; M. Dyzia; A. Dolata-Grosz

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In the research work the result of the reinforcement displacement and solidification analysis for aluminiumcast composites with ceramic particles have been presented. The results of research on the solidification procesare compared for the applied aluminium matrix alloy (AlSi12CuNiMg2), for composites containing glass carboparticles (Cg) and heterophase reinforcement (mixture of silicon carbide (SiC) + glass carbon particles (Cg)).Design/methodology/approach: The course of the solidi...

  4. Strength of advanced ceramic laminated structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlup, Zdeněk; Bermejo, R.; Hadraba, Hynek; Malíková, L.; Ševeček, O.; Danzer, R.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    Brno : Ústav fyziky materiálů AV ČR, v. v. i., 2015 - (Dlouhý, A.; Kunz, L.). s. 42-42 ISBN 978-80-87434-07-9. [ICSMA-17 International Conference on the Strength of Materials /17./. 09.08.2015-14.08.2015, Brno] Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Strength * Laminates * Ceramics Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  5. Regenerative ceramic burner has highest efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gettings, M.

    1986-01-01

    Regenerative ceramic burners consisting of a double gas/air burner and utilising waste heat which is stored via regenerators are described. The system is capable of operating at 1400/sup 0/C, it removes about 85-90% of energy from hot waste gases and exhibits energy savings of 40-60% over cold nozzle mix burners and 20-25% over recuperative burners. (UK).

  6. Co-extrusion of piezoelectric ceramic fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Michen, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The present work successfully developed a methodology for fabricating lead zirconate titanate [PZT] thin solid- and hollow-fibres by the thermoplastic co-extrusion process. The whole process chain, that includes: a) compounding, involving the mixing of ceramic powder with a thermoplastic binder, b) rheological characterizations, c) preform composite fabrication followed by co-extrusion, d) debinding and, finally, e) sintering of the body to near full density, is systematical...

  7. Fluorine 18 in tritium generator ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present time, the ceramic materials generators of tritium are very interesting mainly by the necessity of to found an adequate product for its application as fusion reactor shielding. The important element that must contain the ceramic material is the lithium and especially the isotope with mass=6. The tritium in these materials is generated by neutron irradiation, however, when the ceramic material contains oxygen, then is generated too fluorine 18 by the action of energetic atoms of tritium in recoil on the 16 O, as it is showed in the next reactions: 1) 6 Li (n, α) 3 H ; 2) 16 O(3 H, n) 18 F . In the present work was studied the LiAlO2 and the Li2O. The first was prepared in the laboratory and the second was used such as it is commercially expended. In particular the interest of this work is to study the chemical behavior of fluorine-18, since if it would be mixed with tritium it could be contaminate the fusion reactor fuel. The ceramic materials were irradiated with neutrons and also the chemical form of fluorine-18 produced was studied. It was determined the amount of fluorine-18 liberated by the irradiated materials when they were submitted to extraction with helium currents and argon-hydrogen mixtures and also it was investigated the possibility about the fluorine-18 was volatilized then it was mixed so with the tritium. Finally it was founded that the liberated amount of fluorine-18 depends widely of the experimental conditions, such as the temperature and the hydrogen amount in the mixture of dragging gas. (Author)

  8. Laser Micromachining of Glass, Silicon, and Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    L. Rihakova; Chmelickova, H.

    2015-01-01

    A brief review is focused on laser micromachining of materials. Micromachining of materials is highly widespread method used in many industries, including semiconductors, electronic, medical, and automotive industries, communication, and aerospace. This method is a promising tool for material processing with micron and submicron resolution. In this paper micromachining of glass, silicon, and ceramics is considered. Interaction of these materials with laser radiation and recent research held o...

  9. Sem analysis zirconia-ceramic adhesion interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARDELLI, P.; VERTUCCI, V.; MONTANI, M.; ARCURI, C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives Modern dentistry increasingly tends to use materials aesthetically acceptable and biomimetic. Among these are zirconia and ceramics for several years, a combination that now has becoming synonym of aesthetic; however, what could be the real link between these two materials and especially its nature, remains a controversial topic debated in the literature. The aim of our study was to “underline” the type of bonding that could exist between these materials. Materials and methods To investigate the nature of this bond we used a SEM microscopy (Zeiss SUPRA 25). Different bilaminar specimens: “white” zirconia Zircodent® and ceramic “Noritake®”, after being tested with loading test in bending (three-point-bending) and FEM analysis, were analyzed by SEM. Fragments’ analysis in closeness of the fracture’s point has allowed us to be able to “see” if at large magnifications between these two materials, and without the use of linear, could exist a lasting bond and the possible type of failure that could incur. Results From our analysis of the specimens’ fragments analyzed after test Equipment, it is difficult to highlight a clear margin and no-adhesion zones between the two materials, although the analysis involving fragments adjacent to the fracture that has taken place at the time of Mechanical test Equipment. Conclusions According to our analysis and with all the clarification of the case, we can assume that you can obtain a long and lasting bond between the zirconia and ceramics. Agree to the data present in the literature, we can say that the type of bond varies according to the type of specimens and of course also the type of failure. In samples where the superstructure envelops the ceramic framework Zirconium we are in the presence of a cohesive failure, otherwise in a presence of adhesive failure. PMID:27555905

  10. Optimization of ceramic strength using elastic gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu; Ma, Li

    2009-01-01

    We present a new concept for strengthening ceamics by utilizing a graded structure with a low elastic modulus at both top and bottom surfaces sandwiching a high-modulus interior. Closed-form equations have been developed for stress analysis of simply supported graded sandwich beams subject to transverse center loads. Theory predicts that suitable modulus gradients at the ceramic surface can effectively reduce and spread the maximum bending stress from the surface into the interior. The magnit...

  11. Failure probability of ceramic coil springs

    OpenAIRE

    Nohut, Serkan; Schneider, Gerold A.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic springs are commercially available and a detailed reliability analysis of these components would be useful for their introduction in new applications. In this paper an analytical and a numerical analyses of the failure probability for coil springs under compression is presented. Based on analytically derived relationships and numerically calculated results, fitting functions for volume and surface flaws will be introduced which provide the prediction of the failure probability of cera...

  12. Covalent and heterosupramolecular interaction of ceramic particles

    OpenAIRE

    Stieger, Gregor

    2002-01-01

    New concepts of particle interaction for the processing of ceramic powders are developed. They are based on chemical reactions either by heterosupramolecular or covalent interaction of proper reactants. For this the particles are functionalized so that they are able to undergo defined reactions with each other. A commercially available beta-cyclodextrin derivative, 3-chlor-5-sodium-hydroxyl-trianzinyl-beta-cyclodextrin, is covalently bound to the Si3N4 surface in an one step reaction. An effo...

  13. A novel eccentric lapping machine for finishing advanced ceramic balls

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, J.; Hadfield, M.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced ceramic balls are used extensively in hybrid precision ball bearings and show advantages in high speed, high temperature, high load and hostile environment. Finishing these balls with high quality, good efficiency and low cost is critical to their widespread application. A brief review of the methods for finishing ceramic balls is presented. The design of a novel eccentric lapping machine for finishing advanced ceramic balls is described. The kinematics of eccentric lapping is analys...

  14. Plasma-Spraying Ceramics Onto Smooth Metallic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Rouge, Carl J.; Leissler, George

    1992-01-01

    In fabrication process, plasma-sprayed ceramic coats bonded strongly to smooth metallic surfaces. Principal use of such coats in protecting metal parts in hot-gas paths of advanced gas turbine engines. Process consists of application of initial thin layer of ceramic on smooth surface by low-pressure-plasma spraying followed by application of layer of conventional, low-thermal-conductivity atmospheric-pressure plasma-sprayed ceramic.

  15. Pyroelectric properties of ceramic with tetragonal bronze tungsten structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramics of the tetragonal tungsten bronze type of structure (Srx Ba1-x) Nb2 O6 (SBN), with x=0.25, x=0.50 e x=0.75, were synthesized by conventional methods. The dielectric and pyroelectric properties were analyzed with intention to determine the potential of the SBN ceramics for pyroelectric detection. The pyroelectric properties of these ceramic materials are pioneer results in this area. (author)

  16. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R.; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theor...

  17. In Vitro Mechanical Tests for Modern Dental Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    L. Sadighpour; F. Geramipanah; B. Raeesi

    2006-01-01

    The fracture resistance of all-ceramic restorations is one of the major concerns in clinical applications of these materials. Before initiating a time-consuming and costly clinical investigation, an in vitro study can help to estimate the in vivo usability of a new dental material. Mechanical properties of all-ceramic materials are frequently evaluated to predict their clinical performance. Since the test methods have influences on the obtained results and mechanical behavior of ceramic mater...

