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Sample records for centriologenesis spindle microtubule

  1. Microtubule Dynamics and Oscillating State for Mitotic Spindle

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid-Shomali, Safura

    2010-01-01

    We present a physical mechanism that can cause the mitotic spindle to oscillate. The driving force for this mechanism emerges from the polymerization of astral microtubules interacting with the cell cortex. We show that Brownian ratchet model for growing microtubules reaching the cell cortex, mediate an effective mass to the spindle body and therefore force it to oscillate. We compare the predictions of this mechanism with the previous mechanisms which were based on the effects of motor proteins. Finally we combine the effects of microtubules polymerization and motor proteins, and present the detailed phase diagram for possible oscillating states.

  2. Equilibria of idealized confined astral microtubules and coupled spindle poles.

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    Ivan V Maly

    Full Text Available Positioning of the mitotic spindle through the interaction of astral microtubules with the cell boundary often determines whether the cell division will be symmetric or asymmetric. This process plays a crucial role in development. In this paper, a numerical model is presented that deals with the force exerted on the spindle by astral microtubules that are bent by virtue of their confinement within the cell boundary. It is found that depending on parameters, the symmetric position of the spindle can be stable or unstable. Asymmetric stable equilibria also exist, and two or more stable positions can exist simultaneously. The theory poses new types of questions for experimental research. Regarding the cases of symmetric spindle positioning, it is necessary to ask whether the microtubule parameters are controlled by the cell so that the bending mechanics favors symmetry. If they are not, then it is necessary to ask what forces external to the microtubule cytoskeleton counteract the bending effects sufficiently to actively establish symmetry. Conversely, regarding the cases with asymmetry, it is now necessary to investigate whether the cell controls the microtubule parameters so that the bending favors asymmetry apart from any forces that are external to the microtubule cytoskeleton.

  3. Contribution of noncentrosomal microtubules to spindle assembly in Drosophila spermatocytes.

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    Elena Rebollo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous data suggested that anastral spindles, morphologically similar to those found in oocytes, can assemble in a centrosome-independent manner in cells that contain centrosomes. It is assumed that the microtubules that build these acentrosomal spindles originate over the chromatin. However, the actual processes of centrosome-independent microtubule nucleation, polymerisation, and sorting have not been documented in centrosome-containing cells. We have identified two experimental conditions in which centrosomes are kept close to the plasma membrane, away from the nuclear region, throughout meiosis I in Drosophila spermatocytes. Time-lapse confocal microscopy of these cells labelled with fluorescent chimeras reveals centrosome-independent microtubule nucleation, growth, and sorting into a bipolar spindle array over the nuclear region, away from the asters. The onset of noncentrosomal microtubule nucleation is significantly delayed with respect to nuclear envelope breakdown and coincides with the end of chromosome condensation. It takes place in foci that are close to the membranes that ensheath the nuclear region, not over the condensed chromosomes. Metaphase plates are formed in these spindles, and, in a fraction of them, some degree of polewards chromosome segregation takes place. In these cells that contain both membrane-bound asters and an anastral spindle, the orientation of the cytokinesis furrow correlates with the position of the asters and is independent of the orientation of the spindle. We conclude that the fenestrated nuclear envelope may significantly contribute to the normal process of spindle assembly in Drosophila spermatocytes. We also conclude that the anastral spindles that we have observed are not likely to provide a robust back-up able to ensure successful cell division. We propose that these anastral microtubule arrays could be a constitutive component of wild-type spindles, normally masked by the abundance of centrosome

  4. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

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    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis. PMID:24996848

  5. Fission yeast cells undergo nuclear division in the absence of spindle microtubules.

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    Stefania Castagnetti

    Full Text Available Mitosis in eukaryotic cells employs spindle microtubules to drive accurate chromosome segregation at cell division. Cells lacking spindle microtubules arrest in mitosis due to a spindle checkpoint that delays mitotic progression until all chromosomes have achieved stable bipolar attachment to spindle microtubules. In fission yeast, mitosis occurs within an intact nuclear membrane with the mitotic spindle elongating between the spindle pole bodies. We show here that in fission yeast interference with mitotic spindle formation delays mitosis only briefly and cells proceed to an unusual nuclear division process we term nuclear fission, during which cells perform some chromosome segregation and efficiently enter S-phase of the next cell cycle. Nuclear fission is blocked if spindle pole body maturation or sister chromatid separation cannot take place or if actin polymerization is inhibited. We suggest that this process exhibits vestiges of a primitive nuclear division process independent of spindle microtubules, possibly reflecting an evolutionary intermediate state between bacterial and Archeal chromosome segregation where the nucleoid divides without a spindle and a microtubule spindle-based eukaryotic mitosis.

