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Sample records for ceramic composite hot-gas

  1. Mechanical behavior of ceramic composite hot-gas filters after exposure to severe environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pysher, D.J.; Weaver, B.L.; Smith, R.G. [Ceramic Technology Center, St. Paul, MN (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    A novel type of hot-gas filter based on a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic matrix has been developed, as reported at previous Fossil Energy Materials Conferences, through research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the 3M Company. Simulated testing has been done at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. This filter technology has been extended to full size, 60 mm OD by 1.5 meter long candle filters and a commercially viable process for producing the filters has been developed filters are undergoing testing and demonstration use throughout the world for applications in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants. Demonstration tests of this ceramic composite filter along with other filters are in progress at the Tidd PFBC plant Mechanical tests were performed on the 3 M brand Ceramic Composite Candle Filter after exposure to various corrosive environments in order to assess its ability to function as a hot gas filter in coal-fired applications. Due to the different construction of ceramic composite filters and the thin composite wall versus the typical thick-walled monolithic filter, standard mechanical property tests had to be refined or modified to accurately determine the filters properties. These tests and filter property results will be described Longitudinal tensile and diametral O-ring compression tests were performed on as-produced candle filters as well as on filters which had been exposed to various environments. The exposures were for 1000 hrs at 850{degrees}C in wet air, in wet air containing Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and in wet air containing NaCl. In addition, a filter which bad been coated with ash (Old Grimethorpe) was exposed to wet air at 850{degrees}C for 1000 hours.

  2. Development and characterization of Textron continuous fiber ceramic composite hot gas filter materials. Final report, September 30, 1994--October 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPietro, S.G.; Alvin, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    Uncertainties about the long-term ability of monolithic ceramics to survive in the IGCC or PFBC hot gas filter environment led DOE/METC to consider the merits of using continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCCs) as potential next-generation high temperature filter elements. This seems to be a logical strategy to pursue in light of the fact that properly-engineered CFCC materials have shown much-improved damage tolerance and thermal shock behavior as compared to existing monolithic ceramic materials. Textron`s Advanced Hot Gas Filter Development Program was intended to be a two year, two phase program which transitioned developmental materials R and D into prototype filter element fabrication. The first phase was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of fabricating CFCC hot gas filter elements which could meet the pressure drop specifications of less than ten inches of water (iwg) at a face velocity of ten feet per minute (fpm), while showing sufficient integrity to survive normal mechanical loads and adequate environmental resistance to steam/alkali corrosion conditions at a temperature of approximately 870 C (1600 F). The primary objective of the second phase of the program was to scale up fabrication methods developed in Phase 1 to produce full-scale CFCC candle filters for validation testing. Textron encountered significant process-related and technical difficulties in merely meeting the program permeability specifications, and much effort was expended in showing that this could indeed be achieved. Thus, by the time the Phase 1 program was completed, expenditure of program funds precluded continuing on with Phase 2, and Textron elected to terminate their program after Phase 1. This allowed Textron to be able to focus technical and commercialization efforts on their largely successful DOE CFCC Program.

  3. Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an air to cloth ratio'') for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

  4. Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, R.L.

    1992-11-01

    The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an ``air to cloth ratio``) for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

  5. Automated Nondestructive Evaluation Method for Characterizing Ceramic and Metallic Hot Gas Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingson, W.A.; Pastila, P.; Koehl, E.R.; Wheeler, B.; Deemer, C.; Forster, G.A.

    2002-09-19

    The objective of this work was to develop a nondestructive (NDE), cost-effective and reliable method to assess the condition of rigid ceramic hot gas filters. The work was intended to provide an end user, as well as filter producers, with a nondestructive method to assess the ''quality'' or status of the filters.

  6. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  7. Hot gas cleanup using ceramic cross flow membrane filters. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Keairns, D.L.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1983-12-01

    The single unresolved technical issue in the commercialization of pressurized fluid-bed combustion (PPBC) for electric power production is the hot gas cleaning problem. In this technology, high-temperature and -pressure (HTHP), dust-laden flue gases from the combustor must be cleaned enough to reduce expansion turbine blade erosion to an economically acceptable level. Additionally, the level of particulate emission must be compatible with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for environmental acceptability. The Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a wide range of research and development programs directed at the solution of this problem. These programs were divided into two classifications, one dealing with more advanced concepts where testing was to be done at relatively large scale and a second group of less advanced, novel concepts where the testing was to be carried out at a bench scale. The cross-flow ceramic membrane filter program described in this report is a member of the small-scale, novel concept group.

  8. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot-gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupp, E.R.; Trubelja, M.F.; Spear, K.E.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Experimental corrosion studies of hot gas filter materials and heat exchanger materials in oxidizing combustion environments have been initiated. Filter materials from 3M Co. and DuPont Lanxide Composites Inc. are being tested over a range of temperatures, times and gas flows. It has been demonstrated that morphological and phase changes due to corrosive effects occur after exposure of the 3M material to a combustion environment for as little as 25 hours at 800{degrees}C. The study of heat exchanger materials has focused on enhancing the corrosion resistance of DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} composite tubes by adding chromium to its surfaces by (1) heat treatments in a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder bed, or (2) infiltrating surface porosity with molten chromium nitrate. Each process is followed by a surface homogenization at 1500{degrees}C. The powder bed method has been most successful, producing continuous Cr-rich layers with thicknesses ranging from 20 to 250 {mu}m. As-received and Cr-modified DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} samples will be reacted with commonly encountered coal-ash slags to determine the Cr effects on corrosion resistance.

  9. Ceramic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved ceramic compositions useful for cutting tools and the like are described. They are composed of an essentially homogeneous admixture of sintered powders of an aluminum oxide base material with other refractories including zirconium oxide, titanium oxide, hafnium oxide, titanium nitride, zirconium nitride, and tungsten or molybdenum carbide. In addition to their common and improved properties of hardness and strength, many of these compositions may be made by simple cold-pressing and sintering procedures. This avoids the known drawbacks of conventional hot press production

  10. Evaluation of an all-ceramic tubesheet assembly for a hot gas filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitner, J.L. [Mallett Technology, Inc., Canonsburg, PA (United States); Mallett, R.H. [Mallett Technology, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Eggerstedt, P.M. [Industrial Filter and Pump Mfg. Co., Cicero, IL (United States); Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A 10-inch thick, all-ceramic tubesheet design is evaluated for differential pressure and thermal conditions. Primary stresses from differential pressure are well within a safe allowable. The calculated peak thermal stresses at local discontinuities approach the modules of rupture for the ceramic material. Kiln tests were performed to demonstrate differential temperatures between hot center and cooler rim do not cause failures or visible tensile cracks. There appear to be mitigating mechanisms and design features in the Industrial Filter and Pump (IF and P) Mfg. Co. all-ceramic tubesheet design concept that add forgiveness in accommodating differential pressure and thermal loading stresses. A material characterization program on the ceramic materials is recommended.

  11. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  12. Hot Gas Particulate Cleaning Technology Applied for PFBC/IGFC -The Ceramic Tube Filter (CTF) and Metal Filter-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasatsu, H; Misawa, N; Kobori, K; Iritani, J

    2002-09-18

    Coal is a fossil fuel abundant and widespread all over world. It is a vital resource for energy security, because the supply is stable. However, its CO2 emission per unit calorific value is greater than that of other fossil fuels. It is necessary to develop more efficient coal utilization technologies to expand the coal utilization that meets the social demand for better environment. The Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) combined cycle has become a subject of world attention in terms of better plant operation, improved plant efficiency, lower flue gas emission and fuel flexibility. The gas turbine, one of the most important components in the PFBC, is eager for a hot gas (approximately 650-850C) cleaning system in order to eliminate the severe erosion problem with the less thermal loss. The cyclone is most popular system for a hot gas cleaning, however, the severe damage for gas turbine blades by highly concentrated fine fly ash from PFBC boiler is reported.

  13. High efficiency tantalum-based ceramic composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A. (Inventor); Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); DiFiore, Robert R. (Inventor); Katvala, Victor W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum-based ceramics are suitable for use in thermal protection systems. These composite structures have high efficiency surfaces (low catalytic efficiency and high emittance), thereby reducing heat flux to a spacecraft during planetary re-entry. These ceramics contain tantalum disilicide, molybdenum disilicide and borosilicate glass. The components are milled, along with a processing aid, then applied to a surface of a porous substrate, such as a fibrous silica or carbon substrate. Following application, the coating is then sintered on the substrate. The composite structure is substantially impervious to hot gas penetration and capable of surviving high heat fluxes at temperatures approaching 3000.degree. F. and above.

  14. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  15. Environmental durability of ceramics and ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Dennis S.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the current understanding of the environmental durability of both monolithic ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites, with a view to the prospective development of methods for the characterization, prediction, and improvement of ceramics' environmental durability. Attention is given to the environmental degradation behaviors of SiC, Si3N4, Al2O3, and glass-ceramic matrix compositions. The focus of corrosion prevention in Si-based ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 is on the high and low sulfur fuel combustion-product effects encountered in heat engine applications of these ceramics; sintering additives and raw material impurities are noted to play a decisive role in ceramics' high temperature environmental response.

  16. Toward virtual ceramic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Genet, Martin; LADEVEZE, Pierre; LUBINEAU, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    A first step toward a multi-scale and multi-physic model --a virtual material-- for self-healing ceramic matrix composites is presented. Each mechanism --mechanical, chemical-- that act on the material's lifetime at a given scale --fibre, yarn-- is introduced in a single modeling framework, aimed at providing powerful prediction tools.

  17. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  18. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Wagner

    2002-12-18

    This report summarizes work to develop CFCC's for various applications in the Industries of the Future (IOF) and power generation areas. Performance requirements range from relatively modest for hot gas filters to severe for turbine combustor liners and infrared burners. The McDermott Technology Inc. (MTI) CFCC program focused on oxide/oxide composite systems because they are known to be stable in the application environments of interest. The work is broadly focused on dense and porous composite systems depending on the specific application. Dense composites were targeted at corrosion resistant components, molten aluminum handling components and gas turbine combustor liners. The development work on dense composites led to significant advances in fiber coatings for oxide fibers and matrix densification. Additionally, a one-step fabrication process was developed to produce low cost composite components. The program also supported key developments in advanced oxide fibers that resulted in an improved version of Nextel 610 fiber (commercially available as Nextel 650) and significant progress in the development of a YAG/alumina fiber. Porous composite development focused on the vacuum winding process used to produce hot gas filters and infrared burner components.

  19. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Connolly; G.D. Forsythe

    1998-12-22

    Advanced, coal-based power plants will require durable and reliable hot gas filtration systems to remove particulate contaminants from the gas streams to protect downstream components such as turbine blades from erosion damage. It is expected that the filter elements in these systems will have to be made of ceramic materials to withstand goal service temperatures of 1600 F or higher. Recent demonstration projects and pilot plant tests have indicated that the current generation of ceramic hot gas filters (cross-flow and candle configurations) are failing prematurely. Two of the most promising materials that have been extensively evaluated are clay-bonded silicon carbide and alumina-mullite porous monoliths. These candidates, however, have been found to suffer progressive thermal shock fatigue damage, as a result of rapid cooling/heating cycles. Such temperature changes occur when the hot filters are back-pulsed with cooler gas to clean them, or in process upset conditions, where even larger gas temperature changes may occur quickly and unpredictably. In addition, the clay-bonded silicon carbide materials are susceptible to chemical attack of the glassy binder phase that holds the SiC particles together, resulting in softening, strength loss, creep, and eventual failure.

  20. Advaned hot gas filter development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the fabrication and testing of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) based hot gas filters. The fabrication approach utilized a modified filament winding method that combined both continuous and chopped fibers into a novel microstructure. The work was divided into five primary tasks. In the first task, a preliminary set of compositions was fabricated in the form of open end tubes and characterized. The results of this task were used to identify the most promising compositions for sub-scale filter element fabrication and testing. In addition to laboratory measurements of permeability and strength, exposure testing in a coal combustion environment was performed to asses the thermo-chemical stability of the CFCC materials. Four candidate compositions were fabricated into sub-scale filter elements with integral flange and a closed end. Following the 250 hour exposure test in a circulating fluid bed combustor, the retained strength ranged from 70 t 145 percent of the as-fabricated strength. The post-test samples exhibited non-catastrophic failure behavior in contrast to the brittle failure exhibited by monolithic materials. Filter fabrication development continued in a filter improvement and cost reduction task that resulted in an improved fiber architecture, the production of a net shape flange, and an improved low cost bond. These modifications were incorporated into the process and used to fabricate 50 full-sized filter elements for testing in demonstration facilities in Karhula, Finland and at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. After 581 hours of testing in the Karhula facility, the elements retained approximately 87 percent of their as-fabricated strength. In addition, mechanical response testing at Virginia Tech provided a further demonstration of the high level of strain tolerance of the vacuum wound filter elements. Additional testing in the M. W. Kellogg unit at the PSDF has accumulated over 1800 hours of

  1. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Connolly; G.D. Forsythe

    2000-09-30

    DuPont Lanxide Composites, Inc. undertook a sixty-month program, under DOE Contract DEAC21-94MC31214, in order to develop hot gas candle filters from a patented material technology know as PRD-66. The goal of this program was to extend the development of this material as a filter element and fully assess the capability of this technology to meet the needs of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems at commercial scale. The principal objective of Task 3 was to build on the initial PRD-66 filter development, optimize its structure, and evaluate basic material properties relevant to the hot gas filter application. Initially, this consisted of an evaluation of an advanced filament-wound core structure that had been designed to produce an effective bulk filter underneath the barrier filter formed by the outer membrane. The basic material properties to be evaluated (as established by the DOE/METC materials working group) would include mechanical, thermal, and fracture toughness parameters for both new and used material, for the purpose of building a material database consistent with what is being done for the alternative candle filter systems. Task 3 was later expanded to include analysis of PRD-66 candle filters, which had been exposed to actual PFBC conditions, development of an improved membrane, and installation of equipment necessary for the processing of a modified composition. Task 4 would address essential technical issues involving the scale-up of PRD-66 candle filter manufacturing from prototype production to commercial scale manufacturing. The focus would be on capacity (as it affects the ability to deliver commercial order quantities), process specification (as it affects yields, quality, and costs), and manufacturing systems (e.g. QA/QC, materials handling, parts flow, and cost data acquisition). Any filters fabricated during this task would be used for product qualification tests

  2. Glass, Ceramics, and Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies of plutonium in glass and ceramics have taken place in the thirty years covered by this book. These studies have led to a substantial understanding, arising from fundamental research of actinides in solids and research and development in three technical fields: immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex and, most recently, the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities

  3. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

    2005-09-30

    This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

  4. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  5. Corrosion of ceramic matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Scanu, T.; Colomban, Ph.

    1993-01-01

    Air stable ceramic matrix composites are promising for thermostructural applications such as aircraft engine parts. Turbine parts are subject to both sulphuric acid and sodium molten salts corrosion due to sulphate traces in engine fuel and to the NaCl air content. The chemical stability is a very important criterion but this point has not received much attention to date. We report here a study of acidic and sodium corrosion of various aluminosilicate matrices : LAS matrices (Li2OAl2O32-6SiO2...

  6. Tantalum-Based Ceramics for Refractory Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel; DiFiore, Robert; Kalvala, Victor

    2006-01-01

    A family of tantalum-based ceramics has been invented as ingredients of high-temperature composite insulating tiles. These materials are suitable for coating and/or permeating the outer layers of rigid porous (foam-like or fibrous) ceramic substrates to (1) render the resulting composite ceramic tiles impervious to hot gases and (2) enable the tiles to survive high heat fluxes at temperatures that can exceed 3,000 F ( 1,600 C).

  7. Corrosion of ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanu, T. (ONERA-OM, 92 Chatillon (France) LASIR, CNRS, 94 Thiais (France)); Colomban, P. (ONERA-OM, 92 Chatillon (France) LASIR, CNRS, 94 Thiais (France))

    1993-11-01

    Air stable ceramic matrix composites are promising for thermostructural applications such as aircraft engine parts. Turbine parts are subject to both sulphuric acid and sodium molten salts corrosion due to sulphate traces in engine fuel and to the NaCl air content. The chemical stability is a very important criterion but this point has not received much attention to date. We report here a study of acidic and sodium corrosion of various aluminosilicate matrices : LAS matrices (Li[sub 2]OAl[sub 2]O[sub 3]2-6SiO[sub 2],nP[sub 2]O[sub 5]) in the amorphous, [beta] eucryptite and [beta] spodumene forms, BAS matrix (BaOAl[sub 2]O[sub 3]2SiO[sub 2]) in the form of monoclinic and hexagonal celsian, NASICON matrix (Na[sub 3]Zr[sub 2]Si[sub 2]PO[sub 12]) and mullite matrix. Microstructure damages and ion exchange have been analysed by X-ray diffraction, IR absorption, scanning electron microscopy and Raman microprobe. Drastic corrosion is observed for [beta] spodumene containing composites with the formation of strong hydrogen bond or with the cell expansion due to Li/Na[sup +] exchange. Medium acidic attack occurs for glassy LAS, [beta] eucryptite, BAS and NASICON matrix composites. On the other hand, [beta] eucryptite, NASICON and monoclinic celsian resist to alkaline melts. Mullite matrix composites are never corroded. (orig.).

  8. Corrosion of ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air stable ceramic matrix composites are promising for thermostructural applications such as aircraft engine parts. Turbine parts are subject to both sulphuric acid and sodium molten salts corrosion due to sulphate traces in engine fuel and to the NaCl air content. The chemical stability is a very important criterion but this point has not received much attention to date. We report here a study of acidic and sodium corrosion of various aluminosilicate matrices : LAS matrices (Li2OAl2O32-6SiO2,nP2O5) in the amorphous, β eucryptite and β spodumene forms, BAS matrix (BaOAl2O32SiO2) in the form of monoclinic and hexagonal celsian, NASICON matrix (Na3Zr2Si2PO12) and mullite matrix. Microstructure damages and ion exchange have been analysed by X-ray diffraction, IR absorption, scanning electron microscopy and Raman microprobe. Drastic corrosion is observed for β spodumene containing composites with the formation of strong hydrogen bond or with the cell expansion due to Li/Na+ exchange. Medium acidic attack occurs for glassy LAS, β eucryptite, BAS and NASICON matrix composites. On the other hand, β eucryptite, NASICON and monoclinic celsian resist to alkaline melts. Mullite matrix composites are never corroded. (orig.)

  9. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, George T., II; Hansen; Jeffrey S.; Oden; Laurance L.; Turner; Paul C.; Ochs; Thomas L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  10. Residual stress in ceramics and ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Residual stresses in Si3N4 and SiC have been measured with X-ray diffraction after grinding and thermal shock. The produced surface stresses are compressive after both treatments. The stresses show a strong dependence on the quenching temperature up to a certain temperature when cracks relax the stresses. The influence of the amount of reinforcing phase on the residual stress state in a Al2O3/SiC whisker composite was investigated and correlated to a modified Eshelby model. The agreement is excellent. The composite was quenched in liquid He (4K) and the stress state measured after show no relaxation of stresses, indicating elastic behaviour. An in situ strain measurement as a function of temperature conducted on a Al2O3/SiC whisker composite and a SiC/TiB2 particle composite show very good agreement with the Eshelby model for the Al2O3/SiC system but not agreement for the SiC/TiB2 system. The reason is believed to be stress relaxation during sample preparation. (au) (53 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.)

  11. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  12. Simplex Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Blisk Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Matt; McConnaughey, Helen V. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the testing and demonstration of the Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Blisk. Also discussed are material damping, fatigue life, damage to trailing edges, performance, unsteady blade loading, and stress.

  13. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  14. Batch compositions for cordierite ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, David L.

    1994-07-26

    Ceramic products consisting principally of cordierite and a method for making them are provided, the method employing batches comprising a mineral component and a chemical component, the mineral component comprising clay and talc and the chemical component consisting essentially of a combination of the powdered oxides, hydroxides, or hydrous oxides of magnesium, aluminum and silicon. Ceramics made by extrusion and firing of the batches can exhibit low porosity, high strength and low thermal expansion coefficients.

  15. Manufacturing of superconductive silver/ceramic composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifi, Behrouz; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Eriksen, Morten;

    2000-01-01

    . After the mechanical deformation the tapes are heat treated at approximately 835C whereby the powder-cores by phase diffusion and grain growth are converted into superconducting, ceramic fibres. The geometry, density and texture of the powder cores before heat treatment is essential for the quality and......Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium, and...

  16. A regenerable sorbent injection/filtration process for H{sub 2}S removal from hot gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, R.J.; Ji, W.; Connors, M.J.; Jones, J.F.; Goldsmith, R.L. [CeraMem Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The operational characteristics of a hot gas desulfurization process involving regenerable sorbent injection and its subsequent collection with a ceramic filtration device were studied utilizing a bench-scale transport reactor. Hydrogen sulfide removal from simulated hot gas was evaluated as a function of both zinc oxide-based sorbent physical and chemical characteristics and various process parameters. In addition, the sorbent capture efficiency and regenerability of the ceramic filtration device were evaluated, and regeneration of sulfided sorbents via injection into an oxidizing gas was studied. For both sorbent sulfidation and spent sorbent regeneration, gas-solid reaction occurred both in the duct and within layers of partially reacted sorbent captured by the ceramic filter. Very high sulfur removal efficiencies were obtained only in highly reducing hot gas compositions at or above about 700 C, using stoichiometric ratio (defined as ZnO/H{sub 2}S ratio) values of about 1.5, and sorbent particles of about 20 {micro}m or less in diameter. Under such conditions, the experimental data indicated that reaction of H{sub 2}S with zinc vapor formed by reduction of zinc oxide contributed appreciably to sulfur removal. Negligible zinc loss from the hot zone of the reactor was detected, apparently due to rapid formation of zinc sulfide product layers on zinc oxide particles. The ceramic filtration devices captured 100% of all sorbent particles and were fully regenerable over periods of several tens of injection/backpulse cleaning cycles. Spent sorbent could be fully regenerated rapidly at 850 C without problems due to exotherm generation.

  17. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This is the tenth in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic bed filter elements. Task I is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task I during the past quarter, analyses were performed on a particulate sample from the Transport Reactor Demonstration Unit (TRDU) located at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. Analyses are in progress on ash samples from the Advanced Particulate Filter (APF) at the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) that was in operation at Tidd and ash samples from the Pressurized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) system located at Karhula, Finland. A site visit was made to the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to collect ash samples from the filter vessel and to document the condition of the filter vessel with still photographs and videotape. Particulate samples obtained during this visit are currently being analyzed for entry into the Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) data base. Preparations are being made for a review meeting on ash bridging to be held at Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center - Morgantown (DOE/FETC-MGN) in the near future. Most work on Task 2 was on hold pending receipt of additional funds; however, creep testing of Schumacher FT20 continued. The creep tests on Schumacher FT20 specimens just recently ended and data analysis and comparisons to other data are ongoing. A summary and analysis of these creep results will be sent out shortly. Creep

  18. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  19. Development of iron-aluminide hot-gas filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, I.G.; Judkins, R.R.

    1996-06-01

    Removal of particles from hot synthesis gas produced by coal gasification is vital to the success of these systems. In Integrated [Coal] Gasification Combined Cycle systems, the synthesis gas is the fuel for gas turbines. To avoid damage to turbine components, it is necessary that particles be removed from the fuel gas prior to combustion and introduction into the turbine. Reliability and durability of the hot-gas filtering devices used to remove the particles is, of course, of special importance. Hot-gas filter materials include both ceramics and metals. Numerous considerations must be made in selecting materials for these filters. Constituents in the hot gases may potentially degrade the properties and performance of the filters to the point that they are ineffective in removing the particles. Very significant efforts have been made by DOE and others to develop effective hot-particle filters and, although improvements have been made, alternative materials and structures are still needed.

  20. The corrosion of ceramic-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic matrix composites could replace existing metals and alloys in aircraft, naval engine parts or heat exchanged systems because of their low density and high thermostability. These composites are promising materials for long-life applications if the metastable state of the composite is preserved during the synthesis and on working atmospheres without deletorious evolution of the fibre, the matrix and of the fibre-matrix interface. The review begins with a brief recall on the corrosion of ceramics able to be used in composites (SiC, Si3N4, AlN, BN, aluminosilicates, C). The main sources of corrosion in combustion environment (proton, sodium ion) are discussed. A comparison is made with long-term corrosion at room-temperature. Examples of the different corrosion mechanisms observed for Nicalon NLM202 fibre glass-ceramic or ceramic (LAS, CAS, celsian, cordierite, Al2TiO5, mullite, Nasicon) matrix composites developed at ONERA are presented : ion exchange, grain boundary dissolution, fluxing, favourable and unfavourable fibre-matrix reaction, enhanced corrosion by prior fibre-matrix reaction. (orig.)

  1. The corrosion of ceramic-matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colomban, P. [ONERA, Chatillon (France)]|[CNRS, LASIR, Thiais (France)

    1997-12-31

    Ceramic matrix composites could replace existing metals and alloys in aircraft, naval engine parts or heat exchanged systems because of their low density and high thermostability. These composites are promising materials for long-life applications if the metastable state of the composite is preserved during the synthesis and on working atmospheres without deletorious evolution of the fibre, the matrix and of the fibre-matrix interface. The review begins with a brief recall on the corrosion of ceramics able to be used in composites (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, AlN, BN, aluminosilicates, C). The main sources of corrosion in combustion environment (proton, sodium ion) are discussed. A comparison is made with long-term corrosion at room-temperature. Examples of the different corrosion mechanisms observed for Nicalon NLM202 fibre glass-ceramic or ceramic (LAS, CAS, celsian, cordierite, Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}, mullite, Nasicon) matrix composites developed at ONERA are presented : ion exchange, grain boundary dissolution, fluxing, favourable and unfavourable fibre-matrix reaction, enhanced corrosion by prior fibre-matrix reaction. (orig.) 39 refs.

  2. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  3. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-02-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  4. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  5. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.; Fox, Dennis; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Robinson, R. Craig; Bansal, Narottam

    2004-01-01

    One key factor that limits the performance of current gas turbine engines is the temperature capability of hot section structural components. Silicon-based ceramics, such as SiC/SiC composites and monolithic Si3N4, are leading candidates to replace superalloy hot section components in the next generation gas turbine engines due to their excellent high temperature properties. A major stumbling block to realizing Si-based ceramic hot section components is the recession of Si-based ceramics in combustion environments due to the volatilization of silica scale by water vapor. An external environmental barrier coating (EBC) is the most promising approach to preventing the recession. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3A12O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit the durability and temperature capability of current EBCs. Research is underway to develop EBCs with longer life and enhanced temperature capability. Understanding key issues affecting the performance of current EBCs is necessary for successful development of advanced EBCs. These issues include stress, chemical compatibility, adherence, and water vapor stability. Factors that affect stress are thermal expansion mismatch, phase stability, chemical stability, elastic modulus, etc. The current understanding on these issues will be discussed.

  6. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

    2005-09-30

    This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

  7. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This is the eleventh in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic bed filter elements. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task 1 during the past quarter, analyses were completed on samples obtained during a site visit to the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). Analyses are in progress on ash samples from the Advanced Particulate Filter (APF) at the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) that was in operation at Tidd and ash samples from the Pressurized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) system located at Karhula, Finland. An additional analysis was performed on a particulate sample from the Transport Reactor Demonstration Unit (TRDU) located at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. A manuscript and poster were prepared for presentation at the Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems `97 Conference scheduled for July 22 - 24, 1997. A summary of recent project work covering the mechanisms responsible for ash deposit consolidation and ash bridging in APF`s collecting PFB ash was prepared and presented at FETC-MGN in early July. The material presented at that meeting is included in the manuscript prepared for the Contractor`s Conference and also in this report. Task 2 work during the past quarter included mechanical testing and microstructural examination of Schumacher FT20 and Pall 326 as- manufactured, after 540 hr in service at Karhula, and after 1166 hr in service at

  8. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Cermet compositions having high temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance, and particularly adapted for production of high temperature resistant cermet insulator bodies are presented. The compositions are comprised of a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Also disclosed are novel ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride.

  9. High Strain Rate Compression Testing of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenthal, W. R. (William R.)

    2005-01-01

    The compressive deformation and failure behavior of ceramics and ceramic-metal composites for armor applications has been studied as a function of strain rate at Los Alamos National Laboratory since the late 1980s. High strain rate ({approx}10{sup 3} s{sup -1}) uniaxial compression loading can be achieved using the Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, but special methods must be used to obtain valid strength results. This paper reviews these methods and the limitations of the Kolsky-SHPB technique for this class of materials. The Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky-SHPB) technique was originally developed to characterize the mechanical behavior of ductile materials such as metals and polymers where the results can be used to develop strain-rate and temperature-dependent constitutive behavior models that empirically describe macroscopic plastic flow. The flow behavior of metals and polymers is generally controlled by thermally-activated and rate-dependent dislocation motion or polymer chain motion in response to shear stresses. Conversely, the macroscopic mechanical behavior of dense, brittle, ceramic-based materials is dominated by elastic deformation terminated by rapid failure associated with the propagation of defects in the material in response to resolved tensile stresses. This behavior is usually characterized by a distribution of macroscopically measured failure strengths and strains. The basis for any strain-rate dependence observed in the failure strength must originate from rate-dependence in the damage and fracture process, since uniform, uniaxial elastic behavior is rate-independent (e.g. inertial effects on crack growth). The study of microscopic damage and fracture processes and their rate-dependence under dynamic loading conditions is a difficult experimental challenge that is not addressed in this paper. The purpose of this paper is to review the methods that have been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to

  10. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  11. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  12. Air Plasma-Sprayed Y2O3 Coatings for Al2O3/Al2O3 Ceramic Matrix Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Mechnich, Peter; Braue, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Al2O3/Al2O3 ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are candidate materials for hot-gas leading components of gas turbines. Since Al2O3/Al2O3 CMC are prone to hot-corrosion in combustion environments, the development of environmental barrier coatings (EBC) is mandatory. Owing to its favorable chemical stability and thermal properties, Y2O3 is considered a candidate EBC material for Al2O3/Al2O3 CMC. Up to one mm thick Y2O3 coatings were deposited by means of air plasma spraying (APS) on Al2O3/Al2O3 CM...

  13. Transport properties of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of the transport properties of chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) preforms and densified composites, with particular emphasis on gas permeability and mass diffusivity. The results of this work will be useful both for on-going CVI process development and for evaluation and optimization of composite materials for fossil energy applications. With preforms made with 500 filaments/tow Nicalon at 40 vol% fiber loading, permeability values are similar for square-weave cloth layup and 3-D weave at low density. At greater densification the 3-D weave permeability is lower and approaches zero with significantly more closed porosity than the cloth layup. For filament wound preforms we were unable to make reliable measurements with the available materials. A model for gas transport in these materials utilizes percolation theory concepts. The ultimate achievable density is related to the closing of a continuous gas path through the preform. As the density approaches this limit the gas permeability and diffusivity vanish exponentially. The value of this limit is controlled primarily by the preform fiber architecture. The observed difference between the cloth layup and 3-D weave materials is due to the larger pores at tow crossing points found in the 3-D weave.

  14. Transport properties of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Instrumentation and procedures have been completed for measurement of gas permeability and mass diffusivity of fiber preforms and porous materials. Results are reported for composites reinforced with Nicalon fiber in cloth lay-up and 3-D weave and with Nextel fiber in multi-layer braid. Measured permeability values range from near 100 to less than 0.1 darcies. Mass diffusivity is reported as a structure factor relating the diffusion through the porous material to that in free space. This measure is independent of the diffusing species and depends only on the pore structure of the material. Measurements are compared to predictions of a node-bond model for gas transport. Model parameters adjusted to match measured transport properties relate to physical microstructure features of the different architectures. Combination of this transport model with the CVI process model offers a predictive method to evaluate the densification behavior of various fiber preforms.

  15. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  16. Characterization of CVI densification of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Stock, S.R.; Lee, S. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Ceramic matrix composites promise higher operating temperature and better thermodynamic efficiency in many enregy conversion systems. In particular, composites fabricated by the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process have excellent mechanical properties and, using the forced flow-thermal gradient variation, good processing economics in small scale demonstrations. Scale-up to larger, more complex shapes requires understanding of gas flow through the fiber preform and of the relationship between fiber architecture and densification behavior. This understanding is needed for design of preforms for optimum infiltration. The objective of this research is to observe the deposition of matrix material in the pores of a ceramic fiber preform at various stages of the CVI process. These observations allow us to relate local deposition rates in various regions of the composite to the connectivity of the surrounding network of porosity and to better model the relationship between gas transport and fiber architecture in CVI preforms. Our observation of the CVI process utilizes high resolution X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) in collaboration with Dr. John Kinney at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with repeated imaging of a small preform specimens after various processing times. We use these images to determine geometry and dimensions of channels between and through layers in cloth lay-up preform during CVI densification and relate these to a transport model.

  17. Plasma etching a ceramic composite. [evaluating microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, David R.; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma etching is found to be a superior metallographic technique for evaluating the microstructure of a ceramic matrix composite. The ceramic composite studied is composed of silicon carbide whiskers (SiC(sub W)) in a matrix of silicon nitride (Si3N4), glass, and pores. All four constituents are important in evaluating the microstructure of the composite. Conventionally prepared samples, both as-polished or polished and etched with molten salt, do not allow all four constituents to be observed in one specimen. As-polished specimens allow examination of the glass phase and porosity, while molten salt etching reveals the Si3N4 grain size by removing the glass phase. However, the latter obscures the porosity. Neither technique allows the SiC(sub W) to be distinguished from the Si3N4. Plasma etching with CF4 + 4 percent O2 selectively attacks the Si3N4 grains, leaving SiC(sub W) and glass in relief, while not disturbing the pores. An artifact of the plasma etching reaction is the deposition of a thin layer of carbon on Si3N4, allowing Si3N4 grains to be distinguished from SiC(sub W) by back scattered electron imaging.

  18. Ceramic nanostructure materials, membranes and composite layers

    OpenAIRE

    Burggraaf, A.J.; Keizer, K.; Hassel, van, E Edwin

    1989-01-01

    Synthesis methods to obtain nanoscale materials will be briefly discussed with a focus on sol-gel methods. Three types of nanoscale composites (powders, membranes and ion implanted layers) will be discussed and exemplified with recent original research results. Ceramic membranes with a thickness of 1–10 μm consist of a packing of elementary particles with a size of 3–7 nm. The mean pore size is about 2.5–3 nm. The preparation routes are based on sol and sol-gel technologies. The pores can be ...

  19. Conductive ceramic composition and method of preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

    1991-04-16

    A ceramic anode composition is formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The anode is prepared as a non-stoichiometric crystalline structure by reaction and conditioning in a hydrogen gas cover containing minor proportions of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The structure exhibits a single phase and substantially enhanced electrical conductivity over that of the corresponding stoichiometric structure. Unexpectedly, such oxides and oxygenates are found to be stable in the reducing anode fuel gas of a molten carbonate fuel cell. 4 figures.

  20. Development of high-density ceramic composites for ballistic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of ceramic composites for ballistic application has been generally developed with ceramics of low density, between 2.5 and 4.5 g/cm2. These materials have offered good performance in defeating small-caliber penetrators, but can suffer time-dependent degradation effects when thicker ceramic tiles are needed to defeat modem, longer, heavy metal penetrators that erode rather than break up. This paper addresses the ongoing development, fabrication procedures, analysis, and ballistic evaluation of thinner, denser ceramics for use in armor applications. Nuclear Metals Incorporated (NMI) developed a process for the manufacture of depleted uranium (DU) ceramics. Samples of the ceramics have been supplied to the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) as part of an unfunded cooperative study agreement. The fabrication processes used, characterization of the ceramic, and a ballistic comparison between the DU-based ceramic with baseline Al2O3 will be presented

  1. Ceramic based lightweight composites with extreme dynamic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of several years experiments in development of high performance technical ceramics and in investigation of hetero-modulus and hetero-viscous materials and ceramic matrix composites the authors successfully developed a new family of ceramic reinforced lightweight composites with extreme dynamic strength. To obtain these lightweight composites first the matrix materials were developed from different sort of sintered ceramics with high porosity and after the prepared items were re-sintered using reactive sintering methods or were impregnated with nanoparticles of Si3N4, SiAlON ceramics or light metal alloys having excellent mechanical strength and properties. Where it was necessary the pores and material structures of ceramic matrix materials anchored excellent wetting for a wide range of metal alloys, so it was possible to develop several types of ceramic reinforced hetero-modulus light metal composites with extreme dynamic strength of different density. In this work the authors present the c-Si3N4 diamond particles reinforced corundum matrix composite shield plate structures and some of the specially developed low density ceramic foams and high porosity ceramic matrix materials for lightweight metallic composites

  2. Assessment of ceramic composites for MMW space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed multimegawatt nuclear power systems which operate at high temperatures, high levels of stress, and in hostile environments, including corrosive working fluids, have created interest in the use of ceramic composites as structural materials. This report assesses the applicability of several ceramic composites in both Brayton and Rankine cycle power systems. This assessment considers an equilibrium thermodynamic analysis and also a nonequilibrium assessment. (FI)

  3. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinchcomb, W.W.; Reifsnider, K.L.; Dunyak, T.J. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics)

    1992-06-15

    The objective of the work reported herein is to develop an understanding of the mechanical behavior of advanced ceramic composites subjected to elevated temperature and dynamic (cyclic) loading, to develop a test system and test methods to obtain the properties and performance information required to design engineering components made from ceramic composite materials, and to provide critical and comprehensive evaluations of such materials to material synthesizers and developers to support and enhance progress in ceramic composite material development. The accomplishments of the investigation include the design, development, and demonstration of a high temperature, biaxial mechanical test facility for ceramic composite tubes and the development and validation of a performance simulation model (MRLife) for ceramic composites.

  4. Fundamental alloy design of oxide ceramics and their composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I.W.

    1992-01-01

    The main research was on microstructural development of oxide ceramics. Projects were completed and the publications given. Abstracts are given on: Reactive CeO[sub 2]powders by homogeneous precipitation, SiC whisker-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate composite, solute drag on grain boundary in ionic solids (space charge effect), in-situ alumina/aluminate platelet composites, exaggerated texture and grain growth of superplastic silicon nitride (SiAlON), hot extrusion of ceramics, control of grain boundary pinning in Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]/ZrO[sub 2] composites with Ce[sup 3+]/Ce[sup 4+] doping, superplastic forming of ceramic composites, computer simulation of final stage sintering (model, kinetics, microstructure, effect of initial pore size), development of superplastic structural ceramics, and superplastic flow of two-phase ceramics containing rigid inclusions (zirconia/mullite composites). A proposed research program is outlined: materials, solute drag, densification and coarsening, and grain boundary electrical behavior.

  5. CONOCO DOLOMITE HOT GAS CLEANUP SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report analyzes a proposal that EPA sponsor a large-scale pilot plant to develop the Conoco (formerly Consol) Dolomite Hot Gas Clean-up system. The report includes a history of the prior development program, the technology involved comparisons with competitive technologies i...

  6. Hot Gas in Galaxy Groups: Recent Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy groups are the least massive systems where the bulk of baryons begin to be accounted for. Not simply the scaled-down versions of rich clusters following self-similar relations, galaxy groups are ideal systems to study baryon physics, which is important for both cluster cosmology and galaxy formation. We review the recent observational results on the hot gas in galaxy groups. The first part of the paper is on the scaling relations, including X-ray luminosity, entropy, gas fraction, baryon fraction and metal abundance. Compared to clusters, groups have a lower fraction of hot gas around the center (e.g., r r_500 regions. The hot gas in groups is also iron poor at large radii (0.3 r_500 - 0.7 r_500). The iron content of the hot gas within the central regions (r < 0.3 r_500) correlates with the group mass, in contrast to the trend of the stellar mass fraction. It remains to be seen where the missing iron in low-mass groups is. In the second part, we discuss several aspects of X-ray cool cores in galaxy...

  7. Hot Gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, You-Hua

    2000-01-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) offers an excellent laboratory to study the physical structure of the interstellar medium (ISM) because of its proximity, nearly face-on orientation, and small foreground and internal extinction. Optical and radio surveys of the LMC ISM have revealed interstellar structures of sizes ranging from a few parsecs to over 1000 parsecs. ROSAT X-ray mosaics of the LMC have detected abundant 10 (exp 6) K hot gas, some of which is bounded by large shell structures while the rest, does not appear to be associated with any visible interstellar structure. The X-ray observations have been analyzed to determine the physical conditions of the hot gas. The distribution of the hot gas can be compared to those of the cooler gas and massive stars, in order to determine the production mechanism of the hot gas. UV observations of interstellar absorption lines of high ions, such as C IV, N V, and O VI, can be used to study the interfaces between the 10 (exp 6) K gas and cooler ionized gas, and to provide constraints on the location of 10 (exp 6) K gas with respect to the cooler gas along the line of sight.

  8. High Temperature Tolerant Ceramic Composites Having Porous Interphases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriven, Waltraud M. (Champaign, IL); Lee, Sang-Jin (Chonnam, KR)

    2005-05-03

    In general, this invention relates to a ceramic composite exhibiting enhanced toughness and decreased brittleness, and to a process of preparing the ceramic composite. The ceramic composite comprises a first matrix that includes a first ceramic material, preferably selected from the group including alumina (Al2O3), mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2), yttrium aluminate garnet (YAG), yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), celsian (BaAl2Si2O8) and nickel aluminate (NiAl2O4). The ceramic composite also includes a porous interphase region that includes a substantially non-sinterable material. The non-sinterable material can be selected to include, for example, alumina platelets. The platelets lie in random 3-D orientation and provide a debonding mechanism, which is independent of temperature in chemically compatible matrices. The non-sinterable material induces constrained sintering of a ceramic powder resulting in permanent porosity in the interphase region. For high temperature properties, addition of a sinterable ceramic powder to the non-sinterable material provides sufficiently weak debonding interphases. The ceramic composite can be provided in a variety of forms including a laminate, a fibrous monolith, and a fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix. In the laminated systems, intimate mixing of strong versus tough microstructures were tailored by alternating various matrix-to-interphase thickness ratios to provide the bimodal laminate.

  9. Continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites for heat engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, David E.

    1988-01-01

    High strength at elevated temperatures, low density, resistance to wear, and abundance of nonstrategic raw materials make structural ceramics attractive for advanced heat engine applications. Unfortunately, ceramics have a low fracture toughness and fail catastrophically because of overload, impact, and contact stresses. Ceramic matrix composites provide the means to achieve improved fracture toughness while retaining desirable characteristics, such as high strength and low density. Materials scientists and engineers are trying to develop the ideal fibers and matrices to achieve the optimum ceramic matrix composite properties. A need exists for the development of failure models for the design of ceramic matrix composite heat engine components. Phenomenological failure models are currently the most frequently used in industry, but they are deterministic and do not adequately describe ceramic matrix composite behavior. Semi-empirical models were proposed, which relate the failure of notched composite laminates to the stress a characteristic distance away from the notch. Shear lag models describe composite failure modes at the micromechanics level. The enhanced matrix cracking stress occurs at the same applied stress level predicted by the two models of steady state cracking. Finally, statistical models take into consideration the distribution in composite failure strength. The intent is to develop these models into computer algorithms for the failure analysis of ceramic matrix composites under monotonically increasing loads. The algorithms will be included in a postprocessor to general purpose finite element programs.

  10. Ceramic matrix composites in simulated SSME environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    1988-01-01

    Future Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME)-type rocket engines can benefit from the use of fiber-reinforced ceramix matrix composites (FRCMC). Ceramics reinforced with long continuous fibers exhibit improved tolerance to severe thermomechanical and environmental exposures. An in-house NASA-Lewis program to evaluate the durability of FRCMC in simulated SSME environments is described. Primary tests involve multiple (one second) exposures of FRCMC specimens in a hydrogen/oxygen rocket test rig. This rig generates surface heating rates of 1000 to 2500 C/second. The FRCMC durability evaluation involves measurement of retained strength as a function of thermal shock severity and number of upshock cycles. Preliminary test results for monolithic silicon nitride (Si3N4) and silicon carbide (SiC), and one type of silicon based FRCMC, are presented. The test data are examined in terms of simple thermal shock theory.

  11. Thermal Performance of Ablative/ Ceramic Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana STEFAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid thermal protection system for atmospheric earth re-entry based on ablative materials on top of ceramic matrix composites is investigated for the protection of the metallic structure in oxidative and high temperature environment of the space vehicles. The paper focuses on the joints of ablative material (carbon fiber based CALCARB® or cork based NORCOAT TM and Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC material (carbon fibers embedded in silicon carbide matrix, Cf/SiC, SICARBON TM or C/C-SiC using commercial high temperature inorganic adhesives. To study the thermal performance of the bonded materials the joints were tested under thermal shock at the QTS facility. For carrying out the test, the sample is mounted into a holder and transferred from outside the oven at room temperature, inside the oven at the set testing temperature (1100°C, at a heating rate that was determined during the calibration stage. The dwell time at the test temperature is up to 2 min at 1100ºC at an increasing rate of temperature up to ~ 9,5°C/s. Evaluating the atmospheric re-entry real conditions we found that the most suited cooling method is the natural cooling in air environment as the materials re-entering the Earth atmosphere are subjected to similar conditions. The average weigh loss was calculated for all the samples from one set, without differentiating the adhesive used as the weight loss is due to the ablative material consumption that is the same in all the samples and is up to 2%. The thermal shock test proves that, thermally, all joints behaved similarly, the two parts withstanding the test successfully and the assembly maintaining its integrity.

  12. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  13. Support Services for Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.

    2000-06-06

    Structural and functional materials used in solid- and liquid-fueled energy systems are subject to gas- and condensed-phase corrosion and erosion by entrained particles. For a given material, its temperature and the composition of the corrodents determine the corrosion rates, while gas flow conditions and particle aerodynamic diameters determine erosion rates. Because there are several mechanisms by which corrodents deposit on a surface, the corrodent composition depends not only on the composition of the fuel, but also on the temperature of the material and the size range of the particles being deposited. In general, it is difficult to simulate under controlled laboratory conditions all of the possible corrosion and erosion mechanisms to which a material may be exposed in an energy system. Therefore, with funding from the Advanced Research Materials Program, the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is coordinating with NCC Engineering and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to provide researchers with no-cost opportunities to expose materials in pilot-scale systems to conditions of corrosion and erosion similar to those occurring in commercial power systems. The EERC has two pilot-scale solid-fuel systems available for exposure of materials coupons. The slagging furnace system (SFS) was built under the DOE Combustion 2000 Program as a testing facility for advanced heat exchanger subsystems. It is a 2.5-MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) solid-fuel combustion system with exit temperatures of 2700 to 2900 F to ensure that the ash in the main combustor is molten and flowing. Sample coupons may be exposed in the system either within the slagging zone or near the convective air heater at 1800 F (980 C). In addition, a pilot-scale entrained-bed gasifier system known as the transport reactor development unit (TRDU) is available. Also operating at approximately 2.5 MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr), it is a pressurized unit

  14. Uses of Advanced Ceramic Composites in the Thermal Protection Systems of Future Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Current ceramic composites being developed and characterized for use in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of future space vehicles are reviewed. The composites discussed include new tough, low density ceramic insulation's, both rigid and flexible; ultra-high temperature ceramic composites; nano-ceramics; as well as new hybrid ceramic/metallic and ceramic/organic systems. Application and advantage of these new composites to the thermal protection systems of future reusable access to space vehicles and small spacecraft is reviewed.

  15. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The work proposed herein is to demonstrate that the higher temperature capabilities of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) can be fully utilized to reduce emissions and...

  16. Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrow, S. Marvin (Kingston, TN); Rexford, Donald (Pattersonville, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  17. Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Morrow, S.M.; Rexford, D.

    1999-12-07

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt is disclosed. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  18. Temperature Rise during Resin Composite Polymerization under Different Ceramic Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Yondem, Isa; Altintas, Subutay Han; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure temperature increase induced by various light polymerizing units during resin composite polymerization beneath one of three types of ceramic restorations. Methods: The resin composite (Variolink II) was polymerized between one of three different ceramic specimens (zirconium oxide, lithium disilicate, feldspathic) (diameter 5 mm, height 2 mm) and a dentin disc (diameter 5 mm, height 1 mm) with a conventional halogen light, a high intensity h...

  19. Improved Internal Reference Oxygen Sensors with Composite Ceramic Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qiang; Jacobsen, Torben; Hansen, Karin Vels;

    2012-01-01

    Potentiometric oxygen sensors with an internal reference electrode, which uses the equilibrium pO2 of the binary mixture of Ni/NiO as the reference, are demonstrated. The cells employ Pt or composite ceramics as the sensing electrode. The cells are fabricated by a flexible and potentially low cost...... performance are highly reproducible. The composite ceramics, based on strontium doped manganite and yttria doped zirconia, are proven superior over Pt to serve as the electrode material....

  20. High-temperature testing of glass/ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, John F.; Grande, Dodd H.; Dannemann, Kathryn A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in ceramic and other high-temperature composites have created a need for test methods that can be used at 1000 C and above. Present test methods usually require adhesively bonded tabs that cannot be used at high temperatures. This paper discusses some of the difficulties with high-temperature test development and describes several promising test methods. Stress-strain data are given for Nicalon ceramic fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites tested in air at temperatures up to 1000 C.

  1. Mechanical properties of ceramic composite tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, W.A.; Oleksuk, L.L.; Reifsnider, K.L. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Results of axial tension tests on SiC/SiC tubular ceramic composite components fabricated by a forced-M technique are presented. Axial elastic modulus measurements on a number of tubes show that the Young`s modulus varies along the length of the tube, with occasional very stiff or very soft regions. Tests to failure on a few tubes show the initiation of non-linear stress-strain behavior to be in the range of 3-9 ksi, followed by extensive non-linear deformation up to failure. For one tube, the failure stress obtained was 20.1 ksi, but the strains to failure at various axial locations varies from 0.19%to 0.24%. The correlation between modulus and proportional limit is considered within the ACK matrix cracking theory and within a model in which matrix cracking between fiber tows occurs, both modified to account for matrix porosity. The crack size required to cause stress concentrations large enough to cause failure at the observed strength is considered. Predictions for both matrix cracking and strength suggest that the current generation of tubes are controlled by microstructural defects.

  2. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

    1999-09-30

    The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

  3. Preliminary operating experiences with the AVR at an average hot-gas temperature of 9500C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-loop system with a high temperature reactor, which is operated by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) GmbH and which was built by the BBC/Krupp consortium (today HRB), has been in operation for more than seven years. In that time more than 635 x 106kWhr have been produced and more that 6.5 x 105 spherical fuel elements have been circulated under operation. The fully integrated design, and above all the ceramic gas duct, permit very high gas temperatures although no high alloyed, heat resistant steels were used in the reactor. In February 1974 the average hot-gas temperature at the outlet of the core could thus be increased from its original design value of 8500C to 9500C. Peak temperatures of above 500C are thereby confined to a small region between the middle of the core and the beginning of the steam generator. Carbon protects the steel structures against high temperatures. Unplanned interruptions and reductions of operation due to the increase of the hot-gas temperature have not occurred so far. Some thermocouples in the hot-gas region failed. All other components functioned satisfactorily and, one year after the increase in the hot-gas temperature, there are no misgivings as to their future functioning. These satisfactory but short operating experiences at 9500C will have to be supplemented in the next few years by experiences over a longer period. (Auth.)