  18. The stability mechanisms of an injectable calcium phosphate ceramic suspension.

    OpenAIRE

    Fatimi, Ahmed; Tassin, Jean-François; Axelos, Monique; Weiss, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics are widely used as bone substitutes in dentistry and orthopedic applications. For minimally invasive surgery an injectable calcium phosphate ceramic suspension (ICPCS) was developed. It consists in a biopolymer (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose: HPMC) as matrix and bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics (biphasic calcium phosphate: BCP) as fillers. The stability of the suspension is essential to this generation of "ready to use" injectable biomaterial. But, during storage...

  19. Abstracts of the 7. workshop solid state chemistry and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    79 contributions have been presented as titles with abstracts. They deal with preparation, investigation, and properties of ceramic powders, sintered materials, metal oxides, oxide minerals, nitrides, solid electrolytes, glass ceramics, composite materials, and ceramic superconductors of the type Y-Ba-Cu-O. Phase studies of mixed oxide systems and different chemical processes of the solid state are included. 11 of them are in INIS scope and are processed individually

  20. Dielectric and electrical design consideration of ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development of high performance ceramics for nculear applications are increasing their importance. Especially in nuclear develoment, innovative and application of ceramics are needed in fusion reactors. Summarized are the develoment of new materials such as silicon nitride with good mechanical and electrical properties and the application of zirconia-based ceramics for high temperature electrolysis of tritiated water in a tritium recycling system. (orig.)

  1. Triboemission From Ceramics: Charge Intensity and Energy Distribution Characterizations

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, Gustavo Jose

    2000-01-01

    Lubrication of ceramics is a difficult and not completely solved problem. Ceramics do not respond to conventional lubricants which are designed to function by a chemical reaction with the surface. There is, accordingly, increased interest in the development of lubrication alternatives for ceramics, and in understanding the tribochemical fundamentals by which new lubrication processes can be designed and controlled. In particular, the mechanism of tribopolymerization for some addition-type mon...

  2. A New Parameter Characterising the Ballistic Performance of Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Hoog, K.; Ernst, H.-J.; Wolf, T.

    1997-01-01

    Impacted by a long rod penetrator at 1800 m/s different ceramics of varying thickness and target configurations are investigated. A turning point of the residual penetration curve in the vicinity of thin ceramic layers was not found. The space equivalence factor for vanishing ceramic thickness is introduced as a target configuration independent parameter to describe the ballistic performance of materials. This factor denotes the maximum protection performance of a brittle material by assuming...

  3. Potential of Directionally Solidified Eutectic Ceramics for High Temperature Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Parlier, M.; Valle, R.; Perrière, L.; Lartigue-Korinek, S.; Mazerolles, L.

    2011-01-01

    Directionally solidified eutectic (DSE) ceramics add new potentialities to the advantages of sintered ceramics: a higher strength, almost constant, up to temperatures close to the melting point and a better creep resistance. The microstructure of melt-growth composites (MGC) of ceramic oxides consists in three-dimensional and continuous interconnected networks of single-crystal eutectic phases. After solidification of binary eutectics, the eutectic phases are alumina and either a perovskite o...

  4. Investigation of medieval ceramics from Ras by physicochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Zindović Nataša D.; Damjanović Ljiljana S.; Holclajtner-Antunović Ivanka D.; Mioč Ubavka B.; Bajuk-Bogdanović Danica

    2008-01-01

    Although early medieval Serbian ceramic is well described by the archeologists and historians, knowledge of the Balkan ceramic production is still limited. Archaeometric study of ceramics provenance, technology of preparation and used pigments as well as influence of neighboring countries and specific characteristics of different workshops has never been performed so far. The detailed knowledge of the micro-chemical and micro-structural nature of an archaeological artifact is critical in find...

  5. Electron channeling pattern of ceramic platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron channeling patterns (ECPs), also known as pseudo-Kikuchi patterns, have been imaged in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) according to a contrast mechanism related to the variation in the signal which results from changes in the angle between the incident beam and the crystal lattice of the specimen. It has been shown that this effect makes it possible to determine systematically the crystalline orientation and symmetry of the sample, and that features of the lattice such as tilt, grain boundaries, and, in some cases, individual defects can be imaged and analyzed. Here, ECPs have been generated in the scanning electron microscope from hexagonal-close-packed ceramic (tungsten carbide and silicon carbide) single crystals extracted from commercially available powders. The crystals, commonly employed as reinforcing phases in ceramic composites, were typically platelet-shaped with smooth surfaces. Their averaged diameter was 25 μm with a thickness ranging between 3 and 7 μm. After theoretical maps for the selected crystallographic poles were constructed with a procedure similar to that used for convergent beam electron diffraction, the experimental patterns were indexed and the crystallographic orientation of the crystals was determined. Specific applications for ceramic materials are discussed in comparison with previous work dealing with metals and, as an example of the application of the ECP method, the cleavage plane of fracture has been determined for the SiC platelet embedded in a Si3N4 matrix

  6. Adhesion in ceramics and magnetic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a metal or a polymeric material such as a magnetic medium, strong bonds form between the materials. For ceramic-to-metal contacts, adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the ductility of the metals. Hardness of metals plays a much more important role in adhesion and friction than does the surface energy of metals. Adhesion, friction, surface energy, and hardness of a metal are all related to its Young's modulus and shear modulus, which have a marked dependence on the electron configuration of the metal. An increase in shear modulus results in a decrease in area of contact that is greater than the corresponding increase in surface energy (the fond energy) with shear modulus. Consequently, the adhesion and friction decrease with increasing shear modulus. For ceramics in contact with polymeric magnetic tapes, environment is extremely important. For example, a nitrogen environment reduces adhesion and friction when ferrite contacts polymeric tape, whereas a vacuum environment strengthens the ferrite-to-tape adhesion and increases friction. Adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the particle loading of the tape. An increase in magnetic particle concentration increases the complex modulus of the tape, and a lower real area of contact and lower friction result.

  7. Ceramic and glass radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Readey, D.W.; Cooley, C.R. (comps.)

    1977-01-01

    This report contains 14 individual presentations and 6 group reports on the subject of glass and polycrystalline ceramic radioactive waste forms. It was the general consensus that the information available on glass as a waste form provided a good basis for planning on the use of glass as an initial waste form, that crystalline ceramic forms could also be good waste forms if much more development work were completed, and that prediction of the chemical and physical stability of the waste form far into the future would be much improved if the basic synergistic effects of low temperature, radiation and long times were better understood. Continuing development of the polycrystalline ceramic forms was recommended. It was concluded that the leach rate of radioactive species from the waste form is an important criterion for evaluating its suitability, particularly for the time period before solidified waste is permanently placed in the geologic isolation of a Federal repository. Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the individual papers; the remaining two were previously abstracted.

  8. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls (United States); Murphy, W.M. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.

  9. Using rice straw to manufacture ceramic bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunov German Ivanovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the co-authors offer their advanced and efficient methodologies for the recycling of the rice straw, as well as the novel approaches to the ceramic brick quality improvement through the application of the rice straw as the combustible additive and through the formation of amorphous silica in the course of the rice straw combustion. The co-authors provide characteristics of the raw materials, production techniques used to manufacture ceramic bricks, and their basic properties in the article. The co-authors describe the simulated process of formation of amorphous silica. The process in question has two independent steps (or options: 1 rice straw combustion and ash formation outside the oven (in the oxidizing medium, and further application of ash as the additive in the process of burning clay mixtures; 2 adding pre-treated rice straw as the combustible additive into the clay mixture, and its further burning in compliance with the pre-set temperature mode. The findings have proven that the most rational pre-requisite of the rice straw application in the manufacturing of ceramic bricks consists in feeding milled straw into the clay mixture to be followed by molding, drying and burning. Brick samples are highly porous, and they also demonstrate sufficient compressive strength. The co-authors have also identified optimal values of rice straw and ash content in the mixtures under research.

  10. Glass ceramic toughened with tetragonal zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Keith D.; Michalske, Terry A.

    1986-01-01

    A phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic and a process for making it are disclosed. A mixture of particulate network-forming oxide, network-modifying oxide, and zirconium oxide is heated to yield a homogeneous melt, and this melt is then heat-treated to precipitate an appreciable quantity of tetragonal zirconia, which is retained at ambient temperature to form a phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic. Nucleating agents and stabilizing agents may be added to the mixture to facilitate processing and improve the ceramic's properties. Preferably, the mixture is first melted at a temperature from 1200.degree. to 1700.degree. C. and is then heat-treated at a temperature within the range of 800.degree. to 1200.degree. C. in order to precipitate tetragonal ZrO.sub.2. The composition, as well as the length and temperature of the heat-treatment, must be carefully controlled to prevent solution of the precipitated tetragonal zirconia and subsequent conversion to the monoclinic phase.

