WorldWideScience

Sample records for ceramics

  1. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  2. On Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  3. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.)

  4. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  5. Ceramic Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  6. Engineering ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bengisu, Murat

    2001-01-01

    This is a comprehensive book applying especially to junior and senior engineering students pursuing Materials Science/ Engineering, Ceramic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering degrees. It is also a reference book for other disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering. Important properties of most engineering ceramics are given in detailed tables. Many current and possible applications of engineering ceramics are described, which can be used as a guide for materials selection and for potential future research. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials, processing properties, characterization and applications of engineering ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  7. Tailored ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In polyphase tailored ceramic forms two distinct modes of radionuclide immobilization occur. At high waste loadings the radionuclides are distributed through most of the ceramic phases in dilute solid solution, as indicated schematically in this paper. However, in the case of low waste loadings, or a high loading of a waste with low radionuclide content, the ceramic can be designed with only selected phases containing the radionuclides. The remaining material forms nonradioactive phases which provide a degree of physical microstructural isolation. The research and development work with polyphase ceramic nuclear waste forms over the past ten years is discussed. It has demonstrated the critical attributes which suggest them as a waste form for future HLW disposal. From a safety standpoint, the crystalline phases in the ceramic waste forms offer the potential for demonstrable chemical durability in immobilizing the long-lived radionuclides in a geologic environment. With continued experimental research on pure phases, analysis of mineral analogue behavior in geochemical environments, and the study of radiation effects, realistic predictive models for waste form behavior over geologic time scales are feasible. The ceramic forms extend the degree of freedom for the economic optimization of the waste disposal system

  8. Structural Ceramics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  9. Dental ceramics: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Shenoy Arvind; Shenoy Nina

    2010-01-01

    In the last few decades, there have been tremendous advances in the mechanical properties and methods of fabrication of ceramic materials. While porcelain-based materials are still a major component of the market, there have been moves to replace metal ceramics systems with all ceramic systems. Advances in bonding techniques have increased the range and scope for use of ceramics in dentistry. In this brief review, we will discuss advances in ceramic materials and fabrication techniques. Examp...

  10. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  11. Fatigue of dental ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; lawn, brian

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics

  12. Ceramic art in sculpture

    OpenAIRE

    Rokavec, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Diploma seminar speaks of ceramics as a field of artistic expression and not just as pottery craft. I presented short overview of developing ceramic sculpture and its changing role. Clay inspires design and touch more than other sculpture media. It starts as early as in prehistory. Although it sometimes seems that was sculptural ceramics neglected in art history overview, it was not so in actual praxis. There is a rich tradition of ceramics in the East and also in Europe during the renaissanc...

  13. Ceramic Laser Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Villalobos; Jasbinder Sanghera; Ishwar Aggarwal; Bryan Sadowski; Jesse Frantz; Colin Baker; Brandon Shaw; Woohong Kim

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers,...

  14. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  15. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupperman, David S.; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw

    1992-01-01

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable with composite ceramic ends, or a u-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting.

  16. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  17. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  18. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  19. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  20. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  1. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  2. Verification of ceramic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behar-Lafenetre, S.; Cornillon, L.; Rancurel, M.; Graaf, D. de; Hartmann, P.; Coe, G.; Laine, B.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the "Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures" contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instr

  3. Ceramics As Materials Of Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, A.; Eteiba, M. B.; Abdelmonem, N.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper attempts to review the limitations for using the important ceramics in contact with corrosive media. Different types of ceramics are included. Corrosion properties of ceramics and their electrical properties are mentioned. Recommendations are suggested for using ceramics in different media.

  4. High pressure ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  5. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  6. Ceramic Solar Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Solar receiver uses ceramic honeycomb matrix to absorb heat from Sun and transfer it to working fluid at temperatures of 1,095 degrees and 1,650 degrees C. Drives gas turbine engine or provides heat for industrial processes.

  7. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  8. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  9. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  10. Selecting Ceramics - Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM OF PRESENTATION: To compare a number of materials for extracoronal restoration of teeth with particular reference to CAD-CAM ceramics. CASE DESCRIPTION AND TREATMENT CARRIED OUT: This paper will be illustrated using clinical examples of patients treated using different ceramic restorations to present the advantages and disadvantages and each technique. The different requirements of tooth preparation, impression taking and technical procedures of each system will be presented and compar...

  11. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  12. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2007-08-28

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  13. Piezoelectric Ceramics and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, I.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the piezoelectric effect in ceramics and presents a quantitative representation of this effect. Explains the processes involved in the manufacture of piezoelectric ceramics, the materials used, and the situations in which they are applied. (GS)

  14. Cooled Ceramic Turbine Vane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — N&R Engineering will investigate the feasibility of cooled ceramics, such as ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade concepts that can decrease specific...

  15. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  16. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  17. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  18. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  19. Ceramic vane drive joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Charles H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  20. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

    1993-12-14

    A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

  1. Statistic><Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2008-01-01

    Co-organizer for and participant at the exhibition: Statistic><Ceramics The Röhsska Museum of Design and Decorative Arts; Gothenborg 5/2-16/3 2008 Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg 3/4-27/4 2008...

  2. Ceramic tubesheet design analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    A transport combustor is being commissioned at the Southern Services facility in Wilsonville, Alabama to provide a gaseous product for the assessment of hot-gas filtering systems. One of the barrier filters incorporates a ceramic tubesheet to support candle filters. The ceramic tubesheet, designed and manufactured by Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (EF&PM), is unique and offers distinct advantages over metallic systems in terms of density, resistance to corrosion, and resistance to creep at operating temperatures above 815{degrees}C (1500{degrees}F). Nevertheless, the operational requirements of the ceramic tubesheet are severe. The tubesheet is almost 1.5 m in (55 in.) in diameter, has many penetrations, and must support the weight of the ceramic filters, coal ash accumulation, and a pressure drop (one atmosphere). Further, thermal stresses related to steady state and transient conditions will occur. To gain a better understanding of the structural performance limitations, a contract was placed with Mallett Technology, Inc. to perform a thermal and structural analysis of the tubesheet design. The design analysis specification and a preliminary design analysis were completed in the early part of 1995. The analyses indicated that modifications to the design were necessary to reduce thermal stress, and it was necessary to complete the redesign before the final thermal/mechanical analysis could be undertaken. The preliminary analysis identified the need to confirm that the physical and mechanical properties data used in the design were representative of the material in the tubesheet. Subsequently, few exploratory tests were performed at ORNL to evaluate the ceramic structural material.

  3. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  4. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  5. Grain boundaries in ceramics and ceramic-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, D.R.; Wolf, D.

    1986-01-01

    Three interfaces exist: the crystal-crystal grain boundary in very pure single-phase ceramics, the crystal-glass-crystal grain boundary in most single-phase and polyphase ceramics, and the ceramic-metal interface. It is needed to correlate their structure and adhesion/failure. Methods for studying the bonding, interfacial structure, and fracture and adhesion are discussed, and recommendations are given. 42 refs. (DLC)

  6. Ceramic Stereolithography: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics by Photopolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic stereolithography and related additive manufacturing methods involving photopolymerization of ceramic powder suspensions are reviewed in terms of the capabilities of current devices. The practical fundamentals of the cure depth, cure width, and cure profile are related to the optical properties of the monomer, ceramic, and photo-active components. Postpolymerization steps, including harvesting and cleaning the objects, binder burnout, and sintering, are discussed and compared with conventional methods. The prospects for practical manufacturing are discussed.

  7. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  8. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Joel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-12-10

    Transparent ceramics match or exceed the performance of single-crystal materials in laser applications, with a more-robust fabrication process. Controlling the distribution of optical dopants in transparent ceramics would allow qualitative improvements in amplifier slab design by allowing gain and loss to be varied within the material. My work aims to achieve a controlled pattern or gradient of dopant prior to sintering, in order to produce tailored ceramics.

  9. Ceramic cooling tower packings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honekamp, H.; Katzmann, A.

    1986-05-01

    No material for cooling tower packings demonstrates all the characteristics desired by the designer. The choice of a specific material must therefore always be oriented towards the limiting conditions of a specific project. Resistance to frost, combustibility and resistance to ageing may, for example, be determining requirements. Ceramic stones will find further possibilities of application in the near future due to their almost unlimited durability.

  10. Rheology of Superplastic Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Constitutive equation of rheglogy describing a phenomenological level of superplastic deformation as functional correlation between tensor components of stress and strain rate has been analyzed for the case of superplastic ceramic flow. Rheological properties of material are taken into account by means of scalar rheological coefficients of shear and volume viscosity, which are functions of temperature, effective stress (or strain rate) and density of material.

  11. Laser Micromachining of Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Sciti, Diletta; Bellosi, Alida

    2011-01-01

    Laser surface processing of ceramics is an area of considerable technological importance for several structural, tribological, optical and electronic applications. The laser beam behaves as a heat source that induces a temperature rise on the surface and within the bulk of the material. Depending on laser parameters and material characteristics, lasers can be used for fabricating microholes at designated locations, for cutting, scribing, for surface modifications In this work different types ...

  12. Preparation and characteristics of porous ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei SHAO; Peiping ZHANG; Liyan MA; Juanjuan LIU

    2007-01-01

    Pyrophyllite is always used for making porous ceramics. In order to design the preparation technics of porous ceramics with pyrophyllite reasonably we must know the classifications, characteristics, properties and applications of porous ceramics. The classification and characteristics of porous ceramics are reviewed in this article; and several common preparations with their advantages and disadvantages are also introduced. The authors discussed the problems existing in researching and developing process for porous ceramics, and forecasted the development prospect of porous ceramics.

  13. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roode, M. van [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  14. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  15. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  16. Lightweight high performance ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Stephen D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-02

    A sintered ceramic composition includes at least 50 wt. % boron carbide and at least 0.01 wt. % of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, the sintered ceramic composition being characterized by a density of at least 90% of theoretical density.

  17. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  18. Glass, Ceramics, and Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies of plutonium in glass and ceramics have taken place in the thirty years covered by this book. These studies have led to a substantial understanding, arising from fundamental research of actinides in solids and research and development in three technical fields: immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex and, most recently, the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities

  19. Fast Measurements Of Thermal Diffusivities Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marnell; Goldstein, Howard E.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature rises of samples compared with reference sample. Apparatus quickly measures thermal diffusivities of ceramics at high temperatures. Produces data on relative thermal diffusivities of as many as six ceramic specimens per hour. Thermal-diffusivity tester makes it easy to determine thermal diffusivities of ceramics. Pronounced effects of processing parameters on thermal properties of ceramics evaluated quickly.

  20. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  1. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1998-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  2. Wear prediction of ceramic-on-ceramic hip artificial joints

    OpenAIRE

    Askari, E; Flores, Paulo; Dabirrahmani, D.; Appleyard, R.

    2015-01-01

    Wear can influence the lifetime and performance of implants and has been found to be a key factor in primary failure of artificial hip joints. The present study aims to present a spatial multibody dynamic model to predict wear in ceramic-on-ceramic hip implants. The problem was formulated by developing a spatial multibody dynamic model of a hip prosthesis taking three-dimensional physiological loading and motion of the human body into account. Then, the Archard wear model was inte...

  3. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  4. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  5. Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1997-04-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  6. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  7. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  8. The ceramic gas electron multiplier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosson, Amir; Fleck, Ivor [Siegen University, Siegen (Germany); Collaboration: LCTPC-Deutschland-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) has been proven to fulfill the demands of high energy physics experiments. Effective gain and resistance to the electrical sparks are significant issues to be investigated. A new type of GEM, made out of ceramic, has been produced and results from measurements with this type of GEM are presented. Advantages of ceramic material are its very good stability versus change in temperature and its electrical properties. Using Ar-CO{sub 2}(80-20 %) gas mixture and a X-ray source, the gain of the ceramic GEMs is measured and compared with the one for CERN GEMs. These results assure the possibility of using the ceramic GEMs for high-luminosity experiments.

  9. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  10. Novel Synthesis of Ceramic Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.L.Choy

    2007-01-01

    1 Results There is an increasing demand for producing high performance ceramic films at a reduced cost. This paper describes an innovative and cost-effective method of producing nanostructured ceramic films based on Electrostatic Spray Assisted Vapour Deposition (ESAVD). ESAVD is a variant of chemical vapour deposition process which involves spraying atomised charged precursor droplets across an electric field where the precursor undergo decomposition and heterogeneous chemical reaction near the heat...

  11. Ceramic materials and growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgushi, H.; Yoshikawa, T.; Okumura, M.; Nakajima, H.; Takakura, Y. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orhtopaedic Surgery; Dohi, Y. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Public Health; Noshi, T.; Ikeuchi, M. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Recently, many types of growth factors have been purified and used for promoting cell differentiation cascade. The activity of growth factors can be detected in vitro such as culture condition. However, the activity is difficult to detect when these factors are locally administered in vivo, because these dissipate soon after the administration. In order to retain growth factors in local milieu, these can be incorporated with biocompatible porous ceramic materials. Such ceramic/factors composites when implanted in vivo, can trigger certain types of cell differentiation cascade resulted in new tissue formation and tissue regeneration. The paper describes the ceramic / growth factors composites especially hydroxyapatite ceramic (HA) / bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) composite to induce osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. The HA/BMP composite supported the osteoblastic differentiation on the HA surface and finally resulted in bone bonding to the HA. When the marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were impregnated in pore areas of HA ceramics, the composites showed more and rapid bone formation than the HA/BMP and HA/MSCs composite, indicating the synergistic effect of BMP and MSCs. These findings indicate the importance of ceramic surface to evoke osteoblastic differentiation as well as to capture the molecules of growth factors for the cell differentiation. (orig.)

  12. Ferroelectric ceramics in a pyroelectric accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shchagin, A. V., E-mail: shchagin@kipt.kharkov.ua [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation); Miroshnik, V. S.; Volkov, V. I. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Oleinik, A. N. [Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    The applicability of polarized ferroelectric ceramics as a pyroelectric in a pyroelectric accelerator is shown by experiments. The spectra of X-ray radiation of energy up to tens of keV, generated by accelerated electrons, have been measured on heating and cooling of the ceramics in vacuum. It is suggested that curved layers of polarized ferroelectric ceramics be used as elements of ceramic pyroelectric accelerators. Besides, nanotubes and nanowires manufactured from ferroelectric ceramics are proposed for the use in nanometer-scale ceramic pyroelectric nanoaccelerators for future applications in nanotechnologies.

  13. Rheological Behaviour of Ceramic Inks for Direct Ceramic Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ponnambalam

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, studies were made on the preparation of ceramic inks with: (i alumina powderin ethyl alcohol and (ii zirconia powder in ethyl alcohol at different volume fractions of ceramic.Different amounts (0.75-3.00 vol % of an organic dispersant (oleic acid were added to ceramicink containing 5 per cent of ceramic by volume in ethyl alcohol. The viscosities of the suspensionswere determined with Brookefield viscometer (model: DV-E, which is suitable for measuringthe viscosities of suspensions accurately. These inks were deposited on a substrate to see theirspread. The sediment packing densities ( m of the resulting suspensions were calculated usingtheoretical models which can be related to the density that can be achieved in the final product.The highest sediment packing density was arrived at low viscosity values of the ink and occurredwhen 1 per cent of dispersant by volume was used for 5 per cent alumina content. For 5 percent zirconia content, 2 per cent of dispersant by volume gave a similar result. Experimentswere also conducted to find the value of m for different solid loadings (5-25 vol % of ceramicwith 1 per cent dispersant. It was observed that the sediment packing density and the apparentviscosities were increasing when solid loading concentrations were increased for both aluminaand zirconia-based inks. The optimum value of m and viscosity have been determined from thisstudy. The results of this preliminary study will be useful for further investigations on therheological behaviour of ceramic inks for direct ceramic inkjet printing.

  14. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  15. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  16. Ordered ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.A.; Hill, C.G. Jr.; Zeltner, W.A.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic membranes have been formed from colloidal sols coated on porous clay supports. These supported membranes have been characterized in terms of their permeabilities and permselectivities to various aqueous test solutions. The thermal stabilities and pore structures of these membranes have been characterized by preparing unsupported membranes of the correpsonding material and performing N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and X-ray diffraction studies on these membranes. To date, membranes have been prepared from a variety of oxides, including TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as Zr-, Fe-, and Nb-doped TiO{sub 2}. In many of these membranes pore diameters are less than 2 nm, while in others the pore diameters are between 3 and 5 nm. Procedures for fabricating porous clay supports with reproducible permeabilities for pure water are also discussed. 30 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

  17. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  18. Antiferroelectric Shape Memory Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Uchino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiferroelectrics (AFE can exhibit a “shape memory function controllable by electric field”, with huge isotropic volumetric expansion (0.26% associated with the AFE to Ferroelectric (FE phase transformation. Small inverse electric field application can realize the original AFE phase. The response speed is quick (2.5 ms. In the Pb0.99Nb0.02[(Zr0.6Sn0.41-yTiy]0.98O3 (PNZST system, the shape memory function is observed in the intermediate range between high temperature AFE and low temperature FE, or low Ti-concentration AFE and high Ti-concentration FE in the composition. In the AFE multilayer actuators (MLAs, the crack is initiated in the center of a pair of internal electrodes under cyclic electric field, rather than the edge area of the internal electrodes in normal piezoelectric MLAs. The two-sublattice polarization coupling model is proposed to explain: (1 isotropic volume expansion during the AFE-FE transformation; and (2 piezoelectric anisotropy. We introduce latching relays and mechanical clampers as possible unique applications of shape memory ceramics.

  19. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  20. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appr...

  1. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  2. Insights on Ceramics as Dental Materials. Part I: Ceramic Material Types in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, GW; Matinlinna, JP

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics are widely used biomaterials in prosthetic dentistry due to their attractive clinical properties. They are aesthetically pleasing with their color, shade and luster, and they are chemically stable. The main constituents of dental ceramic are Si-based inorganic materials, such as feldspar, quartz, and silica. Traditional feldspar-based ceramics are also referred to as "Porcelain". The crucial difference between a regular ceramic and a dental ceramic is the proportion of feldspar, quar...

  3. Nondestructive evaluation of structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klima, S.J.; Baaklini, G.Y.; Abel, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented on research and development of techniques for nondestructive evaluation and characterization of advanced ceramics for heat engine applications. Highlighted in this review are Lewis Research Center efforts in microfocus radiography, scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM), and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). The techniques were evaluated by applying them to research samples of green and sintered silicon nitride and silicon carbide in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars containing seeded voids. Probabilities of detection of voids were determined for diameters as small as 20 microns for microfucus radiography, SLAM, and SAM. Strengths and limitations of the techniques for ceramic applications are identified. Application of ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic microstructures is also discussed.

  4. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process

  5. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  6. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  7. Ceramic catalyst materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  8. Chemical characterization of marajoara ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the elemental concentration of Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in 204 fragments of Marajoara archaeological ceramics, of which 156 were provided by the Archaeology and Ethnology Museum of Sao Paulo University (MAE) and 48 were provided by Dr. Denise Pahl Schaan, Marajo Museum curator. Also, 9 contemporary ceramics produced and marketed at Marajo Island were analyzed. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analyses were performed in 8 archaeological samples and 1 contemporary sample in order to identify the burning temperature of the samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed in 13 archaeological samples and 2 contemporary samples for the investigation of their mineralogical composition. Mahalanobis distance was used for the study of outlier while modified filter was used for the study of the temper added to the ceramic paste. Result interpretation was performed using cluster analysis, principal components analysis and discriminant analysis. Procrustes analysis was used for variable selection and it showed that the Ce, Fe, Eu, Hf, K and Th variables are adequate for the characterization of the analyzed samples. The comparative study among the archaeological and contemporary ceramics showed the arrangement of two well-defined and close groups for the archaeological samples and a third, distant group for the contemporary ones. This result indicates that the archaeological and contemporary ceramics differ in their composition. EPR and XRD analysis were inconclusive for the differentiation of archaeological and contemporary ceramics. (author)

  9. Ceramic components for MHD electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, D.D.

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf/sub x/In/sub y/A/sub z/O/sub 2/ where x = 0.1 to 0.4, y = 0.3 to 0.6, z = 0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  10. Electrospinning of ceramic nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Benjamin M.

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) nanofibers of diameters as low as 20 nm are fabricated. The fibers were produced through the electrostatic spinning of the preceramic poly(carbomethylsilane) with pyrolysis to ceramic. A new technique was used where the preceramic was blended with polystyrene (PS) and, subsequent to electrospinning, was exposed to UV to crosslink the PS and prevent fibers flowing during pyrolysis. Electrospun SiC fibers were characterized by FTIR, TGA-DTA, SEM, TEM, XRD, and SAED. Fibers were shown to be polycrystalline and nanograined with alpha-SiC 15R polytype being dominant, where commercial fiber production methods form beta-SiC 3C. Pyrolysis of the bulk polymer blend to SiC produced alpha-SiC 15R as the dominant polytype with larger grains showing that electrospinning nanofibers affects resultant crystallinity. Fibers produced were shown to have a core-shell structure of an oxide scale that was variable by pyrolysis conditions. Metal oxide powders (chromium oxide, cobalt oxide, iron oxide, silicon oxide, tantalum oxide, titanium oxide, tungsten oxide, vanadium oxide, and zirconium oxide), were converted to metal carbide powders and metal nitride powders by the process of carbothermal reduction (CTR). Synthetic pitch was explored as an alternative to graphite which is a common carbon source for CTR. It was shown via characterization with XRD that pitch performs as well and in some cases better than graphite and is therefore a viable alternative in CTR. Conversion of metal oxide powders with pitch led to conversion of sol-gel based metal oxide nanofibers produced by electrospinning. Pitch was soluble in the solutions xv that were electrospun allowing for intimate contact between the sol-gel and the carbon source for CTR. This method became a two step processing method to produce metal carbide and nitride nanofibers: first electrospin sol-gel based metal oxide nanofibers and subsequently pyrolize them in the manner of CTR to transform them. Results indicate

  11. Doubled-ended ceramic thyratron

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The double-ended ceramic thyratron CX 1171 B, with its coaxial voltage divider for the SPS. Such a switch, paralleled by three ignitrons in series forms the "thyragnitron" arrangement, and can switch 10 kA, 25 ms pulses, with very fast rise times.

  12. Optical scattering in glass ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattarelli, M.; Montagna, M.; Verrocchio, P.

    2008-01-01

    The transparency of glass ceramics with nanocrystals is generally higher than that expected from the theory of Rayleigh scattering. We attribute this ultra-transparency to the spatial correlation of the nanoparticles. The structure factor is calculated for a simple model system, the random sequentia

  13. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  14. Art Education: Creative Ceramic Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Nora; Marinaccio, Louis

    A course in forming, decorating, glazing, and firing pottery is presented. Upon completion of the course, the student will be expected to be familiar with all terms and characteristics connected with pottery and ceramics, and he will be expected to be able to properly handle and form clay. Course content includes the history of clay handling,…

  15. Properties Research of Ceramic Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Żółkiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the method of full mould the polystyrene model, which fills the mould cavity in the course of filling by the liquid metal is subjected tothe influence of high temperature and passes from the solid, through the liquid, to the gaseous state. During this process solid and gaseousproducts of thermal decomposition of polystyrene patterns occur. The kinetics of this process is significantly influenced by the gasificationtemperature, density and mass of the polystyrene patterns. One of the basic parameters is the amount and rate of gas from the polystyrenemodel during its thermal decomposition. Specific properties of ceramic layer used for lost foam castings are required. To ensure optimalprocess flow of metal in the form proper permeability of the ceramic layer is needed.To ensure optimal conditions for technological casting method EPS patterns are tested and determined are the technological parametersand physical-chemical process in: material properties of the pattern, properties of the ceramic layer applied to the pattern, pattern gasification kinetics pouring processIn the course of the research the characteristics of polystyrene and ceramic layer were determined.

  16. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  17. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  18. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  19. Preparation and Microstructure of Glass-ceramics and Ceramic Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Feng; XIE Junlin; HAN Da

    2008-01-01

    The technology and microstructure of glass-ceramics and ceramic composite materials were studied.A suitable ceramic body was chosen on the basis of the sintering temperature of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramics.According to the expansion coefficient of the ceramic body,that of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramics was adjusted.a-wollastonite was found present as the major crystalline phase in glass-ceramic.The CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramic layer and ceramic body could be sintered together by adjusting the sintering period.The compositions of glass-ceramic layer and ceramic body diffuse mutually at 1100℃.resulting in an interface between them.To achieve good sintered properties of glass-ceramics and the chosen ceramic body,at least a four-hour sintering time is used.

  20. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia-ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal-ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis

  1. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  2. Build up the Ceramics Platform, Enhance the Brand Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ To promote the export trade of China ceramics industry, to develop the overseas marking channel for domestic architecture sanitary ceramics industry ,China Ceramics City ,jointly with China's Foreign Trade magazine,start to publicize on the overseas market.

  3. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  4. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  5. Experiences with Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....

  6. Experiences with voice to design ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....

  7. Tantalum-Based Ceramics for Refractory Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel; DiFiore, Robert; Kalvala, Victor

    2006-01-01

    A family of tantalum-based ceramics has been invented as ingredients of high-temperature composite insulating tiles. These materials are suitable for coating and/or permeating the outer layers of rigid porous (foam-like or fibrous) ceramic substrates to (1) render the resulting composite ceramic tiles impervious to hot gases and (2) enable the tiles to survive high heat fluxes at temperatures that can exceed 3,000 F ( 1,600 C).

  8. Using a ceramic chamber in kicker magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S.

    1993-05-01

    A ceramic chamber inside kicker magnets can provide the relevant field risetime. On the other hand, some metallic coating inside has to prevent static charge buildup and shield the beam from ceramic and ferrite at high frequencies to avoid possible resonances. The issues concerning the metallized ceramic chamber, such as coupling impedances and requirements on the coating, are studied to find a compromise solution for kickers of the Medium Energy Booster at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  9. Advanced ceramics: the present and the perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development in the Brazilian and international areas of advanced ceramics is described, emphasizing its economic perspectivas and industrial applications. Results obtained by national institutions are reviewed, mainly in the context of those that pioneered the required high technology in this ceramic field. The rapid growth of the interest for those special materials, made more evident by ample information related to the superconducting ceramics great pontential for important practical applications, is one of the most significant characteristics of the area. (author)

  10. Graded Structures for All-ceramic Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Y.; Chai, H.; Lawn, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    One failure mode of all-ceramic restorations is radial cracking at the cementation surface, from occlusally induced flexure of the stiffer ceramic layer(s) on the softer dentin underlayer. We hypothesize that such failure may be substantially mitigated by an appropriate grading of elastic modulus through the ceramic thickness. In this study, we fabricated graded structures by infiltrating glass into zirconia plates, with resulting diminished modulus in the outer surfaces. The plates were then...

  11. Ceramic Materials and Color in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Volpato, Claudia; Fredel, Márcio; Philippi, Analúcia; PETTER, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of metal ceramic crowns, clinicians and researchers have been looking for a restorative system that can associate beauty, strength and durability, but without the presence of a metallic infrastructure. Indeed, dental ceramics are materials that come aesthetically closest to natural teeth. With the improvement of ceramic systems, it has been possible to combine the excellent aesthetic characteristics of this material with a considerable resistance to fracture. It is impe...

  12. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  13. GRAIN BOUNDARIES IN POLYPHASE CERAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, D

    1985-01-01

    The majority of polyphase ceramics contain a residual glass phase at their grain boundaries. The stability of these phases, particularly at the two-grain boundaries, is of significance since they affect the properties of the material as a whole. Drawing analogies with soap films, the stability of a continuous intergranular phase is considered in terms of the balance between the capillarity and disjoining pressures. The individual components to the disjoining pressures are discussed. It is arg...

  14. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation

    OpenAIRE

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative t...

  15. Luminescent ceramics for LED conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raukas, M.; Wei, G.; Bergenek, K.; Kelso, J.; Zink, N.; Zheng, Y.; Hannah, M.; Stough, M.; Wirth, R.; Linkov, A.; Jermann, F.; Eisert, D.

    2011-03-01

    Many LED-based applications would benefit from more efficient and/or high lumen output devices that enable usage in both white and single color illumination schemes. In the present article we briefly review the materials research history leading to optical ceramic converters and discuss their typical characteristics. Recently demonstrated high performance values in terms of efficacy and external quantum efficiency in orange (amber) spectral region are described.

  16. Evaluation of bond strength of various margin ceramics to a zirconia ceramic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comlekoglu, M. Erhan; Dundar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gungor, M. Ali; Gokce, Bulent; Artunc, Celal

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the bond strengths of four different margin ceramics based on fluoroapatite and feldspath to a zirconia ceramic. Methods: Zirconia cores (Zirconzahn) (N = 28, n = 7/margin ceramic group) were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions (diameter: 4 mm; thi

  17. The future of bioactive ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hench, Larry L

    2015-02-01

    Two important worldwide needs must be satisfied in the future; (1) treatment of the deteriorating health of an aging population and, (2) decreasing healthcare costs to meet the needs of an increased population. The ethical and economic dilemma is how to achieve equality in quality of care while at the same time decreasing cost of care for an ever-expanding number of people. The limited lifetime of prosthetic devices made from first-generation nearly inert biomaterials requires new approaches to meet these two large needs. This paper advises an expanded emphasis on: (1) regeneration of tissues and (2) prevention of tissue deterioration to meet this growing need. Innovative use of bioactive ceramics with genetic control of in situ tissue responses offers the potential to achieve both tissue regeneration and prevention. Clinical success of use of bioactive glass for bone regeneration is evidence that this concept works. Likewise the use of micron sized bioactive glass powders in a dentifrice for re-mineralization of teeth provides evidence that prevention of tissue deterioration is also possible. This opinion paper outlines clinical needs that could be met by innovative use of bioactive glasses and ceramics in the near future; including: regeneration of skeletal tissues that is patient specific and genetic based, load-bearing bioactive glass-ceramics for skeletal and ligament and tendon repair, repair and regeneration of soft tissues, and rapid low-cost analysis of human cell-biomaterial interactions leading to patient specific diagnoses and treatments using molecularly tailored bioceramics.

  18. Carbon nanofillers for machining insulating ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Malek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of ceramics in emerging applications is principally limited by the final machining process necessary for producing microcomponents with complex geometries. The addition of carbon nanotubes greatly enhances the electrical properties of insulating ceramics allowing electrical discharge machining to be used to manufacture intricate parts. Meanwhile other properties of the ceramic may be either preserved or even improved. For the first time, a silicon nitride/carbon nanotubes microgear is electrically discharge machined with a remarkably high material removal rate, low surface roughness, and low tool wear. This offers unprecedented opportunities for the manufacture of complicated ceramic parts by adding carbon nanotubes for new engineering and biomedical applications.

  19. Color analysis of different ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladag, Akin; Gungor, Mehmet Ali; Artunc, Celal

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the color properties of three different ceramic systems. Three groups of 10 specimens each were prepared: Dental porcelain alloy was used as a framework for conventional and ProBOND metal-ceramic systems, while glass-ceramic ingots were used as a framework for 10 samples using an all-ceramic system. For the former, dentin porcelain was applied and a ceramic veneering material was applied to the ingot frameworks. Using a dental spectrophotometer, the pre- and post-glaze color compatibility between disc specimens and A3 shade was evaluated. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare color differences among groups in this study, while the Mann-Whitney U test was used to make bilateral comparisons among the three different ceramic systems. The values obtained during the dentin stage revealed a significant difference in the all-ceramic group (p ceramic samples (p > 0.05). These results suggest that ProBOND can yield esthetically superior results in clinical applications compared to conventional ceramic systems. PMID:20478787

  20. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  1. Ceramic-Metal Interfaces in Multilayer Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell, John; Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Andersen, Bjørn;

    1996-01-01

    quality and strength of this interface. In the case of a weak ceramic-metal interface, delaminations will occur under severe working conditions.Work has been carried out on a commercial PZT type ceramic and various types of Pt electrode paste. The present study involves characterization of the interface......Multilayer actuators consist of a number of piezoelectric or electrostrictive ceramic layers, separated by thin metal electrodes. Thus, the ceramic-metal interface plays an even more important role than for bulk piezoceramics. The performance and durability of the actuator depends closely on the...

  2. Measurement of Emissivity of Porous Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    BÜYÜKALACA, Orhan

    1998-01-01

    In this study, measurements of spectral and total emissivities of seven different porous ceramic materials and one ceramic fibre material are reported. Measurements were made for wavelength range from 1.2 µm to 20 µm and temperature range from 200 °C to 700 °C. It was found that total emissivity increases with increase of pore size but decreases with increase of temperature. The results showed all the porous ceramic materials tested to be much better than ceramic fibre in terms of total em...

  3. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Ritzberger; Elke Apel; Wolfram Höland; Arnd Peschke; Volker M. Rheinberger

    2010-01-01

    The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical) and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate...

  4. Sintering of TiB2 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Swiatek

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Titanium diborides (TiB2 ceramic is particularly interesting because it exhibits high elastic modulus and hardness as well as high thermal conductivity. The interest in TiB2 ceramic increased enormously due to these properties but applications seem to be limited due to difficulties during densification process. In the experiment the TiB2 compacts was obtained using HP-HT method. The aim of this study is to work out and optimize the sintering densification process of TiB2 ceramics.Design/methodology/approach: The high temperature-high pressure (HT-HP Bridgman type apparatus was used for densification method of TiB2 powder. Ceramics were sintered at pressure of 7.2 ± 0.2 GPa and temperature at 1500-2300ºC ± 50ºC. The duration of sintering was 60 seconds. In order to investigate the structure changes, the optical and scanning electron microscope was used. Mechanical properties were determined by Vickers hardness. Young modulus measurements were carried out using ultrasonic method.Findings: The TiB2 ceramics was obtained without using sintering agents. The properties and structure of TiB2 ceramics strongly depend on conditions of sintering process. The application of the temperature of 1500ºC±50ºC and pressure of 7.2 ± 0.2 GPa and time of 60 seconds permits to obtain the TiB2 ceramics without cracks.Practical implications: The TiB2 ceramic might be used for production of composites. From a practical position it is important to optimize the sintering densification of TiB2 ceramic.Originality/value: The TiB2 ceramics were formed using HP-HT technique without the use of additives. This method of sintering for TiB2 ceramics is original one.T7

  5. Vitreous ceramic waste form for waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitreous ceramic waste forms are being developed to complement glass waste forms in supporting DOE's environmental restoration efforts. The vitreous ceramics are composed of various metal oxide crystalline phases embedded in a silicate glass matrix. The vitreous ceramics are appropriate final waste forms for waste streams that contain large amounts of scrap metals and elements with low solubilities in glass, and have low-flux contents. Homogeneous glass waste forms are appropriate for wastes with sufficient fluxes and low metal contents. Therefore, utilization of both glass and vitreous ceramics waste forms will make vitrification technology applicable to the treatment of a much larger range of radioactive and mixed wastes. The controlled crystallization in vitreous ceramics resulted in formation of durable crystalline phases and durable residual glass matrix. The durable crystalline phases in vitreous ceramics included Ca3(PO4)2, magnetite (Fe2+Ni,Mn)Fe3+2O4, hibonite Ca(Al,Fe,Zr,Cr)12O19, baddeyelite ZrO2, zirconolite CaZrTi,O, and corundum Al2O3, which are thermodynamically more stable than normal glasses and are also less soluble in water than glasses. The durable glassy matrix in vitreous ceramics is due to the enrichment of silica and alumina during the crystallization process of vitreous ceramic formation. The vitreous ceramics showed exceptional long-term chemical durability and the processability of vitreous ceramics were also demonstrated at both bench- and pilot-scale. This paper briefly describes the use of vitreous ceramics for treating sample mixed wastes with high contents of either Cr, Fe, Zr, and Al, or alkalis

  6. SHEAR BOND STRENGTHS BETWEEN CERAMIC CORES AND VENEERING CERAMICS OF DENTAL BI-LAYERED CERAMIC SYSTEMS AND THE SENSITIVITY TO THERMOCYCLING

    OpenAIRE

    SUN TING, BDS, DDS; SHAO LONQUAN, DDS, MS; DENG BIN, DDS, MS; WEN NING, DDS, MS

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength between various commercial ceramic core materials and veneering ceramics of dental bi-layered ceramic combinations and the effect of thermocycling. The shear bond strength of four dental bi-layered ceramic combinations (white Cercon, yellow Cercon, white Lava, yellow Lava, IPS E.max) were tested. Metal ceramic combinations were conducted as a control group. Half of each group was subjected to thermocycling. All specimens were ther...