  4. Study on Microstructure of Alumina Based Rare Earth Ceramic Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Analysis techniques such as SEM, TEM and EDAX were used to investigate the microstructure of rare earth reinforced Al2O3/(W, Ti)C ceramic composite. Chemical and physical compatibility of the composite was analyzed and interfacial microstructure was studied in detail. It is found that both Al2O3 and (W, Ti)C phases are interlaced with each other to form the skeleton structure in the composite. A small amount of pores and glass phases are observed inside the material which will inevitably influence the physical and mechanical property of the composite. Thermal residual stresses resulted from thermal expansion mismatch can then lead to the emergence of dislocations and microcracks. Interfaces and boundaries of different types are found to exist inside the Al2O3/(W, Ti)C rare earth ceramic composite, which is concerned with the addition of rare earth element and the extent of solid solution of ceramic phases.

  5. Actively Cooled Ceramic Composite Nozzle Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I Project demonstrated the capability of the Pyrowave? manufacturing process to produce fiber-reinforced ceramics (FRCs) with integral metal features,...

  6. Characterization of composite ceramic high level waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a composite ceramic waste form for the disposition of high level radioactive waste produced during electrometallurgical conditioning of spent nuclear fuel. The electrorefiner LiCl/KCl eutectic salt, containing fission products and transuranics in the chloride form, is contacted with a zeolite material which removes the fission products from the salt. After salt contact, the zeolite is mixed with a glass binder. The zeolite/glass mixture is then hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) to produce the composite ceramic waste form. The ceramic waste form provides a durable medium that is well suited to incorporate fission products and transuranics in the chloride form. Presented are preliminary results of the process qualification and characterization studies, which include chemical and physical measurements and product durability testing, of the ceramic waste form

  7. Porous ceramic - metal composites obtained by infiltration methods

    OpenAIRE

    A. Boczkowska; Chabera, P.; Dolata, A. J.; M. Dyzia; Oziębło, A.

    2013-01-01

    A pressure-vacuum infiltration (T = 720 ºC, p = 15 MPa, t = 15 min) and gas-pressure infiltration (GPI) in an autoclave (T = 700ºC, p=4 MPa, t=5 min) were applied for infiltration of porous Al2O3 ceramics by cast aluminum alloy. Effect of the method of the infiltration on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ceramic-metal composites, was studied. Ceramic preforms were formed by method of copying the cellular structure of the polymer matrix. The results of the X-ray tomography prove...

  8. Laminated alumina/zirconia ceramic composites prepared by electrophoretic deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hadraba, Hynek; Drdlík, D.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Maca, K.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    Bratislava : VEDA, 2011 - (Pavol Šajgalík, Zoltán Lenčéš). s. 70 ISBN 978-80-970657-4-4. [Advanced Research Workshop Engineering Ceramics 2011 from Materials to Components. 08.05.2011-12.05.2011, Smolenice Castle] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1644 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Ceramic laminates * Electrophoretic deposition * Hardness Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  9. Tribology of ceramics and composites materials science perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Bikramjit

    2011-01-01

    This book helps students and practicing scientists alike understand that a comprehensive knowledge about the friction and wear properties of advanced materials is essential to further design and development of new materials. With important introductory chapters on the fundamentals, processing, and applications of tribology, the book then examines in detail the nature and properties of materials, the friction and wear of structural ceramics, bioceramics, biocomposites, and nanoceramics, as well as lightweight composites and the friction and wear of ceramics in a cryogenic environment.

  10. Silicone Resin Applications for Ceramic Precursors and Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Masaki Narisawa

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the applications of silicone resins as ceramic precursors. The historical background of silicone synthesis chemistry is introduced to explain the production costs and supply availability of various silicones. Thermal degradation processes of silicones are classified in terms of the main chain structure and cyclic oligomer expulsion process, which determine the resulting ceramic yield and the chemical composition. The high temperature decomposition of Si-O-C beyond 1,400 °...

  11. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program: Gaseous Nitridation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Suplinskas G. DiBona; W. Grant

    2001-10-29

    Textron has developed a mature process for the fabrication of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) tubes for application in the aluminum processing and casting industry. The major milestones in this project are System Composition; Matrix Formulation; Preform Fabrication; Nitridation; Material Characterization; Component Evaluation

  12. Preparation and characterization of porous alumina-zirconia composite ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pabst, W.; Gregorová, E.; Sedlářová, I.; Černý, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 14 (2011), s. 2721-2731. ISSN 0955-2219. [International Conference on Ceramic Processing Science /11./. Zürich, 29.08.2010-01.09.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : sintering * slip casting * composites Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.353, year: 2011

  13. Glass/Ceramic Composites for Sealing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2007-01-01

    A family of glass/ceramic composite materials has been investigated for use as sealants in planar solid oxide fuel cells. These materials are modified versions of a barium calcium aluminosilicate glass developed previously for the same purpose. The composition of the glass in mole percentages is 35BaO + 15CaO + 5Al2O3 + 10B2O3 + 35SiO2. The glass seal was found to be susceptible to cracking during thermal cycling of the fuel cells. The goal in formulating the glass/ ceramic composite materials was to (1) retain the physical and chemical advantages that led to the prior selection of the barium calcium aluminosilicate glass as the sealant while (2) increasing strength and fracture toughness so as to reduce the tendency toward cracking. Each of the composite formulations consists of the glass plus either of two ceramic reinforcements in a proportion between 0 and 30 mole percent. One of the ceramic reinforcements consists of alumina platelets; the other one consists of particles of yttria-stabilized zirconia wherein the yttria content is 3 mole percent (3YSZ). In preparation for experiments, panels of the glass/ceramic composites were hot-pressed and machined into test bars.

  14. Ceramic matrix composites -- Advanced high-temperature structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials was held at the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on November 28--December 2. The symposium was sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technology's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and NASA Lewis Research Center. Among the competing materials for advanced, high-temperature applications, ceramic matrix composites are leading candidates. The symposium was organized such that papers concerning constituents--fibers and matrices--were presented first, followed by composite processing, modeling of mechanical behavior, and thermomechanical testing. More stable reinforcements are necessary to enhance the performance and life of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and to ensure final acceptance of these materials for high-temperature applications. Encouraging results in the areas of polymer-derived SiC fibers and single crystal oxide filaments were given, suggesting composites with improved thermomechanical properties and stability will be realized in the near future. The significance of the fiber-matrix interface in the design and performance of these materials is evident. Numerous mechanical models to relate interface properties to composite behavior, and interpret test methods and data, were enthusiastically discussed. One issue of great concern for any advanced material for use in extreme environments is stability. This theme arose frequently throughout the symposium and was the topic of focus on the final day. Fifty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  15. Preparation and Easy-Cleaning Property of Rare Earth Composite Ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth and far-infrared mineral composite materials were added to ceramic glazes to prepare easy-cleaning ceramic. The morphology of easy-cleaning ceramic was observed by SEM. The influence of easy-cleaning ceramic on water surface tension and contact angles of water were investigated. Through calculation of ceramic surface free energy and observation of oil drop on ceramic surface in water, the easy-cleaning mechanism of rare earth composite ceramic was studied. It is found that the rare earth composite ceramic can make water surface tension decrease. The surface free energy and the polar component of rare earth composite ceramic are increased. The rare earth composite ceramics have the easy-cleaning property.

  16. Hot-Gas Filter Ash Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dockter, B.A.; Hurley, J.P.; Watne, T.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; O`Keefe, C.A. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Minerals Research Center

    1996-12-31

    Large-scale hot-gas testing over the past several years has revealed numerous cases of cake buildup on filter elements that have been difficult, if not impossible to remove. At times, the cake can bridge between candle filters, leading to high filter failure rates. Physical factors, including particle-size distribution, particle shape, the aerodynamics of deposition, and system temperature contribute to difficulty in removing the cake. It is speculated that chemical as well as physical effects are playing a role in leading the ash to bond to the filter or to itself. The Energy and Environmental research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota is working with Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and a consortium of companies in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform the research necessary to determine the factors that cause hot-gas cleanup filters to be blinded by ash or to develop deposits that can bridge the filters and cause them to fail. The objectives of this overall project are threefold: first, to determine the mechanisms by which difficult-to-clean ash is formed; second, to develop a method to determine the rate of blinding/bridging based on fuel and sorbent properties and operating conditions; finally, to provide suggestions fro ways to prevent filter blinding by the troublesome ash. The projects consists of four tasks: field sampling and archive sample analyses, laboratory-scale testing, bench-scale testing, and model and database development testing. This paper present preliminary data from Task 2 on determining the tensile strengths of coal ash particles at elevated temperatures and simulated combustor gas conditions.

  17. Metal-ceramic composites for hostile environment applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have developed a new metal-ceramic composite made from vanadium metal (V) and a non-stoichiometric magnesio-aluminate spinel ceramic. Three vanadium-spinel compositions, 40-60, 50-50, and 60-40 (by volume) were prepared by hot pressing mixtures of commercial powders. The properties of these composites were determined by measuring coefficient of thermal expansion, hardness, elastic constants, and fracture toughness. Radiation damage studies were performed on 50-50 vanadium-spinel composite samples using 1.5 MeV Xe+ ions, with samples held both at 20 K and at room temperature. Room temperature irradiated samples exhibited very little change in microstructure, indicating that this composite has radiation damage resistance qualities such as resistance to volume swelling under particle bombardment. This feature, as well as other properties reviewed in this paper, suggest that vanadium-spinel composites are attractive structural materials for fusion reactor design

  18. Modification of composite ceramics properties via different preparation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M.A., E-mail: moala47@hotmail.com [Materials Science Laboratory (1) Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Okasha, N. [Physics Department, Faculty of Girls, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Imam, N.G. [Experimental Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-12-15

    Modifying the proportion of the base composition by substituting with suitable dopents and improving the preparation conditions is expected to change the performance of composites. In the present study, 0.5(Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4})/0.5(BaTiO{sub 3}) composite was prepared by, the conventional ceramic technique and the citrate method. Ceramic particles, when prepared via different routes, would demonstrate different properties, even with the same starting compositions. With the help of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope (SEM), magnetic properties, and electric properties of the composites have been compared. A critical comparison of those methods is needed to make the best choice for given boundary conditions of targeted eventual material properties, raw materials, investment, processing and waste disposal costs. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NZF/BT nanocomposite is successfully produced by citrate and ceramic techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRD found that, particle size and lattice constant of citrate are smaller than ceramic technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent magnetic and dielectric properties in a wide range of frequency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Citrate method offer preparation at lower temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Citrate method is less cumbersome, more versatile, and cost effective to obtain nano composites.

  19. Fracture Behavior of Alumina-based Prismatic Ceramic Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The fracture toughness and fracture work of Al2O3/SiC prismatic ceramic composites was evaluated in this paper, which showed the fracture energy was improved greatly. Based on the observation for crack propagation and fracture morphology, the fracture behavior of the prismatic composites was analyzed. In the bending test, the composites displayed a non-catastrophic behavior and a graceful failure with reasonable load-carrying capability.

  20. Preliminary study of chemical compositional data from Amazon ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyota, Rosimeiri G.; Munita, Casimiro S.; Luz, Fabio A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: rosimeiritoy@yahoo.com.br; Neves, Eduardo G. [Museu de Arqueologia e Etnolgia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: egneves@usp.br; Oliveira, Paulo M.S. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Inst. de Matematica e Estatistica]. E-mail: poliver@usp.br

    2005-07-01

    Eighty seven ceramic samples from Acutuba, Lago Grande and Osvaldo archaeological sites located in the confluence of the rivers Negro and Solimoes were submitted to chemical analysis using instrumental neutron activation analysis to determine As, Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Rb, Na, Nd, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, Yb, Zn, and U. The database were studied using the Mahalanobis distance, and discriminant analysis. The results showed that the ceramics of each site differ from each other in chemical composition and that they form three different groups. Chemical classification of the ceramics suggests that vessels were made locally, as only ceramics from the same area show homogeneity of data. (author)

  1. Preliminary study of chemical compositional data from Amazon ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighty seven ceramic samples from Acutuba, Lago Grande and Osvaldo archaeological sites located in the confluence of the rivers Negro and Solimoes were submitted to chemical analysis using instrumental neutron activation analysis to determine As, Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Rb, Na, Nd, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, Yb, Zn, and U. The database were studied using the Mahalanobis distance, and discriminant analysis. The results showed that the ceramics of each site differ from each other in chemical composition and that they form three different groups. Chemical classification of the ceramics suggests that vessels were made locally, as only ceramics from the same area show homogeneity of data. (author)

  2. Robocasting of Ceramics and Composites Using Fine Particle Suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid freeform fabrication is the near-net-shape manufacturing of components by sequentially stacking thin layers of material until complicated three dimensional shapes are produced. The operation is computer controlled and requires no molds. This exciting new field of technology provides engineers with the ability to rapidly produce prototype parts directly from CAD drawings and oftentimes little or no machining is necessary after fabrication. Techniques for freeform fabrication with several types of plastics and metals are already quite advanced and maybe reviewed in references 1 and 2. Very complicated plastic models can be fabricated by stereolithography, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modeling, or three-dimensional ink jet printing. Metals may be freeformed by the LENS(trademark) technique and porous ceramic bodies by three dimensional printing into a porous powder bed. However, methods for freeform fabrication that utilize particulate slurries to build dense ceramics and composites are not as well developed. The techniques that are being developed for the freeform fabrication of dense structural ceramics primarily revolve around the sequential layering of ceramic loaded polymers or waxes. Laminated Object Manufacturing and CAM-LEM processing use controlled stacking and laser cutting of ceramic tapes[2,3]. Similar to fused deposition modeling, ceramic loaded polymer/wax filaments are being used for the fused deposition of ceramics[2,4]. Extrusion freeform fabrication uses high pressure extrusion to deposit layers of ceramic loaded polymer/wax systems[1]. Modified stereolithographic techniques are also being developed using ceramic loaded ultraviolet curable resins[2]. Pre-sintered parts made with any of these techniques typically have 40-55 vol.% polymeric binder. In this regard, these techniques are analogous to powder injection molding of ceramics. Very long and complicated burnout heat treatments are necessary to produce a dense ceramic, free

  3. Robocasting of Ceramics and Composites Using Fine Particle Suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CESARANO III,JOSEPH

    1999-10-28

    Solid freeform fabrication is the near-net-shape manufacturing of components by sequentially stacking thin layers of material until complicated three dimensional shapes are produced. The operation is computer controlled and requires no molds. This exciting new field of technology provides engineers with the ability to rapidly produce prototype parts directly from CAD drawings and oftentimes little or no machining is necessary after fabrication. Techniques for freeform fabrication with several types of plastics and metals are already quite advanced and maybe reviewed in references 1 and 2. Very complicated plastic models can be fabricated by stereolithography, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modeling, or three-dimensional ink jet printing. Metals may be freeformed by the LENS{trademark} technique and porous ceramic bodies by three dimensional printing into a porous powder bed. However, methods for freeform fabrication that utilize particulate slurries to build dense ceramics and composites are not as well developed. The techniques that are being developed for the freeform fabrication of dense structural ceramics primarily revolve around the sequential layering of ceramic loaded polymers or waxes. Laminated Object Manufacturing and CAM-LEM processing use controlled stacking and laser cutting of ceramic tapes [2,3]. Similar to fused deposition modeling, ceramic loaded polymer/wax filaments are being used for the fused deposition of ceramics [2,4]. Extrusion freeform fabrication uses high pressure extrusion to deposit layers of ceramic loaded polymer/wax systems[1]. Modified stereolithographic techniques are also being developed using ceramic loaded ultraviolet curable resins [2]. Pre-sintered parts made with any of these techniques typically have 40-55 vol.% polymeric binder. In this regard, these techniques are analogous to powder injection molding of ceramics. Very long and complicated burnout heat treatments are necessary to produce a dense ceramic

  4. INTELLIGENT MATERIALS BASED ON CERAMIC COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Maximov, Y.; Merzlikin, V.; Sidorov, O.; Suttugin, V.

    2010-01-01

    The paper examines the possibility to design intellectual materials based on film composites. Ferroelectric composites are offered to use as the film composites. The authors discuss ferroelectric composites of different structures. Sensors and intellectual materials on the basis of the obtained composites are considered.

  5. Thick film polymer-ceramic composites for pyroelectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, M.; Krause, J.; Solterbeck, C.-H.; Es-Souni, M.

    2007-03-01

    Thick films of 0-3 composites of lead-zirconate-titanate ceramic and polyvinylidene-trifluorethylene copolymer have been produced by spin coating on gold-coated silicon wafers. The dielectric properties were investigated as a function of ceramic volume fraction and temperature. Pyroelectric measurements were undertaken by temperature modulation with a Peltier element. Additionally, the pyroelectric response has been investigated up to 3000Hz using a modulated laser. The piezoelectric response of the composites obtained by using a laser vibrometer are also reported. It is shown that the dielectric constant increases with increasing volume fraction of ceramic and that it reaches a maximum at a temperature in the range of 65-70°C due to the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition of the polymer matrix. The pyroelectric coefficient increases to 92μCm-2K-1 at a ceramic volume fraction of 20%. Furthermore the effective piezoelectric charge coefficient d33 of the composite almost vanishes at this composition. This composites show relatively high pyroelectric figures of merit and may be a potential candidate for pyroelectric sensor applications.

  6. Method of producing a ceramic fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced composite composed of a BaO-Al2O3-2SiO2 (BAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD silicon carbide continuous fibers. A slurry of BAS glass powders is prepared and celsian seeds are added during ball melting. The slurry is cast into tapes which are cut to the proper size. Continuous CVD-SiC fibers are formed into mats of the desired size. The matrix tapes and the fiber mats are alternately stacked in the proper orientation. This tape-mat stack is warm pressed to produce a 'green' composite. The 'green' composite is then heated to an elevated temperature to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot pressed to form a silicon carbide fiber-reinforced celsian (BAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite which may be machined to size.

  7. Assessment of damage in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokhlin, S.I.; Chu, Y.C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Welding Engineering; Baaklini, G.Y. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-07-01

    This paper addresses the application of ultrasonic methods to damage assessment in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites. It focuses on damage caused by thermal shock and oxidation at elevated temperatures. The damage-induced changes in elastic constant and elastic anisotropy are determined by measuring the velocities of ultrasonic waves in different propagation directions within the sample. Thermal shock damage measurement is performed in ceramic samples of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and aluminum oxide. Thermal shock treatment from different temperatures up to 1,000 C is applied to produce the microcracks. Both surface and bulk ultrasonic wave methods are used to correlate the change of elastic constants to microstructural degradation and to determine the change in elastic anisotropy induced by microcrack damage. Oxidation damage is studied in silicon carbide fiber/reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SCS-6/RBSN) composites. The oxidation is done by exposing the samples in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1,400 C, for 100 hours. Significant changes of ultrasonic velocities were observed for composites before and after oxidation. The elastic constants of the composites were determined from the measured velocity data. The Young`s modulus in the fiber direction as obtained from ultrasonic measurements decreases significantly at 600 C but retains its original value at temperatures above 1,200 C. This agrees well with the results of destructive tests by other authors. The transverse longitudinal and shear moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continually until 1,200 C. The results of this work show that the damage-induced anisotropy in both ceramics and ceramic matrix composites can be determined successfully by ultrasonic methods. This suggests the possibility of assessing damage severity using ultrasonic techniques.

  8. Composite definition features using the eastern ornament in ceramic tiles

    OpenAIRE

    Uss, V. F.; National Aviation University, Kyiv, Ukraine; Sahno, K. S.; National Aviation University, Kyiv

    2013-01-01

    This paper was asked a series of questions for the study of composition of the artistic shaping of ceramic tile with oriental ornaments and how to use in interior design. Particular attention is paid to individual elements of ornament and use them in areas such as kitchens, bathrooms, hookah area, cafe and more.

  9. Rapid Prototyping of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Green, C.; Phillips, T.; Cipriani, R.; Yarlagadda, S.; Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Effinger, M.; Cooper, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    For ceramics to be used as structural components in high temperature applications, their fracture toughness is improved by embedding continuous ceramic fibers. Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow increasing the overall operating temperature, raising the temperature safety margins, avoiding the need for cooling, and improving the damping capacity, while reducing the weight at the same time. They also need to be reliable and available in large quantities as well. In this paper, an innovative rapid prototyping technique to fabricate continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. The process is simple, robust and will be widely applicable to a number of high temperature material systems. This technique was originally developed at the University of Delaware Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) for rapid fabrication of polymer matrix composites by a technique called automated tow placement or ATP. The results of mechanical properties and microstructural characterization are presented, together with examples of complex shapes and parts. It is believed that the process will be able to create complex shaped parts at an order of magnitude lower cost than current chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) processes.

  10. Testing and Characterizing of Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowden, Richard M.; Moore, Karren L.; Tortorelli, Pete F.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    1996-01-01

    Understanding interfacial microstructural evolution during environmental testing and use is critical to the development of stable continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC's) for their use in 'corrosive' environments. The use of advanced characterization techniques is required to track subtle microstructural changes. These techniques must be coordinated with other CFCC tasks to completely evaluate their interfacial behavior.

  11. Fatigue and frictional heating in ceramic matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, T.K.; Sørensen, B.F.; Brøndsted, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental technique for monitoring the damage evolution in ceramic matrix composites during cyclic testing. The damage is related to heat dissipation, which may be measured as radiated heat from the surface of the test specimen. In the present experimental set-up an iso...

  12. Silicone Resin Applications for Ceramic Precursors and Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Narisawa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the applications of silicone resins as ceramic precursors. The historical background of silicone synthesis chemistry is introduced to explain the production costs and supply availability of various silicones. Thermal degradation processes of silicones are classified in terms of the main chain structure and cyclic oligomer expulsion process, which determine the resulting ceramic yield and the chemical composition. The high temperature decomposition of Si-O-C beyond 1,400 °C in an inert atmosphere and formation of a protective silica layer on material surfaces beyond 1,200 °C in an oxidative atmosphere are discussed from the viewpoints of the wide chemical composition of the Si-O-C materials. Applications of the resins for binding agents, as starting materials for porous ceramics, matrix sources with impregnation, fiber spinning and ceramic adhesions are introduced. The recent development of the process of filler or cross-linking agent additions to resin compounds is also introduced. Such resin compounds are useful for obtaining thick coatings, MEMS parts and bulk ceramics, which are difficult to obtain by pyrolysis of simple organometallic precursors without additives.

  13. Experimental Investigation on Active Cooling for Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Li-na; HE Guo-qiang; LIU Pei-jin

    2009-01-01

    Compared with conventional materials, the active cooling ceramic matrix composite used in ramjet or scramjet makes their structures lighter in mass and better in performance. In this paper, an active and a passive cooling refractory composite specimens are designed and tested with an experimental facility composed of multilayer smale scale cooling penel which consists of a water cooling system and a ceramic matrix composite specimen, and a gas generator used for providing lower and higher transfer rate gases to simulate the temperatures in combustion chamber of ramjst. The active cooling specimen can continuously suffer high surface temperature of 2 000K for 30s and that of 3 000 K for 9.3 s, respectively. The experiment results show that the active cooling composite structure is available for high-temperature condition in ramjet.

  14. Calculation of thermal stresses in glass-ceramic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Ganghoffer, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Opto-electronics make intensive use of composite materials based on amorphous materials, which can be considered as smart materials since they are capable of high performances in their final state. Particularly, glass-ceramic composites involved in welding operations for microelectronics applications are subjected to important thermal stresses during their production, which can deteriorate their properties at room temperature, until the failure stage is reached. It is then essential to be abl...

  15. The Klinger hot gas double axial valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Klinger hot gas valve is a medium controlled double axial valve with advanced design features and safety function. It was first proposed by Klinger early in 1976 for the PNP-Project as a containment shut-off for hot helium (918 deg. C and 42 bar), because a market research has shown that such a valve is not state of present techniques. In the first stage of development a feasibility study had to be made by detailed design, calculation and by basic experiments for key components in close collaboration with Interatom/GHT. This was the basis for further design, calculation, construction and experimental work for such a valve prototype within the new development contract. The stage of knowledge to that time revealed the following key priority development areas: Finite element stress analysis for the highly stressed high temperature main components; development of an insulation layout; Detailed experimental tests of functionally important structural components or units of the valve, partly at Klingers (gasstatic bearings, flexible metallic sealing element, aerodynamic and thermohydraulic tests), partly at Interatom (actuator unit and also gasstatic bearings), partly at HRB in Juelich (flexible metallic sealing system, aerodynamic and thermohydraulic tests); Design of a test valve for experimental work in the KVK (test circuit at Interatom) for evaluation of temperature distribution and reliability of operation; Design of a prototype and extensive testing in the KVK

  16. METC CFD simulations of hot gas filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, T.J.

    1995-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the fluid/particle flow in several hot gas filtration vessels will be presented. These simulations have been useful in designing filtration vessels and in diagnosing problems with filter operation. The simulations were performed using the commercial code FLUENT and the METC-developed code MFIX. Simulations of the initial configuration of the Karhula facility indicated that the dirty gas flow over the filter assemblage was very non-uniform. The force of the dirty gas inlet flow was inducing a large circulation pattern that caused flow around the candles to be in opposite directions on opposite sides of the vessel. By introducing a system of baffles, a more uniform flow pattern was developed. This modification may have contributed to the success of the project. Several simulations of configurations proposed by Industrial Filter and Pump were performed, varying the position of the inlet. A detailed resolution of the geometry of the candles allowed determination of the flow between the individual candles. Recent simulations in support of the METC/CeraMem Cooperative Research and Development Agreement have analyzed the flow in the vessel during the cleaning back-pulse. Visualization of experiments at the CeraMem cold-flow facility provided confidence in the use of CFD. Extensive simulations were then performed to assist in the design of the hot test facility being built by Ahlstrom/Pyropower. These tests are intended to demonstrate the CeraMem technology.

  17. Elaboration of new ceramic composites containing glass fibre production wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two main by-products or waste from the production of glass fibre are following: sewage sludge containing montmorillonite clay as sorbent material and ca 50 % of organic matter as well as waste glass from aluminium borosilicate glass fibre with relatively high softening temperature (> 600 degree centigrade). In order to elaborate different new ceramic products (porous or dense composites) the mentioned by-products and illicit clay from two different layers of Apriki deposit (Latvia) with illite content in clay fraction up to 80-90 % was used as a matrix. The raw materials were investigated by differential-thermal (DTA) and XRD analysis. Ternary compositions were prepared from mixtures of 15 - 35 wt % of sludge, 20 wt % of waste glass and 45 - 65 wt % of clay and the pressed green bodies were thermally treated in sintering temperature range from 1080 to 1120 degree centigrade in different treatment conditions. Materials produced in temperature range 1090 - 1100 degree centigrade with the most optimal properties - porosity 38 - 52 %, water absorption 39 - 47 % and bulk density 1.35 - 1.67 g/cm3 were selected for production of porous ceramics and materials showing porosity 0.35 - 1.1 %, water absorption 0.7 - 2.6 % and bulk density 2.1 - 2.3 g/cm3 - for dense ceramic composites. Obtained results indicated that incorporation up to 25 wt % of sewage sludge is beneficial for production of both ceramic products and glass-ceramic composites according to the technological properties. Structural analysis of elaborated composite materials was performed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM). By X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) the quartz, diopside and anorthite crystalline phases were detected. (Author) 16 refs.

  18. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  19. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  20. Laminated alumina/zirconia ceramic composites prepared by electrophoretic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hadraba, Hynek; Drdlík, D.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Maca, K.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Cihlář, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 9 (2012), s. 2053-2056. ISSN 0955-2219. [ Engineering Ceramics 2011 - from Materials to Components. Smolenice, 09.05.2011-12.05.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1644 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : electrophoretic deposition * composites * hardness * Al2O3 * ZrO2 Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.360, year: 2012

  1. Phase composition of murataite ceramics for excess weapons plutonium immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, I. A.; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Myasoedov, B. F.; Kullako, Y. M.; Yudintsev, S. V.

    2000-07-01

    Among the host phases for actinides immobilization, murataite (cubic, space group Fm3m) with the general formula A4B2C7O22-x (A=Ca, Mn, Na, Ln, An; B=Mn, Ti, Zr, AnIV; C=Ti, Al, Fe; 0ceramics in detail has shown occurrence of several murataite varieties with three-, five-, and eight-fold fluorite unit cells. [1-3] The goal of the present step of work is to study an effect of waste elements on phase composition of murataite ceramic and isomorphic capacity of waste elements.

  2. Combustion Synthesis of h-BN-SiC Ceramic Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-bo; ZHENG Yong-ting; ZHOU Li-juan; HAN Jie-cai

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility was demonstrated to fabricate h-BN-SiC ceramics through combustion synthesis of the mixture of boron carbide and silicon powders under 100 MPa nitrogen pressure. The mass fraction of BN and SiC in the combustion products were found to be 72 % and 28 % respectively. The thermodynamics of the synthesis reaction and the adiabatic combustion temperature were calculated on the theoretical ground. The bending strengths of the ceramics were measured to be 65.2 MPa at room temperature and 55 MPa at 1350 ℃. The phase composition and microstructure of the combustion products were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  3. Ceramic nanotubes for polymer composites with stable anticorrosion properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhrullin, R. F.; Tursunbayeva, A.; Portnov, V. S.; L'vov, Yu. M.

    2014-12-01

    The use of natural halloysite clay tubes 50 nm in diameter as nanocontainers for loading, storing, and slowly releasing organic corrosion inhibitors is described. Loaded nanotubes can be mixed well with many polymers and dyes in amounts of 5-10 wt % to form a ceramic framework (which increases the strength of halloysite composites by 30-50%), increase the adhesion of these coatings to metals, and allow for the slow release of corrosion inhibitors in defects of coatings. A significant improvement of protective anticorrosion properties of polyacryl and polyurethane coatings containing ceramic nanotubes loaded with benzotriazole and hydroxyquinoline is demonstrated.

  4. Whisker-reinforced ceramic composites for heat engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1988-01-01

    Much work was undertaken to develop techniques of incorporating SiC whiskers into either a Si3N4 or SiC matrix. The result was the fabrication of ceramic composites with ever-increasing fracture toughness and strength. To complement this research effort, the fracture behavior of whisker-reinforced ceramics is studied so as to develop methodologies for the analysis of structural components fabricated from this toughened material. The results, outlined herein, focus on the following areas: the use of micromechanics to predict thermoelastic properties, theoretical aspects of fracture behavior, and reliability analysis.

  5. Current Issues with Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental barrier coating (EBC) for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 ceramics is an emerging field as the application of silicon-based ceramics in the gas turbine engine hot section is on the horizon, both for aero and industrial gas turbines. EBC is an enabling technology for silicon-based ceramics because these materials without an EBC cannot be used in combustion environments due to rapid surface recession. Significant progress in EBC development has been made during the last decade through various government-sponsored programs. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit temperature capability of current EBCs to about 1350 C for long-term applications. There is a need for higher temperature EBCs as the temperature capability of silicon-based ceramics continue to increase. Therefore, research is underway to develop EBCs with improved temperature capability compared to current EBCs. The current status and issues with the advanced EBC development efforts will be discussed.

  6. Assessment of damage in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Y.C.; Baaklini, G.Y.; Rokhlin, S.I.

    1993-05-01

    This paper addresses the application of ultrasonic sensing to damage assessment in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites. It focuses on damage caused by thermal shock or oxidation at elevated temperatures, which often results in elastic anisotropy. This damaged-induced anisotropy is determined by measuring the velocities of ultrasonic waves in different propagation directions. Thermal shock damage is assessed in ceramic samples of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN). Thermal shock treatment from different temperatures up to 1000 C is applied to produce the microcracks. Results indicate that most microcracks produced by thermal shock are located near sample surfaces. Ultrasonic measurements using the surface wave method are found to correlate well with measurements of degradation of mechanical properties obtained independently by other authors using destructive methods. Oxidation damage is assessed in silicon carbide fiber/reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SCS-6/RBSN) composites. The oxidation is done by exposing the samples in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1400 C, for 100 hr. The Youngs' modulus in the fiber direction as obtained from ultrasonic measurements decreases significantly at 600 C but retains its original value at temperatures above 1200 C. This agrees well with the results of destructive tests by other authors. On the other hand, the transverse moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continually until 1200 C. Measurements on the shear stiffnesses show behavior similar to the transverse moduli. The results of this work show that the damage-induced anisotropy in both ceramics and ceramic matrix composites can be determined successfully by ultrasonic methods. This suggests the possibility of assessing damage severity using ultrasonic techniques.

  7. Assessment of damage in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y. C.; Baaklini, G. Y.; Rokhlin, S.I.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the application of ultrasonic sensing to damage assessment in ceramics and ceramic matrix composites. It focuses on damage caused by thermal shock or oxidation at elevated temperatures, which often results in elastic anisotropy. This damaged-induced anisotropy is determined by measuring the velocities of ultrasonic waves in different propagation directions. Thermal shock damage is assessed in ceramic samples of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN). Thermal shock treatment from different temperatures up to 1000 C is applied to produce the microcracks. Results indicate that most microcracks produced by thermal shock are located near sample surfaces. Ultrasonic measurements using the surface wave method are found to correlate well with measurements of degradation of mechanical properties obtained independently by other authors using destructive methods. Oxidation damage is assessed in silicon carbide fiber/reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SCS-6/RBSN) composites. The oxidation is done by exposing the samples in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1400 C, for 100 hr. The Youngs' modulus in the fiber direction as obtained from ultrasonic measurements decreases significantly at 600 C but retains its original value at temperatures above 1200 C. This agrees well with the results of destructive tests by other authors. On the other hand, the transverse moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continually until 1200 C. Measurements on the shear stiffnesses show behavior similar to the transverse moduli. The results of this work show that the damage-induced anisotropy in both ceramics and ceramic matrix composites can be determined successfully by ultrasonic methods. This suggests the possibility of assessing damage severity using ultrasonic techniques.

  8. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components. Final report on Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, W.A.; Reifsnider, K.L.; Oleksuk, L.L.S.; Stinchcomb, W.W. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1994-10-31

    The purpose of Phase 2 of the Investigation of Properties and Performance of Ceramic Composite Components has been to build on and extend the work completed during Phase 1 to further advance the transition from properties of ceramic composite materials to performance of ceramic composite components used in fossil energy environments. The specific tasks of Phase 2 were: (1) develop and validate reliable and accurate high temperature, biaxial mechanical tests methods for structural ceramic composite components; (2) test and evaluate ceramic composite components, specifically tubes; (3) characterize long-term, mechanical performance of ceramic composite tubes at high temperatures; (4) develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanical degradation and performance limitations of ceramic composite components under service conditions; (5) develop predictive models for damage tolerance and reliability; and (6) relate component performance to microstructure and, thereby, provide feedback to the associated process-development effort, to improve performance. Accomplishments for each task are given.

  9. Metallic filters for hot gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilgallon, P.; Simms, N.J.; Oakey, J.E.; Boxall, I. [Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom). Power Generation Technology Centre

    2004-03-01

    This is the final report for DTI Cleaner Coal Programme, project 2001. This project has successfully investigated the performance of a range of candidate materials for the manufacture of filters for use in gasifier (IGCC and ABGC) hot gas paths. The results from Activity A (screening test using high H{sub 2}S at 450{sup o}C) were used to aid the selection of candidate materials for Activity B (the main materials test program). The materials recommended for inclusion in the remaining tests were Haynes D205 EN2691, HY 160, IN690, HA188, Iron Aluminide, IN C276, Hastelloy X and AISI316L (IN800HT and AISI310 will be reference materials). The Activity B tests have been completed, the specimens examined, side thickness measurements made and alloy performance ranked for each of the test conditions. In general the ranking of materials tested in high H{sub 2}S (IGCC) gas correspond with those given in Activity A and the damage was greatest on the deposit coated specimens. The damage to alloys exposed in the low H{sub 2} (ABGC) gas test was significantly lower than in the equivalent high H{sub 2}S (IGCC) gas test. Using the results of Activity B, the existing corrosion life prediction models developed at Cranfield University have been modified. It has been demonstrated how to predict the expected service lives and upper temperature limits of filter media under operational IGCC filter conditions. The design requirements for a prototype element for IGCC/ABGC applications have been identified and related to the data produced in this project. Life prediction models are illustrated for sintered metal fibre and sintered metal powder filter media. 14 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a hot-gas desulfurization process scheme for control of H{sub 2}S in HTHP coal gas that can be more simply and economically integrated with known regenerable sorbents in DOE/METC-sponsored work than current leading hot-gas desulfurization technologies. In addition to being more economical, the process scheme to be developed must yield an elemental sulfur byproduct.

  11. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this project is to develop a hot-gas desulfurization process scheme for control of H{sub 2}S in HTHP coal gas that can be more simply and economically integrated with known regenerable sorbents in DOE/METC-sponsored work than current leading hot-gas desulfurization technologies. In addition to being more economical, the process scheme to be developed must yield an elemental sulfur byproduct.

  12. Mapping the Physical Properties of Cosmic Hot Gas with Hyper-spectral Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dwyer, Mark; Ponman, Trevor; Claridge, Ela; Raychaudhury, Somak

    2005-01-01

    A novel inversion technique is proposed to compute parametric maps showing the temperature, density and chemical composition of cosmic hot gas from X-ray hyper-spectral images. The parameters are recovered by constructing a unique non-linear mapping derived by combining a physics-based modelling of the X-ray spectrum with the selection of optimal bandpass filters. Preliminary results and analysis are presented.

  13. Development of ceramic composites from mixture of alumina and ceramic precursor polymer poly (silsesquioxane))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of ceramics materials, by polymer precursors pyrolysis, has been intensively researched over the past decades, due to advantages that this path provides, such as: lower temperature process compared to conventional techniques; structure control at molecular level; synthesis possibility of a wide range of ceramic compounds; obtaining parts with dimensions of the final product etc. The active filler controlled polymer pyrolysis (AFCOP) process, enables the synthesis of ceramic composites, by reaction between added filler (oxides, metals, intermetallic etc.) and solid and gaseous products, from polymer decomposition. In this study, based on this process, samples of alumina, with addition of 10 and 20 mass% of poly silsesquioxane polymer precursor, were manufactured. These samples were pyrolyzed at 900 degree C and thermal treated at temperatures of 1100, 1300 and 1500 degree C. The samples were characterized for bulk density, porosity and hardness, after each stage of thermal treatment. Structural transformations were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. Samples treated until 1300 degree C resulted in composites of alumina and silicon oxycarbide, while those treated at 1500 degree C, formed composites of mullite and alumina. The samples with 20% of polymer added started to density around 800 degree C and high retraction rate was observed at 1400 degree C. (author)

  14. NANOSTRUCTURED CERAMICS AND COMPOSITES FOR REFRACTORY APPLICATIONS IN COAL GASIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Brown

    2005-01-31

    A class of ceramics, capable of exhibiting low coefficients of thermal expansion and catalytic properties was investigated. Investigations were directed towards nanoengineering of NZP ceramics and NZP-based composites by chemical means by controlling their compositions and processing variables. NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (NZP) was synthesized by combining water-soluble precursors leading to the precipitation of a gel that was dried, calcined, pressed into pellets, then fired at 850 C. Without chemical additives, the resulting ceramic comprised pores ranging in size from approximately 25 to 50 nm and a surface area of about 30m{sup 2}/g. Hydroxyapatite, which has a needle-like morphology, was mechanically mixed with the calcined gel to template NZP crystallization. What resulted was a coarsening of the pore structure and a decrease in surface area. When copper nitrate was added to the solution during synthesis, the resulting ceramic underwent shrinkage upon firing as well as an increase in strength. HAp and copper additions combined resulted in 40% volume shrinkage and a doubling of the tensile strength to 16MPa. A very different type of porosity was achieved when silica was partly substituted for phosphorous in the NZP structure. Na{sub 3}Zr{sub 2}(Si{sub 2}P)O{sub 12} (NASCION) was synthesized in the same manner as NZP, but the fired ceramic possessed a reticulated pore structure comprising large cavities ranging in size from 5 to 50 {micro}m. The NASCION ceramic either shrank or expanded upon firing depending on when the silica was added during synthesis. When the silica precursor (amorphous, precipitated silica) was added before the calcining step, the pressed pellets expanded during firing, whereas they shrank when the silica was added after the gel was calcined. The observed dilation increased with increasing calcining temperature and particle size, up to 26%. The contraction of the ceramic when fired increased with increasing calcining temperature and a

  15. Potential assisted fabrication of metal-ceramic composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility to produce uniform metal-ceramic composite coatings with a high content of ceramic particles up to 60 vol.% will be presented in this study. This method includes a combination of electrophoretic deposition and electrolytic deposition by several steps. A yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (Tosoh TZ-8Y) was first electrophoretically deposited on a ferritic steel plate and then sintered by 1100 C to an open porous layer. In the next step nickel was electrodeposited into the pores of the layer. By a final annealing step it was possible to improve the bonding of the composit coating on the substrate by diffusion of the metal components. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. FRACTURAL PROCESS AND TOUGHENING MECHANISM OF LAMINATED CERAMIC COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the model of multi-layer beam and the assumption of micro-inhomogeneity of material, the 3D fractural characteristics of laminated ceramic composites have been studied with numerical simulation. Under three-point bending load, crack initiation, coalescence, propagation, tuning off in the weak interface and final rupture have been simulated. The spatial distribution and evolution process of acoustic emission are also presented in the paper. The simulation verifies the primary mechanism of the weak interface inducing the crack to expand along there and absorbing the fractural energy. The disciplinary significance of the effect of strength and properties of material on the toughness and strength of laminated ceramic composites is, therefore,discussed in this paper.

  17. Additive Manufacturing of SiC Based Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael Charles; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics and SiC fiber reinforcedSiC ceramic matrix composites (SiCSiC CMCs) offer high payoff as replacements for metals in turbine engine applications due to their lighter weight, higher temperature capability, and lower cooling requirements. Additive manufacturing approaches can offer game changing technologies for the quick and low cost fabrication of parts with much greater design freedom and geometric complexity. Four approaches for developing these materials are presented. The first two utilize low cost 3D printers. The first uses pre-ceramic pastes developed as feed materials which are converted to SiC after firing. The second uses wood containing filament to print a carbonaceous preform which is infiltrated with a pre-ceramic polymer and converted to SiC. The other two approaches pursue the AM of CMCs. The first is binder jet SiC powder processing in collaboration with rp+m (Rapid Prototyping+Manufacturing). Processing optimization was pursued through SiC powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of nanofibers into the powder bed. The second approach was laminated object manufacturing (LOM) in which fiber prepregs and laminates are cut to shape by a laser and stacked to form the desired part. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted on materials from all approaches with select approaches also characterized with XRD, TGA, and bend testing.

  18. Ceramic-metal composite formation by reactive metal penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E.; Ewsuk, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fahrenholtz, W.G. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.; Lakshman, B.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Ceramic-metal composites can be made to near-net-shape by reactive penetration of dense ceramic preforms by molten metals. Reactive metal penetration is driven by a strongly negative Gibbs energy for reaction. For Al, the general form of the reaction is (x+2) Al + (3/y) MO[sub y] yields Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] + M[sub 3/y]Al[sub x], where MO[sub y] is an oxide that is wet by molten Al. In low PO[sub 2] atmospheres and at temperatures above about 900 degrees C, molten Al reduces mullite to produce Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Si. The Al/mullite reaction has a delta G[sub r] degree(927 degrees C) of -338 per mole of mullite and, for fully dense mullite, the theoretical volume change on reaction is less than 1%. Experiments with commercial mullite containing a silicate grain boundary phase average less than 2% volume change on reaction. In the Al/mullite system, reactive metal penetration produces a fine-grained alumina skeleton with an interspersed metal phase. With > or =15 vol.% excess aluminum, mutually interpenetrating ceramic-metal composites are produced. Properties measurements show that ceramic-metal composites produced by reactive metal penetration of mullite by Al have a Young`s modulus and hardness similar to that of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], with improved fracture toughness. Other compositions also are candidates for in- situ reaction synthesis, but they exhibit differences in reaction kinetics, most probably due to different wetting behavior.

  19. Calcium phosphate-based ceramic and composite materials for medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topical problems in chemistry and technology of materials based on calcium phosphates aimed at both the replacement of damaged bone tissue and its regeneration are discussed. Specific features of the synthesis of nanocrystalline powders and the fabrication of ceramic implants are described. Advances in the development of porous scaffolds from resorbable and osteoconductive calcium phosphates and of hybrid composites that form the basis of bone tissue engineering are considered.

  20. Failure of Ceramic Composites in Non-Uniform Stress Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are of interest as hot-section components in gas turbine engines due to their refractoriness and low density relative to metallic alloys. In service, CMCs will be subjected to spatially inhomogeneous temperature and stress fields. Robust tools that enable prediction of deformation and fracture under these conditions are therefore required for component design and analysis. Such tools are presently lacking. The present work helps to address thi...

  1. Stereological characterization of crack path transitions in ceramic matrix composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parag Bhargava; B R Patterson

    2001-04-01

    All ceramic composites involve a mismatch in physical properties the extent of which differs from one composite to another. Mismatch in thermal expansion ( ) and elastic modulus (E) is known to produce stresses that influence the path of a propagating crack. Thus, the relative effect of thermal and elastic mismatch on the crack path is expected to change with change in stress intensity. We propose that the crack path in ceramic composites should undergo a transition with the crack being strongly influenced by the thermal mismatch stresses at low stress intensity and elastic mismatch stresses at high stress intensities. Thus, a material in use under different applications each with its own loading conditions is expected to exhibit different crack propagation tendencies which may be reflected in the – characteristics of the composite material. In the present work several model composites with different combinations of thermal and elastic mismatch have been considered. Cracks propagating at different sub-critical stress intensities (velocities) were generated by a novel indentation technique. Each indentation was performed at a constant displacement rate and a peak load. A range of displacement rates were used to produce cracks propagating at different velocities. The indentations were made using a Vickers indentor fitted in a universal mechanical testing machine. The crack paths in composites were quantified by stereological technique and the proposed theory was verified.

  2. Boron carbide whisker and platelet reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide whisker and platelet-reinforced alumina and boron-carbide-whisker-reinforced silicon carbide composites were prepared by hot-pressing. The mechanical properties of hot-pressed boron carbide platelet and whisker-reinforced composites are better than the inherent ceramic matrix. A maximum fracture toughness, K(lc), of 9.5 MPa sq rt m is achieved for alumina/boron carbide whisker composites, 8.6 MPa sq rt m is achieved for alumina/boron carbide platelet composites, and 3.8 MPa sq rt m is achieved for silicon carbide/boron carbide whisker composites. The fracture toughness is dependent on the volume fraction of the platelets and whiskers. 12 refs

  3. Carbon–ceramic composites for enzyme immobilization

    OpenAIRE

    Lathouder, Karen de; Lozano Castelló, Dolores; Linares Solano, Ángel; Wallin, Sten A.; Kapteijn, Freek; Moulijn, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Tunable carbon nanofiber-coated monoliths as carriers for enzyme adsorption are presented. Carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) were grown on monoliths with different microstructure. ‘‘Classical’’ cordierite monoliths were compared to novel acicular mullite (ACM) monoliths, with a more open wall structure. This open structure allows for a higher CNF-loading without affecting the open structure of the monoliths. The composites were used as a carrier for lactase from Aspergillus oryzae. ACM monoli...

  4. Ceramic compositional analysis in archaeological perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, R.L.; Rands, R.L.; Holley, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    The primary significance of compositional analysis in archaeology lies on the spatial dimension, in distinguishing products made by locally or regionally-based groups. If compositional analysis is to be carried beyond the descriptive recording of similarities and differences, the resource procurement zone (and its geographical relationship to inferred places of manufacture) is a basic operational concept (Rands and Bishop 1980). A zonal concept is clearly indicated in the case of pottery, which frequently is derived from raw materials, clay and temper, that do not necessarily coincide in their place of procurement. Moreover, depending on geomorphological and geochemical variables, these materials may show considerable homogeneity over a fairly extended area. On the other hand, unless there is strong, selective patterning in the exploitation of resources, great heterogeneity within a restricted region may result in fragmented procurement zones that are difficult to equate with the products of specific manufacturing centers. Under favorable circumstances, however, it appears that methods of compositional analysis are approaching the point at which microzones of limited geographical extent can be recognized and assigned heuristically useful boundaries.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gel-cast Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckman, S. L.; Balss, K. M.; Waterfield, L. G.; Jendrzejczyk, J. A.; Raptis, A. C.

    1997-01-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are being employed to aid in the development of advanced near-net-shape gel-cast ceramic composites. MRI is a unique nondestructive evaluation tool that provides information on both the chemical and physical properties of materials. In this effort, MRI imaging was performed to monitor the drying of porous green-state alumina - methacrylamide-N.N`-methylene bisacrylamide (MAM-MBAM) polymerized composite specimens. Studies were performed on several specimens as a function of humidity and time. The mass and shrinkage of the specimens were also monitored and correlated with the water content.

  6. Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

    1999-06-07

    A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

  7. Ceramic Nanocomposites from Tailor-Made Preceramic Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Mera

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present Review addresses current developments related to polymer-derived ceramic nanocomposites (PDC-NCs. Different classes of preceramic polymers are briefly introduced and their conversion into ceramic materials with adjustable phase compositions and microstructures is presented. Emphasis is set on discussing the intimate relationship between the chemistry and structural architecture of the precursor and the structural features and properties of the resulting ceramic nanocomposites. Various structural and functional properties of silicon-containing ceramic nanocomposites as well as different preparative strategies to achieve nano-scaled PDC-NC-based ordered structures are highlighted, based on selected ceramic nanocomposite systems. Furthermore, prospective applications of the PDC-NCs such as high-temperature stable materials for thermal protection systems, membranes for hot gas separation purposes, materials for heterogeneous catalysis, nano-confinement materials for hydrogen storage applications as well as anode materials for secondary ion batteries are introduced and discussed in detail.