  11. TOF neutron diffraction study of archaeological ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The time-of flight (TOF) neutron diffractometer ROTAX [1] at ISIS has been used for identification and quantitative phase analysis of archaeological pottery. Neutron diffraction yields mineral phase fractions which, in parallel with information obtained from other archaeometric examination techniques, can provide a fingerprint that can be used to identify provenance and reconstruct methods of manufacturing of an archaeological ceramic product. Phase fractions obtained from a 13th century Rhenish stoneware jar compare well with those obtained from a powder sample prepared from the same fragment. This indicates that reliable results can be obtained by illuminating a large piece or even an intact ceramic object making TOF neutron diffraction a truly non-destructive examination technique. In comparison to X-ray diffraction, information from the bulk sample rather than from surface regions is obtained. ROTAX allows for a simple experimental set-up, free of sample movements. Programmes of archaeological study on ROTAX involve Russian samples (Upper-Volga culture, 5000-2000 BC), Greek pottery, (Agora/Athens, 500-300 BC), and medieval German earthenware and stoneware ceramics (Siegburg waster heap, 13-15th century). (author)

  12. Possibilities of special cements in ceramic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 25 years ago, the only way to have confinement material for high temperature applications was to prepare a ceramic by sintering or fusion at high temperature. A new technology came, with the production of Low Cement Castables. This new product was obtained by a careful choice of the granulometry of the aggregates, an optimization of the defloculation of fine particles, including the cement (Calcium Aluminate Cement) and the addition of silica fume. Silica fume brought two improvements: a) a fluidifying effect, due partly to the low sensitivity of viscosity to pH, and partly to the geometric effect of the nicely spherical particle, b) a chemical effect, brought by the reaction of silica and Calcium Aluminate Cement to give a coherent zeolithic structure, through which water could escape during the first firing. From a ceramist point of view, it is interesting to understand how this components, nearly colloidal system mixed in water can be heated up to ceramization without any noticeable change in mechanical characteristics and shrinkage. From a more practical point of view, it is also interesting to realize that some characteristics, usually attributed only to ceramics, also apply with low cement castables technology: high compressive strength, flexural strength, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, impact resistance. (orig.)

  13. Atomic profile imaging of ceramic oxide surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic surface profile imaging is an electron optical technique capable of revealing directly the surface crystallography of ceramic oxides. Use of an image-intensifier with a TV camera allows fluctuations in surface morphology and surface reactivity to be recorded and analyzed using digitized image data. This paper reviews aspects of the electron optical techniques, including interpretations based upon computer-simulation image-matching techniques. An extensive range of applications is then presented for ceramic oxides of commercial interest for advanced materials applications: including uranium oxide (UO2); magnesium and nickel oxide (MgO,NiO); ceramic superconductor YBa2Cu3O6.7); barium titanate (BaTiO3); sapphire (α-A12O3); haematite (α-Fe-2O3); monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic monocrystalline forms of zirconia (ZrO2), lead zirconium titanate (PZT + 6 mol.% NiNbO3) and ZBLAN fluoride glass. Atomic scale detail has been obtained of local structures such as steps associated with vicinal surfaces, facetting parallel to stable low energy crystallographic planes, monolayer formation on certain facets, relaxation and reconstructions, oriented overgrowth of lower oxides, chemical decomposition of complex oxides into component oxides, as well as amorphous coatings. This remarkable variety of observed surface stabilization mechanisms is discussed in terms of novel double-layer electrostatic depolarization mechanisms, as well as classical concepts of the physics and chemistry of surfaces (ionization and affinity energies and work function). 46 refs., 16 figs

  14. The radiolysis of lithium oxide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiliks, J.; Supe, A.; Kizane, G.; Tiliks, J. Jr. [Latvia Univ., Riga (Latvia). Dept. of Chemistry; Grishmanov, V.; Tanaka, S.

    1998-03-01

    The radiolysis of Li{sub 2}O ceramics exposed to accelerated electrons (5 MeV) at 380 K was studied in the range of high absorbed doses up to 250 MGy. The formation of radiation defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) was demonstrated to occur simultaneously in the regions of (1) the regular crystalline lattice and (2) an enhanced content of the intrinsic defects and impurities. The production of the electronic RD and RP is more efficient in the region of the defected lattice than that at the site of the regular crystalline lattice. However, the stability of RD and RP formed in the region of the intrinsic defects is far less than those produced at the crystalline lattice, since most of the first mentioned RD and RP disappears with irradiation dose due to the radiation stimulated recombination. By this means the enhanced quantity of RD and RP is localized in the Li{sub 2}O ceramics irradiated to absorbed dose of 40-50 MGy, and hence this can influence the tritium release parameters. As soon as the intrinsic defects have been consumed in the production of RD and RP and the recombination of unstable electronic RD and RP takes place (at dose of {approx}100 MGy), the radiolysis of Li{sub 2}O ceramics occurs only at the crystalline lattice. Furthermore, the concentration of RD and RP increases monotonically and tends to the steady-state level. (author)

  15. Uses of Advanced Ceramic Composites in the Thermal Protection Systems of Future Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Current ceramic composites being developed and characterized for use in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of future space vehicles are reviewed. The composites discussed include new tough, low density ceramic insulation's, both rigid and flexible; ultra-high temperature ceramic composites; nano-ceramics; as well as new hybrid ceramic/metallic and ceramic/organic systems. Application and advantage of these new composites to the thermal protection systems of future reusable access to space vehicles and small spacecraft is reviewed.

  16. Thinning of PLZT ceramic wafers for sensor integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Na; Liu, Weiguo

    2010-08-01

    Characteristics of transparent PLZT ceramics can be tailored by controlling the component of them, and therefore showed excellent dielectric, piezoelectric, pyroelectric and ferroelectric properties. To integrate the ceramics with microelectronic circuit to realize integrated applications, the ceramic wafers have to be thinned down to micrometer scale in thickness. A7/65/35 PLZT ceramic wafer was selected in this study for the thinning process. Size of the wafer was 10×10mm with an initial thickness of 300μm. A novel membrane transfer process (MTP) was developed for the thinning and integration of the ceramic wafers. In the MTP process, the ceramic wafer was bonded to silicon wafer using a polymer bonding method. Mechanical grinding method was applied to reduce the thickness of the ceramic. To minimize the surface damage in the ceramic wafer caused by the mechanical grinding, magnetorheological finishing (MRF) method was utilized to polish the wafer. White light interference (WLI) apparatus was used to monitor the surface qualities of the grinded and ploished ceramic wafers. For the PLZT membrane obtained from the MTP process, the final thickness of the thinned and polished wafer was 10μm, the surface roughness was below 1nm in rms, and the flatness was better than λ/5.

  17. High Temperature Tolerant Ceramic Composites Having Porous Interphases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriven, Waltraud M. (Champaign, IL); Lee, Sang-Jin (Chonnam, KR)

    2005-05-03

    In general, this invention relates to a ceramic composite exhibiting enhanced toughness and decreased brittleness, and to a process of preparing the ceramic composite. The ceramic composite comprises a first matrix that includes a first ceramic material, preferably selected from the group including alumina (Al2O3), mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2), yttrium aluminate garnet (YAG), yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), celsian (BaAl2Si2O8) and nickel aluminate (NiAl2O4). The ceramic composite also includes a porous interphase region that includes a substantially non-sinterable material. The non-sinterable material can be selected to include, for example, alumina platelets. The platelets lie in random 3-D orientation and provide a debonding mechanism, which is independent of temperature in chemically compatible matrices. The non-sinterable material induces constrained sintering of a ceramic powder resulting in permanent porosity in the interphase region. For high temperature properties, addition of a sinterable ceramic powder to the non-sinterable material provides sufficiently weak debonding interphases. The ceramic composite can be provided in a variety of forms including a laminate, a fibrous monolith, and a fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix. In the laminated systems, intimate mixing of strong versus tough microstructures were tailored by alternating various matrix-to-interphase thickness ratios to provide the bimodal laminate.

  18. Functionally Graded Materials using Plasma Spray with Nano Structured Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, nano structured FGM was fabricated using DC plasma spray technique. Nano structured and micro structured powder were used as the feeding powder with steel substrate. The spray parameters was optimized and characterisation of nano-ceramic FGM and micro-ceramic FGM were done using bending test and micro-hardness test. Experimental results have shown that the nano-structured FGM exhibit 20% improvement flexure strength and 10% in hardness. A comparison was made between sintered micro ceramic tile and nano ceramic FGM using simple drop test method.

  19. Brief Discussion of Artistic Development and Innovation of Ceramics Fresco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI; Yan

    2015-01-01

    Along with incessant social development and heightened sense of science,technology,humanities,health,an d environmental friendliness,the pluralistic art ideology and expression form associated with ceramics fresco make fresco works warmly received.To satisfy people’s constant need for ambient decoration quality,a new innovation and development mechanism has to be created by breaking through the restriction of tradition and naturally the development of ceramics fresco is a must.Against a background of ceramics,this paper describes the development history of ceramics fresco art,summarizes the social backdrop and works characteristics of each development period,and points out different development processes in terms of spatial ambience where material and craft technology choice and innovation are concerned.Ceramics fresco is a qualified ambassador for the traditional culture of the Chinese,because traditional Chinese ceramics art has a brilliant history and a profound root.The peculiar textural beauty of ceramics fresco,particularly the rich and colorful texture,ample details,and diversified ornament techniques offered by modern ceramics fresco are the reason why it is so warmly received.While discussing briefly the artistic development and innovation of ceramics fresco,this paper also summarizes new development potentials in environment and technology.