  7. Improving the strength of ceramics by controlling the interparticle forces and rheology of the ceramic suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Y P

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the modification of the interparticle forces of colloidal ceramic particles in aqueous suspensions in order to improve the microstructural homogeneity, and hence the reliability and mechanical performances, of subsequently formed ceramic compacts. A concentrated stable fine ceramic powder suspension has been shown to be able to generate a higher density of a ceramic product with better mechanical, and also electrical, electrochemical and optical, properties of the ceramic body. This is because in a colloidally stable suspension there are no aggregates and so defect formation, which is responsible for the ceramic body performance below its theoretical maximum, is reduced. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to form a well dispersed ceramic suspension by ensuring the interparticle forces between the particles are repulsive, with as a high a loading with particles as possible. By examining the rheological behaviour and the results of Atomic Force Microscope, the dispersion ...

  8. High temperature ceramic/metal joint structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  9. Prestresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Aboushelib; A.J. Feilzer; N. de Jager; C.J. Kleverlaan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: A general trend in all ceramic systems is to use veneering ceramics of slightly lower thermal expansion coefficients compared with that of the framework resulting in a positive mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient (+ΔTEC). The concept behind this TEC mismatch is to generate compre

  10. Ceramic Technology. Art Education: 6688.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaccio, Louis M.

    For information on the Visual Arts Education Curriculum of which this is one course, see SO 007 721. In this course students study ceramic material, form, and decoration, historically and technically, and demonstrate competencies in preparing clay bodies and ceramic glazes. Course content is outlined in those areas. Special sections of the guide…

  11. Dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, Henny J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Dense ceramic membranes made from mixed oxygen-ionic and electronic conducting perovskite-related oxides allow separation of oxygen from an air supply at elevated temperatures (>700 °C). By combining air separation and catalytic partial oxidation of methane to syngas into a ceramic membrane reactor,

  12. New ceramic materials; Nuevos materiales ceramicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-07-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  13. Progress in Joining Ceramics to Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The research and development of joining methods of ceramics to metals, especially brazing, diffusion bonding and partial transition liquid phase bonding, were introduced. Some opinions were put forward. For new composites emerging, it is necessary to develop new joining methods, particularly in the field of high temperature technique for joining ceramics to superalloys.

  14. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti (

  15. Marginal adaptation of ceramic inserts after cementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Pfeiffer, P; Nergiz, [No Value

    2002-01-01

    The advantage of using ceramic inserts is to prevent major drawbacks of composite resins such as polymerization shrinkage, wear and microleakage. This in vitro study evaluated the marginal adaptation of two approximal ceramic insert systems after cementation to the cavities opened with ultrasonic ti

  16. Yellow cake to ceramic uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This overview article first reviews the processes for converting uranium ore concentrates to ceramic uranium dioxide at the Port Hope Refinery of Eldorado Resources Limited. In addition, some of the problems, solutions, thoughts and research direction with respect to the production and properties of ceramic UO2 are described

  17. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  18. Modelling of Tape Casting for Ceramic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud

    of functional ceramics research. Advances in ceramic forming have enabled low cost shaping techniques such as tape casting and extrusion to be used in some of the most challenging technologies. These advances allow the design of complex components adapted to desired specific properties and applications. However......Functional ceramics find use in many different applications of great interest, e.g. thermal barrier coatings, piezoactuators, capacitors, solid oxide fuel cells and electrolysis cells, membranes, and filters. It is often the case that the performance of a ceramic component can be increased markedly......, there is still only very limited insight into the processes determining the final properties of such components. Hence, the aim of the present PhD project is to obtain the required knowledge basis for the optimized processing of multi-material functional ceramics components. Recent efforts in the domain...

  19. Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Knitter; W Bauer

    2003-02-01

    Fabrication of micropatterned ceramics or ceramic microparts make high demands on the precision and resolution of the moulding process. As finishing of miniaturised or micropatterned ceramic components is nearly impossible, shaping has to be done by a replication step in the green, unfired state. To avoid high tooling costs in product development, a rapid prototyping process chain has been established that enables rapid manufacturing of ceramic microcomponents from functional models to small lot series within a short time. This process chain combines the fast and inexpensive supply of master models by rapid prototyping with accurate and flexible ceramic manufacturing by low-pressure injection moulding. Besides proper feedstock preparation and sufficient small grain size, the quality of the final components is mainly influenced by the quality of the master model. Hence, the rapid prototyping method must be carefully selected to meet the requirements of the component to be fabricated.

  20. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  1. Directional Solidification of Eutectic Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayir, Ali

    2001-01-01

    Two major problems associated with structural ceramics are lack of damage tolerance and insufficient strength and creep resistance at very high temperatures of interest for aerospace application. This work demonstrated that the directionally solidified eutectics can have unique poly-phase microstructures and mechanical properties superior to either constituent alone. The constraining effect of unique eutectic microstructures result in higher resistance to slow crack growth and creep. Prospect of achieving superior properties through controlled solidification are presented and this technology can also be beneficial to produce new class of materials.

  2. Properties of ceramic candle filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontius, D.H.

    1995-06-01

    The mechanical integrity of ceramic filter elements is a key issue for hot gas cleanup systems. To meet the demands of the advanced power systems, the filter components must sustain the thermal stresses of normal operations (pulse cleaning), of start-up and shut-down conditions, and of unanticipated process upsets such as excessive ash accumulation without catastrophic failure. They must also survive the various mechanical loads associated with handling and assembly, normal operation, and process upsets. For near-term filter systems, these elements must survive at operating temperatures of 1650{degrees}F for three years.

  3. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  4. [Key points in anterior esthetic restorations with all ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoping; Qian, Dongdong; Yuan, Yu; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2013-04-01

    This paper introduced the key points in fabricating anterior esthetic restorations with all ceramic materials, including pre-operative smile design, standard tooth preparation, provisional restoration fabrication, all ceramic materials selection, all ceramic restoration bonding, ceramic crack and fracture prevention. And then, the authors summarized and reviewed the clinical common problems in anterior esthetic restorations.

  5. Educational Construction for Training Ceramic Experts Needs to be optimized

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Higher education is a very critical link in cultivating ceramic experts.What is the current situation with the ceramic discipline in the institutions of higher education? Is the arrangement of the ceramic discipline in line with the demand for talent? What are the difficulties facing ceramic talent cultivation? Let's take a closer look at these issues.

  6. Radiopaque strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram eHöland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals, was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2 – Al2O3 – Y2O3 – SrO – Na2O – K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O – P2O5 – F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: a Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6 , b Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4 c Sr5(PO43F – pollucite, CsAlSiO4 , and nano-sized NaSrPO4, d Sr5(PO43F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4.The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needlelike morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needlelike Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism.The formation of leucite, pollucite and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  7. Sintering kinetics of YAG ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄毅华; 江东亮; 张景贤; 陈忠明; 林庆玲; 黄政仁

    2014-01-01

    Solid state reactive (SSR) sintering kinetics was observed for YAG ceramics. There were two densification stages in sin-tering process due to its reaction. After the first stage, samples began to expand, then, the second densification stage began. At a heat-ing rate of 10 ºC/min, the sample warped down and warped back to straight. The apparent activation energy of the first densification process was about 522 kJ/mol for the initial shrinkage of Al2O3 and Y2O3 mixed powder green-body, which increased in the follow-ing process due to the solid state reaction. In the second densification stage, synthesis reaction of YAG still worked. Green-bodies processed with higher heating rate got more shrinkage at the same temperature than lower heating rate green bodies. And its kinetic field diagram was abnormal, compared with that of other reported ceramics, such as Al2O3. It was found that the reaction of YAG provided positive effect to the sintering driving force. The apparent activation energy for densification of SSR YAG sintered in ArH5 atmosphere was 855 kJ/mol at temperature holding sintering. And the apparent activation energy for grain growth was 1053 kJ/mol.

  8. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buyakova, S., E-mail: sbuyakova@ispms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, S. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science RAS (Russian Federation); Sablina, T. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science RAS (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO{sub 2}(MgO), ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2} powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO{sub 2} grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  9. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyakova, S.; Sablina, T.; Kulkov, S.

    2015-11-01

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO2(MgO), ZrO2(Y2O3) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO2 powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO2 grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  10. Ceramic restoration repair: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Araújo Raposo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The esthetic and functional rehabilitation of patients with multiple missing teeth can be performed with several techniques and materials. Ceramic restorations provide reliable masticatory function and good esthetics. However, fracture can occur in some cases due to their brittle behavior. In some cases, the replacement of an extensive prosthesis is a problem due to the high treatment cost. In this paper, two cases are presented, in which fractures occurred in extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures, and their replacement was not possible. Ceramic repair was chosen and the sequences of treatment with and without presence of the ceramic fragment are also discussed. The cases illustrate that, in some situations, fractured metal-ceramic partial dentures can be successfully repaired when prosthetic replacement is not a choice. Prosthodontists must use alternatives that allow a reliable repair to extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures. Surface preparation of the ceramic with hydrofluoric acid in conjunction with a silane coupling agent is essential for a predictable bonding of composite resin. The repair performed with composite resin is an esthetic and functional alternative when extensive fixed partial dentures cannot be replaced.

  11. Review of micromachining of ceramics by etching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.T.TING; K.A.ABOU-EL-HOSSEIN; H.B.CHUA

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been an enormous surge in interest in ceramic materials and, as a result, there have been significant advances in their development and applications. Their inherent properties, such as capability of operating at temperatures far above metals, high level of hardness and toughness, low coefficient of thermal expansion and high thermal conductivity rendered ceramics to be one of the leading engineering materials. Many research works have been conducted in the past few years on machining of advanced ceramics using different processing methods in order to obtain a better surface roughness, higher material removal rate and improved tool life. Micromachining using chemical etching is one of those methods that do not involve the problem of tool life and direct tool-work piece contact. However, only a few research works have been done on micromachining of ceramics using chemical etching. Hence, study of chemical machining of advanced ceramics is still needed as the process has found wide application in the industry because of its relative low operating costs. In this work, we summarize the recent progresses in machining of different types of advanced ceramics, material processing methods such as wet etching and dry etching, and finally the prospects for control of material removal rate and surface quality in the process of ceramic micromachining.

  12. Rietveld analysis of ceramic nuclear waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.J. [Univ. of South Australia, Ingle Farm (Australia); Mitamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were collected from three titanate waste forms - a calcine powder, a prototype ceramic without waste, and a ceramic containing 10 wt% JW-A simulated waste - and interpreted quantitatively using the Rietveld method. The calcine consisted of fluorite, pyrochlore, rutile, and amorphous material. The prototype waste form contained rutile, hollandite, zirconolite and perovskite. The phase constitution of the JW-A ceramic was freudenbergite, loveringite, hollandite, zirconolite, perovskite and baddeleyite. Procedures for the collection of X-ray data are described, as are assumptions inherent in the Rietveld approach. A selection of refined crystal data are presented.

  13. Porous ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Munch, Etienne; Franco, Jaime; Deville, Sylvain; Hunger, Phillip; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2008-03-15

    This work compares two novel techniques for the fabrication of ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering with complex porosity: robocasting and freeze casting. Both techniques are based on the preparation of concentrated ceramic suspensions with suitable properties for the process. In robocasting, the computer-guided deposition of the suspensions is used to build porous materials with designed three dimensional (3-D) geometries and microstructures. Freeze casting uses ice crystals as a template to form porous lamellar ceramic materials. Preliminary results on the compressive strengths of the materials are also reported.

  14. [Preparation of porous ceramics based on waste ceramics and its Ni2+ adsorption characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Li; Wang, Cheng-Zhi; Shi, Ce; Shang, Ling-Ling; Ma, Rui; Dong, Wan-Li

    2013-07-01

    The preparation conditions of porous ceramics were determined by SEM, XRD and FT-IR characterizations as well as the nickel removal ability of porous ceramics to be: the mass fraction w of sesbania powder doped was 4%, and the calcination temperature was 800 degrees C. SEM and pore structure characterization illustrated that calcination caused changes in the structure and morphology of waste ceramics. With the increase of calcination temperature, the specific surface area and pore volume decreased, while the aperture increased. EDS analyses showed that the main elements of both the original waste porcelain powder and the porous ceramics were Si, Al and O. The SEM, XRD and FT-IR characterization of porous ceramics illustrated that the structure of porous ceramics was stable before and after adsorption. The series of experiments of Ni2+ adsorption using these porous ceramics showed that when the dosage of porous ceramics was 10 g x L(-1), the adsorption time was 60 min, the pH value was 6.32, and the concentration of nickel-containing wastewater was below 100 mg x L(-1), the Ni2+ removal of wastewater reached 89.7%. Besides, the porous ceramics showed higher removal efficiency on nickel in the wastewater. The Ni(2+)-containing wastewater was processed by the porous ceramics prepared, and the adsorption dynamics and adsorption isotherms of Ni2+ in wastewater by porous ceramics were investigated. The research results showed that the Ni2+ adsorption process of porous ceramics was in accordance with the quasi second-order kinetic model (R2 = 0.999 9), with Q(e) of 9.09 mg x g(-1). The adsorption process can be described by the Freundlich equation and Langmuir equation, and when the temperature increased from 20 degrees C to 40 degrees C, the maximum adsorption capacity Q(m) increased from 14.49 mg x g(-1) to 15.38 mg x g(-1).

  15. Scale up issues involved with the ceramic waste form : ceramic-container interactions and ceramic cracking quantification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, K. J.; DiSanto, T.; Goff, K. M.; Johnson, S. G.; O' Holleran, T.; Riley, W. P., Jr.

    1999-05-03

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a process for the conditioning of spent nuclear fuel to prepare the material for final disposal. Two waste streams will result from the treatment process, a stainless steel based form and a ceramic based form. The ceramic waste form will be enclosed in a stainless steel container. In order to assess the performance of the ceramic waste form in a repository two factors must be examined, the surface area increases caused by waste form cracking and any ceramic/canister interactions that may release toxic material. The results indicate that the surface area increases are less than the High Level Waste glass and any toxic releases are below regulatory limits.

  16. Effect of Ceramic Surface Treatments After Machine Grinding on the Biaxial Flexural Strength of Different CAD/CAM Dental Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Bagheri, Hossein; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Aghajani, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different ceramic surface treatments after machining grinding on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of machinable dental ceramics with different crystalline phases. Materials and Methods: Disk-shape specimens (10mm in diameter and 1.3mm in thickness) of machinable ceramic cores (two silica-based and one zirconia-based ceramics) were prepared. Each type of the ceramic surfaces was then randomly treated (n=15) with different treatments as ...

  17. Intermetallic bonded ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B.; Becher, P.F.; Schneibel, J.H.; Waters, S.B.; Menchhofer, P.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1995-07-01

    A range of carbide and oxide-based cermets have been developed utilizing ductile nickel aluminide (Ni{sub 3}Al) alloy binder phases. Some of these, notably materials based upon tungsten and titanium carbides (WC and TiC respectively), offer potential as alternatives to the cermets which use cobalt binders (i.e. WC/Co). Samples have been prepared by blending commercially available Ni{sub 3}Al alloy powders with the desired ceramic phases, followed by hot-pressing. Alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) matrix materials have also been prepared by pressurized molten alloy infiltration. The microstructure, flexure strength and fracture toughness of selected materials are discussed.

  18. Archaeometric study of Amazon ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is no evidence of urban civilization in Brazilian prehistory; most inhabitants lived in tribal organization, probably with regional economic integration among several independent tribes. There are few evidences of seasonal migrations between the coast and the inland of southern Brazil. Some specialized horticulturists competed among themselves but other groups lived more isolatedly and probably peacefully, in the upper interfluvial regions. The chiefdom system is supposed to have existed only along the Amazon River. In this region, some pottery makers may have been specialized craftsmen and finest ceramics, that should have been exported from one village/region to another, can be found. In this study we tested some limited possibilities in three different cultural and regional contexts to see if application of analytic analysis in economically and politically 'simple' societies should give any results. (author)

  19. Surface characterization of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years several techniques have become available to characterize the structure and chemical composition of surfaces of ceramic materials. These techniques utilize electron scattering and scattering of ions from surfaces. Low-energy electron diffraction is used to determine the surface structure, Auger electron spectroscopy and other techniques of electron spectroscopy (ultraviolet and photoelectron spectroscopies) are employed to determine the composition of the surface. In addition the oxidation state of surface atoms may be determined using these techniques. Ion scattering mass spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry are also useful in characterizing surfaces and their reactions. These techniques, their applications and the results of recent studies are discussed. 12 figures, 52 references, 2 tables

  20. Manufacturing of planar ceramic interconnects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, B.L.; Coffey, G.W.; Meinhardt, K.D.; Armstrong, T.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The fabrication of ceramic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and separator plates for electrochemical separation devices has been a perennial challenge facing developers. Electrochemical vapor deposition (EVD), plasma spraying, pressing, tape casting and tape calendering are processes that are typically utilized to fabricate separator plates or interconnects for the various SOFC designs and electrochemical separation devices. For sake of brevity and the selection of a planar fuel cell or gas separation device design, pressing will be the only fabrication technique discussed here. This paper reports on the effect of the characteristics of two doped lanthanum manganite powders used in the initial studies as a planar porous separator for a fuel cell cathode and as a dense interconnect for an oxygen generator.

  1. Nanocrystalline magnetic alloys and ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Pal; D Chakravorty

    2003-02-01

    Magnetic properties of materials in their nanocrystalline state have assumed significance in recent years because of their potential applications. A number of techniques have been used to prepare nanocrystalline magnetic phases. Melt spinning, high energy ball milling, sputtering, glassceramization and molecular beam epitaxy are some of the physical methods used so far. Among the chemical methods, sol-gel and co-precipitation routes have been found to be convenient. Ultrafine particles of both ferro- and ferrimagnetic systems show superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature. Coercivity $(H_c)$ and maximum energy product $(BH)_{\\text{max}}$ of the magnetic particles can be changed by controlling their sizes. The present paper reviews all these aspects in the case of nanocrystalline magnetic systems — both metallic and ceramics.

  2. CERAMIC WASTE FORM DATA PACKAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2014-06-13

    The purpose of this data package is to provide information about simulated crystalline waste forms that can be used to select an appropriate composition for a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) proof of principle demonstration. Melt processing, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal analysis information was collected to assess the ability of two potential candidate ceramic compositions to be processed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CCIM and to guide processing parameters for the CCIM operation. Given uncertainties in the CCIM capabilities to reach certain temperatures throughout the system, one waste form designated 'Fe-MP' was designed towards enabling processing and another, designated 'CAF-5%TM-MP' was designed towards optimized microstructure. Melt processing studies confirmed both compositions could be poured from a crucible at 1600{degrees}C although the CAF-5%TM-MP composition froze before pouring was complete due to rapid crystallization (upon cooling). X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the crystalline nature and phase assemblages of the compositions. The kinetics of melting and crystallization appeared to vary significantly between the compositions. Impedance spectroscopy results indicated the electrical conductivity is acceptable with respect to processing in the CCIM. The success of processing either ceramic composition will depend on the thermal profiles throughout the CCIM. In particular, the working temperature of the pour spout relative to the bulk melter which can approach 1700{degrees}C. The Fe-MP composition is recommended to demonstrate proof of principle for crystalline simulated waste forms considering the current configuration of INL's CCIM. If proposed modifications to the CCIM can maintain a nominal temperature of 1600{degrees}C throughout the melter, drain, and pour spout, then the CAF-5%TM-MP composition should be considered for a proof of principle demonstration.

  3. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  4. Actively Cooled Ceramic Composite Nozzle Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I Project demonstrated the capability of the Pyrowave? manufacturing process to produce fiber-reinforced ceramics (FRCs) with integral metal features,...

  5. Metallic nut for use with ceramic threads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle guide vane assembly has ceramic components therein having a conventional thread thereon including a preestablished pitch and having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion. The nozzle guide vane assembly has a metallic components therein having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater that the rate of thermal expansion of the ceramic components is positioned in a gas turbine engine. The metallic component, a nut, has a thread therein including a plurality of crests being spaced on a pitch equal to that of the ceramic component and has a pair of contacting surfaces extending from the plurality of crests. A notch spirally extends intermediate adjacent ones of the plurality of crests and has a preestablished depth which is at least twice the size of the conventional pitch. Furthermore, the pair of contacting surfaces are in contact with only a portion of the threaded surface of the ceramic components.

  6. Digital Crafting in the field of Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Evers, Henrik Leander; Tamke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to discuss and explore how craft knowledge in the field of ceramics can be utilized through digital technologies. Based on a set of experiments, which led to the development of a computational system that negotiates between the movement of the designer’s hands and the 3d clay...... custom digital design tools are developed and the way craftsmen in the field of ceramics are developing their material and tools for the making of ceramics. The communalities are especially centred on the experimental approach, pursued by both fields. Reflecting on these positions through our own work we...... identify different modes of experimenting, which are useful to drive design development and to develop the concept of digital crafting in the fields of ceramics. We explore how novel digital means can be utilized for a parametric setup that directly informs ornamentation through bodily engagement...

  7. Thermoluminescence properties of AlN ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Christensen, P.; Agersnap Larsen, N.;

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes thermoluminescence (TL) properties of AlN:Y2O3 ceramics irradiated with ionising radiation. A high TL sensitivity of AlN:Y2O3 ceramics to radiation encouraged a study of the AlN ceramics for application as a dosimetric material. The paper presents experimental data on: glow...... curve, emission spectrum, dose response, energy dependence, influence of heating rate and fading rate. The measured TL characteristics were compared with those of well-known, widely used TLDs, i.e. LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P and Al2O3:C. It is concluded that AlN:Y2O3 ceramics showing a radiation sensitivity...

  8. Bioactivity of mica/apatite glass ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The bioactivity of mica/apatite glass ceramic composites, including the in vitro behavior in simulated body fluid and the histological appearance of the interface between the mica/apatite glass ceramics and the rabbit mandible defect in vivo under a dynamic condition. The results show that biological apatite layer forms on the surface of the mica/apatite glass ceramics after 1 d of immersion in the simulated body fluid, and becomes dense after 14 d. In vivo tests indicate that bone formation occurs after implantation for 14 d, and strong bonding of bone to the implant occurs after 42 d. No aseptic loosening occurs during 42 d of implantation. The finding shows that mica/apatite glass ceramics have good bioactivity and osteoconductivity for constructing bone graft, and can be promising for biomedical application.

  9. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed

  10. Photon CT scanning of advanced ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced ceramic materials are being developed for high temperature applications in advanced heat engines and high temperature heat recovery systems. Small size flaws (10 - 200 μm) and small nonuniformities in density distributions (0.1 -2%) present as long-range density gradients, are critical in most ceramics and their detection is of crucial importance. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging provides a means of obtaining a precise two-dimensional density map of a cross section through an object from which accurate information about small flaws and small density gradients can be obtained. With the use of high energy photon sources high contrast CT images can be obtained for both low and high density ceramics. In the present paper we illustrate the applicability of the photon CT technique to the examination of advanced ceramics. CT images of sintered alumina tiles are presented from which data on high-density inclusions, cracks and density gradients have been extracted

  11. Hydrophobicity of rare-earth oxide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Gisele; Dhiman, Rajeev; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Paxson, Adam T.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrophobic materials that are robust to harsh environments are needed in a broad range of applications. Although durable materials such as metals and ceramics, which are generally hydrophilic, can be rendered hydrophobic by polymeric modifiers, these deteriorate in harsh environments. Here we show that a class of ceramics comprising the entire lanthanide oxide series, ranging from ceria to lutecia, is intrinsically hydrophobic. We attribute their hydrophobicity to their unique electronic structure, which inhibits hydrogen bonding with interfacial water molecules. We also show with surface-energy measurements that polar interactions are minimized at these surfaces and with Fourier transform infrared/grazing-angle attenuated total reflection that interfacial water molecules are oriented in the hydrophobic hydration structure. Moreover, we demonstrate that these ceramic materials promote dropwise condensation, repel impinging water droplets, and sustain hydrophobicity even after exposure to harsh environments. Rare-earth oxide ceramics should find widespread applicability as robust hydrophobic surfaces.

  12. Advanced Ceramics Property and Performance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Michael; Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the what, how, how not, and why for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committees inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of all of the standards in one volume.

  13. Heritage and development of China ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解振宇

    2012-01-01

    China is a country with a glorious history of pottery, it is completely different from Europe and America compared with their ceramic history. The inheritance and the development, combining the national culture are the criteria that we should keep to.

  14. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Zak C; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H; Jacobsen, Alan J; Carter, William B; Schaedler, Tobias A

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging. PMID:26721993

  15. Preparation and properties of dental zirconia ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Y2O3-stabilized tetragonal zireonia polyerystalline (Y-TZP) ceramics with high-performance were prepared for dental application by use of the micro-emulsion and two-step sintering method.The crystal phase,morphology,and microstructure of the reaction products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).XRD results show that the ceramics mainly consist of tetragonal zirconia.Physical and mechanical properties test results show that the bending strength,fracture toughness,and the density of full sintered Y-TZP ceramics are llS0 MPa,5.53 crown machined with this material by CAD/CAM system exhibits a verisimilitude configuration and the material's expansion coefficient well matches that of the glaze.These results further indicate that the product can be used as a promising new ceramic material

  16. Faience: the ceramic technology of ancient Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Faiences are ancient Egyptian ceramic materials, considered as "high-tech" products. The paper discussed the method by which the faiences were produced and the application of SEM and Raman spectroscopy to their analysis

  17. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  18. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Zak C.; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H.; Jacobsen, Alan J.; Carter, William B.; Schaedler, Tobias A.

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging.

  19. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Future Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    With growing trend toward higher temperature capabilities, lightweight, and multifunctionality, significant advances in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be required for future aerospace applications. The presentation will provide an overview of material requirements for future aerospace missions, and the role of ceramics and CMCs in meeting those requirements. Aerospace applications will include gas turbine engines, aircraft structure, hypersonic and access to space vehicles, space power and propulsion, and space communication.

  20. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  1. Ceramics for Dental Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Holloway

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past forty years, the technological evolution of ceramics for dental applications has been remarkable, as new materials and processing techniques are steadily being introduced. The improvement in both strength and toughness has made it possible to expand the range of indications to long-span fixed partial prostheses, implant abutments and implants. The present review provides a state of the art of ceramics for dental applications.

  2. Study on Low Resistance PTC Ceramic Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The low resistance PTC ceramic thermistor material with excellent eleectrical properties are successfully fabricated by raw materials at industrial range made in our country on the study of its composition expression and fabrication process by using the addition of Nb, La, Y, Ta , microstructure regulator BN and ASTL phase .The composition and its fabrication method are studied.The relation of electrical properties of the PTC ceramic material to its composition expression and its related electrical properties are discussed.

  3. Hollow sphere ceramic particles for abradable coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hollow sphere ceramic flame spray powder is disclosed. The desired constituents are first formed into agglomerated particles in a spray drier. Then the agglomerated particles are introduced into a plasma flame which is adjusted so that the particles collected are substantially hollow. The hollow sphere ceramic particles are suitable for flame spraying a porous and abradable coating. The hollow particles may be selected from the group consisting of zirconium oxide and magnesium zirconate

  4. Measurement of radiant properties of ceramic foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental facility is described for the measurement of the normal spectral and total emissivity and transmissivity of semi-transparent materials in the temperature range of 600 C to 1200 C. The set-up was used for the measurement of radiation properties of highly porous ceramic foam which is used in low NOx radiant burners. Emissivity and transmissivity data were measured and are presented for coated and uncoated ceramic foam of different thicknesses. (orig.)

  5. CERAMIC RESTORATION REPAIR: REPORT OF TWO CASES

    OpenAIRE

    Luís Henrique Araújo Raposo; Natália Antunes Neiva; Gisele Rodrigues da Silva; Hugo Lemes Carlo; Adérito Soares da Mota; Célio Jesus do Prado; Carlos José Soares

    2009-01-01

    The esthetic and functional rehabilitation of patients with multiple missing teeth can be performed with several techniques and materials. Ceramic restorations provide reliable masticatory function and good esthetics. However, fracture can occur in some cases due to their brittle behavior. In some cases, the replacement of an extensive prosthesis is a problem due to the high treatment cost. In this paper, two cases are presented, in which fractures occurred in extensive metal-ceramic fixed pa...

  6. Evaluation of some ceramic clays from Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    1993-01-01

    This reports details the technical evaluation of ceramic clays collected during visits to Zambia in 1990 and 1991 by the author (Clive Mitchell). The clay samples included: Choma kaolin (Southern Province), Twapia kaolin (Copperbelt Province), Kapiri Mposhi kaolin (Central Province), Masenche clay (Northern Province), Leula clay, Misenga clay and Chikankata clay (Southern Province). The Choma kaolin was asessed to be an excellent source of ceramic-grade kaolin. The Twapia and Kapiri Mposhi ka...

  7. Literature search for ceramic vacuum tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, W.

    1977-01-12

    The NTIS and Engineering Index files were searched for citations relating to Ceramic and/or Metal Electron Tubes and High Temperature Electronics. A total of 24 citations were found relating directly to ceramic tubes and 24 to high temperature electronics. A search for electron tubes in general was examined for high temperature applications and 39 were obtained. Computer printouts of the abstracts are included in appendices. (MHR)

  8. Strengthening of steels by ceramic phases

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yujie

    2013-01-01

    Production of ceramic reinforced thin sheet steel composites for automotive application with low density, high elastic modulus and strength is the aim of current study. Within this work, potential of various ceramic phases and possible processing routes were studied, summarized and compared through literature research. Laboratory production of TiC, TiB2 and Fe2B reinforced steel composites through conventional melting-casting route, twin roller route and powder metallurgy method were carried ...

  9. Thick highly textured (Bi, Pb)-2223 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dense (Bi, Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10+x ceramics textured by sinter-forging exhibit superconducting properties among the best for polycrystalline bulk 2223 materials. Investigations showed that the deformation during the sinter-forging process is mainly responsible for the grain alignment of the ceramics. A sharp texture can only be obtained after a strong deformation from the starting cold-pressed powder to the final thin forged disc. To obtain thick ceramics, several thin and highly identically textured discs were linked together by an additional short sinter-forging step. Microscopic observations showed that the interface between the discs disappeared after the hot treatment. Transport critical current measurements performed at 77 K through bars of different sizes confirm that, through an equal texture, the critical current density (JCT = 10,000 A cm-2) is nearly constant with the shape of the bar section: thin or thick, narrow or wide. A ceramic composed of many stacked and sinter-forged discs allowed resistivity and JCT to be measured along the sinter-forging axis. Low anisotropic ratios confirmed the strong link between the thin discs and a very homogeneous whole ceramic. This shape processing of bulk 2223 ceramics is thus attractive for the fabrication of current leads and limiters with high capabilities. (author)

  10. Expected radiation effects in plutonium immobilization ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A., LLNL

    1997-09-01

    The current formulation of the candidate ceramic for plutonium immobilization consists primarily of pyrochlore, with smaller amounts of hafnium-zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite or perovskite. At a plutonium loading of 10.5 weight %, this ceramic would be made metamict (amorphous) by radiation damage resulting from alpha decay in a time much less than 10,000 years, the actual time depending on the repository temperature as a function of time. Based on previous experimental radiation damage work by others, it seems clear that this process would also result in a bulk volume increase (swelling) of about 6% for ceramic that was mechanically unconfined. For the candidate ceramic, which is made by cold pressing and sintering and has porosity amounting to somewhat more than this amount, it seems likely that this swelling would be accommodated by filling in the porosity, if the material were tightly confined mechanically by the waste package. Some ceramics have been observed to undergo microcracking as a result of radiation-induced anisotropic or differential swelling. It is unlikely that the candidate ceramic will microcrack extensively, for three reasons: (1) its phase composition is dominated by a single matrix mineral phase, pyrochlore, which has a cubic crystal structure and is thus not subject to anisotropic swelling; (2) the proportion of minor phases is small, minimizing potential cracking due to differential swelling; and (3) there is some flexibility in sintering process parameters that will allow limitation of the grain size, which can further limit stresses resulting from either cause.

  11. Marginal Strength of Collarless Metal Ceramic Crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikka Swati

    2010-01-01

    fracture strength at margins of metal ceramic crowns cemented to metal tooth analogs. Crowns evaluated with different marginal configurations, shoulder and shoulder bevel with 0 mm, 0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 1.5 mm, were selected. Methods. Maxillary right canine typhodont tooth was prepared to receive a metal ceramic crown with shoulder margin. This was duplicated to get 20 metal teeth analogs. Then the same tooth was reprepared to get shoulder bevel configuration. These crowns were then cemented onmetal teeth analogs and tested for fracture strength atmargin on an Instron testing machine. A progressive compressive load was applied using 6.3 mm diameter rod with crosshead speed of 2.5 mm per minute. Statisticaly analysis was performed with ANOVA, Student's “t” test and “f” test. Results. The fracture strength of collarless metal ceramic crowns under study exceeded the normal biting force. Therefore it can be suggested that collarless metal ceramic crowns with shoulder or shoulder bevel margins up to 1.5 mm framework reduction may be indicated for anteriormetal ceramic restorations. Significance. k Collarless metal ceramic crowns have proved to be successful for anterior fixed restorations. Hence, it may be subjected to more clinical trials.

  12. Ceramics in Restorative and Prosthetic DENTISTRY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. Robert

    1997-08-01

    This review is intended to provide the ceramic engineer with information about the history and current use of ceramics in dentistry, contemporary research topics, and potential research agenda. Background material includes intra-oral design considerations, descriptions of ceramic dental components, and the origin, composition, and microstructure of current dental ceramics. Attention is paid to efforts involving net-shape processing, machining as a forming method, and the analysis of clinical failure. A rationale is presented for the further development of all-ceramic restorative systems. Current research topics receiving attention include microstructure/processing/property relationships, clinical failure mechanisms and in vitro testing, wear damage and wear testing, surface treatments, and microstructural modifications. The status of the field is critically reviewed with an eye toward future work. Significant improvements seem possible in the clinical use of ceramics based on engineering solutions derived from the study of clinically failed restorations, on the incorporation of higher levels of "biomimicry" in new systems, and on the synergistic developments in dental cements and adhesive dentin bonding.