  8. Toughening and strengthening of ceramics composite through microstructural refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggraini, Lydia; Isonishi, Kazuo; Ameyama, Kei

    2016-04-01

    Silicon carbide with 50 mass% zirconia ceramic matrix composites were processed by mechanical milling (MM) followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). By controlling the parameters of MM and SPS, an ultra-fine ZrO2 grain was homogeneously dispersed and refined on the surface of a fine SiC powder, forming a harmonic microstructure. The mechanical properties and the densification behavior of the SiC-ZrO2 composites were investigated. The effects of the milling time on the microstructure and on the mechanical properties of the composite are discussed. The results indicate that the composite mechanically milled for 144 ks and sintered at 1773 K had the highest relative density of 98 %, along with a fracture toughness of 10.7 MPa.m1/2 and a bending strength of 1128 MPa. These superior mechanical properties were influenced by the microstructure characteristics such as the homogeneous grain dispersion. Thus, the microstructural refinement forming harmonic dispersion can be considered a remarkable design tool for improving the mechanical properties of SiC-ZrO2, as well as other ceramic composite materials.

  9. SHS/PHIP of ceramic composites using ilmenite concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kholghy, M. [Yerevan State University and Isfahan University of Technology, Dept. of Materials Eng (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kharatyan, S. [Yerevan State University, Yerevan, A. Manukyan str. 1, AM-0025 (Armenia); Edris, H., E-mail: h-edris@cc.iut.ac.i [Isfahan University of Technology, Dept. of Materials Eng. Isfahan, 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-07-23

    Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) process in the mixture of ilmenite, boron carbide and aluminum combined with a pseudo hot isostatic pressing (PHIP) is used in this research to produce a compact multi-ceramic composite Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiB{sub 2}/TiC with Fe as a binder. Several tests were performed to identify the optimum partial weight percent of the ilmenite, boron carbide and aluminum to produce a suitable amount of each components of the product. On the other hand, a number of tests were performed to measure the delay time, optimum compaction time and optimum compaction force to produce a compact high toughness samples. The results of phase analysis using XRD tests and microstructure using SEM and EDS show that the product is a multi-ceramic composite of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiB{sub 2}/TiC with Fe as a binder. It was shown that there are no primary reactants in the product. In this work, the combustion characteristics (combustion wave propagation velocity and temperature) of the process, as well as density and hardness of the combustion product were measured. The fracture toughness of the product was measured using Vickers indenter and Brazilian test. This shows that the samples have a high toughness in comparison to conventional ceramics.

  10. Neural network applied to elemental archaeological Marajoara ceramic compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decades several analytical techniques have been used in archaeological ceramics studies. However, instrumental neutron activation analysis, INAA, employing gamma-ray spectrometry seems to be the most suitable technique because it is a simple analytical method in its purely instrumental form. The purpose of this work was to determine the concentration of Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb, and Zn in 160 original marajoara ceramic fragments by INAA. Marajoara ceramics culture was sophisticated and well developed. This culture reached its peak during the V and XIV centuries in Marajo Island located on the Amazon River delta area in Brazil. The purpose of the quantitative data was to identify compositionally homogeneous groups within the database. Having this in mind, the data set was first converted to base-10 logarithms to compensate for the differences in magnitude between major elements and trace elements, and also to yield a closer to normal distribution for several trace elements. After that, the data were analyzed using the Mahalanobis distance and using the lambda Wilks as critical value to identify the outliers. The similarities among the samples were studied by means of cluster analysis, principal components analysis and discriminant analysis. Additional confirmation of these groups was made by using elemental concentration bivariate plots. The results showed that there were two very well defined groups in the data set. In addition, the database was studied using artificial neural network with unsupervised learning strategy known as self-organizing maps to classify the marajoara ceramics. The experiments carried out showed that self-organizing maps artificial neural network is capable of discriminating ceramic fragments like multivariate statistical methods, and, again the results showed that the database was formed by two groups. (author)

  11. Neural network applied to elemental archaeological Marajoara ceramic compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyota, Rosimeiri G.; Munita, Casimiro S., E-mail: rosimeiritoy@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: camunita@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Boscarioli, Clodis, E-mail: boscarioli@gmail.co [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas. Colegiado de Informatica; Hernandez, Emilio D.M., E-mail: boscarioli@gmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Neves, Eduardo G.; Demartini, Celia C., E-mail: eduardo@pq.cnpq.b [Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia (MAE/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In the last decades several analytical techniques have been used in archaeological ceramics studies. However, instrumental neutron activation analysis, INAA, employing gamma-ray spectrometry seems to be the most suitable technique because it is a simple analytical method in its purely instrumental form. The purpose of this work was to determine the concentration of Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb, and Zn in 160 original marajoara ceramic fragments by INAA. Marajoara ceramics culture was sophisticated and well developed. This culture reached its peak during the V and XIV centuries in Marajo Island located on the Amazon River delta area in Brazil. The purpose of the quantitative data was to identify compositionally homogeneous groups within the database. Having this in mind, the data set was first converted to base-10 logarithms to compensate for the differences in magnitude between major elements and trace elements, and also to yield a closer to normal distribution for several trace elements. After that, the data were analyzed using the Mahalanobis distance and using the lambda Wilks as critical value to identify the outliers. The similarities among the samples were studied by means of cluster analysis, principal components analysis and discriminant analysis. Additional confirmation of these groups was made by using elemental concentration bivariate plots. The results showed that there were two very well defined groups in the data set. In addition, the database was studied using artificial neural network with unsupervised learning strategy known as self-organizing maps to classify the marajoara ceramics. The experiments carried out showed that self-organizing maps artificial neural network is capable of discriminating ceramic fragments like multivariate statistical methods, and, again the results showed that the database was formed by two groups. (author)

  12. Summary of workshop on ceramic composite interface coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Commercialization of fiber-reinforced composites has been limited because of the stability of the interface coatings that control the mechanical properties of the composites. Typical materials are currently manufactured with pyrolytic carbon interface coatings that perform well in inert atmospheres or when stresses are kept very low (<70 MPa). Unfortunately, carbon coatings are not stable at high temperatures in air or oxidizing conditions which results in degradation of the mechanical properties of the composites. The problem of oxidation resistant interface coatings is not unique to the Fossil Program. Such coatings are also a concern to the United States Air Force, the Continuous Fiber-reinforced Ceramic Composites Program, the Fusion Energy Materials Program, and to the European Community. This workshop was organized to compare and discuss the need for and development of oxidation-resistant interface coatings in each of these programs.

  13. Polymer derived ceramic composites as environmental barrier coatings on steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, Jessica D.

    Polymer derived ceramics have shown promise as a novel way to process low-dimensional ceramics such as fibers and coatings. They offer advantages over traditional ceramic processing routes including lower pyrolysis temperatures and the ability to employ polymeric processing techniques. The main drawback to preceramic polymers is that they undergo a shrinkage during pyrolysis that can be greater than 50-volume%. One way to overcome this shrinkage is to add filler particles, usually elemental or binary metals, which will expand upon reaction with the pyrolysis atmosphere, thereby compensating for the shrinkage of the polymer. The aim of this study is to develop a polymer derived ceramic composite coating on steel as a barrier to oxidation and carburization, while concurrently gaining insight as to the fundamental mechanisms for compositional and microstructural evolution within the system. A systematic approach to selecting the preceramic polymer and expansion agents was taken. Six commercially available poly(silsesquioxane) polymers and a polysiloxane were studied. Several metals and an intermetallic were considered as potential expansion agents. The most desirable polymer/expansion agent combination was achieved with poly(hydridomethylsiloxane) as the matrix and titanium disilicide as the filler. Processing parameters have been optimized and a relationship derived to predict final coating thickness based on slurry viscosity and dip coating withdrawal speed. Microstructural analysis reveals an amorphous composite coating of oxidized filler particles in a silica matrix. A diffusion layer is visible at the coating-steel interface, indicating good bonding. The optimized coatings are ˜18mum thick, have some residual porosity and a density of 2.57g/cm3. A systematic study of the phase transformations and microstructural changes in the coating and its components during pyrolysis in air is also presented. The system evolves from a polymer filled with a binary metal at

  14. Dielectric properties of BST/MZO ceramic composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3/Mg1-xZnxO (MZO, x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20) ceramic composites were prepared by traditional ceramic processing. The crystal structure, fracture surface morphology, and dielectric properties were investigated. The samples with x = 0, 0.05 and 0.10 exhibited favorable sintering behavior, and homogeneous diphase microstructure was obtained. Nevertheless, the microstructure of the samples with x = 0.15 and 0.20 was inhomogeneous and abnormal grain growth could be observed, and the abnormal grain growth induced the degradation of dielectric strength. The sample with x = 0.10 has relatively low dielectric loss (1.26×10-3) and the optimal FOM value (about 174).

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of a ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Paul P.; Duke, John C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Monolithic ceramic materials have proven their usefulness in many applications, yet, their potential for critical structural applications is limited because of their sensitivity to small imperfections. To overcome this extreme sensitivity to small imperfections, ceramic matrix composite materials have been developed that have the ability to withstand some distributed damage. A borosilicate glass reinforced with several layers of silicon-carbide fiber mat has been studied. Four-point flexure and tension tests were performed not only to determine some of the material properties, but also to initiate a controlled amount of damage within each specimen. Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements were performed periodically during mechanical testing. This paper will compare the AU results to the mechanical test results and data from other nondestructive methods including acoustic emission monitoring and X-ray radiography. It was found that the AU measurements were sensitive to the damage that had developed within the material.

  16. Wear and Reactivity Studies of Melt infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmon, David C.; Ojard, Greg; Brewer, David N.

    2013-01-01

    As interest grows in the use of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) for critical gas turbine engine components, the effects of the CMCs interaction with the adjoining structure needs to be understood. A series of CMC/material couples were wear tested in a custom elevated temperature test rig and tested as diffusion couples, to identify interactions. Specifically, melt infiltrated silicon carbide/silicon carbide (MI SiC/SiC) CMC was tested in combination with a nickel-based super alloy, Waspaloy, a thermal barrier coating, Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), and a monolithic ceramic, silicon nitride (Si3N4). To make the tests more representative of actual hardware, the surface of the CMC was kept in the as-received state (not machined) with the full surface features/roughness present. Test results include: scanning electron microscope characterization of the surfaces, micro-structural characterization, and microprobe analysis.

  17. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This project demonstrated that higher temperature capabilities of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) can be used to reduce emissions and improve fuel consumption in gas turbine engines. The work involved closely coupling aerothermal and structural analyses for the first-stage vane of a high-pressure turbine (HPT). These vanes are actively cooled, typically using film cooling. Ceramic materials have structural and thermal properties different from conventional metals used for the first-stage HPT vane. This project identified vane configurations that satisfy CMC structural strength and life constraints while maintaining vane aerodynamic efficiency and reducing vane cooling to improve engine performance and reduce emissions. The project examined modifications to vane internal configurations to achieve the desired objectives. Thermal and pressure stresses are equally important, and both were analyzed using an ANSYS® structural analysis. Three-dimensional fluid and heat transfer analyses were used to determine vane aerodynamic performance and heat load distributions.

  18. Resin composite or ceramic inlays/onlays in posterior permanent teeth : a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Breistrand, Joakim Lund; Juliussen, Øyvind

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical survival and long-term costs of extensive composite restorations to ceramic inlays and onlays. The hypothesis was that ceramic inlays and onlays can be more tooth substance saving and long-term economic for the patient than composite restorations. Methods: The dental literature, predominantly since 1990, was reviewed for prospective clinical studies of longevity of ceramic inlays/onlays and direct composite restorations in permanent posterior teeth. Only ...

  19. Microstructure characteristics of FeMo-Sialon ceramic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new metal-Sialon based ceramic composite of FeMo-Sialon has been processed using Si3N4, α-Al2O3 and FeMo70 alloy powders as the main raw materials. To explain why this composite has excellent mechanical properties, microstructure characterizations are carried out using the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that FeMo, FeSi2 and Mo have formed an alloy mixture of Mo-Fe-Si in the FeMo-Sialon ceramic composite. Elongated β-Sialon crystals, interlacing with each other, vary in size. The Y-SiAlON glass, as an inter-granular phase, surrounds the grain boundaries of β-Sialon crystals. Some of β-Sialon crystals are semi-surrounded by dumbbell-like Mo-Fe-Si particles. The good mechanical properties of FeMo-Sialon composite are greatly dependent on the elongated Sialon grains and Mo-Fe-Si particles with interlocking structures.

  20. Colloidal processing of Fe-based metal ceramic composites with high content of ceramic reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major difficulties of processing metal-matrix composites by means of conventional powder metallurgy techniques are the lack of dispersion of the phases within the final microstructure. In this work, processing through colloidal techniques of the Fe-based metal-matrix composites, with a high content of a ceramic reinforcement (Ti(C,N) ), is presented for the first time in the literature. The colloidal approach allows a higher control of the powders packing and a better homogenization of phases since powders are mixed in a liquid medium. The chemical stability of Fe in aqueous medium determines the dispersion conditions of the mixture. The Fe slurries were formulated by optimising their zeta potential and their rheology, in order to shape bulk pieces by slip-casting. Preliminary results demonstrate the viability of this procedure, also opening new paths to the microstructural design of fully sintered Fe-based hard metal, with 50 vol. % of Ti(C,N) in its composition. (Author)

  1. Durable, High Thermal Conductivity Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites for Turbine Engine Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Durable, creep-resistant ceramic composites are necessary to meet the increased operating temperatures targeted for advanced turbine engines. Higher operating...

  2. Structure and Evolution of Hot Gas in 30 Dor

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Q D

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the structure and evolution of hot gas in the 30 Dor nebula, based on recent X-ray observations. Our deep ROSAT HRI image shows that diffuse X-ray emission arises in blister-shaped regions outlined by loops of HII gas. X-ray spectroscopic data from ASCA confirm the thermal nature of the emission and indicate that hot gas temperature decreases from the core to the halo of the nebula. The structure of the nebula can be understood as outflows of hot and HII gases from the parent giant molecular cloud of the central OB association. The dynamic mixing between the two gas phases is likely responsible for the mass loading to the hot gas, as required to explain the observed thermal structure and X-ray luminosity of the nebula. Such processes should also be important in the formation of similar giant HII regions and in their subsequent evolution into supergiant bubbles or galactic chimneys.

  3. Glass-ceramic frits for porcelain stoneware bodies: effects on sintering, phase composition and technological properties

    OpenAIRE

    Zanelli, Chiara; Baldi, Giovanni; Dondi, Michele; Ercolani, Giampaolo; Guarini, Guia; Raimondo, Maria Rosa

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, the effects of glass-ceramic frits (10wt%) added to a porcelain stoneware body in replacement of non-plastic raw materials, were evaluated simulating the tile-making process. Each glass-ceramic frit plays its own peculiar effect on the compositional properties and only some precursors behave as real glass ceramic materials. The positive influence of glass-ceramic precursors in promoting the sintering stands out when temperature onset densification and sintering rate are c...

  4. New toughening concepts for ceramic composites from rigid natural materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, George

    2011-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying the toughening in rigid natural composites exhibited by the concentric cylindrical composites of spicules of hexactinellid sponges, and by the nacre (brick-and-mortar) structure of mollusks such as Haliotis rufescens (red abalone), as well as the crossed-lamellar structure of Strombus gigas (queen conch) show commonalities in the manner in which toughening takes place. It is proposed that crack diversion, a new kind of crack bridging, resulting in retardation of delamination, creation of new surface areas, and other energy-dissipating mechanisms occur in both natural systems. However, these are generally different from the toughening mechanisms that are utilized for other classes of structural materials. Complementary to those mechanisms found in rigid natural ceramic/organic composites, special architectures and thin viscoelastic organic layers have been found to play controlling roles in energy dissipation in these structures. PMID:21565715

  5. Theory and experimental technique for nondestructive evaluation of ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    The important ultrasonic scattering mechanisms for SiC and Si3N4 ceramic composites were identified by examining the interaction of ultrasound with individual fibers, pores, and grains. The dominant scattering mechanisms were identified as asymmetric refractive scattering due to porosity gradients in the matrix material, and symmetric diffractive scattering at the fiber-to-matrix interface and at individual pores. The effect of the ultrasonic reflection coefficient and surface roughness in the ultrasonic evaluation was highlighted. A new nonintrusive ultrasonic evaluation technique, angular power spectrum scanning (APSS), was presented that is sensitive to microstructural variations in composites. Preliminary results indicate that APSS will yield information on the composite microstructure that is not available by any other nondestructive technique.

  6. Reinforcing and toughening alumina/titania ceramic composites with nano-dopants from nanostructured composite powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured alumina/titania composite powders were prepared using nanosized alumina and titania doped with nanosized zirconia and ceria through ball-milling, spray drying and heat treating. The nanostructured reconstituted powders were then cool isostatic pressed and pressureless sintered into bulk ceramic composites. The phase constitution and microstructures of as-prepared ceramic composites were characterized by using X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscope. The mechanical properties of the ceramic composites were evaluated by Vickers hardness test, flexural strength test and fracture toughness test. The effects of nano-dopants and sintering temperatures on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. It was found that nano-dopants had the effects of lowering sintering temperature, accelerating densification, reinforcing and toughening the composites. The maximum flexural strength, fracture toughness and Vickers hardness of the composites with nano-dopants were 51, 20 and 56% higher than that of the composites without nano-dopants. The reinforcing and toughening mechanisms are discussed in detail.

  7. Integration Science and Technology of Silicon-Based Ceramics and Composites:Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic integration technologies enable hierarchical design and manufacturing of intricate ceramic and composite parts starting with geometrically simpler units that are subsequently joined to themselves and/or to metals to create components with progressively higher levels of complexity and functionality. However, for the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance for high temperature applications, detailed understanding of various thermochemical and thermomechanical factors is critical. Different technical approaches are required for the integration of ceramic to ceramic and ceramic to metal systems. Active metal brazing, in particular, is a simple and cost-effective method to integrate ceramic to metallic components. Active braze alloys usually contain a reactive filler metal (e.g., Ti, Cr, V, Hf etc) that promotes wettability and spreading by inducing chemical reactions with the ceramics and composites. In this presentation, various examples of brazing of silicon nitride to themselves and to metallic systems are presented. Other examples of joining of ceramic composites (C/SiC and SiC/SiC) using ceramic interlayers and the resulting microstructures are also presented. Thermomechanical characterization of joints is presented for both types of systems. In addition, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic-ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic-metal) material systems will be discussed. Potential opportunities and need for the development of innovative design philosophies, approaches, and integrated system testing under simulated application conditions will also be presented.

  8. Description of strengthening mechanism in layered ceramic composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štegnerová, Kateřina; Náhlík, Luboš; Hutař, Pavel

    Zurich: Trans Tech Publications, 2016 - (Bajić, D.; Tonković, Z.; Aliabadi, F.), s. 93-96. (Key Engineering Materials. 665). ISBN 978-3-03835-541-0. ISSN 1013-9826. [FDM 2015 International Conference on Fracture and Damage /14./. Budva (ME), 21.09.2015-23.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-09347S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : layered ceramic composite s * residual stresses * crack propagation * strain energy density factor Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics www.scientific.net/KEM.665.93

  9. Analytical Micromechanics Modeling Technique Developed for Ceramic Matrix Composites Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James B.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) promise many advantages for next-generation aerospace propulsion systems. Specifically, carbon-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) CMCs enable higher operational temperatures and provide potential component weight savings by virtue of their high specific strength. These attributes may provide systemwide benefits. Higher operating temperatures lessen or eliminate the need for cooling, thereby reducing both fuel consumption and the complex hardware and plumbing required for heat management. This, in turn, lowers system weight, size, and complexity, while improving efficiency, reliability, and service life, resulting in overall lower operating costs.

  10. Analysis of Damage in a Ceramic Matrix Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Talreja, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of damage and the associated mechanical response are stud ied for a unidirectionally fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite subjected to uniaxial tensile loading parallel to fibers. A multi-stage development of damage is identified, and for each stage the governing mechanisms are...... discussed. For distributed matrix micro cracking a continuum damage model is used as the basis for describing the associated stress-strain behavior. A simplified analysis of frictional sliding at the fiber/matrix inter face is made to elucidate its effect on the stress-strain response....

  11. Fabrication Routes for Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1998-01-01

    The primary approaches used for fabrication of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) components have been reviewed. The CFCC fabrication issues related to fiber, interface, and matrix have been analyzed. The capabilities, advantages and limitations of the five matrix-infiltration routes have been compared and discussed. Today, the best fabrication route for the CFCC end-user is not clear and compromises need to be made depending on the details of the CFCC application. However, with time, this problem should be reduced as research continues to develop advanced CFCC constituents and fabrication routes.

  12. The mechanical properties and microstructure of the bionic alloy-ceramic laminated composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The bionic alloy-ceramic laminated composite was fabricated by EB-PVD. → Mechanical properties and microstructure of laminated composite were investigated. → Laminated composite was heat treated in order to improve the tensile strength. -- Abstract: In the present work, the bionic alloy-ceramic laminated composite was fabricated by electron beam-physical vapor deposition method. The ingots of Ni-20Co-12Cr-4Al (wt.%) and ZrO2-8 mol%Y2O3 were used as the sources of the alloy layer and ceramic layer, respectively. The laminated composite was generally destroyed within the ceramic layer when the interlaminar strength was determined, which revealed that the excellent interface bonding between the ceramic layer and the alloy layer. The obvious diffusion interfaces between the ceramic and alloy layers were readily detected, which was favorable to the mechanical properties of the laminated composite. In the heat treatment process, the diffusion of the flaws within the ceramic layer and/or alloy layer to the interface between the ceramic layer and alloy layer was easier compared with the occurrence of interlaminar diffusion. It was confirmed by the X-ray diffractometer that the reaction of the ceramic layer with alloy layer was simple physical diffusion. The tensile strength of the laminated composite increased first and then decreased as the heat treatment time increased, which was attributed to the mutual reaction of the increase in the relative density with the formation of the flaws located at the interface.

  13. A study of ceramic-lined composite steel pipes prepared by SHS centrifugal-thermite process

    OpenAIRE

    Li Yuxin; Jiang Letao; Lu Qing; Bai Peikang; Liu Bin; Wang Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Al2O3 ceramic-lined steel pipe was produced by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis centrifugal thermite process (SHS C-T process) from Fe2O3 and Al as the raw materials. The composition, phase separation and microstructures were investigated. The result showed the ceramic lined pipe is composed of the three main layers of various compositions, which were subsequently determined to be Fe layer, the transition layer and the ceramic layer. Fe layer is ...

  14. The Influence of Tool Composite's Structure During Process of Diamond Grinding of Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Gawlik Józef; Niemczewska-Wójcik Magdalena; Krajewska Joanna; Sokhan Serghej V.; Paščenko E.A.; Žuk T.S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the tests performed during the grinding process of the ceramic materials: – polycrystalline ceramics (Zirconium ZrO2) and mono-crystalline ceramics (sapphire α-Al2O3) by the diamond tools. Studies have shown that the concentration (thickening) of the tool composite changes the tool's pore structure when using suitable wetted adamantine additives. Such modified composite has positive impact on tribological properties of the subsurface layer of the machined co...

  15. Application of Technogenic-Raw Material and Burning Out Additive in Composite Ceramic System

    OpenAIRE

    Viktor KIZINIEVIČ; Ramunė ŽURAUSKIENĖ; Kizinievič, Olga; Liudas TUMONIS; Rimvydas ŽURAUSKAS

    2012-01-01

    The investigation of the composite ceramic system containing easily fusible hydro-micous clay, technogenic finely dispersed raw material, and burning out waste additive is presented in the article. The properties of the raw materials used are described in the paper. The obtained ceramic bodies were burned at 1000 °C and 1050 °C temperatures, keeping at the highest burning temperature for 4 h. The analysis of physical-mechanical properties of composite ceramics (density, compressive strength, ...

  16. Factors Affecting Fiber Design and Selection for Advanced Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Structural Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) have the potential for application in the hot sections of a variety of advanced propulsion and power systems. It is therefore necessary to have a general understanding of the key properties of CMC and Reinforcing Fibers. This need is complicated by the wide variety of application conditions and structural requirements for which CMC's will be used, and the proprietary concerns of the design engineers. CMC's, to be successful, must display properties which are competitive with the currently used high temperature structural materials: (i.e., Iron and Nickel based superalloys, tough monolithic ceramics, and carbon/carbon composites.) Structural CMC offers several areas of competition: (1) performance, (i.e., strength and strength retention, creep resistance, and thermal conductivity), (2) reliability (i.e., environmental durability, and damage tolerance) and (3) processing (i.e., capability for varying sizes and shapes, and cost effective fabrication). The presentation further discusses, and illustrates with fiber and CMC data the key fiber properties and processes which strongly affect each CMC area of competition. The presentation further discusses the current knowledge of the important factors which control the key fiber properties. A design guidelines for the optimum fiber characteristics is developed, and the currently available fibers are compared against those guidelines.

  17. Synthesis of TiN/AlON composite ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The synthesis process of TiN/AlON composite ceramics was studied, the thermodynamics, mechanical properties and microstructures of TiN/AlON have also been investigated. The TiN/AlON composite ceramics has been synthesized by both hot-pressing and pressureless sintering. The characterizations of the material synthesized were analyzed with XRD (X-ray diffraction) and TEM (transmission electronic microscope). The density and toughness strength of TiN/AlON are 3.57 g/cm3 and 4.74 MPa@ m1/2, respectively. The bending strength was measured at both room temperature and high temperatures and the results are 399 MPa (room temperature), 406 MPa (1 073 K), 417 MPa (1 273 K) and 323 MPa (1 573 K). Pattern Recognition (PR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) were used to optimize the parameters and to predict the expected values. A proper parameter for pressureless sintering of TiN/AlON has been obtained and testified, the parameters are temperature (1978 K), AlN / (AlN + Al2O3) ratio (0.22), MgO (4.7%) and TiO2 (7.2%).

  18. The Hot Gas Halos of Galaxies in Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, Tesla E; Mulchaey, John S

    2008-01-01

    We use Chandra observations of 13 nearby groups of galaxies to investigate the hot gas content of their member galaxies. We find that a large fraction of near-IR bright, early-type galaxies in groups have extended X-ray emission, indicating that they retain significant hot gas halos even in these dense environments. In particular, we detect hot gas halos in ~80% of L_K > L_star galaxies. We do not find a significant difference in the L_K-L_X relation for detected group and cluster early-type galaxies. However, we detect X-ray emission from a significantly higher fraction of galaxies brighter than L_star in groups compared to clusters, indicating that a larger fraction of galaxies in clusters experience significant stripping of their hot gas. In addition, group and cluster galaxies appear to be X-ray faint compared to field galaxies, though a Chandra based field sample is needed to confirm this result. The near-IR bright late-types galaxies in clusters and groups appear to follow the L_K-L_X relation for early...

  19. Modeling oxidation damage of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Peng Yang; Gui-Qiong Jiao; Bo Wang

    2011-01-01

    For fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), oxidation of the constituents is a very important damage type for high temperature applications. During the oxidizing process, the pyrolytic carbon interphase gradually recesses from the crack site in the axial direction of the fiber into the interior of the material. Carbon fiber usually presents notch-like or local neck-shrink oxidation phenomenon, causing strength degradation. But, the reason for SiC fiber degradation is the flaw growth mechanism on its surface. A micromechanical model based on the above mechanisms was established to simulate the mechanical properties of CMCs after high temperature oxidation. The statistic and shearlag theory were applied and the calculation expressions for retained tensile modulus and strength were deduced, respectively. Meanwhile, the interphase recession and fiber strength degradation were considered. And then, the model was validated by application to a C/SiC composite.

  20. Preparation of Ceramic Composite Pipes Through Paste Extrusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongchun Chen; Takenobu Takeda; Keisuke Kikuchi

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out in order to prepare ceramic composite pipes used for tubular solid oxide fuel cells by using a multi-billet extrusion technique. Particular emphasis was given to the forming possibility and extrusion behavior of a two-layer pipe consisting of NiO-YSZ(PSZ) (anode) and YSZ (electrolyte). It is shown that the extrusion pressure and binder content required decrease with increasing the fraction of nickel oxide in the anode layers. The porosity in the anode layers depends on the binder content in pastes. It is feasible to prepare anode/electrolyte composite pipes by means of co-extrusion of different pastes.Furthermore, it is possible to obtain sound sintered pipes even under pressureless sintering conditions.

  1. Application of CFCC technology to hot gas filtration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richlen, S.

    1995-06-01

    Discussion will feature high temperature filter development under the DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program. Within the CFCC Program there are four industry projects and a national laboratory technology support project. Atlantic Research, Babcock & Wilcox, DuPont Lanxide Composites, and Textron are developing processing methods to produce CFCC Components with various types of matrices and composites, along with the manufacturing methods to produce industrial components, including high temperature gas filters. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is leading a National Laboratory/University effort to increase knowledge of such generic and supportive technology areas as environmental degradation, measurement of mechanical properties, long-term performance, thermal shock and thermal cycling, creep and fatigue, and non-destructive characterization. Tasks include composite design, materials characterization, test methods, and performance-related phenomena, that will support the high temperature filter activities of industry and government.

  2. Ceramic Composite Mechanical Fastener System for High-Temperature Structural Assemblies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under Phase I, the feasibility of a novel thermal stress-free ceramic composite mechanical fastener system suitable for assembly of high-temperature composite...

  3. ELASTIC BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS OF 3D ANGLE-INTERLOCK WOVEN CERAMIC COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Yanjun; Jiao Guiqiong; Wang Bo; Liu Wei

    2006-01-01

    A micromechanical model for elastic behavior analysis of angle-interlock woven ceramic composites is proposed in this paper. This model takes into account the actual fabric structure by considering the fiber undulation and continuity in space, the cavities between adjacent yarns and the actual cross-section geometry of the yarn. Based on the laminate theory, the elastic properties of 3D angle-interlock woven ceramic composites are predicted. Different numbers of interlaced wefts have almost the same elastic moduli. The thickness of ceramic matrix has little effect on elastic moduli. When the undulation ratio increases longitudinal modulus decreases and the other Young's moduli increase. Good agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental results demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed model in analyzing the elastic properties of3D angle-interlock woven ceramic composites. The results of this paper verify the fact that the method of analyzing polyester matrix composites is suitable for woven ceramic composites.

  4. Microstructural, compositional and mechanical properties of the archaeological indigenous ceramics of Caninhas, Sao Paulo,Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archaeological ceramics contain infinity of data about social and cultural indigenous site Caninhas/SP. The ceramics present a gradient of color (ochre to dark gray), when from the surface to the center of the piece, indicating compositional variability caused by inefficient sintering carried out by indigenous peoples. It was analyzed the composition phases by X-rays diffraction (XRD) and mapping by EDS, identifying the illite, quartz and lutecite phases (ochre region) and illite, quartz, hydrated alumina and lutecite phases (dark gray region). The results of EDS confirmed the stages identified by X-rays diffraction and suggesting the presence of roots and scrap of ceramics sintered in the composition of indigenous ceramics, when compared by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Vickers hardness identified as fragile and heterogeneous are archaeological ceramics, reaching approximately 203 HV in the grains of silica and 16 HV in the ceramic matrix. (author)

  5. Ultrasonic assessment of interfacial oxidation damage in ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y. C.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach to characterizing oxidation damage in ceramic matrix composites using ultrasonic techniques is proposed. In this approach, the elastic constants of the composite are determined nondestructively by measuring the angular dependence of both longitudinal and transverse wave velocities. A micromechanical model for composites with anisotropic constituents is used to find the anisotropic properties of an effective fiber, which is a combination of the fiber and the interface. Interfacial properties are extracted from the properties of this effective fiber by analyzing the difference between effective and actual fiber properties. Unidirectional /0/28 SiC/Si3N4 composites with 30 percent fiber volume fraction and 30 percent matrix porosity are used. The samples are exposed in a flowing oxygen environment at elevated temperatures, up to 1400 C, for 100 hours and then measured by ultrasonic methods at room temperature. The Young's modulus in the fiber direction of the sample oxidized at 600 C decreased significantly but it was unchanged for samples oxidized at temperatures above 1200 C. The transverse moduli obtained from ultrasonic measurements decrease continuously up to 1200 C. The shear stiffnesses show behavior similar to the transverse moduli. The effective elastic moduli of the interfacial carbon coating are determined from the experimental data, and their change due to thermal oxidation is discussed.

  6. 15th annual conference on composites and advanced ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baaklini, G.Y.; Bhatt, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    The room-temperature tensile testing of silicon carbide fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) composite specimens was monitored by using in-situ x ray film radiography. Radiographic evaluation before, during, and after loading provided data on the effect of preexisting volume flaws (high density impurities, and local density variations) on the fracture behavior of composites. Results from (0)1, (0)3, (0)5, and (0)8 composite specimens, showed that x ray film radiography can monitor damage accumulations during tensile loading. Matrix cracking, fiber-matrix debonding, and fiber pullout were imaged throughout the tensile loading history of the specimens. Further, in-situ film radiography was found to be a helpful and practical technique for estimating interfacial shear strength between the SiC fiber and the RBSN matrix by the matrix crack spacing method. It is concluded that pretest, in-situ, and post-test radiography can provide for a greater understanding of ceramic matrix composite mechanical behavior, a verification of related experimental procedures, and a validation and development of related analytical models.

  7. Improved C/SiC Ceramic Composites Made Using PIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easler, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Improved carbon-fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic-matrix composite (C/SiC CMC) materials, suitable for fabrication of thick-section structural components, are producible by use of a combination of raw materials and processing conditions different from such combinations used in the prior art. In comparison with prior C/SiC CMC materials, these materials have more nearly uniform density, less porosity, and greater strength. The majority of raw-material/processing-condition combinations used in the prior art involve the use of chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) for densifying the matrix. In contrast, in synthesizing a material of the present type, one uses a combination of infiltration with, and pyrolysis of, a preceramic polymer [polymer infiltration followed by pyrolysis (PIP)]. PIP processing is performed in repeated, tailored cycles of infiltration followed by pyrolysis. Densification by PIP processing takes less time and costs less than does densification by CVI. When one of these improved materials was tested by exposure to a high-temperature, inert-gas environment that caused prior C/SiC CMCs to lose strength, this material did not lose strength. (Information on the temperature and exposure time was not available at the time of writing this article.) A material of the present improved type consists, more specifically, of (1) carbon fibers coated with an engineered fiber/matrix interface material and (2) a ceramic matrix, containing SiC, derived from a pre-ceramic polymer with ceramic powder additions. The enhancements of properties of these materials relative to those of prior C/SiC CMC materials are attributable largely to engineering of the fiber/ matrix interfacial material and the densification process. The synthesis of a material of this type includes processing at an elevated temperature to a low level of open porosity. The approach followed in this processing allows one to fabricate not only simple plates but also more complexly shaped parts. The carbon fiber

  8. Economical Fabrication of Thick-Section Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Jason; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian; Benander, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for producing thick-section [>2 in. (approx.5 cm)], continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Ultramet-modified fiber interface coating and melt infiltration processing, developed previously for thin-section components, were used for the fabrication of CMCs that were an order of magnitude greater in thickness [up to 2.5 in. (approx.6.4 cm)]. Melt processing first involves infiltration of a fiber preform with the desired interface coating, and then with carbon to partially densify the preform. A molten refractory metal is then infiltrated and reacts with the excess carbon to form the carbide matrix without damaging the fiber reinforcement. Infiltration occurs from the inside out as the molten metal fills virtually all the available void space. Densification to 41 ksi (approx. 283 MPa) flexural strength.

  9. Hoop Tensile Properties of Ceramic Matrix Composite Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; DiCarlo, James A.; Yun, HeeMan; Barnett, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Tensile stress-strain properties in the hoop direction were obtained for 100-mm diameter SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite cylinders using ring specimens machined form the cylinder ends. The cylinders were fabricated from 2D balanced SiC fabric with several material variants, including wall thickness (6,8, and 12 plies), SiC fiber type (Sylramic, Sylramic-iBN, Hi-Nicalon, and Hi-Nicalon S), fiber sizing type, and matrix type (full CVI SiC, and partial CVI SiC plus slurry cast + melt-infiltrated SiC-Si). Fiber ply splices existed in all the hoops. Tensile hoop measurements are made at room temperature and 1200 C using hydrostatic ring test facilities. The failure mode of the hoops, determined through microstructural examination, is presented. The hoop properties are compared with in-plane data measured on flat panels using same material variants, but containing no splices.

  10. Diode-pumped multilayer Yb:YAG composite ceramic laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All-ceramic multilayer composite ytterbium doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Yb:YAG) laser gain medium with doping concentration distribution of 0-5-10-15-20-15-10-5-0 at.% Yb ions was successfully fabrication by the technique of tape casting and simple vacuum sintering process. Full dense microstructure is achieved, and excellent optical properties are gained. The obtained result shows that the optical transmittance of >80% is reached when the wavelength is larger than 500 nm. The emission cross section is 4.03×10-20 cm2 at the wavelength of 1030 nm. Continuous wave (CW) laser performance is further demonstrated when the sample is pumped by 940 nm fiber-coupler diode laser. The threshold absorbed pump power is 5.9 W, and the slope efficiency attains to 27% with transmission of output coupler of 6%

  11. Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: Hot-Gas Filtration; Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-333

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, R.

    2012-07-01

    The hypothesis that was tested in this task was that separation of char, with its associated mineral matter from pyrolysis vapors before condensation, will lead to improved oil quality and stability with respect to storage and transportation. The metric used to evaluate stability in this case was a 10-fold reduction in the rate of increase of viscosity as determined by ASTM D445 (the accelerated aging test). The primary unit operation that was investigated for this purpose was hot-gas filtration. A custom-built heated candle filter system was fabricated by the Pall Corporation and furnished to NREL for this test campaign. This system consisted of a candle filter element in a containment vessel surrounded by heating elements on the external surface of the vessel. The filter element and housing were interfaced to NREL?s existing 0.5 MTD pyrolysis Process Development Unit (PDU). For these tests the pyrolysis reactor of the PDU was operated in the entrained-flow mode. The HGF test stand was installed on a slipstream from the PDU so that both hot-gas filtered oil and bio-oil that was not hot-gas filtered could be collected for purposes of comparison. Two filter elements from Pall were tested: (1) porous stainless steel (PSS) sintered metal powder; (2) sintered ceramic powder. An extremely sophisticated bio-oil condensation and collection system was designed and fabricated at NREL and interfaced to the filter unit.

  12. Microstructures and Composition of Ceramic Coatings on Aluminum Produced by Micro-Arc Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN De-jiu; WANG Yu-lin; GU Wei-chao; XING Guang-zhong

    2004-01-01

    Microstructures and phase composition of the ceramic coatings formed on pure aluminum by heteropolar pulsed current ceramic synthesizing system for different periods were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Results show that the amount of the discharge channels in the ceramic coating sminish while the aperture largen in the micro-arc oxidation process, and the surface of the ceramic coatingmelted and solidified in the process.XRD studies of ceramic coatings deposited for different time show that these coatings consist mainly of α-Al2 O3, γ-Al2 O3 , θ-Al2 O3 and a little amorphous phase, and phase composition of compact and porous ceramic coatings don' t have much difference but have a little change of the content of α-Al2 O3 and amorphous phase.

  13. Catalytic hot gas cleaning of gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work was to study the catalytic cleaning of gasification gas from tars and ammonia. In addition, factors influencing catalytic activity in industrial applications were studied, as well as the effects of different operation conditions and limits. Also the catalytic reactions of tar and ammonia with gasification gas components were studied. The activities of different catalyst materials were measured with laboratory-scale reactors fed by slip streams taken from updraft and fluid bed gasifiers. Carbonate rocks and nickel catalysts proved to be active tar decomposing catalysts. Ammonia decomposition was in turn facilitated by nickel catalysts and iron materials like iron sinter and iron dolomite. Temperatures over 850 deg C were required at 2000{sup -1} space velocity at ambient pressure to achieve almost complete conversions. During catalytic reactions H{sub 2} and CO were formed and H{sub 2}O was consumed in addition to decomposing hydrocarbons and ammonia. Equilibrium gas composition was almost achieved with nickel catalysts at 900 deg C. No deactivation by H{sub 2}S or carbon took place in these conditions. Catalyst blocking by particulates was avoided by using a monolith type of catalyst. The apparent first order kinetic parameters were determined for the most active materials. The activities of dolomite, nickel catalyst and reference materials were measured in different gas atmospheres using laboratory apparatus. This consisted of nitrogen carrier, toluene as tar model compound, ammonia and one of the components H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O or CO+CO{sub 2}. Also synthetic gasification gas was used. With the dolomite and nickel catalyst the highest toluene decomposition rates were measured with CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. In gasification gas, however, the rate was retarded due to inhibition by reaction products (CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}). Tar decomposition over dolomite was modelled by benzene reactions with CO{sub 2}, H

  14. Mechanical Properties of Candidate Materials for Hot Gas Duct of VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot gas duct of VHTR is operated at 950 .deg.. Ni based superalloys, such as Hastelloy XR, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, for hot gas duct have been candidate material because of good strength and corrosion properties at high temperature. Mechanical properties of these alloys are tested at high temperature to apply to hot gas duct of VHTR

  15. Structure recognition from high resolution images of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Loring, Burlen; Bale, Hrishikesh; Parkinson, Dilworth; Sethian, James

    2015-01-05

    Fibers provide exceptional strength-to-weight ratio capabilities when woven into ceramic composites, transforming them into materials with exceptional resistance to high temperature, and high strength combined with improved fracture toughness. Microcracks are inevitable when the material is under strain, which can be imaged using synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography (mu-CT) for assessment of material mechanical toughness variation. An important part of this analysis is to recognize fibrillar features. This paper presents algorithms for detecting and quantifying composite cracks and fiber breaks from high-resolution image stacks. First, we propose recognition algorithms to identify the different structures of the composite, including matrix cracks and fibers breaks. Second, we introduce our package F3D for fast filtering of large 3D imagery, implemented in OpenCL to take advantage of graphic cards. Results show that our algorithms automatically identify micro-damage and that the GPU-based implementation introduced here takes minutes, being 17x faster than similar tools on a typical image file.

  16. Continuous fiber ceramic composites for energy related applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-07

    The US Department of Energy has established the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program to develop technology for the manufacture of CFCC`s for use in industrial applications where a reduction in energy usage or emissions could be realized. As part of this program, the Dow Chemical Company explored the manufacture of a fiber reinforced/self reinforced silicon nitride for use in industrial chemical processing. In Dow`s program, CFCC manufacturing technology was developed around traditional, cost effective, tape casting routes. Formulations were developed and coupled with unique processing procedures which enabled the manufacture of tubular green laminates of the dimension needed for the application. An evaluation of the effect of various fibers and fiber coatings on the properties of a fiber reinforced composites was also conducted. Results indicated that fiber coatings could provide composites exhibiting non-catastrophic failure and substantially improved toughness. However, an evaluation of these materials in industrial process environments showed that the material system chosen by Dow did not provide the required performance improvements to make replacement of current metallic components with CFCC components economically viable.

  17. Hot gas in Mach cones around Virgo Cluster spiral galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Wezgowiec, M.; Vollmer, B.; Ehle, M.; Dettmar, R. -J.; Bomans, D. J.; Chyzy, K. T.; Urbanik, M.; Soida, M.

    2011-01-01

    The detailed comparison between observations and simulations of ram pressure stripped spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster has led to a three dimensional view of the galaxy orbits within the hot intracluster medium. The 3D velocities and Mach numbers derived from simulations can be used to derive simple Mach cone geometries for Virgo spiral galaxies. We search for indications of hot gas within Mach cones in X-ray observations of selected Virgo Cluster spiral galaxies (NGC 4569, NGC 4388, and ...

  18. Experimental investigation of hot gas mixture free jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gregor, J.; Jakubová, I.; Šenk, J.; Konrád, Miloš

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, suppl.C (2004), C696-C701. ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology /21st/. Praha, 14.06.2004-17.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1057202 Keywords : free jet, hot gas mixture, arc heater , hybrid torch Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  19. Monitoring Damage Accumulation in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig E.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai H.

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection and accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites. Woven silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) ceramic matrix composites (CMC) possess unique properties such as high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, improved toughness, and good environmental stability (oxidation resistance), making them particularly suitable for hot structure applications. In specific, CMCs could be applied to hot section components of gas turbines [1], aerojet engines [2], thermal protection systems [3], and hot control surfaces [4]. The benefits of implementing these materials include reduced cooling air requirements, lower weight, simpler component design, longer service life, and higher thrust [5]. It has been identified in NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program that the SiC/SiC CMC has the most promise for high temperature, high oxidation applications [6]. One of the critical issues in the successful application of CMCs is on-board or insitu assessment of the damage state and an accurate prediction of the remaining service life of a particular component. This is of great concern, since most CMC components envisioned for aerospace applications will be exposed to harsh environments and play a key role in the vehicle s safety. On-line health monitoring can enable prediction of remaining life; thus resulting in improved safety and reliability of structural components. Monitoring can also allow for appropriate corrections to be made in real time, therefore leading to the prevention of catastrophic failures. Most conventional nondestructive

  20. The hot gas content of fossil galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, G W; Arnaud, M; van der Burg, R F J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the hot gas in four fossil galaxy systems detected at high significance in the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) survey. XMM-Newton observations reveal overall temperatures of kT ~ 5-6 keV and yield hydrostatic masses M500,HE > 3.5 x 10e14 Msun, confirming their nature as bona fide massive clusters. We measure the thermodynamic properties of the hot gas in X-rays (out to beyond R500 in three cases) and derive their individual pressure profiles out to R ~ 2.5 R500 with the SZ data. We combine the X-ray and SZ data to measure hydrostatic mass profiles and to examine the hot gas content and its radial distribution. The average Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) concentration parameter, c500 = 3.2 +/- 0.4, is the same as that of relaxed `normal' clusters. The gas mass fraction profiles exhibit striking variation in the inner regions, but converge to approximately the cosmic baryon fraction (corrected for depletion) at R500. Beyond R500 the gas mass fraction profiles again diverge, which we int...

  1. Tidd hot gas clean up program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This Final Report on the Tidd Hot Gas Clean Up Program covers the period from initial Proof-of-Concept testing in August, 1990, through final equipment inspections in May, 1995. The Tidd Hot Gas Clean Up (HGCU) system was installed in the Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Demonstration Plant, which is the first utility-scale PFBC plant in the United States. Detailed design work on the project began in July, 1990, and site construction began in December, 1991. Initial operation of the system occurred in May, 1992, and the hot gas filter was commissioned in October, 1992. The test program ended in March, 1995, when the Tidd Plant was shut down following its four-year test program. Section 1.0 of this report is an executive summary of the project covering the project background, system description, test results and conclusions. Section 2.0 is an introduction covering the program objectives and schedule. Section 3.0 provides detailed descriptions of the system and its major components. Section 4.0 provides detailed results of all testing including observations and posttest inspection results. Sections 5.0 and 6.0 list the program conclusions and recommendations, respectively. Appendix I is a report prepared by Southern Research Institute on the properties of Tidd PFBC ash sampled during the test program. Appendix II is a report prepared by Westinghouse STC on the performance of candle filter fail-safe regenerator devices.

  2. Influence of Alumina Addition on the Optical Property of Zirconia/Alumina Composite Dental Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Li; LIAO Yunmao; LI Wei; WAN Qianbing; ZHAO Yongqi

    2011-01-01

    The influence of various alumina additions on the optical property of zirconia/alumina composite ceramics was investigated.The relative sintered densities,transmittances,color and the microstructure of the composite ceramics were studied.The experimental results showed that the relative sintered densities and transmittances decreased with alumina addition.The lightness increased obviously but the chroma change was small.Pure zirconia nanopowders sintered densely could obtain the relatively high transmittance,while the transmittance and the lightness of slight addition changed significantly.The zirconia/alumina composite ceramics with alumina addition less than 7.5wt% could achieve the relatively stable and reliable optical properties.

  3. Production of AlN-Si-Al Ceramic-Metal Composites via Pressurless Infiltration Method

    OpenAIRE

    KALEMTAŞ, Ayşe; ARSLAN, Gürsoy; KARA, Ferhat

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the production of light (∼2,9 g/cm3) and dense (> 99 %) AlN based ceramic metal composites was conducted by the pressureless melt infiltration method. These composites contain a high ceramic volume fraction (> 50 vol %) which is the result of the reaction between Si3N4 and Al in the Si3N4-Al system. The production of the ceramic-metal composites was achieved via infiltrating 2024 Al alloys at different temperatures and holding times into the porous pellets which were prepared us...

  4. Marginal Adaptation of Indirect Composite, Glass-Ceramic Inlays and Direct Composite: An In Vitro Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mahboub

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This experimental in vitro study compared marginal adaptation of indirect composite, glass-ceramic inlays and direct composite.Materials and Methods: Seventy-five recently extracted human molars were randomly divided into three groups (n=25 and mesio-occluso-distal cavities with the same dimensions were prepared in the teeth. Indirect composite and glass-ceramic inlays were fabricatedfollowing manufacturer's instructions and the marginal gap was measured by a stereomicroscope at magnification 40× before cementation. After cementation of inlays and restoring the third group by direct composite, all the specimens were thermocycled and the marginal gaps were measured exactly as previously described. Repeated measure ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey test were used for pairwise comparison of occlusal, proximal, and gingival marginal gaps in each group. One-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey test wereused for comparison of mean marginal gap in the three groups and for comparison of marginal gap before and after cementation in inlays, paired T-test was used.Results: The marginal gap of direct composite (19.96 μm was significantly lower than that of indirect composite inlay (48.47 μm, which in itself was significantly lower than that of glass-ceramic inlay (60.96 μm. In all the restorations, marginal gap in the gingival margin was significantly higher than occlusal and proximal margins. The marginal gap of inlays did not change after cementation and thermocycling.Conclusion: This study indicated that the marginal gaps of the evaluated restorations are less than 100 μm, which is clinically acceptable.

  5. Lightweight Ceramic Composition of Carbon Silicon Oxygen and Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Lightweight, monolithic ceramics resistant to oxidation in air at high temperatures are made by impregnating a porous carbon preform with a sol which contains a mixture of tetraethoxysilane, dimethyldiethoxysilane and trimethyl borate. The sol is gelled and dried on the carbon preform to form a ceramic precursor. The precursor is pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form the ceramic which is made of carbon, silicon, oxygen and boron. The carbon of the preform reacts with the dried gel during the pyrolysis to form a component of the resulting ceramic. The ceramic is of the same size, shape and form as the carbon precursor. Thus, using a porous, fibrous carbon precursor, such as a carbon felt, results in a porous, fibrous ceramic. Ceramics of the invention are useful as lightweight tiles for a reentry spacecraft.

  6. Mechanical properties of dense to porous alumina/lanthanum hexaaluminate composite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For development of new composite materials based on lanthanum hexaaluminate and alumina ceramics, a better understanding of the microstructure-properties relationship is essential. In this paper, attention was focused on the evaluation of mechanical properties of lanthanum hexaaluminate/alumina particulate composite. It was found out that the lanthanum hexaaluminate content plays a critical role in determination of the microstructure and mechanical properties of the composite ceramics. In situ formation of plate-like lanthanum hexaaluminate in the ceramic matrix was accompanied with formation of pores so that the microstructure shifted from dense to porous. Increasing the lanthanum hexaaluminate content up to a certain value enhanced the fracture toughness, increased the hardness, and increased the elastic modulus of the composite materials. Further increase in the lanthanum hexaaluminate content degraded the hardness as well as the elastic modulus of composite ceramics. The influence of lanthanum hexaaluminate on mechanical properties was described by means of microstructure, porosity, and intrinsic characteristics of lanthanum hexaaluminate.