  20. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, October 1992--March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Although progress has been made in developing reliable structural ceramics, further work is needed to reduce cost. The work described in this report is organized according to the following work breakdown structure project elements: Materials and processing (monolithics [Si nitride, carbide], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining, cost effective ceramic machining), materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts), data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, nondestructive evaluation development), and technology transfer.

  1. Ceramic based lightweight composites with extreme dynamic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of several years experiments in development of high performance technical ceramics and in investigation of hetero-modulus and hetero-viscous materials and ceramic matrix composites the authors successfully developed a new family of ceramic reinforced lightweight composites with extreme dynamic strength. To obtain these lightweight composites first the matrix materials were developed from different sort of sintered ceramics with high porosity and after the prepared items were re-sintered using reactive sintering methods or were impregnated with nanoparticles of Si3N4, SiAlON ceramics or light metal alloys having excellent mechanical strength and properties. Where it was necessary the pores and material structures of ceramic matrix materials anchored excellent wetting for a wide range of metal alloys, so it was possible to develop several types of ceramic reinforced hetero-modulus light metal composites with extreme dynamic strength of different density. In this work the authors present the c-Si3N4 diamond particles reinforced corundum matrix composite shield plate structures and some of the specially developed low density ceramic foams and high porosity ceramic matrix materials for lightweight metallic composites

  2. ORNL`s gelcasting: Molding the future of ceramic forming?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, C.

    1995-12-31

    Gelcasting is now receiving industrial and government support for early commercialization. Ceramics were probably discovered when someone accidentally dropped into fire a clay pot or bowl shaped by hand and allowed to dry; the resulting object was observed to be hard and dense. Today some ceramics are still formed at a potter`s wheel, which was invented 5000 years ago by the Sumerians, while others are made by slip-casing before being fired in a kiln. In the 20th century, a new kind of ceramics emerged. These ceramics are less visible, but they play an important role in today`s technologies - the space shuttle, jet aircraft, power plants, and some cars and trucks. Americans call them `engineering ceramics` and the Japanese call them `fine ceramics.` These advanced ceramics are formed by using high temperature to process or densify inorganic, nonmetallic compounds, such as oxides, nitrides, borides, carbides, silicides, and sulfides. These materials are also known as `structural ceramics` because they are strong enough to bear weight. Researchers at ORNL have perfected a technique for the casting of ceramic parts which has minimized some of the conventional production steps, and greatly increased the production yield of cast parts.

  3. Gas-pressure forming of superplastic ceramic sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieh, T.G.; Wadsworth, J.

    1993-06-24

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics are given. These include yttria stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP) a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid YTZP/C103 (ceramic-metal) structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  4. Higher fracture toughness of tetragonal zirconia ceramics through nanocrystalline structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fracture toughness of nanocrystalline zirconia ceramic stabilized with 1.5 mol.% Y2O3 was measured and compared with fracture toughness of submicrometer-grained zirconia ceramics stabilized with 3 mol.% Y2O3. It was found that nanocrystalline ceramics demonstrated higher fracture toughness than submicrometer-grained zirconia ceramics with both optimized and common grain sizes. The high fracture toughness of nanocrystalline zirconia was confirmed by two different testing methods: indentation method (15.5 MPa m0.5) and chevron notched beam method (7.9 MPa m0.5).

  5. Preparation and Chiral Selectivity of BSA-Modified Ceramic Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Lian SU; Rong Ji DAI; Bin TONG; Yu Lin DENG

    2006-01-01

    An affinity-transport system, containing porous ceramic membranes bound with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used for chiral separation of racemic tryptophan. The preparation of BSA modified ceramic membrane included three steps. Firstly, the membrane was modified with amino group using silanization with an amino silane. Secondly, the amino group modified membrane was bound with aldehyde group using gluteraldehyde. Finally, BSA was covalently bound on the surface of the ceramic membrane. Efficient separation of racemic tryptophan was carried out by performing permeation cell experiments, with BSA modified, porous ceramic membranes.

  6. UV laser micromachining of ceramic materials: formation of columnar topographies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser machining is increasingly appearing as an alternative for micromachining of ceramics. Using ceramic materials using excimer lasers can result in smooth surfaces or in the formation of cone-like or columnar topography. Potential applications of cone-shaped or columnar surface topography include, for example, light trapping in anti-reflection coatings and improvement of adhesion bonding between ceramic materials. In this communication results of a comparative study of surface topography change during micromachining of several ceramic materials with different ablation behaviors are reported. (orig.)

  7. All-ceramic systems: laboratory and clinical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guess, Petra C; Schultheis, Stefan; Bonfante, Estevam A; Coelho, Paulo G; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A

    2011-04-01

    Several all-ceramic systems have been developed in dentistry to meet the increased expectations of patients and dentists for highly aesthetic, biocompatible, and long-lasting restorations. However, early bulk fractures or chippings have led the research community to investigate the mechanical performance of the all-ceramic systems. This overview explores the current knowledge of monolithic and bilayer dental all-ceramic systems, addressing composition and processing mechanisms, laboratory and clinical performance, and possible future trends for all-ceramic materials. PMID:21473997

  8. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ming, E-mail: mtang@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, Gordon [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Crum, Jarrod; Turo, Laura; Riley, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  9. Comparison of Fracture Toughness of All-Ceramic and Metal–Ceramic Cement Retained Implant Crowns: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, S.; Chowdhary, R.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the fracture toughness of cement-retained implant-supported metal–ceramic molar crown with that of all-ceramic crowns, fabricated using IPS Empress 2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia copings. An dental implant and abutment was embedded in a clear polymethyl methacrylate model. A wax pattern reproducing the anatomy and dimension of a mandibular molar was made using inlay wax. Copings were made from the manufacturers guidelines for zirconia, metal ceramic and empress crown, in total o...

  10. Discussion on Confucian culture on modern ceramic art innovation%Discussion on Confucian culture on modern ceramic art innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛晓东

    2012-01-01

    Chinese contemporary ceramic art influenced by abstract expressionism and the influence of post- modernism, began to abandon the traditional and the pursuit of emotional catharsis, Undeniably, this approach has accelerated the modern ceramic art in China's development process, but the traditional culture is worthy of a lot of Chinese artists to study and research. In view of this, this paper mainly discusses the influence of Confucianism on modern ceramic art.

  11. Internal fit of two all-ceramic systems and metal-ceramic crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Leandro Moura Martins; Fabio Cesar Lorenzoni; Alcides Oliveira de Melo; Luciana Mendonça da Silva; de OLIVEIRA, José Luiz G.; Pedro Cesar Garcia de Oliveira; Gerson Bonfante

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the internal fit (IF) of glass-infiltrated alumina (ICA - In-Ceram Alumina), yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP - IPS e.max ZirCAD), and metal-ceramic (MC - Ni-Cr alloy) crowns. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty standardized resin-tooth replicas of a maxillary first molar were produced for crown placement and divided into 3 groups (n=20 each) according to the core material used (metal, ICA or Y-TZP). The IF of the crowns wa...

  12. Corrosion Issues for Ceramics in Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Fox, Dennis S.; Smialek, James L.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Tortorelli, Peter F.; More, Karren L.; Nickel, Klaus G.; Hirata, Takehiko; Yoshida, Makoto; Yuri, Isao

    2000-01-01

    The requirements for hot-gas-path materials in gas turbine engines are demanding. These materials must maintain high strength and creep resistance in a particularly aggressive environment. A typical gas turbine environment involves high temperatures, rapid gas flow rates, high pressures, and a complex mixture of aggressive gases. Figure 26.1 illustrates the requirements for components of an aircraft engine and critical issues [1]. Currently, heat engines are constructed of metal alloys, which meet these requirements within strict temperature limits. In order to extend these temperature limits, ceramic materials have been considered as potential engine materials, due to their high melting points and stability at high temperatures. These materials include oxides, carbides, borides, and nitrides. Interest in using these materials in engines appears to have begun in the 1940s with BeO-based porcelains [2]. During the 1950s, the efforts shifted to cermets. These were carbide-based materials intended to exploit the best properties of metals and ceramics. During the 1960s and 1970s, the silicon-based ceramics silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) were extensively developed. Although the desirable high-temperature properties of SiC and Si3N4 had long been known, consolidation of powders into component-sized bodies required the development of a series of specialized processing routes [3]. For SiC, the major consolidation routes are reaction bonding, hot-pressing, and sintering. The use of boron and carbon as additives which enable sintering was a particularly noteworthy advance [4]. For Si3N4 the major consolidation routes are reaction bonding and hot pressing [5]. Reaction-bonding involves nitridation of silicon powder. Hot pressing involves addition of various refractory oxides, such as magnesia (MgO), alumina (Al2O3), and yttria (y2O3). Variations on these processes include a number of routes including Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), gas-pressure sintering