  13. Ceramic to metal attachment system. [Ceramic electrode to metal conductor in MHD generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, D.D.

    1983-06-10

    A composition and method are described for attaching a ceramic electrode to a metal conductor. A layer of randomly interlocked metal fibers saturated with polyimide resin is sandwiched between the ceramic electrode and the metal conductor. The polyimide resin is then polymerized providing bonding.

  14. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders : A comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazar, Dolores R. R.; Bottino, Marco C.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. (1) To synthesize 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. Methods.

  15. Did we push dental ceramics too far? A brief history of ceramic dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubenreich, James E; Robinson, Fonda G; West, Karen P; Frazer, Robert Q

    2005-01-01

    Humankind has developed and used ceramics throughout history. It currently has widespread industrial applications. Dental ceramics are used for fabricating highly esthetic prosthetic denture teeth, crowns, and inlays. However, ceramic's biocompatibility and compressive strength are offset by its hardness and brittleness. Nonetheless, a single crystal sapphire aluminum oxide endosseous implant was developed in 1972 as an alternative to metal. It was more esthetic than its metallic counterparts and was eventually produced in a variety of shapes and sizes. Clinical studies demonstrated its excellent soft and hard tissue biocompatibility, yet the range of problems included fractures during surgery, fractures after loading, mobility, infection, pain, bone loss, and lack of osseointegration. Ultimately, single crystal sapphire implants fell into irredeemable disfavor because of its poor impact strength, and dentists and surgeons eventually turned to other implant materials. However, bioactive ceramic coatings on metal implants have kept ceramics as a key component in dental implantology.

  16. Characterization of ceramic powders used in the inCeram systems to fixed dental Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Almeida Diego

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available InCeram (Vita Zahnfabrik- Germany is known as a high strength ceramic being used for core crowns and for fixed partial denture frameworks. InCeram system consists of slip-casting technique which is used for to build the framework, which is then pre-sintered obtaining an open-pore microstructure. The material gains its strength by infiltration of the lanthanum glass into the porous microstructure. In this work, commercial alumina (Al2O3, alumina-zirconia (Al2O3-ZrO2 and glasses lanthanum oxide-rich powders, used in InCeram system, were characterized, using x ray diffraction, dilatometry and scanning electron microscopy. The characteristics of these powders were related aiming to consider their substitution for new ceramic materials.

  17. Development in laser peening of advanced ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pratik; Smith, Graham C.; Waugh, David G.; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Laser peening is a well-known process applicable to surface treat metals and alloys in various industrial sectors. Research in the area of laser peening of ceramics is still scarce and a complete laser-ceramic interaction is still unreported. This paper focuses on laser peening of SiC ceramics employed for cutting tools, armor plating, dental and biomedical implants, with a view to elucidate the unreported work. A detailed investigation was conducted with 1064nm Nd:YAG ns pulse laser to first understand the surface effects, namely: the topography, hardness, KIc and the microstructure of SiC advanced ceramics. The results showed changes in surface roughness and microstructural modification after laser peening. An increase in surface hardness was found by almost 2 folds, as the diamond footprints and its flaws sizes were considerably reduced, thus, enhancing the resistance of SiC to better withstand mechanical impact. This inherently led to an enhancement in the KIc by about 42%. This is attributed to an induction of compressive residual stress and phase transformation. This work is a first-step towards the development of a 3-dimensional laser peening technique to surface treat many advanced ceramic components. This work has shown that upon tailoring the laser peening parameters may directly control ceramic topography, microstructure, hardness and the KIc. This is useful for increasing the performance of ceramics used for demanding applications particularly where it matters such as in military. Upon successful peening of bullet proof vests could result to higher ballistic strength and resistance against higher sonic velocity, which would not only prevent serious injuries, but could also help to save lives of soldiers on the battle fields.

  18. ANL-1(A) - Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section includes the following papers: Development of Nondestructive Evaluation Methods for Structural Ceramics; Effects of Flaws on the Fracture Behavior of Structural Ceramics; Design, Fabrication, and Interface Characterization of Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites; Development of Advanced Fiber-Reinforced Ceramics; Modeling of Fibrous Preforms for CVD Infiltration; NDT of Advanced Ceramic Composite Materials; Joining of Silicon Carbide Reinforced Ceramics; Superconducting Film Fabrication Research; Short Fiber Reinforced Structural Ceramics; Structural Reliability and Damage Tolerance of Ceramic Composites for High-Temperature Applications; Fabrication of Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration; Characterization of Fiber-CVD Matrix interfacial Bonds; Microwave Sintering of Superconducting Ceramics; Improved Ceramic Composites Through Controlled Fiber-Matrix Interactions; Evaluation of Candidate Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells; Ceramic Catalyst Materials: Hydrous Metal Oxide Ion-Exchange Supports for Coal Liquefaction; and Investigation of Properties and Performance of Ceramic Composite Components

  19. Rolling Contact Fatigue of Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Wang, W. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Wang, Y. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Hadfield, M. [Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; Kanematsu, W. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan; Kirkland, Timothy Philip [ORNL; Jadaan, Osama M. [University of Wisconsin, Platteville

    2006-09-01

    High hardness, low coefficient of thermal expansion and high temperature capability are properties also suited to rolling element materials. Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) has been found to have a good combination of properties suitable for these applications. However, much is still not known about rolling contact fatigue (RCF) behavior, which is fundamental information to assess the lifetime of the material. Additionally, there are several test techniques that are employed internationally whose measured RCF performances are often irreconcilable. Due to the lack of such information, some concern for the reliability of ceramic bearings still remains. This report surveys a variety of topics pertaining to RCF. Surface defects (cracks) in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and their propagation during RCF are discussed. Five methods to measure RCF are then briefly overviewed. Spalling, delamination, and rolling contact wear are discussed. Lastly, methods to destructively (e.g., C-sphere flexure strength testing) and non-destructively identify potential RCF-limiting flaws in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls are described.

  20. Moisture in multilayer ceramic capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, Daniel Noel

    When both precious metal electrode and base metal electrode (BME) capacitors were subjected to autoclave (120°C/100% RH) testing, it was found that the precious metal capacitors aged according to a well known aging mechanism (less than 3% from their starting values), but the BME capacitors degraded to below the -30% criterion at 500 hours of exposure. The reasons for this new failure mechanism are complex, and there were two theories that were hypothesized. The first was that there could be oxidation or corrosion of the nickel plates. The other hypothesis was that the loss of capacitance was due to molecular changes in the barium titanate. This thesis presents the evaluation of these hypotheses and the physics of the degradation mechanism. It is concluded by proof by elimination that there are molecular changes in the barium titanate. Furthermore, the continuous reduction in capacitor size makes the newer base metal electrode capacitors more vulnerable to moisture degradation than the older generation precious metal capacitors. In addition, standard humidity life testing, such as JESD-22 THB and HAST, will likely not uncover this problem. Therefore, poor reliability due to degradation of base metal electrode multilayer ceramic capacitors may catch manufacturers and consumers by surprise.

  1. Proton-conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, L.R.; Coffey, G.W.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Single-cell solid oxide fuel cells were constructed using strontium cerate as the electrolyte and their performance tested. Like certain zirconates, hafnates, and tantalates, the cerate perovskites are among a class of solid electrolytes that conduct protons at elevated temperatures. Depending on the temperature and chemical environment, these ceramics also support electronic and oxygen ion currents. A maximum power output of {approx}100 mW per cm{sup 2} electrolyte surface area was obtained at 900{degrees}C using 4% hydrogen as the fuel and air as the oxidant. A series of rare earth/ceria/zirconia were prepared and their electrical properties characterized. Rare earth dopants included ytterbia, yttria, terbia, and europia. Ionic conductivities were highest for rare earth/ceria and rare earth zirconia compositions; a minimum in ionic conductivity for all series were found for equimolar mixtures of ceria and zirconia. Cerium oxysulfide is of interest in fossil energy applications because of its high chemical stability and refractory nature. An alternative synthesis route to preparing cerium oxysulfide powders has been developed using combustion techniques.

  2. Element Partitioning in Glass-Ceramic Designed for Actinides Immobilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Glass-ceramics were designed for immobilization of actinides. In order to immobilizing more wastes in the matrix and to develop the optimum formulation for the glass-ceramic, it is necessary to study the

  3. Effect of acidic agents on surface roughness of dental ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonlert Kukiattrakoon

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Acidic agents used in this study negatively affected the surface of ceramic materials. This should be considered when restoring the eroded tooth with ceramic restorations in patients who have a high risk of erosive conditions.

  4. Development of high-density ceramic composites for ballistic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of ceramic composites for ballistic application has been generally developed with ceramics of low density, between 2.5 and 4.5 g/cm2. These materials have offered good performance in defeating small-caliber penetrators, but can suffer time-dependent degradation effects when thicker ceramic tiles are needed to defeat modem, longer, heavy metal penetrators that erode rather than break up. This paper addresses the ongoing development, fabrication procedures, analysis, and ballistic evaluation of thinner, denser ceramics for use in armor applications. Nuclear Metals Incorporated (NMI) developed a process for the manufacture of depleted uranium (DU) ceramics. Samples of the ceramics have been supplied to the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) as part of an unfunded cooperative study agreement. The fabrication processes used, characterization of the ceramic, and a ballistic comparison between the DU-based ceramic with baseline Al2O3 will be presented

  5. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2–Al2O3–Y2O3–SrO–Na2O–K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O–P2O5–F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F – pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  6. A new bio-active glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1960 fine ceramics such as alumina have been used side by side with metallic materials for bone and joint replacement. They have high mechanical strength and are free from corrosion problem faced by metals. However they don't bond to the natural living bone and hence are called bio-inactive. This was followed by the development of bio-active glasses and glass-ceramics which bond to the natural bone but have low mechanical strength. In the present work a new bio-active glass-ceramic, based on CaO-SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 3/-MgO composition, has been developed which has mechanical strength compared to that of a bio-inactive glass ceramic and also bonds strongly to the natural bone. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals wollastanite and apatite phases in the glass ceramic. A new bio-active cement has also been developed which can be used to join broken pieces of bone or by itself at a filler. (author)

  7. Preparation and Structure of Rainbow Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Xing

    2003-01-01

    Rainbow piezoelectric ceramics are a new type of stress-biased, oxide-reduced composite ferroelectric ceramics, which have a special dome structure. The have shown excellent properties such as ultra-high displacement under an applied electric field and enhanced load-bearing capability. In this article, their manufacture,structures and properties were discussed in detail by combining experiments and theory analysis. The resuts show that the optimal conditions for producing Rainbow samples from PLZT ceramics were determined to be 900℃ for 1 to 1.5 hours. A number of different phases have been found in the reduced layer of Rainbow ceramics by XRD analyses . The phases found include metallic lead and other oxide phases , such cs PbO , ZrO2 and TiO2 . The original PLZT phase was not observed. The reduced layer was transgranularly fractured while the unreduced ceramic was intergranularly fractured. Two kinds of fracture types can be seen at the interface , which denotes the different degrees of reduction. It is shown that the Pb grains ( about 0.2 μm ) constitute a continuous phase in the reduced layer, which accounts for the good electrical condnctivity.

  8. Performance study of the ceramic THGEM

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Jia-Qing; Hu, Tao; Lu, Jun-Guang; Zhou, Li; Qu, Guo-Pu; Cai, Xiao; Niu, Shun-Li; Chen, Hai-Tao

    2014-01-01

    The THGEMs based on ceramic substrate were developed successfully for neutron and single photon detection. The influences on thermal neutron scattering and the internal radioactivity of both ceramic and FR-4 substrates were studied and compared. The ceramic THGEMs are homemade of 200 um hole diameter, 600 um pitch, 200 um thickness, 80 um rim, and 50 mm*50 mm sensitive area. The FR-4 THGEMs with the same geometry were used for the reference. The gas gain, energy resolution and gain stability were measured in different gas mixtures by using the 5.9 keV X-rays. The maximum gain of single layer ceramic THGEM reaches 6*104 and 1.5*104 at Ne+CH4 = 95:5 and Ar+i-C4H10 = 97:3, respectively. The energy resolution is better than 24%. The good gain stability was obtained during more than 100 hour continuous test at Ar+CO2 = 80:20. By using the 239Pu source, the alpha deposited energy spectrum and gain curve of ceramic THGEM were measured.

  9. AC Complex Impedance Analysis of Doped Strontium Titanate Multifunctional Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Doped SrTiO3 capacitor-varistor multifunctional ceramics were fabricated by a single sintering process. AC compleximpedance analysis was performed to investigate electrical features ofgrains and grain boundaries for both as-reducedceramic and reoxidized ceramics. The results showed that the as-reduced ceramic exhibited inductive response athigh frequencies above 2 MHz, which is attributed to the contribution of electron behavior in semiconducting grains.The high frequency inductive response disappeared in impedance plots of reoxidized ceramics.

  10. Frictional Resistance of Three Types of Ceramic Brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Claire L; Khaled Khalaf

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To investigate the static frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface in two recently introduced bracket systems and compare them to conventional ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems. Three variables were considered including the bracket system, archwire type and archwire angulation. Material and Methods Four bracket systems were tested in vitro: Self ligating ceramic, ceramic with metal slot and module, conventional ceramic with module and convention...

  11. Zirconia-based sintered ceramics for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkov, Sergey; Buyakova, Svetlana

    2016-08-01

    A porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders has been studied. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials was a cellular structure. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformations on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  12. Design of LTCC-based Ceramic Structure for Chemical Microreactor

    OpenAIRE

    D. Belavic; Hrovat, M.; G. Dolanc; Santo Zarnik, M.; Holc, J.; Makarovic, K.

    2012-01-01

    The design of ceramic chemical microreactor for the production of hydrogen needed in portable polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is presented. The microreactor was developed for the steam reforming of liquid fuels with water into hydrogen. The complex three-dimensional ceramic structure of the microreactor includes evaporator(s), mixer(s), reformer and combustor. Low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology was used to fabricate the ceramic structures with buried cavities and...

  13. Removing and Recovering Phosphate from Poultry Wastewater Using Amorphous Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Youhui Xie; Qin Li; Xianzhi Zhao; Yi Luo; Yangming Wang; Xiangwei Peng; Qigui Wang; Jian Su; Yin Lu

    2014-01-01

    A novel and effective technique for phosphate from poultry wastewater was developed using amorphous ceramics. Amorphous ceramics, which showed high performance for phosphate removal and recovery from poultry wastewater, were synthesized using unlimitedly available, inexpensive materials such as silica fume and lime. Dissolved phosphate in poultry wastewater can be deposited as a solid on the surface of amorphous ceramics. Phosphate content on the surface of amorphous ceramics could reach 14.2...

  14. Studies and Properties of Ceramics with High Thermal Conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The sintering technology of the AlN ceramics power were discussed. It is discussed that the compound sintering aids is consistent with the enhancement of the the thermal conductivity of AlN ceramics, and sintering technics is helped to the improvement of density. It is analyzed how to sinter machinable AlN ceramics with high thermal conductivity. And the microstructure of compound ceramics based on AlN was studied.

  15. Dental ceramics and the molar crown testing ground

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, P.; Dianne E. Rekow

    2004-01-01

    All ceramic crowns are highly esthetic restorations and their popularity has risen with the demand for life-like and cosmetic dentistry. Recent ceramic research has concentrated on developing a fundamental understanding of ceramic damage modes as influenced by microstructure. Dental investigations have elucidated three damage modes for ceramic layers in the 0.5-2 mm thickness using point contacts that duplicate tooth cuspal radii; classic Hertzian cone cracking, yield (pseudo-plastic behavior...

  16. Influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nogawa, Hiroshi; Hiraba, Haruto; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of rounded rod specimens. Plate specimens were fabricated from zirconia (ZrO2), feldspathic porcelain, and lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDG ceramics). Plate surfaces were either ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens with a 2.0-mm-diameter were fabricated from type 4 gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics (HP ceramics). Wear testing was performed by means of a wear testing apparatus under 5,000 reciprocal strokes of the rod specimen with 5.9 N vertical loading. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The gold alloy showed the maximal height loss (90.0 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground porcelain, whereas the HP ceramics exhibited maximal height loss (49.8 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground zirconia. There was a strong correlation between height loss of the rod and surface roughness of the underlying plates, for both the gold alloy and HP ceramics.

  17. Ceramic hot plate and method for its manufacture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhoek, M.J.; Van den Heuvel, R.C.; Kelder, E.M.; Schoonman, J.

    2000-01-01

    The subject is a hot plate comprising at least one cooking zone of ceramic material to be located above a heat source of a cooking range. The cooking zone consists of a ceramic material exhibiting a Mott transition. The material exhibiting a Mott transition may consist of a primary ceramic material,

  18. Ceramics Art Education and Contemporary Challenges in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashim, Isah Bolaji; Adelabu, Oluwafemi Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Formal ceramics art education is becoming a fundamental requirement for professional practice in ceramics in Nigeria. Considering the ample resources available for ceramic practices in the country with a teeming population of over 140 million people, there is a promising future for the art, in spite of the effects of globalization and…

  19. Soaring Voices: Recent Ceramics by Women from Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2011-01-01

    Japanese ceramics enjoy a long and distinguished history, and the Japanese aesthetic of elegant simplicity, along with their approach to materials, has influenced ceramic artists around the world for centuries. Women in Japan have been involved in the production of ceramics for thousands of years, but with few exceptions, their names have remained…

  20. Using the Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede Hansen, Flemming; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    Digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. This project is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding material can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. The project presents...... SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer...... to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice....

  1. Fabrication of lanthanum doped yttria transparent ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG YiHua; JIANG DongLiang; ZHANG JingXian; LIN QingLing

    2009-01-01

    Yttria nanocrystalline powder doped with 9% lanthanum was synthesized by co-precipitation method using ammonia for pH adjusting. After calcinations, finer particles with narrow distribution and large surface area were obtained. After dry pressing, samples were sintered at 1500℃-1700℃ for 4 h in vacuum to produce transparent polycrystalline ceramics with uniform grains. Samples with 9 mol%lanthanum were transparent in visible light after being sintered at 1500℃ for 4 h. The grain sizes increased with lanthanum doping compared with those of pure yttria transparent ceramic sintered at the same conditions. Relative density of the transparent ceramic was 99.7%. The in-line transmittance was 73% at 580 nm wavelength after milling and polishing.

  2. Trace elements in ancient ceramics: Pt.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last period of Tong Dynasty, Jingdezhen began its production of ceramics. During the Song Dynasty, the ceramic industry greatly developed and produced fine white ware at Hutian. In the Yuan Dynastry, Hutian became the centre of production making the world famous blue and white wares. Here are reported results of analyses of ancient porcelians of Hutian in Jiangdezhen by reactor neutron activation analysis. The results show that the patterns of eight rare earth elements are apparently different for products in different periods, indicating that methods for producing ceramics or kinds of clay used were different. The contents of some other trace elements such as hafnium, tantalum, thorium and uranium show the same regularity in difference of composition also

  3. Characterization of some bioglass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElBatal, H.A.; Azooz, M.A.; Khalil, E.M.A.; Soltan Monem, A.; Hamdy, Y.M

    2003-06-26

    Controlled crystallization were carried out to convert some selected bioglasses to their corresponding bioglass-ceramics. Nucleation and crystallization regimes were carried out by parameters obtained from diloatometric measurement and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The formed crystalline phases were identified using X-ray diffraction investigation. Complete surface analyses were performed utilizing scanning electron microscopy. Also, the infrared reflection spectroscopy of the bioglass-ceramics were measured before and after immersion for prolonged times in simulated body fluid and the results were compared with the same behavior for the parent bioglasses. Experimental results indicate the formation of two main crystalline phases of sodium calcium silicate beside three other crystalline phases formed according to the change in the bioglass composition, namely, calcium sodium borate, calcium phosphate and calcium silicate. The bioactivity rate determined by the infrared reflection spectroscopy revealed slight retardation with the bioglass-ceramics except in the bioglasses containing high SiO{sub 2} content.

  4. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, S.; Nair, Balakrishnan G.; Small, Troy; Heck, Brian

    2011-09-06

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  5. Cathodoluminescence of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tb, Ce, Eu activated oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with the composition SiO2 · Al2O3 · Li2O · LaF3 have been studied by cathodoluminescence (CL). We compared CL intensities and decay times of the Tb, Ce, Eu activated glass-ceramic samples and observed that the Tb activated sample has the most intense luminescence, but the Ce activated sample has the shortest decay times. Induced optical absorption and thermostimulated luminescence have been observed after X-ray irradiation of samples. -- Highlights: ►We have studied Tb, Ce and Eu activated oxyfluoride glass-ceramics. ► Ce activated sample has the fastest cathodoluminescence decay times. ► X-ray excited luminescence shows, that Tb activated sample is the most intense. ► Intensity of Tb activated sample is 10 times smaller than intensity of CsI(Tl)

  6. Ceramic colorant from untreated iron ore residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Oscar Costa; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2012-09-30

    This work deals with the development of a ceramic colorant for glazes from an untreated iron ore residue. 6 mass% of the residue was added in suspensions (1.80 g/cm(3) density and 30s viscosity) of white, transparent and matte glazes, which were applied as thin layers (0.5mm) on engobeb and not fired ceramic tiles. The tiles were fired in laboratory roller kiln in a cycle of 35 min and maximum temperatures between 1050 and 1180°C. The residue and glazes were characterized by chemical (XRF) and thermal (DTA and optical dilatometry) analyses, and the glazed tiles by colorimetric and XRD analyses. The results showed that the colorant embedded in the transparent glaze results in a reddish glaze (like pine nut) suitable for the ceramic roof tile industry. For the matte and white glazes, the residue has changed the color of the tiles with temperature. PMID:22795839

  7. Ceramic application for regenerative burner system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D.B.; Park, B.H.; Kim, Y.W.; Bae, W.S. [RIST, Pohang (Korea)

    1999-05-01

    Recently, regenerative burner system was developed and begins to be gradually used for better energy savings. Compared to conventional burner system, the regenerative one has the several merits such as higher fuel efficiency, light weight of apparatus, low harmful toxic gas and homogeneous heating zone, etc. The regenerative material, a very important component of the new regenerative burner system should possess the properties of low specific density, higher surface area and high specific heat capacity. Ceramics is the best regenerative material because of stable mechanical properties even at high temperature and better thermal properties and excellent chemical stability. In this study, alumina ball, alumina tube, 3-D ceramic foam and honeycomb as regenerative materials were tested and evaluated. The computer simulation was conducted and compared to the result of field test. This paper is aimed to introduce a new application of ceramics at high temperature. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Dissolution of tailored ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolution experiments on polyphase, high alumina tailored ceramic nuclear waste forms developed for the chemical immobilization of Savannah River Plant nuclear waste are described. Three forms of leach tests have been adopted; bulk samples conforming to the Materials Characterization Center Static Leach Test (MCC-1), a powdered sample leach test, and a leach test performed on transmission electron microscope thin foil samples. From analysis of these tests the crystalline phases that preferentially dissolve on leaching and the product phases formed are identified and related to the tailoring and processing schemes used in forming the ceramics. The thin foil sample leaching enables the role of intergranular amorphous phases as short-circuit leaching paths in polyphase ceramics to be investigated

  9. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  10. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  11. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  12. On the ballistic response of comminuted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results have strongly suggested that the ballistic-resistance of different comminuted ceramics is similar, independent of the original strength of the material. In particular, experimental work focused on the ballistic response of such materials has suggested that ballistic response is largely controlled by shattered material morphology. Consequently, it has been postulated that control of the nature of ceramic fragmentation should provide a potential route to optimise post-impact ballistic resistance. In particular, such an approach would open up a route to control in multi-hit capabilities. Here, ballistic tests into pre-formed 'fragmented-ceramic' analogues assembled from compacted alumina powders with two differing morphologies were conducted. Strong hints of a morphology-based contribution to ballistic resistance were apparent, although there was insufficient fidelity in the experimental data set to categorically identify the nature of this contribution.

  13. Ceramic tile glazes: design, trends and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfredini, T. [Modena Univ. (Italy). Faculty of Engineering

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this lecture is to describe the state of the art of glazes for applications in ceramic tile industry. A glaze for application in ceramic tile industry must satisfy certain requirements, which may be divided into two large groups, one in relation to its preparation and industrial utilisation and the other specific of the product utilisation. In order to design glaze compositions certain aspects must be taken into account. Viscosity and surface tension of the melt matching the body requirements, linear thermal expansion, nucleation and crystal growth processes occurring during firing, durability and optical properties must be designed and adjusted in the industrial practice. Glass-ceramic systems are the more suitable compositions for innovative glazes for fast firing of wall and floor tiles. (orig.)

  14. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

  15. SHEAR BOND STRENGTHS BETWEEN CERAMIC CORES AND VENEERING CERAMICS OF DENTAL BI-LAYERED CERAMIC SYSTEMS AND THE SENSITIVITY TO THERMOCYCLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN TING, BDS, DDS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength between various commercial ceramic core materials and veneering ceramics of dental bi-layered ceramic combinations and the effect of thermocycling. The shear bond strength of four dental bi-layered ceramic combinations (white Cercon, yellow Cercon, white Lava, yellow Lava, IPS E.max were tested. Metal ceramic combinations were conducted as a control group. Half of each group was subjected to thermocycling. All specimens were thereafter subjected to a shear force. The initial mean shear bond strength values in MPa ± S.D were 28.02 ± 3.04 for White Cercon Base/Cercon Ceram Kiss, 27.54 ± 2.20 for Yellow Cercon Base/Cercon Ceram Kiss, 28.43 ± 2.13for White Lava Frame/Lava Ceram, 27.36 ± 2.25 for Yellow Lava Frame/Lava Ceram, 47.10 ± 3.77 for IPS E.max Press/IPS E.max Ceram and 30.11 ± 2.15 for metal ceramic control. The highest shear strength was recorded for IPS E.max Press/IPS E.max Ceram before and after thermocycling. The mean shear bond strength values of five other combinations were not significantly different (P < 0.05. Lithium-disilicate based combinations produced the highest core-veneer bonds that overwhelmed the metal ceramic combinations. Thermocycling had no effect on the core-veneer bonds. The core-veneer bonds of zirconia based combinations were not weakened by the addition of coloring pigments.

  16. Sothi-Siswal Ceramic Assemblage: A Reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Garge

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Harappan evidences in Chautan valley has a unique ceramic tradition. In the light of recent plethora of knowledge as well as against the background of the studies conducted by A. Ghosh, J.S. Nigam, Katy Frenchman, Suraj Bhan & Madhu Bala, we will have to not only reclassify the Sothi-Siswal ceramic assemblage but also alter basic nomenclatures and concepts involve in it. It will give us deep insight in to the process of evolution of Early Harappan cultures vis-à-vis the dynamic of regional cultural complexes.

  17. Electronic structure of nanograin barium titanate ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Xiangyun; WANG Xiaohui; LI Dejun; LI Longtu

    2007-01-01

    The density of states and band structure of 20 nm barium titanate(BaTiO3,BT)ceramics are investigated by first-principles calculation.The full potential linearized augmented plane wave(FLAPW)method is used and the exchange correlation effects are treated by the generalized gradient approximation(GGA).The results show that there is substantial hybridization between the Ti 3d and O 2p states in 20 nm BT ceramics and the interaction between barium and oxygen is typically ionic.

  18. Plant hallucinogens, shamanism and Nazca ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin de Rios, M; Cardenas, M

    1980-09-01

    The ceramics of the ancient Nazca, an extinct people that lived on the south coast of Peru from 100 to 800 AD, are examined. It is suggested that plant hallucinogens and stimulants including Trichocereus pachanoi, Erythroxylon coca, Datura spp., and Anadenanthera peregrina were utilized in religious ritualism connected with shamanism, stressing personal ecstasy as a means of contact with the supernatural on the part of regional religious-political leaders. Shamanic themes linked to world-wide plant hallucinogenic ingestion are identified and summarized, and their representation in Nazca ceramic art delineated.

  19. Manufacturing of superconductive silver/ceramic composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifi, Behrouz; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Eriksen, Morten;

    2000-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium......, and copper oxides is inserted into a silver tube and reduced by multi-step drawing. These single-filaments are packed in a new silver tube thus forming a multi-filament containing e.g. 37 single-filaments, which is subsequently reduced by drawing and rolling to tapes approximately 0.2 mm thick by 3 mm wide...

  20. Aging of nickel manganite NTC ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Dao-lai; Zheng, Cui-hong; Chen, Chu-sheng; Winnubst, A.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of thermal history and chemical composition on aging of Ni x Mn3 − x O4 +  δ (0.56 ≤ x ≤ 1.0) ceramics was investigated. It was found that all the Ni x Mn3 − x O4 +  δ ceramic samples metallized by co-firing at 1050°C showed significant electrical stability with an aging coefficient less than

  1. Tritium transport in lithium ceramics porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, S.W.; Ambrose, V.

    1991-12-31

    A random network model has been utilized to analyze the problem of tritium percolation through porous Li ceramic breeders. Local transport in each pore channel is described by a set of convection-diffusion-reaction equations. Long range transport is described by a matrix technique. The heterogeneous structure of the porous medium is accounted for via Monte Carlo methods. The model was then applied to an analysis of the relative contribution of diffusion and convective flow to tritium transport in porous lithium ceramics. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Tritium transport in lithium ceramics porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, S.W.; Ambrose, V.

    1991-01-01

    A random network model has been utilized to analyze the problem of tritium percolation through porous Li ceramic breeders. Local transport in each pore channel is described by a set of convection-diffusion-reaction equations. Long range transport is described by a matrix technique. The heterogeneous structure of the porous medium is accounted for via Monte Carlo methods. The model was then applied to an analysis of the relative contribution of diffusion and convective flow to tritium transport in porous lithium ceramics. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  4. Applications of sol gel ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sol gel method is a chemical technique in which polycrystalline ceramic films are fabricated from a solution of organometallic precursors. The technique is attractive for many industrial applications because it is a simple (films are processed in air), flexible (can be used to coat complex geometries) and cost effective (does not require expensive equipment) process. In addition, dense, high quality coatings can be achieved at much lower temperatures than is generally required for sintering bulk ceramics. In this paper the conventional sol gel method and the new datec process are reviewed and potential applications of sol gel coatings in automotive, aerospace, petrochemical, nuclear and electronic industries are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Fracture Toughness Prediction for MWCNT Reinforced Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the development of a micromechanics model to predict fracture toughness of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramic composites to guide future experimental work for this project. The modeling work described in this report includes (i) prediction of elastic properties, (ii) development of a mechanistic damage model accounting for matrix cracking to predict the composite nonlinear stress/strain response to tensile loading to failure, and (iii) application of this damage model in a modified boundary layer (MBL) analysis using ABAQUS to predict fracture toughness and crack resistance behavior (R-curves) for ceramic materials containing MWCNTs at various volume fractions.

  6. A randomized controlled clinical trial of 3-unit posterior zirconia–ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDP) with layered or pressed veneering ceramics: 3-year results

    OpenAIRE

    Naenni, Nadja; Bindl, Andreas; Sax, Caroline; Hämmerle, Christoph; Sailer, Irena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was to test whether or not posterior zirconia-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with pressed veneering ceramic exhibit less chipping than FDPs with layered veneering ceramics

  7. [Photocatalytic functional ceramic and its speciality of photodecomposition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Dai, Wen-xin; Shao, Yu; Lin, Hua-xiang; Zheng, Hua-rong; Fu, Xian-zhi

    2004-07-01

    Photocatalytic ceramic was prepared by coating photocatalytic membrane on ceramic matrix. The photocatalytic behavior of the TiO2 coated ceramic for degradation of oleic acid, ethylene, SO2, NOx and sterilization was studied by using XRD, chromatogram, in-situ IR and spectrophotometer. The results showed that the photocatalytic ceramic prepared by special conditions have the function of environmental conservation such as the photodegradating organic contaminants, removing inorganic baleful gas and killing bacteria. Degradation ratio of ethylene, oleic acid, SO2 and NOx reached 95%-100% respectively for the photocatalytic functional ceramic. PMID:15515948

  8. Compressive properties of open-cell ceramic foams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-yan; FU Yi-ming; ZENG Xiao-ming

    2006-01-01

    The compressive experiments of two kinds of ceramic foams were completed. The results show that the behavior of ceramic foams made by organic filling method is anisotropic. The stress-strain responses of ceramic foams made by sponge-replication show isotropy and strain rate dependence. The struts brittle breaking of net structure of this ceramic foam arises at the weakest defects of framework or at the part of framework,which causes the initiation and expanding of cracks. The compressive strength of ceramic foam is dependent on the strut size and relative density of foams.

  9. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section

  10. Micro-separation in vitro produces clinically relevant wear of ceramic-ceramic total hip replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevelos, J.; Fisher, J. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Mechanical Engineering; Ingham, E. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Div. of Microbiology; Doyle, C. [Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Newbury (United Kingdom); Streicher, R. [Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Kilchberg (Switzerland); Nevelos, A. [Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    Typical clinical wear rates for well-positioned first generation ceramic-ceramic total hip arthroplasties (THAs) were of the order of 1-5 mm{sup 3}/year. This wear took the form of a 'stripe' of worn area on the heads with an Ra of approximately 0.1 {mu}m. As-manufactured unworn areas have an average Ra of 0.005 {mu}m Ra. This wear pattern has not been recorded following standard simulator testing with typical wear rates of less than 0.1 mm{sup 3} per million cycles. Therefore new material combinations for ceramic-ceramic total hip arthroplasty cannot be validated using standard hip simulator testing methods. However, recent fluoroscopy studies have shown that the head and cup of total hip replacements can separate during normal gait. This separation would lead to rim contact upon heel strike as shown in Figure 1. (orig.)

  11. Tailoring of unipolar strain in lead-free piezoelectrics using the ceramic/ceramic composite approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khansur, Neamul H.; Daniels, John E. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Groh, Claudia; Jo, Wook; Webber, Kyle G. [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, Christina [Diamond Light Source, Beamline I12 JEEP, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Kimpton, Justin A. [The Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2014-03-28

    The electric-field-induced strain response mechanism in a polycrystalline ceramic/ceramic composite of relaxor and ferroelectric materials has been studied using in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction. The addition of ferroelectric phase material in the relaxor matrix has produced a system where a small volume fraction behaves independently of the bulk under an applied electric field. Inter- and intra-grain models of the strain mechanism in the composite material consistent with the diffraction data have been proposed. The results show that such ceramic/ceramic composite microstructure has the potential for tailoring properties of future piezoelectric materials over a wider range than is possible in uniform compositions.

  12. Spectroscopic investigations on glasses, glass-ceramics and ceramics developed for nuclear waste immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caurant, D.

    2014-05-01

    Highly radioactive nuclear waste must be immobilized in very durable matrices such as glasses, glass-ceramics and ceramics in order to avoid their dispersion in the biosphere during their radioactivity decay. In this paper, we present various examples of spectroscopic investigations (optical absorption, Raman, NMR, EPR) performed to study the local structure of different kinds of such matrices used or envisaged to immobilize different kinds of radioactive wastes. A particular attention has been paid on the incorporation and the structural role of rare earths—both as fission products and actinide surrogates—in silicate glasses and glass-ceramics. An example of structural study by EPR of a ceramic (hollandite) irradiated by electrons (to simulate the effect of the β-irradiation of radioactive cesium) is also presented.