  7. Numerical Homogenization of Protective Ceramic Composite Layers using the Hybrid Finite-Discrete Element Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainorizuan Mohd Jaini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Innovative technologies have resulted in more effective ceramic composite as high rate loading-resistance and protective layer. The ceramic composite layer consists of ceramic frontal plate that bonded by softer-strong reinforced polymer network, consequently gains the heterogeneous condition. These materials serve specific purposes of defeating high rate loading and maintaining the structural integrity of the layer. Further due to the lack of a constituent material and tedious problem in heterogonous material modelling, a numerical homogenization is employed to analyse the isotropic material properties of ceramic composite layer in homogenous manner. The objective of this study is to derive a constitutive law of the ceramic composite using the multi-scale analysis. Two-dimensional symmetric macrostructure of the ceramic composite was numerically modelled using the hybrid finite-discrete element method to investigate the effective material properties and strength profile. The macrostructure was modelled as brittle material with nonlinear material properties. The finite element method is incorporated with a Rankine-Rotating Crack approach and discrete element to model the fracture onset. The prescribed uniaxial and biaxial loadings were imposed along the free boundaries to create different deformations. Due to crack initiation on the macrostructure, the averaged stresses were calculated to plot the stress-strain curves and the effective yield stress surface. From the multi-scale analysis, the rate-dependency of Mohr-Coulomb constitutive law was derived for the ceramic composite layer.

  8. Thermophysical properties and elastic moduli of alumina-zirconia composite ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hostaša, J.; Pabst, W.; Matějíček, Jiří; Gregorová, E.; Malangré, D.

    Stockholm : City Conference Centre(CCC), 2011, s. 722-722. [Conference of the European Ceramic Society (ECerS XII)/12th./. Stockholm (SE), 19.06.2011-23.06.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : alumina * zirconia * composites * thermal diffusivity * elastic modulus Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  9. Bond strength durability of a resin composite on a reinforced ceramic using various repair systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Leite, Fabiola; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. This study compared the durability of repair bond strength of a resin composite to a reinforced ceramic after three repair systems. Methods. Alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic blocks (Vitadur-alpha(R)) (N=30) were randomly divided into three groups according to the repair method: PR-

  10. Thermodynamic Investigation of Synthesizaing Metastable β—Sialon—Alon Composite Ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGXiangdong; LIWenchao; 等

    1999-01-01

    Based on its thermodynamic analysis ,β-Sialon-Alon metastable composite ceramic has been prepared by hot pressing sintering,XRD results indicate that the product of hot pressing singering is indeed Sialon-Alon metastable omposite ceramic ,which is in accordance with thermodynamic analysis

  11. High Temperature Mechanical Characterization of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature mechanical characterization laboratory has been assembled at NASA Lewis Research Center. One contribution of this work is to test ceramic matrix composite specimens in tension in environmental extremes. Two high temperature tensile testing systems were assembled. The systems were assembled based on the performance and experience of other laboratories and meeting projected service conditions for the materials in question. The systems use frames with an electric actuator and a center screw. A PC based data acquisition and analysis system is used to collect and analyze the data. Mechanical extensometers are used to measure specimen strain. Thermocouples, placed near the specimen, are used to measure the specimen gage section temperature. The system for testing in air has a resistance element furnace with molybdenum disilicide elements and pneumatic grips with water cooling attached to hydraulic alignment devices. The system for testing in an inert gas has a graphite resistance element furnace in a chamber with rigidly mounted, water cooled, hydraulically actuated grips. Unidirectional SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 and triaxially woven, two dimensional, SiC fiber reinforced enhanced SiC composites were tested in unidirectional tension. Theories for predicting the Young's modulus, modulus near the ultimate strength, first matrix cracking stress, and ultimate strength were applied and evaluated for suitability in predicting the mechanical behavior of SiC/RBSN and enhanced SiC/SiC composites. The SiC/RBSN composite exhibited pseudo tough behavior (increased area under the stress/strain curve) from 22 C to 1500 C. The rule of mixtures provides a good estimate of the Young's modulus of the SiC/RBSN composite using the constituent properties from room temperature to 1440 C for short term static tensile tests in air or nitrogen. The rule of mixtures significantly overestimates the secondary modulus near the ultimate strength. The ACK theory

  12. Hot gas filtration: Investigations to remove gaseous pollutant components out of flue gas during hot gas filtration. Final report; HGR: Untersuchung zur Minimierung von gasfoermigen Schadstoffen aus Rauchgasen bei der Heissgasfiltration. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, A.; Gross, R.; Renz, U.

    1998-07-01

    Power plants with gas and steam turbines in pressurized fluidized bed or pressurized gasification processes enable power generation of coal with high efficiency and little emissions. To run these plants the cleaning of the flue gas is necessary before entering the turbines under the conditions of high temperature and pressure. Ceramic filter elements are the most probable method for hot gas cleaning. A simultaneous reduction of gaseous pollutant components under these conditions could help to make the whole process more efficient. The aim of the project is to integrate the catalytic reduction of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and nitric oxides into the hot gas filtration with ceramic filter elements as a one step mecanism. The project is focused on: - the catalytic behaviour of ferruginous ashes of brown coal, - the effectiveness of calcinated aluminates as a catalyst to remove uncombusted hydrocarbons in a hot gas filtration unit, - numerical simulation of the combined removal of particles and gaseous pollutant components out of the flue gas. (orig.) [Deutsch] Gas- und Dampfturbinen-Kraftwerke mit Druckwirbelschicht- oder mit Druckvergasungsverfahren ermoeglichen die Verstromung von Kohle mit hohem Wirkungsgrad und niedrigen Emissionen. Eine Voraussetzung fuer den Betrieb dieser Anlagen ist die Entstaubung der Rauchgase bei hohen Temperaturen und Druecken. Abreinigungsfilter mit keramischen Elementen werden dazu eingesetzt. Eine Reduzierung gasfoermiger Schadstoffe unter den gleichen Bedingungen koennte die Rauchgaswaesche ersetzen. Ziel des Gesamtvorhabens ist es, die Integration von Heissgasfiltration und katalytischem Abbau der Schadstoffe Kohlenmonoxid, Kohlenwasserstoffe und Stickoxide in einem Verfahrensschritt zu untersuchen. Die Arbeitsschwerpunkte dieses Teilvorhabens betreffen - die katalytische Wirkung eisenhaltiger Braunkohlenaschen, - die Wirksamkeit des Calciumaluminats als Katalysator des Abbaus unverbrannter Kohlenwasserstoffe im Heissgasfilter

  13. Improved Foreign Object Damage Performance for 3D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  14. Improved Foreign Object Damage Performance for 2D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  15. Effect of Rare Earth Composite Ceramic Materials on Oil Combustion of Oil-Burning Boiler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The rare earth composite ceramic materials were prepared using rare earths and far infrared natural mineral. The effects of the as-prepared ceramic materials on the oil consumption and air pollutants emissions of oil-burning boiler were investigated. The results show that the composite ceramic materials can radiate higher intensity of far infrared. The molecular movement is strengthened and the chemical bonds of the molecules are easily ruptured when the diesel oil is dealt with the composite materials. The oil-saving rate of the RBS·VH-1.5 boiler dealt with the rare earth composite ceramic materials is 3.49%, and the reducing rates of CO and NO in the exhaust gas are 25.4% and 9.7%, respectively.

  16. Low-Cost Innovative Hi-Temp Fiber Coating Process for Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MATECH GSM (MG) proposes 1) to demonstrate a low-cost innovative Hi-Temp Si-doped in-situ BN fiber coating process for advanced ceramic matrix composites in order...

  17. Ceramic Composite Mechanical Fastener System for High-Temperature Structural Assemblies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hot structures fabricated from ceramic composite materials are an attractive design option for components of future high-speed aircraft, re-entry vehicles and...

  18. Development of a thin film vitreous bond based composite ceramic coating for corrosion and abrasion services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IPC has been involved with the Alberta Research Council in developing a vitreous bond (VB) - based composite ceramic fluoropolymer coating technology. Compared to the present state of the art which is based on a hard discontinuous phase (ceramic particles) suspended in a soft continuous matrix (fluoropolymer mix) the novelty of our approach consists of designing a composite system in which both the ceramic and the fluoropolymer phases are continuous. The ceramic matrix will provide the strength and the erosion resistance for the fluoropolymer matrix even at high temperatures. The ceramic formulation employed is not affected by temperatures up to 500 oF while the fluoropolymer matrix provides a corrosion protection seal for the ceramic matrix. The inherent flexibility of the polymer matrix will protect against brittle fractures that may develop by handling or impact. Therefore the composite coating is able to withstand the deformation of the substrate without chipping or disbanding. The fluoropolymer matrix also provides dry lubrication properties further enhancing the erosion resistance of the ceramic phase. The thickness of the coating is very thin, in the 25 to 100 micron range. In summary, the coating technology is able to provide the following features: Corrosion protection levels similar to those of fluoropolymer coatings; Erosion resistance similar to that of ceramic coatings; Price comparable to that of polymer coatings; Exceptional wear resistance properties; and Capability for coating complicated shapes internally or externally or both. This paper will discuss the theory and development of this new technology and the resultant coating and potential properties. (author)

  19. A study of ceramic-lined composite steel pipes prepared by SHS centrifugal-thermite process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3 ceramic-lined steel pipe was produced by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis centrifugal thermite process (SHS C-T process from Fe2O3 and Al as the raw materials. The composition, phase separation and microstructures were investigated. The result showed the ceramic lined pipe is composed of the three main layers of various compositions, which were subsequently determined to be Fe layer, the transition layer and the ceramic layer. Fe layer is composed of austenite and ferrite, the transition layer consisted of Al2O3 ceramic and Fe, the ceramic layer consisted of the dendritic-shaped Al2O3 and the spinel-shaped structured FeAl2O4.

  20. Mechanical properties of dispersed ceramic nanoparticles in polymer composites for orthopedic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huinan Liu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Huinan Liu, Thomas J WebsterDivision of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Ceramic/polymer composites have been considered as third-generation orthopedic biomaterials due to their ability to closely match properties (such as surface, chemistry, biological, and mechanical of natural bone. It has already been shown that the addition of nanophase compared with conventional (or micron-scale ceramics to polymers enhances bone cell functions. However, in order to fully take advantage of the promising nanometer size effects that nanoceramics can provide when added to polymers, it is critical to uniformly disperse them in a polymer matrix. This is critical since ceramic nanoparticles inherently have a strong tendency to form larger agglomerates in a polymer matrix which may compromise their properties. Therefore, in this study, model ceramic nanoparticles, specifically titania and hydroxyapatite (HA, were dispersed in a model polymer (PLGA, poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid using high-power ultrasonic energy. The mechanical properties of the resulting PLGA composites with well-dispersed ceramic (either titania or HA nanoparticles were investigated and compared with composites with agglomerated ceramic nanoparticles. Results demonstrated that well-dispersed ceramic nanoparticles (titania or HA in PLGA improved mechanical properties compared with agglomerated ceramic nanoparticles even though the weight percentage of the ceramics was the same. Specifically, well-dispersed nanoceramics in PLGA enhanced the tensile modulus, tensile strength at yield, ultimate tensile strength, and compressive modulus compared with the more agglomerated nanoceramics in PLGA. In summary, supplemented by previous studies that demonstrated greater osteoblast (bone-forming cell functions on well-dispersed nanophase ceramics in polymers, the present study demonstrated that the combination of PLGA with well-dispersed nanoceramics enhanced mechanical properties

  1. An Investigation of Reliability Models for Ceramic Matrix Composites and their Implementation into Finite Element Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1998-01-01

    The development of modeling approaches for the failure analysis of ceramic-based material systems used in high temperature environments was the primary objective of this research effort. These materials have the potential to support many key engineering technologies related to the design of aeropropulsion systems. Monolithic ceramics exhibit a number of useful properties such as retention of strength at high temperatures, chemical inertness, and low density. However, the use of monolithic ceramics has been limited by their inherent brittleness and a large variation in strength. This behavior has motivated material scientists to reinforce the monolithic material with a ceramic fiber. The addition of a second ceramic phase with an optimized interface increases toughness and marginally increases strength. The primary purpose of the fiber is to arrest crack growth, not to increase strength. The material systems of interest in this research effort were laminated ceramic matrix composites, as well as two- and three- dimensional fabric reinforced ceramic composites. These emerging composite systems can compete with metals in many demanding applications. However, the ongoing metamorphosis of ceramic composite material systems, and the lack of standardized design data has in the past tended to minimize research efforts related to structural analysis. Many structural components fabricated from ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have been designed by "trial and error." The justification for this approach lies in the fact that during the initial developmental phases for a material system fabrication issues are paramount. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating feasibility rather than fully understanding the processes controlling mechanical behavior. This is understandable during periods of rapid improvements in material properties for any composite system. But to avoid the ad hoc approach, the analytical methods developed under this effort can be used to develop rational structural

  2. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness certification for ceramic matrix composite components in civil aircraft systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gonczy Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are being designed and developed for engine and exhaust components in commercial aviation, because they offer higher temperature capabilities, weight savings, and improved durability compared to metals. The United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issues and enforces regulations and minimum standards covering the safe manufacture, operation, and maintenance of civil aircraft. As new materials, these ceramic composite components will have to meet the...

  3. Corrosion Issues for Ceramics in Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Opila, Elizabeth; Nickel, Klaus G.

    2004-01-01

    The requirements for hot-gas-path materials in gas turbine engines are demanding. These materials must maintain high strength and creep resistance in a particularly aggressive environment. A typical gas turbine environment involves high temperatures, rapid gas flow rates, high pressures, and a complex mixture of aggressive gases. Over the past forty years, a wealth of information on the behavior of ceramic materials in heat engine environments has been obtained. In the first part of the talk we summarize the behavior of monolithic SiC and Si3N4. These materials show excellent baseline behavior in clean, oxygen environments. However the aggressive components in a heat engine environment such as water vapor and salt deposits can be quite degrading. In the second part of the talk we discuss SiC-based composites. The critical issue with these materials is oxidation of the fiber coating. We conclude with a brief discussion of future directions in ceramic corrosion research.

  4. Ancient ceramics and glass compositional studies using nuclear methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    relative error. The detection limits are in the range of 30 (Ni, As, Sb) to 200 ppm (Ti, Fe, Zn, Sn, Ba, Pb) for trace elements and in the range of 0.2 to 1percent for major lights elements. These detection limits were tested using NBS geological standards (W1, BM, KH). Some compositional results on various archaeological ceramics objects from Romanian sites ( glaze and painting agents for neolithic Cucuteni and blue Iznik Turkish ceramics but also clay elemental analyses) are presented. For glasses, chemical differences that occur during preparation of materials will affect the elemental composition and could be used for the identification of technologies and workshops involved. The problem is to identify colouring agents, decolorants, opacifiers and fining agents. The XRF and FNAA techniques were used. Some results on Byzantine (XIII Century) glass bracelets and XVIII Century vessel samples founded in South-Eastern Romania are presented

  5. Creep Forming of Carbon-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.; Scotti, Stephan J.; Ashe, Melissa P.; Connolly, Liz

    2007-01-01

    A set of lecture slides describes an investigation of creep forming as a means of imparting desired curvatures to initially flat stock plates of carbon-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite (C-CMC) materials. The investigation is apparently part of a continuing effort to develop improved means of applying small CCMC repair patches to reinforced carbon-carbon leading edges of aerospace vehicles (e.g., space shuttles) prior to re-entry into the atmosphere of the Earth. According to one of the slides, creep forming would be an intermediate step in a process that would yield a fully densified, finished C-CMC part having a desired size and shape (the other steps would include preliminary machining, finish machining, densification by chemical vapor infiltration, and final coating). The investigation included experiments in which C-CMC disks were creep-formed by heating them to unspecified high temperatures for time intervals of the order of 1 hour while they were clamped into single- and double-curvature graphite molds. The creep-formed disks were coated with an oxidation- protection material, then subjected to arc-jet tests, in which the disks exhibited no deterioration after exposure to high-temperature test conditions lasting 490 seconds.

  6. Sealing system for piston rod of hot gas engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundholm, S.G.; Ringqvist, S.A.

    1980-11-25

    An improvement to a sealing system for restricting fluid flow around a piston rod between a piston cylinder and crankshaft space in a hot gas engine where a seal element is secured around the piston rod in an intermediate chamber, the improvement including a link in the crankshaft space connecting, and permitting relative radial motion between, the piston rod and the crosshead and an o-ring having a diameter substantially greater than that of the piston rod and being secured between a lower ring securing the seal element in place around the piston rod and a wall of the intermediate chamber for frictionally restricting radial movement of the lower ring.

  7. Structural ceramic coatings in composite microtruss cellular materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bele, E.; Bouwhuis, B.A.; Codd, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hibbard, G.D., E-mail: glenn.hibbard@utoronto.ca [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: The compressive strength increase per unit sleeve thickness of Al cores reinforced with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sleeves is lower than the corresponding strength increase when the same cores are reinforced with nanocrystalline Ni (n-Ni) sleeves (left). However, because anodizing is a transformative surface treatment, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was able to achieve this performance increase with little overall weight penalty (right). Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} A new type of metal/ceramic microtruss cellular composite has been created. {yields} Reinforcing sleeves of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were deposited on low density Al microtruss cores. {yields} Significant compressive strength increases were seen at virtually no weight penalty. {yields} Failure mechanisms were studied by electron microscopy and finite element analysis. {yields} Buckling, sleeve wrinkling, and coating fracture dictated the compressive strength. - Abstract: In the present study, anodizing was used to produce Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings in a conventional 3003 aluminum alloy microtruss core; a 38.5 {mu}m thick anodic coating provided a 143% increase in compressive strength. Finite-element analyses were used to illustrate the dependence of the compressive strength and failure mechanism on the thickness of the anodic coating. At low thicknesses the microtruss strength is dictated by global bucking of the internal struts. However, at higher thicknesses the compressive strength is controlled by coating fracture and local deformation in the hinge region of the struts. Regardless of the failure mechanism, the compressive strength of the composite microtruss increased with increasing anodic coating thickness, with very little corresponding weight penalty.

  8. Structural ceramic coatings in composite microtruss cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The compressive strength increase per unit sleeve thickness of Al cores reinforced with Al2O3 sleeves is lower than the corresponding strength increase when the same cores are reinforced with nanocrystalline Ni (n-Ni) sleeves (left). However, because anodizing is a transformative surface treatment, the Al2O3 coating was able to achieve this performance increase with little overall weight penalty (right). Display Omitted Highlights: → A new type of metal/ceramic microtruss cellular composite has been created. → Reinforcing sleeves of Al2O3 were deposited on low density Al microtruss cores. → Significant compressive strength increases were seen at virtually no weight penalty. → Failure mechanisms were studied by electron microscopy and finite element analysis. → Buckling, sleeve wrinkling, and coating fracture dictated the compressive strength. - Abstract: In the present study, anodizing was used to produce Al2O3 coatings in a conventional 3003 aluminum alloy microtruss core; a 38.5 μm thick anodic coating provided a 143% increase in compressive strength. Finite-element analyses were used to illustrate the dependence of the compressive strength and failure mechanism on the thickness of the anodic coating. At low thicknesses the microtruss strength is dictated by global bucking of the internal struts. However, at higher thicknesses the compressive strength is controlled by coating fracture and local deformation in the hinge region of the struts. Regardless of the failure mechanism, the compressive strength of the composite microtruss increased with increasing anodic coating thickness, with very little corresponding weight penalty.

  9. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  10. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments. Annual report, FY1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company. Continuous ceramic filaments are a principal component in many advanced high temperature materials like continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) and woven ceramic textiles. The use of continuous ceramic filaments in CFCC radiant burners, gas turbines, waste incineration, and hot gas filters in U.S. industry and power generation is estimated to save at least 2.16 quad/yr by year 2010 with energy cost savings of at least $8.1 billion. By year 2010, continuous ceramic filaments and CFCC`s have the potential to abate pollution emissions by 917,000 tons annually of nitrous oxide and 118 million tons annually of carbon dioxide (DOE Report OR-2002, February, 1994).

  11. Characterization of composite materials based on cement-ceramic powder blended binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulovaná, Tereza; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of newly developed composite mortars with incorporated ceramic powder coming from precise brick cutting as partial Portland cement replacement up to 40 mass% is presented in the paper. Fine ceramic powder belongs to the pozzolanic materials. Utilization of pozzolanic materials is accompanied by lower request on energy needed for Portland clinker production which generally results in lower production costs of blended binder and lower CO2 emission. In this paper, the ceramic powder is used in cement based mortar composition in amount of 8, 16, 24, 32, and 40 mass% of cement. Chemical composition of ceramic powder is analyzed by X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Diffraction. The particle size distribution of ceramics is accessed on laser diffraction principle. For 28 days cured mortar samples, basic physical and mechanical properties are experimentally determined. The obtained results demonstrate that ceramic powder has potential to replace a part of Portland cement in composition of cement based composites and to reduce negative environmental impact of their production.

  12. High temperature deformation of ZrB2-SiC-AlN ceramic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZrB2 ceramic composites are powerful candidates for use in ultra-high temperature structural materials given their strength under high temperatures, superb ablation resistance, and good oxidation resistance. Unfortunately, ZrB2 ceramic composites are difficult to deform due to inherent brittle property, which impedes large-scale application. High temperature deformation of ZrB2-SiC-AlN ceramic composite at 1900 deg. C with inert gas protection is investigated using deep drawing technique. The deformation behavior under biaxial stress and the microstructure characteristics are analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) along with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results indicate that the fine grain ZrB2-SiC-AlN ceramic composites have excellent high temperature deformation property at 1900 deg. C. The effects of inducting AlN into ZrB2-SiC ceramic and punch rate on high temperature deformation are discussed. The deformation mechanism of ceramic composites is proposed correspondingly.

  13. Fabrication and Performances of 1-3-2 Piezoelectric Ceramic/Polymer Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Likun Wang; Guang Li; Hongliang Du; Lei Qin; Shuxiang Li

    2006-01-01

    A novel 1-3-2 piezoelectric composite has been developed, which consists of piezoelectric ceramic plate and 1-3 piezoelectric composite. The composite was fabricated by dicing PZT ceramic along mutual perpendicular two directions and then filling epoxy into grooves. The piezoelectric and electromechanical properties of the novel composite were determined.The results show a coefficient d33 of 405 pC/N, a vibration displacement of 113.5 pm, an acoustic impendence of 13.3 Mraly,a bandwidth of 12 kHz and a thickness electromechanical coupling coefficient of 0.56.

  14. Composite materials based on porous ceramic preform infiltrated by aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nagel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of this project is the optimization of manufacturing technology of the ceramic preforms basedon Al2O3 powder manufactured by the pressure infiltration method with liquid metal alloy.Design/methodology/approach: Ceramic preforms were manufactured by the method of sintering of ceramicpowder. The preform material consists of powder Condea Al2O3 CL 2500, however, as the forming factor ofthe structure of canals and pores inside the ceramic agglomerated framework the carbon fibers Sigrafil C10M250 UNS were used. Then ceramic preforms were infiltrated with liquid EN AC – AlSi12 aluminum alloy.Stereological and structure investigations of obtained composite materials were made on light microscope.Findings: It was proved that developed technology of manufacturing of composite materials with the pore ceramicAl2O3 infiltration ensures expected structure and can be used in practice.Practical implications: The developed technology allows to obtain method’s elements locally reinforced andcomposite materials with precise shape mapping.Originality/value: The received results show the possibility of obtaining the new composite materials being thecheaper alternative for other materials based on the ceramic fibers.

  15. BENCH-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents that can reduce the sulfur in coal-derived fuel-gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn(sub 2)TiO(sub 4) or ZnTiO(sub 3)), formed by a solid-state reaction of zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO(sub 2)), is currently one of the leading sorbents. Overall chemical reactions with Zn(sub 2)TiO(sub 4) during the desulfurization (sulfidation)-regeneration cycle are shown. The sulfidation/regeneration cycle can be carried out in a fixed-bed, moving-bed, or fluidized-bed reactor configuration. The fluidized-bed reactor configuration is most attractive because of several potential advantages including faster kinetics and the ability to handle the highly exothermic regeneration to produce a regeneration offgas containing a constant concentration of SO(sub 2)

  16. Cement-based piezoelectric ceramic composites for sensor applications in civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Biqin

    The objectives of this thesis are to develop and apply a new smart composite for the sensing and actuation application of civil engineering. Piezoelectric ceramic powder is incorporated into cement-based composite to achieve the sensing and actuation capability. The research investigates microstructure, polarization and aging, material properties and performance of cement-based piezoelectric ceramic composites both theoretically and experimentally. A hydrogen bonding is found at the interface of piezoelectric ceramic powder and cement phase by IR (Infrared Ray), XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) and SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy). It largely affects the material properties of composites. A simple first order model is introduced to explain the poling mechanism of composites and the dependency of polarization is discussed using electromechanical coupling coefficient kt. The mechanisms acting on the aging effect is explored in detail. Dielectrical, piezoelectric and mechanical properties of the cement-based piezoelectric ceramic composites are studied by experiment and theoretical calculation based on modified cube model (n=1) with chemical bonding . A complex circuit model is proposed to explain the unique feature of impedance spectra and the instinct of high-loss of cement-based piezoelectric ceramic composite. The sensing ability of cement-based piezoelectric ceramic composite has been evaluated by using step wave, sine wave, and random wave. It shows that the output of the composite can reflects the nature and characteristics of mechanical input. The work in this thesis opens a new direction for the current actuation/sensing technology in civil engineering. The materials and techniques, developed in this work, have a great potential in application of health monitoring of buildings and infrastructures.

  17. A novel biomimetic approach to the design of high-performance ceramic/metal composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Munch, Etienne; Alsem, Daan Hein; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-08-01

    The prospect of extending natural biological design to develop new synthetic ceramic-metal composite materials is examined. Using ice-templating of ceramic suspensions and subsequent metal infiltration, we demonstrate that the concept of ordered hierarchical design can be applied to create fine-scale laminated ceramic-metal (bulk) composites that are inexpensive, lightweight and display exceptional damage-tolerance properties. Specifically, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al-Si laminates with ceramic contents up to approximately 40 vol% and with lamellae thicknesses down to 10 {micro}m were processed and characterized. These structures achieve an excellent fracture toughness of 40 MPa{radical}m at a tensile strength of approximately 300 MPa. Salient toughening mechanisms are described together with further toughening strategies.

  18. Corrosion Resistance of Plasma Sprayed Ceramic CompositeCoatings on Q235 Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of SiO2/Al2O3, TiO2/Al2O3 and (SiO2+TiO2)/Al2O3 ceramic composite coatings on Q235 substrate fabricated by means of plasma spraying was investigated. The results show that Al2O3+13 wt pct TiO2 ceramic coating has the highest density, the lowest connected porosity and the best corrosion resistance. The corrosion mechanism of Q235 with ceramic coating has also been studied.

  19. In-situ Formation of Reinforcement Phases in Ultra High Temperature Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackpoole, Margaret M (Inventor); Gasch, Matthew J (Inventor); Olson, Michael W (Inventor); Hamby, Ian W. (Inventor); Johnson, Sylvia M (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A tough ultra-high temperature ceramic (UHTC) composite comprises grains of UHTC matrix material, such as HfB.sub.2, ZrB.sub.2 or other metal boride, carbide, nitride, etc., surrounded by a uniform distribution of acicular high aspect ratio reinforcement ceramic rods or whiskers, such as of SiC, is formed from uniformly mixing a powder of the UHTC material and a pre-ceramic polymer selected to form the desired reinforcement species, then thermally consolidating the mixture by hot pressing. The acicular reinforcement rods may make up from 5 to 30 vol % of the resulting microstructure.

  20. Computational Simulation of Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Mital, Subodh K.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a methodology which predicts the behavior of ceramic matrix composites and has been incorporated in the computational tool CEMCAN (CEramic Matrix Composite ANalyzer). The approach combines micromechanics with a unique fiber substructuring concept. In this new concept, the conventional unit cell (the smallest representative volume element of the composite) of the micromechanics approach is modified by substructuring it into several slices and developing the micromechanics-based equations at the slice level. The methodology also takes into account nonlinear ceramic matrix composite (CMC) behavior due to temperature and the fracture initiation and progression. Important features of the approach and its effectiveness are described by using selected examples. Comparisons of predictions and limited experimental data are also provided.

  1. Research on toughening mechanisms of alumina matrix ceramic composite materials improved by rare earth additive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xihua; LIU Changxia; LI Musen; ZHANG Jianhua

    2008-01-01

    Mixed rare earth elements were incorporated into alumina ceramic materials. Hot-pressing was used to fabricate alumina matrix composites in nitrogen atmosphere protection. Microstructures and mechanical properties of the composites were tested. It was indicated that the bending strength and fracture toughness of alumina matrix ceramic composites sintered at 1550℃ and 28 Mpa for 30 min were improved evidently. Besides mixed rare earth elements acting as a toughening phase, AlTiC master alloys were also added in as sintering assistants, which could prompt the formation of transient liquid phase, and thus nitrides of rare earth elements were produced. All of the above were beneficial for improving the mechanical properties of alumina matrix ceramic composites.

  2. Mechanical properties of dispersed ceramic nanoparticles in polymer composites for orthopedic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Huinan Liu, Thomas J WebsterDivision of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Ceramic/polymer composites have been considered as third-generation orthopedic biomaterials due to their ability to closely match properties (such as surface, chemistry, biological, and mechanical) of natural bone. It has already been shown that the addition of nanophase compared with conventional (or micron-scale) ceramics to polymers enhances bone cell functions. However, in order to fully ta...

  3. Multiscale Homogenization Models for the Elastic Behaviour of Metal/Ceramic Composites with Lamellar Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Tobias; Neubrand, Achim; Piat, Romana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This study predicts the elastic properties of an innovative metal-ceramic composite with statistically oriented domains of parallel ceramic platelets embedded in a eutectic Al-Si-alloy. For this purpose, a two-step homogenisation procedure was employed by finite element- and micromechanical modelling. In a first step, the microstructure of the specimen was divided in domains with the same orientation of lamellae and the elastic properties of single domains were calculated ...

  4. Composition analysis of medieval ceramics by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc Oztoprak, B.; Sinmaz, M. A.; Tülek, F.

    2016-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique is expected to be one of the most preferred techniques in archaeology research since it does not disrupt the structural and chemical form of archaeological samples, and it is considered virtually nondestructive analysis method. In this work, LIBS is used for analyses of glaze, paint, and clay of medieval ceramics collected from East Plain Cilicia, Osmaniye Province during archaeological survey. Transparent glazed and colour-painted ceramics of the Islam and Byzantine pottery traditions are analysed to detect distinctive and common features of the chemical compositions of their glazes. The spectral lines of Islamic and Byzantine glazes indicate that their structures are same. However, strontium (Sr) is determined in the transparent glaze of Islamic ceramics. Elemental composition and homogeneity of paint on one of the sample are determined by LIBS analysis. Colour changes are related with composition differences of the paint content in the archaeological ceramic. In addition, the clay classification of archaeological ceramics taken from the Yapılıpınar mounds, Taşlıhöyük mounds, and Örenşehir ancient sites is done using PCA and PLS-DA chemometric techniques. According to the results of the classification, Yapılıpınar mounds terracotta ceramics differ from those of Taşlıhöyük and Örenşehir ancient sites.

  5. ThermophysicalProperties of Cellular Aluminium andCeramic Particulate / Aluminium Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Almadhoni

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the thermophysical properties of cellular Al and Ceramic Particulate / Al Composites were explored. Thermophysical properties are defined as material properties that vary with temperature without altering the material's chemical identity including thermal conductivity (TC, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE, energy absorption, porosity and relative density. The significance of cellular Al and AMMCs reinforced by ceramic particles lies in their propertieswhich are difficult to be available combined in other engineering materials. New cellular AMMCs that meet the needs of the required engineering applications could be synthesized by selection an appropriate reinforcements. Different kinds of ceramic particles such as oxides, carbides, nitrides, as well as carbon nanotubes can be utilized as reinforcements for manufacturing of cellular AMMCs. Thermophysicalproperties of cellular AMMCs consisting of Al as continuous matrix phase and ceramic particles as reinforcements are directly influenced by type, size, and geometry of dispersions, also the RVR. In addition, the constituents of ceramic particulate / aluminium composites characterized by different heat transfer mechanisms, wherethe TC mechanism in metals is attributed to free electrons, while phonons are primarily responsible for TC in nonmetallic materials, as well as an interfacial thermal barrier resistance influence effectively on heat transfer inside the composite and thus the thermophysical properties. In this paper, based on the literature review, thermophysical properties of cellular Al and AMMCs reinforced by ceramic particles were discussed.

  6. Development of Nano-crystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hai [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Dong, Junhang [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lin, Jerry [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Romero, Van [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This is a final technical report for the first project year from July 1, 2005 to Jan 31, 2012 for DoE/NETL funded project DE-FC26-05NT42439: Development of Nanocrystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases. This report summarizes the technical progresses and achievements towards the development of novel nanocrystalline doped ceramic material-enabled optical fiber sensors for in situ and real time monitoring the gas composition of flue or hot gas streams involved in fossil-fuel based power generation and hydrogen production.

  7. Tailored ceramic consolidation forms for ICPP waste compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a polyphase tailored ceramic developed for the consolidation of simulated ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant)-type high Zr content high-level waste (HLW) calcines. The ceramic is specifically designed to provide chemically stable host phases for each species present in the HLW and to maximize waste volume reduction through high loadings and form density. The ceramic is designed for a 73 wt% waste loading with a density of 3.35 ± 0.05 (g/cm3). The major phase in the ceramic is a high-silica glass, which contains the neutron poison boron as well as the majority of the nonrefractory species in the waste. The primary crystalline phases are calcium fluoride, calcium-yttrium stabilized cubic zirconia, a hexagonal apatite type silicate containing the plutonium simulant Ce, and a Cd metal phase. Minor phases include zircon, zirconolite, and a sphene-type. Leaching testing and microscopic analysis shows the ceramic form to be chemically durable, with only the glass phase showing any detectable dissolution in deionized water at 90 degrees C

  8. ENGINEERING EVALUATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION WITH SULFUR RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.W. ROBERTS; J.W. PORTZER; S.C. KOZUP; S.K. GANGWAL

    1998-05-31

    Engineering evaluations and economic comparisons of two hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) processes with elemental sulfur recovery, being developed by Research Triangle Institute, are presented. In the first process, known as the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), the SO{sub 2} tail gas from air regeneration of zinc-based HGD sorbent is catalytically reduced to elemental sulfur with high selectivity using a small slipstream of coal gas. DSRP is a highly efficient first-generation process, promising sulfur recoveries as high as 99% in a single reaction stage. In the second process, known as the Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP), the zinc-based HGD sorbent is modified with iron so that the iron portion of the sorbent can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} . This is followed by air regeneration to fully regenerate the sorbent and provide the required SO{sub 2} for iron regeneration. This second-generation process uses less coal gas than DSRP. Commercial embodiments of both processes were developed. Process simulations with mass and energy balances were conducted using ASPEN Plus. Results show that AHGP is a more complex process to operate and may require more labor cost than the DSRP. Also capital costs for the AHGP are higher than those for the DSRP. However, annual operating costs for the AHGP appear to be considerably less than those for the DSRP with a potential break-even point between the two processes after just 2 years of operation for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant using 3 to 5 wt% sulfur coal. Thus, despite its complexity, the potential savings with the AHGP encourage further development and scaleup of this advanced process.

  9. BENCH-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents that can reduce the sulfur in coal-derived fuel-gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn(sub 2) TiO(sub 4) or ZnTiO(sub 3)), formed by a solid-state reaction of zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO(sub 2)), is currently one of the leading sorbents. Overall chemical reactions with Zn(sub 2) TiO(sub 4) during the desulfurization (sulfidation)-regeneration cycle are shown below: Sulfidation: Zn(sub 2) TiO(sub 4)+ 2H(sub 2)S(yields) 2ZnS+ TiO(sub 2)+ 2H(sub 2)O; Regeneration: 2ZnS+ TiO(sub 2)+ 3O(sub 2)(yields) Zn(sub 2) TiO(sub 4)+ 2SO(sub 2) The sulfidation/regeneration cycle can be carried out in a fixed-bed, moving-bed, or fluidized-bed reactor configuration. The fluidized-bed reactor configuration is most attractive because of several potential advantages including faster kinetics and the ability to handle the highly exothermic regeneration to produce a regeneration offgas containing a constant concentration of SO(sub 2)

  10. Bench-Scale Demonstration of Hot-Gas Desulfurization Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the current project, development of the DSRP was done in a laboratory setting, using synthetic gas mixtures to simulate the regeneration off-gas and coal gas feeds. The objective of the current work is to further the development of zinc titanate fluidized-bed desulfurization (ZTFBD) and the DSRP for hot-gas cleanup by testing with actual coal gas. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Develop and test an integrated, skid-mounted, bench-scale ZTFBD/DSRP reactor system with a slipstream of actual coal gas; (2) Test the bench-scale DSRP over an extended period with a slipstream of actual coal gas to quantify the degradation in performance, if any, caused by the trace contaminants present in coal gas (including heavy metals, chlorides, fluorides, and ammonia); (3) Expose the DSRP catalyst to actual coal gas for extended periods and then test its activity in a laboratory reactor to quantify the degradation in performance, if any, caused by static exposure to the trace contaminants in coal gas; (4) Design and fabricate a six-fold larger-scale DSRP reactor system for future slipstream testing; (5) Further develop the fluidized-bed DSRP to handle high concentrations (up to 14 percent) of SO2 that are likely to be encountered when pure air is used for regeneration of desulfurization sorbents; and (6) Conduct extended field testing of the 6X DSRP reactor with actual coal gas and high concentrations of SO2. The accomplishment of the first three objectives--testing the DSRP with actual coal gas, integration with hot-gas desulfurization, and catalyst exposure testing--was described previously (Portzer and Gangwal, 1994, 1995; Portzer et al., 1996). This paper summarizes the results of previous work and describes the current activities and plans to accomplish the remaining objectives

  11. Microstructure-electrical properties relation of zirconia based ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical properties of zirconia based ceramic composites were studied by impedance spectroscopy. Three materials were prepared with different relative compositions of the conducting and insulating phases: (ZrO2:8 mol% Y2)3) + MgO, (ZrO2:8 mol% Y2O3) + Y2O3 and ZrO2 + 8 mol% Y2O3. All specimens were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy for microstructural characterization and for correlation of microstructural aspects with electrical properties. For (ZrO2:8 mol% Y2O3) + MgO the main results show that the dependence of the different (microstructural constituents) contributions to the electrical resistivity on the magnesia content follows two stages: one below and another above the solubility limit of magnesia in Yttria-stabilized zirconia. The same dependence is found for the lattice parameter determined by X-ray diffraction measurements. The impedance diagrams of the composites have been resolved allowing the identification of contributions due to the presence of each microstructural constituent in both stages. Magnesia as a second phase is found to inhibit grain growth in Yttria-stabilized zirconia and the solubility limit for magnesia in the zirconia matrix is around 10 mol%. For (ZrO2:8 mol% Y2O3) + Y2O3 the main results show that: Yttria is present as a second phase for 1350 deg C /0.1 h sintering; the addition of 2 mol% of Yttria does not modify significantly the electrical properties; the solubility limit for Yttria is around 2 mol% according to electrical measurements. Similarly to magnesia, Yttria inhibits grain growth on Yttria-stabilized zirconia. The general effective medium theory was used to analyze the percolation of the insulating phase; the percolation threshold is different if one considers separately the total, bulk and grain boundary contributions to the electrical conductivity: 32.0, 38.5 and 27.8 vol% for total, intra and intergranular contributions, respectively. The increase of the activation energy for ionic

  12. The Influence of Tool Composite's Structure During Process of Diamond Grinding of Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawlik Józef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the tests performed during the grinding process of the ceramic materials: – polycrystalline ceramics (Zirconium ZrO2 and mono-crystalline ceramics (sapphire α-Al2O3 by the diamond tools. Studies have shown that the concentration (thickening of the tool composite changes the tool's pore structure when using suitable wetted adamantine additives. Such modified composite has positive impact on tribological properties of the subsurface layer of the machined components. This is manifested by the reduction of the surface roughness and reduction of the vibration amplitude of the coefficient of friction. The possibilities of the positive effects when using wetted additives on the tool's composite during the pressing (briquetting stage confirm the study results.

  13. Sintering densification and properties of Al2O3/PSZ(3Y) ceramic composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马伟民; 修稚萌; 闻雷; 孙旭东; 铁维麟

    2004-01-01

    The content of partially stabilized zirconia has remarkable influence on densification and mechanical properties of Al2 O3/PSZ(3Y) ceramic composites. When 15%PSZ(3Y) is added to Al2 O3, after vacuum sintering for 2h at 1 550 ℃, the fracture toughness and bending strength of the Al2O3/PSZ(3Y) ceramic composite reaches 8.2properties was investigated. The change of rn-ZrO2 and t-ZrO2 phases content before and after fracture was measured by X-ray diffraction quantitative phase analysis. It is confirmed that improvement in bending strength and fracture toughness of the Al2O3/PSZ(3Y) ceramic composite is due to the phase transformation toughening mechanism of PSZ(3Y).

  14. Rotor disk cooling and rim sealing to prevent hot gas ingestion. Rotor reikyaku to hot gas no seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamabe, K. (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-03-01

    In designing a high-temperature gas turbine disc, it is necessary to know pressure distribution around a disc, which correlates with flows inside and outside the disc. With design conditions becoming very stringent for efficiency improvement as a background, this paper describes latest trends in technologies on heat transfer around a disc and hot gas sealing while introducing reports on various studies. Generally speaking, fundamental researches on rotors without mainstreams have conventionally been carried out mainly in Europe and the U.S.A. Researches have become active recently on entrainment of mainstream gas where there is a mainstream that renders practical problems. The number of research papers is increasing sharply that relate to rotor shapes closer to those used in practical turbines incorporating moving and static blades, and high rotation Reynolds numbers. Further, studies using numerical analysis are on the increase, and rotor cooling studies are advancing remarkably in recent years. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Effects of Natural Convection and Radiation inside Hot-Gas-Duct on Temperature Distribution on the Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The VHTR necessarily requires an intermediate loop composed of a hot gas duct(HGD), an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a process heat exchanger. The IHX is one of the important components of VHTR system because the IHX transfers the 950 .deg. high temperature massive heat to a hydrogen production plant or power conversion unit at high system pressure. Hot gas duct (HGD) is a unique component of a gas cooled reactor (GCR). The internal of a HGD is insulated using a ceramic fiber insulator (Kaowool) to prevent a mechanical failure itself from high temperature and high pressure operating conditions. The coolant temperature at the internal of a HGD can go up to 950 .deg. C. Thermo-hydraulic simulation using the COMSOL commercial solver is successfully performed at a uniform heat flux condition in a horizontal HGD. We obtained nonlinear temperature distribution from the COMSOL simulation with the assumption of the insulator in a HGD governed with conduction and convection heat transfer in porous medium

  16. Failure of Ceramic Composites in Non-Uniform Stress Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Varun P.

    Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are of interest as hot-section components in gas turbine engines due to their refractoriness and low density relative to metallic alloys. In service, CMCs will be subjected to spatially inhomogeneous temperature and stress fields. Robust tools that enable prediction of deformation and fracture under these conditions are therefore required for component design and analysis. Such tools are presently lacking. The present work helps to address this deficiency by developing models for CMC mechanical behavior at two length scales: that of the constituents and that of the components. Problems of interest are further divided into two categories: '1-D loadings,' in which the stresses are aligned with the fiber axes, and '2-D loadings,' in which the stress state is more general. For the former class of problems, the major outstanding issue is material fracture, not deformation. A fracture criterion based on the attainment of a global load maximum is developed, which yields results for pure bending of CMCs in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. For the latter class of problems, the understanding of both the micro-scale and macro-scale behavior is relatively immature. An approach based upon analysis of a unit cell (a single fiber surrounded by a matrix jacket) is pursued. Stress fields in the constituents of the composite are estimated using analytical models, the accuracy of which is confirmed using finite element analysis. As part of a fracture mechanics analysis, these fields enable estimation of the steady-state matrix cracking stress for arbitrary in-plane loading of a unidirectional ply. While insightful at the micro-scale, unit cell models are difficult to extend to coarser scales. Instead, material deformation is typically predicted using phenomenological constitutive models. One such model for CMC laminates is investigated and found to predict material instability where none should exist. Remedies to

  17. A method for preparing composite diffusion coating alloy on ceramic surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hongxia; Wang Wenxian; Chen Shaoping; Wei Yinghui

    2008-01-01

    Metallization of the ceramic surfaces of Si3N4 and Al2O3 was carried out in a composite diffusion coating vacuum furnace using a Ti-Cu composite target. The experimental process and influencing factors were discussed. Optical microscope (OM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffusion (XRD) and sound emissive scratch test (SEST) were applied to evaluate the alloy layer formed on the ceramic surface. It was indicated that the diffusion coating alloy layer contained Cu, Ti, Fe, Al and Si etc. XRD result indicated that the diffusion coating alloy layer was composed of CuTi2, Cu, Si2Ti and CuTi, Al2TiO5, Ti3O5. It was found that the diffusion coating alloy layer got bonded with ceramic well, and no spallation occurred under the maximum load of 100N. Deposited Si3N4 ceramic was welded with Q235 and the joining quality was examined. Robust joint was formed between Si3N4 ceramic/Q235. This present method has advantages in high efficiency and low cost and provides a new approach for producing ceramic and metal bond.

  18. Geometrically nonlinear bending analysis of Metal-Ceramic composite beams under thermomechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabizadeh, Mohammad Amin

    2013-07-01

    A new method is developed to derive equilibrium equations of Metal-Ceramic beams based on first order shear deformation plate theory which is named first order shear deformation beam theory2(FSDBT2). Equilibrium equations obtained from conventional method (FSDBT1) is compared with FSDBT2 and the case of cylindrical bending of Metal-Ceramic composite plates for non-linear thermomechanical deformations and various loadings and boundary conditions. These equations are solved by using three different methods (analytical, perturbation technique and finite element solution). The through-thickness variation of the volume fraction of the ceramic phase in a Metal-Ceramic beam is assumed to be given by a power-law type function. The non-linear strain-displacement relations in the von-Kármán sense are used to study the effect of geometric non-linearity. Also, four other representative averaging estimation methods, the linear rule, Mori-Tanaka, Self-Consistent and Wakashima-Tsukamoto schemes, by comparing with the power-law type function are also investigated. Temperature distribution through the thickness of the beams in thermal loadings is obtained by solving the one-dimensional heat transfer equation. Finally it is concluded that for Metal-Ceramic composites, these two theories result in identical static responses. Also the displacement field and equilibrium equations in the case of cylindrical bending of Metal-Ceramic plates are the same as those supposed in FSDBT2.

  19. Phase Stability and Thermal Conductivity of Composite Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, Samantha; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings are being developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites in harsh combustion environments. The current coating development emphasis has been placed on the significantly improved cyclic durability and combustion environment stability in high-heat-flux and high velocity gas turbine engine environments. Environmental barrier coating systems based on hafnia (HfO2) and ytterbium silicate, HfO2-Si nano-composite bond coat systems have been processed and their stability and thermal conductivity behavior have been evaluated in simulated turbine environments. The incorporation of Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNT) into high stability (HfO2) and/or HfO2-silicon composite bond coats, along with ZrO2, HfO2 and rare earth silicate composite top coat systems, showed promise as excellent environmental barriers to protect the SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites.

  20. Electrodeposition of nanostructured Nickel-Ceramic composite coatings: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Yahia H.; Mohamed, Adel M.A.

    2014-01-01

    This review presents a recent literature on electrochemically prepared nickel-ceramic nanocomposites coatings. These nanostructured coatings exhibit remarkable enhanced corrosion resistance and microhardness which are of interest for applications in diverse fields. In this review article significant attention is paid to the mechanisms of metal-particle electrocodeposition and different parameters affecting the electrodeposition process. Different techniques used in characterization of these c...

  1. Gradient composite metal-ceramic foam as supportive component for planar SOFCs and MIEC membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel approach to the design of planar gradient porous supports for the thin-film SOFCs and MIEC membranes is described. The support's thermal expansion is controlled by the creation of a two-component composite metal-ceramic foam structure. Thin MIEC membranes and SOFCs were prepared on the composite supports by the layerwise deposition of composite functional layers including complex fluorites and perovskites. Lab-scale studies demonstrated promising performance of both MIEC membrane and SOFC.

  2. Application of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al alloy matrix composite on piston for internal combustion engines

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Shenqing; Li Jun

    2010-01-01

    The preparation and properties of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite and it’s application on the piston for internal combustion engines are presented. Alumina or aluminosilicate fibers reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite has more excellent synthetical properties at elevated temperature than the matrix alloys. A partially reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite piston produced by squeeze casting technique has a firm interface between reinforced and unreinforced are...

  3. GdAlO3-ZrO2: A ductile ceramic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ceramic with a high fracture toughness KIC that is close to the respective values of cast iron and Mg alloys has been fabricated by microwave sintering of GdAlO3 and ZrO2 into composite materials of different molar fractions; for the 80/20 composite KIC reaches the remarkable value of 17.5 Mpa m1/2. Such composites may become extremely valuable for structural applications in advanced technologies. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Production of mullite-zirconia ceramics composites by 'In situ' reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullita-zirconia ceramic composites were produced by 'In situ' reaction of alumina and brazilian zircon. The ideal curve of thermal treatment (reaction + sinterization) was determined for the obtention of composites of maximum mechanical resistence. The retained fraction of tetragonal fase was evaluated by X-ray difraction and correlated with the values of mechanical resistence obtained by different treatment curves. The performance of the developed composites under corrosion and thermal shock was evaluated by glass casting. (Author)

  5. Alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites formed by centrifugal slip casting

    OpenAIRE

    Justyna Zygmuntowicz; Aleksandra Miazga; Katarzyna Konopka; Katarzyna Jedrysiak; Waldemar Kaszuwara

    2015-01-01

    The paper is focused on the possibility of fabricating the alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites with gradient concentration of metal particles. Centrifugal slip casting method was chosen for the composite fabrication. This method allows fabrication of the graded distribution of nickel particles in the hollow cylinder composites. The horizontal rotation axis was applied. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM and quantitative description of the microstructure. The macroscopic as well a...