  13. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy L. Ward

    2003-03-01

    This project addresses the need for reliable fabrication methods of supported thin/thick dense ceramic membranes for oxygen separation. Some ceramic materials that possess mixed conductivity (electronic and ionic) at high temperature have the potential to permeate oxygen with perfect selectivity, making them very attractive for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. In order to maximize permeation rates at the lowest possible temperatures, it is desirable to minimize diffusional limitations within the ceramic by reducing the thickness of the ceramic membrane, preferably to thicknesses of 10 {micro}m or thinner. It has proven to be very challenging to reliably fabricate dense, defect-free ceramic membrane layers of such thickness. In this project we are investigating the use of ultrafine SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} (SCFO) powders produced by aerosol pyrolysis to fabricate such supported membranes. SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} is a ceramic composition that has been shown to have desirable oxygen permeability, as well as good chemical stability in the reducing environments that are encountered in some important applications. Our approach is to use a doctor blade procedure to deposit pastes prepared from the aerosol-derived SCFO powders onto porous SCFO supports. We have previously shown that membrane layers deposited from the aerosol powders can be sintered to high density without densification of the underlying support. However, these membrane layers contained large-scale cracks and open areas, making them unacceptable for membrane purposes. In the past year, we have refined the paste formulations based on guidance from the ceramic tape casting literature. We have identified a multicomponent organic formulation utilizing castor oil as dispersant in a solvent of mineral spirits and isopropanol. Other additives were polyvinylbutyral as binder and dibutylphthalate as plasticizer. The nonaqueous formulation has superior wetting properties with the powder, and

  14. Ballistic performance of polyurea-coated armor grade ceramic tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiee, Ahsan; Isaacs, Jon; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2010-04-01

    The use of ceramics as energy absorbents has been studied by many researchers and some improvements in the ballistic performance of ceramic tiles have been made by coating them with different classes of materials (e.g. E-glass/epoxy, carbon-fiber/epoxy, etc.). Using ceramics for energy absorbing applications leads to a significant weight reduction of the system. Therefore, any modification to the ceramic configuration in the system which leads to more energy absorption with the same or less areal density is significant. On the other hand, polyurea has been proved to be an excellent energy dissipating agent in many applications. Inspired by this, we are studying the effect of coating ceramics with polyurea and other materials, on the energy absorption and ballistic performance of the resulting ceramic-based composites. In this study, we investigate the effect of polyurea on ballistic efficiency of ceramic tiles. To this end, we have performed a set of penetration tests on polyurea-ceramic composites. In our experiments, a high velocity projectile is propelled to impact and perforate the ceramic-polyurea composite. The velocity and mass of the projectile are measured before and after the penetration. The change in the kinetic energy of the projectile is evaluated and compared for different polyurea-ceramic configurations (e.g., polyurea on front face, polyurea on back face, polyurea between two ceramic tiles, etc.). The experimental results suggest that polyurea is not as effective as other restraining materials such as E-glass/epoxy and carbon-fiber/epoxy.

  15. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  16. Additive Manufacturing of SiC Based Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael Charles; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics and SiC fiber reinforcedSiC ceramic matrix composites (SiCSiC CMCs) offer high payoff as replacements for metals in turbine engine applications due to their lighter weight, higher temperature capability, and lower cooling requirements. Additive manufacturing approaches can offer game changing technologies for the quick and low cost fabrication of parts with much greater design freedom and geometric complexity. Four approaches for developing these materials are presented. The first two utilize low cost 3D printers. The first uses pre-ceramic pastes developed as feed materials which are converted to SiC after firing. The second uses wood containing filament to print a carbonaceous preform which is infiltrated with a pre-ceramic polymer and converted to SiC. The other two approaches pursue the AM of CMCs. The first is binder jet SiC powder processing in collaboration with rp+m (Rapid Prototyping+Manufacturing). Processing optimization was pursued through SiC powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of nanofibers into the powder bed. The second approach was laminated object manufacturing (LOM) in which fiber prepregs and laminates are cut to shape by a laser and stacked to form the desired part. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted on materials from all approaches with select approaches also characterized with XRD, TGA, and bend testing.

  17. Preparation of high performance ceramic tiles using waste tile granules and ceramic polishing powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gong-xun; SU Da-gen

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative approach to reusing waste tile granules (TG) and ceramic polishing powder (PP) to produce high performance ceramic tiles. We studied formulations each with a TG mass fraction of 25.0% and a different PP mass fraction between 1.0% and 7.0%. The formulations included a small amount of borax additive of a mass fracton between 0.2%and 1.2%. The effects of these industrial by-products on compressive strength, water absorption and microstructure of the new ceramic tiles were investigated. The results indicate that the compressive strength decreases and water absorption increases when TG with a mass fraction of 25.0% are added. Improvement of the compressive strength may be achieved when TG (up to 25.0%)and PP (up to 2.0%) are both used at the same time. In particular, the compressive strength improvement can be maximized and water absorption reduced when a borax additive of up to 0.5% is used as a flux. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that a certain amount of fine PP granules and a high content of fluxing oxides from borax avail the formation of glassy phase that fills up the pores in the new ceramic tiles, resulting in a dense product with high compressive strength and low water absorption.

  18. [Long-term clinical results with Procera AllCeram full-ceramic crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Martha L; Hagmann, Edgar; Marinello, Carlo P; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical study was to investigate the long-term survival rate of Procera AllCeram full-ceramic crowns, which were fabricated with aluminiumoxide cores. In 50 patients, 155 Procera crowns with a conventional or reduced core (porcelain collar) were placed on natural abutment teeth. 78% of this group (39 patients with 135 crowns) were examined between May and August 2005 according to the modified USPHS-Criteria. These crowns had been in place for a period of one to 92 months (mean 55 months). Almost half of the crowns were located in the molar region, while 28% were premolars and 24% anterior crowns. Due to one crown fracture the cumulative survival rate was 99% after five and seven years. The clinical success was achieved irrespective of the tooth position, tooth vitality, the preparation margin and the cementum medium used (composite resin or glasionomer cement). In addition, survival was neither influenced by the core design with reduced or conventional margin nor by the core thickness, which measured regularly 0.6 mm in the majority of the specimens. Based on the present findings, it can be concluded that Procera AllCeram is a predictable technique for metal-free, esthetic full-ceramic crowns in the anterior and posterior region. PMID:16989114

  19. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments. Annual report, FY1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company. Continuous ceramic filaments are a principal component in many advanced high temperature materials like continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) and woven ceramic textiles. The use of continuous ceramic filaments in CFCC radiant burners, gas turbines, waste incineration, and hot gas filters in U.S. industry and power generation is estimated to save at least 2.16 quad/yr by year 2010 with energy cost savings of at least $8.1 billion. By year 2010, continuous ceramic filaments and CFCC`s have the potential to abate pollution emissions by 917,000 tons annually of nitrous oxide and 118 million tons annually of carbon dioxide (DOE Report OR-2002, February, 1994).

  20. Irradiation study of PNNL synthesized glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossoy-simakov, Anna-eden [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Usov, Igor O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18

    Two types of glass-ceramic were investigated: (1) for immobilization of Ln, alkali, and alkaline earths (GC4); and (2) same as above + high (7%) molybdenum content (Mo7) multiphase specimens. The purpose was to study the radiation stability of PNNL synthesized glass-ceramics and changes in microstructure/phase composition.

  1. Durability testing of heavy ion irradiated crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to assess the effects of heavy-ion irradiation on the durability of pyrochlore-rich baseline ceramics and single-phase pyrochlore, zirconolite and brannerite ceramics. Development of a titanate-based crystalline ceramic form to immobilize surplus weapons-useable plutonium for disposition is the mission of the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). A major development and testing activity for this program is performance testing and qualification of the wasteform for a repository. As part of the performance testing, the leaching behavior of the ceramic form must be evaluated to determine the anticipated repository behavior. To study the impact of radiation damage on the performance of the ceramic, the damage must be accelerated using techniques such as 238Pu doping and ion irradiation. The purpose of this report is to assess the effects of heavy-ion irradiation on the durability of pyrochlore-rich baseline ceramics and single-phase pyrochlore, zirconolite and brannerite ceramics. Ion irradiation of ceramic pellet surfaces will transform the outermost several tenths of microns of the surface into a metamict (i.e., noncrystalline) state. Short-term monolithic leach tests on unirradiated and irradiated samples should elucidate any significant differences in the durability of the undamaged crystalline surface versus the damaged metamict surface. Data developed under this task will support a preliminary integrated data report to be supplied to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) for use in the license application for the candidate Yucca Mountain repository

  2. RESEARCH ON MICROWAVE HUMIDITY TESTING OF CERAMIC PRODUCTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper analyses the principle of microwave humidity testing. According to the problems in the production procedure of ceramic products, a microwave humidity testing system is designed and analyzed for its advantages. Furthermore, the system has been applied to the production line that produces ceramic products and the testing results are also satisfying.

  3. Thermoluminescent properties of Mn-doped YAP ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhydachevskii, Ya.; Suchocki, A.; Berkowski, M.