  13. Frictional Resistance of Three Types of Ceramic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the static frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface in two recently introduced bracket systems and compare them to conventional ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems. Three variables were considered including the bracket system, archwire type and archwire angulation. Material and Methods: Four bracket systems were tested in vitro: Self ligating ceramic, ceramic with metal slot and module, conventional ceramic with module and conventional metal with module. A specially constructed jig and an Instron testing machine were used to measure the static frictional resistance for 0.014 inches round and 0.018 x 0.025 inches rectangular stainless steel wires at 0° and 7° angulations. Main outcome measures: static frictional force at the bracket/archwire interface; recorded and measured in units of force (Newtons. Results: Self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems generated significantly less static frictional resistance than conventional ceramic bracket systems with the wire at both angulations (P < 0.05. Changing the wire from 0.014 round to 0.018 x 0.025 rectangular wire significantly increased frictional forces for metal slot ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems (P < 0.01. Increasing wire angulation significantly increased frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface for all four types of bracket systems tested (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Compared to conventional ceramic, self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems should give improved clinical performance, matching that of conventional metal brackets.

  14. Ceramic Inlays: Effect of Mechanical Cycling and Ceramic Type on Restoration-dentin Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, F Z; Kleverlaan, C J; da Silva, L H; Feilzer, A J; Cesar, P F; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max Press; IPS e.Max CAD; Vita PM9; Vita Mark II; and Vita VM7) and the mechanical cycling factor (with and without [100 N, 2 Hz, 1.2×10(6) cycles]). The inlays were adhesively cemented, and all of the specimens were cut into microbars (1×1 mm, nontrimming method), which were tested under microtensile loading. The failure mode was classified and contact angle, roughness, and microtopographic analyses were performed on each ceramic surface. The mechanical cycling had a significant effect (p=0.0087) on the bond strength between dentin and IPS e.max Press. The Vita Mark II group had the highest bond strength values under both conditions, with mechanical cycling (9.7±1.8 MPa) and without (8.2±1.9 MPa), while IPS e.Max CAD had the lowest values (2.6±1.6 and 2.2±1.4, respectively). The adhesive failure mode at the ceramic/cement interface was the most frequent. Vita Mark II showed the highest value of average roughness. IPS e.max Press and Vita Mark II ceramics presented the lowest contact angles. In conclusion, the composition and manufacturing process of ceramics seem to have an influence on the ceramic surface and resin cement bond strength. Mechanical cycling did not cause significant degradation on the dentin and ceramic bond strength under the configuration used. PMID:27455117

  15. Lightweight Ceramic Composition of Carbon Silicon Oxygen and Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Lightweight, monolithic ceramics resistant to oxidation in air at high temperatures are made by impregnating a porous carbon preform with a sol which contains a mixture of tetraethoxysilane, dimethyldiethoxysilane and trimethyl borate. The sol is gelled and dried on the carbon preform to form a ceramic precursor. The precursor is pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form the ceramic which is made of carbon, silicon, oxygen and boron. The carbon of the preform reacts with the dried gel during the pyrolysis to form a component of the resulting ceramic. The ceramic is of the same size, shape and form as the carbon precursor. Thus, using a porous, fibrous carbon precursor, such as a carbon felt, results in a porous, fibrous ceramic. Ceramics of the invention are useful as lightweight tiles for a reentry spacecraft.

  16. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  17. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, G. D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin M.; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James C.

    2014-02-03

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (~1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  18. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, Gordon; Crum, Jarrod; Turo, Laura; Riley, Brian; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James

    2014-05-01

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1-5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  19. Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms for immobilizing ICPP high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms have been consolidated from simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant wastes by hot isostatic pressing calcined waste and chemical additives by 10000C or less. The ceramic forms can contain over 70 wt% waste with densities ranging from 3.5 to 3.85 g/cm3, depending upon the formulation. Major phases are CaF2, CaZrTi207, CaTiO3, monoclinic ZrO2, and amorphous intergranular material. The relative fraction of the phases is a function of the chemical additives (TiO2, CaO, and SiO2) and consolidation temperature. Zirconolite, the major actinide host, makes the ceramic forms extremely leach resistant for the actinide simulant U238. The amorphous phase controls the leach performance for Sr and Cs which is improved by the addition of SiO2. Glass-ceramic forms were also consolidated by HIP at waste loadings of 30 to 70 wt% with densities of 2.73 to 3.1 g/cm3 using Exxon 127 borosilicate glass frit. The glass-ceramic forms contain crystalline CaF2, Al203, and ZrSi04 (zircon) in a glass matrix. Natural mineral zircon is a stable host for 4+ valent actinides. 17 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  20. Wear characteristics of polished and glazed lithium disilicate ceramics opposed to three ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Kodaira, Akihisa; Okamura, Kentaro; Matsumura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the wear characteristics of a heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic material opposed to feldspathic porcelain, a lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and zirconia materials. Ceramic plate specimens were prepared from feldspathic porcelain (EX-3 nA1B), lithium disilicate glass ceramics (e.max CAD MO1/C14), and zirconia (Katana KT 10) and then ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens were fabricated from heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramic (e.max press LT A3) and then glazed or polished. A sliding wear testing apparatus was used for wear testing. Wear of glazed rods was greater than that of polished rods when they were abraded with ground zirconia, ground porcelain, polished porcelain, or polished lithium disilicate ceramics. For both glazed and polished rods, wear was greater when the rods were abraded with ground plates. The findings indicate that application of a polished surface rather than a glazed surface is recommended for single restorations made of heat-pressed lithium disilicate material. In addition, care must be taken when polishing opposing materials, especially those used in occlusal contact areas. (J Oral Sci 58, 117-123, 2016). PMID:27021548

  1. MECHANICAL STRENGTH OF HIGHLY POROUS CERAMICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBORN, IC; SANTEN, A; HOEKSTRA, HD; DEHOSSON, JTM; Born, I.C. van den

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical strength of highly porous ceramics in terms of the Weibull and Duxbury-Leath distributions. More than 1000 side-crushing strength tests on silica-catalyst carriers of various particle sizes have been performed in series. Within a series, preparation conditions we

  2. Hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Estrup, Maja;

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of the hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics on their degree of crystallisation has been explored by means of differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Vickers indentation. Different degrees of crystallisation in the basaltic glasses were achieved...

  3. Interfacing design and making of Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the relationship between crafting materiality and digital representation, and how experiential knowledge of crafts rooted in ceramics can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. Thus the research refers to the overall theme Materiality and Aesthe......This research investigates the relationship between crafting materiality and digital representation, and how experiential knowledge of crafts rooted in ceramics can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. Thus the research refers to the overall theme Materiality...... and Aesthetics in the conference. Digital technology as 3D printing with ceramic allows to bridge from the digital design environment to fabrication. At the same time novel digital means can create new interfaces between the human, space and the material. Here advances in 3d motion capture technology and sensors...... investigates the idea of an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics and is working on two levels. One which has to do with a digital interactive system that responds on the movement of the hands; at a certain distance the user’s hands appear on a monitor screen...

  4. Sintering behavior of nano-ceramic coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, JTM; Popma, R; Hooijmans, J; Komarneni, S; Parker, JC; Hahn, H

    2000-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the densification of sol gel derived thin nano-ceramic coatings by laser radiation and by furnace treatment. Deposition of the film is done by means of spin coating of Zirconia. The sintering of the layer is observed using a number of different measuring techniques. Especi

  5. Production Process for Strong, Light Ceramic Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, G. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Tomer, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Proportions of ingredients and sintering time/temperature schedule changed. Production process for lightweight, high-strength ceramic insulating tiles for Space Shuttle more than just scaled-up version of laboratory process for making small tiles. Boron in aluminum borosilicate fibers allows fusion at points where fibers contact each other during sintering, thereby greatly strengthening tiles structure.

  6. Dielectric silicone elastomers with mixed ceramic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiubianu, George, E-mail: george.stiubianu@icmpp.ro [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Bele, Adrian; Cazacu, Maria; Racles, Carmen; Vlad, Stelian [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Ignat, Mircea [National R& D Institute for Electrical Engineering ICPE-CA Bucharest, Splaiul Unirii 313, District 3, Bucharest 030138 (Romania)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Composite ceramics nanoparticles (MCN) with zirconium dioxide and lead zirconate. • Dielectric elastomer films wDith PDMS matrix and MCN as dielectric filler. • Hydrophobic character—water resistant and good flexibility specific to siloxanes. • Increased value of dielectric constant with the content of MCN in dielectric films. • Increased energy output from uniaxial deformation of the dielectric elastomer films. - Abstract: A ceramic material consisting in a zirconium dioxide-lead zirconate mixture has been obtained by precipitation method, its composition being proved by wide angle X-ray powder diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average diameter of the ceramic particles ranged between 50 and 100 nm, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy images. These were surface treated and used as filler for a high molecular mass polydimethylsiloxane-α,ω-diol (Mn = 450,000) prepared in laboratory, the resulted composites being further processed as films and crosslinked. A condensation procedure, unusual for polydimethylsiloxane having such high molecular mass, with a trifunctional silane was approached for the crosslinking. The effect of filler content on electrical and mechanical properties of the resulted materials was studied and it was found that the dielectric permittivity of nanocomposites increased in line with the concentration of ceramic nanoparticles.

  7. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  8. Ceramic Fabric Coated With Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Smith, M.; Goldstein, H.; Zimmerman, N.

    1988-01-01

    Material used as high-temperature shell. Ceramic fabric coated with silicon carbide (SiC) serves as tough, heat-resistant covering for other refractory materials. Developed to protect reusable insulating tiles on advanced space transportation systems. New covering makes protective glaze unnecessary. Used on furnace bricks or on insulation for engines.

  9. Three-dimensionally Perforated Calcium Phosphate Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics were produced by compression molding using a special mold followed by sintering. The porous calcium phosphate ceramics have three-dimensional and penetrated open pores380-400μm in diameter spaced at intervals of 200μm. The layers of the linear penetration pores alternately lay perpendicular to pore direction. The porosity was 59%-65% . The Ca/P molar ratios of the porous calcium phosphate ceramics range from 1.5 to 1.85. A binder containing methyl cellulose was most effective for preparing the powder compact among vinyl acetate, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, stearic acid, methyl cellulose and their mixtures. Stainless steel, polystyrene, nylon and bamboo were used as the long columnar male dies for the penetrated open pores. When polystyrene, nylon and bamboo were used as the long columnar male dies, the dies were burned out during the sintering process. Using stainless steel as the male dies with the removal of the dies before heat treatment resulted in a higher level of densification of the calcium phosphate ceramic.

  10. [Dental ceramics: its history and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureau, Thomas; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an historical background of dental ceramics. It synthesises the evolution of such material and its technical improvements from the stone-age to our time. Focusing on the importance of dental aesthetics, it shows the investigations realised to upgrade the prosthetic results.

  11. Graded structures for all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Chai, H; Lawn, B R

    2010-04-01

    One failure mode of all-ceramic restorations is radial cracking at the cementation surface, from occlusally induced flexure of the stiffer ceramic layer(s) on the softer dentin underlayer. We hypothesize that such failure may be substantially mitigated by an appropriate grading of elastic modulus through the ceramic thickness. In this study, we fabricated graded structures by infiltrating glass into zirconia plates, with resulting diminished modulus in the outer surfaces. The plates were then bonded to a polymeric base and subjected to flexure by contact loading until fracture. Comparison of infiltrated specimens with non-infiltrated controls showed a significant increase in the fracture loads, by a factor of nearly 2. Finite element analysis revealed the cause of increase in the load-bearing capacity to be diminished tensile stresses within the lower-modulus graded zone, corresponding to an increase in material strength. The results confirmed that suitably graded structures can be highly beneficial in the design of next-generation all-ceramic restorations. PMID:20200413

  12. Lutetium oxide-based transparent ceramic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeley, Zachary; Cherepy, Nerine; Kuntz, Joshua; Payne, Stephen A.

    2016-01-19

    In one embodiment, a transparent ceramic of sintered nanoparticles includes gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with europium having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YEu.sub.YO.sub.3, where X is any value within a range from about 0.05 to about 0.45 and Y is any value within a range from about 0.01 to about 0.2, and where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm. In another embodiment, a transparent ceramic scintillator of sintered nanoparticles, includes a body of sintered nanoparticles including gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with a rare earth activator (RE) having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YRE.sub.YO.sub.3, where RE is selected from the group consisting of: Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy, where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm.

  13. Making Ceramic Reference Specimens Containing Seeded Voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Klima, Stanley J.; Roth, Don J.

    1994-01-01

    Internal and surface voids of known sizes incorporated into silicon carbide and silicon nitride ceramic reference specimens at prescribed locations. Specimens used to demonstrate sensitivity and resolution in nondestructive examination techniques like scanning laser acoustic microscopy and x-radiography, and to assist in establishing proper examination procedures.

  14. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  15. Using the Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer...

  16. SEGMENTATION AND GRAIN SIZE OF CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Arnould

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some methods to automatically extract the grain boundaries of materials in order to develop an automatic method to determine the grain size and morphological parameters of ceramic materials. Results are presented in the case of sintered cerine (CeO2 materials.

  17. Method of producing ceramic fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the evaporation procedure the UO2-ceramic powder, possible to sinter, is mixed with epoxy resin pellets or UO2-gel-pellets and compacted at a pressure between 700 and 2800 kg/cm2. After sintering at 12000 up to 16500C the pellets show a uniform porosity. (RW)

  18. Samanid ceramics and neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarpay, G.; Frierman, J.D.; Asaro, F.

    1977-08-29

    Glazed pottery known as ''Afrasiyab'' and ''Nishapur'' wares (early Islamic ceramics) are generally attributed to the Samanid dynasty (819-1005). The clay composition of Samanid wares and discarded kiln items found in situ were analyzed by NAA and the elemental composition compared with that of other sherds. 7 figures, 1 table. (DLC)

  19. Robotic milling for rapid ceramic pototyping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Guang-chao; ZHANG Hai-ou; WANG Gui-lan

    2005-01-01

    Robotic milling is a developing method for rapidly producing prototypes and parts, but the application is limited for materials such as wax, wood, plastic and light metal, etc. The reason for this is because of the robotic weak rigidity. In this paper, a method of robotic milling for ceramic prototyping is developed, one that has been successfully applied in a new rapid hard tooling technology-Direct Prototype Spray Tooling[1]. At first, the appropriate ceramic materials mixed with metal powder are confirmed for the robotic milling and the following plasma spraying process. Then the 6 - DOF robotic milling paths are extracted from the NC code and transformed into the robotic JBI type file, the NC code generated through the general CAD/CAM software such as UG -NX.Finally, the robotic milling characteristics such as moving path accuracy and milling force are tested to find the best milling parameters and to ensure the executable, accurate and efficient ceramic prototype milling technology.The development of this method not only broadens the robotic milling material range but also extends the rapid prototyping fields. It can also be used for producing ceramic parts that are difficult to machine.

  20. Colloidal forming of metal/ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Herencia, A.J.; Gutierrez, C.A.; Millan, A.J.; Nieto, M.I.; Moreno, R. [Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Metal/Ceramic composites have very attractive properties as either structural or electronic materials. For certain applications, complex microstructures and shapes are required. Colloidal processing of ceramics has proved to provide better properties and allows to obtain near net complex shaped parts. However colloidal processing has not received a similar attention in powder metallurgy. This work deals with the colloidal approach to the forming of metallic and metal/ceramic composites in an aqueous medium. Rheological behavior of concentrated pure nickel, nickel/alumina and nickel/zirconia suspensions is studied and optimized for obtaining flat surfaces or near net shaped parts by tape casting and gel casting respectively. In each case the influence of the processing additives (acrylic binders for tape casting and carrageenans for gel casting) on the rheological behavior of the slurries is determined. Pure nickel and nickel/ceramic composites with different compositions have been prepared. Static and dynamic sintering studies were performed at different conditions in order to control the porosity and microstructure of the final bodies, which were characterized by optical microscopy. (orig.)

  1. A Ceramic Heat Exchanger for Solar Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson Jr., C.; Stacy, L.

    1985-01-01

    Design intended for high-temperature service. Proposed ceramic-tube and header heat exchangers used for solar-concentrating collector operating in 25- to 150-KW power range at temperatures between 2,000 degrees and 3,000 degrees F (1,095 degrees and 1,650 degrees C).

  2. Support Services for Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.

    2000-06-06

    built to simulate the Kellogg entrained-bed gasifier in use at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville facility, but at 1/10 of the firing rate. At the exit of the unit is a large candle filter vessel typically operated at approximately 1000 F (540 C) in which coupons of materials can be inserted to test their resistance to gasifier ash and gas corrosion. The system also has ports for testing of hydrogen separation membranes that are suitably contained in a pressure housing. In addition, NETL is operating the combustion and environmental research facility (CERF). In recent years, the 0.5 MMBtu/hr (0.5 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) CERF has served as a host for exposure of over 60 ceramic and alloy samples at ambient pressure as well as at 200 psig (for tubes). Samples have been inserted in five locations covering 1700-2600 F (930-1430 C), with exposures exceeding 1000 hours. In the present program, the higher priority metals are to be tested at 1500-1600 F (820-870 C) in one CERF location and near 1800-2000 F (980-1090 C) at other locations to compare results with those from the EERC tests.

  3. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  4. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C Kong

    2010-07-01

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  5. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ritzberger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate high translucency, preferable optical/mechanical properties and an application as dental inlays, onlays and crowns. Based on an improvement of the mechanical parameters, specially the strength and toughness, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramics are used as crowns; applying a procedure to machine an intermediate product and producing the final glass-ceramic by an additional heat treatment. Small dental bridges of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were fabricated using a molding technology. ZrO2 ceramics show high toughness and strength and were veneered with fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. Machining is possible with a porous intermediate product.

  6. Processing and Characterization of Multiphase Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Danju

    Multiphase ceramic composites structure design has advantages for many applications. It is not only an effective way of limiting grain growth which allows for fine-grain size superplasticity at elevated temperatures, but also a combination of various desirable properties can be obtained from different phases, which otherwise cannot be found in one single phase material. The goal of this research is to select, design and optimize multiphase ceramic systems for mainly two purposes: shape forming and inert matrix nuclear fuel. These ceramic composites feature the machinability of monazite (LaPO 4) due to weak interfacial bonding with other oxides, the superplasticity of 3 mol% tetragonal zirconia (3Y-TZP), and the high hardness and strength of Al2O3 and MgAl2O4. These materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mechanical behavior at room temperature was characterized for the elastic modulus, hardness and fracture toughness. They were fabricated and demonstrated to have deformation rates in the superplastic range of at high temperatures and easy machinability at room temperature using conventional tools. An issue with conventional nuclear fuel, UO2, is its very low thermal conductivity that causes high central temperatures, which can lead to melting and cracking during reactor operation. The solution can be found in multiphase ceramic composites, by combining nuclear fuel particles in a heat conducting phase with high thermal conductivity and other phases that absorb fission byproducts while maintaining good radiation stability. In the current research, proposed multiphase ceramic composite materials were designed and radiation damage was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Gold irradiation was used to represent the primary knock-on atoms damage caused by neutrons. Xenon irradiation was used to represent the fission product damage. Magnetoplumbite, was the most susceptible to

  7. KROME Ceramics: color management system for the ceramics industry; KROME: Ceramics Sistema de gestion del color para la industra ceramica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Luque, J.; Pla, O.; Selvi, S.

    2013-05-01

    Digital Decoration Systems, SL (DIGIT-S) with Unicer, SL, has implemented a system to improve and optimize the process of decorating by inkjet printing for ceramic industry. It provides a comprehensive solution, KROME Ceramics, to improve the cost effectiveness of product and process through the implementation of a working system based on the control of digital decoration process and the synchronization of all elements that make up the decorative modules, including the creation of a work flow, management of files that are generated during the process, a correct color management system, and of course, optimizing and evaluating ink jet inks integrating all elements involved: Lighting, Computer, Software, Monitor, Plotter, Paper, Ink, Ink jet, Body's, Enamels and Oven. (Author)

  8. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets

  9. A comparison between the effect of All-Ceramic and metal-ceramic restorations on the plaque accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezatollah Jalalian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Tooth crowning often leads to changes in periodontal index through changes in emergence profile zone. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of metal-ceramic with that ofAll-Ceramic restorations on the plaque a accumulation.   Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, we used 102 teeth covered with metal-ceramic and all-ceramic restorations. Before and after crowning, plaque index (PI and gingival indexes (MGl were measured. Data were analyzed using covariance (ANCOVA test.   Results: Measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD in PFM Group prior to crowning were (1.96±0.38 and (1.45±0.48, respectively. In metal-ceramic restorations group, six months after crowning, measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD were (1.22±0.49 and (1.82±0.61, respectively. Measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD in All-Ceramic Group prior to crowning were (1.22±0.52 and (1.25±0.29, respectively. In All-Ceramic, six months after crowning, measured PI and MGI (Mean±SD were (0.88±0.51 and (1.43±0.50, respectively. ANOVA test showed statistical significance difference between metal-ceramic and All-Ceramic Groups in Indexes (P<0.001.   Conclusion: Metal-ceramic and All-Ceramic crowns were associated with inflammatory changes in gingival. Metal-ceramic restorations were associated with higher inflammatory indexes compared with All-Ceramic crowns.

  10. FT-IR characterization of articulated ceramic bricks with wastes from ceramic industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, G.; Viruthagiri, G.

    The 30 ceramic test samples with the kaolinitic clay and ceramic rejects (in the as-received state and sintered at temperatures 900-1200 °C) were investigated through spectral studies in order to elucidate the possibility of recycling the wastes from the government ceramic industry of Vriddhachalam, Tamilnadu state, South India. A detailed attribution of all the spectroscopic frequencies in the spectra recorded in the 4000-400 cm-1 region was attempted and their assignment to different minerals was accomplished. X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to demonstrate the reliability of IR attributions. The indication of well-ordered kaolinite is by the band at 1115 cm-1 in the raw samples which tends to shift towards 1095 cm-1 in all the fired samples. The peaks at 563 cm-1 and 795 cm-1 can be assigned to anorthite and dickite respectively. The presence of quartz and anorthite is confirmed both by XRD and FTIR. The microstructural observations were done through the SEM images which visualized the vitrification of the fired bricks at higher temperatures. The refractory properties of the samples found through the XRF analysis are also appreciable. The present work suggests that the incorporation of the rejects into the clay mixture will be a valid route for the ceramic industries to reduce the costs of the ceramic process.

  11. Current Issues with Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental barrier coating (EBC) for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 ceramics is an emerging field as the application of silicon-based ceramics in the gas turbine engine hot section is on the horizon, both for aero and industrial gas turbines. EBC is an enabling technology for silicon-based ceramics because these materials without an EBC cannot be used in combustion environments due to rapid surface recession. Significant progress in EBC development has been made during the last decade through various government-sponsored programs. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit temperature capability of current EBCs to about 1350 C for long-term applications. There is a need for higher temperature EBCs as the temperature capability of silicon-based ceramics continue to increase. Therefore, research is underway to develop EBCs with improved temperature capability compared to current EBCs. The current status and issues with the advanced EBC development efforts will be discussed.

  12. PREFACE: 3rd International Congress on Ceramics (ICC3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niihara, Koichi; Ohji, Tatsuki; Sakka, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Early in 2005, the American Ceramic Society, the European Ceramic Society and the Ceramic Society of Japan announced a collaborative effort to provide leadership for the global ceramics community that would facilitate the use of ceramic and glass materials. That effort resulted in an agreement to organize a new biennial series of the International Congress on Ceramics, convened by the International Ceramic Federation (ICF). In order to share ideas and visions of the future for ceramic and glass materials, the 1st International Congress on Ceramics (ICC1) was held in Canada, 2006, under the organization of the American Ceramic Society, and the 2nd Congress (ICC2) was held in Italy, 2008, hosted by the European Ceramic Society. Organized by the Ceramic Society of Japan, the 3rd Congress (ICC3) was held in Osaka, Japan, 14-18 November 2010. Incorporating the 23rd Fall Meeting of the Ceramic Society of Japan and the 20th Iketani Conference, ICC3 was also co-organized by the Iketani Science and Technology Foundation, and was endorsed and supported by ICF, Asia-Oceania Ceramic Federation (AOCF) as well as many other organizations. Following the style of the previous two successful Congresses, the program was designed to advance ceramic and glass technologies to the next generation through discussion of the most recent advances and future perspectives, and to engage the worldwide ceramics community in a collective effort to expand the use of these materials in both conventional as well as new and exciting applications. ICC3 consisted of 22 voluntarily organized symposia in the most topical and essential themes of ceramic and glass materials, including Characterization, design and processing technologies Electro, magnetic and optical ceramics and devices Energy and environment related ceramics and systems Bio-ceramics and bio-technologies Ceramics for advanced industry and safety society Innovation in traditional ceramics It also contained the Plenary Session and the

  13. Cerec anterior crowns: restorative options with monolithic ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Sven; Fiedlar, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the different types of monolithic ceramic crowns that can be placed on anterior teeth with existing shoulder preparations. Anterior crowns were indicated for the teeth 12 to 22 in the present case. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had received all-ceramic crowns 20 years earlier, which had started to develop cracks and palatal fractures over the last few years. The patient's teeth were prepared and four sets of crowns were fabricated using different monolithic ceramic materials: IPS e.max CAD, Cerec Blocs C In, VITABLOCS Real Life, and ENAMIC. Both shade characterization and crystallization firing were performed on the monolithic lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns. The silicate ceramic crowns received glaze firing alone. The crowns made of hybrid ceramic (ENAMIC) were treated with a polymer sealant. PMID:24555406

  14. Manufacturing of ceramic cutting blades by PIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rak, Z.S.; Snijders, G. [ECN Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    1997-09-01

    Ceramic cutting blades of differing size and thickness varying between 0.15-0.60 mm are manufactured by powder injection moulding (PIM) using a feedstock based on the yttria partially stabilised zirconia (TZ-3YS) powder and polyacetal-based system. The injection process ensures a high production efficiency, and is followed by a short catalytic debinding process (1 -3 h) at the temperatures of 105-115C. The sintered blades are machined to the final thickness, and if necessary, undergo an additional heat treatment in reducing conditions to improve the mechanical properties of the product. The influence of the manufacturing procedure on the quality of the final product is discussed. A comparison of the degree of densification, micro-structure and mechanical properties of ceramic knives manufactured by PIM, uniaxial pressing and tape casting is reviewed. 11 refs.

  15. Production of ceramics from coal fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angjusheva Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense ceramics are produced from fly ash from REK Bitola, Republic of Macedonia. Four types of fly ash from electro filters and one from the collected zone with particles < 0.063 mm were the subject of this research. Consolidation was achieved by pressing (P= 133 MPa and sintering (950, 1000, 1050 and 11000C and heating rates of 3 and 100/min. Densification was realized by liquid phase sintering and solid state reaction where diopside [Ca(Mg,Al(Si,Al2O6] was formed. Ceramics with optimal properties (porosity 2.96±0.5%, bending strength - 47.01±2 MPa, compressive strength - 170 ±5 MPa was produced at 1100ºC using the heating rate of 10ºC/min.

  16. Electrical resistivity measurements in superconducting ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical resistivity measurements have been done in (Y, Ba, Cu, O) - and (Y, A1, Ba, Cu, O) - based superconducting ceramics. The sintered specimens were prepared by applying gold electrodes and winding on the non-metalized part with a copper strip to be immersed in liquid nitrogen for cooling. The resistivity measurements have been done by the four-probe method. A copper-constantan or chromel-alumel thermocouple inserted between the specimen and the copper cold finger has been used for the determination of the critical temperature Tc. Details of the experimental set-up and resistivity versus temperature plots in the LNT-RT range for the superconducting ceramics are the major contributions of this communication. (author)

  17. [Multiply upconversion emission in oxyfluoride ceramics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Si-guo; Yang, Xiao-liang; Liu, Zhen-wei

    2003-02-01

    Oxyfluoride ceramics with the host composition of SiO2 and PbF2 have been prepared. X-ray diffraction analysis of the ceramics revealed that fluoride type beta-PbF2 solid solution regions are precipitated in the glass matrix. Rare earth ions in the beta-PbF2 solid solution show highly efficient upconversion performance due to the very small multi-phonon relaxation rates. Eight upconversion emission bands whose central wavelength are 846, 803, 665, 549, 523, 487, 456 and 411 nm have been observed when the sample was excited with 930 nm diode light. Four possible energy transfer processes between Er3+ and Yb3+ cause the electronic population of high energy level of Er3+ and realize the abound upconversion luminescence bands. PMID:12939954

  18. Ceramic onlay for endodontically treated mandibular molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopadevi Garlapati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of endodontically treated teeth is important for the success of endodontic treatment. In full coverage restorations, maximum amount of tooth structure is compromised, so as to conserve the amount of tooth structure partial coverage restorations, can be preferred. This case report is on fabrication of a conservative tooth colored restoration for an endodontically treated posterior tooth. A 22-year-old male patient presented with pain in the mandibular left first molar. After endodontic treatment, composite material was used as postendodontic restoration. The tooth was then prepared to receive a ceramic onlay and bonded with self-adhesive universal resin cement. Ceramic onlay restoration was periodically examined up to 2 years.

  19. Translucency of Dental Ceramic, Post and Bracket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Keun Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Translucency of dental ceramics, esthetic posts and orthodontic brackets was reviewed. Translucency parameter (TP and contrast ratio (CR are generally used for translucency evaluation. For the evaluation of translucency, two criteria such as the translucency of human teeth (TP = 15–19, 1 mm thick and the visual perceptibility threshold for the translucency difference (∆CR > 0.07 or ∆TP > 2 were used. In ceramics, translucency differences were in the perceptible range depending on the type of material and the thickness. However, variations caused by the difference in the required thickness for each layer by the material and also by the measurement protocols should be considered. As to the translucency of esthetic posts, a significant difference was found among the post systems. Translucency was influenced by the bracket composition and brand, and the differences by the brand were visually perceptible.

  20. Radiation effects in ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on alpha-decay event damage (a particle and recoil-nucleus) that results in atomic-scale disorder which causes changes in the molar volume, corrosion rate, stored energy, mechanical properties, and macrostructure of ceramics. These changes particularly of volume and corrosion rate, have critical implications for the long-term durability of nuclear waste forms, such as the polyphase. Ti-based ceramic Synroc. This paper reviews data on actinide-bearing (U and Th) phases of great age (>100 m.y.) found in nature and compares these results to observation on actinide-doped phases (Pu and Cm) of nearly equivalent α-decay doses. Of particular interest is evidence for annealing of radiation damage effects over geologic periods of time under ambient conditions

  1. Photorefraction demonstrations using electrooptic PLZT ceramics modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozolinsh, Maris; Hanstorp, Dag

    2003-11-01

    PLZT ceramics electrooptic (EO) modulator was designed for demonstrations and student's laboratory works to study photorefraction using Ar+ laser (λ = 514 nm). PLZT element had an aperture of 1.5 x 8 mm2 and thickness of 1.5 mm. Reading of recorded patterns was realized by applying to the element the biasing electric field. The most efficient writing took place for ceramics composition PLZT 8.75/65/35. The total intensity of two writing beams was up to 300 mW, the applied electric field during writing -- up to 20 kV/cm. The diffraction efficiency depended on the applied biasing reading electric field EBR. For the reading He-Ne laser the diffraction efficiency η ~ 0.48 was obtained at the bias field values EBR = 13 kV/cm. The simplicity of the modulator alignment and writing and reading processes promote the use of such modulators in the teaching process.

  2. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M.A.

    1994-05-03

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

  3. Efficient photoemission from robust ferroelectric ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscolo, I. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan, (Italy); Castellano, M.; Catani, L.; Ferrario, M.; Tazzioli, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy); Giannessi, L. [ENEA, Frascati, Rome (Italy). Centro Ricerche Elettronica

    1999-07-01

    Experimental results on photoemission by ferroelectric ceramic disks, with a possible interpretation, are presented. Two types of lead zirconate titanate lanthanum doped, PLZT, ceramics have been used for tests. 25 ps light pulses of 532 and 355 nm were used for excitation. The intensity ranged within the interval 0.1-3 GW/cm{sup 2}. The upper limit of the intensity was established by the damage threshold tested by the onset of ion emission. At low value of the intensity the yield was comparable at the two wavelengths. At the highest intensity of green light the emitted charge was 1 nC per 10 mm{sup 2}, but it was limited by the space charge effect. In fact, the applied field was only 20 kV/cm, allowed both by the mechanical design of the apparatus and the poor vacuum, 10{sup -4} mbar. No surface processing was required. The measurement of the electron pulse length under way.

  4. a Plutonium Ceramic Target for Masha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, P. A.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Kenneally, J. M.; Wild, J. F.; Stoyer, M. A.; Patin, J. B.; Lougheed, R. W.; Ebbinghaus, B. B.; Landingham, R. L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Yeremin, A. V.; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2005-09-01

    We are currently developing a plutonium ceramic target for the MASHA mass separator. The MASHA separator will use a thick plutonium ceramic target capable of tolerating temperatures up to 2000 °C. Promising candidates for the target include oxides and carbides, although more research into their thermodynamic properties will be required. Reaction products will diffuse out of the target into an ion source, where they will then be transported through the separator to a position-sensitive focal-plane detector array. Experiments on MASHA will allow us to make measurements that will cement our identification of element 114 and provide for future experiments where the chemical properties of the heaviest elements are studied.

  5. Foshan ceramics - One Thousand-Year-Old City of Ceramic Arts%佛山陶瓷千年陶韵

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏国恩; 张江年

    2006-01-01

    @@ Foshan is a famous city with culture and history.Among the civilizations of Foshan, ceramic culutre is the most well-konwn and outstanding. Shi Wan Ceramics in Foshan is a name card of Foshan. It wins the reputation as the "the ceramic capital in South China" for Foshan city and develops the regional economic concept of "greater Foshan ceramics".

  6. Modelling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential use of a thermochemical software package (FactSage 6.2), in the design of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics, experimental and modelled results on four glass ceramics were compared. Initially large discrepancies were found. These are described and related...... for the topology of multicomponent melts, before accurate prediction of phase relations within boron-containing glass ceramics can be obtained....

  7. End-Pumped Tm:YAG Ceramic Slab Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiao-Jin; XU Jian-Qiu; ZHANG Wen-Xin; JIANG Sen-Xue; PAN Yu-Bai

    2009-01-01

    Lasers from a Tm:YAG ceramic aare reported for the first time to our best knowledge. The Tm:YAG ceramic slab is end-pumped by a laser diode with central wavelength 792nm. At room temperature, the maximum continuous-wave output power is 4.5 W, and the sloping efficiency is obtained to be 20.5%. The laser spectrum of the Tm: YAG ceramic is centered at 2015 nm.

  8. Ceramic Replaces Metal In High Performance Optomechanical Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Peter; Fox, Robert L.; Sandford, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    Recently developed ceramic materials and fabrication techniques integrated by Langley Research Center workers to produce superior optomechanical structures for spacecraft and aircraft instrumentation. Basic features of these novel supports, such as dimensional stability, low cost, and ease of fabrication, also make them ideal for many commerical optical systems as well. Ceramic supports for optical components and benches offer important advantages over usual metal parts. Ceramic materials expand and contract only slightly with changes in temperature. Moreover, they are relatively inexpensive and lightweight.