  6. Chemical composition and morphology of oxidic ceramics at filtration of steel deoxidised by aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bažan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Composition and morphology of filter ceramics were investigated during filtration of steel deoxidised by aluminium. Filtration was realized with use of filters based on oxidic ceramics Cr2O3, TiO2, SiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, 3Al2O3•2SiO2 and MgO•Al2O3. It was established that change of interphase (coating occurs during filtration of steel on the surface of capillaries of ceramics, where content of basic oxidic component decreases. Loss of oxidic component in the coating is replaced by increase of oxides of manganese and iron and it is great extent inversely proportional to the value of Gibbs’ energy of oxide, which forms this initial basis of ceramics.

  7. An investigation of the element composition of superconducting ceramics by neutron activation and radiography methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron activation methods for determining the general composition and distribution of the main components in HTSC ceramics were developed. The conditions for the reduction of the analysis error were discussed. The dependences of the oxygen content and superconducting parameters of single-phase and polyphase yttrium ceramics on the regime of heat treatment in air were investigated. Variation in the oxygen content was found to have a nonmonotone character, depending on the temperature of quenching and annealing. Correlation between the character of the superconducting transition and the oxygen content was observed. During the heat treatment, reversible structural phase transitions proceed in the single-phase ceramics in the polyphase ceramics, the recrystallization processes occur, which result in homogenization of its structure

  8. Effect of silica sol on the properties of alumina-based ceramic core composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of alumina-based ceramic cores sintered at 1300 deg. C, 1400 deg. C, and 1500 deg. C for 5 h were prepared, and the phases and microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The effect of colloidal silica sols on the properties of ceramic core was discussed. The properties of these materials were determined. The microstructure of the core formed on the substantially un-reacted coarse Al2O3 particles was predominantly a polycrystalline composition consisting essentially of in situ synthesized 3Al2O3.2SiO2. The colloidal silica sol contents do not have an appreciable effect on the densification and shrinkage of alumina ceramic core. The ceramic cores of 5 wt% colloidal silica sol contents sintered at 1500 deg. C for 5 h showed the smallest creep deformation in the present research.

  9. Oxidation of O'-SiAlON-ZrO2 Composite Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of O'-SiAlON-ZrO2 composite ceramics in the temperature range of 1373-1773K has been studied. The oxidation experiments with powder and plates of O'-SiAlON-ZrO2 composite ceramics in air have been carried out. The overall activation energy of oxidation reaction is 263.69 kJ / mol. The products and structures of O'-SiAlON-ZrO2 oxidation layer have been analysed by XRD (X-ray diffraction), SEM (scanning electron microscope) and AFM (atomic force microscope).

  10. Characterization of silicon-silicon carbide ceramic derived from carbon-carbon silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vijay K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Varanasi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krenkel, Walter [Univ. of Bayreuth (Germany). Dept. of Ceramic Materials Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The main objective of the present work is to process porous silicon - silicon carbide (Si - SiC) ceramic by the oxidation of carboncarbon silicon carbide (C/C - SiC) composites. Phase studies are performed on the oxidized porous composite to examine the changes due to the high temperature oxidation. Further, various characterization techniques are performed on Si- SiC ceramics in order to study the material's microstructure. The effects of various parameters such as fiber alignment (twill weave and short/chopped fiber) and phenolic resin type (resol and novolak) are characterized.

  11. Thixoforming of SiC ceramic matrix composites in pseudo-semi-solid state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yuan-sheng; LUO Shou-jing; DU Zhi-ming

    2005-01-01

    A new forming process, ceramic matrix composites thixoforming in pseudo-semi-solid state, was proposed based on powder metallurgy technology combined with the semi-solid metal forming process. The satellite angle-frames were prepared by this technology with Alp and SiCp materials mixed with different volume fractions. It is proved that it is feasible for the forming of the ceramic matrix composites by this technology through metallographic analyses and tensile tests. The results also show that the microstructures of samples are homogeneous and they have high hardness and certain plasticity.

  12. Elastic properties of silica-silica continuous fibre-reinforced, ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambient and elevated temperature elastic properties of silica-silica ceramic fibre-reinforced, ceramic-matrix composites (silica-silica CFCCs), obtained using resonance beam technique, have been reported and discussed. The composite exhibits in-plane isotropy and through-thickness anisotropy in the elastic properties at ambient temperatures and increasing elastic moduli with increasing test temperature. The latter results are attributable to the change in the nature of atomic bonding of the silica material up to about 1173 K and further increase in moduli with temperature is due to the combined effects of devitrification and densification due to sintering

  13. Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coated Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the developments of thermo-mechanical testing approaches and durability performance of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and EBC coated SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Critical testing aspects of the CMCs will be described, including state of the art instrumentations such as temperature, thermal gradient, and full field strain measurements; materials thermal conductivity evolutions and thermal stress resistance; NDE methods; thermo-mechanical stress and environment interactions associated damage accumulations. Examples are also given for testing ceramic matrix composite sub-elements and small airfoils to help better understand the critical and complex CMC and EBC properties in engine relevant testing environments.

  14. Fracture toughness of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites used for cutting tool edges

    OpenAIRE

    M. Szutkowska

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Specific characteristics in fracture toughness measurements of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites with particular reference to α-Al2O3, Al2O3-ZrO2, Al2O3-ZrO2-TiC and Al2O3-Ti(C,N) has been presented.Design/methodology/approach: The present study reports fracture toughness obtained by means of the conventional method and direct measurements of the Vickers crack length (DCM method) of selected tool ceramics based on alumina: pure alumina, alumina-zirconia composit...

  15. Study on Preparation and Physical Mechanical Properties of Si3N4 Composite Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Wei; Lv Zhenglin; Gao Dongqiang; Ai Xu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, by using the hot-pressed sintered technology, pure Si3N4 ceramics and Si3N4 composite ceramics containing different volume fraction(hBN) are prepared with the sintered catalyst of Al2O3 and Y2O3(total 10vol%) by HIGH MULTI 5000 multi-functional high temperature sintering furnace. And the phase compositions, microstructure and mechanical properties of specimen were studied. The results show that, based on the hot pressing sintering process, the α-Si3N4 is all changed into β-Si3N...

  16. Randomized Clinical Trial of Indirect Resin Composite and Ceramic Veneers : Up to 3-year Follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Kalk, Warner; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This randomized controlled split-mouth clinical trial evaluated the short-term survival rate of indirect resin composite and ceramic laminate veneers. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 patients (mean age: 48.6 years) received 46 indirect resin composite (Estenia; n = 23) and ceramic lami

  17. Bioactivity of thermal plasma synthesized bovine hydroxyapatite/glass ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone injuries and failures often require the inception of implant biomaterials. Research in this area is receiving increasing attention worldwide. A variety of artificial bone materials, such as metals, polymeric materials, composites and ceramics, are being explored to replace diseased bones. Calcium phosphate ceramics are currently used as biomaterials for many applications in both dentistry and orthopedics. Bioactive silicate-based glasses show a higher bioactive behaviour than calcium phosphate materials. It is very interesting to study the mixtures of HA and silicate-based glasses. In the present study; natural bovine hydroxyapatite / SiO2-CaO-MgO glass composites were produced using the Transferred arc plasma (TAP) melting method. TAP melting route is a brisk process of preparation of glass-ceramics in which the raw materials are melted in the plasma and crystallization of the melt occurs while cooling down at a much faster rate in relatively short processing times compared to the conventional methods of manufacture of glass ceramics/composites. It is well known that; one essential step to the understanding of the biological events occurring at the bone tissue/material interface is the biological investigation by in vitro tests. Cell lines are commonly used for biocompatibility tests, and are very efficient because of their reproducibility and culture facility. In this study, we report the results of a study on the response of primary cultures of human fibroblast cells to TAP melted bioactive glass ceramics.

  18. Economic evaluation of IGCC plants with hot gas cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Techno-economic evaluation of hot gas cleaning IGCC power plants in Germany. ► Scenario analysis in light of nuclear phase-out and outdated coal-fired power plants. ► Consideration of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and combined heat and power (CHP). ► Economic viability is sensitive to heat-to-power ratio, CHP subsidy, and CO2 price. ► Least-cost investment is not necessarily the one with the lowest GHG emissions. -- Abstract: This paper investigates whether coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power plants can be an economically viable future technology for providing less carbon-intensive electricity and heat energy in Germany than today. In the context of CO2 emission mitigation in power generation, energy conversion technologies enabling the implementation of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) need to be considered. IGCC is such a technology, as it utilizes coal but does not necessarily emit CO2. In our study we investigate, from an economic perspective, whether IGCC plants can be an alternative to nuclear and/or conventional coal-fired power plants. The research is based on scenario analysis. The starting point is the expected shut-down of nuclear power stations and outdated coal-fired power plants, as well as the projected evolution of the CO2 price. The hot gas cleaning option in IGCC plants is of particular interest, as it allows a significant enhancement of the efficiency of the IGCC technology and the use of combined heat and power production (CHP). Corresponding supplementary earnings (incl. subsidies) are compared with an increase in specific investment costs. Besides hot gas cleaning, we also investigate the economic impact of injecting pure CO2 (separated from the IGCC process) into oilfields, as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) can help to reduce the costs of CO2 transport and storage. Based on the results from our analysis we find that the replacement of currently operating power plants by IGCC facilities is only

  19. Comparison of the microstructure and composition of aboriginal ceramics, from indigenous site Caninhas, with the obtained ones in the region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The archaeological site of Caninhas is made of funeral and combustion structures and various objects of aboriginal daily use. These parts and fragments were safe and inventoried, constituting approximately 4000 units. The objective of this project was to analyze the microstructure and composition of archaeological ceramics, and ceramics made of argil current of the zone. The crystalline phases were identified by X-Rays Diffraction (XRD), elementary composition was obtained by X-Rays Fluorescence (XRF) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS), and the microstructure was evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Composition and microstructure of archaeological ceramics are different of current ceramics, indicating the effect of lixiviation in function of the time and the microstructural evolution due different ceramic processing. These results are valuable for the archaeological area studies, mainly for the cultural denoting which represents. The relation between some studies is basic to add knowledge: use of the ceramic materials engineering for archaeology application. (author)

  20. Health Monitoring of a Composite Actuator with a PZT Ceramic during Electromechanical Fatigue Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes an investigation into the feasibility of using an acoustic emission (AE) technique to evaluate the integrity of a composite actuator with a PZT ceramic under electromechanical cyclic loading. AE characteristics have been analyzed in terms of the behavior of the AE count rate and signal waveform in association with the performance degradation of the composite actuator during the cyclic tests. The results showed that the fatigue cracking of the composite actuator with a PZT ceramic occurred only in the PZT ceramic layer, and that the performance degradation caused by the fatigue damage varied immensely depending on the existence of a protecting composite bottom layer. We confirmed the correlations between the fatigue damage mechanisms and AE signal types for the actuators that exhibited multiple modes of fatigue damage; transgranular micro damage, intergranular fatigue cracking, and breakdown by a short circuiting were related to a burst type signal showing a shortly rising and slowly decaying waveform with a comparably low voltage, a continuous type signal showing a gradual rising and slowly decaying waveform with a very high voltage and a burst and continuous type signal with a high voltage, respectively. Results from the present work showed that the evolution of fatigue damage in the composite actuator with a PZT ceramic can be nondestructively identified via in situ AE monitoring and microscopic observations

  1. Ion sputtering erosion mechanisms of h-BN composite ceramics with textured microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Textured h-BN ceramics were made by hot press sintering using mullite as additives. • Sintering pressures play important role on ions sputtering resistance properties. • Textured microstructures lead to various surface morphologies by ion sputtering. • Sputtering erosion mechanisms include B–N bonds breaking and BN layers delamination. - Abstract: Since the hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) grain shows typical lamellar structures, textured materials can be obtained by arranging h-BN grains along one direction. In this work, textured h-BN composite ceramics with the c-axis orientation arranged along the pressure direction are manufactured by hot-press sintering using mullite as the sintering additive. The results show that sintering pressures not only play a major role in the density and the textured degrees of composite ceramics, but also influence Xe ion erosion resistance performances. After Xe ion sputtering, compositions of both h-BN and mullite stay stable, while the elemental compositions have changed due to the so-called “preferential sputtering”. Sputtered surfaces along different orientations show diverse morphologies attributed to the textured microstructures. The erosion mechanisms of h-BN grains during Xe ion sputtering are breaking of B–N bonds and delamination of BN layers. While the mass loss of composite ceramics is due to the erosion of h-BN grains and mullite coupled with partial detachment of h-BN grains from the surface

  2. Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-10-14

    Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3 % of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to development of an advanced hot-gas process that can eliminate the problematic SO{sub 2} tail gas and yield elemental sulfur

  3. Comparison and simulation of salt-ceramic composites for use in high temperature concentrated solar power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossile, Lauren Michelle

    Due to the inherently intermittent nature of solar energy caused by cloud cover among other sources, thermal storage systems are needed to make solar energy more consistent. This same technology could be used to prolong the daily number of useful hours of solar energy power plants. Salt-ceramic materials are a relatively new prospect for heat storage, but have been researched mostly with magnesium oxide and several different carbonate salts. Salt ceramics are a phase change material where the salt changes phase inside the ceramic structure allowing for the system to use the sensible heat of both materials and the latent heat of the salt to store thermal energy. Capillary forces within the ceramic structure hold in the salt when the salt melts. The focus here is on the possibility of creating a low-cost salt-ceramic storage material for high temperature solar energy applications. A theoretical analysis of the resulting materials is performed. While most of the existing salt ceramics have been made from magnesium oxide, aluminum oxide is more readily available from various companies in the area. Magnesium oxide is often considered a custom ceramic, so it is more expensive. A cost and material property comparison has been completed between these two materials to determine which is better suited for solar storage. Many of the existing salt-ceramics use carbonate salts, but nitrate salts are commonly used in graphite/salt composites. Therefore, a cost and theoretical performance comparison is between these materials also. For comparisons' sake, zirconia and graphite have also been analyzed as the filler in the composite. Each combination of salt and ceramic or graphite has been analyzed. In order to make the use of salt-ceramics more cost-effective and available to Nevada's energy providers, research has been done into which ceramics have high availability in Nevada, low cost, and the best material properties for this application. The thermal properties and cost of

  4. Alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites formed by centrifugal slip casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Zygmuntowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the possibility of fabricating the alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites with gradient concentration of metal particles. Centrifugal slip casting method was chosen for the composite fabrication. This method allows fabrication of the graded distribution of nickel particles in the hollow cylinder composites. The horizontal rotation axis was applied. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM and quantitative description of the microstructure. The macroscopic as well as SEM observations of the prepared composites confirmed the gradient concentration of Ni particles in the composite materials. The application of the centrifugal slip casting method allows for the graded distribution of metal particles in the samples.

  5. Comparison of shear bond strengths of conventional orthodontic composite and nano-ceramic restorative composite: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namit Nagar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the shear bond strength of a nano-ceramic restorative composite Ceram-X MonoTM♦, a restorative resin with the traditional orthodontic composite Transbond XTTM† and to evaluate the site of bond failure using Adhesive Remnant Index. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolars were divided into two groups of 30 each. Stainless steel brackets were bonded using Transbond XTTM† (Group I and Ceram-X MonoTM♦ (Group II according to manufacturer′s protocol. Shear bond strength was measured on Universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. Adhesive Remnant Index scores were assigned to debonded brackets of each group. Data was analyzed using unpaired ′t′ test and Chi square test. Results: The mean shear bond strength of Group I (Transbond XTTM† was 12.89 MPa ± 2.19 and that of Group II (Ceram-X MonoTM was 7.29 MPa ± 1.76. Unpaired ′t′ test revealed statistically significant differences amongst the shear bond strength of the samples measured. Chi-square test revealed statistically insignificant differences amongst the ARI scores of the samples measured. Conclusions: Ceram-X MonoTM♦ had a lesser mean shear bond strength when compared to Transbond XTTM† which was statistically significant difference. However, the mean shear bond of Ceram X Mono was within the clinically acceptable range for bonding. Ceram-X MonoTM† and Transbond XTTM† showed cohesive fracture of adhesive in 72.6% and 66.6% of the specimens, respectively.

  6. Estimation of the heat of reaction in traditional ceramic compositions

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer, S.; Mezquita, Ana; Gómez Tena, María Pilar; Machí, Cristina; Monfort Gimeno, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    Most energy studies on the traditional ceramic manufacturing process focus on the firing stage because this is the process stage that consumes the greatest amount of thermal energy. At present in Europe, using typical technologies, about 50% of the energy input in the firing stage is still lost through the kiln stacks. A key issue in energy studies is the accurate determination of the energy efficiency of the process, an issue that may become crucial in coming years to enable the energy manag...

  7. Layered ceramic composites via control of electrophoretic deposition kinetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hadraba, Hynek; Drdlík, D.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Maca, K.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Cihlář, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 12 (2013), s. 2305-2312. ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1644; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Alumina * Zirconia * Laminates * Electrophoretic deposition Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.307, year: 2013

  8. Application of Technogenic-Raw Material and Burning Out Additive in Composite Ceramic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga KIZINIEVIČ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the composite ceramic system containing easily fusible hydro-micous clay, technogenic finely dispersed raw material, and burning out waste additive is presented in the article. The properties of the raw materials used are described in the paper. The obtained ceramic bodies were burned at 1000 °C and 1050 °C temperatures, keeping at the highest burning temperature for 4 h. The analysis of physical-mechanical properties of composite ceramics (density, compressive strength, water absorption, its structural parameters (effective and total open porosity, reserve of pore volume, relative wall thickness of the pores and capillaries, and X-ray diffraction analysis was performed. The interdependencies between some structural parameters are described by empirical equations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.3.2443

  9. Aluminium based composites strengthened with metallic amorphous phase or ceramic (Al2O3) particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Al-based composites with amorphous Al strengthening phase were obtained. • A better adhesion of metallic amorphous particles than of ceramic phase. • Avoiding crystallization of amorphous phase during a composite pressing process. • Properties similar for 10% metallic amorphous and ceramic strengthening phases. • Better amorphization in case of melt spinning than gas atomization of the Al alloy. - Abstract: Two methods were used to obtain amorphous aluminium alloy powder: gas atomization and melt spinning. The sprayed powder contained only a small amount of the amorphous phase and therefore bulk composites were prepared by hot pressing of aluminium powder with the 10% addition of ball milled melt spun ribbons of the Al84Ni6V5Zr5 alloy (numbers indicate at.%). The properties were compared with those of a composite containing a 10% addition of Al2O3 ceramic particles. Additionally, a composite based on 2618A Al alloy was prepared with the addition of the Al84Ni6V5Zr5 powder from the ribbons used as the strengthening phase. X-ray studies confirmed the presence of the amorphous phase with a small amount of aluminium solid solution in the melt spun ribbons. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) studies showed the start of the crystallization process of the amorphous ribbons at 437 °C. The composite samples were obtained in the process of uniaxial hot pressing in a vacuum at 380 °C, below the crystallization temperature of the amorphous phase. A uniform distribution of both metallic and ceramic strengthening phases was observed in the composites. The hardness of all the prepared composites was comparable and amounted to approximately 50 HV for those with the Al matrix and 120 HV for the ones with the 2618A alloy matrix. The composites showed a higher yield stress than the hot pressed aluminium or 2618A alloy. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies after compression tests revealed that the propagation of cracks in the composites

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Jothimurugesan; Santosh K. Gangwal

    2000-12-01

    The techniques employed in this project have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing sorbents that achieve greater than 99% H{sub 2}S removal at temperatures 480 C and that retain their activity over 50 cycles. Fundamental understanding of phenomena leading to chemical deactivation and high regeneration light-off temperature has enabled us to successfully prepare and scale up a FHR-32 sorbent that showed no loss in reactivity and capacity over 50 cycles. This sorbent removed H{sub 2}S below 80 ppmv and lighted-off nicely at 480 C during regeneration. Overall the test is a success with potential for an optimized FHR-32 to be a candidate for Sierra-Pacific. An advanced attrition resistant hot-gas desulfurization sorbent that can eliminate the problematic SO{sub 2} tail gas and yield elemental sulfur directly has been developed. Attrition resistant Zn-Fe sorbent (AHI-2) formulations have been prepared that can remove H{sub 2}S to below 20 ppmv from coal gas and can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} to produce elemental sulfur.

  11. Hot gas stream application in micro-bonding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrijasevic, Daniela; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Smetana, Walter; Boehm, Stefan; Brenner, Werner

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept for bonding micro-parts with dimensions in the range of 50 μm to 300 μm. Two different kinds of adhesives - polyurethane adhesive foil and hot melt glue - were applied to a basic substrate by different techniques. The focused and concentrated hot gas stream softened glue which had been applied in a solid state. Micro-parts were then embossed in the softened glue, or covered and shielded by it. In this way, a rigid and compact bond was obtained after cooling. For the positioning of micro-parts (optical fibers), it has been necessary to manufacture adequate V-grooves. Finite element analyses using the ANSYS TM program package were performed in order to evaluate parameters which govern the heat transfer to the adhesive and substrate respectively. Experimental results are in good agreement with results obtained by the numerical simulations. The advantages of this new approach are small system size, low capital costs, simple usage, applicability to many material combinations, easy integration into existing production lines, etc.

  12. KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.C. Kwon

    2002-01-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 was examined in this report. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 130 mm particles are reacted with 18000-ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-525 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.069-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-180 s.

  13. AGN-stimulated Cooling of Hot Gas in Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Valentini, Milena

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of relatively weak AGN feedback on the interstellar medium of intermediate and massive elliptical galaxies. We find that the AGN activity, while globally heating the ISM, naturally stimulates some degree of hot gas cooling on scales of several kpc. This process generates the persistent presence of a cold ISM phase, with mass ranging between 10$^4$ and $\\gtrsim$ 5 $\\times$ 10$^7$ M$_\\odot$, where the latter value is appropriate for group centered, massive galaxies. Widespread cooling occurs where the ratio of cooling to free-fall time before the activation of the AGN feedback satisfies $t_{cool}/t_{ff} \\lesssim 70$, that is we find a less restrictive threshold than commonly quoted in the literature. This process helps explaining the body of observations of cold gas (both ionized and neutral/molecular) in Ellipticals and, perhaps, the residual star formation detected in many early-type galaxies. The amount and distribution of the off-center cold gas vary irregularly with time. The cold ISM v...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques employed in this project have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing sorbents that achieve greater than 99% H(sub 2)S removal at temperatures 480 C and that retain their activity over 50 cycles. Fundamental understanding of phenomena leading to chemical deactivation and high regeneration light-off temperature has enabled us to successfully prepare and scale up a FHR-32 sorbent that showed no loss in reactivity and capacity over 50 cycles. This sorbent removed H(sub 2)S below 80 ppmv and lighted-off nicely at 480 C during regeneration. Overall the test is a success with potential for an optimized FHR-32 to be a candidate for Sierra-Pacific. An advanced attrition resistant hot-gas desulfurization sorbent that can eliminate the problematic SO(sub 2) tail gas and yield elemental sulfur directly has been developed. Attrition resistant Zn-Fe sorbent (AHI-2) formulations have been prepared that can remove H(sub 2)S to below 20 ppmv from coal gas and can be regenerated using SO(sub 2) to produce elemental sulfur

  15. Combinatorial bulk ceramic magnetoelectric composite libraries of strontium hexaferrite and barium titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullar, Robert C

    2012-07-01

    Bulk ceramic combinatorial libraries were produced via a novel, high-throughput (HT) process, in the form of polycrystalline strips with a gradient composition along the length of the library. Step gradient ceramic composite libraries with 10 mol % steps of SrFe12O19-BaTiO3 (SrM-BT) were made and characterized using HT methods, as a proof of principle of the combinatorial bulk ceramic process, and sintered via HT thermal processing. It was found that the SrM-BT libraries sintered at 1175 °C had the optimum morphology and density. The compositional, electrical and magnetic properties of this library were analyzed, and it was found that the SrM and BT phases did not react and remained discrete. The combinatorial synthesis method produced a relatively linear variation in composition. The magnetization of the library followed the measured compositions very well, as did the low frequency permittivity values of most compositions in the library. However, with high SrM content of ≥80 mol %, the samples became increasingly conductive, and no reliable dielectric measurements could be made. Such conductivity would also greatly inhibit any ferroelectricity and magnetoelectric coupling with these composites with high levels of the SrM hexagonal ferrite. PMID:22676556

  16. A POLYMER-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MEMBRANE FOR RECOVERING VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM WASTEWATERS BY PERVAPORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A composite membrane was constructed on a porous ceramic support from a block copolymer of styrene and butadiene (SBS). It was tested in a laboratory pervaporation apparatus for recovering volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such a 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethylene ...

  17. Ceramic core–shell composites with modified mechanical properties prepared by thermoplastic co-extrusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaštyl, J.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Clemens, F.; Trunec, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 10 (2015), s. 2873-2881. ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Alumina * Zirconia toughened alumina * Co-extrusion * Composite * Mechanical properties1 Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.947, year: 2014

  18. Thermal Conductivity of Al2O3–ZrO2 Composite Ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hostaša, J.; Pabst, W.; Matějíček, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 12 (2011), s. 4404-4409. ISSN 1551-2916 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : alumina * zirconia * composites * thermal conductivity * model Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  19. Preparation and Photocatalytic Property of TiO2/Diatomite-Based Porous Ceramics Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuilin Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diatomite-based porous ceramics was made by low-temperature sintering. Then the nano-TiO2/diatomite-based porous ceramics composite materials were prepared by hydrolysis deposition method with titanium tetrachloride as the precursor of TiO2 and diatomite-based porous as the supporting body of the nano-TiO2. The structure and microscopic appearance of nano-TiO2/diatomite-based porous ceramics composite materials was characterized by XRD and SEM. The photocatalytic property of the composite was investigated by the degradation of malachite green. Results showed that, after calcination at 550°C, TiO2 thin film loaded on the diatomite-based porous ceramics is anatase TiO2 and average grain size of TiO2 is about 10 nm. The degradation ratio of the composite for 5 mg/L malachite green solution reached 86.2% after irradiation for 6 h under ultraviolet.

  20. INTERFACES IN SiC FIBER-REINFORCED GLASS-CERAMIC COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Mazerolles, L.; D. Michel; Ulmer, L.; Pastol, J.; Parlier, M.; Ritti, M.

    1990-01-01

    Interfaces between SiC Nicalon fibers and a lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glass-ceramic matrix were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Minor additive elements in the matrix, like niobium, can modify the mechanical properties of the composite because of the formation of niobium carbide at the fiber-matrix interface.

  1. Tensile behavior of glass/ceramic composite materials at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, J. F.; Grande, D. H.; Jacobs, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the tensile behavior of high-temperature composite materials containing continuous Nicalon ceramic fiber reinforcement and glass and glass/ceramic matrices. The longitudinal properties of these materials can approach theoretical expectations for brittle matrix composites, failing at a strength and ultimate strain level consistent with those of the fibers. The brittle, high-modulus matrices result in a nonlinear stress-strain curve due to the onset of stable matrix cracking at 10 to 30 percent of the fiber strain to failure, and at strains below this range in off-axis plies. Current fibers and matrices can provide attractive properties well above 1000 C, but composites experience embrittlement in oxidizing atmospheres at 800 to 1000 C due to oxidation of a carbon interface reaction layer.The oxidation effect greatly increases the interface bond strength, causing composite embrittlement.

  2. Mechanochemically synthesized kalsilite based bioactive glass-ceramic composite for dental vaneering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pattem Hemanth; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2015-08-01

    Kalsilite glass-ceramic composites have been prepared by a mechanochemical synthesis process for dental veneering application. The aim of the present study is to prepare bioactive kalsilite composite material for application in tissue attachment and sealing of the marginal gap between fixed prosthesis and tooth. Mechanochemical synthesis is used for the preparation of microfine kalsilite glass-ceramic. Low temperature frit and bioglass have been prepared using the traditional quench method. Thermal, microstructural and bioactive properties of the composite material have been examined. The feasibility of the kalsilite to be coated on the base commercial opaque as well as the bioactive behavior of the coated specimen has been confirmed. This study indicates that the prepared kalsilite-based composites show similar structural, morphological and bioactive behavior to that of commercial VITA VMK95 Dentin 1M2.

  3. Mechanical behavior and properties of fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites for high temperature use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chongdu Cho; Qiang Pan; Sangkyo Lee

    2007-01-01

    Ceramics can keep their mechanical characteristics up to 2 000℃ or higher.In this paper,A model to predict ultimate strength of continuous fiber-reinforced brittle matrix composites is developed.A statistical theory for the strength of a uni-axially fiber-reinforced brittle matrix composite is presented.Also a semi-empirical frictional heating method for estimating in-situ interfacial shear in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites was improved.Local uneven fiber packing variation as well as uneven micro-damage during fatigue can be expected to have effects on the composites:generation of frictional heating,thermal gradients,and residual stresses around local fiber breaks.This study examined those engineering interests by the finite element method.

  4. High resolution energy loss research: Si compound ceramics and composites. [1990 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, R W; Lin, S H

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses proposed work on silicon compound ceramics and composites. High resolution composition and structure analysis of interfaces in ceramic and metal matrix composites and certain grain boundaries in silicon and its interfaces with oxides and nitrides is proposed. Composition and bonding analysis will be done with high spatial resolution (20 Angstroms or better) parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy using a field emission analytical electron microscope. Structural analysis will be done at the 1.8 Angstrom resolution level at 200kV by HREM. Theoretical electron energy loss cross section computations will be used to interpret electronic structure of these materials. Both self-consistent field MO and multiple scattering computational methods are being done and evaluated.

  5. Processing and characterization of pure cordierite and zirconia-doped cordierite ceramic composite by precipitation technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Senthil Kumar; A Elaya Perumal; T R Vijayaram; Govindan Senguttuvan

    2015-06-01

    Pure cordierite and cordierite–ZrO2 composite (5–20 wt%) ceramics for various stoichiometric compositions were synthesized from standard raw materials by a novel precipitation technique. The analytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction, simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and bulk density were employed to evaluate the properties and microstructure. Results show that the ceramic composites consist of cordierite and zircon phases. The cordierite–zirconia (20 wt%) increased the fracture toughness value from 3.38 to 3.94 MPa, which is mainly due to martensitic transformation present in zirconia. The flexural strength of composite was found to increase from 126.46 to 297.62 MPa. The thermal expansion coefficients of cordierite and cordierite–zirconia (20 wt%) were 4.08 × 10−6 and 4.42 × 10−6 ° C−1 which may be due to the addition of zirconia.

  6. Colloidal processing of Fe-based metalceramic composites with high content of ceramic reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Escribano, J.A.; Ferrari, Begoña; Alvaredo Olmos, Paula; Gordo Odériz, Elena; Sánchez-Herencia, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Major difficulties of processing metal-matrix composites by means of conventional powder metallurgy techniques are the lack of dispersion of the phases within the final microstructure. In this work, processing through colloidal techniques of the Fe-based metal-matrix composites, with a high content of a ceramic reinforcement (Ti(C,N) ), is presented for the first time in the literature. The colloidal approach allows a higher control of the powders packing and a better homogenization of phases...

  7. High-strength zirconium diboride-based ceramic composites consolidated by low-temperature hot pressing

    OpenAIRE

    Shuqi Guo and Yutaka Kagawa

    2012-01-01

    Two compositions of ZrB2-based ceramic composites containing Si3N4, Al2O3 and Y2O3 have been hot-pressed at different temperatures between 1673 and 1773 K for 60 min in vacuum. The densification behavior of the composites was examined during the sintering process. The microstructures of the composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and the crystalline phases were identified by x-ray diffraction. The effects of Al2O3 and Y2O3 additives on the densification behavior and fle...

  8. The effect of filler on the temperature coefficient of the relative permittivity of PTFE/ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, S.; Murali, K. P.; Jantunen, H.; Ratheesh, R.

    2011-11-01

    High permittivity and low-loss ceramic fillers have been prepared by means of the solid state ceramic route. Ceramic-filled composites were prepared by the Sigma Mixing, Extrusion, Calendering, which was followed by the Hot pressing (SMECH) process. The microwave dielectric properties of the composites were studied using X-band waveguide cavity perturbation technique. The temperature coefficient of the relative permittivity of the composites was investigated in the 0-100 °C temperature range using a hot and cold chamber coupled with an impedance analyzer. The temperature coefficient of the relative permittivity of the composites showed strong dependence on the temperature coefficient of the relative permittivity of the filler material. In the present study, a high-permittivity polymer/ceramic composite, having τεr ∼63 ppm/K, has been realized. This composite is suitable for outdoor wireless applications.

  9. Additive Manufacturing of Reactive In Situ Zr Based Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Reactive in situ multi-material additive manufacturing of ZrB2-based ultra-high-temperature ceramics in a Zr metal matrix was demonstrated using LENS™. Sound metallurgical bonding was achieved between the Zr metal and Zr-BN composites with Ti6Al4V substrate. Though the feedstock Zr power had α phase, LENS™ processing of the Zr powder and Zr-BN premix powder mixture led to the formation of some β phase of Zr. Microstructure of the Zr-BN composite showed primary grains of zirconium diboride phase in zirconium metal matrix. The presence of ZrB2 ceramic phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness of pure Zr was measured as 280 ± 12 HV and, by increasing the BN content in the feedstock, the hardness was found to increase. In Zr-5%BN composite, the hardness was 421 ± 10 HV and the same for Zr-10%BN composite was 562 ± 10 HV. It is envisioned that such multi-materials additive manufacturing will enable products in the future that cannot be manufactured using traditional approaches particularly in the areas of high-temperature metal-ceramic composites with compositional and functional gradation.

  10. Low Cost Fabrication of Silicon Carbide Based Ceramics and Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Levine, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A low cost processing technique called reaction forming for the fabrication of near-net and complex shaped components of silicon carbide based ceramics and composites is presented. This process consists of the production of a microporous carbon preform and subsequent infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The microporous preforms are made by the pyrolysis of a polymerized resin mixture with very good control of pore volume and pore size thereby yielding materials with tailorable microstructure and composition. Mechanical properties (elastic modulus, flexural strength, and fracture toughness) of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics are presented. This processing approach is suitable for various kinds of reinforcements such as whiskers, particulates, fibers (tows, weaves, and filaments), and 3-D architectures. This approach has also been used to fabricate continuous silicon carbide fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCC's) with silicon carbide based matrices. Strong and tough composites with tailorable matrix microstructure and composition have been obtained. Microstructure and thermomechanical properties of a silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites are discussed.

  11. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensor Development for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Zhu, Dongming; Laster, Kimala L.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has an on-going effort for developing high temperature thin film sensors for advanced turbine engine components. Stable, high temperature thin film ceramic thermocouples have been demonstrated in the lab, and novel methods of fabricating sensors have been developed. To fabricate thin film heat flux sensors for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems, the rough and porous nature of the CMC system posed a significant challenge for patterning the fine features required. The status of the effort to develop thin film heat flux sensors specifically for use on silicon carbide (SiC) CMC systems with these new technologies is described.

  12. Study of phase composition on resorption glass-ceramic соatings for titanium

    OpenAIRE

    Шадріна, Галина Миколаївна; Саввова, Оксана Вікторівна; Шемет, Дарина Юріївна

    2014-01-01

     The problem of long-term knitting of bioactive glass-ceramic calcium silicate-phosphate coatings for titanium with a bone that constitutes about 6 months today, using foreign implants of this kind is considered in the paper. The solution to this problem by providing an appropriate resorption level of glass-ceramic coatings due to reproducing a certain ratio of phase-forming components is proposed.The purpose of this work was to study the effect of phase composition on resorption of glass-cer...

  13. Correlations between chemical composition and provenance of Justino site ceramics by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), have been used for the definition of compositional groups of potteries from Justino site, Brazil, according to the chemical similarities of ceramic paste. The outliers were identified by means of robust Mahalanobis distance. The temper effect in the ceramic paste was studied by means of modified Mahalanobis filter. The results were interpreted by means of cluster, principal components, and discriminant analyses. This work provides contributions for the reconstruction of the prehistory of baixo Sao Francisco region, and for the reconstitution of the Brazilian Northeast ceramist population of general frame. (author)

  14. The effect of various primers on shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic and resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasiwimol Sanohkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the in vitro shear bond strengths (SBS of zirconia ceramic to resin composite after various primer treatments. Materials and Methods: Forty zirconia ceramic (Zeno, Wieland Dental specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were prepared, sandblasted with 50 μm alumina, and divided into four groups (n = 10. Three experimental groups were surface treated with three primers; CP (RelyX Ceramic Primer, 3M ESPE, AP (Alloy Primer, Kuraray Medical, and MP (Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent AG. One group was not treated and served as the control. All specimens were bonded to a resin composite (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE cylinder with an adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive, 3M ESPE and then stored in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 h before SBS testing in a universal testing machine. Mean SBS (MPa were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Tukey′s Honestly Significant Difference (HSD test (α = 0.05. Results: Group AP yielded the highest mean and standard deviation (SD value of SBS (16.8 ± 2.5 MPa and Group C presented the lowest mean and SD value (15.4 ± 1.6 MPa. The SBS did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.079. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, the SBS values between zirconia ceramic to resin composite using various primers and untreated surface were not significantly different.

  15. Solidification of Zeolite and Toxic Element (Cs) as a Waste CeramicComposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solidification of Zeolite-Cs and weak cullet mixtures as a waste ceramicin the pellet form. The simulation waste contain the Cs toxic element withinitial concentration 550 ppm, pH 7, in the 15 ml volume were contacted with0.3 gram of Zeolite-Na in the time 60 second, it was found Zeolite-Cs. Theconcentration of Cs in waste after was contacted with zeolite-Na, 90 % of Cscan be exchanged and then formed zeolite-Cs. Zeolite-Cs and weak cullet weremixture on the optimal composition (10 : 90) % were made a pellet form byhydraulic press, and then it was solidification process in the furnace on 800oC and 3 hours in the time, to formed a waste ceramic. The quality of wasteceramic was testing by XRD for mineralogy test, AAS for composition test, 0.1N NaOH for leaching test and hydraulic press for pressure test. The mineralcomposition of waste ceramic was consist of mordenite and clinoptilolite. Thechemical composition of those ceramic was contain of Mn 0.16 %, Cu 7.62 %, Fe0.97 %, K 2.24 %, Si 38.54 %, Ca 3 %, Mg 1 %, Al 2.9 % dan Cs 260 ppm. Toxicmetal of Cs. was not leached by water and 0.1 N NaOH. Zeolite-Cs ceramic haspressures proof < 2.5 kN. (author)

  16. High-Temperature, Lightweight, Self-Healing Ceramic Composites for Aircraft Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Sai V.; Bhatt, Ramkrishna

    2013-01-01

    The use of reliable, high-temperature, lightweight materials in the manufacture of aircraft engines is expected to result in lower fossil and biofuel consumption, thereby leading to cost savings and lower carbon emissions due to air travel. Although nickel-based superalloy blades and vanes have been successfully used in aircraft engines for several decades, there has been an increased effort to develop high-temperature, lightweight, creep-resistant substitute materials under various NASA programs over the last two decades. As a result, there has been a great deal of interest in developing SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) due to their higher damage tolerance compared to monolithic ceramics. Current-generation SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites rely almost entirely on the SiC fibers to carry the load, owing to the premature cracking of the matrix during loading. Thus, the high-temperature usefulness of these CMCs falls well below their theoretical capabilities. The objective of this work is to develop a new class of high-temperature, lightweight, self-healing, SiC fiber-reinforced, engineered matrix ceramic composites.

  17. Synthesis of (Zn, Mg)TiO3-TiO2 composite ceramics for multilayer ceramic capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (Zn0.8Mg0.2)TiO3-xTiO2 composite ceramics has been prepared via the solid-phase synthesis method. TiO2 was employed to tone temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (τf) and stabilize hexagonal (Zn, Mg)TiO3 phase. 3ZnO-B2O3 was effective to promote sintering. The movement of grain boundary was obvious because of the liquid phase sintering. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) patterns showed that segregation and precipitation of dissociative (Zn, Mg)TiO3 grains occurred at grain boundary during sintering. SnO2 was used as inhibitor to prevent the grain boundary from moving. The dielectric behaviors of specimen strongly depended on structural transition and microstructure. We found that 1.0 wt.% 3ZnO-B2O3 doped (Zn, Mg)TiO3-0.25TiO2 ceramics with 0.1 wt.% SnO2 additive displayed excellent dielectric properties (at 1000 deg. C): εr = 27.7, Q x f = 65,490 GHz (at 6.07 GHz) and τf = -8.88 ppm deg. C-1. The above-mentioned material was applied successfully to make multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs), which exhibited an excellent electrical property. The self-resonance frequency (SRF) and equivalent series resistance (ESR) of capacitor decreased with capacitance increasing, and the quality factor (Q) of capacitor reduced as frequency or capacity increased.

  18. Composition-Driven Phase Boundary and Piezoelectricity in Potassium-Sodium Niobate-Based Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ting; Wu, Jiagang; Xiao, Dingquan; Zhu, Jianguo; Wang, Xiangjian; Lou, Xiaojie

    2015-09-16

    The piezoelectricity of (K,Na)NbO3 ceramics strongly depends on the phase boundary types as well as the doped compositions. Here, we systematically studied the relationships between the compositions and phase boundary types in (K,Na) (Nb,Sb)O3-Bi0.5Na0.5AO3 (KNNS-BNA, A=Hf, Zr, Ti, Sn) ceramics; then their piezoelectricity can be readily modified. Their phase boundary types are determined by the doped elements. A rhombohedral-tetragonal (R-T) phase boundary can be driven in the compositions range of 0.035≤BNH≤0.040 and 0.035≤BNZ≤0.045; an orthorhombic-tetragonal (O-T) phase boundary is formed in the composition range of 0.005≤BNT≤0.02; and a pure O phase can be only observed regardless of BNS content (≤0.01). In addition, the phase boundary types strongly affect their corresponding piezoelectricities. A larger d33 (∼440-450 pC/N) and a higher d33* (∼742-834 pm/V) can be attained in KNNS-BNA (A=Zr and Hf) ceramics due to the involvement of R-T phase boundary, and unfortunately KNNS-BNA (A=Sn and Ti) ceramics possess a relatively poor piezoelectricity (d33≤200 and d33*<600 pm/V) due to the involvement of other phase structures (O-T or O). In addition, the underlying physical mechanisms for the relationships between piezoelectricity and phase boundary types were also discussed. We believe that comprehensive research can design more excellent ceramic systems concerning potassium-sodium niobate. PMID:26302094

  19. Processing and properties of ceramic matrix-polymer composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsuan Yao

    The basic composite structure of natural hard tissue was used to guide the design and processing of dental restorative materials. The design incorporates the methodology of using inorganic minerals as the main structural phase reinforced with a more ductile but tougher organic phase. Ceramic-polymer composites were prepared by slip casting a porous ceramic structure, heating and chemical treating the porous preform, infiltrating with monomer and then curing. The three factors that determined the mechanical properties of alumina-polymer composites were the type of polymer used, the method of silane treatments, and the type of bond between particles in the porous preforms. Without the use of silane coupling agents, the composites were measured to have a lower strength. The composite with a more "flexible" porous alumina network had a greater ability to plastically dissipate the energy of propagating cracks. However, the aggressive nature of the alumina particles on opposing enamel requires that these alumina-polymer composites have a wear compatible coating for practical application. A route to dense bioactive apatite wollastonite glass ceramics (AWGC)-polymer composites was developed. The problems associated with glass dissolution into the aqueous medium for slip casting were overcome with the use of silane. The role of heating rate and development of ceramic compact microstructure on composite properties was explored. In general, if isothermal heating was not applied, decreasing heating rate increased glass crystallinity and particle-particle fusion, but decreased pore volume. Also composite strength and fracture toughness decreased while modulus and hardness increased with decreasing heating rate. If isothermal heating was applied, glass crystallinity, pore content, and composite mechanical properties showed relatively little change regardless of the initial heating rate. The potential of AWGC-polymer composites for dental and implant applications was explored

  20. Metal-ceramic composite development based on its modelling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvilis, E. S.; Khasanov, O. L.; Khasanov, A. O.; Petyukevich, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    The modeling (and its experimental verification) of packing and deformation of the composites consisted of aluminum-magnesium alloy AMg6, B4C powder and W nano-powder has been performed. The powder compositions were determined using discrete element modeling of the composite particles packing based on the particle size distribution functions of real powders. The models of maximum mixture packing densities have been rendered.

  1. Fiber reinforced superalloys, ceramics, and refractory metals, and directionally solidified eutectics (heat-resistant composites)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-temperature composites have been shown to have excellent elevated-temperature tensile and stress-rupture strengths and specific strengths. Tungsten alloy fiber reinforced superalloys have been demonstrated to have stress rupture strengths at 20000F superior to superalloys and sufficient impact resistance for gas turbines. Recently developed tungsten alloy fibers should permit production of composites with use-temperatures (gas turbine blades, vanes) as high as 24000F. Their main problem is associated with the direction and perfection of growth of strong whiskers or lamina in irregularly shaped components. Artificially made whisker composites are believed to warrant serious consideration. Use-temperatures of refractory metal matrix composites can be as much as 25000F for Nb matrix composites and over 30000F for W matrix composites. Ceramic matrix composites with use-temperatures ranging from 18000F to over 30000F are possibilities. Stationary, large, turbines for power generation may make use of refractory fiber/superalloy matrix, ceramic matrix, and coated refractory matrix composites. Such an application may capitalize on the high-temperature strength and high use-temperatures of the composites, which, in turn, will enhance engine performance. (127 references, 62 fig, 22 tables) (U.S.)

  2. Joining of SiC ceramics and SiC/SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabin, B.H. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This project has successfully developed a practical and reliable method for fabricating SiC ceramic-ceramic joints. This joining method has the potential to facilitate the use of SiC-based ceramics in a variety of elevated temperature fossil energy applications. The technique is based on a reaction bonding approach that provides joint interlayers compatible with SiC, and excellent joint mechanical properties at temperatures exceeding 1000{degrees}C. Recent efforts have focused on transferring the joining technology to industry. Several industrial partners have been identified and collaborative research projects are in progress. Investigations are focusing on applying the joining method to sintered a-SiC and fiber-reinforced SiC/SiC composites for use in applications such as heat exchangers, radiant burners and gas turbine components.

  3. Joining of SiC ceramics and SiC/SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabin, B.H. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This project has successfully developed a practical and reliable method for fabricating SiC ceramic-ceramic joints. This joining method will permit the use of SiC-based ceramics in a variety of elevated temperature fossil energy applications. The technique is based on a reaction bonding approach that provides joint interlayers compatible with SiC, and excellent joint mechanical properties at temperatures exceeding 1000{degrees}C. Recent emphasis has been given to technology transfer activities, and several collaborative research efforts are in progress. Investigations are focusing on applying the joining method to sintered {alpha}-SiC and fiber-reinforced SiC/SiC composites for use in applications such as heat exchangers, radiant burners and gas turbine components.

  4. Influence of Composite Phosphate Inorganic Antibacterial Materials Containing Rare Earth on Activated Water Property of Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁金生; 梁广川; 祁洪飞; 吴子钊; 冀志江; 金宗哲

    2004-01-01

    Antibacterial ceramic was prepared by doping enamel slurry with composite phosphate inorganic antibacterial materials containing rare earth (inorganic antibacterial additives), and then the mechanisms for activating water and improving seed germinative property were tested by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and the method of testing oxygen dissolved in activated water. Results show that the half peak width of 17O-NMR for tap water activated by the antibacterial ceramic drops from 115.36 to 99.15 Hz, and oxygen concentrations of activated water increase by 20%, germinate rate of horsebean and earthnut seeds increases by 12.5% and 7.5%, respectively. Therefore antibacterial ceramic doped enamel slurry with inorganic antibacterial additives containing rare earth can reduce the volume of clusters of water molecules, improve activation of tap water, and promote plant seeds germinate.

  5. Intraoral repair of all ceramic fixed partial denture utilizing preimpregnated fiber reinforced composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkaslan, Süha; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

    2008-01-01

    All ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPD)s exhibit enhanced biocompatibility and esthetics as compared to metal-ceramic restorations. However, framework fractures are frequently reported especially when the connector dimensions are inadequate to withstand the high tensile stresses. The repair of the failed connector would be desirable rather than the complete removal and renewal since the latter is an expensive and time consuming procedure. Furthermore, the replacement or removal of the restoration for extra-oral repair purposes might increase the risk of destroying the entire restoration or damaging the abutment teeth during the removal. This article presents a direct intra-oral method that may be used to repair the connector fractures of all-ceramic FPDs which are otherwise clinically satisfactory. In the present technique, the connector is reconstructed intraorally utilizing composite resin restorative material reinforced with E-glass-fiber. PMID:19212511

  6. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  7. Chemical hot gas purification for biomass gasification processes; Chemische Heissgasreinigung bei Biomassevergasungsprozessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemmler, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The German government decided to increase the percentage of renewable energy up to 20 % of all energy consumed in 2020. The development of biomass gasification technology is advanced compared to most of the other technologies for producing renewable energy. So the overall efficiency of biomass gasification processes (IGCC) already increased to values above 50 %. Therefore, the production of renewable energy attaches great importance to the thermochemical biomass conversion. The feedstock for biomass gasification covers biomasses such as wood, straw and further energy plants. The detrimental trace elements released during gasification of these biomasses, e.g. KCl, H{sub 2}S and HCl, cause corrosion and harm downstream devices. Therefore, gas cleaning poses an especial challenge. In order to improve the overall efficiency this thesis aims at the development of gas cleaning concepts for the allothermic, water blown gasification at 800 C and 1 bar (Guessing-Process) as well as for the autothermic, water and oxygen blown gasification at 950 C and 18 bar (Vaernamo-Process). Although several mechanisms for KCl- and H{sub 2}S-sorption are already well known, the achievable reduction of the contamination concentration is still unknown. Therefore, calculations on the produced syngas and the chemical hot gas cleaning were done with a thermodynamic process model using SimuSage. The syngas production was included in the calculations because the knowledge of the biomass syngas composition is very limited. The results of these calculations prove the dependence of syngas composition on H{sub 2}/C-ratio and ROC (Relative Oxygen Content). Following the achievable sorption limits were detected via experiments. The KCl containing syngases were analysed by molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). Furthermore, an optimised H{sub 2}S-sorbent was developed because the examined sorbents exceeded the sorption limit of 1 ppmv. The calculated sorption limits were compared to the limits

  8. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT–ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  9. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fupo; Ren, Weiwei; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. PMID:27127035

  10. Fibrous monoliths: Economic ceramic matrix composites from powders [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigali, Mark; Sutaria, Manish; Mulligan, Anthony; Creegan, Peter; Cipriani, Ron

    1999-05-26

    The project was to develop and perform pilot-scale production of fibrous monolith composites. The principal focus of the program was to develop damage-tolerant, wear-resistant tooling for petroleum drilling applications and generate a basic mechanical properties database on fibrous monolith composites.