    2012-01-01

    The work is devoted to synthesis of Mn-doped YAlO3 (YAP) ceramics by common solid-state reaction and their characterization by photoluminescence and thermoluminescence techniques. An impact of the synthesis conditions on the thermoluminescence (TL) efficiency of the ceramics is analyzed from the point of view of possible application of the material for TL dosimetry of ionizing radiation.

  4. Leaching of polyphase nuclear waste ceramics: microstructural and phase characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alumina-based ceramics are potential materials for storage of nuclear wastes. Static leach tests conducted on ceramic monoliths in deionized water, in simulated silicate, and in brine groundwaters, conforming to Materials Characterization Center standards and an accelerated, microscopic leach test, were used to identify the processes. Dissolution and formation of surface passivation layers are discussed. 40 refs

  5. Behaviour of Open Cell Ceramic Foams in Tension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk

    Columbus, Ohio, 2011. s. 165-165. [Materials Science and Technology 2011. Conference and Exhibition. 16.10.2011-20.10.2011, Columbus, Ohio] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : foam ceramics * tensile test * damage quantification Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  6. Calculation of the bio-ceramic material parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fuis, Vladimír; Janíček, Přemysl

    Berlin : Springer, 2014, s. 855-861. ISBN 978-3-319-02293-2. [Mechatronics 2013 /10./. Brno (CZ), 07.10.2013-09.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34632S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : ceramics * material parameters * weibull Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  7. NASA/CARES dual-use ceramic technology spinoff applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Lynn M.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has developed software that enables American industry to establish the reliability and life of ceramic structures in a wide variety of 21st Century applications. Designing ceramic components to survive at higher temperatures than the capability of most metals and in severe loading environments involves the disciplines of statistics and fracture mechanics. Successful application of advanced ceramics material properties and the use of a probabilistic brittle material design methodology. The NASA program, known as CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures), is a comprehensive general purpose design tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. The latest version of this software, CARESALIFE, is coupled to several commercially available finite element analysis programs (ANSYS, MSC/NASTRAN, ABAQUS, COSMOS/N4, MARC), resulting in an advanced integrated design tool which is adapted to the computing environment of the user. The NASA-developed CARES software has been successfully used by industrial, government, and academic organizations to design and optimize ceramic components for many demanding applications. Industrial sectors impacted by this program include aerospace, automotive, electronic, medical, and energy applications. Dual-use applications include engine components, graphite and ceramic high temperature valves, TV picture tubes, ceramic bearings, electronic chips, glass building panels, infrared windows, radiant heater tubes, heat exchangers, and artificial hips, knee caps, and teeth.

  8. Simulation of percolation properties of HTSC ceramics under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretically is considered the irradiation effects on the Josephson contacts random net which simulate the granulated structure obtained fabrication of HTSC ceramics. Radiation dose effect is determined on the specific electric resistance of the ceramics and YBaCu3O7-x films at different temperatures and on their critical temperature

  9. Modelling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential use of a thermochemical software package (FactSage 6.2), in the design of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics, experimental and modelled results on four glass ceramics were compared. Initially large discrepancies were found. These are described and related...

  10. Developing 300°C Ceramic Circuit Boards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A

    2015-02-15

    This paper covers the development of a geothermal ceramic circuit board technology using 3D traces in a machinable ceramic. Test results showing the circuit board to be operational to at least 550°C. Discussion on producing this type of board is outlined along with areas needing improvement.

  11. Radiation treatment of the ceramic and polymer implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobeynikov, M. V.; Bryazgin, A. A.; Bezuglov, V. V.; Shtarklev, E. A.; Vlasov, A. Yu; Voronin, L. A.; Tkachenko, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    Implants are used in medical practice during decades. The ceramic implants are the new trend in medicine. The polymer implants are used for many years, and they are mainly sterilized by the radiation treatment. The article describes the new ceramic and polymer implants that were treated in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics.

  12. Radiation effects in a model ceramic for nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.

    2007-04-01

    The safe immobilization of nuclear waste in geological repositories is one of the major scientific challenges facing humanity today. Crystalline ceramics hold the promise of locking up actinides from nuclear fuel and excess weapons plutonium in their structure thereby isolating them from the environment. This paper presents the atomistic details of radiation damage in a model ceramic, zircon.

  13. Changes in properties of glass ceramics under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in properties of glass ceramics are considered as in initial state so after additional heat treatment up to 3000 K during neutron irradiation in the temperature range of 400-430 to 700-800 K and with fluence up to 2.5x1020 n/cm2. It is shown that additional heat treatment diminishes radiation effects in glass ceramics

  14. Advanced ceramics in Brazil: actual stage and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of advanced ceramics in Brazil, the perspectives of the world and Brazilian markets, the raw materials, the equipments for industry and research, the human resources, and the disposable technology, are presented. The researches on advanced ceramics in Brazil initiated in the sixty decade, with the nuclear fuel development and production projets. (M.C.K.)

  15. Analysis by neutron activation analysis a some ancient Dacian ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Olariu, A

    1999-01-01

    Ancient Dacian ceramics, from three different establishments from Romanian territory have been analyzed by neutron activation analysis. A series of elements has been determined: Ba, Eu, K, La, Mn, Na, Sc, Sm. Ba is the element that could be considered to differentiate relatively the three groups of ceramics.

  16. Basic research in crystalline and noncrystalline ceramic systems. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingery, W. D.; Coble, R. L.

    1968-04-01

    Various research subjects on ceramics have been investigated, including heat conduction, surface characteristics, diffusion in oxides, high-temperature kinetic processes, microstructure development, effects of microstructure on properties, structure and properties of noncrystalline ceramics, dissolution kinetics, and solid-vapor reactions. (DLC)

  17. Brazing zone structure at active brazing of alumina ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Nowadays one of the most effective methods of joining of oxide ceramics with other elements of construction is active brazing based on using of active metals (Ti, Zr), which increase reactivity of brazing alloy relative to ceramic element of a joining.

  18. Effects of irradiation on structural properties of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability of crystalline ceramic nuclear waste may be degraded by self-irradiation damage. Changes in density, strength, thermal conductivity, and lattice structure are of concern. In this paper, structural damage of ceramics under various radiation conditions is discussed and related to possible effects in nuclear waste

  19. New Hypothesis for SOFC Ceramic Oxygen Electrode Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Graves, Christopher R.;

    2016-01-01

    A new hypothesis for the electrochemical reaction mechanism in solid oxide cell ceramic oxygen electrodes is proposed based on literature including our own results. The hypothesis postulates that the observed thin layers of SrO-La2O3 on top of ceramic perovskite and other Ruddlesden-Popper struct...

  20. Ceramic Substrates for High-temperature Electronic Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Chasserio, Nadège; Guillemet-Fritsch, Sophie; Lebey, Thierry; Dagdag, Sélim

    2009-01-01

    One of the most attractive ways to increase power handling capacity in power modules is to increase the operating temperature using wide-band-gap semiconductors. Ceramics are ideal candidates for use as substrates in high-power high-temperature electronic devices. The present article aims to determine the most suitable ceramic material for this application.

  1. Assessment of ceramic composites for MMW space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed multimegawatt nuclear power systems which operate at high temperatures, high levels of stress, and in hostile environments, including corrosive working fluids, have created interest in the use of ceramic composites as structural materials. This report assesses the applicability of several ceramic composites in both Brayton and Rankine cycle power systems. This assessment considers an equilibrium thermodynamic analysis and also a nonequilibrium assessment. (FI)

  2. State of the art: alumina ceramics for energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prominent ceramic raw materials and products manufacturers were surveyed to determine the state of the art for alumina ceramic fabrication. This survey emphasized current capabilities and limitations for fabrication of large, high-density, high-purity, complex shapes. Some directions are suggested for future needs and development

  3. Microelectrical Discharge Machining: A Suitable Process for Machining Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schubert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Today ceramics are used in many industrial applications, for example, in the biomedical field, for high-temperature components or for cutting tools. This is attributed to their excellent mechanical and physical properties, as low density, high strength, and hardness or chemical resistance. However, these specific mechanical properties lead to problems regarding the postprocessing of ceramics. In particular, cutting processes require expensive tools which cause high manufacturing costs to machine ceramics. Consequently, there is a demand for alternative machining processes. Microelectrical discharge machining (micro-EDM is a thermal abrasion process which is based on electrical discharges between a tool and a workpiece. The advantages of micro-EDM are more and more in focus for ceramic machining. These advantages include the process of being a noncontact technology, an independency of material brittleness and hardness, a low impact on the material, and the achievable microstructures. This paper presents the current state of investigations regarding micro-EDM of ceramics. Beside the process principle of EDM, the used procedures for machining ceramics and insulating ceramics are described. Furthermore several machining examples are presented to demonstrate the possibilities of the micro-EDM process with regard to the machining of ceramics.