  9. The stability mechanisms of an injectable calcium phosphate ceramic suspension.

    OpenAIRE

    Fatimi, Ahmed; Tassin, Jean-François; Axelos, Monique,; Weiss, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    International audience Calcium phosphate ceramics are widely used as bone substitutes in dentistry and orthopedic applications. For minimally invasive surgery an injectable calcium phosphate ceramic suspension (ICPCS) was developed. It consists in a biopolymer (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose: HPMC) as matrix and bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics (biphasic calcium phosphate: BCP) as fillers. The stability of the suspension is essential to this generation of "ready to use" injectable biomat...

  10. Slip casting nano-particle powders for making transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Soules, Thomas F.; Landingham, Richard Lee; Hollingsworth, Joel P.

    2011-04-12

    A method of making a transparent ceramic including the steps of providing nano-ceramic powders in a processed or unprocessed form, mixing the powders with de-ionized water, the step of mixing the powders with de-ionized water producing a slurry, sonifing the slurry to completely wet the powder and suspend the powder in the de-ionized water, separating very fine particles from the slurry, molding the slurry, and curing the slurry to produce the transparent ceramic.

  11. Plasma-Spraying Ceramics Onto Smooth Metallic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Rouge, Carl J.; Leissler, George

    1992-01-01

    In fabrication process, plasma-sprayed ceramic coats bonded strongly to smooth metallic surfaces. Principal use of such coats in protecting metal parts in hot-gas paths of advanced gas turbine engines. Process consists of application of initial thin layer of ceramic on smooth surface by low-pressure-plasma spraying followed by application of layer of conventional, low-thermal-conductivity atmospheric-pressure plasma-sprayed ceramic.

  12. Triboemission From Ceramics: Charge Intensity and Energy Distribution Characterizations

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, Gustavo Jose

    2000-01-01

    Lubrication of ceramics is a difficult and not completely solved problem. Ceramics do not respond to conventional lubricants which are designed to function by a chemical reaction with the surface. There is, accordingly, increased interest in the development of lubrication alternatives for ceramics, and in understanding the tribochemical fundamentals by which new lubrication processes can be designed and controlled. In particular, the mechanism of tribopolymerization for some addition-type mon...

  13. Conductive nanocomposite ceramics as tribological and electrical contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    Oberg, A.; Kassman, A.; Andre, B.; Wiklund, U.; Lindquist, M; Lewin, E.; Jansson, U.; Högberg, Hans; Joelsson, T.; Ljungcrantz, H

    2010-01-01

    Conductive ceramics have widespread use in many industrial applications. One important application for such materials is electrical contact technology. Over the last few years, a new class of nanocomposite ceramic thin film materials has been developed with contact coatings as one key objective. This family of materials has proven to combine the favorable contact properties of metals, such as low electrical and thermal resistivity, and high ductility, with those of ceramics such as low fricti...

  14. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R.; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theor...

  15. In Vitro Mechanical Tests for Modern Dental Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    L. Sadighpour; F. Geramipanah; B. Raeesi

    2006-01-01

    The fracture resistance of all-ceramic restorations is one of the major concerns in clinical applications of these materials. Before initiating a time-consuming and costly clinical investigation, an in vitro study can help to estimate the in vivo usability of a new dental material. Mechanical properties of all-ceramic materials are frequently evaluated to predict their clinical performance. Since the test methods have influences on the obtained results and mechanical behavior of ceramic mater...

  16. Analysis of Material Removal in Alumina Ceramic Honing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The removal mechanism is of importance to the grinding of hard and brittle ceramic materials. It is more suitable to analyze the material removal during ceramics honing processes by means of indention fracture approach. There are two honing characteristics different from grinding, the honing incidental tensile stresses and the crosshatch pattern. The stresses may influence material removal of brittle ceramics with lower tensile strength. In addition, the criss-cross cutting pattern on a bore known as cros...

  17. Potential of Directionally Solidified Eutectic Ceramics for High Temperature Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Parlier, M.; Valle, R.; Perrière, L.; Lartigue-Korinek, S.; Mazerolles, L.

    2011-01-01

    Directionally solidified eutectic (DSE) ceramics add new potentialities to the advantages of sintered ceramics: a higher strength, almost constant, up to temperatures close to the melting point and a better creep resistance. The microstructure of melt-growth composites (MGC) of ceramic oxides consists in three-dimensional and continuous interconnected networks of single-crystal eutectic phases. After solidification of binary eutectics, the eutectic phases are alumina and either a perovskite o...

  18. Investigation of medieval ceramics from Ras by physicochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Zindović Nataša D.; Damjanović Ljiljana S.; Holclajtner-Antunović Ivanka D.; Mioč Ubavka B.; Bajuk-Bogdanović Danica

    2008-01-01

    Although early medieval Serbian ceramic is well described by the archeologists and historians, knowledge of the Balkan ceramic production is still limited. Archaeometric study of ceramics provenance, technology of preparation and used pigments as well as influence of neighboring countries and specific characteristics of different workshops has never been performed so far. The detailed knowledge of the micro-chemical and micro-structural nature of an archaeological artifact is critical in find...

  19. Mapping ceramics research and its evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Deville, Sylvain; Stevenson, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    We show here how a simple data mining of bibliographic records can be used to follow and help understand the evolution of a research domain, at a level that cannot be captured by reading individual papers in a field of this size. We illustrate the approach by investigating 43 years of research on ceramic materials, covered by 253k bibliographic records. The patterns of keywords used reveal the trends and the evolution of research ideas and priorities within the field. Simple, interactive tool...

  20. Alkaline activation of ceramic waste materials

    OpenAIRE

    REIG CERDÁ, LUCÍA; Tashima, M. M.; Soriano, L.; Borrachero, M. V.; Monzó, J.; Payá, J.

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic materials represent around 45 % of construction and demolition waste, and originate not only from the building process, but also as rejected bricks and tiles from industry. Despite the fact that these wastes are mostly used as road sub-base or construction backfill materials, they can also be employed as supplementary cementitious materials, or even as raw material for alkali-activated binders This research aimed to investigate the properties and microstructure of alkali-activated cem...

  1. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Plainfield, IL); Kobylinski, Thaddeus P. (Prospect, PA); Morissette, Sherry L. (Las Cruces, NM); Pei, Shiyou (Naperville, IL)

    1998-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions and their uses are described. Mixed metal oxide compositions of the invention have stratified crystalline structure identifiable by means of powder X-ray diffraction patterns. In the form of dense ceramic membranes, the present compositions demonstrate an ability to separate oxygen selectively from a gaseous mixture containing oxygen and one or more other volatile components by means of ionic conductivities.

  2. Development of mica glass-ceramic glazes

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Maximina; Rincón López, Jesús María; Acosta, Anselmo

    2004-01-01

    The effect of iron content on crystallization of a mica glaze as coating for fast firing stoneware substrates has been investi¬gated. Measurements by differential thermal analysis (DTA) combined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have shown the development of preferential crystal orientation in the mica glass-ceramic glaze. By com¬parison with amorphous and partly crystalline glazes, an enhancement of the mechanical properties of coatings with aligned and inte...

  3. Regenerative ceramic burner has highest efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gettings, M.

    1986-01-01

    Regenerative ceramic burners consisting of a double gas/air burner and utilising waste heat which is stored via regenerators are described. The system is capable of operating at 1400/sup 0/C, it removes about 85-90% of energy from hot waste gases and exhibits energy savings of 40-60% over cold nozzle mix burners and 20-25% over recuperative burners. (UK).

  4. Co-extrusion of piezoelectric ceramic fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Michen, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The present work successfully developed a methodology for fabricating lead zirconate titanate [PZT] thin solid- and hollow-fibres by the thermoplastic co-extrusion process. The whole process chain, that includes: a) compounding, involving the mixing of ceramic powder with a thermoplastic binder, b) rheological characterizations, c) preform composite fabrication followed by co-extrusion, d) debinding and, finally, e) sintering of the body to near full density, is systematical...

  5. Proton conducting ceramics in membrane separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Kyle S; Korinko, Paul S; Fox, Elise B; Chen, Frank

    2015-04-14

    Perovskite materials of the general formula SrCeO.sub.3 and BaCeO.sub.3 are provided having improved conductivity while maintaining an original ratio of chemical constituents, by altering the microstructure of the material. A process of making Pervoskite materials is also provided in which wet chemical techniques are used to fabricate nanocrystalline ceramic materials which have improved grain size and allow lower temperature densification than is obtainable with conventional solid-state reaction processing.

  6. Sem analysis zirconia-ceramic adhesion interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARDELLI, P.; VERTUCCI, V.; MONTANI, M.; ARCURI, C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives Modern dentistry increasingly tends to use materials aesthetically acceptable and biomimetic. Among these are zirconia and ceramics for several years, a combination that now has becoming synonym of aesthetic; however, what could be the real link between these two materials and especially its nature, remains a controversial topic debated in the literature. The aim of our study was to “underline” the type of bonding that could exist between these materials. Materials and methods To investigate the nature of this bond we used a SEM microscopy (Zeiss SUPRA 25). Different bilaminar specimens: “white” zirconia Zircodent® and ceramic “Noritake®”, after being tested with loading test in bending (three-point-bending) and FEM analysis, were analyzed by SEM. Fragments’ analysis in closeness of the fracture’s point has allowed us to be able to “see” if at large magnifications between these two materials, and without the use of linear, could exist a lasting bond and the possible type of failure that could incur. Results From our analysis of the specimens’ fragments analyzed after test Equipment, it is difficult to highlight a clear margin and no-adhesion zones between the two materials, although the analysis involving fragments adjacent to the fracture that has taken place at the time of Mechanical test Equipment. Conclusions According to our analysis and with all the clarification of the case, we can assume that you can obtain a long and lasting bond between the zirconia and ceramics. Agree to the data present in the literature, we can say that the type of bond varies according to the type of specimens and of course also the type of failure. In samples where the superstructure envelops the ceramic framework Zirconium we are in the presence of a cohesive failure, otherwise in a presence of adhesive failure. PMID:27555905

  7. Optimization of ceramic strength using elastic gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu; Ma, Li

    2009-01-01

    We present a new concept for strengthening ceamics by utilizing a graded structure with a low elastic modulus at both top and bottom surfaces sandwiching a high-modulus interior. Closed-form equations have been developed for stress analysis of simply supported graded sandwich beams subject to transverse center loads. Theory predicts that suitable modulus gradients at the ceramic surface can effectively reduce and spread the maximum bending stress from the surface into the interior. The magnit...

  8. Stereolithography of SiOC Ceramic Microcomponents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Erika; Cattaldo, Marco; Franchin, Giorgia; Schwentenwein, Martin; Homa, Johannes; Brusatin, Giovanna; Colombo, Paolo

    2016-01-13

    The first example of the fabrication of complex 3D polymer-derived-ceramic structures is presented with micrometer-scale features by a 3D additive manufacturing (AM) technology, starting with a photosensitive preceramic precursor. Dense and crack-free silicon-oxycarbide-based microparts with features down to 200 μm are obtained after pyrolysis at 1000 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere. PMID:26545292

  9. Polymer-Ceramic Bionanocomposites for Dental Application

    OpenAIRE

    Jung-Hwan Lee; Hae-Won Kim; Seog-Jin Seo

    2016-01-01

    Multiphasic bionanocomposites have been highlighted in the biotechnology field since they have offered mechanical flexibility during operation. This interest has been increased mainly through polymer/ceramic/metal manipulation techniques and modifications in formulation. Recently, a number of studies on bionanocomposites have been examined due to their favorable mechanical properties and cellular activities when compared to the neat polymers or polymer blends. This paper critically reviews re...

  10. Metal ceramic fixed partial denture: fracture resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Piloto, P. A. G.; Alves, Ana; Correia, A.; Campos, J.C. Reis; Fernandes, J.C. Sampaio; Vaz, M.A.P.; Viriato, Nuno

    2010-01-01

    Partially encased beam is a steel-concrete composite structure, made-up with a hot rolled profile and filled with concrete between flanges. Such structural element improves load-bearing capacity at elevated temperatures. Metal ceramic Fixed Partial Dentures (FPD) are suitable to increase fracture resistance presenting higher clinical longevity. This type of prosthesis is mainly used when a great number of teeth replacements are needed. The FPD under analysis is defined by a metallic infra...

  11. Joining of ultra-high temperature ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestroni, Laura; Sciti, Diletta; Esposito, Laura; Glaeser, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, ultra-high temperature ceramics raised renewed interest after the first studies in the 60's. Thanks to their high melting point, superior to any group of materials, and to their set of interesting physical and engineering properties, they find application in aerospace industry, propulsion field, as cladding materials in generation IV nuclear reactors and solar absorbers in novel HT CSP systems. Recent efforts were devoted to the achievement of high strength and toughness m...

  12. Literature Review of Polymer Derived Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Reuben James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs), also known as preceramic polymers, are valuable coating agents that are used to produce surface barriers on substrates such as stainless steel. These barriers protect against a multitude of environmental threats, and have been used since their research and development in 19772. This paper seeks to review and demonstrate the remarkable properties and versatility that PDCs have to offer, while also giving a brief overview of the processing techniques used today.

  13. Fluorine 18 in tritium generator ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present time, the ceramic materials generators of tritium are very interesting mainly by the necessity of to found an adequate product for its application as fusion reactor shielding. The important element that must contain the ceramic material is the lithium and especially the isotope with mass=6. The tritium in these materials is generated by neutron irradiation, however, when the ceramic material contains oxygen, then is generated too fluorine 18 by the action of energetic atoms of tritium in recoil on the 16 O, as it is showed in the next reactions: 1) 6 Li (n, α) 3 H ; 2) 16 O(3 H, n) 18 F . In the present work was studied the LiAlO2 and the Li2O. The first was prepared in the laboratory and the second was used such as it is commercially expended. In particular the interest of this work is to study the chemical behavior of fluorine-18, since if it would be mixed with tritium it could be contaminate the fusion reactor fuel. The ceramic materials were irradiated with neutrons and also the chemical form of fluorine-18 produced was studied. It was determined the amount of fluorine-18 liberated by the irradiated materials when they were submitted to extraction with helium currents and argon-hydrogen mixtures and also it was investigated the possibility about the fluorine-18 was volatilized then it was mixed so with the tritium. Finally it was founded that the liberated amount of fluorine-18 depends widely of the experimental conditions, such as the temperature and the hydrogen amount in the mixture of dragging gas. (Author)

  14. Laser Micromachining of Glass, Silicon, and Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    L. Rihakova; Chmelickova, H.

    2015-01-01

    A brief review is focused on laser micromachining of materials. Micromachining of materials is highly widespread method used in many industries, including semiconductors, electronic, medical, and automotive industries, communication, and aerospace. This method is a promising tool for material processing with micron and submicron resolution. In this paper micromachining of glass, silicon, and ceramics is considered. Interaction of these materials with laser radiation and recent research held o...

  15. Stereolithography of SiOC Ceramic Microcomponents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Erika; Cattaldo, Marco; Franchin, Giorgia; Schwentenwein, Martin; Homa, Johannes; Brusatin, Giovanna; Colombo, Paolo

    2016-01-13

    The first example of the fabrication of complex 3D polymer-derived-ceramic structures is presented with micrometer-scale features by a 3D additive manufacturing (AM) technology, starting with a photosensitive preceramic precursor. Dense and crack-free silicon-oxycarbide-based microparts with features down to 200 μm are obtained after pyrolysis at 1000 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere.

  16. Uses of Advanced Ceramic Composites in the Thermal Protection Systems of Future Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Current ceramic composites being developed and characterized for use in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of future space vehicles are reviewed. The composites discussed include new tough, low density ceramic insulation's, both rigid and flexible; ultra-high temperature ceramic composites; nano-ceramics; as well as new hybrid ceramic/metallic and ceramic/organic systems. Application and advantage of these new composites to the thermal protection systems of future reusable access to space vehicles and small spacecraft is reviewed.

  17. The radiolysis of lithium oxide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiliks, J.; Supe, A.; Kizane, G.; Tiliks, J. Jr. [Latvia Univ., Riga (Latvia). Dept. of Chemistry; Grishmanov, V.; Tanaka, S.

    1998-03-01

    The radiolysis of Li{sub 2}O ceramics exposed to accelerated electrons (5 MeV) at 380 K was studied in the range of high absorbed doses up to 250 MGy. The formation of radiation defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) was demonstrated to occur simultaneously in the regions of (1) the regular crystalline lattice and (2) an enhanced content of the intrinsic defects and impurities. The production of the electronic RD and RP is more efficient in the region of the defected lattice than that at the site of the regular crystalline lattice. However, the stability of RD and RP formed in the region of the intrinsic defects is far less than those produced at the crystalline lattice, since most of the first mentioned RD and RP disappears with irradiation dose due to the radiation stimulated recombination. By this means the enhanced quantity of RD and RP is localized in the Li{sub 2}O ceramics irradiated to absorbed dose of 40-50 MGy, and hence this can influence the tritium release parameters. As soon as the intrinsic defects have been consumed in the production of RD and RP and the recombination of unstable electronic RD and RP takes place (at dose of {approx}100 MGy), the radiolysis of Li{sub 2}O ceramics occurs only at the crystalline lattice. Furthermore, the concentration of RD and RP increases monotonically and tends to the steady-state level. (author)

  18. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls (United States); Murphy, W.M. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.

  19. Ceramic and glass radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Readey, D.W.; Cooley, C.R. (comps.)

    1977-01-01

    This report contains 14 individual presentations and 6 group reports on the subject of glass and polycrystalline ceramic radioactive waste forms. It was the general consensus that the information available on glass as a waste form provided a good basis for planning on the use of glass as an initial waste form, that crystalline ceramic forms could also be good waste forms if much more development work were completed, and that prediction of the chemical and physical stability of the waste form far into the future would be much improved if the basic synergistic effects of low temperature, radiation and long times were better understood. Continuing development of the polycrystalline ceramic forms was recommended. It was concluded that the leach rate of radioactive species from the waste form is an important criterion for evaluating its suitability, particularly for the time period before solidified waste is permanently placed in the geologic isolation of a Federal repository. Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the individual papers; the remaining two were previously abstracted.

  20. Glass ceramic toughened with tetragonal zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Keith D.; Michalske, Terry A.

    1986-01-01

    A phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic and a process for making it are disclosed. A mixture of particulate network-forming oxide, network-modifying oxide, and zirconium oxide is heated to yield a homogeneous melt, and this melt is then heat-treated to precipitate an appreciable quantity of tetragonal zirconia, which is retained at ambient temperature to form a phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic. Nucleating agents and stabilizing agents may be added to the mixture to facilitate processing and improve the ceramic's properties. Preferably, the mixture is first melted at a temperature from 1200.degree. to 1700.degree. C. and is then heat-treated at a temperature within the range of 800.degree. to 1200.degree. C. in order to precipitate tetragonal ZrO.sub.2. The composition, as well as the length and temperature of the heat-treatment, must be carefully controlled to prevent solution of the precipitated tetragonal zirconia and subsequent conversion to the monoclinic phase.

  1. FOD Simulation for Ceramic Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiro; Li, Yinsheng

    Foreign object impact damage is a serious problem for ceramic gas turbines. In this paper, a series of finite element analyses with an elastic assumption was made to estimate the plausible damage behavior of axial and radial ceramic blades. Foreign objects were assumed to impact the leading part of the blade suction surface. The present analysis showed that the stress peaking process is strongly influenced by the interaction of various stress waves, leading to structural damage. The locations of the peak principal tensile stress (peak stress) in the axial blade corresponded well with the damaged parts of the blade observed experimentally. The maximum peak stress appeared in the suction surface and the averaged peak stress value in this surface was roughly double that in the pressure surface. Unlike the axial blade, the radial blade reached maximum peak stress in the pressure surface. The value was much larger than the initial impact stress due to the wave interactions. For the effect of the rotation, centrifugal force did not change the basic distribution of peak stresses, but it caused additional stress peaks near the hub in the pressure surface. Moreover, the centrifugal force caused appreciable differences in the averaged peak stresses in the suction and the pressure surfaces. The present finite element analysis with elastic assumption seems useful for understanding structural fracture behavior, when designing ceramic blades.

  2. Using rice straw to manufacture ceramic bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunov German Ivanovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the co-authors offer their advanced and efficient methodologies for the recycling of the rice straw, as well as the novel approaches to the ceramic brick quality improvement through the application of the rice straw as the combustible additive and through the formation of amorphous silica in the course of the rice straw combustion. The co-authors provide characteristics of the raw materials, production techniques used to manufacture ceramic bricks, and their basic properties in the article. The co-authors describe the simulated process of formation of amorphous silica. The process in question has two independent steps (or options: 1 rice straw combustion and ash formation outside the oven (in the oxidizing medium, and further application of ash as the additive in the process of burning clay mixtures; 2 adding pre-treated rice straw as the combustible additive into the clay mixture, and its further burning in compliance with the pre-set temperature mode. The findings have proven that the most rational pre-requisite of the rice straw application in the manufacturing of ceramic bricks consists in feeding milled straw into the clay mixture to be followed by molding, drying and burning. Brick samples are highly porous, and they also demonstrate sufficient compressive strength. The co-authors have also identified optimal values of rice straw and ash content in the mixtures under research.

  3. Adhesion in ceramics and magnetic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1989-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a metal or a polymeric material such as a magnetic medium, strong bonds form between the materials. For ceramic-to-metal contacts, adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the ductility of the metals. Hardness of metals plays a much more important role in adhesion and friction than does the surface energy of metals. Adhesion, friction, surface energy, and hardness of a metal are all related to its Young's modulus and shear modulus, which have a marked dependence on the electron configuration of the metal. An increase in shear modulus results in a decrease in area of contact that is greater than the corresponding increase in surface energy (the fond energy) with shear modulus. Consequently, the adhesion and friction decrease with increasing shear modulus. For ceramics in contact with polymeric magnetic tapes, environment is extremely important. For example, a nitrogen environment reduces adhesion and friction when ferrite contacts polymeric tape, whereas a vacuum environment strengthens the ferrite-to-tape adhesion and increases friction. Adhesion and friction are strongly dependent on the particle loading of the tape. An increase in magnetic particle concentration increases the complex modulus of the tape, and a lower real area of contact and lower friction result.

  4. A hybrid phenomenological model for ferroelectroelastic ceramics. Part II: Morphotropic PZT ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, S.; Neumeister, P.; Balke, H.

    2016-10-01

    In this part II of a two part series, the rate-independent hybrid phenomenological constitutive model introduced in part I is modified to account for the material behavior of morphotropic lead zirconate titanate ceramics (PZT ceramics). The modifications are based on a discussion of the available literature results regarding the micro-structure of these materials. In particular, a monoclinic phase and a highly simplified representation of the hierarchical structure of micro-domains and nano-domains observed experimentally are incorporated into the model. It is shown that experimental data for the commercially available morphotropic PZT material PIC151 (PI Ceramic GmbH, Lederhose, Germany) can be reproduced and predicted based on the modified hybrid model.

  5. Brief Discussion of Artistic Development and Innovation of Ceramics Fresco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI; Yan

    2015-01-01

    Along with incessant social development and heightened sense of science,technology,humanities,health,an d environmental friendliness,the pluralistic art ideology and expression form associated with ceramics fresco make fresco works warmly received.To satisfy people’s constant need for ambient decoration quality,a new innovation and development mechanism has to be created by breaking through the restriction of tradition and naturally the development of ceramics fresco is a must.Against a background of ceramics,this paper describes the development history of ceramics fresco art,summarizes the social backdrop and works characteristics of each development period,and points out different development processes in terms of spatial ambience where material and craft technology choice and innovation are concerned.Ceramics fresco is a qualified ambassador for the traditional culture of the Chinese,because traditional Chinese ceramics art has a brilliant history and a profound root.The peculiar textural beauty of ceramics fresco,particularly the rich and colorful texture,ample details,and diversified ornament techniques offered by modern ceramics fresco are the reason why it is so warmly received.While discussing briefly the artistic development and innovation of ceramics fresco,this paper also summarizes new development potentials in environment and technology.

  6. Preparation and Chiral Selectivity of BSA-Modified Ceramic Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Lian SU; Rong Ji DAI; Bin TONG; Yu Lin DENG

    2006-01-01

    An affinity-transport system, containing porous ceramic membranes bound with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used for chiral separation of racemic tryptophan. The preparation of BSA modified ceramic membrane included three steps. Firstly, the membrane was modified with amino group using silanization with an amino silane. Secondly, the amino group modified membrane was bound with aldehyde group using gluteraldehyde. Finally, BSA was covalently bound on the surface of the ceramic membrane. Efficient separation of racemic tryptophan was carried out by performing permeation cell experiments, with BSA modified, porous ceramic membranes.

  7. All-ceramic systems: laboratory and clinical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guess, Petra C; Schultheis, Stefan; Bonfante, Estevam A; Coelho, Paulo G; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A

    2011-04-01

    Several all-ceramic systems have been developed in dentistry to meet the increased expectations of patients and dentists for highly aesthetic, biocompatible, and long-lasting restorations. However, early bulk fractures or chippings have led the research community to investigate the mechanical performance of the all-ceramic systems. This overview explores the current knowledge of monolithic and bilayer dental all-ceramic systems, addressing composition and processing mechanisms, laboratory and clinical performance, and possible future trends for all-ceramic materials. PMID:21473997

  8. Brief Discussion of Artistic Development and Innovation of Ceramics Fresco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Yan

    2015-01-01

    Along with incessant social development and heightened sense of science,technology,humanities,health,an d environmental friendliness,the pluralistic art ideology and expression form associated with ceramics fresco make fresco works warmly received.To satisfy people's constant need for ambient decoration quality,a new innovation and development mechanism has to be created by breaking through the restriction of tradition and naturally the development of ceramics fresco is a must.Against a background of ceramics,this paper describes the development history of ceramics fresco art,summarizes the social backdrop and works characteristics of each development period,and points out different development processes in terms of spatial ambience where material and craft technology choice and innovation are concerned.Ceramics fresco is a qualified ambassador for the traditional culture of the Chinese,because traditional Chinese ceramics art has a brilliant history and a profound root.The peculiar textural beauty of ceramics fresco,particularly the rich and colorful texture,ample details,and diversified ornament techniques offered by modern ceramics fresco are the reason why it is so warmly received.While discussing briefly the artistic development and innovation of ceramics fresco,this paper also summarizes new development potentials in environment and technology.

  9. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, October 1992--March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Although progress has been made in developing reliable structural ceramics, further work is needed to reduce cost. The work described in this report is organized according to the following work breakdown structure project elements: Materials and processing (monolithics [Si nitride, carbide], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining, cost effective ceramic machining), materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts), data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, nondestructive evaluation development), and technology transfer.

  10. Process for strengthening aluminum based ceramics and material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    1998-12-01

    A process for strengthening aluminum based ceramics is provided. A gaseous atmosphere consisting essentially of silicon monoxide gas is formed by exposing a source of silicon to an atmosphere consisting essentially of hydrogen and a sufficient amount of water vapor. The aluminum based ceramic is exposed to the gaseous silicon monoxide atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to produce a continuous, stable silicon-containing film on the surface of the aluminum based ceramic that increases the strength of the ceramic.

  11. Functionally Graded Materials using Plasma Spray with Nano Structured Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, nano structured FGM was fabricated using DC plasma spray technique. Nano structured and micro structured powder were used as the feeding powder with steel substrate. The spray parameters was optimized and characterisation of nano-ceramic FGM and micro-ceramic FGM were done using bending test and micro-hardness test. Experimental results have shown that the nano-structured FGM exhibit 20% improvement flexure strength and 10% in hardness. A comparison was made between sintered micro ceramic tile and nano ceramic FGM using simple drop test method.

  12. Gas-pressure forming of superplastic ceramic sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieh, T.G.; Wadsworth, J.

    1993-06-24

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics are given. These include yttria stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP) a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid YTZP/C103 (ceramic-metal) structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  13. Microfractures in metal-ceramic and all-ceramic implant-supported fixed dental prostheses caused by superstructure fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias; Graef, Friedrich; Wichmann, Manfred; Beck, Nina

    2012-01-01

    The effect of ceramic veneering on the passivity of fit of cast metal and CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia ceramic implant-supported three-unit cement-retained restorations was investigated, as well as the effect of misfit stress on the marginal integrity of ceramic veneers. Superstructures were fabricated using cast metal or by CAD/CAM milling of presintered or HIP zirconia ceramic (n=10). Before and after veneering, strain gages were used to measure in vitro the strain developed in all the restorations as a result of superstructure fixation. Fluorescent penetrant method was used to detect microcracks developed in ceramic veneers. Cast frameworks showed significantly higher strain values than CAD/CAM frameworks (p=0.000). Veneering significantly increased strain development in all CAD/CAM frameworks (p=0.000). Compared to zirconia ceramic restorations, significantly more microcracks were observed in cast restorations (p=0.000) both before and after superstructure fixation. PMID:22673463

  14. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ming, E-mail: mtang@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, Gordon [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Crum, Jarrod; Turo, Laura; Riley, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  15. Discussion on Confucian culture on modern ceramic art innovation%Discussion on Confucian culture on modern ceramic art innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛晓东

    2012-01-01

    Chinese contemporary ceramic art influenced by abstract expressionism and the influence of post- modernism, began to abandon the traditional and the pursuit of emotional catharsis, Undeniably, this approach has accelerated the modern ceramic art in China's development process, but the traditional culture is worthy of a lot of Chinese artists to study and research. In view of this, this paper mainly discusses the influence of Confucianism on modern ceramic art.

  16. Comparison of Fracture Toughness of All-Ceramic and Metal–Ceramic Cement Retained Implant Crowns: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, S.; Chowdhary, R.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the fracture toughness of cement-retained implant-supported metal–ceramic molar crown with that of all-ceramic crowns, fabricated using IPS Empress 2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia copings. An dental implant and abutment was embedded in a clear polymethyl methacrylate model. A wax pattern reproducing the anatomy and dimension of a mandibular molar was made using inlay wax. Copings were made from the manufacturers guidelines for zirconia, metal ceramic and empress crown, in total o...

  17. Interfacial adhesion of dental ceramic-resin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro

    The clinical success of resin bonding procedures for indirect ceramic restorations and ceramic repairs depends on the quality and durability of the bond between the ceramic and the resin. The quality of this bond will depend upon the bonding mechanisms that are controlled in part by the surface treatment that promotes micromechanical and/or chemical bonding to the substrate. The objective of this study is to correlate interfacial toughness (K A) with fracture surface morphological parameters of the dental ceramic-resin systems as a function of ceramic surface treatment. The analytical procedures focused on characterizing the microstructure and fracture properties of EmpressRTM ceramics (a leucite-based core ceramic, two lithia disilicate-based core ceramics, and a glass veneer) and determining the ceramic-resin adhesion zone bond strength characteristics. Microstructure and composition are controlling factors in the development of micromechanical retention produced by etching. Silane treated ceramics negated the effect of surface roughening produced by etching, inducing lower surface energy of the ceramic and, reduced bonding effectiveness. There was a positive correlation between WA, tensile bond strength (a), and KA, i.e., higher mean WA value, and higher mean sigma and KA values. This study suggests that (1) the sigma and KA values for ceramic bonded to resin are affected by the ceramic microstructure and the ceramic surface treatments; (2) the definition of the adhesion zone is essential to classify the modes of failure, which should be an integral component of all failure analyses; (3) the microtensile test may be preferable to conventional shear or flexural tests as an indicator of composite-ceramic bond quality; and (4) careful microscopic analysis of fracture surfaces and an x-ray dot map can produce a more consistent and complete description of the fracture process and interpretation of the modes of failure. The mode of failure and fractographic analyses

  18. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  19. Preparation of high performance ceramic tiles using waste tile granules and ceramic polishing powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gong-xun; SU Da-gen

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative approach to reusing waste tile granules (TG) and ceramic polishing powder (PP) to produce high performance ceramic tiles. We studied formulations each with a TG mass fraction of 25.0% and a different PP mass fraction between 1.0% and 7.0%. The formulations included a small amount of borax additive of a mass fracton between 0.2%and 1.2%. The effects of these industrial by-products on compressive strength, water absorption and microstructure of the new ceramic tiles were investigated. The results indicate that the compressive strength decreases and water absorption increases when TG with a mass fraction of 25.0% are added. Improvement of the compressive strength may be achieved when TG (up to 25.0%)and PP (up to 2.0%) are both used at the same time. In particular, the compressive strength improvement can be maximized and water absorption reduced when a borax additive of up to 0.5% is used as a flux. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that a certain amount of fine PP granules and a high content of fluxing oxides from borax avail the formation of glassy phase that fills up the pores in the new ceramic tiles, resulting in a dense product with high compressive strength and low water absorption.

  20. Innovation and Change: Great Ceramics from the Ceramics Research Center, Arizona State University Art Museum Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    Clay is one of the oldest materials known to humanity and has been used for utilitarian purposes and creative expression since prehistoric times. As civilizations evolved, ceramic materials, techniques, purposes and design all became more sophisticated and expressive. With the addition of different minerals and firing methods, clay was used to…

  1. [Long-term clinical results with Procera AllCeram full-ceramic crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Martha L; Hagmann, Edgar; Marinello, Carlo P; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical study was to investigate the long-term survival rate of Procera AllCeram full-ceramic crowns, which were fabricated with aluminiumoxide cores. In 50 patients, 155 Procera crowns with a conventional or reduced core (porcelain collar) were placed on natural abutment teeth. 78% of this group (39 patients with 135 crowns) were examined between May and August 2005 according to the modified USPHS-Criteria. These crowns had been in place for a period of one to 92 months (mean 55 months). Almost half of the crowns were located in the molar region, while 28% were premolars and 24% anterior crowns. Due to one crown fracture the cumulative survival rate was 99% after five and seven years. The clinical success was achieved irrespective of the tooth position, tooth vitality, the preparation margin and the cementum medium used (composite resin or glasionomer cement). In addition, survival was neither influenced by the core design with reduced or conventional margin nor by the core thickness, which measured regularly 0.6 mm in the majority of the specimens. Based on the present findings, it can be concluded that Procera AllCeram is a predictable technique for metal-free, esthetic full-ceramic crowns in the anterior and posterior region. PMID:16989114

  2. Additive Manufacturing of SiC Based Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael Charles; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics and SiC fiber reinforcedSiC ceramic matrix composites (SiCSiC CMCs) offer high payoff as replacements for metals in turbine engine applications due to their lighter weight, higher temperature capability, and lower cooling requirements. Additive manufacturing approaches can offer game changing technologies for the quick and low cost fabrication of parts with much greater design freedom and geometric complexity. Four approaches for developing these materials are presented. The first two utilize low cost 3D printers. The first uses pre-ceramic pastes developed as feed materials which are converted to SiC after firing. The second uses wood containing filament to print a carbonaceous preform which is infiltrated with a pre-ceramic polymer and converted to SiC. The other two approaches pursue the AM of CMCs. The first is binder jet SiC powder processing in collaboration with rp+m (Rapid Prototyping+Manufacturing). Processing optimization was pursued through SiC powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of nanofibers into the powder bed. The second approach was laminated object manufacturing (LOM) in which fiber prepregs and laminates are cut to shape by a laser and stacked to form the desired part. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted on materials from all approaches with select approaches also characterized with XRD, TGA, and bend testing.