  11. Qualification of Ni-base superalloys for hot gas duct of VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot gad duct of VHTR is operated at 950 .deg. C. Ni based superalloys for hot gas duct have been candidate in other country such as Hastelloy X for Japan, Alloy 617 for USA, and Haynes 230 for France because of good strength and corrosion properties at high temperature. Mechanical properties of these alloys are tested and compared with ASME design Code to apply to hot gas duct of VHTR

  12. Ceramics reinforced metal base composite coatings produced by CO II laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xichen; Wang, Yu; Yang, Nan

    2008-03-01

    Due to the excellent performance in high strength, anti-temperature and anti-wear, ceramics reinforced metal base composite material was used in some important fields of aircraft, aerospace, automobile and defense. The traditional bulk metal base composite materials are the expensive cost, which is limited in its industrial application. Development of laser coating of ceramics reinforced metal base composite is very interesting in economy. This paper is focused on three laser cladding ceramics coatings of SiC particle /Al matrix , Al IIO 3 powder/ Al matrix and WC + Co/mild steel matrix. Powder particle sizes are of 10-60μm. Chemical contents of aluminum matrix are of 3.8-4.0% Cu, 1.2-1.8% Mg, 0.3-0.99% Mn and balance Al. 5KW CO II laser, 5 axes CNC table, JKF-6 type powder feeder and co-axis feeder nozzle are used in laser cladding. Microstructure and performance of laser composite coatings have been respectively examined with OM,SEM and X-ray diffraction. Its results are as follows : Microstructures of 3C-,6H- and 5H- SiC particles + Al + Al 4SiC 4 + Si in SiC/Al composite, hexagonal α-Al IIO 3 + cubic γ-Al IIO 3 + f.c.c Al in Al IIO 3 powder/ Al composite and original WC particles + separated WC particles + eutectic WC + γ-Co solid solution + W IIC particles in WC + Co/steel coatings are respectively recognized. New microstructures of 5H-SiC in SiC/Al composite, cubic γ-Al IIO 3 in Al IIO 3 composite and W IIC in WC + Co/ steel composite by laser cladding have been respectively observed.

  13. Advanced SiC/SiC Ceramic Composites For Gas-Turbine Engine Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.; Easler, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing a variety of advanced SiC/SiC ceramic composite (ASC) systems that allow these materials to operate for hundreds of hours under stress in air at temperatures approaching 2700 F. These SiC/SiC composite systems are lightweight (approximately 30% metal density) and, in comparison to monolithic ceramics and carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, are able to reliably retain their structural properties for long times under aggressive gas-turbine engine environments. The key for the ASC systems is related first to the NASA development of the Sylramic-iBN Sic fiber, which displays higher thermal stability than any other SiC- based ceramic fibers and possesses an in-situ grown BN surface layer for higher environmental durability. This fiber is simply derived from Sylramic Sic fiber type that is currently produced at ATK COI Ceramics (COIC). Further capability is then derived by using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and/or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) to form a Sic-based matrix with high creep and rupture resistance as well as high thermal conductivity. The objectives of this study were (1) to optimize the constituents and processing parameters for a Sylramic-iBN fiber reinforced ceramic composite system in which the Sic-based matrix is formed at COIC almost entirely by PIP (full PIP approach), (2) to evaluate the properties of this system in comparison to other 2700 F Sylramic-iBN systems in which the matrix is formed by full CVI and CVI + PIP, and (3) to examine the pros and cons of the full PIP approach for fabricating hot-section engine components. A key goal is the development of a composite system with low porosity, thereby providing high modulus, high matrix cracking strength, high interlaminar strength, and high thermal conductivity, a major property requirement for engine components that will experience high thermal gradients during service. Other key composite property goals are demonstration at

  14. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, C.; Marrow, T. J.; Reinhard, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.

    2016-03-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a "node-bond" geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1~ 9.3% closed micropores.

  15. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions. [for thermal resistant insulators and refractory coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance are properties of cermet compositions particularly to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on metal substrates, for use as electrical insulation seals for thermionic converters. The compositions comprise a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride are also described.

  16. The effect of composition, processing conditions, and irradiation, on lattice defects in spinel ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazilevskaya, T. A.; Gritsyna, V. T.; Orlinski, D. V.; Udalova, L. V.; Voitsenya, A. V.

    1998-03-01

    The lattice defects in pure spinel ceramics MgO· nAl 2O 3 were investigated as to their dependence on composition, temperature, and time duration of calcination in the course of synthesizing spinel powder. Defects were studied by optical methods measuring absorption and photo-, thermo-, and X-ray-stimulated luminescence. The variation of ceramic composition 0.98≤ n≤1.02 leads to the formation of different absorption bands: at n1 the band is at 620 nm (2.0 eV) with Δ E=0.5 eV; and at n=1 ceramics are transparent. In luminescence spectra, prominent bands were observed at 253, 370, and 520 nm. Variation of temperature of calcination in the range of 1150-1220°C; duration of calcination of 0.5-2.0 h; and irradiation with X-rays, electrons, and neutrons cause changes in the relative intensities of the absorption and luminescence bands, which makes identifying the nature of lattice defects in spinel ceramics possible.

  17. The effect of composition, processing conditions, and irradiation, on lattice defects in spinel ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lattice defects in pure spinel ceramics MgO.nAl2O3 were investigated as to their dependence on composition, temperature, and time duration of calcination in the course of synthesizing spinel powder. Defects were studied by optical methods measuring absorption and photo-, thermo-, and X-ray-stimulated luminescence. The variation of ceramic composition 0.98≤n≤1.02 leads to the formation of different absorption bands: at n1 the band is at 620 nm (2.0 eV) with ΔE=0.5 eV; and at n=1 ceramics are transparent. In luminescence spectra, prominent bands were observed at 253, 370, and 520 nm. Variation of temperature of calcination in the range of 1150-1220 C; duration of calcination of 0.5-2.0 h; and irradiation with X-rays, electrons, and neutrons cause changes in the relative intensities of the absorption and luminescence bands, which makes identifying the nature of lattice defects in spinel ceramics possible. (orig.)

  18. Effect of sintering atmosphere on composition and properties of NiFe2O4 ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田忠良; 张腾; 刘恺; 赖延清; 李劼

    2015-01-01

    NiFe2O4 ceramics were prepared in different sintering atmospheres. The phase compositions, microstructures and mechanical properties were studied. The results show that the stoichiometric compound NiFe2O4 cannot be obtained in vacuum or atmospheres with oxygen contents of 2×10−5, 2×10−4 and 2×10−3, respectively. All the samples sintered in above-mentioned atmospheres contain phases of NiFe2O4 and NiO. With increasing oxygen content, NiFe2O4 content in the ceramic increases, while NiO content appears a contrary trend. In vacuum, NiFe2O4 ceramic has average grain size of 3.94μm, and bending strength of 85.12 MPa. The changes of the phase composition and mechanical properties of NiFe2O4 based cermets are mainly caused by the alteration of their properties of NiFe2O4 ceramic.

  19. A bulk metal/ceramic composite material with a cellular structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhankui; YAO Kefu; LI Jingfeng

    2006-01-01

    A bulk metal/ceramic composite material with a honeycomb-like micro-cell structure has been prepared by sintering the spherical Al90Mn9Ce1 alloy powders clad by Al2O3 nano-powder with the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The as-prepared material consists of Al90Mn9Ce1 alloy cell and closed Al2O3 ceramic cell wall. The diameter of the cells is about 20―40 μm, while a thickness of the cell wall is about 1―2 μm. The ultimate compressive strength of the as-sintered materials is about 514 MPa, while its fracture strain is up to about 0.65 %. This composite material might possess good anti-corrosion, thermal endurance and other potential properties due to its unique microstructure. The result shows that the Al90Mn9Ce1/Al2O3 composite powders can be sintered by spark plasma sintering technique despite the large difference in their sintering temperature. This work offers a way of designing and preparing metal/ceramic composite material with functional property.

  20. Effect of Load Rate on Ultimate Tensile Strength of Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2001-01-01

    The strengths of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-II, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, were determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 to 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for composite materials, at least for short range of lifetimes and when ultimate strength is used as the failure criterion.

  1. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  2. Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jothimurugesan, K.

    2000-04-17

    Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3 % of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to testing the FHR-32 sorbent. FHR-32 sorbent was tested for 50 cycles of sulfidation in a laboratory scale reactor.

  3. Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-04-26

    Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3% of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to development of optimized low-cost zinc-oxide-based sorbents for Sierra-Pacific. The sorbent surface were modified to prevent

  4. Mechanical Properties of a new Dental all-ceramic Material-zirconia Toughened Nanometer-ceramic Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI Feng; XU Ling; CHAO Yong-lie; LIAO Yun-mao; ZHAO Yi-min

    2003-01-01

    Objectives:All-ceramic dental restorations are attractive to the dental community because of their advantages.But they're also challenged by relatively low flexural strength and intrinsic poor resistance to fracture.This paper aims to investigate mechanical properties of a new dental all-ceramic material, i.e. zirconia toughened nanometer-ceramic composite (α-Al2O3/nZrO2).Methods:α-Al2O3/nZrO2 ceramics powder (W) was processed with combined methods of chemical co-precipitation method and ball milling. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)was used to determine the particle size distribution and to characterize the particle morphology of the powders. Four kinds of powders with different ZrO2 content (5wt%, 10wt%, 15wt% and 20wt%) were prepared by using α-Al2O3 powder to dilute the higher ZrO2 content powder (W). The ceramic matrix compacts were made by slip-casting technique and sintering to 1 200~1 600 ℃. The flexural strength and the fracture toughness of the matrix materials were measured via three-point bending test and single-edge notch beam methods, respectively.Results:1) The particle distribution of the Al2O3/nZrO2 powder ranged from 0.02~3.0 μm, with the superfine particles almost accounting for 20%;2) There is a significant difference of flexural strength (P<0.05) between the groups with 1 450 ℃ and 1 600 ℃ sintering temperature and 1 200 ℃;3) There is a significant difference of flexural strength (P<0.05) between different zirconia volume fraction groups with the same sintering temperature, the ceramic matrix samples with higher nZrO2 (W) content had much better mechanical properties than those of pure α-Al2O3 ceramics.Conclusions:The studied nanometer α-Al2O3/nZrO2 powder was homogeously distributed within the matrix and had reasonable powder-size gradation to improve mechanical properties of ceramics.%目的:口腔全瓷修复体以其独特优越性受到医患青睐,但脆性问题一直限制其应用范围及使用可靠性.本研

  5. DETERMINATION OF THE MASS TRANSFER CHARACTERIZATION OF A CERAMIC-POLYMER COMPOSITE MEMBRANE IN THE PERVAPORATION MODE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of the coating layer thickness on VOC extraction performance of a ceramic polymer composite membrane has been investigated. It was found, under experimental condiitons representing typical field operation, the overall mass transfer rates of feed components were control...

  6. Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of abstracts and slides of papers presented at the NASA Lewis Structural Ceramics Workshop. Collectively, these papers depict the scope of NASA Lewis' structural ceramics program. The technical areas include monolithic SiC and Si3N4 development, ceramic matrix composites, tribology, design methodology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), fracture mechanics, and corrosion.

  7. Numerical study of internal load transfer in metal/ceramic composites based on freeze-cast ceramic preforms and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elastic–plastic deformation and internal load transfer in metal/ceramic composites are studied in this work both numerically and experimentally. The composite was fabricated by squeeze-casting AlSi12 melt in an open porous preform made by freeze-casting and drying of alumina suspension. Such composites exhibit a complex microstructure composed of lamellar domains. Single-domain samples were extracted from bulk material. Uniaxial compression tests were carried out parallel to the direction of the alternating metallic alloy and ceramic lamellae in the plane normal to the direction of freeze-casting. This loading mode is selected as highest load transfer occurs when loaded along the ceramic lamellae. Numerical modeling was done using the finite element method using quasi-3D microstructure based on metallographic 2D section and a modified Voigt homogenization technique assuming plastic behavior of the metallic alloy, absence of any damage and ideal interface between the phases. Internal load transfer mechanism was predicted for composites with different ceramic volume fractions. Results show that at any applied stress, as the ceramic content increases, the phase stress in alumina along the loading direction continuously decreases. Experimental validation of the numerical results is carried out by in-situ compression test along with energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction in one sample with 41 vol% ceramic. Results show that both the numerical techniques yield similar results, which match well with the experimental measurements. The ratio of the phase stress to the applied stress in alumina reaches a highest value between 2 and 2.5 up to a compressive stress of about 300 MPa. At higher applied stresses both the experimentally determined lattice microstrain and the phase stress along the loading direction in alumina decrease due to the initiation of possible damage. This study shows that the applied economic and more flexible homogenization technique is a

  8. Polymer-derived ceramic composite fibers with aligned pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sourangsu; Zou, Jianhua; Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Chengying; An, Linan; Zhai, Lei

    2010-04-01

    Polymer-derived ceramic fibers with aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are fabricated through the electrospinning of polyaluminasilazane solutions with well-dispersed MWCNTs followed by pyrolysis. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)-b-poly (poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate) (P3HT-b-PPEGA), a conjugated block copolymer compatible with polyaluminasilazane, is used to functionalize MWCNT surfaces with PPEGA, providing a noninvasive approach to disperse carbon nanotubes in polyaluminasilazane chloroform solutions. The electrospinning of the MWCNT/polyaluminasilazane solutions generates polymer fibers with aligned MWCNTs where MWCNTs are oriented along the electrospun jet by a sink flow. The subsequent pyrolysis of the obtained composite fibers produces ceramic fibers with aligned MWCNTs. The study of the effect of polymer and CNT concentration on the fiber structures shows that the fiber size increases with the increment of polymer concentration, whereas higher CNT content in the polymer solutions leads to thinner fibers attributable to the increased conductivity. Both the SEM and TEM characterization of the polymer and ceramic fibers demonstrates the uniform orientation of CNTs along the fibers, suggesting excellent dispersion of CNTs and efficient CNT alignment via the electrospinning. The electrical conductivity of a ceramic fibers with 1.2% aligned MWCNTs is measured to be 1.58 x 10(-6) S/cm, which is more than 500 times higher than that of bulk ceramic (3.43 x 10(-9) S/cm). Such an approach provides a versatile method to disperse CNTs in preceramic polymer solutions and offers a new approach to integrate aligned CNTs in ceramics. PMID:20423134

  9. Effect of ceramic thickness and composite bases on stress distribution of inlays--a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Letícia Brandão; Guimarães, Jackeline Coutinho; Monteiro Junior, Sylvio; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cavity depth, ceramic thickness, and resin bases with different elastic modulus on von Mises stress patterns of ceramic inlays. Tridimensional geometric models were developed with SolidWorks image software. The differences between the models were: depth of pulpal wall, ceramic thickness, and presence of composite bases with different thickness and elastic modulus. The geometric models were constrained at the proximal surfaces and base of maxillary bone. A load of 100 N was applied. The stress distribution pattern was analyzed with von Mises stress diagrams. The maximum von Mises stress values ranged from 176 MPa to 263 MPa and varied among the 3D-models. The highest von Mises stress value was found on models with 1-mm-thick composite resin base and 1-mm-thick ceramic inlay. Intermediate values (249-250 MPa) occurred on models with 2-mm-thick composite resin base and 1-mm-thick ceramic inlay and 1-mm-thick composite resin base and 2-mm-thick ceramic inlay. The lowest values were observed on models restored exclusively with ceramic inlay (176 MPa to 182 MPa). It was found that thicker inlays distribute stress more favorably and bases with low elastic modulus increase stress concentrations on the internal surface of the ceramic inlay. The increase of ceramic thickness tends to present more favorable stress distribution, especially when bonded directly onto the cavity without the use of supporting materials. When the use of a composite base is required, composite resin with high elastic modulus and reduced thickness should be preferred. PMID:25831105

  10. Preparation of nano-segmented SiOC, SiONC and related ceramics and their optimization as composite matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strachota, Adam; Depa, Katarzyna; Brus, Jiří; Pleštil, Josef; Černý, Martin; Sucharda, Z.; Chlup, Zdeněk

    Gothenburg: Division for Surface and Material Chemistry of the Swedish Chemical Society, 2012. P4. [ Material s for Tomorrow 2012. 23.10.2012-25.10.2012, Gothenburg] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP107/12/2445 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985891 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : silicon oxycarbide * ceramics * nano composites Subject RIV: JI - Composite Material s; JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Material s and Glass (USMH-B)

  11. Approach to microstructure-behavior relationships for ceramic matrix composites reinforced by continuous fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Lamon Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) reinforced with continuous fibers exhibit several features that differentiate them from homogeneous unreinforced materials. The microstructure consists of various distinct constituents: fibres, matrix, and fiber/matrix interfaces or interphases. Several entities at micro- and mesoscopic length scales can be defined depending on fiber arrangement. Furthermore, the CMCs contain flaw populations that govern matrix cracking and fiber failures. The paper describes ...

  12. Numerical Analysis of Sub-Critical Crack Growth in Particulate Ceramic Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majer, Zdeněk; Pletz, M.; Krautgasser, C.; Náhlík, Luboš; Hutař, Pavel; Bermejo, R.

    Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2014, s. 2071-2076. (Procedia Materials Science. 3). ISSN 2211-8128. [European Conference on Fracture /20./. Trondheim (NO), 30.06.2014-04.07.2014] Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0039 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Fracture Mechanics * Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics * Micro-crack Propagation * Finite Element Method * Lifetime Estimation Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  13. Structure and Composition of Ba-W-Ti-O Ceramics Interface Regions Formed at Ultrasonic Vibration

    OpenAIRE

    Karban, O.; O. Kanunnikova; Khazanov, E.; E. Salamatov; Khasanov, O.; A. Taranov

    2012-01-01

    The study of Ba-W-Ti-O ceramics has shown that the structure and composition of their interface regions differ from those in the grain bulk owing to the diffusion of tungsten atoms to the grain surface during sintering. They are determined by the conditions of compacting of dry nanopowders (compaction pressure and power of ultrasonic action) and vary in a nonmonotonic way. Increasing the pressure during dry static compacting and exposure to ultrasound result in the formation of a complex stru...

  14. Poly(borosiloxanes) as precursors for carbon fiber ceramic matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Luiz Siqueira; Inez Valéria Pagotto Yoshida; Luiz Claudio Pardini; Marco Antônio Schiavon

    2007-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), constituted of a silicon boron oxycarbide (SiBCO) matrix and unidirectional carbon fiber rods as a reinforcement phase, were prepared by pyrolysis of carbon fiber rods wrapped in polysiloxane (PS) or poly(borosiloxane) (PBS) matrices. The preparation of the polymeric precursors involved hydrolysis/condensation reactions of alkoxysilanes in the presence and absence of boric acid, with B/Si atomic ratios of 0.2 and 0.5. Infrared spectra of PBS showed evidence o...

  15. Composite Coatings of Alumina-based Ceramics and Stainless Steel Manufactured by Plasma Spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Ageorges, H.; Neufuss, Karel; Zahálka, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2009), s. 108-114. ISSN 1392-1320 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS200430560 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Cermet * plasma spraying * microstructure * elastic modulus * wear resistance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.299, year: 2009 http://internet.ktu.lt/en/science/journals/medz/medz0-97.html#Composite_Coatings_

  16. Improved feed compositions for slurry-fed ceramic melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One method for immobilizing high-level nuclear waste is to convert it into a glass. This is commonly done by fusing together glass frit and waste, which in the case of West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is an alkaline sludge. In work conducted at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories for the WVDP, frit is being evaluated in large-scale, slurry-fed ceramic melter tests. However, the glass frit can give rise to some difficulties, and therefore other ''glass formers'' are being investigated in parallel. Melter feed consisting of frit is abrasive, which results in relatively high wear of pumps, valves, and piping. For example, mechanical seals can fail in a short time. Even pumps designed to avoid seal problems can exhibit significant wear of the impeller and housing, and flowmeters are similarly susceptible. To compound the situation, frit and sludge mixtures tend to separate upon standing unless they are properly agitated or transported above minimum flow velocities. If separation does occur, a ''hard pan'' can form that is difficult to resuspend. This phenomenon seems to be the reason why airlifting of a glass frit--waste suspension is frequently terminated by plugging. West Valley wastes are high in iron and contain nickel and manganese oxides and, as such, are susceptible to spinel formation during vitrification. This tendency would be increased if localized high waste to frit concentrations occurred because of separation of the frit from the waste. For the same reason, a molten sulfate phase that is both corrosive and prone to segregate cesium can form even when the average sulfate level is below the saturation limit in the glass. In contrast, a melter feed based upon a colloidal dispersion of glass formers is nonabrasive, can be easily pumped and airlifted, and is not prone to settling or thixotropic behavior. Furthermore, the glass formers mix more intimately with the waste sludge before melting than can be achieved by using frit

  17. Alumina/Phenolphthalein Polyetherketone Ceramic Composite Polypropylene Separator Film for Lithium Ion Power Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PEK-C (Tg: ∼230 °C) was used as binder to prepare ceramic coated composite PP separator. • The composite PP separator was stable and showed low thermal shrinkage in the electrolyte solvent. • The composite PP separator was helpful for high current density discharge. • The composite PP separator improved the safety performance of the coin cells. - Abstract: One way to obtain the lithium ion power battery with better safety performance was to increase the thermal shrinkage resistance of the separator at higher temperature. Phenolphthalein polyetherketone (PEK-C) is a polymer that can withstand high temperature to about 230 °C. Here, we developed a new Al2O3 coated composite polypropylene (PP) separator with PEK-C as binder. The coating layer was formed on the surface of the PP separator and both ceramic particles and binder did not infiltrated into the separator along the thickness direction. The composite separator with 4 μm coating layer provided balanced permeability and thermal shrinkage properties. The composite separator was stable at the electrochemical window for lithium ion battery. The coin cells with composite separator showed better charge/discharge performance than that of the cells with the PP separator. It seemed that the composite separator was helpful for high current density discharge. Also, the battery safety performance test had verified that the Al2O3 coated composite separator with PEK-C as binder had truly improved the safety performance of the coin cells. So, the newly developed Al2O3 coated composite PP separator was a promising safety product for lithium ion power batteries with high energy density

  18. Investigation of TaC–TaB2 ceramic composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Behzad Mehdikhani; Gholam Hossein Borhani; Saeed Reza Bakhshi; Hamid Reza Baharvandi

    2016-02-01

    The TaC–TaB2 composition was sintered by spark plasma (SPS) at 1900–2100°C and applied pressure of 30 MPa. TaC and 2–3 wt% B4C were used as starting powders. Densification process, phase evolution, microstructure and the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. The results indicated that the TaC–TaB2 composition could be SPS to 97% of theoretical density in 10 min at 2100°C. Addition of B4C leads to an increase in the density sample from 76 to 97%. B4C nano-powder resists grain growth even at high temperature 2100°C. The formation of TaB2/carbon at TaC grain boundaries helps in pinning the grain boundary and inhibiting grain growth. The phase formation was associated with carbon and boron diffusion from the starting particles B4C to form TaB2 phases. TaC grain sizes decreased with increase in B4C concentration. Samples with 2.0 wt% B4C composition had highest flexure strength up to 520 MPa. The effect of B4C addition on hardness measured by microhardness has been studied. Hardness of samples containing 3.0 wt% B4C was 16.99 GPa.

  19. Laser Clad ZrO2-Y2O3 Ceramic/Ni-base Alloy Composite Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Y.T.; Ouyang, J.H.; Lei, T.C.; Zhou, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A laser cladding technique was used to produce ZrO2-Y2O3 ceramic/Ni-base alloy composite coatings on stainless steel 4Cr13. The microstructure and hardness of the composite coatings are analyzed by XRD, SEM, EPMA, TEM and microhardness testing techniques. A stratification is observed in the laser clad zone. The upper region of the clad is a pure ZrO2 ceramic layer, and the lower region is an excellent transition layer of Ni-base alloy. The ZrO2 ceramic layer exhibits equiaxed grains and colum...

  20. The Increasing of Bentonite Quality as a Composite of B-3 Waste CeramicSolidification Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ceramic composite from local material of bentonite Nanggulan wascarried out. The material were grinded, sieved to get through 100 mesh,rinsed with aquadest, dried at the temperature of 60 oC and putted in theexecutor, then were calcinate (physical activated) at 300 oC and chemicalactivated with NaCl 1.0 to 5.0 M. The activated bentonite were contacted withlead concentration of 150 to 500 ppm and then were dried at 60 oC.Bentonite-Pb which obtained was made to pellet by adding weak cullet withcomposition variation of bentonite-Pb to cullet = 20:80, 25:75, 30:70, 35:65,and 40:60%, and ignited on furnace at the the temperature of 850 oC, 900oC, and 1000 oC for composite ceramic production. The chemical compositionand mineral test for original local material and ceramic composite ofoptimization result were done by using AAS and X-ray diffraction, whereas theleaching test, pressure and porosity test were done only for ceramiccomposite. The experiment results were reported in this paper. (author)

  1. ON THE EFFECT OF NANO-PARTICLE CLUSTERING ON TOUGHENING OF NANO-COMPOSITE CERAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董照旭; 方岱宁; 苏爱嘉

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, two and three-dimensional clustering models are developed to characterize the effect of nano-particle clustering on toughening of nanocomposite ceramics. It is found that crack pinning toughens the nano-composite ceramics because a higher stress intensity factor is needed for crack to propagate around or to pull-out the nano-particle. The nano-particle along the grain boundary steers the crack into the matrix grain due to the strong cohesion between the nanoparticle and the matrix. Since the fracture resistance of the grain boundary is lower than that of the grain lattice, the higher the probability of transgranular fracture induced by nano-particles, the tougher is the nano-composite. However, both crack pinning and transgranular fracture are affected by nano-particle clustering. Nanoparticle clustering, which increases with increasing volume fraction of nano-particles,leads to reduction of both the strength and toughness of the nano-composite ceramics. The larger the size of the clustered particle, and the more defects it contains, the easier it is for the crack to pass through the clustered particle, which means that the nano-particle clustering can reduce toughening induced by crack pinning and transgranular fracture. The theoretical prediction, based on the combination of the three mechanisms of nano-particles, is in agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Formation of carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with polysiloxane/silicon derived matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ceramic matrix for carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) has been developed from poly(methylsilsesquioxane)/silicon mixtures, using a low-cost process. In this process the space in two-dimensional carbon fiber preform was filled with a slurry composed by Si powder dispersed into poly(methylsilsesquioxane)/trietoxysilane solutions. Three different volume ratio of Si:polymer were used to stack eight-harness plain weave of carbon fiber, forming laminates composites, which were pressed and cured up to 200 deg. C. The compact bodies were first pre-pyrolyzed at 1000 deg. C and then pyrolyzed at 1450 deg. C/2 h and 1500 deg. C/1 h. On pyrolysis, the polymer-filler mixture was converted to a multiphase ceramic matrix through reactions between Si, gaseous and solids products from the polymer degradation and the N2 atmosphere. Pyrolysis led to conversion of the initial matrix into silicon oxide (SiO2), silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon oxinitride (Si2ON2), though after pyrolysis at 1450 deg. C metallic silicon was still detected. With one cycle of infiltration the composite characteristics were followed by bulk density and open porosity measurements, X-ray diffraction, microscopy and mechanical testing

  3. Measurements of residual strains in ceramic-elastomer composites with diffuse scattering of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment of diffuse scattering (also referred to as wide-angle neutron scattering) of polarized neutrons with polarization analysis was performed in order to detect residual strains in ceramic-elastomer composites of porous SiO2 and poly(urea-urethane) elastomers. Two ceramics, with pore sizes of 20 and 70 μm, and two elastomers, with hard/soft segments molar ratios of H/S = 0.25 and 1.5, were selected for composite fabrication. The use of polarization analysis made it possible to detect and study very weak coherent scattering peaks from the elastomer synthesized inside SiO2 ceramics. Residual strains were detected and measured based on interatomic distances in the SiO2+ H/S = 1.5 composite but not in the SiO2+ H/S = 0.25. The reason is sought in soft domains being ordered in the H/S = 0.25 elastomer as opposed to the H/S = 1.5 one

  4. Evaluation of a Variable-Impedance Ceramic Matrix Composite Acoustic Liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.; Howerton, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    As a result of significant progress in the reduction of fan and jet noise, there is growing concern regarding core noise. One method for achieving core noise reduction is via the use of acoustic liners. However, these liners must be constructed with materials suitable for high temperature environments and should be designed for optimum absorption of the broadband core noise spectrum. This paper presents results of tests conducted in the NASA Langley Liner Technology Facility to evaluate a variable-impedance ceramic matrix composite acoustic liner that offers the potential to achieve each of these goals. One concern is the porosity of the ceramic matrix composite material, and whether this might affect the predictability of liners constructed with this material. Comparisons between two variable-depth liners, one constructed with ceramic matrix composite material and the other constructed via stereolithography, are used to demonstrate this material porosity is not a concern. Also, some interesting observations are noted regarding the orientation of variable-depth liners. Finally, two propagation codes are validated via comparisons of predicted and measured acoustic pressure profiles for a variable-depth liner.

  5. Method of making carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian (Inventor); Benander, Robert (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of making a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composite wherein the result is a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement is embedded within a ceramic matrix. The ceramic matrix does not penetrate into the carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement to any significant degree. The carbide matrix is a formed in situ solid carbide of at least one metal having a melting point above about 1850 degrees centigrade. At least when the composite is intended to operate between approximately 1500 and 2000 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time the solid carbide with the embedded reinforcement is formed first by reaction infiltration. Molten silicon is then diffused into the carbide. The molten silicon diffuses preferentially into the carbide matrix but not to any significant degree into the carbon-carbon reinforcement. Where the composite is intended to operate between approximately 2000 and 2700 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time such diffusion of molten silicon into the carbide is optional and generally preferred, but not essential.

  6. High-strength zirconium diboride-based ceramic composites consolidated by low-temperature hot pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqi Guo and Yutaka Kagawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two compositions of ZrB2-based ceramic composites containing Si3N4, Al2O3 and Y2O3 have been hot-pressed at different temperatures between 1673 and 1773 K for 60 min in vacuum. The densification behavior of the composites was examined during the sintering process. The microstructures of the composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and the crystalline phases were identified by x-ray diffraction. The effects of Al2O3 and Y2O3 additives on the densification behavior and flexural strength were assessed. A relative density of ~95% was obtained after sintering at 1723 K or higher temperatures. The microstructures of the composites consisted of (Zr,YB2, α-Si3N4 and Y3(Al,Si5O12 phases. The room-temperature flexural strength increased with the amount of additives and approached 1 GPa.

  7. Rugometric and microtopographic non-invasive inspection in dental-resin composites and zirconia ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Costa, Manuel F. M.; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María. M.

    2013-11-01

    Surface properties are essential for a complete characterization of biomaterials. In restorative dentistry, the study of the surface properties of materials meant to replace dental tissues in an irreversibly diseased tooth is important to avoid harmful changes in future treatments. We have experimentally analyzed the surface characterization parameters of two different types of dental-resin composites and pre-sintered and sintered zirconia ceramics. We studied two shades of both composite types and two sintered zirconia ceramics: colored and uncolored. Moreover, a surface treatment was applied to one specimen of each dental-resin. All the samples were submitted to rugometric and microtopographic non-invasive inspection with the MICROTOP.06.MFC laser microtopographer in order to gather meaningful statistical parameters such as the average roughness (Ra), the root-mean-square deviation (Rq), the skewness (Rsk), and the kurtosis of the surface height distribution (Rku). For a comparison of the different biomaterials, the uncertainties associated to the surface parameters were also determined. With respect to Ra and Rq, significant differences between the composite shades were found. Among the dental resins, the nanocomposite presented the highest values and, for the zirconia ceramics, the pre-sintered sample registered the lowest ones. The composite performance may have been due to cluster-formation variations. Except for the composites with the surface treatment, the sample surfaces had approximately a normal distribution of heights. The surface treatment applied to the composites increased the average roughness and moved the height distribution farther away from the normal distribution. The zirconia-sintering process resulted in higher average roughness without affecting the height distribution.

  8. Mechanical characterisation of interpenetrating network metal-ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of interpenetrating light weight metal matrix composites (porous Al2O3 preforms infiltrated with the aluminium alloy AlSi9Cu3) have been characterised under tensile und compressive loads and fractographically examined by scanning electron microscopy. Fatigue and thermophysical properties were determined. Compared to die-cast AlSi9Cu3, the mechanical properties of the interpenetrating composites were significantly improved. The elastic modulus increased more than twofold, the tensile strength increases by a factor of 2, fatigue limits increased by a factor of 2.3-2.6, density increased slightly by a factor of 1.2 and thermal conductivity is reduced by a factor of 0.5.

  9. Process engineering of ceramic composite coatings for fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G.; Kim, H.; Chen, M.; Yang, Q.; Troczynski, T. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Researchers at UBCeram at the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering at the University of British Columbia have developed a technology to chemically bond composite sol-gel (CB-CSG) coating onto metallic surfaces of complex or concave shapes. The process has been optimized for electrically resistive coatings and corrosion-resistant coatings. The CSG is sprayed onto metallic surfaces and is heat-treated at 300 degrees C to partially dehydrate the hydroxides. The CSG film is then chemically bonded through reaction of active alumina with metal phosphates, such as aluminium phosphate. A new chromate-free process is being developed to address the issue of coatings porosity. The electrodeposition technique involves polymer particles mixed with suspended fine alumina particles which are co-deposited by electrophoretic means or by electrocoagulation. The composite e-coatings have excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as a protective coating for various components of fuel cell systems. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Synthesis of steel slag ceramics:chemical composition and crystalline phases of raw materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hua Zhao; Wei Wei; Hao Bai; Xu Zhang; Da-qiang Cang

    2015-01-01

    Two types of porcelain tiles with steel slag as the main raw material (steel slag ceramics) were synthesized based on the CaO–Al2O3–SiO2 and CaO–MgO–SiO2 systems, and their bending strengths up to 53.47 MPa and 99.84 MPa, respectively, were obtained. The presence of anorthite,α-quartz, magnetite, and pyroxene crystals (augite and diopside) in the steel slag ceramics were very different from the composition of traditional ceramics. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) results illustrated that the addition of steel slag reduced the temperature of extensive liquid generation and further decreased the firing temperature. The considerable contents of glass-modifying oxide liquids with rather low viscosities at high temperature in the steel slag ceramic adobes promoted element diffusion and crystallization. The results of this study demonstrated a new approach for extensive and effective recycling of steel slag.

  11. Polyphase ceramic for consolidating nuclear waste compositions with high Zr-Cd-Na content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of dense polyphase tailored ceramic forms for the immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes has been extended to an Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Fluorinel composition. The ceramic was designed to maximize waste loading and subsequent waste volume reduction without sacrificing chemical durability in aqueous environments. The ceramic, fabricated by hot isostatic pressing, consists of four main crystalline phases, calcium fluoride, zirconia, an apatite-structured solid-solution phase, and sphene. The form also contains a designed borosilicate glass phase, a Ni-Cd alloy, and a minor amount of crystalline zircon. The crystalline apatite solid-solution phase is the major host for incorporating the actinide simulants U, Ce, and Y, while the glass phase contains Cs and Sr. The calcium fluoride and sphene phases provide microstructural isolation of the radionuclide-containing phases. Since the glass and crystalline components of the ceramic are not phase compatible at all temperatures, the exact phase content is determined by the tailoring additives, consolidation temperature, and oxidation state control during processing

  12. Characterization of fabricated three dimensional scaffolds of bio ceramic-polymer composite via microstereolithography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full-text: Microstereolithography is a method used for rapid proto typing of polymeric and ceramic components. This technique converts a computer-aided design (CAD) to a three dimensional (3D) model, and enables layer per layer fabrication curing a liquid resin with UV-light or laser source. The aim of this project was to formulate photo curable polymer reinforced with synthesized calcium pyrophosphate (CPP), and to fabricate a 3D scaffolds with optimum mechanical properties for specific tissue engineering applications. The photo curable ceramic suspension was prepared with acrylate polyester, multifunctional acrylate monomer with the addition of 50-70 wt % of CPP, photo initiators and photo inhibitors. The 3D structure of disc (5 mm height x 4 mm diameter) was successfully fabricated using Envisiontec Perfactory3. They were then sintered at high temperature for polymer removal, to obtain a ceramic of the desired porosity. The density increased to more than 35 % and the dimensional shrinkage after sintering were 33 %. The discs were then subjected compressive measurement, biodegradation and bioactivity test. Morphology and CPP content of the sintered polymer was investigated with SEM and XRD, respectively. The addition of CPP coupled with high temperature sintering, had a significant effect on the compressive strength exhibited by the bio ceramic. The values are in the range of cancellous bone (2-4 MPa). In biodegradation and bioactivity test, the synthesized CPP induced the formation of apatite layer and its nucleation onto the composite surface. (author)

  13. Nanoporous Polymer-Ceramic Composite Electrolytes for Lithium Metal Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Tu, Zhengyuan

    2013-09-16

    A nanoporous composite material that offers the unique combination of high room-temperature ionic conductivity and high mechanical modulus is reported. When used as the separator/electrolyte in lithium batteries employing metallic lithium as anode, the material displays unprecedented cycling stability and excellent ability to prevent premature cell failure by dendrite-induced short circuits © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Method of producing a silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3-2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  15. Silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3 - 2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  16. Structures Formation on the Y-TZP-AI2O3 Ceramic Composites Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkov, Sergei; Sevostyanova, Irina; Sablina, Tatiana; Buyakova, Svetlana; Pshenichnyy, Artem; Savchenko, Nickolai

    2016-07-01

    The paper discusses the structure of Y-TZP-Al2O3 ceramics produced from nanopowders and friction surface, wear resistance, friction coefficient of Y-TZP-AEO3 composites rubbed against a steel disk counterface at a pressure of 5 MPa in a range of sliding speeds from 0.2 to 47 m/s. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy showed that the high wear resistance of Y-TZP-Al2O3 composites at high sliding speeds is due to high-temperature phase transitions and protective film formation on the friction surface.

  17. Processing–structure–property relations of chemically bonded phosphate ceramic composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H A Colorado; C Hiel; H T Hahn

    2011-07-01

    Mechanical properties and microstructures of a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) and its composite with 1.0 wt% graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) reinforcement have been investigated. Microstructure was identified by using optical and scanning electron microscopes, X-ray tomography, and X-ray diffraction. In addition, weight loss of the resin at room temperature was studied. The microstructure characterization shows that CBPC is itself a composite with several crystalline (wollastonite and brushite) and amorphous phases. SEM and micro tomography show a homogeneous distribution of crystalline phases. Bending and compression strength of the CBPC was improved by reducing bubbles via preparation in vacuum.

  18. Fracture toughness of fiber-reinforced glass ceramic and ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Kevin R.; Parvizi-Majidi, A.

    1991-01-01

    A fracture mechanics investigation of 2D woven Nicalon SiC/SiC and Nicalon SiC/LAS has been undertaken. An energy approach has been adopted to characterize and quantify the fracture properties of these materials. Chevron-notched bend specimens were tested in an edgewise configuration in which the crack propagated perpendicular to the ply direction. R-curves were obtained from repeated loading and unloading of specimens using several methods of data reduction. Values correconding to the plateau regions of the R-curves were taken as steady-state crack-growth resistance. These ranged from 37 to 63 kJ/sq m for 2D-SiC/LAS and 2.6 to 2.8 kJ/sq m for 2D-SiC/SiC composites.

  19. Dielectric, Electromagnetic Interference Shielding and Absorption Properties of Si3N4-PyC Composite Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Hao; Xiaowei Yin; Litong Zhang; Laifei Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) was infiltrated into silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics by precursor infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) of phenolic resin,and Ni nanoparticles were added into the phenolic resin to change the electric conductivity of Si3N4-PyC composite ceramics.Dielectric permittivity,electromagnetic interference (EMI)shielding and absorption properties of Si3N4-PγC composite ceramics were studied as a function of Ni content at 8.2-12.4 GHz (X-band).When Ni nanoparticles were added into phenolic resin,the electric conductivity of the prepared composite ceramics decreased with increasing Ni content,which was attributed to the decrease of graphitization degree of PyC.The decrease in electric conductivity led to the decrease in both permittivity and EMI shielding effectiveness.Since too high permittivity is harmful to the impendence match and results in the strong reflection,the electromagnetic wave absorption property of Si3N4-PyC composite ceramics increases with increasing Ni content.When the content of Ni nanoparticles added into phenolic resin was 2 wt%,the composite ceramics possessed the lowest electric conductivity and displayed the most excellent absorption property with a minimum reflection loss as low as-28.9 dB.

  20. Numerical study of mechanical behavior of ceramic composites under compression loading in the framework of movable cellular automaton method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, Igor S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru; Smolin, Alexey Yu., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru; Konovalenko, Ivan S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Promakhov, Vladimir V. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    Movable cellular automaton method was used for investigating the mechanical behavior of ceramic composites under uniaxial compression. A 2D numerical model of ceramic composites based on oxides of zirconium and aluminum with different structural parameters was developed using the SEM images of micro-sections of a real composite. The influence of such structural parameters as the geometrical dimensions of layers, inclusions, and their spatial distribution in the sample, the volume content of the composite components and their mechanical properties (as well as the amount of zirconium dioxide that underwent the phase transformation) on the fracture, strength, deformation and dissipative properties was investigated.

  1. Composite Eshelby model and domain band geometries of ferroelectric ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A method of composite Eshelby inclusion is proposed for aferroelectric grain with domain switching embedded in a polycrystalline ferroelectric matrix. The method quantifies the twinning structure due to spontaneous polarization, as well as the conventional and non-conventional domain structures after poling induced domain reorientation of 90 degree. The predicted parameters include the volume fraction, the thickness, and the surface inclination angle of switched domain plates. The domain wall energy for non-conventional domain structures is derived in terms of the arrays of misfit dislocations. The domain geometries predicted by the present work agree with the measured domain morphology near an indentation crack tip when subjected to lateral electric field.

  2. 15th annual conference on composites and advanced ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, N.P.; Hyatt, M.J.; Drummond, C.H., III.

    1991-01-01

    Powders of roller quenched (Sr,Ba)O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-{sup 2}SiO{sub 2} glasses of various compositions were uniaxially pressed into bars and hot isostatically pressed at 1350{degree}C for 4 hours or cold isostatically pressed and sintered at different temperatures between 800 to 1500{degree}C for 10 or 20 hours. Densities, flexural strengths, and linear thermal expansion were measured for three compositions. The glasss transition and crystallization temperatures were determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The liquidus and crystallization temperature from the melt were measured using high temperature Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). Crystalline phases formed on heat treatment of the glasses were identified by powder x ray diffraction. In Sr containing glasses, the monoclinic celsian phase always crystallized at temperatures above 1000{degree}C. At lower temperatures, the hexagonal analog formed. The temperature for orthorhombic to hexagonal structure transformation increased monotonically with SrO content, from 327{degree}C for BaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-{sup 2}SiO{sub 2} to 758{degree}C for SrO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-{sup 2}SiO{sub 2}. These glass powders can be sintered to almost full densities and monoclinic celsian phase at a relatively low temperature of 1100{degree}C.

  3. X-ray microtomography of ceramic and metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baaklini, G.Y.; Bhatt, R.T.; Eckel, A.J. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Engler, P.; Rauser, R.W. [Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States); Castelli, M.G. [NYMA, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Capabilities and limitations of X-ray computed microtomography (CT) in characterizing relevant composite material issues as identified during manufacturing processes were investigated. Damage in engine subcomponents was evaluated and compared with damage detected in pedigreed coupon type specimens. The system used is a newly developed state-of-the-art X-ray computed tomography system capable of providing digital radiography, computed tomography, and computed laminography. CT was found viable for characterizing processing defects and coating effect in thermally shocked carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (C/SiC) samples. CT results from mechanically tested silicon carbide fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) matrix sample were evaluated and compared to engine tested SiC/RBSN turbine vanes. Thermomechanically cycled SiC (SCS-6) fiber reinforced Timetal 21S samples showed viability of CT in detecting composite constituents and limitations of CT in detecting matrix and fiber cracking. Also an engineering analysis approach was proposed to continuously integrate nondestructive evaluation modalities in the design-manufacturing-prototyping cycle of engine components.

  4. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA airworthiness certification for ceramic matrix composite components in civil aircraft systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonczy Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs are being designed and developed for engine and exhaust components in commercial aviation, because they offer higher temperature capabilities, weight savings, and improved durability compared to metals. The United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA issues and enforces regulations and minimum standards covering the safe manufacture, operation, and maintenance of civil aircraft. As new materials, these ceramic composite components will have to meet the certification regulations of the FAA for “airworthiness”. The FAA certification process is defined in the Federal Aviation Regulations (Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, FAA policy statements, orders, advisory circulars, technical standard orders, and FAA airworthiness directives. These regulations and documents provide the fundamental requirements and guidelines for design, testing, manufacture, quality assurance, registration, operation, inspection, maintenance, and repair of aircraft systems and parts. For metallic parts in aircraft, the FAA certification and compliance process is well-established for type and airworthiness certification, using ASTM and SAE standards, the MMPDS data handbook, and FAA advisory circulars. In a similar manner for polymer matrix composites (PMC, the PMC industry and the FAA have jointly developed and are refining parallel guidelines for polymer matrix composites (PMCs, using guidance in FAA circulars and the CMH-17 PMC handbook. These documents discuss design methods and codes, material testing, property data development, life/durability assessment, production processes, QA procedures, inspection methods, operational limits, and repairs for PMCs. For ceramic composites, the FAA and the CMC and aerospace community are working together (primarily through the CMH-17 CMC handbook to define and codify key design, production, and regulatory issues that have to be addressed in the certification of CMC components in

  5. Poly(borosiloxanes as precursors for carbon fiber ceramic matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Luiz Siqueira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs, constituted of a silicon boron oxycarbide (SiBCO matrix and unidirectional carbon fiber rods as a reinforcement phase, were prepared by pyrolysis of carbon fiber rods wrapped in polysiloxane (PS or poly(borosiloxane (PBS matrices. The preparation of the polymeric precursors involved hydrolysis/condensation reactions of alkoxysilanes in the presence and absence of boric acid, with B/Si atomic ratios of 0.2 and 0.5. Infrared spectra of PBS showed evidence of Si-O-B bonds at 880 cm-1, due to the incorporation of the crosslinker trigonal units of BO3 in the polymeric network. X ray diffraction analyses exhibited an amorphous character of the resulting polymer-derived ceramics obtained by pyrolysis up to 1000 °C under inert atmosphere. The C/SiBCO composites showed better thermal stability than the C/SiOC materials. In addition, good adhesion between the carbon fiber and the ceramic phase was observed by SEM microscopy

  6. Application of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al alloy matrix composite on piston for internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shenqing

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and properties of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite and it’s application on the piston for internal combustion engines are presented. Alumina or aluminosilicate fibers reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite has more excellent synthetical properties at elevated temperature than the matrix alloys. A partially reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite piston produced by squeeze casting technique has a firm interface between reinforced and unreinforced areas, low reject rate and good technical tolerance. As a new kind of piston material, it has been used for mass production of about 400,000 pieces of automobile engines piston. China has become one of a few countries in which aluminum alloy matrix composite materials have been used in automobile industry and attained industrialization.

  7. A parametric design of ceramic faced composite armor subject to air weapon threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y. N.; Sun, Q.

    2015-12-01

    By taking into consideration the two categories of military projectile threats to aircraft structures, an optimal layer configuration of ceramic faced composite armor was designed in this paper. Using numerical simulations and the same layer arrangement of ceramic, UHMWPE, and carbon fiber laminates, a parametric finite element model using LS-DYNA code was built. Several thickness combinations were analyzed in order to determine the final lightest configuration that is capable of supporting a high-speed impact load and HEI blast wave load, which implements a high anti-penetration design for aircraft armor. This configuration can be used to improve the anti-impact ability of aircraft structures as well as achieve a structure/function integration design that considers a lighter weight.

  8. Study of Using Certain Composition of Bismuth Silicate Glass and Glass Ceramic for Gamma Radiation Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bismuth silicate glass with composition 20, 80 wt. % respectively was prepared. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements show that this glass has a very good stability when exposed to γ irradiation, which encourage the assumption of using it as a shielding material. Many properties should be investigated to fulfill this application. Study of density and molar volume to understand the structural properties, also the mechanical properties are verified by measuring microhardness, while the chemical resistance was identified by testing its durability in a base solution. The EPR results were supported by measuring electrical conductivity of the glass samples at different temperatures ranging from 295 - 553 K, which proved that this glass has very low conductivity even at high temperatures. The corresponding glass ceramic was prepared by means of heat treatment, and the formed phases were demonstrated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). Also the probability of using this glass ceramic as a shielding material was investigated

  9. Ceramic composites derived from poly(phenylsilsesquioxane)/Al2O3/Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active filler controlled reaction pyrolysis of polymers (AFCOP) is a recent method for obtaining near-net shaped ceramic bodies from a mixture of polymers, reactive filler and inert filler. Samples containing 60 wt.% of poly(phenylsilsesquioxane) (PPS) and 40 wt.% of metallic niobium and alumina powders were homogenized, uniaxially warm pressed and subsequently pyrolyzed in flowing argon at 1200, 1400 and 1600 deg. C. Ceramic bodies were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), fourier transform infrared (FTIR), porosity measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the AFCOP process is potentially very suitable for obtaining multiphase composite materials of the Al2O3-Nb system at low temperatures

  10. Ceramic Identity Contributes to Mechanical Properties and Osteoblast Behavior on Macroporous Composite Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kent Leach

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Implants formed of metals, bioceramics, or polymers may provide an alternative to autografts for treating large bone defects. However, limitations to each material motivate the examination of composites to capitalize on the beneficial aspects of individual components and to address the need for conferring bioactive behavior to the polymer matrix. We hypothesized that the inclusion of different bioceramics in a ceramic-polymer composite would alter the physical properties of the implant and the cellular osteogenic response. To test this, composite scaffolds formed from poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLG and either hydroxyapatite (HA, β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP, or bioactive glass (Bioglass 45S®, BG were fabricated, and the physical properties of each scaffold were examined. We quantified cell proliferation by DNA content, osteogenic response of human osteoblasts (NHOsts to composite scaffolds by alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, and changes in gene expression by qPCR. Compared to BG-PLG scaffolds, HA-PLG and TCP-PLG composite scaffolds possessed greater compressive moduli. NHOsts on BG-PLG substrates exhibited higher ALP activity than those on control, HA-, or TCP-PLG scaffolds after 21 days, and cells on composites exhibited a 3-fold increase in ALP activity between 7 and 21 days versus a minimal increase on control scaffolds. Compared to cells on PLG controls, RUNX2 expression in NHOsts on composite scaffolds was lower at both 7 and 21 days, while expression of genes encoding for bone matrix proteins (COL1A1 and SPARC was higher on BG-PLG scaffolds at both time points. These data demonstrate the importance of selecting a ceramic when fabricating composites applied for bone healing.