  4. Assessment of damage in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokhlin, S.I.; Chu, Y.C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Welding Engineering; Baaklini, G.Y. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-07-01

    This paper addresses the application of ultrasonic methods to damage assessment in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites. It focuses on damage caused by thermal shock and oxidation at elevated temperatures. The damage-induced changes in elastic constant and elastic anisotropy are determined by measuring the velocities of ultrasonic waves in different propagation directions within the sample. Thermal shock damage measurement is performed in ceramic samples of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and aluminum oxide. Thermal shock treatment from different temperatures up to 1,000 C is applied to produce the microcracks. Both surface and bulk ultrasonic wave methods are used to correlate the change of elastic constants to microstructural degradation and to determine the change in elastic anisotropy induced by microcrack damage. Oxidation damage is studied in silicon carbide fiber/reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SCS-6/RBSN) composites. The oxidation is done by exposing the samples in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1,400 C, for 100 hours. Significant changes of ultrasonic velocities were observed for composites before and after oxidation. The elastic constants of the composites were determined from the measured velocity data. The Young`s modulus in the fiber direction as obtained from ultrasonic measurements decreases significantly at 600 C but retains its original value at temperatures above 1,200 C. This agrees well with the results of destructive tests by other authors. The transverse longitudinal and shear moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continually until 1,200 C. The results of this work show that the damage-induced anisotropy in both ceramics and ceramic matrix composites can be determined successfully by ultrasonic methods. This suggests the possibility of assessing damage severity using ultrasonic techniques.

  5. Assessment of damage in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Y.C.; Baaklini, G.Y.; Rokhlin, S.I.

    1993-05-01

    This paper addresses the application of ultrasonic sensing to damage assessment in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites. It focuses on damage caused by thermal shock or oxidation at elevated temperatures, which often results in elastic anisotropy. This damaged-induced anisotropy is determined by measuring the velocities of ultrasonic waves in different propagation directions. Thermal shock damage is assessed in ceramic samples of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN). Thermal shock treatment from different temperatures up to 1000 C is applied to produce the microcracks. Results indicate that most microcracks produced by thermal shock are located near sample surfaces. Ultrasonic measurements using the surface wave method are found to correlate well with measurements of degradation of mechanical properties obtained independently by other authors using destructive methods. Oxidation damage is assessed in silicon carbide fiber/reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SCS-6/RBSN) composites. The oxidation is done by exposing the samples in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1400 C, for 100 hr. The Youngs' modulus in the fiber direction as obtained from ultrasonic measurements decreases significantly at 600 C but retains its original value at temperatures above 1200 C. This agrees well with the results of destructive tests by other authors. On the other hand, the transverse moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continually until 1200 C. Measurements on the shear stiffnesses show behavior similar to the transverse moduli. The results of this work show that the damage-induced anisotropy in both ceramics and ceramic matrix composites can be determined successfully by ultrasonic methods. This suggests the possibility of assessing damage severity using ultrasonic techniques.

  6. Assessment of damage in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y. C.; Baaklini, G. Y.; Rokhlin, S.I.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the application of ultrasonic sensing to damage assessment in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites. It focuses on damage caused by thermal shock or oxidation at elevated temperatures, which often results in elastic anisotropy. This damaged-induced anisotropy is determined by measuring the velocities of ultrasonic waves in different propagation directions. Thermal shock damage is assessed in ceramic samples of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN). Thermal shock treatment from different temperatures up to 1000 C is applied to produce the microcracks. Results indicate that most microcracks produced by thermal shock are located near sample surfaces. Ultrasonic measurements using the surface wave method are found to correlate well with measurements of degradation of mechanical properties obtained independently by other authors using destructive methods. Oxidation damage is assessed in silicon carbide fiber/reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SCS-6/RBSN) composites. The oxidation is done by exposing the samples in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1400 C, for 100 hr. The Youngs' modulus in the fiber direction as obtained from ultrasonic measurements decreases significantly at 600 C but retains its original value at temperatures above 1200 C. This agrees well with the results of destructive tests by other authors. On the other hand, the transverse moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continually until 1200 C. Measurements on the shear stiffnesses show behavior similar to the transverse moduli. The results of this work show that the damage-induced anisotropy in both ceramics and ceramic matrix composites can be determined successfully by ultrasonic methods. This suggests the possibility of assessing damage severity using ultrasonic techniques.

  7. Ceramic membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Ceramic gas separation membranes can provide very high separation factors if the pore size is sufficiently small to separate gas molecules by molecular sieving and if oversized pores are adequately limited. Ceramic membranes typically have some pores that are substantially larger than the mean pore size and that should be regarded as defects. To assess the effects of such defects on the performance of ceramic membranes, a simple mathematical model has been developed to describe flow through a gas separation membrane that has a primary mode of flow through very small pores but that has a secondary mode of flow through undesirably large pores. This model permits separation factors to be calculated for a specified gas pair as a function of the molecular weights and molecular diameters of the gases, the membrane pore diameter, and the diameter and number of defects. This model will be described, and key results from the model will be presented. The separation factors of the authors membranes continue to be determined using a permeance test system that measures flows of pure gases through a membrane at temperatures up to 275{degrees}C. A primary goal of this project for FY 1996 is to develop a mixed gas separation system for measuring the separation efficiency of membranes at higher temperatures. Performance criteria have been established for the planned mixed gas separation system and design of the system has been completed. The test system is designed to measure the separation efficiency of membranes at temperatures up to 600{degrees}C and pressures up to 100 psi by separating the constituents of a gas mixture containing hydrogen. The system will accommodate the authors typical experimental membrane that is tubular and has a diameter of about 9 mm and a length of about 23 cm. The design of the new test system and its expected performance will be discussed.

  8. SOLID-STATE CERAMIC LIGHTING PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne D. Brown

    2003-06-01

    Meadow River Enterprises, Inc. (MRE) and the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University (NYSCC) received a DOE cooperative agreement award in September 1999 to develop an energy-efficient Solid-State Ceramic Lamp (SSCL). The program spanned a nominal two(2) year period ending in February of 2002. The federal contribution to the program totaled $1.6 million supporting approximately 78% of the program costs. The SSCL is a rugged electroluminescent lamp designed for outdoor applications. MRE has filed a provisional patent for this ''second generation'' technology and currently produces and markets blue-green phosphor SSCL devices. White phosphor SSCL devices are also available in prototype quantities. In addition to reducing energy consumption, the ceramic EL lamp offers several economic and societal advantages including lower lifecycle costs and reduced ''light pollution''. Significant further performance improvements are possible but will require a dramatic change in device physical construction related to the use of micro-powder materials and processes. The subject ''second-generation'' program spans a 27 month period and combines the materials and processing expertise of NYSCC, the manufacturing expertise of Meadow River Enterprises, and the phosphor development expertise of OSRAM Sylvania to develop an improved SSCL system. The development plan also includes important contributions by Marshall University (a part of the West Virginia University system). All primary development objectives have been achieved with the exception of improved phosphor powders. The performance characteristics of the first generation SSCL devices were carefully analyzed in year 1 and a second generation lamp was defined and optimized in year 2. The provisional patent was ''perfected'' through a comprehensive patent application filed in November 2002. Lamp efficiency was improved more than 2:1.

  9. Solidification analysis of AMMCs with ceramic particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sleziona

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the research work the result of the reinforcement displacement and solidification analysis for aluminiumcast composites with ceramic particles have been presented. The results of research on the solidification procesare compared for the applied aluminium matrix alloy (AlSi12CuNiMg2, for composites containing glass carboparticles (Cg and heterophase reinforcement (mixture of silicon carbide (SiC + glass carbon particles (Cg.Design/methodology/approach: The course of the solidification process was recorded by means of a systemwhich enabled continuous control and measurement of the metal temperature during solidification of the compositsuspension. The system was equipped with a thermoelectric cup core QC4080, with an incorporated thermocouple oK type (NiCr-Ni. The application of disposable thermoelectric cup cores of identical heat abstraction coefficient anknown, standardized dimensions, ensured identical conditions and rate of heat abstraction during the cooling of thcastings. The structure analysis for composite casts was performed by means of optical and scanning microscopy.Findings: The research has shown, that ceramic particles have an influence on temperature change and the timof aluminium matrix alloy solidification. The changes results, first of all, from disparate physical properties othe glassy carbon particles and silicon carbide particles used (thermal conductivity, mass density, compared taluminium matrix alloy.Practical implications: Ceramic particles decrease shrinkage of the casting and change the nature of itcrystallization.Originality/value: Employment of glass carbon particles for matrix reinforcement allows to get flotation in thaluminium alloy. Employment of heterophase reinforcement (glass carbon and silicon carbide particles allows tget segregation of particles: flotation as well as sedimentation in the matrix, which results in the occurrence of layered structure.