  3. NASA/CARES dual-use ceramic technology spinoff applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Lynn M.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has developed software that enables American industry to establish the reliability and life of ceramic structures in a wide variety of 21st Century applications. Designing ceramic components to survive at higher temperatures than the capability of most metals and in severe loading environments involves the disciplines of statistics and fracture mechanics. Successful application of advanced ceramics material properties and the use of a probabilistic brittle material design methodology. The NASA program, known as CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures), is a comprehensive general purpose design tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. The latest version of this software, CARESALIFE, is coupled to several commercially available finite element analysis programs (ANSYS, MSC/NASTRAN, ABAQUS, COSMOS/N4, MARC), resulting in an advanced integrated design tool which is adapted to the computing environment of the user. The NASA-developed CARES software has been successfully used by industrial, government, and academic organizations to design and optimize ceramic components for many demanding applications. Industrial sectors impacted by this program include aerospace, automotive, electronic, medical, and energy applications. Dual-use applications include engine components, graphite and ceramic high temperature valves, TV picture tubes, ceramic bearings, electronic chips, glass building panels, infrared windows, radiant heater tubes, heat exchangers, and artificial hips, knee caps, and teeth.

  4. Radiation treatment of the ceramic and polymer implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobeynikov, M. V.; Bryazgin, A. A.; Bezuglov, V. V.; Shtarklev, E. A.; Vlasov, A. Yu; Voronin, L. A.; Tkachenko, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    Implants are used in medical practice during decades. The ceramic implants are the new trend in medicine. The polymer implants are used for many years, and they are mainly sterilized by the radiation treatment. The article describes the new ceramic and polymer implants that were treated in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics.

  5. Dynamic strength of reaction-sintered boron carbide ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinykh, A. S.; Garkushin, G. V.; Razorenov, S. V.; Rumyantsev, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    The shock compression wave profiles in three modifications of boron carbide ceramic are studied in the compressive stress range 3-19 GPa. The Hugoniot elastic limit and the spall strength of the materials are determined. It is confirmed that the spall strength of high-hardness ceramic changes nonmonotonically with the compressive stress in a shock wave.

  6. Radiation effects in a model ceramic for nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.

    2007-04-01

    The safe immobilization of nuclear waste in geological repositories is one of the major scientific challenges facing humanity today. Crystalline ceramics hold the promise of locking up actinides from nuclear fuel and excess weapons plutonium in their structure thereby isolating them from the environment. This paper presents the atomistic details of radiation damage in a model ceramic, zircon.

  7. Radiation Effects in a Model Ceramic for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.

    2007-04-02

    The safe immobilization of nuclear waste in geological repositories is one of the major scientific challenges facing humanity today. Crystalline ceramics hold the promise of locking up actinides from nuclear fuel and excess weapons plutonium in their structure thereby isolating them from the environment. In this paper, we discuss the atomistic details of radiation damage in a model ceramic, zircon.

  8. Penetration dynamics of AP8 in thin ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadjieva, E.; Khoe, Y.S.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of thin ceramic tiles with AP8 (WC core, 7,62 mm) at 1000 m/s velocity has been studied experimentally and numerically. “Thin” ceramic tiles refers here to ratio of the tile thickness (t) to the projectile diameter, (d), t/d@ 1, as they are both in the same order. The method applied

  9. Analysis by neutron activation analysis a some ancient Dacian ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Olariu, A

    1999-01-01

    Ancient Dacian ceramics, from three different establishments from Romanian territory have been analyzed by neutron activation analysis. A series of elements has been determined: Ba, Eu, K, La, Mn, Na, Sc, Sm. Ba is the element that could be considered to differentiate relatively the three groups of ceramics.

  10. [The color of implants of aluminum oxide ceramics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, G

    1990-12-01

    Ceramic implants are manufactured from aluminium oxide ceramics (Al2O3) doped with magnesium oxide (MgO). The yellow or brown discoloration following gamma-sterilization does not constitute a material defect, but rather a property of the material. This chromic effect is explained in the following article. PMID:2078648

  11. Brazing zone structure at active brazing of alumina ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Nowadays one of the most effective methods of joining of oxide ceramics with other elements of construction is active brazing based on using of active metals (Ti, Zr), which increase reactivity of brazing alloy relative to ceramic element of a joining.

  12. Brazing zone structure at active brazing of alumina ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Demchuk; V.; A.; Kalinichenko; B.; B.

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays one of the most effective methods of joining of oxide ceramics with other elements of construction is active brazing based on using of active metals (Ti, Zr), which increase reactivity of brazing alloy relative to ceramic element of a joining.……

  13. Easy Fabrication of Dense Ceramic Membrane for Oxygen Separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A combined EDTA-citrate complexing method was developed for the easy preparation of mixed oxygen-ionic and electronic conducting dense ceramic membrane for oxygen separation.The new method takes the advantage of lower calcination temperature for phase formation, lower membrane sintering temperature and higher relative density over the standard ceramic method.

  14. Leaching of polyphase nuclear waste ceramics: microstructural and phase characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alumina-based ceramics are potential materials for storage of nuclear wastes. Static leach tests conducted on ceramic monoliths in deionized water, in simulated silicate, and in brine groundwaters, conforming to Materials Characterization Center standards and an accelerated, microscopic leach test, were used to identify the processes. Dissolution and formation of surface passivation layers are discussed. 40 refs

  15. Developing 300°C Ceramic Circuit Boards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A

    2015-02-15

    This paper covers the development of a geothermal ceramic circuit board technology using 3D traces in a machinable ceramic. Test results showing the circuit board to be operational to at least 550°C. Discussion on producing this type of board is outlined along with areas needing improvement.

  16. Basic research in crystalline and noncrystalline ceramic systems. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingery, W. D.; Coble, R. L.

    1968-04-01

    Various research subjects on ceramics have been investigated, including heat conduction, surface characteristics, diffusion in oxides, high-temperature kinetic processes, microstructure development, effects of microstructure on properties, structure and properties of noncrystalline ceramics, dissolution kinetics, and solid-vapor reactions. (DLC)

  17. An educational program on structural design with brittle /ceramic/ materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, J. I.

    1978-01-01

    The organization of a proposed ceramic structural materials program is described, and a suggested course sequence for college-level and graduate-level courses is presented. The course work on ceramics and brittle fracture are intended to lead to a brittle material design project and a brittle material design problem. Criteria for the selection of appropriate projects/problems are considered.

  18. Ballistic performance and microstructure of four armor ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadjieva, E.; Carton, E.P.

    2013-01-01

    The ballistic behavior of four different armor ceramic materials with thicknesses varying from 3 mm to 14 mm has been investigated. These are two types of alumina Al2O3 armor grades and two types of SiC armor grades produced by different armor ceramic producers. The ballistic study has been performe

  19. Stress Field Analyses of Functionally Gradient Ceramic Tool by FEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The cutting properties of the functionally gradient ceramic cutting tools relate closely to the gradient distribution. A cutting model of the functionally gradient ceramic tool is firstly designed in the present paper. The optimum of gradient distribution is obtained by way of the FEM analyses.

  20. Advanced ceramics in Brazil: actual stage and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of advanced ceramics in Brazil, the perspectives of the world and Brazilian markets, the raw materials, the equipments for industry and research, the human resources, and the disposable technology, are presented. The researches on advanced ceramics in Brazil initiated in the sixty decade, with the nuclear fuel development and production projets. (M.C.K.)

  1. RESEARCH ON MICROWAVE HUMIDITY TESTING OF CERAMIC PRODUCTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper analyses the principle of microwave humidity testing. According to the problems in the production procedure of ceramic products, a microwave humidity testing system is designed and analyzed for its advantages. Furthermore, the system has been applied to the production line that produces ceramic products and the testing results are also satisfying.

  2. State of the art: alumina ceramics for energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prominent ceramic raw materials and products manufacturers were surveyed to determine the state of the art for alumina ceramic fabrication. This survey emphasized current capabilities and limitations for fabrication of large, high-density, high-purity, complex shapes. Some directions are suggested for future needs and development

  3. Microelectrical Discharge Machining: A Suitable Process for Machining Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schubert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Today ceramics are used in many industrial applications, for example, in the biomedical field, for high-temperature components or for cutting tools. This is attributed to their excellent mechanical and physical properties, as low density, high strength, and hardness or chemical resistance. However, these specific mechanical properties lead to problems regarding the postprocessing of ceramics. In particular, cutting processes require expensive tools which cause high manufacturing costs to machine ceramics. Consequently, there is a demand for alternative machining processes. Microelectrical discharge machining (micro-EDM is a thermal abrasion process which is based on electrical discharges between a tool and a workpiece. The advantages of micro-EDM are more and more in focus for ceramic machining. These advantages include the process of being a noncontact technology, an independency of material brittleness and hardness, a low impact on the material, and the achievable microstructures. This paper presents the current state of investigations regarding micro-EDM of ceramics. Beside the process principle of EDM, the used procedures for machining ceramics and insulating ceramics are described. Furthermore several machining examples are presented to demonstrate the possibilities of the micro-EDM process with regard to the machining of ceramics.

  4. Design of LTCC-based Ceramic Structure for Chemical Microreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Belavic

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The design of ceramic chemical microreactor for the production of hydrogen needed in portable polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cells is presented. The microreactor was developed for the steam reforming of liquid fuels with water into hydrogen. The complex three-dimensional ceramic structure of the microreactor includes evaporator(s, mixer(s, reformer and combustor. Low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC technology was used to fabricate the ceramic structures with buried cavities and channels, and thick-film technology was used to make electrical heaters, temperature sensors and pressure sensors. The final 3D ceramic structure consists of 45 LTCC tapes. The dimensions of the structure are 75 × 41 × 9 mm3 and the weight is about 73 g.

  5. Micro Embossing of Ceramic Green Substrates for Micro Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, X -C; Maw, H P; Lu, C W; Lam, Y C

    2008-01-01

    Multilayered ceramic substrates with embedded micro patterns are becoming increasingly important, for example, in harsh environment electronics and microfluidic devices. Fabrication of these embedded micro patterns, such as micro channels, cavities and vias, is a challenge. This study focuses on the process of patterning micro features on ceramic green substrates using micro embossing. A ceramic green tape that possessed near-zero shrinkage in the x-y plane was used, six layers of which were laminated as the embossing substrate. The process parameters that impact on the pattern fidelity were investigated and optimized in this study. Micro features with line-width as small as several micrometers were formed on the ceramic green substrates. The dynamic thermo-mechanical analysis indicated that extending the holding time at certain temperature range would harden the green substrates with little effect on improving the embossing fidelity. Ceramic substrates with embossed micro patterns were obtain d after co-firi...

  6. Bone-inducing Activity of Biological Piezoelectric Ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To simulate the piezoelectric effect of nature bone, two kinds of biological piezoelectric composite ceramics consisted of hydroxyapatite ( HA ) and lithium sodium potassium riobate (LNK) ceramic of which the ratio of HA/ LNK was 1: 10 and 5:5( wt/ wt ) were prepared. Their piezoelectric property and growth of apatite crystal in the ceramics surface were investigated. With the increase of LNK amount, piezoelectric activity increased correspondingly. By immersing the poled piezoelectric ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 36.5 ℃ for 7,14, and 21 days, apatite crystal was formed on negatively charged surfaces. After 21 days immersion in SBF,the thickest apatite crystal on the negatively charged surfaces increased to 3.337μm. The novel biological piezoelectric ceramics show an excellent piezoelectric property and superior potential bioactivity.

  7. DC conductivity of silicon nitride based carbon-ceramic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Fényi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The silicon nitride ceramics are usually known as strongly refractory and enduring materials and have typical electrically insulating properties. If the reinforcing phase of ceramic composite (that is mainly put in the material to improve mechanical properties is a good electrical conductor, it is worth to investigate the composite in electrical aspect. In this work carbon nanotubes, black-carbon and graphite were added to the basic silicon nitride ceramic and the electrical conductivity of the prepared carbon-ceramic composites was determined. The conductivity of the ceramic composites with different type and concentration of the carbon additives was observed by applying four point DC resistance measurements. Insulator and conductor composites in a wide conductivity range can be produced depending on the type and quantity of the additives. The additive types as well as the sintering parameters have influence on the basic electrical properties of the conductor composites.

  8. A scanning electron microscopic investigation of ceramic orthodontic brackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic brackets were introduced to overcome the esthetic disadvantages of stainless steel brackets. The clinical impression of these brackets is very favorable. However, the sliding mechanics used in the Straightwire (A Company, San Diego, CA, USA) system appear to produce slower tooth movements with ceramic compared to stainless steel brackets. To determine whether this was due to any obvious mechanical problem in the bracket slot, Transcend (Unitek Corporation/3M, Monrovia, CA, USA) ceramic brackets were examined by a scanning electron microscope and compared to stainless steel brackets.Consistently, large surface defects were found in the ceramic bracket slots that were not present in the metal bracket slots. These irregularities could obviously hinder the sliding mechanics of the bracket slot-archwire system and create a greater demand on anchorage. Conversely, the fitting surface of the Transcend ceramic bracket showed extremely smooth surface characteristics, and it would seem advisable for the manufacturers to incorporate this surface within the bracket slot. (author)

  9. Experimental study on ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Dongsheng; Bu Xueqin; Sun Bing; Lin Guiping; Zhao Hongtao; Cai Yan; Fang Ling

    2016-01-01

    The ceramic membrane oxygen generation technology has advantages of high concentra-tion of produced oxygen and potential nuclear and biochemical protection capability. The present paper studies the ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation. Comparisons are made to have knowledge of the effects of two kinds of ceramic membrane separation technologies on oxygen generation, namely electricity driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (EDCMSOGT) and pressure driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (PDCMSOGT). Experiments were conducted under different temperatures, pressures of feed air and produced oxygen flow rates. On the basis of these experiments, the flow rate of feed air, electric power provided, oxygen recovery rate and concentration of produced oxygen are compared under each working condition. It is concluded that the EDCMSOGT is the oxygen generation means more suitable for onboard conditions.

  10. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinchcomb, W.W.; Reifsnider, K.L.; Dunyak, T.J. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics)

    1992-06-15

    The objective of the work reported herein is to develop an understanding of the mechanical behavior of advanced ceramic composites subjected to elevated temperature and dynamic (cyclic) loading, to develop a test system and test methods to obtain the properties and performance information required to design engineering components made from ceramic composite materials, and to provide critical and comprehensive evaluations of such materials to material synthesizers and developers to support and enhance progress in ceramic composite material development. The accomplishments of the investigation include the design, development, and demonstration of a high temperature, biaxial mechanical test facility for ceramic composite tubes and the development and validation of a performance simulation model (MRLife) for ceramic composites.

  11. Experimental study on ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Dongsheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ceramic membrane oxygen generation technology has advantages of high concentration of produced oxygen and potential nuclear and biochemical protection capability. The present paper studies the ceramic membrane technology for onboard oxygen generation. Comparisons are made to have knowledge of the effects of two kinds of ceramic membrane separation technologies on oxygen generation, namely electricity driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (EDCMSOGT and pressure driven ceramic membrane separation oxygen generation technology (PDCMSOGT. Experiments were conducted under different temperatures, pressures of feed air and produced oxygen flow rates. On the basis of these experiments, the flow rate of feed air, electric power provided, oxygen recovery rate and concentration of produced oxygen are compared under each working condition. It is concluded that the EDCMSOGT is the oxygen generation means more suitable for onboard conditions.

  12. Applications of the electron backscatter diffraction technique to ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblischka, M. R.; Koblischka-Veneva, A.

    2013-07-01

    A technique with a relatively high spatial resolution is required for an effective analysis of the microstructure of ceramic materials. The recently developed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique, which works within a scanning electron microscope, enables a spatially highly resolved study of crystallographic orientations while recording Kikuchi patterns on a user-defined grid. However, such an EBSD texture analysis was until now not often performed on ceramic materials - in contrary, the technique is widely employed in the analysis of metallic materials, including the investigation of various types of steels. The use of ceramics possesses a variety of problems for EBSD investigations like: (i) complicated crystal structure, (ii) difficult surface preparation, and (iii) problems arising from a low conductivity of the ceramic materials. Here, we discuss these problems and present solutions in order to obtain high-quality Kikuchi patterns from such ceramics.

  13. Sintering of zirconia ceramics using microwave and spark heating techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashutenko, A. S.; Frangulyan, T. S.; Ghyngazov, S. A.; Petrova, A. B.

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents the results of an complex study of structural and mechanical properties of zirconia ceramics sintered using different techniques. The samples were sintered via the conventional method of heating, in the field of microwave radiation and spark plasma. The experimental data indicates that a microwave field and spark plasma have a stimulating effect on zirconia ceramics sintering. In contrast to the microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering provides ceramics with improved properties at similar time-temperature annealing modes. Moreover, the properties of the ceramics under spark plasma sintering at T=1300 °C are similar to the properties of the ceramics sintered in a microwave field at T=1400 °C.

  14. Fundamental alloy design of oxide ceramics and their composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I.W.

    1992-01-01

    The main research was on microstructural development of oxide ceramics. Projects were completed and the publications given. Abstracts are given on: Reactive CeO[sub 2]powders by homogeneous precipitation, SiC whisker-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate composite, solute drag on grain boundary in ionic solids (space charge effect), in-situ alumina/aluminate platelet composites, exaggerated texture and grain growth of superplastic silicon nitride (SiAlON), hot extrusion of ceramics, control of grain boundary pinning in Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]/ZrO[sub 2] composites with Ce[sup 3+]/Ce[sup 4+] doping, superplastic forming of ceramic composites, computer simulation of final stage sintering (model, kinetics, microstructure, effect of initial pore size), development of superplastic structural ceramics, and superplastic flow of two-phase ceramics containing rigid inclusions (zirconia/mullite composites). A proposed research program is outlined: materials, solute drag, densification and coarsening, and grain boundary electrical behavior.

  15. Ceramic Nanocomposites from Tailor-Made Preceramic Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Mera

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present Review addresses current developments related to polymer-derived ceramic nanocomposites (PDC-NCs. Different classes of preceramic polymers are briefly introduced and their conversion into ceramic materials with adjustable phase compositions and microstructures is presented. Emphasis is set on discussing the intimate relationship between the chemistry and structural architecture of the precursor and the structural features and properties of the resulting ceramic nanocomposites. Various structural and functional properties of silicon-containing ceramic nanocomposites as well as different preparative strategies to achieve nano-scaled PDC-NC-based ordered structures are highlighted, based on selected ceramic nanocomposite systems. Furthermore, prospective applications of the PDC-NCs such as high-temperature stable materials for thermal protection systems, membranes for hot gas separation purposes, materials for heterogeneous catalysis, nano-confinement materials for hydrogen storage applications as well as anode materials for secondary ion batteries are introduced and discussed in detail.

  16. Assessment of damage in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokhlin, S.I.; Chu, Y.C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Welding Engineering; Baaklini, G.Y. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-07-01

    This paper addresses the application of ultrasonic methods to damage assessment in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites. It focuses on damage caused by thermal shock and oxidation at elevated temperatures. The damage-induced changes in elastic constant and elastic anisotropy are determined by measuring the velocities of ultrasonic waves in different propagation directions within the sample. Thermal shock damage measurement is performed in ceramic samples of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and aluminum oxide. Thermal shock treatment from different temperatures up to 1,000 C is applied to produce the microcracks. Both surface and bulk ultrasonic wave methods are used to correlate the change of elastic constants to microstructural degradation and to determine the change in elastic anisotropy induced by microcrack damage. Oxidation damage is studied in silicon carbide fiber/reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SCS-6/RBSN) composites. The oxidation is done by exposing the samples in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1,400 C, for 100 hours. Significant changes of ultrasonic velocities were observed for composites before and after oxidation. The elastic constants of the composites were determined from the measured velocity data. The Young`s modulus in the fiber direction as obtained from ultrasonic measurements decreases significantly at 600 C but retains its original value at temperatures above 1,200 C. This agrees well with the results of destructive tests by other authors. The transverse longitudinal and shear moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continually until 1,200 C. The results of this work show that the damage-induced anisotropy in both ceramics and ceramic matrix composites can be determined successfully by ultrasonic methods. This suggests the possibility of assessing damage severity using ultrasonic techniques.

  17. Assessment of damage in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Y.C.; Baaklini, G.Y.; Rokhlin, S.I.

    1993-05-01

    This paper addresses the application of ultrasonic sensing to damage assessment in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites. It focuses on damage caused by thermal shock or oxidation at elevated temperatures, which often results in elastic anisotropy. This damaged-induced anisotropy is determined by measuring the velocities of ultrasonic waves in different propagation directions. Thermal shock damage is assessed in ceramic samples of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN). Thermal shock treatment from different temperatures up to 1000 C is applied to produce the microcracks. Results indicate that most microcracks produced by thermal shock are located near sample surfaces. Ultrasonic measurements using the surface wave method are found to correlate well with measurements of degradation of mechanical properties obtained independently by other authors using destructive methods. Oxidation damage is assessed in silicon carbide fiber/reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SCS-6/RBSN) composites. The oxidation is done by exposing the samples in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1400 C, for 100 hr. The Youngs' modulus in the fiber direction as obtained from ultrasonic measurements decreases significantly at 600 C but retains its original value at temperatures above 1200 C. This agrees well with the results of destructive tests by other authors. On the other hand, the transverse moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continually until 1200 C. Measurements on the shear stiffnesses show behavior similar to the transverse moduli. The results of this work show that the damage-induced anisotropy in both ceramics and ceramic matrix composites can be determined successfully by ultrasonic methods. This suggests the possibility of assessing damage severity using ultrasonic techniques.

  18. Assessment of damage in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y. C.; Baaklini, G. Y.; Rokhlin, S.I.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the application of ultrasonic sensing to damage assessment in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites. It focuses on damage caused by thermal shock or oxidation at elevated temperatures, which often results in elastic anisotropy. This damaged-induced anisotropy is determined by measuring the velocities of ultrasonic waves in different propagation directions. Thermal shock damage is assessed in ceramic samples of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN). Thermal shock treatment from different temperatures up to 1000 C is applied to produce the microcracks. Results indicate that most microcracks produced by thermal shock are located near sample surfaces. Ultrasonic measurements using the surface wave method are found to correlate well with measurements of degradation of mechanical properties obtained independently by other authors using destructive methods. Oxidation damage is assessed in silicon carbide fiber/reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SCS-6/RBSN) composites. The oxidation is done by exposing the samples in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1400 C, for 100 hr. The Youngs' modulus in the fiber direction as obtained from ultrasonic measurements decreases significantly at 600 C but retains its original value at temperatures above 1200 C. This agrees well with the results of destructive tests by other authors. On the other hand, the transverse moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continually until 1200 C. Measurements on the shear stiffnesses show behavior similar to the transverse moduli. The results of this work show that the damage-induced anisotropy in both ceramics and ceramic matrix composites can be determined successfully by ultrasonic methods. This suggests the possibility of assessing damage severity using ultrasonic techniques.

  19. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, V N; Papandreou, A; Kanellopoulou, D; Stournaras, C J

    2013-11-15

    In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in an increase of mechanical strength. Moreover, leaching tests performed according to the Europeans standards on the EAFD-block samples showed that the quantities of heavy metals leached from crushed blocks were within the regulatory limits. Thus the EAFD-blocks can be regarded as material of no environmental concern.

  20. Ceramic helium-cooled blanket test module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leshukov, A. E-mail: leshu@entek.ru; Kovalenko, V.; Shatalov, G.; Goroshkin, G.; Obukhov, A

    2000-11-01

    The design of RF DEMO-relevant ceramic helium cooled blanket test module (CHC BTM) for testing in international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) is under consideration. The RF concept of DEMO BTM is based upon the breeder inside tube (BIT)-concept. This concept suggests the use of solid breeding ceramic material, helium as coolant and tritium purge-gas, ferrite-martensite steel as structural material, and beryllium as neutron multiplier. The parameters of the primary circuit coolant are the following, pressure -8 MPa, inlet/outlet temperature -300/550 deg. C, respectively. Helium (0.1 MPa pressure) is used for tritium removal from ceramic breeder. The ITER water coolant is the secondary circuit coolant of DEMO BTM cooling system. Lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) is used as tritium breeding material (pebbles-bed of diameter 0.5-1 mm spheres). It is planned to use the beryllium as neutron multiplier (spheres diameter 1 mm pebbles-bed or the porous beryllium). The 3-D neutronic calculations on Monte Carlo method, in accordance with FENDL-1 library of the nuclear data, have been performed for CHC BTM. To validate the CHC BTM concept, the thermal hydraulic analysis has been performed for the design elements and cooling system equipment. The preliminary stress analysis for BTM design elements has been carried out on the ASME-code and RF strength regulations. The four types of LOFA and LOCA accidents have been investigated. The parameters of cooling, coolant purification and tritium extraction systems have been determined.

  1. Ceramic membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Ceramic gas separation membranes can provide very high separation factors if the pore size is sufficiently small to separate gas molecules by molecular sieving and if oversized pores are adequately limited. Ceramic membranes typically have some pores that are substantially larger than the mean pore size and that should be regarded as defects. To assess the effects of such defects on the performance of ceramic membranes, a simple mathematical model has been developed to describe flow through a gas separation membrane that has a primary mode of flow through very small pores but that has a secondary mode of flow through undesirably large pores. This model permits separation factors to be calculated for a specified gas pair as a function of the molecular weights and molecular diameters of the gases, the membrane pore diameter, and the diameter and number of defects. This model will be described, and key results from the model will be presented. The separation factors of the authors membranes continue to be determined using a permeance test system that measures flows of pure gases through a membrane at temperatures up to 275{degrees}C. A primary goal of this project for FY 1996 is to develop a mixed gas separation system for measuring the separation efficiency of membranes at higher temperatures. Performance criteria have been established for the planned mixed gas separation system and design of the system has been completed. The test system is designed to measure the separation efficiency of membranes at temperatures up to 600{degrees}C and pressures up to 100 psi by separating the constituents of a gas mixture containing hydrogen. The system will accommodate the authors typical experimental membrane that is tubular and has a diameter of about 9 mm and a length of about 23 cm. The design of the new test system and its expected performance will be discussed.

  2. Modeling binder removal in ceramic compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incledon, Matthew L.

    Binder is often added to ceramic systems to provide mechanical strength to the green bodies during processing. The binder removal sequence for an individual system is difficult to predict due to the thermal reaction and mass transport of the volatile products. The objective of this work is to use computational methods to predict the kinetics of binder removal as a function of composition, particle size, pore size and tortuosity, temperature, body size and shape, etc.. The model will be used to predict the composition, temperature, and pore pressure as a function of time, position within the body, and heating sequence parameters. This will provide the ability to predict optimum heating sequences that minimize processing time and energy input while avoiding harmful high internal pressures and temperatures. Since there are many binder systems in use, a few specific cases will be considered. TGA (thermogravimetric analysis) of binders will be used to measure kinetics parameters that are inputs for the computational model. A framework will be developed to assess the binder removal sequence for a binder and ceramic system. The input for the model, computed in COMSOL Multiphysics, will be determined through analysis of TGA weight loss data and green body characterization. A set of tools will be presented that assist in the fitting of the TGA data, including the binder degrading into multiple species, higher order reactions, parallel and series reactions, etc.. The use of these ideas and tools will allow the modeler to better predict the heating sequence required for a ceramic and binder system to successfully remove all binder material.

  3. Polymer-Ceramic Bionanocomposites for Dental Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hwan Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiphasic bionanocomposites have been highlighted in the biotechnology field since they have offered mechanical flexibility during operation. This interest has been increased mainly through polymer/ceramic/metal manipulation techniques and modifications in formulation. Recently, a number of studies on bionanocomposites have been examined due to their favorable mechanical properties and cellular activities when compared to the neat polymers or polymer blends. This paper critically reviews recent applications of bionanocomposites for regeneration of pulp-dentin complex, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone, and substitute of enamel in dentistry.

  4. Modeling Residual Stresses in Ceramic Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantavella, V.; Moreno, A.; Mezquita, A.; Reig, Y.

    2008-02-01

    The generation of residual stresses during cooling of layered ceramic plates has been modeled. Each plate comprises a body and two thin layers (engobe and glaze). The model takes into account two types of stresses: thermal stresses, resulting from temperature gradients inside the plate during cooling, and the stresses produced by the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the layers. The body has been simulated using a linear viscoelastic constitutive equation. The engobe and the glaze layer have been considered as elastic solids below a certain temperature (setting temperature: Ta). Above Ta these two layers have no mechanical influence on the body.

  5. CERCON- SMART CERAMICS, FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela POPA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of the CAD/CAM systems in dentistry has resulted in highly accurate and quality dentures, meeting the needs of both dental technician and dentist. The present study aims at illustrating the benefits and peculiarities of using CAD/CAM systems in current practice. To this aim, the case of a 29 year-old patient who wanted to have a 2.1 coverage crown replaced, being dissatisfied with its aesthetics, was considered. The fixed single tooth prosthesis was restored with the CAD/CAM CERCON (DeguDent - Smart Ceramics.

  6. Preparation techniques for ceramic waste form powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuels result in a chloride waste salt requiring geologic disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing ceramic waste forms which can incorporate this waste. Currently, zeolite- or sodalite-glass composites are produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) techniques. Powder preparations include dehydration of the raw zeolite powders, hot blending of these zeolite powders and secondary additives. Various approaches are being pursued to achieve adequate mixing, and the resulting powders have been HIPed and characterized for leach resistance, phase equilibria, and physical integrity

  7. Statistical design study of lunar ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Mike; Tucker, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Fabrication of a lunar ceramic was conducted according to a statistically designed experiment. The method of cold pressing was used since the consumption of electrical energy is kept to a minimum (a priority in the lunar environment). This traditional fabrication technique also provides an initial data source on which further investigations can be based. Results obtained from using two percent binder, a cold pressing pressure of 276 MPa, and 24 hours sintering time yielded the greatest compressive strength of 247 MPa. Analysis of each variable's influence on the compressive strength is also presented.

  8. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  9. Principles and Applications of Ceramic Humidity Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Pelino; Carlo Cantalini; Marco Faccio

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of the state of the art in humidity and gas ceramic sensors R&D; it also describes the principle, fabrication and application of the humidity-sensitive Si-doped a-hematite (α-Fe2O3) sintered compacts. The humidity signal response is characterized by volt-amperometric and impedance spectroscopy techniques in the 0-97% relative humidity (RH) range. The response time of the sensor is evaluated by 0-60% RH variations. Experimental techniques used to measure the ...

  10. Grain boundary dynamics in ceramics superplasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakai, E.

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Superplasticity refers to an ability of polycrystalline solids to exhibit exceptionally large elongation in tension. The application of superplasticity makes it possible to fabricate ceramic components by superplastic forming (SPF, concurrent with diffusion bonding, and superplastic sinter-forging just like superplastic metals. Furthermore the superplastic deformation plays an important role in stress-assisted densification processes such as hot isostatic pressing (HIP and hot pressing (HP. The ceramics superplasticity has been one of intensive research fields in the last decade. Although most of reports are still limited to those of zirconia[1], new developments have been achieved in superplasticity of Si3N4 and SiC in recent years. It is clearly demonstrated that the superplasticity is one of the common natures of fine-grained ceramics and nanocrystalline ceramics at elevated temperatures.

    La superplaticidad se refiere a la capacidad que posee un sólido policristalino de presentar alargamientos excepcionalmente elevados en tracción. La aplicación de la superplasticidad hace posible la fabricación de componentes cerámicos por conformado superplástico, soldadura por difusión y forja-sinterizado superplástica, igual que en metales superplásticos. Además, la deformación superplástica tiene un rol importante en los procesos de densificación asistidos por tensiones, tales como la compactación isostática en caliente y el prensado en caliente. Las cerámicas superplásticas han sido uno de los campos donde se ha realizado una investigación más intensa en la última década. Aunque, la mayoría de los informes se limitan a la circonia[1] se han alcanzado nuevos desarrollos en superplasticidad de Si3N4 y SiC. Está claramente demostrado que la superplasticidad es una propiedad intrínseca de las cerámicas de pequeño tamaño de grano y de las cer

  11. Sensitive Ceramics_Pattern #1-#5

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2014-01-01

    Exhibition as a part of the All Makers Now? conference, 10-11 July 2014. A two-day conference exploring craft values in 21st century production.General description of the contribution:The exhibit is showing examples from an experiment about an interactive digital design tool for designing ceramics. The experiment is working on two levels. One which has to do with designing compositions and patterns in a virtual 3d universe based on a digital dynamic system that responds on the movement of the...

  12. Conductive ceramic composition and method of preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

    1991-04-16

    A ceramic anode composition is formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The anode is prepared as a non-stoichiometric crystalline structure by reaction and conditioning in a hydrogen gas cover containing minor proportions of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The structure exhibits a single phase and substantially enhanced electrical conductivity over that of the corresponding stoichiometric structure. Unexpectedly, such oxides and oxygenates are found to be stable in the reducing anode fuel gas of a molten carbonate fuel cell. 4 figures.