  11. Ultrasonic evaluation of initiation and development of oxidation damage in ceramic-matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Y.C.; Lavrentyev, A.I.; Rokhlin, S.I. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Nondestructive Evaluation Program; Baaklini, G.Y.; Bhatt, R.T. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-07-01

    In this paper the authors report on the development of a method for ultrasonic nondestructive characterization of oxidation damage in ceramic-matrix composites. The method is based on ultrasonic measurement of elastic moduli of the composite, which are then used to determine the elastic moduli of the fiber-matrix interphase. Thus the interphasial damage may be estimated quantitatively. As a model system they used, to demonstrate applicability of the method, a unidirectional SiC-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite (SiC/RBSN). The composite samples were oxidized in flowing oxygen for 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 h at 600, 900, 1200, and 1400 C. The ultrasonic phase velocity in the composite was measured at room temperature before and after oxidation; the data were then used to find the composite moduli, which quantify the induced damage. significant changes in ultrasonic velocities and composite moduli, which quantify the induced damage. Significant changes in ultrasonic velocities and composite moduli were found as a result of oxidation. Fiber-matrix interphasial moduli were determined by multiphase micromechanical analysis. They found that oxidation of the carbon interphasial layer is the dominant mechanism in decreasing the elastic moduli of the composite. The critical exposure time for transition from the nondamaged to the damage state of different oxidation temperatures has been determined.

  12. Perovskite ceramic nanoparticles in polymer composites for augmenting bone tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing interest in the use of nanoparticles as fillers in polymer matrices to develop biomaterials which mimic the mechanical, chemical and electrical properties of bone tissue for orthopaedic applications. The objective of this study was to prepare poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocomposites incorporating three different perovskite ceramic nanoparticles, namely, calcium titanate (CT), strontium titanate (ST) and barium titanate (BT). The tensile strength and modulus of the composites increased with the addition of nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that dispersion of the nanoparticles scaled with the density of the ceramics, which in turn played an important role in determining the enhancement in mechanical properties of the composite. Dielectric spectroscopy revealed improved permittivity and reduced losses in the composites when compared to neat PCL. Nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated via electrospinning. Induction coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy indicated the release of small quantities of Ca+2, Sr+2, Ba+2 ions from the scaffolds. Piezo-force microscopy revealed that BT nanoparticles imparted piezoelectric properties to the scaffolds. In vitro studies revealed that all composites support osteoblast proliferation. Expression of osteogenic genes was enhanced on the nanocomposites in the following order: PCL/CT > PCL/ST > PCL/BT > PCL. This study demonstrates that the use of perovskite nanoparticles could be a promising technique to engineer better polymeric scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. (paper)

  13. The Effect of adding pore formers on the microstructure of NiO-YSZ ceramic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ceramic composite of nickel oxide (NiO) with zirconium stabilized with 8 mol% yttria (8-YSZ) is the most employed material for use as anode for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The nickel oxide in the composite is reduced to metallic nickel and this result in a 15% of porosity although the porosity needed to a proper function of an anode is about 30%, demanding the use of a pore former. In this work, NiO-YSZ composite powders were synthesized by a combustion process with urea as fuel, and the effect of the addition of carbon black and corn and rice starch as pore former were investigated. Powders were pressed as cylindrical pellets, sintered at 1350 °C for 60 minutes and density were measured by an immersion method and microstructure were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that ceramic composite has homogeneous microstructure and pores have different morphology and size depending on the kind of the pore former employed. (author)

  14. Quantitative fracture analysis of a biological ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Thomas Jerald

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the improved mechanical properties of the Strombus gigas over non-biogenic aragonite (CaCO3) by controlling and analyzing the presence of the proteinaceous matrix and water. The specific objectives of this study were to (1) estimate the relative increase of mechanical properties from structure and proteinaceous interface of the Strombus gigas, (2) determine if ions in aqueous solution of stress redistribution from the presence of water was the primary mechanism in increasing work of fracture, (3) identify if water activates any viscoelastic effects from the proteinaceous matrix, and (4) identify if the fractal dimension can discern if toughening mechanisms are present in the complex composite. The Strombus gigas system was chosen for this study because it has demonstrated a 10000-fold increase in the amount of energy to cause failure over monoliths composed of the same basic material. It was concluded that the presence of the protein interface causes an order of magnitude increase in work of fracture, while water increases the work of fracture approximately two-fold over just the protein alone. The water appears to redistribute the stress throughout the structure lowering local stress distribution which was demonstrated by the use of stressing rates. Finally, the fractal dimension appears to be able to discern between some toughening mechanisms occurring in this material.

  15. Noble Metal/Ceramic Composites in Flame Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Heiko; Madler, Lutz; Strobel, Reto; Jossen, Rainer; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Johannessen, Tue

    [3,4], palladium [5], silver [6] and gold [7] crystallites on Al2O3 [3,5], SiO2 [7] and TiO2 [4,6,7] in a single step.. The as-prepared materials exhibited a high external specific surface area (40 – 320 m2 g-1) [3-7] with a high degree of crystallinity and an excellent noble metal distribution [3...... conditions influence the resulting noble metal particles size in those systems [1]. For every specific application the particle size and the metal/metal oxide interaction affect the performance of these nano-composite materials [2]. Recently, aerosol processes have been successfully used to produce platinum...... particle size is mainly dependent on its loading [3,7]. In this study, the role of the supporting metal oxide on the noble metal particle size was systematically investigated for the flame spray pyrolysis process. The materials were produced at fixed process conditions such as resident time of the...

  16. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verné, Enrica; Bruno, Matteo; Miola, Marta; Maina, Giovanni; Bianco, Carlotta; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia

    2015-08-01

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5-FeO-Fe2O3 and contains magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite - HAp - layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. PMID:26042695

  17. Electrostatic Assembly Preparation of High-Toughness Zirconium Diboride-Based Ceramic Composites with Enhanced Thermal Shock Resistance Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoxi; Zhang, Xinghong; Hong, Changqing; Qiu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Jia; Han, Jiecai; Hu, PingAn

    2016-05-11

    The central problem of using ceramic as a structural material is its brittleness, which associated with rigid covalent or ionic bonds. Whiskers or fibers of strong ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC) or silicon nitride (Si3N4) are widely embedded in a ceramic matrix to improve the strength and toughness. The incorporation of these insulating fillers can impede the thermal flow in ceramic matrix, thus decrease its thermal shock resistance that is required in some practical applications. Here we demonstrate that the toughness and thermal shock resistance of zirconium diboride (ZrB2)/SiC composites can be improved simultaneously by introducing graphene into composites via electrostatic assembly and subsequent sintering treatment. The incorporated graphene creates weak interfaces of grain boundaries (GBs) and optimal thermal conductance paths inside composites. In comparison to pristine ZrB2-SiC composites, the toughness of (2.0%) ZrB2-SiC/graphene composites exhibited a 61% increasing (from 4.3 to 6.93 MPa·m(1/2)) after spark plasma sintering (SPS); the retained strength after thermal shock increased as high as 74.8% at 400 °C and 304.4% at 500 °C. Present work presents an important guideline for producing high-toughness ceramic-based composites with enhanced thermal shock properties. PMID:27031536

  18. The Effects of an Unexpected Ceramic Coating Phase at the Head of a Pipe on Joining and Postprocessing of a Ceramic-Lined Composite Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodian, R.; Rahbari, R. G.; Hamdi, M.; Hassan, M. A.; Sparham, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Produced ceramic-lined steel pipe using the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method has found uses in many applications. A SHS-centrifugal machine was designed to produce a ceramic-lined steel pipe from ferric oxide and aluminum powder (thermite mixture) under high centrifugal acceleration. The obtained products are expected to be Al2O3 ceramic in the innermost layer and a Fe layer in a region between the outer steel pipes. In the present work, specific regions of a pipe was particularly observed to investigate the stuck (dead) spaces at the pipe head because of its importance in further processes (joining, welding, etc.) which may affect the quality of the next operations. In this article, the product's composition, phase separation, microhardness, and surface finish were studied on three zones of the pipe.

  19. The Influence of the Particle Size on the Adhesion Between Ceramic Particles and Metal Matrix in MMC Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzabek, Dariusz M.; Chmielewski, Marcin; Dulnik, Judyta; Strojny-Nedza, Agata

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the influence of the particle size on the adhesion force between ceramic particles and metal matrix in ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites. The Cu-Al2O3 composites with 5 vol.% of ceramic phase were prepared by a powder metallurgy process. Alumina oxide powder as an electrocorundum (Al2O3) powder with different particle sizes, i.e., fine powder materials and carried out the experiments with the use of the self-made tensile tester. We have observed that the interface strength is higher for the sample with coarse particles and is equal to 74 ± 4 MPa and it is equal to 68 ± 3 MPa for the sample with fine ceramic particles.

  20. The diametral tensile strength and hydrostability of polymer-ceramic nano-composite (pcnc) material prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepez, Johanna

    Statement of the problem: There is a weak connection between the filler and the resin matrix of dental composites caused primarily by hydrolysis of silane coupling agent, therefore, jeopardizing the mechanical properties of the dental restorations. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of a nano-mechanically bonded polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) versus the chemically bonding prototype polymer ceramic nano composite (pcnc) fabricated by using hydrolytically stable interphase. Materials and Methods: Composites were made with 60wt % filler, 38% triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEDGMA), 1% camphorquinone (CQ) and 1% 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). Tests for DTS were performed using a universal testing machine. The disk-shaped specimens were loaded in compression between two supporting plates at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The samples, measuring 3 mm in height and 6 mm in diameter, were produced in a round stainless steel (SS) mold. A total of 144 samples were created. Groups of 48 samples were made for each of three different fillers. Specimens were soaked in artificial saliva at 37° for four time periods, dry(t=0), 1 day, 7 days, 28 days). At the end of each soaking time DTS tests were performed. Results: There where statistically significant differences in the DTS between the filler groups and the soaking times (p=dental composites is a detrimental factor in the mechanical behavior. The silanation of the filler particles have a positive influence on the mechanical properties of dental composites but the hydrolysis of the silane coupling agent can dramatically reduce the average lifetime of dental composites.

  1. Damage analysis of the ceramic reinforced steel matrix composites sheets: experimental and numerical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bayraktar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper reports damage analysis of TiB2 (ceramic particles reinforced steel matrix composite sheets. This new steel composite receives much attention as potential structural materials due to their high specific strength and stiffness. The goal of the research described in this paper is to study the usage of this new steel family in the manufacture of light structures.Design/methodology/approach: therefore in this study is focused to the titanium diboride TiB2 reinforced steel matrix composite sheets that they were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopes after the mechanical tests carried out on the base metal and welded specimens under dynamic and static test conditions.Findings: The non homogeneity of the structure in this type of composites makes deeply complexity of their numerical and analytical modelling to predict their damage during the loading. For example, the interfaces essentially play a key role in determining mechanical and physical properties. For this reason, a Finite Element (FEM analysis is used for modelling to simulate the macroscopic behaviour of this material, taking into account the relevant microscopic scales.Practical implications: defined in this research is based on the impact dynamic behaviour of this steel sheets by using a special impact tensile test developed formerly that all details were published in this journal. This type of test gives more comprehensible information about special steel sheets (welded or base metal in case of dynamic crash conditions.Originality/value: The present research gives detail information on the new steel matrix composite sheets reinforced TiB2 ceramic particles. This new composite was developed by ARCELOR research group and impact dynamic behaviour and weldability of the welded parts and base metals from this composite steel are discussed here in order to give practical and useful solution for industrial applications.

  2. SiC fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic composites in the zirconia/magnesium aluminosilicate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass-ceramic matrix compositions derived from metal alkoxides were vacuum hot-pressed. The compositions were nominally cordierite, with variations in silica content, and additions of up to 30% zirconia. Composites fabricated by vacuum hot-pressing the matrix compositions with SiC Nicalon fibers were also studied. Variations in pressing conditions and subsequent heat treatments were examined. Crystalline phase development, bend strength and fracture toughness were evaluated as a function of hot-pressing parameters

  3. Lyman alpha absorption at low redshifts and hot gas in galactic haloes

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    Motivated by recent observation of Lanzetta et al. that most luminous galaxies at low redshifts produce $\\lya$ absorption at impact parameter $l\\lsim 160 \\kpch$, we propose that these absorbers are clouds confined by the pressure of ambient hot gas in galactic haloes. We determine the properties of this hot gas and of the absorption systems on the basis of observational and theoretical constraints. The absorbing clouds need to be replenished on about one orbital time ($\\sim 10^9$ yrs) in the ...

  4. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verné, Enrica, E-mail: enrica.verne@polito.it [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Bruno, Matteo [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Miola, Marta [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Maina, Giovanni; Bianco, Carlotta [Traumatology Orthopedics and Occupational Medicine Dept., Università di Torino, Via G. Zuretti 29, 10126 Torino (Italy); Cochis, Andrea [Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Rimondini, Lia [Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali, Via G. Giusti, 9, 50121 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-08-01

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO{sub 2}–Na{sub 2}O–CaO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–FeO–Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and contains magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite – HAp – layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. - Highlights: • An in vitro biological characterization was carried out on ferromagnetic and bioactive composite cements. • No release of iron was revealed in the physiological solution. • Bioactivity tests

  5. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO2–Na2O–CaO–P2O5–FeO–Fe2O3 and contains magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite – HAp – layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. - Highlights: • An in vitro biological characterization was carried out on ferromagnetic and bioactive composite cements. • No release of iron was revealed in the physiological solution. • Bioactivity tests show hydroxyapatite precipitates on the cement

  6. Progress in the characterisation of structural oxide/oxide ceramic matrix composites fabricated by electrophoretic deposition (EPD)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stoll, E.; Mahr, P.; Kruger, H. G.; Kern, H.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2006), s. 282-285. ISSN 1438-1656 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/05/0495 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : electorphoretic deposition * oxid/oxid ceramic matrix composites * flexural strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.402, year: 2006 http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jissue/112579545

  7. Graphite and carbon/carbon components for hot gas ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large coal reserves in the Federal Republic of Germany and the uncertainty of the future energy situation on the world market make it appear sound policy to devote some thought to the gasification of coal. For certain chemical processes, moreover, it would be advantageous to have a reasonably priced source of process heat available. In the Federal Republic of Germany this process heat shall be produced in a high-temperature nuclear reactor (HTR), the primary heating temperatures being in the range between 950 deg. C and 1050 deg. C. One serious problem in utilisation of high temperature heat is the resistance of the construction materials. Ceramic materials with high temperature resistance are considered. The material includes graphite and CC carbon fibre reinforced carbon. As a result of the project promoted by Ministerium fur Wirtschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) it has been demonstrated that both CC and graphite manufactured by SIGRI GmbH are well suited for use in high temperature reactors

  8. Modeling of the mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites using finite element method (FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of the mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC is presented by the example of Al2O3 fibers in an alumina based matrix. The starting point of the modeling is a substructure (elementary cell which includes on a micromechanical scale the statistical properties of the fiber, matrix and fiber-matrix interface and their interactions. The numerical evaluation of the model is accomplished by means of the finite element method. The numerical results of calculating the elastic modulus of the composite dependance on the quantity of the fibers added and porosity was compared to experimental values of specimens having the same composition. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON174004 i TVH to project III45012

  9. Tauro: a ceramic composite structural material self-cooled Pb-17Li breeder blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a low-activation (LA) ceramic composite (CC) as structural material appears essential to demonstrate the potential of fusion power reactors for being inherently or, at least, passively safe. Tauro is a self-cooled Pb-17Li breeder blanket with a SiC/SiC composite as structure. This study determines the required improvements for existing industrial LA composites (mainly SiC/SiC) in order to render them acceptable for blanket operating conditions. 3D SiC/SiC CC, recently launched on the market, is a promising candidate. A preliminary evaluation of a possible joining technique for SiC/SiC is also described. (orig.)

  10. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a 'node-bond' geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1∼ 9.3% closed micropores

  11. Composite Coatings with Ceramic Matrix Including Nanomaterials as Solid Lubricants for Oil-Less Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posmyk A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the theoretical basis of manufacturing and chosen applications of composite coatings with ceramic matrix containing nanomaterials as a solid lubricant (AHC+NL. From a theoretical point of view, in order to reduce the friction coefficient of sliding contacts, two materials are required, i.e. one with a high hardness and the other with low shear strength. In case of composite coatings AHC+NL the matrix is a very hard and wear resistant anodic oxide coating (AHC whereas the solid lubricant used is the nanomaterial (NL featuring a low shear strength such as glassy carbon nanotubes (GC. Friction coefficient of cast iron GJL-350 sliding against the coating itself is much higher (0.18-0.22 than when it slides against a composite coating (0.08-0.14. It is possible to reduce the friction due to the presence of carbon nanotubes, or metal nanowires.

  12. Prediction of lifetime in static fatigue at high temperatures for ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous works have shown that ceramic matrix composites are sensitive to delayed failure during fatigue in oxidizing environments. The phenomenon of slow crack growth has been deeply investigated on single fibers and multi-filament tows in previous papers. The present paper proposes a multiscale model of failure driven by slow crack growth in fibers, for 2D woven composites under a constant load. The model is based on the delayed failure of longitudinal tows. Additional phenomena involved in the failure of tows have been identified using fractographic examination of 2D woven SiC/SiC composite test specimens after fatigue tests at high temperatures. Stochastic features including random load sharing, fiber overloading, fiber characteristics and fiber arrangement within the tows have been introduced using appropriate density functions. Rupture time predictions are compared to experimental data. (authors)

  13. Thermal and mechanical behavior of metal matrix and ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John M. (Editor); Moeller, Helen H. (Editor); Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses local stresses in metal-matrix composites (MMCs) subjected to thermal and mechanical loads, the computational simulation of high-temperature MMCs' cyclic behavior, an analysis of a ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) flexure specimen, and a plasticity analysis of fibrous composite laminates under thermomechanical loads. Also discussed are a comparison of methods for determining the fiber-matrix interface frictional stresses of CMCs, the monotonic and cyclic behavior of an SiC/calcium aluminosilicate CMC, the mechanical and thermal properties of an SiC particle-reinforced Al alloy MMC, the temperature-dependent tensile and shear response of a graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMC, the fiber/matrix interface bonding strength of MMCs, and fatigue crack growth in an Al2O3 short fiber-reinforced Al-2Mg matrix MMC.

  14. Plasma-Spraying Ceramics Onto Smooth Metallic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Rouge, Carl J.; Leissler, George

    1992-01-01

    In fabrication process, plasma-sprayed ceramic coats bonded strongly to smooth metallic surfaces. Principal use of such coats in protecting metal parts in hot-gas paths of advanced gas turbine engines. Process consists of application of initial thin layer of ceramic on smooth surface by low-pressure-plasma spraying followed by application of layer of conventional, low-thermal-conductivity atmospheric-pressure plasma-sprayed ceramic.

  15. High-temperature turbine technology program hot-gas path development test. Part II. Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, M.W.

    1982-03-01

    This topical report of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) Phase II program presents the results of testing full-scale water-cooled first-stage and second-stage turbine nozzles at design temperature and pressure to verify that the designs are adequate for operation in a full-scale turbine environment. Low-cycle fatigue life of the nozzles was demonstrated by subjecting cascade assemblies to several hundred simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycles. This testing was accomplished in the Hot-Gas Path Development Test Stand (HGPDTS), which is capable of evaluating full-scale combustion and turbine nozzle components. A three-throat cascade of the first-stage turbine nozzle was successfully tested at a nozzle inlet gas temperature of 2630/sup 0/F and a nozzle inlet pressure of 11.3 atmospheres. In addition to steady-state operation at the design firing temperature, the nozzle cascade was exposed to a simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycle by varying the firing temperature. A total of 42 h at the design point and 617 thermal cycles were accumulated during the test periods. First-stage nozzle test results show that measured metal and coolant temperatures correspond well to the predicted design values. This nozzle design has been shown to be fully satisfactory for the application (2600/sup 0/F), with growth capability to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature. A post-test metallurgical examination of sectioned portions of the tested nozzles shows a totally bonded structure, confirming the test results and attesting to the successful performance of water-cooled composite nozzle hardware.

  16. Fatigue-crack propagation behavior in monolithic and composite ceramics and intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, R.O.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Venkateswara Rao, K.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    We study microstructural mechanisms of fatigue crack growth in advanced monolithic and composite ceramics and intermetallics. Much attention is devoted to the contribution of cycling loading to the hindrance of mechanisms that lead to a considerable increase in toughness (crack-tip shielding) of these materials. For example, in intermetallics with a ductile phase, such as {Beta}-TiNb-reinforced {gamma}-TiAl or Nb-reinforced Nb{sub 3}Al, a significant increase in toughness caused by the presence of uncracked ductile phase inside a crack is retarded under cyclic loading because ductile particles immediately fail by fatigue. Similarly, in monolithic ceramics, e.g., in alumina (aluminum oxide) or silicon nitride, the significant plasticization appearing under monotonic loading is greatly diminished under cyclic loading due to gradual wear at the grain-matrix interface. In fact, the nature of fatigue in such low-plasticity materials differs essentially from the well-known mechanisms of fatigue in metals and is governed, first of all, by a decrease in shielding, which depends on the loading cycle and time. The susceptibility of intermetallics and ceramics to fatigue degradation under cyclic loading affects seriously the possibility of structural use of these materials in practice. In particular, in this case, it is difficult to apply strength calculation methods that take into account the presence of defects and to implement life-prediction procedures.

  17. Flexural Strength of Preheated Resin Composites and Bonding Properties to Glass-Ceramic and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Richard Kramer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the impact of preheating (25, 37, 54, or 68 °C of TetricEvoCeram (TEC, FiltekSupremeXT (FSXT, and Venus (V on flexural strength (FS, shear bond strength (SBS and interfacial tension (IFT. FS was tested with TEC and FSXT. For SBS, glass-ceramic and human dentin substrate were fabricated and luted with the preheated resin composite (RC. SBSs of 1500 thermal cycled specimens were measured. For IFT, glass slides covered with the non-polymerized RC were prepared and contact angles were measured. Data were analyzed using 2/1-way ANOVA with Scheffé-test, and t-test (p < 0.05. Preheated TEC (37–68 °C showed higher FS compared to the control-group (25 °C (p < 0.001. FSXT presented higher FS than TEC (p < 0.001. For SBS to dentin higher values for FSXT than TEC were found. The preheating temperature showed no impact on SBS to dentin. SBS to glass-ceramic revealed a positive influence of temperature for TEC 25–68 °C (p = 0.015. TEC showed higher values than V and FSXT (p < 0.001. IFT values increased with the preheating temperature. A significant difference could be observed in every RC group between 25 and 68 °C (p < 0.001.

  18. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program. Inventory of federally funded CFCC R&D projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richlen, S. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Industrial Technologies; Caton, G.M.; Karnitz, M.A.; Cox, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hong, W. [Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) are a new class of materials that are lighter, stronger, more corrosion resistant, and capable of performing at elevated temperatures. This new type of material offers the potential to meet the demands of a variety of industrial, military, and aerospace applications. The Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) has a new program on CFCCs for industrial applications and this program has requested an inventory of all federal projects on CFCCs that relate to their new program. The purpose of this project is to identify all other ongoing CFCC research to avoid redundancy in the OIT Program. The inventory will be used as a basis for coordinating with the other ongoing ceramic composite projects. The inventory is divided into two main parts. The first part is concerned with CFCC supporting technologies projects and is organized by the categories listed below. (1) Composite Design; (2) Materials Characterization; (3) Test Methods; (4) Non-Destructive Evaluation; (5) Environmental Effects; (6) Mechanical Properties; (7) Database Life Prediction; (8) Fracture/Damage; and (9) Joining. The second part has information on component development, fabrication, and fiber-related projects.

  19. "A New Class of Creep Resistant Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohit Jain, Dr. Ganesh Skandan, Prof. Roger Cannon, Rutgers University

    2007-03-30

    Despite recent progress in the development of SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), their application in industrial gas turbines for distributed energy (DE) systems has been limited. The poor oxidation resistance of the non-oxide ceramics warrants the use of envrionmental barrier coatings (EBCs), which in turn lead to issues pertaining to life expectancy of the coatings. On the other hand, oxide/oxide CMCs are potential replacements, but their use has been limited until now due to the poor creep resistance at high temperatures, particularly above 1200 oC: the lack of a creep resistant matrix has been a major limiting factor. Using yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) as the matrix material system, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in oxide/oxide CMCs by introducing innovations in both the structure and composition of the matrix material, thereby leading to high temperature matrix creep properties not achieved until now. An array of YAG-based powders with a unique set of particle characteristics were produced in-house and sintered to full density and compressive creep data was obtained. Aided in part by the composition and the microstructure, the creep rates were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially. Even after accounting for porosity and a smaller matrix grain size in a practical CMC component, the YAG-based matrix material was found to creep slower than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially.

  20. Structure modification of 0-3 piezoelectric ceramic/polymer composites through dielectrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropic material properties can be induced in ceramic/polymer composites by applying an alternating electric field of moderate strength during processing. Under suitable conditions, particles of a ceramic filler material that are randomly dispersed in a liquid polymer or pre-polymer can be polarized and they then exhibit a collective response to localized gradients in the electric field. Typically, the particles experience a mutually attractive force which causes them to form 'pearl-chains' or columnar structures spanning the gap between electrodes. If the fluid is solidified, for example by curing the polymer resin, then the newly formed structures can be fixed in place to produce a composite with directional electrical and mechanical properties. Direct visual observations were made for low volume fraction dispersions of pure lead titanate in an epoxy pre-polymer under the influence of an electric field. The observed interaction was correlated with low-field dielectric measurements and existing theory to identify optimum assembly conditions. The dielectric properties of the fluid are predominant and the formation of chain-like structures is found to be both field strength and field frequency dependent. The dielectric permittivities of a range of structurally modified composites were measured and compared with existing theoretical models of di-phasic materials

  1. Joining of SiC/SiCf ceramic matrix composites for fusion reactor blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a preceramic polymer, joints between SiC/SiCf ceramic matrix composites were obtained. The polymer, upon pyrolysis at high temperature, transforms into a ceramic material and develops an adhesive bonding with the composite. The surface morphology of 2D and 3D SiC/SiCf composites did not allow satisfactory results to be obtained by a simple application of the method initially developed for monolithic SiC bodies, which employed the use of a pure silicone resin. Thus, active or inert fillers were mixed with the preceramic polymer, in order to reduce its volumetric shrinkage which occurs during pyrolysis. In particular, the joints realized using the silicone resin with Al-Si powder as reactive additive displayed remarkable shear strength (31.6 MPa maximum). Large standard deviation for the shear strength has nevertheless been measured. The proposed joining method is promising for the realization of fusion reactor blanket structures, even if presently the measured strength values are not fully satisfactory

  2. Luting of CAD/CAM ceramic inlays: direct composite versus dual-cure luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Bonroy, Kim; Elsen, Caroline; Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Suyama, Yuji; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bonding effectiveness in direct restorations. A two-step self-etch adhesive and a light-cure resin composite was compared with luting with a conventional dual-cure resin cement and a two-step etch and rinse adhesive. Class-I box-type cavities were prepared. Identical ceramic inlays were designed and fabricated with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. The inlays were seated with Clearfil SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical) or ExciTE F DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), each by two operators (five teeth per group). The inlays were stored in water for one week at 37°C, whereafter micro-tensile bond strength testing was conducted. The micro-tensile bond strength of the direct composite was significantly higher than that from conventional luting, and was independent of the operator (P<0.0001). Pre-testing failures were only observed with the conventional method. High-power light-curing of a direct composite may be a viable alternative to luting lithium disilicate glass-ceramic CAD/CAM restorations. PMID:26407114

  3. Elevated-temperature fracture resistances of monolithic and composite ceramics using chevron-notched bend tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Asish; Jenkins, Michael G.; Ferber, Mattison K.; Peussa, Jouko; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1992-01-01

    The quasi-static fracture behaviors of monolithic ceramics (SiC, Si3N4, MgAl2O4), self-reinforced monoliths (acicular grained Si3N4, acicular grained mullite), and ceramic matrix composites (SiC whisker/Al2O3 matrix, TiB2 particulate/SiC matrix, SiC fiber/CVI SiC matrix, Al2O3 fiber/CVI SiC matrix) were measured over the temperature range of 20 to 1400 C. The chevron notched, bend bar test geometry was essential for characterizing the elevated temperature fracture resistances of this wide range of quasi-brittle materials during stable crack growth. Fractography revealed the differences in the fracture behavior of the different materials at the various temperatures. The fracture resistances of the self-reinforced monoliths were comparable to those of the composites and the fracture mechanisms were found to be similar at room temperature. However at elevated temperatures the differences of the fracture behavior became apparent where the superior fracture resistance of the self-reinforced monoliths were attributed to the minor amounts of glassy, intergranular phases which were often more abundant in the composites and affected the fracture behavior when softened by elevated temperatures.

  4. Penetration of tungsten-alloy rods into composite ceramic targets: Experiments and 2-D simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of terminal ballistics experiments, with scaled tungsten-alloy penetrators, was performed on composite targets consisting of ceramic tiles glued to thick steel backing plates. Tiles of silicon-carbide, aluminum nitride, titanium-dibroide and boron-carbide were 20-80 mm thick, and impact velocity was 1.7 km/s. 2-D numerical simulations, using the PISCES code, were performed in order to simulate these shots. It is shown that a simplified version of the Johnson-Holmquist failure model can account for the penetration depths of the rods but is not enough to capture the effect of lateral release waves on these penetrations

  5. Recycling of glass fibers from fiberglass polyester waste composite for manufacture glass-ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    López Gómez, Félix Antonio; Martín, M. Isabel; García Díaz, Irene; Rodríguez, O.; Alguacil, Francisco José; Romero, M.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the feasibility of reusing a glass fiber resulting from the thermolysis and gasification of waste composites to obtain glass-ceramic tiles. Polyester fiberglass (PFG) waste was treated at 550˚C for 3 h in a 9.6 dm3 thermolytic reactor. This process yielded an oil (≈24 wt%), a gas (≈8 wt%) and a solid residue (≈68 wt%). After the polymer has been removed, the solid residue is heated in air to oxidize residual char and remove surface contamination. The cleaning fibers were co...

  6. The Fabrication and Characterization of PCL/Rice Husk Derived Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Composite Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to fabricate a 3D scaffold using polycaprolactone (PCL) and silicate based bioactive glass-ceramic (R-SBgC). Different concentrations of R-SBgC prepared from rice husk ash (RHA) were combined with PCL to fabricate a composite scaffold using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) method. The products were then characterized using SEM and EDX. The results demonstrated that R-SBgC in PCL matrix produced a bioactive material which has highly porous structure wit...

  7. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelis, D. G.; Dassios, K. G.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    Barium osumilite (BMAS) ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE) sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism. PMID:24381524

  8. WEARPROOFNESS OF TITANIC ALLOY, FIXED CERAMIC COMPOSITION COVERAGE IN THE CONDITIONS OF FRETTAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Лабунець, В. Ф.; Національний авіаційний університет; Бурбела, Ю.Б.; Національний авіаційний університет

    2013-01-01

    In this article the wearproofness of titanic alloy of ВТЗ-1 is considered under conditions of a contact load-ing. The situation analysis and needs in such work have been carried out. The research of the surface strength-ening of this alloy with ceramic composition coverages is also described. The tests results under conditions of frettage at a friction without lubricating material out on the air in the systems „coverage-coverage” and „cov-erage-steel 45” are shown here.

  9. Composite ceramic bone graft substitute in the treatment of locally aggressive benign bone tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Schindler, O. S.; Cannon, S.R.; Briggs, T. W.; Blunn, G. W.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report the use of a composite ceramic bone graft substitute containing calcium sulphate and hydroxyapatite (HA) in the treatment of large expansive osteolytic benign bone tumours. METHODS: 4 women and 9 men aged 8 to 49 (mean, 22) years with aneurysmal bone cysts (n=6) or giant cell tumours (n=7) in the epi- or meta-physeal areas of the lower limbs underwent curettage, phenolisation, and filling with bone graft substitute containing calcium sulphate and HA. The mean tumour size wa...

  10. Studying the sintering behavior of BeOx-SiC1-x Composite ceramic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Tarik Talib

    2011-12-01

    The sintering behavior for BeO-SiC compacts composite ceramic at different sintering temperatures in air were conducted, resulting data indicated that the percentage of SiC (Wt% 5) sintered at 800 C° lead to higher sintering density of (1.80 gm/cm3). The x-ray diffraction pattern analysis indicated nothing change concerning the crystal structure. Microstructure development has been studied as a function SiC content. Silicon carbide found to be suppressed the sinter ability of the matrix BeO powder.

  11. FEAMAC/CARES Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel; Bednarcyk, Brett; Pineda, Evan; Arnold, Steven; Mital, Subodh; Murthy, Pappu; Bhatt, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Reported here is a coupling of two NASA developed codes: CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) with the MAC/GMC (Micromechanics Analysis Code/ Generalized Method of Cells) composite material analysis code. The resulting code is called FEAMAC/CARES and is constructed as an Abaqus finite element analysis UMAT (user defined material). Here we describe the FEAMAC/CARES code and an example problem (taken from the open literature) of a laminated CMC in off-axis loading is shown. FEAMAC/CARES performs stochastic-strength-based damage simulation response of a CMC under multiaxial loading using elastic stiffness reduction of the failed elements.

  12. Preparation and properties of yttria doped tetragonal zirconia polycrystal/Sr-doped barium hexaferrite ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The 3Y-TZP/Sr-doped barium ferrite composites were prepared. • The saturation magnetization was improved by 15% with Sr-doping. • The dispersion coefficient p could reflect the microscopic lattice variation. • The composite with x = 0.5 had the maximum fracture toughness of 8.3 MPa m1/2. - Abstract: The effects of substitution of Ba2+ by Sr2+ on the magnetic property of barium ferrite and addition barium ferrite secondary phase to the 3 mol% yttria-doped tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (3Y-TZP) matrix on the mechanical property of composites were investigated. The Sr-doped barium ferrite (Ba1−xSrxFe12O19, x = 0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75) was synthesized by solid-state reaction in advance. Then 3Y-TZP/20 wt% Sr-doped barium ferrite composites were prepared by means of conventional ceramic method. It was found that a moderate amount of Sr added to barium ferrite could boost the saturation magnetization by 15% compared with the composites without Sr-doping. Besides, the composite with x = 0.50 possessed the best mechanical properties, such as 11.5 GPa for Vickers hardness and 8.3 MPa m1/2 for fracture toughness, respectively. It was demonstrated that magnetic and mechanical properties of the composites could be harmonized by the incorporation of barium ferrite secondary phase

  13. Micromechanics Fatigue Damage Analysis Modeling for Fabric Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, J. B.; Xue, D.; Shi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A micromechanics analysis modeling method was developed to analyze the damage progression and fatigue failure of fabric reinforced composite structures, especially for the brittle ceramic matrix material composites. A repeating unit cell concept of fabric reinforced composites was used to represent the global composite structure. The thermal and mechanical properties of the repeating unit cell were considered as the same as those of the global composite structure. The three-phase micromechanics, the shear-lag, and the continuum fracture mechanics models were integrated with a statistical model in the repeating unit cell to predict the progressive damages and fatigue life of the composite structures. The global structure failure was defined as the loss of loading capability of the repeating unit cell, which depends on the stiffness reduction due to material slice failures and nonlinear material properties in the repeating unit cell. The present methodology is demonstrated with the analysis results evaluated through the experimental test performed with carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix plain weave composite specimens.

  14. Calcium phosphate/microgel composites for 3D powderbed printing of ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Mandy-Nicole; Agrawal, Garima; Bergmann, Christian; Schröder, Ricarda; Lechner, Sebastian J; Pich, Andrij; Fischer, Horst

    2016-06-01

    Composites of microgels and calcium phosphates are promising as drug delivery systems and basic components for bone substitute implants. In this study, we synthesized novel composite materials consisting of pure β-tricalcium phosphate and stimuli-responsive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam-co-acetoacetoxyethyl methacrylate-co-vinylimidazole) microgels. The chemical composition, thermal properties and morphology for obtained composites were extensively characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, IGAsorp moisture sorption analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, granulometric analysis, ESEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and TEM. Mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated by ball-on-three-balls test to determine the biaxial strength. Furthermore, initial 3D powderbed-based printing tests were conducted with spray-dried composites and diluted 2-propanol as a binder to evaluate a new binding concept for β-tricalcium phosphate-based granulates. The printed ceramic bodies were characterized before and after a sintering step by ESEM. The hypothesis that the microgels act as polymer adhesive agents by efficient chemical interactions with the β-tricalcium phosphate particles was confirmed. The obtained composites can be used for the development of new scaffolds. PMID:25870955

  15. Fracture toughness and reliability in high-temperature structural ceramics and composites: Prospects and challenges for the 21st Century

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil Dutta

    2001-04-01

    The importance of high fracture toughness and reliability in Si3N4, and SiC-based structural ceramics and ceramic matrix composites is reviewed. The potential of these ceramics and ceramic matrix composites for high temperature applications in defence and aerospace applications such as gas turbine engines, radomes, and other energy conversion hardware have been well recognized. Numerous investigations were pursued to improve fracture toughness and reliability by incorporating various reinforcements such as particulate-, whisker-, and continuous fibre into Si3N4 and SiC matrices. All toughening mechanisms, e.g. crack deflection, crack branching, crack bridging, etc essentially redistribute stresses at the crack tip and increase the energy needed to propagate a crack through the composite material, thereby resulting in improved fracture toughness and reliability. Because of flaw insensitivity, continuous fibre reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) was found to have the highest potential for higher operating temperature and longer service conditions. However, the ceramic fibres should display sufficient high temperature strength and creep resistance at service temperatures above 1000°C. The greatest challenge to date is the development of high quality ceramic fibres with associate coatings able to maintain their high strength in oxidizing environment at high temperature. In the area of processing, critical issues are preparation of optimum matrix precursors, precursor infiltration into fibre array, and matrix densification at a temperature, where grain crystallization and fibre degradation do not occur. A broad scope of effort is required for improved processing and properties with a better understanding of all candidate composite systems.

  16. Fracture Toughness and Reliability in High-Temperature Structural Ceramics and Composites: Prospects and Challenges for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1999-01-01

    The importance of high fracture toughness and reliability in Si3N4, and SiC-based structural ceramics and ceramic matrix composites is reviewed. The potential of these ceramics and ceramic matrix composites for high temperature applications in defense and aerospace applications such as gas turbine engines, radomes, and other energy conversion hardware have been well recognized. Numerous investigations were pursued to improve fracture toughness and reliability by incorporating various reinforcements such as particulate-, whisker-, and continuous fiber into Si3N4 and SiC matrices. All toughening mechanisms, e.g. crack deflection, crack branching, crack bridging, etc., essentially redistribute stresses at the crack tip and increase the energy needed to propagate a crack through the composite material, thereby resulting in improved fracture toughness and reliability. Because of flaw insensitivity, continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) was found to have the highest potential for higher operating temperature and longer service conditions. However, the ceramic fibers should display sufficient high temperature strength and creep resistance at service temperatures above 1000 'C. The greatest challenge to date is the development of high quality ceramic fibers with associate coatings able to maintain their high strength in oxidizing environment at high temperature. In the area of processing, critical issues are, preparation of optimum matrix precursors, precursor infiltration into fiber array, and matrix densification at a temperature, where grain crystallization and fiber degradation do not occur. A broad scope of effort is required for improved processing and properties with a better understanding of all candidate composite systems.

  17. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic Composites. Part III; Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Ramsey, Jack; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the third part of a three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce ceramic matrix composite materials and aircraft engine components by the binder jet process. Different SiC powders with median sizes ranging from 9.3 to 53.0 microns were investigated solely and in powder blends in order to maximize powder packing. Various infiltration approaches were investigated to include polycarbosilane (SMP-10), phenolic, and liquid silicon. Single infiltrations of SMP-10 and phenolic only slightly filled in the interior. When the SMP-10 was loaded with sub-micron sized SiC powders, the infiltrant gave a much better result of filling in the interior. Silicon carbide fibers were added to the powder bed to make ceramic matrix composite materials. Microscopy showed that the fibers were well distributed with no preferred orientation on the horizontal plane and fibers in the vertical plane were at angles as much as 45deg. Secondary infiltration steps were necessary to further densify the material. Two to three extra infiltration steps of SMP-10 increased the density by 0.20 to 0.55 g/cc. However, the highest densities achieved were 2.10 to 2.15 g/cc. Mechanical tests consisting of 4 point bend tests were conducted. Samples from the two CMC panels had higher strengths and strains to failure than the samples from the two nonfiber reinforced panels. The highest strengths were from Set N with 65 vol% fiber loading which had an average strength of 66 MPa. Analysis of the fracture surfaces did not reveal pullout of the reinforcing fibers. Blunt fiber failure suggested that there was not composite behavior. The binder jet additive manufacturing method was used to also demonstrate the fabrication of turbine engine vane components of two different designs and sizes. The

  18. Nanoscale mapping of heterogeneity of the polarization reversal in lead-free relaxor-ferroelectric ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeljic, D.; Shvartsman, V. V.; Belianinov, A.; Okatan, B.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S. V.; Groh, C.; Rödel, J.; Lupascu, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Relaxor/ferroelectric ceramic/ceramic composites have shown to be promising in generating large electromechanical strain at moderate electric fields. Nonetheless, the mechanisms of polarization and strain coupling between grains of different nature in the composites remain unclear. To rationalize the coupling mechanisms we performed advanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) studies of 0.92BNT-0.06BT-0.02KNN/0.93BNT-0.07BT (ergodic/non-ergodic relaxor) composites. PFM is able to distinguish grains of different phases by characteristic domain patterns. Polarization switching has been probed locally, on a sub-grain scale. k-Means clustering analysis applied to arrays of local hysteresis loops reveals variations of polarization switching characteristics between the ergodic and non-ergodic relaxor grains. We report a different set of switching parameters for grains in the composites as opposed to the pure phase samples. Our results confirm ceramic/ceramic composites to be a viable approach to tailor the piezoelectric properties and optimize the macroscopic electromechanical characteristics.Relaxor/ferroelectric ceramic/ceramic composites have shown to be promising in generating large electromechanical strain at moderate electric fields. Nonetheless, the mechanisms of polarization and strain coupling between grains of different nature in the composites remain unclear. To rationalize the coupling mechanisms we performed advanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) studies of 0.92BNT-0.06BT-0.02KNN/0.93BNT-0.07BT (ergodic/non-ergodic relaxor) composites. PFM is able to distinguish grains of different phases by characteristic domain patterns. Polarization switching has been probed locally, on a sub-grain scale. k-Means clustering analysis applied to arrays of local hysteresis loops reveals variations of polarization switching characteristics between the ergodic and non-ergodic relaxor grains. We report a different set of switching parameters for grains in the

  19. Effects of magnetic field treatment on dielectric properties of CCTO@Ni/PVDF composite with low concentration of ceramic fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Q. G., E-mail: qgchi@hotmail.com, E-mail: empty-cy@l63.com [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectrics and Its Application, Ministry of Education, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Gao, L. [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectrics and Its Application, Ministry of Education, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); College of Electrical Engineering, Suihua University, Suihua 152061 (China); Wang, X.; Chen, Y., E-mail: qgchi@hotmail.com, E-mail: empty-cy@l63.com; Dong, J. F.; Cui, Y.; Lei, Q. Q. [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectrics and Its Application, Ministry of Education, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Using melt mixing, we produced a ceramic/polymer composite with a matrix of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and a filler of 5 vol.% Ni-deposited CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} core-shell ceramic particles (CCTO@Ni), and studied its prominent dielectric characteristics for the first. Its phase composition and morphology were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. After treating the composite films with various durations of a magnetic field treatment, we compared their dielectric properties. We found that the CCTO@Ni ceramic had a typical urchin-like core-shell structure, and that different durations of the magnetic field treatment produced different distributions of ceramic particles in the PVDF matrix. The dielectric permittivity of the untreated CCTO@Ni/PVDF composite was 20% higher than that of neat PVDF, and it had a low loss tangent. However, only the composite treated for 30 min in the magnetic field had an ultra-high dielectric permittivity of 1.41 × 10{sup 4} at 10 Hz, three orders of magnitude higher than the untreated composite, which declined dramatically with increasing frequency, accompanied by an insulating-conducting phase transition and an increase in loss tangent. Our results demonstrate that changes in the dielectric properties of PVDF composites with magnetic field treatment are closely related to the percolation effect and interfacial polarization.

  20. Effects of magnetic field treatment on dielectric properties of CCTO@Ni/PVDF composite with low concentration of ceramic fillers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using melt mixing, we produced a ceramic/polymer composite with a matrix of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and a filler of 5 vol.% Ni-deposited CaCu3Ti4O12 core-shell ceramic particles (CCTO@Ni), and studied its prominent dielectric characteristics for the first. Its phase composition and morphology were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. After treating the composite films with various durations of a magnetic field treatment, we compared their dielectric properties. We found that the CCTO@Ni ceramic had a typical urchin-like core-shell structure, and that different durations of the magnetic field treatment produced different distributions of ceramic particles in the PVDF matrix. The dielectric permittivity of the untreated CCTO@Ni/PVDF composite was 20% higher than that of neat PVDF, and it had a low loss tangent. However, only the composite treated for 30 min in the magnetic field had an ultra-high dielectric permittivity of 1.41 × 104 at 10 Hz, three orders of magnitude higher than the untreated composite, which declined dramatically with increasing frequency, accompanied by an insulating-conducting phase transition and an increase in loss tangent. Our results demonstrate that changes in the dielectric properties of PVDF composites with magnetic field treatment are closely related to the percolation effect and interfacial polarization

  1. Carbon oxidation in ceramic composites and the evaluation of interfacial sealing for oxidation resistant fiber-reinforced composite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glime, William Harrison, III

    1997-11-01

    Carbon offers desirable properties as a fiber-matrix interphase material in ceramic matrix composites (CMC's), but oxidation of carbon at temperatures above 500sp°C has limited its utility. In an effort to better understand the kinetics associated with carbon oxidation pertaining to CMC applications, the origin of non-planar morphologies observed in the reaction front of carbon fibers and interphases receding into a ceramic matrix in the temperature range of 700sp°C to 1000sp°C was analyzed. A numerical simulation based on the finite difference method is utilized to evaluate the parameters which govern the morphology of the receding carbon reaction front. The study indicates that the morphology of the reaction front contains information regarding the interplay between oxidation behavior and microstructural features of the carbon. Carbon oxidation was found to obey "weak-link" behavior, that is, a sub-component which is more susceptible to oxidation governs the recession kinetics. The implications of weak link oxidation to preservation of a carbon interphase in a ceramic composite are discussed. Interrupted interphases have demonstrated the ability to confine oxidation of a carbon interphase to a localized region adjacent to a matrix crack. Commercial SiC mono-filaments (SCS-6, Textron Specialty Materials) were modified with a laser to produce fibers with discontinuous carbon coatings that were used in experiments to study mechanical properties. The laser-scribed fibers were tested in isolation, used in single-fiber microcomposites, or incorporated into small bulk composite specimens using a powder processing route to produce the matrix. The mechanical performance of the various types of specimens prepared using the laser scribing technique is presented and these results are used in a simulation of ultimate composite properties. The effect of fiber matrix fusion, by direct bonding or through a reaction product which seals the interface, was investigated with

  2. MAPPING OF TEMPERATURE AND VELOCITY FIELD IN HOT GAS FREE JET

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gregor, Jan; Jakubová, I.; Mendl, T.; Šenk, J.

    Brno, 2005, s. 81-83. ISBN 80-214-2931-3. [Symposium on Physics of Switching Arc /16th./. Nové Město na Moravě (CZ), 05.09.2005-09.09.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : hot gas mixture * temperature * velocity Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  3. The Milky Way's Hot Gas Kinematics: Signatures in Current and Future OVII Absorption Line Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew J.; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund J.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-02-01

    Detections of z ≈ 0 oxygen absorption and emission lines indicate the Milky Way hosts a hot (˜ {10}6 K), low-density plasma extending ≳ 50 {{kpc}} into the Mily Way’s halo. Current X-ray telescopes cannot resolve the line profiles, but the variation of their strengths on the sky constrains the radial gas distribution. Interpreting the O vii Kα absorption line strengths has several complications, including optical depth and line of sight velocity effects. Here, we present model absorption line profiles accounting for both of these effects to show the lines can exhibit asymmetric structures and be broader than the intrinsic Doppler width. The line profiles encode the hot gas rotation curve, the net inflow or outflow of hot gas, and the hot gas angular momentum profile. We show how line of sight velocity effects impact the conversion between equivalent width and the column density, and provide modified curves of growth accounting for these effects. As an example, we analyze the LMC sight line pulsar dispersion measure and O vii equivalent width to show the average gas metallicity is ≳ 0.6{Z}⊙ and b ≳ 100 km s-1. Determining these properties offers valuable insights into the dynamical state of the Milky Way’s hot gas, and improves the line strength interpretation. We discuss future strategies to observe these effects with an instrument that has a spectral resolution of about 3000, a goal that is technically possible today.

  4. Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

  5. The Properties of Diffuse Warm and Hot Gas in I Zw 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomans, D. J.

    With their generally low metallicity and shallow potential wells, low mass galaxies are especially well suited laboratories for the interplay between gas and stars. Even moderate star formation events effect large parts of the host system and outflows of warm and hot gas with freshly produced metals appear to be relatively common. In addition the cooling rate of the hot gas in the outflows should be depressed as effect of the low metallicity. While the study of the creation and transport of the hot gas and the interaction between hot and colder gas needs X-ray data, relatively little data are available in the literature for dwarf galaxies, yet. Here we present a case study of the diffuse hot gas of I Zw 18 using CHANDRA ACIS-S imaging and spectroscopy. The X-ray results are compared with HST imaging and long-slit echelle spectroscopy of the warm diffuse gas. I Zw 18 is an especially well suited target due to extremely low metallicity, relatively high current star formation rate, and low mass. Narrow band imaging and echelle spectroscopy demonstrate that gas is flowing out of the galaxy. The low metallicity should aid the detection of metallicity differences between the galaxy and the hot, possibly metal-enriched gas on its way out of the host galaxy. The ACIS-S spectrum is discussed in this respect.

  6. Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Cr7C3/γ-Fe Ceramal Composite Coating Fabricated by Plasma Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Junbo

    2007-01-01

    A new type in situ Cr7C3/γ-Fe ceramal composite coating was fabricated on substrate of hardened and tempered grade C steel by plasma cladding with Fe-Cr-C alloy powders. The ceramal composite coating has a rapidly solidified microstructure consisting of primary Cr7C3 and the Cr7C3/γ-Fe eutectics, and is metallurgically bonded to the degree C steel substrate. The corrosion resistances of the coating in water solutions of 0.5 mol/L H2SO4 and 3.5% NaCl were evaluated utilizing the electrochemical polarization corrosion-test method. Because of the inherent excellent corrosion-resisting properties of the constituting phase and the rapidly solidified homogeneous microstructure, the plasma clad ceramal composite coating exhibits excellent corrosion resistance in the water solutions of 0.5 mol/L H2SO4 and 3.5% NaCl.