  10. Modeling binder removal in ceramic compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incledon, Matthew L.

    Binder is often added to ceramic systems to provide mechanical strength to the green bodies during processing. The binder removal sequence for an individual system is difficult to predict due to the thermal reaction and mass transport of the volatile products. The objective of this work is to use computational methods to predict the kinetics of binder removal as a function of composition, particle size, pore size and tortuosity, temperature, body size and shape, etc.. The model will be used to predict the composition, temperature, and pore pressure as a function of time, position within the body, and heating sequence parameters. This will provide the ability to predict optimum heating sequences that minimize processing time and energy input while avoiding harmful high internal pressures and temperatures. Since there are many binder systems in use, a few specific cases will be considered. TGA (thermogravimetric analysis) of binders will be used to measure kinetics parameters that are inputs for the computational model. A framework will be developed to assess the binder removal sequence for a binder and ceramic system. The input for the model, computed in COMSOL Multiphysics, will be determined through analysis of TGA weight loss data and green body characterization. A set of tools will be presented that assist in the fitting of the TGA data, including the binder degrading into multiple species, higher order reactions, parallel and series reactions, etc.. The use of these ideas and tools will allow the modeler to better predict the heating sequence required for a ceramic and binder system to successfully remove all binder material.

  11. Physical-chemistry characterization of hydroxyapatite (Ha) powder and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bio ceramics have been used recently in medicine as implant materials. For these applications each type of ceramics offers some advantages and inconvenient and the choice of one or the other will depend on some factors such as the region and extension of the implant. In this paper, synthetic hydroxy apatite powders and their ceramics (sintered to various temperatures) were analysed by X-ray diffraction and fluorescence, infra-red spectroscopy, transmission electro microscopy, BET analysis and particle size analyser. The result measurements of the synthetic hydroxy apatite powder (obtained by precipitation method) and ceramics were compared with those of the commercial source (powder and ceramics), and showed that calcium hydroxy apatite is the only phase present. (author)

  12. Design of LTCC-based Ceramic Structure for Chemical Microreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Belavic

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The design of ceramic chemical microreactor for the production of hydrogen needed in portable polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cells is presented. The microreactor was developed for the steam reforming of liquid fuels with water into hydrogen. The complex three-dimensional ceramic structure of the microreactor includes evaporator(s, mixer(s, reformer and combustor. Low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC technology was used to fabricate the ceramic structures with buried cavities and channels, and thick-film technology was used to make electrical heaters, temperature sensors and pressure sensors. The final 3D ceramic structure consists of 45 LTCC tapes. The dimensions of the structure are 75 × 41 × 9 mm3 and the weight is about 73 g.

  13. Processing FeB03 glass-ceramics in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of preparing FeBO3 glass-ceramic in space is explored. A transparent glass-ceramic of FeBO3, due to its unique properties could be an excellent material for magneto-optic applications which currently utilize high price materials such as single crystals of Ga-YIG. The unique magneto-optic properties of FeBO3 were found to come from glass-ceramic but not from the glass form. It was anticipated and later confirmed that the FeBO3 glass-ceramics could not be prepared on earth. Phase separation and iron valence reduction, were identified as the two terrestrial manufacturing obstacles. Since the phase separation problem could be overcome by space processing, the preparation of FeBO3 glass-ceramic in space appears attractive.

  14. Bone-inducing Activity of Biological Piezoelectric Ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To simulate the piezoelectric effect of nature bone, two kinds of biological piezoelectric composite ceramics consisted of hydroxyapatite ( HA ) and lithium sodium potassium riobate (LNK) ceramic of which the ratio of HA/ LNK was 1: 10 and 5:5( wt/ wt ) were prepared. Their piezoelectric property and growth of apatite crystal in the ceramics surface were investigated. With the increase of LNK amount, piezoelectric activity increased correspondingly. By immersing the poled piezoelectric ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 36.5 ℃ for 7,14, and 21 days, apatite crystal was formed on negatively charged surfaces. After 21 days immersion in SBF,the thickest apatite crystal on the negatively charged surfaces increased to 3.337μm. The novel biological piezoelectric ceramics show an excellent piezoelectric property and superior potential bioactivity.

  15. Sintering of zirconia ceramics using microwave and spark heating techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashutenko, A. S.; Frangulyan, T. S.; Ghyngazov, S. A.; Petrova, A. B.

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents the results of an complex study of structural and mechanical properties of zirconia ceramics sintered using different techniques. The samples were sintered via the conventional method of heating, in the field of microwave radiation and spark plasma. The experimental data indicates that a microwave field and spark plasma have a stimulating effect on zirconia ceramics sintering. In contrast to the microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering provides ceramics with improved properties at similar time-temperature annealing modes. Moreover, the properties of the ceramics under spark plasma sintering at T=1300 °C are similar to the properties of the ceramics sintered in a microwave field at T=1400 °C.

  16. Micro Embossing of Ceramic Green Substrates for Micro Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, X -C; Maw, H P; Lu, C W; Lam, Y C

    2008-01-01

    Multilayered ceramic substrates with embedded micro patterns are becoming increasingly important, for example, in harsh environment electronics and microfluidic devices. Fabrication of these embedded micro patterns, such as micro channels, cavities and vias, is a challenge. This study focuses on the process of patterning micro features on ceramic green substrates using micro embossing. A ceramic green tape that possessed near-zero shrinkage in the x-y plane was used, six layers of which were laminated as the embossing substrate. The process parameters that impact on the pattern fidelity were investigated and optimized in this study. Micro features with line-width as small as several micrometers were formed on the ceramic green substrates. The dynamic thermo-mechanical analysis indicated that extending the holding time at certain temperature range would harden the green substrates with little effect on improving the embossing fidelity. Ceramic substrates with embossed micro patterns were obtain d after co-firi...

  17. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinchcomb, W.W.; Reifsnider, K.L.; Dunyak, T.J. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics)

    1992-06-15

    The objective of the work reported herein is to develop an understanding of the mechanical behavior of advanced ceramic composites subjected to elevated temperature and dynamic (cyclic) loading, to develop a test system and test methods to obtain the properties and performance information required to design engineering components made from ceramic composite materials, and to provide critical and comprehensive evaluations of such materials to material synthesizers and developers to support and enhance progress in ceramic composite material development. The accomplishments of the investigation include the design, development, and demonstration of a high temperature, biaxial mechanical test facility for ceramic composite tubes and the development and validation of a performance simulation model (MRLife) for ceramic composites.

  18. Ceramic Nanocomposites from Tailor-Made Preceramic Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Mera

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present Review addresses current developments related to polymer-derived ceramic nanocomposites (PDC-NCs. Different classes of preceramic polymers are briefly introduced and their conversion into ceramic materials with adjustable phase compositions and microstructures is presented. Emphasis is set on discussing the intimate relationship between the chemistry and structural architecture of the precursor and the structural features and properties of the resulting ceramic nanocomposites. Various structural and functional properties of silicon-containing ceramic nanocomposites as well as different preparative strategies to achieve nano-scaled PDC-NC-based ordered structures are highlighted, based on selected ceramic nanocomposite systems. Furthermore, prospective applications of the PDC-NCs such as high-temperature stable materials for thermal protection systems, membranes for hot gas separation purposes, materials for heterogeneous catalysis, nano-confinement materials for hydrogen storage applications as well as anode materials for secondary ion batteries are introduced and discussed in detail.

  19. A scanning electron microscopic investigation of ceramic orthodontic brackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic brackets were introduced to overcome the esthetic disadvantages of stainless steel brackets. The clinical impression of these brackets is very favorable. However, the sliding mechanics used in the Straightwire (A Company, San Diego, CA, USA) system appear to produce slower tooth movements with ceramic compared to stainless steel brackets. To determine whether this was due to any obvious mechanical problem in the bracket slot, Transcend (Unitek Corporation/3M, Monrovia, CA, USA) ceramic brackets were examined by a scanning electron microscope and compared to stainless steel brackets.Consistently, large surface defects were found in the ceramic bracket slots that were not present in the metal bracket slots. These irregularities could obviously hinder the sliding mechanics of the bracket slot-archwire system and create a greater demand on anchorage. Conversely, the fitting surface of the Transcend ceramic bracket showed extremely smooth surface characteristics, and it would seem advisable for the manufacturers to incorporate this surface within the bracket slot. (author)

  20. Fundamental alloy design of oxide ceramics and their composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I.W.

    1992-01-01

    The main research was on microstructural development of oxide ceramics. Projects were completed and the publications given. Abstracts are given on: Reactive CeO[sub 2]powders by homogeneous precipitation, SiC whisker-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate composite, solute drag on grain boundary in ionic solids (space charge effect), in-situ alumina/aluminate platelet composites, exaggerated texture and grain growth of superplastic silicon nitride (SiAlON), hot extrusion of ceramics, control of grain boundary pinning in Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]/ZrO[sub 2] composites with Ce[sup 3+]/Ce[sup 4+] doping, superplastic forming of ceramic composites, computer simulation of final stage sintering (model, kinetics, microstructure, effect of initial pore size), development of superplastic structural ceramics, and superplastic flow of two-phase ceramics containing rigid inclusions (zirconia/mullite composites). A proposed research program is outlined: materials, solute drag, densification and coarsening, and grain boundary electrical behavior.