  13. Tribological behaviour of ceramics at room temperature. Comparative analysis of tribological studies of thermomechanical ceramics for diesel engines. Ceramics properties, test and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taibi, M. [Institut National des Hydrocarbures et de la Chimie, Boumerdes (Algeria); Chalant, G. [Faculte de Technologie de Guyane, Cayenne (French Guiana)

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a synthesis of theoretical and experimental results on the physical and mechanical properties and tribological behaviour as well of thermomechanical ceramics, on the basis of a critical paper revue. (authors). 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Tribological behaviour of ceramics at high temperature. Comparative analysis of tribological studies of thermomechanical ceramics for Diesel engines. Ceramics properties, test and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taibi, M. [Institut National des Hydrocarbures et de la Chimie, Boumerdes (Algeria); Chalant, G. [Faculte de Technologie de Guyane, Cayenne (French Guiana)

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a synthesis of theoretical and experimental results on the tribological behaviour of thermomechanical ceramics, with various experimental conditions especially at high temperature, on the basis of a critical paper revue. (authors). 40 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Ceramic Bas-Reliefs of the Divine Comedy: A Gift from Italian Master Engo Babini

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu; Nianrui

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the China Jingdezhen International Ceramic Fair(CJICF),held annually since 2004,is to promote ceramic cultural exchanges and world ceramic development.Over a hundred foreign ceramists attended in 2009,when Engo Babini,a famous Italian carving master,introduced his elaborately created ceramic bas-reliefs of the Divine Comedy to enhance Sino-Italian friendship and

  16. Effect of mechanical cycling on the flexural strength of densely sintered ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itinoche, Koiti Marco; Ozcan, Mudu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Oyafuso, Denise

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mechanical cycling on the biaxial flexural strength of two densely sintered ceramic materials. Methods. Disc shaped zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) and high alumina (Procera AllCeram) ceramic specimens (diameter: 15 min and thickness: 1.2

  17. Effect of Ceramic Surface Treatments After Machine Grinding on the Biaxial Flexural Strength of Different CAD/CAM Dental Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Hossein; Aghajani, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different ceramic surface treatments after machining grinding on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of machinable dental ceramics with different crystalline phases. Materials and Methods: Disk-shape specimens (10mm in diameter and 1.3mm in thickness) of machinable ceramic cores (two silica-based and one zirconia-based ceramics) were prepared. Each type of the ceramic surfaces was then randomly treated (n=15) with different treatments as follows: 1) machined finish as control, 2) machined finish and sandblasting with alumina, and 3) machined finish and hydrofluoric acid etching for the leucite and lithium disilicate-based ceramics, and for the zirconia; 1) machined finish and post-sintered as control, 2) machined finish, post-sintered, and sandblasting, and 3) machined finish, post-sintered, and Nd;YAG laser irradiation. The BFS were measured in a universal testing machine. Data based were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple comparisons post-hoc test (α=0.05). Results: The mean BFS of machined finish only surfaces for leucite ceramic was significantly higher than that of sandblasted (P=0.001) and acid etched surfaces (P=0.005). A significantly lower BFS was found after sandblasting for lithium disilicate compared with that of other groups (P<0.05). Sandblasting significantly increased the BFS for the zirconia (P<0.05), but the BFS was significantly decreased after laser irradiation (P<0.05). Conclusions: The BFS of the machinable ceramics was affected by the type of ceramic material and surface treatment method. Sandblasting with alumina was detrimental to the strength of only silica-based ceramics. Nd:YAG laser irradiation may lead to substantial strength degradation of zirconia. PMID:27148372

  18. The influence of metallic shell deformation on the contact mechanics of a ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Changdong; Wang, Ling; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty of ceramic-on-ceramic bearing combinations is increasingly used clinically. The majority of these implants are used with cementless fixation that a metal-backing shell is press-fitted into the pelvic bone. This usually results in the deformation of the metallic shell, which may also influence the ceramic liner deformation and consequently the contact mechanics between the liner and the femoral head under loading. The explicit dynamic finite element method was applied to model the implantation of a cementless ceramic-on-ceramic with a titanium shell and subsequently to investigate the effect of the metallic shell deformation on the contact mechanics. A total of three impacts were found to be necessary to seat the titanium alloy shell into the pelvic bone cavity with a 1 mm diameter interference and a 1.3 kg impactor at 4500 mm s(-1) velocity. The maximum deformation of the metallic shell was found to be 160 µm in the antero-superior and postero-inferior direction and 97 µm in the antero-inferior and postero-superior direction after the press-fit. The corresponding values were slightly reduced to 67 and 45 µm after the ceramic liner was inserted and then modified to 74 and 43 µm under loading, respectively. The maximum deformation and the maximum principal stress of the ceramic liner were 31 µm and 144 MPa (tensile stress), respectively, after it was inserted into the shell and further increased to 52 µm and 245 MPa under loading. This research highlights the importance of the press-fit of the metallic shell on the contact mechanics of the ceramic liner for ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasties and potential clinical performances.

  19. Reorientation of Defect Dipoles in Ferroelectric Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bao-Shan; LI Guo-Rong; ZHAO Su-Chuan; ZHU Zhi-Gang; DING Ai-Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the frequency, temperature, tetragonality and quenched temperature dependences of the hysteresis loops in Pb[(Zr0.52 Ti0.48)0.95 (Mn1/3Nb2/3)0.05]O3 (PMnN-PZT) ceramics. It has been demonstrated that the polarization-field hysteresis curves show "pinched" shapes when tested at room temperature, higher frequency or using the large-tetragonality specimen. While normal square-like loops are observed at 200 ℃ and 0.01 Hz or using the small-tetragonality one. Meanwhile, close relations between the P-E loops and the applied frequency,temperature or tetragonality reveal that there exists a typical relaxation time corresponding to the reorientation of the defect dipoles. It can be seen further from the quenched temperature dependences of the loops that the reorientation of the defect dipoles may influence the pinching. Compared to the intrinsic depinning procedure induced by changes of the distribution of defect dipoles, we provide new evidence for extrinsic depinning mechanism of the defect dipoles in the ferroelectric ceramics.

  20. Rare earths in ceramic materials technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare earth elements are mainly exploited for electronic devices, but far from negligible is their importance in materials for structural applications, i.e. for their mechanical properties, useful in modern technologies. For example, widely renown is the role of rare earth oxides in the study of zirconia (zirconium dioxide, ZrO2), by far the most interesting ceramic material for structural applications. Among rare earth oxides, ceria (cerium dioxide, CeO2) has played a fundamental role because at room temperature it stabilizes the tetragonal phase of zirconia, which is the most interesting phase from a mechanical point of view. In this presentation the main characteristics of the system CeO2-ZrO2 are outlined, along with the mechanical properties of binary alloys of the two oxides; these properties are evaluated as a function of their composition and microstructure. Some of these alloys exhibited behaviour completely unexpected for ceramic materials, e.g. the Shape Memory Effect (SME) and the Gorsky Effect. (orig.)

  1. Glass ceramic-to-metal seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1982-04-19

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65 to 80% SiO/sub 2/, 8 to 16% Li/sub 2/O, 2 to 8% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 1 to 8% K/sub 2/O, 1 to 5% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and 1.5 to 7% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to caus growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  2. Oxidation process of lanthanum hexaboride ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Oxidation process of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) ceramic powder was investigated . The LaB6 powder samples were heated continually from room temperature to 1 473 K at a heating rate of 10 K/min by differential scanning calorimetry. The oxidation tests were conducted at different exposure temperatures. The phases and morphologies of the samples before and after exposure were analyzed by XRD and SEM. It was pointed out that before 1 273 K, LaB6 has high oxidation resistant ability, which was due to that the oxide layer hinders the oxygen diffusion from outer to the surface of LaB6 grains. The oxide layer was composed of the transition phases, which were composed of La2O3 and B2O3 formed from the initial oxidation; when the oxidation temperature exceeded 1 273 K, protective layer was destroyed due to the vaporization of liquid B2O3. Based on the results of X-ray diffraction analysis, oxidation process of LaB6 ceramic powder can be described as follows: Before 1 273 K, lanthanum borate,La(BO2)3 was formed on the surface of samples, then lanthanum oxide (La2O3) and boron oxide (B2O3) were present on the surface of samples oxidized when the temperature reached to 1 473 K.

  3. Thermoluminescence dating of Brazilian indigenous ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two indigenous ceramics fragments, one from Lagoa Queimada (LQ) and another from Barra dos Negros (BN), both sites located on Bahia state (Brazil), were dated by thermoluminescence (TL) method. Each fragment was physically prepared and divided into two fractions, one was used for TL measurement and the other for annual dose determination. The TL fraction was chemically treated, divided in sub samples and irradiated with several doses. The plot extrapolation from TL intensities as function of radiation dose enabled the determination of the accumulated dose (Dac), 3.99 Gy and 1.88 Gy for LQ and BN, respectively. The annual dose was obtained through the uranium, thorium and potassium determination by ICP-MS. The annual doses (D an) obtained were 2.86 and 2.26 mGy/year. The estimated ages were ∼1375 and 709 y for BN and LQ ceramics, respectively. The ages agreed with the archaeologists' estimation for the Aratu and Tupi tradition periods, respectively. (authors)

  4. Characterization of CVI densification of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Stock, S.R.; Lee, S. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Ceramic matrix composites promise higher operating temperature and better thermodynamic efficiency in many enregy conversion systems. In particular, composites fabricated by the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process have excellent mechanical properties and, using the forced flow-thermal gradient variation, good processing economics in small scale demonstrations. Scale-up to larger, more complex shapes requires understanding of gas flow through the fiber preform and of the relationship between fiber architecture and densification behavior. This understanding is needed for design of preforms for optimum infiltration. The objective of this research is to observe the deposition of matrix material in the pores of a ceramic fiber preform at various stages of the CVI process. These observations allow us to relate local deposition rates in various regions of the composite to the connectivity of the surrounding network of porosity and to better model the relationship between gas transport and fiber architecture in CVI preforms. Our observation of the CVI process utilizes high resolution X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) in collaboration with Dr. John Kinney at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with repeated imaging of a small preform specimens after various processing times. We use these images to determine geometry and dimensions of channels between and through layers in cloth lay-up preform during CVI densification and relate these to a transport model.

  5. Plasma synthesis of high temperature ceramic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I.G.; Monteiro, O.R.

    1998-11-01

    Thin films of alumina, chromia, mullite, yttria and zirconia have been synthesized using a plasma-based method called metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (Mepiiid)--a highly versatile plasma deposition technique with ion energy control. Monolithic films (a single ceramic component) and multilayer films (individual layers of different ceramic materials) were formed. The films were characterized for their composition and structure in a number of different ways, and the high temperature performance of the films was explored, particularly for their ability to maintain their integrity and adhesion when subjected to repetitive high temperature thermal cycling up 1100 C. We found that the films retain their adhesion and quality without any apparent degradation with time, even after a large number of cycles; (the tests were extended out to a total of 40 cycles each of 24 hours duration). After repetitive high temperature thermal cycling, the film-substrate adhesion was greater than {approx}70 Mpa, the instrumental limit of measurement, and the interface toughness was approximately 0.8 MPa m{sup 1/2}.

  6. Optimization of ceramic strength using elastic gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Ma, Li

    2009-05-01

    We present a new concept for strengthening ceamics by utilizing a graded structure with a low elastic modulus at both top and bottom surfaces sandwiching a high-modulus interior. Closed-form equations have been developed for stress analysis of simply supported graded sandwich beams subject to transverse center loads. Theory predicts that suitable modulus gradients at the ceramic surface can effectively reduce and spread the maximum bending stress from the surface into the interior. The magnitude of such stress dissipation is governed by the thickness ratio of the beam to the graded layers. We test our concept by infiltrating both top and bottom surfaces of a strong class of zirconia ceramic with an in-house prepared glass of similar coefficient of thermal expansion and Poisson's ratio to zirconia, producing a controlled modulus gradient at the surface without significant long-range residual stresses. The resultant graded glass/zirconia/glass composite exhibits significantly higher load-bearing capacity than homogeneous zirconia. PMID:20161019

  7. Ceramics technology for advanced industrial gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in the fabrication of high strength ceramic materials and in their application to automotive and aerospace gas turbine engines may lead also to significant improvements in the performance of industrial gas turbines. This paper presents a brief review of the improvements projected in a study initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy. The future costs of power generated by small gas turbines (up to 25 MW) are predicted, as well as the potential for fuel savings. Gas turbines in this size range are used extensively for gas compression and for cogeneration, as well as in a variety of more diverse applications. This paper includes results of analyses of the ways in which changes in gas turbine cost and performance are likely to affect market penetration. These results lead to predictions of future savings in U.S. fuel consumption in the industrial sector that would result. The paper also presents a brief overview of the scope of a suggested R and D program, with an appropriate schedule, which would provide a technical basis for achieving the projected results. Important parts of this program would cover ceramic design and fabrication technology, engine development and demonstration, and combustion technology

  8. Elastic properties of various ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio of various ceramics have been investigated at room temperature and compared with data from the literature. The ceramic materials investigated are Al2O3, Al2O3-ZrO2, MgAl2O4, LiAlO2, Li2SiO3, Li4SiO4, UO2, AlN, SiC, B4C, TiC, and TiB2. The dependence of the elastic moduli on porosity and temperature have been reviewed. Measurements were also performed on samples of Al2O3, AlN, and SiC, which had been irradiated to maximum neutron fluences of 1.6.1026 n/m2 (E>0.1 MeV) at different temperatures. The Young's modulus is nearly unaffected at fluences up to about 4.1024 n/m2. However, it decreases with increasing neutron fluence and seems to reach a saturation value depending upon the irradiation temperature. The reduction of the Young's modulus is lowest in SiC. (orig.)

  9. Preparation and Easy-Cleaning Property of Rare Earth Composite Ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth and far-infrared mineral composite materials were added to ceramic glazes to prepare easy-cleaning ceramic. The morphology of easy-cleaning ceramic was observed by SEM. The influence of easy-cleaning ceramic on water surface tension and contact angles of water were investigated. Through calculation of ceramic surface free energy and observation of oil drop on ceramic surface in water, the easy-cleaning mechanism of rare earth composite ceramic was studied. It is found that the rare earth composite ceramic can make water surface tension decrease. The surface free energy and the polar component of rare earth composite ceramic are increased. The rare earth composite ceramics have the easy-cleaning property.

  10. Insulating Structural Ceramics Program, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Mark J.; Tandon, Raj; Ott, Eric; Hind, Abi Akar; Long, Mike; Jensen, Robert; Wheat, Leonard; Cusac, Dave; Lin, H. T.; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Ferber, Mattison K.; Lee, Sun Kun; Yoon, Hyung K.; Moreti, James; Park, Paul; Rockwood, Jill; Boyer, Carrie; Ragle, Christie; Balmer-Millar, Marilou; Aardahl, Chris; Habeger, Craig; Rappe, Ken; Tran, Diana; Koshkarian, Kent; Readey, Michael

    2005-11-22

    New materials and corresponding manufacturing processes are likely candidates for diesel engine components as society and customers demand lower emission engines without sacrificing power and fuel efficiency. Strategies for improving thermal efficiency directly compete with methodologies for reducing emissions, and so the technical challenge becomes an optimization of controlling parameters to achieve both goals. Approaches being considered to increase overall thermal efficiency are to insulate certain diesel engine components in the combustion chamber, thereby increasing the brake mean effective pressure ratings (BMEP). Achieving higher BMEP rating by insulating the combustion chamber, in turn, requires advances in material technologies for engine components such as pistons, port liners, valves, and cylinder heads. A series of characterization tests were performed to establish the material properties of ceramic powder. Mechanical chacterizations were also obtained from the selected materials as a function of temperature utilizing ASTM standards: fast fracture strength, fatique resistance, corrosion resistance, thermal shock, and fracture toughness. All ceramic materials examined showed excellent wear properties and resistance to the corrosive diesel engine environments. The study concluded that the ceramics examined did not meet all of the cylinder head insert structural design requirements. Therefore we do not recommend at this time their use for this application. The potential for increased stresses and temperatures in the hot section of the diesel engine combined with the highly corrosive combustion products and residues has driven the need for expanded materials capability for hot section engine components. Corrosion and strength requirements necessitate the examination of more advanced high temperture alloys. Alloy developments and the understanding of processing, structure, and properties of supperalloy materials have been driven, in large part, by the gas

  11. Laser-Aided Ceramic Bracket Debonding: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Rezvaneh; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Different techniques have been introduced for the removal of ceramic brackets. Since the early 1990s, lasers have been used experimentally for debonding ceramic brackets. The goal of this study is to give a comprehensive literature review on laser-aided ceramic bracket debonding. PubMed and Google Scholar databases were used to identify dental articles with the following combination of key words: Ceramic brackets, Debonding, and Laser. Sixteen English articles from 2004 to 2015 were selected. The selected studies were categorized according to the variables investigated including the intrapulpal temperature, shear bond strength, debonding time, enamel damage and bracket failure. Most articles reported decreased shear bond strength and debonding time following laser irradiation without any critical and irritating increase in pulpal temperature. There were no reports of bracket failure or enamel damage. Laser irradiation is an efficient way to reduce shear bond strength of ceramic bracket and debonding time. This technique is a safe way for removing ceramic bracket with minimal impact on intrapulpal temperature and enamel surface and it reduces ceramic bracket failure. PMID:27330690

  12. Continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites for heat engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, David E.

    1988-01-01

    High strength at elevated temperatures, low density, resistance to wear, and abundance of nonstrategic raw materials make structural ceramics attractive for advanced heat engine applications. Unfortunately, ceramics have a low fracture toughness and fail catastrophically because of overload, impact, and contact stresses. Ceramic matrix composites provide the means to achieve improved fracture toughness while retaining desirable characteristics, such as high strength and low density. Materials scientists and engineers are trying to develop the ideal fibers and matrices to achieve the optimum ceramic matrix composite properties. A need exists for the development of failure models for the design of ceramic matrix composite heat engine components. Phenomenological failure models are currently the most frequently used in industry, but they are deterministic and do not adequately describe ceramic matrix composite behavior. Semi-empirical models were proposed, which relate the failure of notched composite laminates to the stress a characteristic distance away from the notch. Shear lag models describe composite failure modes at the micromechanics level. The enhanced matrix cracking stress occurs at the same applied stress level predicted by the two models of steady state cracking. Finally, statistical models take into consideration the distribution in composite failure strength. The intent is to develop these models into computer algorithms for the failure analysis of ceramic matrix composites under monotonically increasing loads. The algorithms will be included in a postprocessor to general purpose finite element programs.

  13. [First clinical experiences with ceramic ball attachments for overdentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttel, Adrian E; Schmidli, Fredy; Marinello, Carlo P; Lüthy, Heinz

    2008-01-01

    In this prospective clinical study on 40 patients with similar clinical conditions (edentulous jaw with 2 interforaminal implants) commercially available ceramic ball attachments (ruby) were compared to commercial titanium ball attachments. The primary aim of the study was to measure the wear of the ball attachments after being 1 year in function. However, in the course of the study already after 7 to 12 months multiple failures with ceramic ball attachments occurred. Twelve (28%) of 43 ceramic ball attachments had to be replaced, mostly because of fractures (8) of the ceramic ball. It seems that ceramic ball attachments of the investigated design are not able to withstand normal intraoral stresses. The short-term susceptibility to fractures didn't allow to examine the ceramic-inherent features such as compressive strength and wear resistance. Furthermore, a secure connection between a titan base and a ceramic ball seems to be challenging. Based on these results, in implant-retained removable prosthesis the use of metal-based retainers is still recommended, although during maintenance a higher wear has to be expected. This wear can be compensated by either activating or changing the matrix or the patrix. PMID:18293602

  14. Preparation, Characterization and Performance of Conch Ceramics Added With Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qingyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The conch ceramics bodies with different ratios were prepared by compression moulding technology using shell, kaolin, and calcium oxide etc. as the raw materials, and then calcined at the high temperature to obtain the conch ceramics. The effects of raw material ratios and calcination temperatures on the performance of conch ceramics were investigated by rotational viscometer, vernier caliper, digital display whiteness meter, thermal analyzer, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer(FT-IR. The results indicated that the viscosity, line shrinkage rate, and whiteness of the conch ceramics were 1.29 Pa·s, 17.9%, and 54.1%, respectively, when the content of the shell powder was 20 wt% and kaolin was 65 wt%. The density of the conch ceramics was the largest (3.8 g/cm3 when calcination temperature was 1200 °C. The results of FT-IR spectrum showed that the addition of the shell powders changed the structure of the ceramic body, which improved the performance of the conch ceramics.

  15. Hydrothermal interaction of a ceramic waste form with basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of crystalline supercalcine-ceramic in the presence of basalt was investigated under mild hydrothermal conditions at 100, 200, and 3000C with a pressure of 300 bars. Both the solid phases and solution concentrations of the interaction products of basalt and supercalcine-ceramic were characterized. At 1000C, no alteration products could be detected in experiments involving supercalcine-ceramic and basalt. The solution analyses for elements specific to the supercalcine-ceramic did not indicate any significant differences between the treatments with and without basalt, suggesting little or no interaction between basalt and supercalcine-ceramic at this temperature. At 3000C, several solid alteration/interaction products were identified. These products included two phases, pollucite and scheelite, originally incorporated into the ceramic formulation but which reformed with different bulk chemical compositions. In addition, isolated crystals of unidentified K (+-Ba) aluminosilicate phases were observed. Solution analyses of these runs did not indicate any significant differences between the treatments of supercalcine-ceramic with and without basalt, except that the Sr concentration decreased in the presence of basalt. Similar behavior was noted earlier, when basalt and SrZrO3 experiments were conducted. Alteration products and solution concentrations at 2000C lie intermediate between the 1000 and 3000C results

  16. Ceramic package fabrication for YMP nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilfinger, K.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop alternate materials/design concepts to metal barriers for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project. There is some potential that site conditions may prove to be too aggressive for successful employment of the metal alloys under current consideration or that performance assessment models will predict metal container degradation rates that are inconsistent with the goal of substantially complete containment included in the NRC regulations. In the event that the anticipated lifetimes of metal containers are considered inadequate, alternate materials (i.e. ceramics or ceramic/metal composites) will be chosen due to superior corrosion resistance. This document was prepared using information taken from the open literature, conversations and correspondence with vendors, news releases and data presented at conferences to determine what form such a package might take. This discussion presents some ceramic material selection criteria, alternatives for the materials which might be used and alternatives for potential fabrication routes. This includes {open_quotes}stand alone{close_quotes} ceramic components and ceramic coatings/linings for metallic structures. A list of companies providing verbal or written information concerning the production of ceramic or ceramic lined waste containers appears at the end of this discussion.

  17. FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS microstructural analysis of metal-ceramic and zirconia-ceramic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Sebastiani, M; Battaini, P; Menghini, P; Bemporad, E

    2011-01-01

    Recently introduced FIB/SEM analysis in microscopy seems to provide a high-resolution characterization of the samples by 3D (FIB) cross-sectioning and (SEM) high resolution imaging. The aim of this study was to apply the FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS analysis to the interfaces of a metal-ceramic vs. two zirconia-ceramic systems. Plate samples of three different prosthetic systems were prepared in the dental lab following the manufacturers' instructions, where metal-ceramic was the result of a ceramic veneering (porcelain-fused-to-metal) and the two zirconia-ceramic systems were produced by the dedicated CAD-CAM procedures of the zirconia cores (both with final sintering) and then veneered by layered or heat pressed ceramics. In a FIB/SEM equipment (also called DualBeam), a thin layer of platinum (1 μm) was deposited on samples surface crossing the interfaces, in order to protect them during milling. Then, increasingly deeper trenches were milled by a focused ion beam, first using a relatively higher and later using a lower ion current (from 9 nA to 0.28 nA, 30KV). Finally, FEG-SEM (5KV) micrographs (1000-50,000X) were acquired. In a SEM the analysis of the morphology and internal microstructure was performed by 13KV secondary and backscattered electrons signals (in all the samples). The compositional maps were then performed by EDS probe only in the metal-ceramic system (20kV). Despite the presence of many voids in all the ceramic layers, it was possible to identify: (1) the grain structures of the metallic and zirconia substrates, (2) the thin oxide layer at the metal-ceramic interface and its interactions with the first ceramic layer (wash technique), (3) the roughness of the two different zirconia cores and their interactions with the ceramic interface, where the presence of zirconia grains in the ceramic layer was reported in two system possibly due to sandblasting before ceramic firing. PMID:22709611

  18. FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS microstructural analysis of metal-ceramic and zirconia-ceramic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Sebastiani, M; Battaini, P; Menghini, P; Bemporad, E

    2012-01-10

    Recently introduced FIB/SEM analysis in microscopy seems to provide a high-resolution characterization of the samples by 3D (FIB) cross-sectioning and (SEM) high resolution imaging. The aim of this study was to apply the FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS analysis to the interfaces of a metal-ceramic vs. two zirconia-ceramic systems. Plate samples of three different prosthetic systems were prepared in the dental lab following the manufacturers' instructions, where metal-ceramic was the result of a ceramic veneering (porcelain-fused-to-metal) and the two zirconia-ceramic systems were produced by the dedicated CAD-CAM procedures of the zirconia cores (both with final sintering) and then veneered by layered or heat pressed ceramics. In a FIB/SEM equipment (also called DualBeam), a thin layer of platinum (1 μm) was deposited on samples surface crossing the interfaces, in order to protect them during milling. Then, increasingly deeper trenches were milled by a focused ion beam, first using a relatively higher and later using a lower ion current (from 9 nA to 0.28 nA, 30KV). Finally, FEG-SEM (5KV) micrographs (1000-50,000X) were acquired. In a SEM the analysis of the morphology and internal microstructure was performed by 13KV secondary and backscattered electrons signals (in all the samples). The compositional maps were then performed by EDS probe only in the metal-ceramic system (20kV). Despite the presence of many voids in all the ceramic layers, it was possible to identify: (1) the grain structures of the metallic and zirconia substrates, (2) the thin oxide layer at the metal-ceramic interface and its interactions with the first ceramic layer (wash technique), (3) the roughness of the two different zirconia cores and their interactions with the ceramic interface, where the presence of zirconia grains in the ceramic layer was reported in two system possibly due to sandblasting before ceramic firing.

  19. Polymer Coating for Immobilizing Soluble Ions in a Phosphate Ceramic Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Patel, Kartikey D.

    1999-05-05

    A polymer coating is applied to the surface of a phosphate ceramic composite to effectively immobilize soluble salt anions encapsulated within the phosphate ceramic composite. The polymer coating is made from ceramic materials, including at least one inorganic metal compound, that wet and adhere to the surface structure of the phosphate ceramic composite, thereby isolating the soluble salt anions from the environment and ensuring long-term integrity of the phosphate ceramic composite.

  20. Integral ceramic superstructure evaluation using time domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Bradu, Adrian; Topala, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive low coherence interferometry technique that includes several technologies (and the corresponding devices and components), such as illumination and detection, interferometry, scanning, adaptive optics, microscopy and endoscopy. From its large area of applications, we consider in this paper a critical aspect in dentistry - to be investigated with a Time Domain (TD) OCT system. The clinical situation of an edentulous mandible is considered; it can be solved by inserting 2 to 6 implants. On these implants a mesostructure will be manufactured and on it a superstructure is needed. This superstructure can be integral ceramic; in this case materials defects could be trapped inside the ceramic layers and those defects could lead to fractures of the entire superstructure. In this paper we demonstrate that a TD-OCT imaging system has the potential to properly evaluate the presence of the defects inside the ceramic layers and those defects can be fixed before inserting the prosthesis inside the oral cavity. Three integral ceramic superstructures were developed by using a CAD/CAM technology. After the milling, the ceramic layers were applied on the core. All the three samples were evaluated by a TD-OCT system working at 1300 nm. For two of the superstructures evaluated, no defects were found in the most stressed areas. The third superstructure presented four ceramic defects in the mentioned areas. Because of those defects the superstructure may fracture. The integral ceramic prosthesis was send back to the dental laboratory to fix the problems related to the material defects found. Thus, TD-OCT proved to be a valuable method for diagnosing the ceramic defects inside the integral ceramic superstructures in order to prevent fractures at this level.

  1. Ceramic membrane separation technique for washing nano-sized ceramic powder precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Dong; Xingqin Liu; Tianshu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Washing using ceramic micro-filtration membranes was studied in the preparation of nano-sized TiO2 and Al203 powder precursors obtained by wet chemical methods.The key parameters for the washing process,such as operation pressure,cross-flow velocity,and slurry concentration,were examined and optimized.The shape and size of particles influenced the structure of the filter cake,leading to different permeation flux for different systems.The results demonstrated that washing using ceramic membranes is superior to the traditional plate-and-frame filtration and could be considered an advanced technique for ultra-fine powder preparation by wet-chemical method.

  2. Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

    1999-06-07

    A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

  3. The transition to farming and the ceramic trajectories in Western Eurasia. From ceramic figurines to vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihael Budja

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In Eurasia the invention of ceramic technology and production of fired-clay vessels has not necessarily been related to the dynamics of the transition to farming. The invention of ceramic technology in Europe was associated with female and animal figurine making in Gravettian technocomplex. The fired-clay vessels occurred first in hunter-gatherer contexts in Eastern Eurasia a millennia before the agriculture. The adoption of pottery making in Levant seems to correlate with the collapse of the ‘ritual economy’, social decentralisation and community fragmentation in the Levantine Pre-Pottery Neolithic. In South-eastern Europe the adoption of pottery making was closely associated with social, symbolic and ritual hunter-gatherers’ practices.

  4. AN EXPERIMENT WITH THE VOICE TO DESIGN CERAMICS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2013-01-01

    This article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical interaction with a responding material can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. The article presents an experiment with a 3D interactive and dynamic system to create ceramics...... from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. 3D digital shape is created using simple geometric rules and is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic objects. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice....

  5. Special requirements for alumina ceramic of ESG electrode bowl

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-an; XUE Kai; ZHANG Jia-tai; ZHANG Qiang

    2004-01-01

    At present ESG (Electrostatic Suspended Gyro) is the most precise inertia element in the world. The electrode bowl, which has direct effect on the precision of ESG, is a key part to ESG. Through the analysis of the function and characteristic of the electrode bowl in hollow rotor ESG and the present situation of new material development in the world, the alumina ceramic is regarded as the best material for the electrode bowl of hollow rotor ESG. By analyzing the present situation of alumina ceramic in the world, main technique requirements have been put forward for the alumina ceramic of ESG electrode bowl which is also fit for solid rotor ESG.

  6. Nonlinear optical responses of erbium-doped YAG ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wangliang; Yi, Jun; Miao, Lili; Li, Jiang; Xie, Tengfei; Zhao, Chujun; Pan, Yubai; Wen, Shuangchun

    2016-07-01

    By performing the Z-scan measurements with ultrafast femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm wavelength, we can unambiguously distinguish the real and imaginary part of the third-order optical nonlinearity of the erbium-doped YAG ceramics. The reverse saturable absorption of the erbium-doped YAG ceramics has been observed experimentally, and the nonlinear refractive index of the ceramics is estimated to be about 10-21 m2/W. The experimental results may provide design guidelines for the high power laser design and its applications.

  7. Data compilation for radiation damage on ceramic insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data of radiation effects on ceramic insulators were compiled from the literatures and summarized from the viewpoint of fast neutron irradiation effects. The data were classified according to the properties of ceramics. The properties are dimensional stability, mechanical property, thermal property and electrical and dielectric properties. The data sheets for each table or graph in the literatures were made. The characteristic feature of the data base was briefly described. As to swelling, the data were complied according to the dose dependence and the temperature dependence for each ceramics and reviewed briefly. (author)

  8. Wear Performance of Ceramic-On-Metal Hip Bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Jörn Reinders; Robert Sonntag; Christian Heisel; Tobias Reiner; Leo Vot; Jan Philippe Kretzer

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic-on-metal (CoM) bearings are considered to be a promising alternative to polyethylene-based bearings or hard-on-hard bearings (Ceramic-on-Ceramic (CoC) and Metal-on-Metal (MoM)). Although, CoM shows lower wear rates than MoM, in-vitro wear testing of CoM shows widely varying results. This may be related to limitations of wear-measuring methods. Therefore, the aim of this study was to improve the gravimetric measurement technique and to test wear behaviour of CoM bearings compared to Co...

  9. A glass-ceramic material for fixation of radioactive waste

    OpenAIRE

    Bozadzhiev L.S.; Georgiev G.T.; Bozadzhiev R.L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, a starting mixture for the preparation of glass-ceramic material for radioactive waste (RW), consisting of 85-95 mass % basanite and 5-15 mass % oxides of elements in I-VIII group of the Periodical table of elements imitating RW, is proposed. The glass-ceramic material is obtained by melting the starting mixture in air at 1450°C for 1 hour and by further crystallization of the melts at 950°C for 30 minutes. It has been noticed that the texture of the glass-ceramic mater...

  10. Multiferroic PbFe12O19 Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Guo-Long; Wang, Min

    2011-01-01

    PbFe12O19 (PFO) powders in hexagonal structure have been synthesized by sol-gel process using lead acetate, glycerin and ferric acetylacetonate as the precursor. PbFe12O19 ceramics were obtained by sintering the PbFe12O19 powders at 1000\\degree C for 1 hour. Distorted flaky hexahedron grains are frequently observed in the SEM images of sintered PbFe12O19 ceramics. Large spontaneous polarization was observed in PbFe12O19 ceramic at room temperature, exhibiting a clear ferroelectric hysteresis ...

  11. Pressureless sintering of translucent MgO ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Dianying [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Jordan, Eric H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)], E-mail: jordan@engr.uconn.edu; Gell, Maurice [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    MgO nanocrystalline powders were synthesized via a wet precipitation process. X-ray diffraction analysis of the heat-treated precursor powders shows that a crystalline MgO phase forms at {approx}500 deg. C. Translucent MgO ceramics were prepared by pressureless sintering the nanocrystalline MgO powders at 1400 deg. C for 2 h under ambient atmosphere. The as-sintered MgO ceramics have a relative density of 98.1% with an average hardness of 6.8 GPa. Scanning electron microscope characterization revealed that the translucent MgO ceramics have an average grain size of {approx}6 {mu}m.

  12. Air quality comparison between two European ceramic tile clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguillón, M. C.; Monfort, E.; Escrig, A.; Celades, I.; Guerra, L.; Busani, G.; Sterni, A.; Querol, X.

    2013-08-01

    The European ceramic tile industry is mostly concentrated in two clusters, one in Castelló (Spain) and another one in Modena (Italy). Industrial clusters may have problems to accomplish the EU air quality regulations because of the concentration of some specific pollutants and, hence, the feasibility of the industrial clusters can be jeopardised. The present work assesses the air quality in these ceramic clusters in 2008, when the new EU emission regulations where put into force. PM10 samples were collected at two sampling sites in the Modena ceramic cluster and one sampling site in the Castelló ceramic cluster. PM10 annual average concentrations were 12-14 μg m-3 higher in Modena than in Castelló, and were close to or exceeded the European limit. Air quality in Modena was mainly influenced by road traffic and, in a lower degree, the metalmechanical industry, as evidenced by the high concentrations of Mn, Cu, Zn, Sn and Sb registered. The stagnant weather conditions from Modena hindering dispersion of pollutants also contributed to the relatively high pollution levels. In Castelló, the influence of the ceramic industry is evidenced by the high concentrations of Ti, Se, Tl and Pb, whereas this influence is not seen in Modena. The difference in the impact of the ceramic industry on the air quality in the two areas was attributed to: better abatement systems in the spray-drier facilities in Modena, higher coverage of the areas for storage and handling of dusty raw materials in Modena, presence of two open air quarries in the Castelló region, low degree of abatement systems in the ceramic tile kilns in Castelló, and abundance of ceramic frit, glaze and pigment manufacture in Castelló as opposed to scarce manufacture of these products in Modena. The necessity of additional measures to fulfil the EU air quality requirements in the Modena region is evidenced, despite the high degree of environmental measures implemented in the ceramic industry. The Principal

  13. The Mechanical and Tribological Properties or Ion Implanted Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, Stephen John

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of ion implanted ceramics are primarily a function of the radiation damage produced by the implantation process. For crystalline ceramics this damage is chiefly nuclear displacements, though for glasses electronic effects have also been observed. In this study a number of single crystal and polycrystalline ceramics and a soda-lime-silica glass have been implanted with a range of ions in the energy range 90keV to 400keV and the changes in mechanical properties prod...

  14. Unipolar memristive switching in bulk positive temperature coefficient ceramic thermistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongya; Wang, Caihui; Fu, Hua; Zhou, Ji; Zheng, Shuzhi

    2016-01-01

    A memristive switching phenomena was investigated in macroscale bulk positive temperature coefficient (PTC) thermosensitive ceramics. (BaxSr1-x)TiO3, which is a well-known PTC thermistor, was taken as an example to analyze the memristive behavior of those macroscale bulk ceramics. Hysteretic current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, which are the features of memristor were obtained. The origin of the effect is attributed to the PTC thermosensitive characteristic of the bulk ceramics, and a switching mechanism driven by competing field-driven heat generation and heat dissipation was proposed.