  7. Ultimate Tensile Strength as a Function of Test Rate for Various Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength of five different continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/BSAS (2D 2 types), SiC/MAS-5 (2D), SiC/SiC (2D enhanced), and C/SiC(2D) was determined as a function of test rate at I 100 to 1200 'C in air. All five composite materials exhibited a significant dependency of ultimate strength on test rate such that the ultimate strength decreased with decreasing test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress rate) to another (constant stress loading) for SiC/BSAS suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics.

  8. Synthesis of FeNi-Ceramic composite by carbothermal reduction from Fe2O3-WO3-Ni system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Niyomwas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available FeNi-Ceramics (Fe3W3C, Fe6W6C composite powder was synthesized by carbothermal reduction of Fe2O3-WO3-Ni mixture under argon gas atmosphere at 1200oC temperature. The standard Gibbs energy minimization method was used to calculate the equilibrium composition of the reacting species. Effects of synthesis milling time of precursors on the FeNi-Ceramics conversion were investigated. The resulted product phases and morphologies were identified using XRD and SEM methods. The synthesized products showed composite of ceramic (Fe3W3C, Fe6W6C and iron-nickel alloy (FeNi phases.

  9. Fracture toughness determination of ceramic and resin-based dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvam, K

    1992-01-01

    A new method has been developed for Klc determinations of brittle materials with precracks introduced by indentations. A reference glass, five ceramic materials, and one resin-based composite were tested. Knoop hardness indentations were made with a load of 49 N in a line from edge to edge vertical to the long axis on one surface of four-point flexure bars, to make a continuous crack under the indentations. Five specimens of each material were fractured in a four-point bend test with the line of indentations placed in the zone of constant and maximum tensile stress. Separate unfractured specimens were ground and polished to expose and measure the preformed continuous crack. The mean of six crack-depth measurements was used together with the fracture load and the dimensions of the bend specimens to calculate the fracture toughness, Klc of each material. The determined Klc value (x +/- SD) for the reference glass was 0.81 +/- .24 MPa m1/2 and corresponds to previous studies. The resin-based composite material, Silux Plus, had a value of 1.04 +/- 0.14 MPa m1/2. The Klc values (MPa m1/2) were 0.94 +/- 0.31 for Dicor, 1.41 +/- 0.18 for Cerestore, 1.50 +/- 0.29 for NBK-1000, 1.60 +/- 0.17 for Vitadur-N and 2.14 +/- 0.14 for Hi-Ceram. Hi-Ceram had significantly higher Klc values than the other materials. The new method seemed to be of value in determining the fracture toughness of non-metallic dental materials. PMID:1550892

  10. Study on Preparation and Physical Mechanical Properties of Si3N4 Composite Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, by using the hot-pressed sintered technology, pure Si3N4 ceramics and Si3N4 composite ceramics containing different volume fraction(hBN are prepared with the sintered catalyst of Al2O3 and Y2O3(total 10vol% by HIGH MULTI 5000 multi-functional high temperature sintering furnace. And the phase compositions, microstructure and mechanical properties of specimen were studied. The results show that, based on the hot pressing sintering process, the α-Si3N4 is all changed into β-Si3N4. Addition of hBN into Si3N4 inhibits the growth of the crystal grain and makes the ceramic materials generate hBN segregation zone in internal materials, which causes the addition of hBN that cannot improve the physical mechanical properties effectively just because the serious stress concentrates and fatigue break down. In addition, compared with other sintering process, the physical and mechanical properties of Si3N4 prepared by hot-pressing sintering are better than other methods. Improvement of sintering temperature and time can refine the crystal grain and be a helpful densification. The changed β-Si3N4 grain completely forms an intertwined structure and increases the physical and mechanical properties of Si3N4. Meanwhile, Y2O3 and Al2O3 additives are melted and filled into Si3N4 particles at the high temperature, leading to a significant drop of the porosity and the increase of density.

  11. Properties and performance of polysiloxane-derived ceramic matrix in heat resistant composites reinforced with R-glass or fine ceramic fibres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Martin; Glogar, Petr; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Machovič, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2005), s. 145-152. ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/02/0177; GA ČR(CZ) GP106/02/P025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : polysiloxane resin * fibre-reinforced composite * mechanical properties Subject RIV: JH - Ceramic s, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.463, year: 2005

  12. MASBAL: A computer program for predicting the composition of nuclear waste glass produced by a slurry-fed ceramic melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a user's manual for the MASBAL computer program. MASBAL's objectives are to predict the composition of nuclear waste glass produced by a slurry-fed ceramic melter based on a knowledge of process conditions; to generate simulated data that can be used to estimate the uncertainty in the predicted glass composition as a function of process uncertainties; and to generate simulated data that can be used to provide a measure of the inherent variability in the glass composition as a function of the inherent variability in the feed composition. These three capabilities are important to nuclear waste glass producers because there are constraints on the range of compositions that can be processed in a ceramic melter and on the range of compositions that will be acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. MASBAL was developed specifically to simulate the operation of the West Valley Component Test system, a commercial-scale ceramic melter system that will process high-level nuclear wastes currently stored in underground tanks at the site of the Western New York Nuclear Services Center (near West Valley, New York). The program is flexible enough, however, to simulate any slurry-fed ceramic melter system. 4 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Electrochemical study of lithiated transition metal oxide composite as symmetrical electrode for low temperature ceramic fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Liangdong; Zhang, Hongjuan; Chen, Mingming; Wang, Chengyang; Wang, Hao; Singh, Manish; Zhu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    In this work, Lithiated NiCuZnOx (LNCZO) composite is synthesized and evaluated as a potential symmetrical electrode for ceria-carbonate composite electrolyte based low temperature ceramic fuel cells. Its crystal structures, the hydrogen oxidation/oxygen reduction electrochemical activities and fuel cell performances are systematically examined on the symmetrical cell configuration. Nano crystallite particles in the form of composite are observed for these oxides. The LNCZO shows relatively h...

  14. The Fabrication and Characterization of PCL/Rice Husk Derived Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Composite Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Naghizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to fabricate a 3D scaffold using polycaprolactone (PCL and silicate based bioactive glass-ceramic (R-SBgC. Different concentrations of R-SBgC prepared from rice husk ash (RHA were combined with PCL to fabricate a composite scaffold using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS method. The products were then characterized using SEM and EDX. The results demonstrated that R-SBgC in PCL matrix produced a bioactive material which has highly porous structure with interconnected porosities. There appears to be a relationship between the increase in R-SBgC concentration and increased material density and compressive modulus; however, increasing R-SBgC concentration result in reduced scaffold porosity. In conclusion, it is possible to fabricate a PCL/bioactive glass-ceramic composite from processed rice husk. Varying the R-SBgC concentrations can control the properties of this material, which is useful in the development of the ideal scaffold intended for use as a bone substitute in nonload bearing sites.

  15. Surface properties of ceramic/metal composite materials for thermionic converter applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic/metal composite electrode materials are of interest for thermionic energy conversion (TEC) applications for several reasons. These materials consist of submicron metal fibers or islands in an oxide matrix and therefore provide a basis for fabricating finely structured electrodes, with projecting or recessed metallic regions for more efficient electron emission or collection. Furthermore, evaporation and surface diffusion of matrix oxides may provide oxygen enhancement of cesium adsorption and work function lowering at both the collecting and emitting electrode surfaces of the TEC. Finally, the high work function oxide matrix or oxide-metal interfaces may provide efficient surface ionization of cesium for space-charge reduction in the device. The authors are investigating two types of ceramic/metal composite materials. One type is a directionally solidified eutectic consisting of a bulk oxide matrix such as UO2 or stabilized ZrO2 with parallel metal fibers (W) running through the oxide being exposed at the surface by cutting perpendicular to the fiber direction. The second type of material, called a surface eutectic, consists of a refractory substrate (Mo) with a thin layer of deposited and segregated material (Mo-Cr2O3-A12O3) on the surface. The final configuration of this layer is an oxide matrix with metallic islands scattered throughout

  16. Strontium chloroapatite based glass-ceramics composites for nuclear waste immobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apatites are naturally occurring minerals with a general formula of M10(PO4)6X2, (M= Ca, Sr, Ba, X= OH, Cl, F) with a hexagonal crystal structure (S.G :P63/m) and can accommodate alkaline earth and various other aliovalent cations and anions into its crystal structure. Apatites are also known to have high resistance to leaching of the constituent elements under geological conditions. It may not often be possible to immobilize the whole spectrum of the radioactive waste in a single phase M10(PO4)6Cl2, then a combination of M-chloroapatite encapsulated in borosilicate glass (BSG) can immobilize most of the radwaste elements in the composite glass-ceramic matrix (glass bonded chloroapatite), thus utilizing the immobilizing efficiency of both the ceramic phase and glass. In the present study, the synthesis, characterization and thermo-physical property measurements of the Sr-chloroapatite (SrApCI) and some glass-bonded composites based on it have been investigated. The Sr-chloroapatite glass-ceramics were prepared by solid state reactions among stoichiometric concentrations of apatite forming reagents, 20 wt. % borosilicate glass (BSG), and known concentrations (10, 13 and 16 wt. %) of a simulated waste in chloride form. The products were characterized by XRD to confirm the formation of Sr10(PO4)6Cl2 and glass bonded-chloroapatite composites. The surface morphology and qualitative chemical composition of the powders were examined by SEM and EDX. Thermal expansion and glass transition temperature of the matrices were measured by dilatometry. Glass transition temperature of the glass-bonded composites was also examined by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis. The 10-16 wt.% waste loaded matrices showed similar thermal expansion as that of SrApCI, indicating the thermal stability of the matrix to chloride waste immobilization. The glass transition temperature of the waste loaded matrices decreases on increasing the waste loading. The

  17. Synthesis and ceramic processing of zirconia alumina composites for application as solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global warmness and the necessity to obtain clean energy from alternative methods than petroleum raises the importance of developing cleaner and more efficient systems of energy generation, among then, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Cubic stabilized zirconia (CSZ) has been the most studied material as electrolyte in SOFC, due to its ionic conductivity and great stability at operation conditions. However, its low fracture toughness difficulties its application as a thin layer, what could lead to an improvement of cell efficiency. In this sense, the alumina addition in CSZ forms a composite, which can shift its mechanical properties, without compromising its electrical properties. In this work, coprecipitation synthesis route and ceramic processing of zirconia-alumina composites were studied, in order to establish optimum conditions to attain high density, homogeneous microstructure, and better mechanical properties than CSZ, without compromising ionic conductivity. For this purpose, composites containing up to 40 wt % of alumina, in a 9 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (9Y-CSZ) matrix were evaluated. In order to optimize the synthesis of the composites, a preliminary study of powder obtaining and processing were carried out, at compositions containing 20 wt % of alumina, in 9Y-CSZ. The ceramic powders were characterized by helium picnometry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, granulometry by laser diffraction and gas adsorption (BET). The characterization of sinterized compacts were performed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, density measurements, Vickers indentation and impedance spectroscopy. The obtained results show that the alumina addition, in the 9Y-CSZ matrix powders, raises the specific surface area, promotes deagglomeration of powders and elevates the oxides crystallization temperature, requiring higher

  18. Properties of Ceramic Candle Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal-fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems require ceramic candle filter elements which can withstand the mechanical, thermal, and chemical environment of hot gas cleanup applications. These systems demand filter elements to sustain the thermal stresses of normal operations (pulse cleaning), of start-up and shut-down conditions, and of unanticipated process upsets such as excessive ash accumulation without catastrophic failure. The filter elements must also survive the mechanical loads associated with handling and assembly, normal operation, and process upsets. Objectives of the test program at Southern Research are as follows: (1) Provide material characterization to develop an understanding of the physical, mechanical, and thermal behavior of hot gas filter materials. (2) Develop a material property data base from which the behavior of materials in the hot gas cleanup environment may be predicted. (3) Perform testing and analysis of filter elements after exposure to actual operating conditions to determine the effects of the thermal and chemical environments in hot gas filtration on material properties. (4) Explore the glass-like nature of the matrix material

  19. Metal-ceramic composite coatings obtained by new thermal spray technologies: Cold Gas Spray (CGS) and its wear resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, composite coatings composed by an aluminum bronze metal matrix and a hard ceramic alumina phase obtained by cold spray technique were obtained in order to increase the tribological properties of the pure bronze coatings. The different processes that occur during the coating formation (hardening of the metal particles, fragmentation of the ceramic particles, shot peening on the metal substrate, etc) are described and their effects on the coating properties are studied. Wear tests consisting on Ball-on-Disk tests, abrasion Rubber Wheel tests and erosion tests as well as microhardness and adhesion tests are carried out and the results are correlated with the ceramic phase content of the coatings. It can be concluded that the hard ceramic phase increases the tribological properties with relation of the initial bronze coating. Finally, main wear mechanisms during the tribological tests are described. (Author) 21 refs.

  20. Toughening mechanism of lined Al2O3-ZrO2 multiphase ceramics in SHS composite pipes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Hypoeutectic and hypereutectic Al2O3-ZrO2 multiphase ceramics-lined composite pipes were produced by using the gravitational separation self-propagate high-temperature synthesis (SHS) process.The microstructure of the ceramics was observed by means of SEM and EPMA.The fracture toughness of the multiphase ceramics was tested by using the Vickers indentation method.The ceramics is 15.23 Mpa.m1/2.The toughening mechanisms were systematically investigated by means of SEM and XRD.The results show that the bridging toughening mechanism, stress induced ZrO2 transformation toughening mechanism, and microcrack toughening mechanism are the predominant toughening mechanism.

  1. Characterisation of some Clays Used for Whiteware Ceramics I. Mineralogical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Benea

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain a semiquantitative mineralogical composition of raw materials used for whiteware ceramics, four different clay types were analysed by X-ray diffraction. Studies were carried out by using a combination of analyses of the bulk sample, and of the fine fraction. Using a well-established pre-treatment methodology (use of chemicals, ultrasonic treatment, dispersion procedures, clay mineral concentration by centrifugation and sedimentation, oriented and random powder preparation, cation saturation, expansion/dehydration methods, 12 X-ray diffractometer traces were obtained from each sample. Based on these informations it was possible to establish the qualitative mineralogical composition, and also a semiquantitative one using peak intensities and peak area corrected by various factors. Scanning electron microscopy was also used in order to illustrate the identified mineral phases.

  2. The influence of glass composition on crystalline phase stability in glass-ceramic wasteforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Crystalline phase formation shown to depend on glass matrix composition. • Zirconolite forms as the sole crystalline phase only for most aluminous glasses. • Thermodynamics indicate that low silica activity glasses stabilise zirconolite. - Abstract: Zirconolite glass-ceramic wasteforms were prepared using a suite of Na2O–Al2O3–B2O3–SiO2 glass matrices with variable Al:B ratios. Zirconolite was the dominant crystalline phase only for the most alumina rich glass compositions. As the Al:B ratio decreased zirconolite was replaced by sphene, zircon and rutile. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate a silica activity in the glass melt below which zirconolite is the favoured crystalline phase. The concept of the crystalline reference state of glass melts is then utilised to provide a physical basis for why silica activity varies with the Al:B ratio

  3. Low-Activation structural ceramic composites for fusion power reactors: materials development and main design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is devoted to the development of advanced Low-Activation Materials (LAMs) with favourable short-term activation characteristics for the use as structural materials in a fusion power reactor (in order to reduce the risk associated with a major accident, in particular those related with radio-isotopes release in the environment), and to try to approach the concept of an inherently safe reactor. LA Ceramics Composites (LACCs) are the most promising LAMs because of their relatively good thermo-mechanical properties. At present, SiC/SiC composite is the only LACC considered by the fusion community, and therefore is the one having the most complete data base. The preliminary design of a breeding blanket using SiC/SiC as structural material indicated that significant improvement of its thermal conductivity is required. (orig.)

  4. Low-activation structural ceramic composites for fusion power reactors: materials development and main design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of advanced Low-Activation Materials (LAMs) with favourable short-term activation characteristics is discussed, for the use as structural materials in a fusion power reactor (in order to reduce the risk associated with a major accident, in particular those related with radio-isotopes release in the environment), and to try to approach the concept of an inherently safe reactor. LA Ceramics Composites (LACCs) are the most promising LAMs because of their relatively good thermo-mechanical properties. At present, SiC/SiC composite is the only LACC considered by the fusion community, and therefore is the one having the most complete data base. The preliminary design of a breeding blanket using SiC/SiC as structural material indicated that significant improvement of its thermal conductivity is required. (author) 11 refs.; 3 figs

  5. Continuous fiber ceramic composite. Phase I final report, April 1992--April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goettler, R.W.

    1995-04-01

    Babcock and Wilcox assembled a team to develop the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) processing technology, identify the industrial applications, generate design and life prediction software, and to begin the necessary steps leading to full commercialization of CFCC components. Following is a summary of Phase I activities on this program. B&W has selected an oxide-oxide composite system for development and optimization in this program. This selection was based on the results of exposure tests in combustion environments typical of the boiler and heat exchanger applications. Aluminum oxide fiber is the selected reinforcement, and both aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide matrices were selected, based on their superior resistance to chemical attack in hostile industrial service.

  6. Neutron diffraction residual stress analysis of Al2O3/Y-TZP ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Residual stress measurements were conducted by time-of-flight neutron diffraction and Rietveld analysis method in Al2O3/Y-TZP ceramic composites fabricated by different green processing techniques (a novel tape casting and conventional slip casting) and with different Y-TZP content (5 and 40 vol.% Y-TZP). The results show that the residual stresses in Y-TZP particulates are tensile and the ones in Al2O3 matrix are compressive, with almost flat through-thickness residual stress profiles in all bulk samples. As Y-TZP content increased, tension in Y-TZP phase was decreased but compression in Al2O3 matrix was increased (in absolute value). The values of residual stresses for both phases were mainly dependent on the Y-TZP content in the studied Al2O3/Y-TZP composites, irrespective of sample orientation and fabrication processes (a novel tape casting and conventional slip casting). (Author)

  7. Gold Nanoparticles As A Modifying Agent of Ceramic-Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobczak-Kupiec A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Much effort has been invested in the development of biomaterials for the repair or replacement of hard tissue. The synthesis of composites based on mineral and organic constituents is nowadays extremely important for the development of materials for biomedical applications. In this paper we report the preparation and characterization of ceramic-polymer composites doped with gold nanoparticles. Properties and applications in medicine and dentistry of colloidal gold nanoparticles depends upon their size and shape. The influence of the presence of the metallic nanoparticles on the degradation process was investigated by pH and conductivity analyses of water filtrates. The nanocomposites were characterized with the use of X-ray Diffaction (XRD and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR methods.

  8. The influence of glass composition on crystalline phase stability in glass-ceramic wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddrell, Ewan, E-mail: ewan.r.maddrell@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Thornber, Stephanie; Hyatt, Neil C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Crystalline phase formation shown to depend on glass matrix composition. • Zirconolite forms as the sole crystalline phase only for most aluminous glasses. • Thermodynamics indicate that low silica activity glasses stabilise zirconolite. - Abstract: Zirconolite glass-ceramic wasteforms were prepared using a suite of Na{sub 2}O–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} glass matrices with variable Al:B ratios. Zirconolite was the dominant crystalline phase only for the most alumina rich glass compositions. As the Al:B ratio decreased zirconolite was replaced by sphene, zircon and rutile. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate a silica activity in the glass melt below which zirconolite is the favoured crystalline phase. The concept of the crystalline reference state of glass melts is then utilised to provide a physical basis for why silica activity varies with the Al:B ratio.

  9. Nondestructive evaluation of ceramic and metal matrix composites for NASA's HITEMP and enabling propulsion materials programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1992-01-01

    In a preliminary study, ultrasonic, x-ray opaque, and fluorescent dye penetrants techniques were used to evaluate and characterize ceramic and metal matrix composites. Techniques are highlighted for identifying porosity, fiber alignment, fiber uniformity, matrix cracks, fiber fractures, unbonds or disbonds between laminae, and fiber-to-matrix bond variations. The nondestructive evaluations (NDE) were performed during processing and after thermomechanical testing. Specific examples are given for Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber), FeCrAlY/Al2O3 fibers, Ti-15-3/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) materials, and Si3N4/SiC (SCS-6 fiber) actively cooled panel components. Results of this study indicate that the choice of the NDE tools to be used can be optimized to yield a faithful and accurate evaluation of advanced composites.

  10. Physics-Based Design Tools for Lightweight Ceramic Composite Turbine Components with Durable Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Under the Supersonics Project of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program, modeling and experimental efforts are underway to develop generic physics-based tools to better implement lightweight ceramic matrix composites into supersonic engine components and to assure sufficient durability for these components in the engine environment. These activities, which have a crosscutting aspect for other areas of the Fundamental Aero program, are focusing primarily on improving the multi-directional design strength and rupture strength of high-performance SiC/SiC composites by advanced fiber architecture design. This presentation discusses progress in tool development with particular focus on the use of 2.5D-woven architectures and state-of-the-art constituents for a generic un-cooled SiC/SiC low-pressure turbine blade.

  11. Data on post irradiation experiments of heat resistant ceramic composite materials. PIE for 97M-13A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research on the radiation damage mechanism of heat resistant ceramic composite materials is one of the research subjects of the innovative basic research in the field of high temperature engineering, using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Three series of irradiation tests on the heat resistant ceramic composite materials, first to third irradiation test program, were carried out using the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR). This is a summary report on the first irradiation test program; irradiation induced dimensional change, thermal expansion coefficient, X-ray diffraction and γ-ray spectrum are reported. (author)

  12. Data on post irradiation experiments of heat resistant ceramic composite materials. PIE for 97M-13A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shin-ichi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Souzawa, Shizuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Sekino, Hajime [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The research on the radiation damage mechanism of heat resistant ceramic composite materials is one of the research subjects of the innovative basic research in the field of high temperature engineering, using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Three series of irradiation tests on the heat resistant ceramic composite materials, first to third irradiation test program, were carried out using the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR). This is a summary report on the first irradiation test program; irradiation induced dimensional change, thermal expansion coefficient, X-ray diffraction and {gamma}-ray spectrum are reported. (author)

  13. Crystallization and dielectric properties of lead-free glass-ceramic composites with Gd_2O_3 addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Lead-free glass-ceramic composites in barium sodium niobate silica system with Gd2O3 addition were synthesized through melt-casting fol-lowed by controlled crystallization technique. Crystallization and dielectric properties of the Gd2O3 adding glass-ceramic composites were investigated. With the increase in the concentration of Gd2O3, the glass transition temperature and the crystallization temperature of the pre-cursor glass shift towards the higher temperature. The crystallization behavior that occurred ...

  14. Metal/ceramic interface structures and segregation behavior in aluminum-based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimodal Al alloy (AA) matrix composites consisting of ultrafine-grained (UFG) and coarse-grained (CG) Al phases and micron-sized B4C ceramic reinforcement particles exhibit combinations of strength and ductility that render them useful for potential applications in the aerospace, defense and automotive industries. Tailoring of microstructures with specific mechanical properties requires a detailed understanding of interfacial structures to enable strong interface bonding between ceramic reinforcement and metal matrix, and thereby allow for effective load transfer. Trimodal AA metal matrix composites typically show three characteristics that are noteworthy: nanocrystalline grains in the vicinity of the B4C reinforcement particles; Mg segregation at AA/B4C interfaces; and the presence of amorphous interfacial layers separating nanocrystalline grains from B4C particles. Interestingly, however, fundamental information related to the mechanisms responsible for these characteristics as well as information on local compositions and phases are absent in the current literature. In this study, we use high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and precession assisted electron diffraction to gain fundamental insight into the mechanisms that affect the characteristics of AA/B4C interfaces. Specifically, we determined interfacial structures, local composition and spatial distribution of the interfacial constituents. Near atomic resolution characterization revealed amorphous multilayers and a nanocrystalline region between Al phase and B4C reinforcement particles. The amorphous layers consist of nonstoichiometric AlxOy, while the nanocrystalline region is comprised of MgO nanograins. The experimental results are discussed in terms of the possible underlying mechanisms at AA/B4C interfaces

  15. The Effect of Stochastically Varying Creep Parameters on Residual Stresses in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Mital, Subodh K.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Constituent properties, along with volume fraction, have a first order effect on the microscale fields within a composite material and influence the macroscopic response. Therefore, there is a need to assess the significance of stochastic variation in the constituent properties of composites at the higher scales. The effect of variability in the parameters controlling the time-dependent behavior, in a unidirectional SCS-6 SiC fiber-reinforced RBSN matrix composite lamina, on the residual stresses induced during processing is investigated numerically. The generalized method of cells micromechanics theory is utilized to model the ceramic matrix composite lamina using a repeating unit cell. The primary creep phases of the constituents are approximated using a Norton-Bailey, steady state, power law creep model. The effect of residual stresses on the proportional limit stress and strain to failure of the composite is demonstrated. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted using a normal distribution for the power law parameters and the resulting residual stress distributions were predicted.

  16. Properties and microstructure of molybdenum disilicide-β'-SiAlON particulate ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particulate ceramic composites that were composed of a combustion-synthesized β'-SiAlON matrix and dispersed MoSi2 particles were hot pressed at 1,600 C in a nitrogen atmosphere. The physical and mechanical properties of the composites that contained 15, 30, and 45 vol% MoSi2 were evaluated. The average four-point bend strength, fracture toughness, and Vickers hardness of the composites were in the ranges of 500--600 MPa, 3--4 MPa·m1/2, and 11--13 GPa, respectively. The measured mechanical strength and hardness were very similar to the values that were predicted from the rule of mixtures. The fracture toughness of the combustion-synthesized β'-SiAlON (2.5 MPa·m1/2) was apparently enhanced by the MoSi2 particles that were added. The increase in the fracture toughness was predominantly attributed to the residual thermal stress that was induced by the thermal expansion mismatch between the MoSi2 particles and the β'-SiAlON matrix. The composites showed improved electrical conductivity and oxidation resistance over monolithic β'-SiAlON. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy examination of the composites indicated that the MoSi2 was chemically well compatible with the β'-SiAlON

  17. Novel Vibration Damping of Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Blades Developed for RLV Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James B.

    2000-01-01

    The Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) represents the next generation of space transportation for the U.S. space program. The goal for this vehicle is to lower launch costs by an order of magnitude from $10,000/lb to $1,000/lb. Such a large cost reduction will require a highly efficient operation, which naturally will require highly efficient engines. The RS-2200 Linear Aerospike Engine is being considered as the main powerplant for the RLV. Strong, lightweight, temperature-resistant ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials such as C/SiC are critical to the development of the RS-2200. Preliminary engine designs subject turbopump components to extremely high frequency dynamic excitation, and ceramic matrix composite materials are typically lightly damped, making them vulnerable to high-cycle fatigue. The combination of low damping and high-frequency excitation creates the need for enhanced damping. Thus, the goal of this project has been to develop well-damped C/SiC turbine components for use in the RLV. Foster-Miller and Boeing Rocketdyne have been using an innovative, low-cost process to develop light, strong, highly damped turbopump components for the RS-2200 under NASA s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is managing this work. The process combines three-dimensionally braided fiber reinforcement with a pre-ceramic polymer. The three-dimensional reinforcement significantly improves the structure over conventional two-dimensional laminates, including high through-the-thickness strength and stiffness. Phase I of the project successfully applied the Foster-Miller pre-ceramic polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) process to the manufacture of dynamic specimens representative of engine components. An important aspect of the program has been the development of the manufacturing process. Results show that the three-dimensionally braided carbon-fiber reinforcement provides good processability and good mechanical

  18. Robocast Pb(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O3 Ceramic Monoliths and Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robocasting, a computer controlled slurry deposition technique, was used to fabricate ceramic monoliths and composites of chemically prepared Pb(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O3 (PZT 95/5) ceramics. Densities and electrical properties of the robocast samples were equivalent to those obtained for cold isostatically pressed (CIP) parts formed at 200 MPa. Robocast composites consisting of alternate layers of the following sintered densities: (93.9%--96.1%--93.9%), were fabricated using different levels of organic pore former additions. Modification from a single to a multiple material deposition robocaster was essential to the fabrication of composites that could withstand repeated cycles of saturated polarization switching under 30 kV/cm fields. Further, these composites withstood 500 MPa hydrostatic pressure induced poled ferroelectric (FE) to antiferroelectric (AFE) phase transformation during which strain differences on the order of 0.8% occurred between composite elements

  19. The high frequency fatigue behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Nikhilesh

    Many potential applications for continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCMCs), such as gas turbines and heat exchangers, will involve high frequency cyclic loading (75 Hz or higher). While most of the work in the area of fatigue of CFCMCs has concentrated on low frequency behavior, it has been shown that fatigue at high frequencies can exacerbate the accumulation of microstructural damage and significantly decrease fatigue life. "Soft" matrix composites with strong interface bonding provided superior resistance to high frequency fatigue damage. Nicalon/SiCON composites with strong interfacial bonding between the fibers and matrix exhibited very little internal heating during high frequency fatigue loading. This composite system exhibited excellent fatigue life, with fatigue runout at 10sp7 cycles occurring for stresses close to 80% of the ultimate strength (at a loading frequency of 100 Hz). Thick fiber coatings may be more effective in reducing the amount of fiber wear and damage which occur during high frequency fatigue. More effective lubrication at the fiber/matrix interface was achieved with thicker carbon coatings in Nicalon/C/SiC composites subjected to high frequency fatigue loading. Composites with thicker coatings exhibited substantially lower frictional heating and had much higher fatigue lives. The effect of laminate stacking sequence had a significant effect on the high frequency fatigue behavior of CFCMCs. In SCS-6/Sisb3Nsb4 composites, frictional heating in angle-ply laminates (±45) was substantially higher than that in cross-ply laminates (0/90). Since the angle-ply had a lower stiffness, matrix microcracking in this composite was more predominant. Finally, preliminary fatigue damage mechanism maps for CFCMCs were developed. These maps provided a means to identify which fatigue mechanisms were operating at a given stress level and number of cycles.

  20. The suitability of XRF analysis for compositional classification of archaeological ceramic fabric: A comparison with a previous NAA study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main drawbacks of EDXRF techniques, restricting its more frequent use for the specific purpose of compositional analysis of archaeological ceramic fabric, have been the insufficient sensitivity to determine some important elements (like Cr, REE, among others), a somewhat worse precision and the inability to perform standard-less quantitative procedures in the absence of suitable certified reference materials (CRM) for ceramic fabric. This paper presents the advantages of combining two energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence methods for fast and non-destructive analysis of ceramic fabric with increased sensitivity. Selective polarized excitation using secondary targets (EDPXRF) and radioisotope excitation (R-XRF) using a 241Am source. The analytical performance of the methods was evaluated by analyzing several CRM of sediment type, and the fitness for the purpose of compositional classification was compared with that obtained by using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis in a previous study of Cuban aborigine pottery

  1. The suitability of XRF analysis for compositional classification of archaeological ceramic fabric: A comparison with a previous NAA study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, R. [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), Laboratorio de Analisis Quimico, Calle 30 no. 502, Playa, Ciudad Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: roman.padilla@infomed.sld.cu; Espen, P. van [University of Antwerp (Belgium); Torres, P.P. Godo [Centro de Antropologia, Havana (Cuba)

    2006-02-03

    The main drawbacks of EDXRF techniques, restricting its more frequent use for the specific purpose of compositional analysis of archaeological ceramic fabric, have been the insufficient sensitivity to determine some important elements (like Cr, REE, among others), a somewhat worse precision and the inability to perform standard-less quantitative procedures in the absence of suitable certified reference materials (CRM) for ceramic fabric. This paper presents the advantages of combining two energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence methods for fast and non-destructive analysis of ceramic fabric with increased sensitivity. Selective polarized excitation using secondary targets (EDPXRF) and radioisotope excitation (R-XRF) using a {sup 241}Am source. The analytical performance of the methods was evaluated by analyzing several CRM of sediment type, and the fitness for the purpose of compositional classification was compared with that obtained by using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis in a previous study of Cuban aborigine pottery.

  2. Hot gas and magnetic arms of NGC 6946: Indications for reconnection heating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weżgowiec, M.; Ehle, M.; Beck, R.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The grand-design face-on spiral galaxy NGC 6946 is remarkable because of its high star formation activity, the massive northern spiral arm, and the magnetic arms, which are observed in polarized radio synchrotron emission and are located between the optical arms and possibly are magnetic reconnection regions. Aims: We used electron densities and temperatures in star-forming (active) and less active regions and compared them to findings from the analysis of the radio data to study the energy budget of NGC 6946. The hot gas above the magnetic arms between the optical arms might suggest gas heating by reconnection. We also study the population of point sources in NGC 6946, including the origin of the puzzling ultra-luminous emission complex MF16. Methods: X-ray observations of NGC 6946 performed with XMM-Newton were used to study the emission from X-ray point sources and diffuse hot gas, including the magnetic arms and the halo. Spectral fitting of the diffuse X-ray emission allowed us to derive temperatures of the hot gas. With assumptions about the emission volume, this allowed us to estimate gas densities, masses, and cooling times. Results: To explain the X-ray emission from the spiral arms of NGC 6946 two-temperature plasma models are needed to account for the disk and halo emission. The interarm regions show only one thermal component. We observe that the temperature of the hot gas in and above the magnetic arm regions increases slightly when compared to the average temperatures in the areas in and above the spiral arms. For the southwestern part of the disk, which is depolarized in the radio range by Faraday rotation, we find more efficient mixing of disk and halo gas. Conclusions: We propose magnetic reconnection in the magnetic arm regions of NGC 6946 as the possible cause of the additional heating of the gas and ordering of the magnetic fields. In the southwestern part of the galactic disk we observed indications of a possible faster outflow of the

  3. Preparation and properties of yttria doped tetragonal zirconia polycrystal/Sr-doped barium hexaferrite ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shanshan; Zhang, Chao; Guo, Ruisong, E-mail: rsguo@tju.edu.cn; Liu, Lan; Yang, Yuexia; Li, Kehang

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The 3Y-TZP/Sr-doped barium ferrite composites were prepared. • The saturation magnetization was improved by 15% with Sr-doping. • The dispersion coefficient p could reflect the microscopic lattice variation. • The composite with x = 0.5 had the maximum fracture toughness of 8.3 MPa m{sup 1/2}. - Abstract: The effects of substitution of Ba{sup 2+} by Sr{sup 2+} on the magnetic property of barium ferrite and addition barium ferrite secondary phase to the 3 mol% yttria-doped tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (3Y-TZP) matrix on the mechanical property of composites were investigated. The Sr-doped barium ferrite (Ba{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19}, x = 0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75) was synthesized by solid-state reaction in advance. Then 3Y-TZP/20 wt% Sr-doped barium ferrite composites were prepared by means of conventional ceramic method. It was found that a moderate amount of Sr added to barium ferrite could boost the saturation magnetization by 15% compared with the composites without Sr-doping. Besides, the composite with x = 0.50 possessed the best mechanical properties, such as 11.5 GPa for Vickers hardness and 8.3 MPa m{sup 1/2} for fracture toughness, respectively. It was demonstrated that magnetic and mechanical properties of the composites could be harmonized by the incorporation of barium ferrite secondary phase.

  4. Environmental Effects on Non-oxide Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1997-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) are promising materials for a wide range of high temperature applications. These include such diverse applications as components for heat engines, high temperature electronics, and re-entry shields for space vehicles. Table I lists a number of selected applications. Most of the emphasis here will be on SiC and Si3N4. Where appropriate, other non-oxide materials such as aluminum nitride (AlN) and boron nitride (BN) will be discussed. Proposed materials include both monolithic ceramics and composites. Composites are treated in more detail elsewhere in this volume, however, many of the oxidation/corrosion reactions discussed here can be extended to composites. In application these materials will be exposed to a wide variety of environments. Table I also lists reactive components of these environments.It is well-known that SiC and Si3N4 retain their strength to high temperatures. Thus these materials have been proposed for a variety of hot-gas-path components in combustion applications. These include heat exchanger tubes, combustor liners, and porous filters for coal combustion products. All combustion gases contain CO2, CO, H2, H2O, O2, and N2. The exact gas composition is dependent on the fuel to air ratio or equivalence ratio. (Equivalence ratio (EQ) is a fuel-to-air ratio, with total hydrocarbon content normalized to the amount of O2 and defined by EQ=1 for complete combustion to CO2 and H2O). Figure 1 is a plot of equilibrium gas composition vs. equivalence ratio. Note that as a general rule, all combustion atmospheres are about 10% water vapor and 10% CO2. The amounts of CO, H2, and O2 are highly dependent on equivalence ratio.

  5. The preparation of dental glass-ceramic composites with controlled fraction of leucite crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Mrázová

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is dealing with synthesis of leucite powder, which can be used for the preparation of dental glassceramic composites by subsequent thermal treatment. Newly developed procedure is based on preparation of dental raw material as a mixture of two separate compounds: the crystalline leucite powder prepared at relatively low temperature and a commercial matrix powder.Hydrothermal synthesis of tetragonal leucite particles (KAlSi2O6 with the average size of about 3 μm was developed in our laboratory. The leucite dental raw material was prepared by mixing of 20 wt.% of synthetic tetragonal leucite with commercial matrix. Dental composites were prepared from the dental raw material by uniaxial pressing and firing up to 960°C. Dilatometric measurements confirmed that the coefficient of thermal expansion increased by 32% when 20 wt.% of the tetragonal leucite was added into the basic matrix. In addition, it was showed that the synthesized leucite powder was suitable for the preparation of leucite composites with controlled coefficient of thermal expansion. High value of the thermal expansion coefficient enables application of prepared composite in metal-ceramics restorations.

  6. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components: Final report on Phases 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, W.A.; Halverson, H.; Carter, R.H.; Miraj, N.; Reifsnider, K.L. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1998-01-15

    The objective of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The research program of the Materials Response Group at Virginia Tech addresses the need for reliable and durable structural ceramic composites to perform in high temperature environments. The research effort provides an experimental and analytical basis for the transition from properties of materials to performance of actual component structures. Phases 1 and 2 of the present program focused on the development of test capabilities, initial studies of component mechanical response under various conditions and the development of a life prediction methodology. These efforts have been described in previous reports. This report summarizes the major tasks completed under Phases 3 and 4 of the project. Overall, the authors have made significant progress in a broad spectrum of tasks in this program. Their efforts have encompassed component evaluation, assessment of new SiC-based composites with improved high-temperature potential, development of oxide coating materials for SiC, and the extension and development of new models for predicting the durability of composite components under specific operating conditions for various CMC applications. Each of these areas of work is an important area for achieving the ultimate goal of usable SiC-based composites in high-temperature corrosive environments typical of fossil energy applications.

  7. Ceramic/Metal Composites with Positive Temperature Dependence of Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most materials show decreasing thermal conductivity with increasing temperature, but an opposite temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is required for some industrial applications. The present work was conducted with a motivation to develop composite materials with a positive temperature dependence of thermal conductivity. ZrO2/ stainless steel powders (304L) composite, with 3% stearic acid, was prepared by normal sintering under the protecting of Ar after mixing by mechanical ball milling technique. With the 304L content increasing from 10% to 20%, the thermal conductivity values increased. For all samples, the thermal conductivity in the temperature range of room temperature to 700 °C decreased with temperature below 300 °C, and then began to increase. The increasing thermal conductivity of the composites (within the high temperature range was attributed to the difference of the thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient between ZrO2 ceramic and 304L stainless steel powders. Two simple models were also used to estimate the thermal conductivity of the composites, which were in good agreement with the experiment results.

  8. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-06-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  9. Influence of Composition on Properties of Medium Temperature Sintering (Ba, Sr)TiO3 Series Capacitor Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the composition (Yb2O3, MgO, CeO2, Li2CO3) on the dielectric properties of medium temperature sintering (Ba,Sr)TiO3(BST) series capacitor ceramics was investigated by means of conventional technology process and orthogonal design experiments. The major secondary influencing factors and the influencing tendency of various factor′s levels for the dielectric properties of BST ceramics were obtained. The optimum formula for maximum dielectric constant (ε) and for minimum dielectric loss (tanδ) was obtained under the experimental conditions. The BST ceramics with optimum comprehensive properties was obtained by means of orthogonal design experiments, with the sintering temperature at 1200 ℃, the dielectric constant 5239, the dielectric loss 0.0097, withstand electric voltage over 6 MV·m-1, capacitance temperature changing rate (ΔC/C) -75.67%, and suited for Y5V character. The mechanism of the influence of various components on the dielectric properties of medium temperature sintering BST ceramics was studied, thus providing the basis for preparation of multilayer capacitor ceramics and single-chip capacitor ceramics.

  10. Preparation of metal-ceramic composites by sonochemical synthesis of metallic nano-particles and in-situ decoration on ceramic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulia, A; Sakkas, P M; Kanellopoulou, D G; Sourkouni, G; Legros, C; Argirusis, Chr

    2016-07-01

    Copper and nickel nanoparticles were synthesized using reducing agents in the presence of direct high energy ultra-sonication. The metallic nanoparticles were decorated on various ceramic substrates (e.g. α-Al2O3, and TiO2) leading to metal reinforced ceramics with up to 45% metallic content. Different parameters, such as the amount of precursor material or the substrate, as well as the intensity of ultrasound were examined, in order to evaluate the percentage of final metallic decoration on the composite materials. All products were characterized by means of Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy in order to investigate the loading with metallic particles. X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy were also used for further sample characterization. Selected samples were examined using Transmission Electron Microscopy, while finally, some of the powders synthesized, were densified by means of Spark Plasma Sintering, followed by a SEM/EDX examination and an estimation of their porosity. PMID:26964967

  11. Ceramic-intermetallic composites produced by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering

    CERN Document Server

    Cabanas-Moreno, J G; Martínez-Sanchez, R; Delgado-Gutierrez, O; Palacios-Gomez, J; Umemoto, M

    1998-01-01

    Nano-and microcomposites of intermetallic (Co/sub 3/Ti, AlCo/sub 2 /Ti) and ceramic (TiN, Ti(C, N), Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) phases have been produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS) of powders resulting from mechanical alloying of Al-Co-Ti elemental powder mixtures. The mechanically alloyed powders consisted of mixtures of nanocrystalline and amorphous phases which, on sintering, transformed into complex microstructures of the intermetallic and ceramic phases. For Al contents lower than about 30 at% in the original powder mixtures, the use of SPS led to porosities of 1-2% in the sintered compacts and hardness values as high as ~1700 kg/mm/sup 2/; in these cases, the composite matrix was TiN and Ti(C, N), with the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ phase found as finely dispersed particles in the matrix and the Co /sub 3/Ti and AlCo/sub 2/Ti phases as interdispersed grains. (19 refs).

  12. Structural properties of a bone-ceramic composite as a promising material in spinal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the results of in vitro tests of composite bone-ceramic implants and procedures for modifying implant surfaces to enhance osteogenesis. Analysis of CBCI ESs demonstrated that they have a porous structure with the mean longitudinal pore size of 70 µm and the mean transverse pore size of 46 µm; surface pores are open, while inner pores are closed. Elemental analysis of the CBCI surface demonstrates that CBCIs are composed of aluminum and zirconium oxides and contain HA inclusions. Profilometry of the CBCI ES surface revealed the following deviations: the maximum deviation of the profile in the sample center is 15 µm and 16 µm on the periphery, while the arithmetical mean and mean square deviations of the profile are 2.65 and 3.4 µm, respectively. In addition, CBCI biodegradation products were pre-examined; a 0.9% NaCl solution was used as a comparison group. Potentially toxic and tissue accumulated elements, such as cadmium, cobalt, mercury, and lead, are present only in trace amounts and have no statistically significant differences with the comparison group, which precludes their potential toxic effects on the macroorganism. Ceramic-based CBCI may be effective and useful in medicine for restoration of the anatomic integrity and functions of the bone tissue

  13. Radiation-tolerant joining technologies for silicon carbide ceramics and composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai, E-mail: katohy@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Snead, Lance L.; Cheng, Ting; Shih, Chunghao; Lewis, W. Daniel [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Koyanagi, Takaaki; Hinoki, Tatsuya [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd., Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Ferraris, Monica [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) for nuclear structural applications, whether in the monolithic ceramic or composite form, will require a robust joining technology capable of withstanding the harsh nuclear environment. This paper presents significant progress made towards identifying and processing irradiation-tolerant joining methods for nuclear-grade SiC. In doing so, a standardized methodology for carrying out joint testing has been established consistent with the small volume samples mandated by neutron irradiation testing. Candidate joining technologies were limited to those that provide low induced radioactivity and included titanium diffusion bonding, Ti–Si–C MAX-phase joining, calcia–alumina glass–ceramic joining, and transient eutectic-phase SiC joining. Samples of these joints were irradiated in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor at 500 or 800 °C, and their microstructure and mechanical properties were compared to pre-irradiation conditions. Within the limitations of statistics, all joining methodologies presented retained their joint mechanical strength to ∼3 dpa at 500 °C, thus indicating the first results obtained on irradiation-stable SiC joints. Under the more aggressive irradiation conditions (800 °C, ∼5 dpa), some joint materials exhibited significant irradiation-induced microstructural evolution; however, the effect of irradiation on joint strength appeared rather limited.

  14. Radiation-tolerant joining technologies for silicon carbide ceramics and composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Cheng, Ting; Shih, Chunghao; Lewis, W. Daniel; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Henager, Charles H.; Ferraris, Monica

    2014-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) for nuclear structural applications, whether in the monolithic ceramic or composite form, will require a robust joining technology capable of withstanding the harsh nuclear environment. This paper presents significant progress made towards identifying and processing irradiation-tolerant joining methods for nuclear-grade SiC. In doing so, a standardized methodology for carrying out joint testing has been established consistent with the small volume samples mandated by neutron irradiation testing. Candidate joining technologies were limited to those that provide low induced radioactivity and included titanium diffusion bonding, Ti–Si–C MAX-phase joining, calcia–alumina glass–ceramic joining, and transient eutectic-phase SiC joining. Samples of these joints were irradiated in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor at 500 or 800 °C, and their microstructure and mechanical properties were compared to pre-irradiation conditions. Within the limitations of statistics, all joining methodologies presented retained their joint mechanical strength to ~3 dpa at 500 °C, thus indicating the first results obtained on irradiation-stable SiC joints. Finally, under the more aggressive irradiation conditions (800 °C, ~5 dpa), some joint materials exhibited significant irradiation-induced microstructural evolution; however, the effect of irradiation on joint strength appeared rather limited.

  15. Structural properties of a bone-ceramic composite as a promising material in spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilova, I. A., E-mail: IKirilova@mail.ru; Sadovoy, M. A.; Podorozhnaya, V. T., E-mail: VPodorognaya@niito.ru; Taranov, O. S. [Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics n.a. Ya.L. Tsivyan, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Klinkov, S. V.; Kosarev, V. F. [Christianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Shatskaya, S. S. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The paper describes the results of in vitro tests of composite bone-ceramic implants and procedures for modifying implant surfaces to enhance osteogenesis. Analysis of CBCI ESs demonstrated that they have a porous structure with the mean longitudinal pore size of 70 µm and the mean transverse pore size of 46 µm; surface pores are open, while inner pores are closed. Elemental analysis of the CBCI surface demonstrates that CBCIs are composed of aluminum and zirconium oxides and contain HA inclusions. Profilometry of the CBCI ES surface revealed the following deviations: the maximum deviation of the profile in the sample center is 15 µm and 16 µm on the periphery, while the arithmetical mean and mean square deviations of the profile are 2.65 and 3.4 µm, respectively. In addition, CBCI biodegradation products were pre-examined; a 0.9% NaCl solution was used as a comparison group. Potentially toxic and tissue accumulated elements, such as cadmium, cobalt, mercury, and lead, are present only in trace amounts and have no statistically significant differences with the comparison group, which precludes their potential toxic effects on the macroorganism. Ceramic-based CBCI may be effective and useful in medicine for restoration of the anatomic integrity and functions of the bone tissue.

  16. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  17. Characterization of Ceramic Composite-Membranes Prepared by ORMOSIL Coating Sol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Goo-Dae Kim; Tae-Bong Kim

    2004-01-01

    Sol-gel methods offer many advantages over conventional slip-casting, including the ability to produce ceramic membranes. They are purer, more homogeneous, more reactive and contain a wider variety of compositions. We produced ormosil sol using sol-gel process under different molecular weight of polymer species [polyethylene glycol (PEG) ] in total system [Tetraethyl ortho silicate(TEOS)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)]. The properties of as-prepared ormosil sol such as,viscosity, gelation time were characterized. Also, the ceramic membrane was prepared by dip-coating with synthetic sol and its micro-structure was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The permeability and rejection efficiency of membrane for oil/water emulsion were evaluated as cross-flow apparatus. The ormosil sol coated Membrane is easily formed by steric effect of polymer and it improves flux efficiency because infiltration into porous support decreased. Its flux efficiency is elevated about 200(1/m2·h) compared with colloidal sol coated membrane at point of five minutes from starting test.

  18. Some metal-graphite and metal-ceramic composites for use as high energy brake lining materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Materials were studied as candidates for development as potential new aircraft brake lining materials. These families were (1) copper-graphite composites; (2) nickel-graphite composites; (3) copper - rare-earth-oxide (gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) or lanthanum oxide (La2O3)) composites and copper - rare-earth-oxide (La2O3) - rare-earth-fluoride (lanthanum fluoride (LaF3)) composites; (4) nickel - rare-earth-oxide composites and nickel - rare-earth-oxide - rare-earth-fluoride composites. For comparison purposes, a currently used metal-ceramic composite was also studied. Results showed that the nickel-Gd2O3 and nickel-La2O3-LaF3 composites were comparable or superior in friction and wear performance to the currently used composite and therefore deserve to be considered for further development.

  19. Marginal adaptation of 1 fiber-reinforced composite and 2 all-ceramic inlay fixed partial denture systems

    OpenAIRE

    Monaco, Carlo; Krejci, Ivo; Bortolotto Ibarra, Tissiana; Perakis, Nikolaos; Ferrari,Marco; Scotti, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation and retention of inlay fixed partial dentures (IFPDs) made with 1 fiber-reinforced composite and 2 different ceramic materials using quantitative scanning electron microscope analysis after thermal cycling and mechanical loading, which simulated approximately 5 years of oral service.

  20. Comparison of fracture resistance of teeth restored with ceramic inlay and resin composite: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti D Desai

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The fracture resistant strength of teeth restored with ceramic inlay was comparable to that of the normal intact teeth or slightly higher, while teeth restored with direct composite resin restoration showed less fracture resistant strength than that of the normal teeth.