  15. Leaching of polyphase nuclear waste ceramics: microstructural and phase characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching of complex polyphase nuclear waste ceramics is described in the context of the geochemically established dissolution behavior of the constituent phases. Static leach tests conducted on ceramic monoliths in deionized water, in simulated silicate, and in brine groundwaters, conforming to Materials Characterization Center standards and an accelerated, microscopic leach test, were used to identify the processes. Dissolution and formation of surface passivation layers are discussed in terms of hydrolysis and the adsorption of the metal hydroxocomplexes onto the monolith surface. The factors observed to affect dissolution are pertinent to the leaching of other polyphase nuclear waste ceramics. 11 figures, 1 table

  16. Modelling the viscoelasticity of ceramic tiles by finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Ana; Fragassa, Cristiano

    2016-05-01

    This research details a numerical method aiming at investigating the viscoelastic behaviour of a specific family of ceramic material, the Grès Porcelain, during an uncommon transformation, known as pyroplasticity, which occurs when a ceramic tile bends under a combination of thermal stress and own weight. In general, the theory of viscoelasticity can be considered extremely large and precise, but its application on real cases is particularly delicate. A time-depending problem, as viscoelasticity naturally is, has to be merged with a temperature-depending situation. This paper investigates how the viscoelastic response of bending ceramic materials can be modelled by commercial Finite Elements codes.

  17. Characterization and microstructure of porous lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Praveenkumar; H H Kumar; D K Kharat

    2005-08-01

    Porous lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics are widely used because of their low acoustic impedance, high figure of merit and high hydrostatic sensitivity. In the present work, porous PZT ceramics were fabricated by incorporating polyethylene oxide (PEO) as pore-forming agent. Both PZT powder and PEO were mixed with a binder at different ratios and compaction was carried out. The samples were slowly heated to remove the pore-forming agent and binder without cracks, followed by controlled sintering and electrode forming. Samples were poled using corona poling technique. The ferroelectric properties and microstructure of the prepared ceramics were characterized. The correlation of porosity with microstructure and ferroelectric properties were discussed.

  18. Experimental 511 W Composite Nd:YAG Ceramic Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hai-Feng; XU De-Gang; YANG Yang; WANG Yu-Ye; ZHOU Rui; ZHANG Tie-Li; ZHAO Xin; WANG Peng; YAO Jian-Quan

    2005-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate a 511 W laser diode pumped composite Nd:YAG ceramic laser. The optical pumping system is consisted of five laser diode stacked arrays arranged in a pentagonal shape around the ceramic rod whose size is φ6.35×144mm. When the pumping power is 1600W, the cw laser output up to 511 W at 1064nm can be obtained with a linear plano-plano cavity, and the optical-to-optical efficiency is 31.9%. To our knowledge, this is the highest value of laser output by using a newly invented composite Nd:YAG ceramic rod as the gain medium.

  19. Report on the planning workshop on cost-effective ceramic machining. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1991-11-01

    A workshop on ``Cost Effective Ceramic Machining`` (CECM) was held at Oak Ridge Associated Universities Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, May 1991. The purpose of this workshop was to present a preliminary project plan for industry critique and to identify specific components and cost-reduction targets for a new project on Cost Effective Ceramic Machining. The CECM project is an extension of the work on the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Program sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Materials. The workshop consisted of fifteen invited papers, discussions, a survey of the attendee`s opinions, and a tour of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory at ORNL. The total number of registrants was sixty-seven, including thirty-three from industry or private sector organizations, seven from universities, three from industry groups, fourteen from DOE laboratories (including ORNL, Y-12, and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory), three from trade associations, and three from other government organizations. Forty- one survey forms, which critiqued the proposed project plan, were completed by attendees, and the results are presented in this report. Valves, cam roller followers, water pump seals, and diesel engine head plates were rated highest fro application of ceramic machining concepts to reduce cost. Coarse grinding, abrasives and wheel technology, and fine grinding were most highly rated as regards their impact on cost reduction. Specific cost-reduction targets for given parts varied greatly in the survey results and were not felt to be useful for the purposes for the CECM plan development. A range of individual comments were obtained and are listed in an appendix. As a result of the workshop and subsequent discussions, a modified project plan, different in certain aspects from the original CECM plan, has been developed.

  20. Ceramics in Environmental Catalysis:Applications and Possibilities%Ceramics in Environmental Catalysis: Applications and Possibilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nitin LABHSETWAR; P.DOGGALI; S.RAYALU; R.YADAV; T.MISTUHASHI; H.HANEDA

    2012-01-01

    Environmental catalysis has been steadily growing because of the advances in its scientific and engineering aspects,as well as due to the new environmental challenges in the industrial era.The development of new catalysts and materials is essential for new technologies for various environmental applications.Ceramics play important roles in various environmental applications including the identification,monitoring,and quantification of pollutants and their control.Ceramics have important applications as sensors and photocatalysts,and they are extensively used as catalyst carriers and supports.Many ceramics are being explored as catalysts for pollution control applications.Their low cost,thermal and chemical stability,and capability of being tailored make them especially attractive for pollution control applications.Although a wide variety of materials have been developed as catalyst supports,this area is still of interest with new or modified catalyst supports being frequently reported.It is of equal importance to develop new or modified processes for the loading of catalysts on specific supports.Applications like chemical looping combustion (CLC) and other catalytic combustion processes are raising the demands to a new scale.We have been working on the development of both new and modified support materials,including mesoporous materials without structural order for possible applications in CLC and other catalytic reactions.Successful attempts have been made in the modification of conventional γ-Al2O3 and improved synthesis processes for supporting perovskite type catalysts.Our research on environmental catalysis applications of ceramic materials and processes are also briefly discussed.

  1. Internal fit of two all-ceramic systems and metal-ceramic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Moura Martins

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the internal fit (IF of glass-infiltrated alumina (ICA - In-Ceram Alumina, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP - IPS e.max ZirCAD, and metal-ceramic (MC - Ni-Cr alloy crowns. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty standardized resin-tooth replicas of a maxillary first molar were produced for crown placement and divided into 3 groups (n=20 each according to the core material used (metal, ICA or Y-TZP. The IF of the crowns was measured using the replica technique, which employs a light body polyvinyl siloxane impression material to simulate the cement layer thickness. The data were analyzed according to the surfaces obtained for the occlusal space (OS, axial space (AS and total mean (TM using two-way ANOVA with Tukey ’s multiple comparison test (p<0.05. RESULTS: No differences among the different areas were detected in the MC group. For the Y-TZP and ICA groups, AS was statistically lower than both OS and TM. No differences in AS were observed among the groups. However, OS and TM showed significantly higher values for ICA and Y-TZP groups than MC group. Comparisons of ICA and Y-TZP revealed that OS was significantly lower for Y-TZP group, whereas no differences were observed for TM. CONCLUSIONS: The total mean achieved by all groups was within the range of clinical acceptability. However, the metal-ceramic group demonstrated significantly lower values than the all-ceramic groups, especially in OS.

  2. Proceedings of the national symposium on materials and processing: functional glass/glass-ceramics, advanced ceramics and high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of materials science it is becoming increasingly important to process some novel materials in the area of glass, advanced ceramics and high temperature metals/alloys, which play an important role in the realization of many new technologies. Such applications demand materials with tailored specifications. Glasses and glass-ceramics find exotic applications in areas like radioactive waste storage, optical communication, zero thermal expansion coefficient telescopic mirrors, human safety gadgets (radiation resistance windows, bullet proof apparels, heat resistance components etc), biomedical (implants, hyperthermia treatment, bone cement, bone grafting etc). Advanced ceramic materials have been beneficial in biomedical applications due to their strength, biocompatibility and wear resistance. Non-oxide ceramics such as carbides, borides, silicides, their composites, refractory metals and alloys are useful as structural and control rod components in high temperature fission/ fusion reactors. Over the years a number of novel processing techniques like selective laser melting, microwave heating, nano-ceramic processing etc have emerged. A detailed understanding of the various aspects of synthesis, processing and characterization of these materials provides the base for development of novel technologies for different applications. Keeping this in mind and realizing the need for taking stock of such developments a National Symposium on Materials and Processing -2012 (MAP-2012) was planned. The topics covered in the symposium are ceramics, glass/glass-ceramics and metals and materials. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. Influence of ceramic surface treatment on shear bond strength of ceramic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Fernandes Ramos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare four different surface treatment methods and determine which produces adequate bond strength between ceramic brackets and facets of porcelain (feldspathic, and evaluate the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores. Materials and Methods: Ten facets of porcelain specimens with glazed surfaces were used for each group. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment conditions of the porcelain surface: (1 no surface treatment (control group, (2 fine diamond bur + orthophosphoric acid gel 37%, (3 hydrofluoric acid (HFL 10%, and (4 HFL 10% + silane. Ceramic brackets were bonded with the adhesive cement Transbond XT. The shear bond strength values were measured on a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: There was a significant difference (P<0.05 between the control group and all other groups. There was no significant difference (P<0.05 between treated porcelain surface with diamond bur + orthophosphoric acid gel 37% (4.8 MPa and HFL 10% (6.1 MPa, but the group treated with HFL 10% had clinically acceptable bond strength values. The group treated with HFL 10% + silane (17.5 MPa resulted in a statistically significant higher tensile bond strength (P<0.05. In group 4, 20% of the porcelain facets displayed damage. Conclusion: Etching of the surface with HFL increased the bond strength values. Silane application was recommended to bond a ceramic bracket to the porcelain surface in order to achieve bond strengths that are clinically acceptable.

  4. Development of ceramic composites from mixture of alumina and ceramic precursor polymer poly (silsesquioxane))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of ceramics materials, by polymer precursors pyrolysis, has been intensively researched over the past decades, due to advantages that this path provides, such as: lower temperature process compared to conventional techniques; structure control at molecular level; synthesis possibility of a wide range of ceramic compounds; obtaining parts with dimensions of the final product etc. The active filler controlled polymer pyrolysis (AFCOP) process, enables the synthesis of ceramic composites, by reaction between added filler (oxides, metals, intermetallic etc.) and solid and gaseous products, from polymer decomposition. In this study, based on this process, samples of alumina, with addition of 10 and 20 mass% of poly silsesquioxane polymer precursor, were manufactured. These samples were pyrolyzed at 900 degree C and thermal treated at temperatures of 1100, 1300 and 1500 degree C. The samples were characterized for bulk density, porosity and hardness, after each stage of thermal treatment. Structural transformations were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. Samples treated until 1300 degree C resulted in composites of alumina and silicon oxycarbide, while those treated at 1500 degree C, formed composites of mullite and alumina. The samples with 20% of polymer added started to density around 800 degree C and high retraction rate was observed at 1400 degree C. (author)

  5. Infrared sensing by semiconducting ceramic monofiber. Handotai ceramic tansen prime i ni yoru sekigaisen kanchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, N.; Miyayama, M.; Yanagida, H. (Univ of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Research Center for Advanced Science and Tech.); Mori, N.; Kajiwara, T. (Sogo Keibi-Hosho Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Urano, A.; Ichikawa, H.; Imai, Y. (Nippon Carbon Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-01

    A study was conducted on the IR beam sensor characteristics of a thermal IR-sensor using a semiconductor ceramic monofiber of SiC and PAN-based carbon. In the case of using a SiC monofiber, IR-beam was detected at a rapid response of 1.6ms of thermal time constant. Using a PAN-based carbon monofiber having at least 200 ohm-cm specific resistance, detection of static and moving human body could be made. In the case of using a monofiber, thermal time constant increases by the increase of the fiber diameter, this constant can be controlled by changing the fiber diameter. The output voltage increases by the increase of a radiation energy and the decrease of the surrounding temperature. Similar trend was observed as forecast by a theoretical formula. According to this study, the IR-beam sensor, which uses a semiconductor ceramic fiber, is a practical compact sensor, and as a position information is available by the type of the fiber arrangement, the semiconductor ceramic fiber is promising as a new thermal IR sensor material. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  7. Recent advances in the field of ceramic fibers and ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslain, R.

    2005-03-01

    Progress achieved during the last decade in the field of ceramic fibers and related ceramic matrix composites is reviewed. Both SiC-based and alumina-based fine fibers have been improved in terms of thermal stability and creep resistance with temperature limit of about 1400 and 1200 ° C, respectively. Two concepts for achieving damage-tolerant ceramic matrix composites have been identified : (i) that of non-oxide composites with a dense matrix in which matrix cracks formed under load are deflected and arrested in a weak fiber coating referred to as the interphase and (ii) that of all-oxide composites with a highly porous matrix with no need of any fiber coating. The lifetime under load of non-oxide composites in oxidizing atmospheres, is improved through the use of multilayered self-healing interphases and matrices deposited from gaseous precursors by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Lifetime ranging from 1000 to 10,000 hours at 1200 ° C under cyclic loading in air are foreseen. Alumina-based composites although attractive for long term exposures in oxidizing atmospheres up to ≈1200 ° C, are still experimental materials.

  8. The effect of ceramic thickness and number of firings on the color of a zirconium oxide based all ceramic system fabricated using CAD/CAM technology

    OpenAIRE

    Bachhav, Vinay Chila; Aras, Meena Ajay

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Ceramics have a long history in fixed prosthodontics for achieving optimal esthetics and various materials have been used to improve ceramic core strength. However, there is a lack of information on how color is affected by fabrication procedure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of various dentin ceramic thicknesses and repeated firings on the color of zirconium oxide all-ceramic system (Lava™) fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty disc...

  9. Glass ceramics for high - Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass formation in the BiO1.5-Ca0.5-Sr0.5O-CuO quasiternary oxide system was examined by the twin-roller and metal-plate quenching techniques. The crystallization process and kinetics were systematically studied by differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy as well as electrical measurements. The route and kinetic properties of crystallization were shown to have a strong compositional dependence. It was found that the growth of crystals in the glasses can be accelerated in the presence of an electrical field. A temperature gradient-related orientation of crystallization was revealed in the Bi-based glasses. This has been ascribed to the large crystallographic anisotropy of the superconducting crystals. The effects of compositions, annealing conditions, and oxygen deficiency on the superconductivity in the Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-0 glass ceramics are also discussed. 27 refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs

  10. Recycling liquid effluents in a ceramic industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo Almeida, B.; Almeida, M.; Martins, S.; Alexandra Macarico, V.; Tomas da Fonseca, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work is presented a study on the recycling of liquid effluents in a ceramic installation for sanitary industry. The effluents were characterized by X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma to evaluate their compositions. It was also assessed the daily production rate. Several glaze-slurry mixtures were prepared and characterized according to procedures and equipment of the company's quality laboratory. The results show that for most of the properties, the tested mixtures exhibited acceptable performance. However, the pyro plasticity parameter is highly influenced by the glaze content and imposes the separation of glaze and slurry liquid effluents. In addition, it is necessary to invest on a storage plant, including tanks with constant stirring and a new pipeline structure to implement the reincorporation method on the slurry processing. (Author)

  11. COMBINED DAMAGE FRACTURE CRITERIA FOR PIEZOELECTRIC CERAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xinhua; Chen Chuanyao; Hu Yuantai; Wang Cheng

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical and electrical damages are introduced to study the fracture mechanics of piezoelectric ceramics in this paper. Two kinds of piezoelectric fracture criteria are established using the method of least squares combined with a damage analysis of the well-known piezoelectric fracture experiments of Park and Sun's. One is based on a linear combination of the mechanical and electrical damages and the other on their nonlinear combination. When the combined damage D is up to its critical value Dc, piezoelectric fracture occurs. It is found from the qualitative comparison of the numerical results with the experimental data that the nonlinearly combined damage fracture criterion can give a better prediction of piezoelectric fracture. And it is concluded from the nonlinearly combined damage fracture criterion that a negative electric field impedes fracture whereas the effect of a positive electric field on fracture depends on its magnitude.

  12. Ceramic heat recuperators for industrial heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, J. J.; Gonzalez, J. M.; Kohnken, K. H.; Rebello, W. J.

    1980-08-01

    A cordierite (magnesium aluminum silicate) recuperator was designed for relatively small furnaces with firing rates of 0.3 MM to 0.6 MM Btu/h and with exhaust gas temperatures of 1500 F to 2600 F. Five demonstration programs were performed to determine the heat transfer performance of the device, establish the energy savings by recovery, demonstrate the durability of the ceramic core, determine the operating requirements of the burners and controls with recuperation, and establish the overall system costs and payback period. The recuperator is described and results of tests and measurements, system economics, and cost performance analyses are presented. The methodology is developed and techniques for impact analysis are described. Industrial applications are implied and a process flow diagram for smelting and refining primary copper is shown.

  13. Glass-ceramic composition for hermetic seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Jr., Clifford P.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to a glass-ceramic composition having a high fracture strength adaptable for hermetically sealing to chromium bearing iron or nickel base alloys at temperatures of between about 950.degree. C to about 1100.degree. C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body, comprising from about 55 to about 65 weight percent SiO.sub.2, from about 0 to about 5 weight percent Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, from about 6 to about 11 weight % Li.sub.2 O, from about 25 to about 32 weight percent BaO, from about 0.5 to about 1.0 weight percent CoO and from about 1.5 to about 3.5 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5.

  14. Role of vanadium in Bi-2223 ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D R Mishra; S V Sharma; R G Sharma

    2000-02-01

    The effect of substitution of vanadium in Bi1.6Pb0.4Sr2Ca2Cu3O ceramic at Bi and Cu sites has been investigated for the resistivity, a.c. susceptibility, XRD and a.c. magnetization studies. Enhancement in for the smaller concentrations of V at either of the two sites was observed which followed an expected lattice distortion and decrease in for higher V concentrations. V plays a role of substituting element more than just a sintering agent as reflected in the more rapid decrease in at Cu-site and further in the magnetization values that are higher compared to the values at the Bisite. It indicates higher magnetization scattering at the Cu site. The results were explained keeping in mind the liquid phase mechanism behind the formation of the 2223 phase and the possibility of magnetic scattering.

  15. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Naperville, IL); Kobylinski, Thaddeus P. (Lisle, IL); Morissette, Sherry L. (Las Cruces, NM); Pei, Shiyou (Naperville, IL)

    1997-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

  16. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1996-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

  17. Electrochemical Characterization of Gelatine Derived Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak A.P.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available New materials obtained by pyrolysis of gelatine (G and poly(1,2-dimethylsilazane (PSN (weight ratio: G/PSN 70/30 at temperatures 700 and 900 °C were characterized by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The presence of ceramics influences on the cluster size of the materials. Electrochemical tests were performed by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic cyclic polarization. The capacity of G/PSN was 464 and 527 mAh/g for materials pyrolysed at 700 and 900 °C. The capacity fading was 1 % after 17th cycle for G/PSN at 900 °C. This value is higher of 185 mAh/g in comparison to capacity of gelatine pyrolysed at the same conditions.

  18. Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

    2010-08-05

    Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor – in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900°C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors – in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600°C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to

  19. RUGGED CERAMIC WINDOW FOR RF APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MIKE NEUBAUER

    2012-11-01

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  20. Transparent ceramics and methods of preparation thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Joel P.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Soules, Thomas F.

    2012-12-25

    A method for forming a transparent ceramic preform in one embodiment includes forming a suspension of oxide particles in a solvent, wherein the suspension includes a dispersant, with the proviso that the suspension does not include a gelling agent; and uniformly curing the suspension for forming a preform of gelled suspension. A method according to another embodiment includes creating a mixture of inorganic particles, a solvent and a dispersant, the inorganic particles having a mean diameter of less than about 2000 nm; agitating the mixture; adding the mixture to a mold; and curing the mixture in the mold for gelling the mixture, with the proviso that no gelling agent is added to the mixture.

  1. Precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.; Paul, H.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the effect of machine parameters and material properties on precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass. The critical grinding depth to initiate the plastic flow-to-brittle fracture regime will be directly measured using plunge-grind tests. This information will be correlated with machine parameters such as wheel bonding and diamond grain size. Multiaxis grinding tests will then be made to provide data more closely coupled with production technology. One important aspect of the material property studies involves measuring fracture toughness at the very short crack sizes commensurate with grinding damage. Short crack toughness value`s can be much less than the long-crack toughness values measured in conventional fracture tests.

  2. Obtaining of ceramics biphasic dense and porous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the bioceramic hydroxyapatite (HAP) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) are materials commonly used in biomedical field. Their combined properties result in a material with absorbable and at the same time with bioactive surface. Called biphasic ceramics such materials respond more quickly when exposed to physiological environment. In this work, powders of HAP/beta-TCP were obtained by chemical precipitation. After obtaining the post-phase was added at a ratio of 0, 15% and 30w% aqueous solutions of corn starch in order to obtain porous bodies. After mixing the resulting solutions were dried, resigned in tablet form and sintered at 1300 deg C. The initial powder was characterized by X-ray diffraction with Rietveld refinement to quantify the phases present. Bodies-of-evidence has been characterized by calculating the bulk density, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and diametral compression. (author)

  3. Teaching methods to explore ceramics museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于程杨

    2015-01-01

    As early as 8000 years ago the period of primitive society, our ancestors had invented pottery making technology, pottery has been widely used, with the development of The Times, the birth of China greatly improve human quality of life, one by one through the porcelain making porcelain craftsmen sublime skill and wisdom to this, give the modern with the material of inheritance and explore the porcelain making industry. Museum is not only a place full of ideas and wisdom, and knowledge transfer medium, it not only has the cultural relics collection, collection, preservation, display function, but also has guiding, activates the creative role. Modern ceramic in colleges and universities to establish the teaching course of contact is also a museum and museum is a very worth exploring topic.

  4. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue;

    2004-01-01

    will be spherical due to the fast coalescence at the high temperatures in the flame. The primary product from the flame pyrolysis is an aerosol of metal oxide nanoparticles. The aerosol gas from the flame can be utilized for several different purposes, depending on the precursors fed to the flame. With the present...... technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...... tube, where a part of the gas is sucked through the wall of the substrate, thereby creating a thin filter cake on the inner surface of the substrate tube. The top-layer can be deposited directly on a coarse pore structure. Since the Brownian motion of the aerosol particles is fast compared to the fluid...

  5. Laser hearth melt processing of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Weber, J. K.; Felten, J. J.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1996-02-01

    A new technique for synthesizing small batches of oxide-based ceramic and glass materials from high purity powders is described. The method uses continuous wave CO2 laser beam heating of material held on a water-cooled copper hearth. Contamination which would normally result during crucible melting is eliminated. Details of the technique are presented, and its operation and use are illustrated by results obtained in melting experiments with a-aluminum oxide, Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductor material, and the mixtures, Al2O3-SiO2, Bi2O3-B2O3, Bi2O3-CuO. Specimen masses were 0.05-1.5 g.

  6. Ceramics based on calcium pyrophosphate nanopowders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Safronova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Present work is aimed at the fabrication of resorbable bioceramics based on calcium pyrophosphate (CPP from the synthesized powders of amorphous hydrated calcium pyrophosphate (AHCPP. Amorphous hydratedcalcium pyrophosphate in the form of nanopowders was precipitated from Ca(NO3 2 and (NH4 4P2O7 solutions at room temperature in the presence of PO3– ions. Crystalline CPP powder was fabricated from AHCPP by its thermal decomposition at 600 °C and consisted of β- and α- phase. Small particles, with the size less than 200 nm, were formed promoting sintering of the ceramic material. The final sample, sintered at 900 °C, exhibits microstructure with submicron grains, apparent density of 87% of theoretical density (TD and demonstrates tensile strength of 70 MPa.

  7. Rational design of precursors for oxide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apblett, A.W.; Georgieva, G. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The use of molecular species as precursors for inorganic materials has received considerable attention in recent years. As a result, metal-organic precursors are becoming increasingly sophisticated as particular decomposition mechanisms and specific stoichiometry are integrated into their design. The authors have pursued both of these design aspects for the development of low-temperature precursors for mono- and bi-metallic oxide materials. Thus, a great variety of metal complexes with 2- and 3-oximinocarboxylic acids, acyloin oximes, 2,4-diols, and diacetone alcohol have been prepared and their thermal behavior investigated. The results of this investigation and their application to the preparation of a variety of metal, oxide ceramics, will be discussed. Particular attention will be paid to precursors for alumina, titania, zirconia, perovskite-phase ferroelectric materials, and ferrites.

  8. FILTER COMPONENT ASSESSMENT--CERAMIC CANDLES--

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Alvin

    2004-04-23

    Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on development of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation applications. SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report summarizes the results of SWPC's filter component assessment efforts, identifying the performance and stability of porous monolithic, fiber reinforced, and filament wound ceramic hot gas candle filters, potentially for {ge}3 years of viable pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) service operating life.

  9. Water vapor sorption hysteresis of ceramic bricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronthalyova, Olga

    2016-07-01

    A quantification of the hysteretic effects and their thorough analysis was carried out for three types of ceramic bricks. Water vapor adsorption/desorption isotherms were measured by the standard desiccator method. The desorption measurements were carried out from capillary moisture content as well as from equilibrium moisture content corresponding to the relative humidity of 98 %. For all three tested types of bricks the hysteretic effects were present but their significance differed depending on the particular type of brick. Significant differences were noticed also in desorption curves determined from capillary moisture content and from equilibrium moisture content corresponding to the relative humidity of 98 %. Based on the measured data a possible correlation between pore structure parameters and noticed hysteretic effects as well as relevance of the open pore model are discussed. The obtained adsorption/desorption curves were approximated by an analytical relation.

  10. Low thermal stress ceramic turbine nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, Boris; Bagheri, Hamid; Fierstein, Aaron R.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of vanes therebetween. Each of the plurality of vanes have a device for heating and cooling a portion of each of the plurality of vanes. Furthermore, the inner shroud has a plurality of bosses attached thereto. A cylindrical member has a plurality of grooves formed therein and each of the plurality of bosses are positioned in corresponding ones of the plurality of grooves. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  11. Mullite Ceramics: Its Properties Structure and Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Anggono

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Besides its importance for conventional ceramics, mullite has become a choice of material for advanced structural and functional ceramics due to its favourable properties. Some outstanding properties of mullite are low thermal expansion, low thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, high-temperature strength, and good chemical stability. The mechanism of mullite formation depends upon the method of combining the alumina- and silica-containing reactants. It is also related to the temperature at which the reaction leads to the formation of mullite (mullitisation temperature. Mullitisation temperatures have been reported to differ by up to several hundred degrees Celsius depending on the synthesis method used. The three synthesis methods used to prepare mullite are discussed in this paper together with an overview of mullite, its properties and the current application of mullite. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Keramik mullite tidak hanya penting dalam penggunaan konvensional, tetapi juga sudah menjadi bahan pilihan untuk aplikasi struktural dan fungsional karena sifat-sifatnya yang menguntungkan. Beberapa keunggulan sifat mullite adalah sifat muai dan konduktivitas panasnya rendah, ketahanan mulur yang tinggi, kekuatan yang terjaga pada temperatur tinggi, dan sifat korosinya yang baik. Mekanisme pembentukan mullite bergantung pada bagaimana proses menggabungkan reaktan yang mengandung alumina dan silika. Mekanisme tersebut juga bergantung pada temperatur reaksi awal yang akan mengarah pada pembentukan mullite (mullitisation. Beberapa penelitian melaporkan terjadinya temperatur mullitisation yang bervariasi hingga beberapa ratus derajat Celsius bergantung pada proses sintesa yang digunakan. Artikel ini menjelaskan tiga proses sintesa yang menghasilkan mullite yang dibahas bersama dengan sifat-sifat dan aplikasi mullite saat ini. Kata kunci: mullite, mullitisation, fasa glassy, sol-gel, spray pyrolysis, chemical vapour deposition.

  12. Evaluation of mercuric iodide ceramic semiconductor detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, M.; Zuck, A.; Braiman, M.; Nissenbaum, J. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel); Turchetta, R.; Dulinski, W.; Husson, D.; Riester, J.L. [LEPSI (ULP/IN2P3), Strasbourg (France)

    1998-02-01

    Mercuric iodide ceramic radiation detectors, which can act as nuclear particle counters, have been fabricated with single continuos electrical contacts and with linear strip contacts. They have been tested with different kinds of {gamma} and {beta} sources as well as in a high energy beam at CERN. The detectors were also successfully tested for radiation hardness with irradiation of 5*10{sup 14} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. The ratio of detected photons over the number of absorbed photons has been measured with {gamma} sources of different energies, and it ranges from 20% at 44 keV up to about 30% at 660 keV. An absolute efficiency of 70% has been measured for a 350 {mu}m thick detector for {beta} particles emitted by a {sup 90}Sr source. Charge collection efficiency, defined as the amount of charge induced on the electrodes by a mminimum ionizing particle (MIP) traversing the detector, has been measured in two samples. The average collected charge fits well with a linear curve with slope of 35 electrons/(kV/cm) per 100 {mu}m. This result is well described by a dynamic device simulation, where the free carrier mean lifetime is used as a free parameter, adjusted to a value of 1.5 ns, i.e. about 1/100 of the corresponding lifetime in single crystal HgI{sub 2} detectors. The response to MIP has also been studied with a high energy (100 GeV) muon beam in CERN. A preliminary beam profile is presented while a more detailed analysis is still in progress and will be presented elsewhere. These results together with the low cost of the material make ceramic HgI{sub 2} detectors excellent candidates for large area particle tracking and imaging applications, even in a radiation harsh environment. (orig.). 14 refs.

  13. Biomimetic processing of oriented crystalline ceramic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, J.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project was to develop the capabilities for Sandia to fabricate self assembled Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of various materials and to exploit their two-dimensional crystalline structure to promote the growth of oriented thin films of inorganic materials at room temperature. This includes the design and synthesis of Langmuir-active (amphiphilic) organic molecules with end groups offering high nucleation potential for various ceramics. A longer range goal is that of understanding the underlying principles, making it feasible to use the techniques presented in this report to fabricate unique oriented films of various materials for electronic, sensor, and membrane applications. Therefore, whenever possible, work completed in this report was completed with the intention of addressing the fundamental phenomena underlying the growth of crystalline, inorganic films on template layers of highly organized organic molecules. This problem was inspired by biological processes, which often produce exquisitely engineered structures via templated growth on polymeric layers. Seashells, for example, exhibit great toughness owing to their fine brick-and-mortar structure that results from templated growth of calcium carbonate on top of layers of ordered organic proteins. A key goal in this work, therefore, is to demonstrate a positive correlation between the order and orientation of the template layer and that of the crystalline ceramic material grown upon it. The work completed was comprised of several parallel efforts that encompassed the entire spectrum of biomimetic growth from solution. Studies were completed on seashells and the mechanisms of growth for calcium carbonate. Studies were completed on the characterization of LB films and the capability developed for the in-house fabrication of these films. Standard films of fatty acids were studied as well as novel polypeptides and porphyrins that were synthesized.

  14. Thermal Performance of Ablative/ Ceramic Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana STEFAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid thermal protection system for atmospheric earth re-entry based on ablative materials on top of ceramic matrix composites is investigated for the protection of the metallic structure in oxidative and high temperature environment of the space vehicles. The paper focuses on the joints of ablative material (carbon fiber based CALCARB® or cork based NORCOAT TM and Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC material (carbon fibers embedded in silicon carbide matrix, Cf/SiC, SICARBON TM or C/C-SiC using commercial high temperature inorganic adhesives. To study the thermal performance of the bonded materials the joints were tested under thermal shock at the QTS facility. For carrying out the test, the sample is mounted into a holder and transferred from outside the oven at room temperature, inside the oven at the set testing temperature (1100°C, at a heating rate that was determined during the calibration stage. The dwell time at the test temperature is up to 2 min at 1100ºC at an increasing rate of temperature up to ~ 9,5°C/s. Evaluating the atmospheric re-entry real conditions we found that the most suited cooling method is the natural cooling in air environment as the materials re-entering the Earth atmosphere are subjected to similar conditions. The average weigh loss was calculated for all the samples from one set, without differentiating the adhesive used as the weight loss is due to the ablative material consumption that is the same in all the samples and is up to 2%. The thermal shock test proves that, thermally, all joints behaved similarly, the two parts withstanding the test successfully and the assembly maintaining its integrity.

  15. Research and development status of ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was also recognized by the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated areas in the properties data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on issues such as tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests are underway, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials. 36 refs

  16. Ceramic Oxygen Generator for Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR Phase I proposal (Topic X9.01), NexTech Materials, Ltd. proposes to develop a high efficiency ceramic oxygen generation system which will separate O2...

  17. International Engineering Foundation Conference on the Plastic Deformation of Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Brookes, Chris; Routbort, Jules

    1995-01-01

    This proceedings volume, "Plastic Deformation of Ceramics," constitutes the papers of an international symposium held at Snowbird, Utah from August 7-12, 1994. It was attended by nearly 100 scientists and engineers from more than a dozen countries representing academia, national laboratories, and industry. Two previous conferences on this topic were held at The Pennsylvania State University in 1974 and 1983. Therefore, the last major international conference focusing on the deformation of ceramic materials was held more than a decade ago. Since the early 1980s, ceramic materials have progressed through an evolutionary period of development and advancement. They are now under consideration for applications in engineering structures. The contents of the previous conferences indicate that considerable effort was directed towards a basic understanding of deformation processes in covalently bonded or simple oxide ceramics. However, now, more than a decade later, the focus has completely shifted. In particular, the...

  18. Wettable Ceramic-Based Drained Cathode Technology for Aluminum Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.N. Bruggeman; T.R. Alcorn; R. Jeltsch; T. Mroz

    2003-01-09

    The goal of the project was to develop the ceramic based materials, technology, and necessary engineering packages to retrofit existing aluminum reduction cells in order to reduce energy consumption required for making primary aluminum. The ceramic materials would be used in a drained cathode configuration which would provide a stable, molten aluminum wetted cathode surface, allowing the reduction of the anode-cathode distance, thereby reducing the energy consumption. This multi-tasked project was divided into three major tasks: (1) Manufacturing and laboratory scale testing/evaluation of the ceramic materials, (2) Pilot scale testing of qualified compositions from the first task, and (3) Designing, retrofitting, and testing the ceramic materials in industrial cells at Kaiser Mead plant in Spokane, Washington. Specific description of these major tasks can be found in Appendix A - Project Scope. Due to the power situation in the northwest, the Mead facility was closed, thus preventing the industrial cell testing.

  19. Crack Growth along Interfaces in Porous Ceramic Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Horsewell, Andy

    2001-01-01

    Crack growth along porous ceramic layers was studied experimentally. Double cantilever beam sandwich specimens were loaded with pure bending moments to obtain stable crack growth. The experiments were conducted in an environmental scanning electron microscope enabling in situ observations of...

  20. Natural radioactivity in imported ceramic tiles used in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija M. Janković

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic tiles are one of the commonly used decorative building materials. Body of ceramic tiles is a mixture of different raw materials including clays, quartz materials and feldspat, and may be glazed or left unglazed. Due to the presence of zircon in the glaze, ceramic tiles can show natural radioactivity concentration significantly higher than the average values for building materials. This study presents a summary of results obtained by a survey which was consisted of measurements of activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in imported ceramic tile samples used in Serbia using a gamma spectrometer with HPGe detector. Based on the obtained concentrations, gamma index, radium equivalent activity, the indoor absorbed dose rate and the corresponding annual effective dose were evaluated to assess the potential radiological hazard associated with these building materials.