  6. The Drosophila microtubule-associated protein mars stabilizes mitotic spindles by crosslinking microtubules through its N-terminal region.

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    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs.

  7. Chromosome position at the spindle equator is regulated by chromokinesin and a bipolar microtubule array.

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    Takagi, Jun; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    The chromosome alignment is mediated by polar ejection and poleward forces acting on the chromosome arm and kinetochores, respectively. Although components of the motile machinery such as chromokinesin have been characterized, their dynamics within the spindle is poorly understood. Here we show that a quantum dot (Qdot) binding up to four Xenopus chromokinesin (Xkid) molecules behaved like a nanosize chromosome arm in the meiotic spindle, which is self-organized in cytoplasmic egg extracts. Xkid-Qdots travelled long distances along microtubules by changing several tracks, resulting in their accumulation toward and distribution around the metaphase plate. The analysis indicated that the direction of motion and velocity depend on the distribution of microtubule polarity within the spindle. Thus, this mechanism is governed by chromokinesin motors, which is dependent on symmetrical microtubule orientation that may allow chromosomes to maintain their position around the spindle equator until correct microtubule-kinetochore attachment is established. PMID:24077015

  8. Katanin maintains meiotic metaphase chromosome alignment and spindle structure in vivo and has multiple effects on microtubules in vitro.

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    McNally, Karen; Berg, Evan; Cortes, Daniel B; Hernandez, Veronica; Mains, Paul E; McNally, Francis J

    2014-04-01

    Assembly of Caenorhabditis elegans female meiotic spindles requires both MEI-1 and MEI-2 subunits of the microtubule-severing ATPase katanin. Strong loss-of-function mutants assemble apolar intersecting microtubule arrays, whereas weaker mutants assemble bipolar meiotic spindles that are longer than wild type. To determine whether katanin is also required for spindle maintenance, we monitored metaphase I spindles after a fast-acting mei-1(ts) mutant was shifted to a nonpermissive temperature. Within 4 min of temperature shift, bivalents moved off the metaphase plate, and microtubule bundles within the spindle lengthened and developed a high degree of curvature. Spindles eventually lost bipolar structure. Immunofluorescence of embryos fixed at increasing temperature indicated that MEI-1 was lost from spindle microtubules before loss of ASPM-1, indicating that MEI-1 and ASPM-1 act independently at spindle poles. We quantified the microtubule-severing activity of purified MEI-1/MEI-2 complexes corresponding to six different point mutations and found a linear relationship between microtubule disassembly rate and meiotic spindle length. Previous work showed that katanin is required for severing at points where two microtubules intersect in vivo. We show that purified MEI-1/MEI-2 complexes preferentially sever at intersections between two microtubules and directly bundle microtubules in vitro. These activities could promote parallel/antiparallel microtubule organization in meiotic spindles. PMID:24501424

  9. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etemad, B.; Kuijt, T.E.F.; Kops, G.J.P.L.

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome-spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore-microtubule

  10. Using Photobleaching to Measure Spindle Microtubule Dynamics in Primary Cultures of Dividing Drosophila Meiotic Spermatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Savoian, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    In dividing animal cells, a microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle governs chromosome movement. Current models propose that the spindle facilitates and/or generates translocating forces by regionally depolymerizing the kinetochore fibers (k-fibers) that bind each chromosome. It is unclear how conserved these sites and the resultant chromosome-moving mechanisms are between different dividing cell types because of the technical challenges of quantitatively studying MTs in many specimens. In par...

  11. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint.

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    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kuijt, Timo E F; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome-spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore-microtubule attachment or the force generated by dynamic microtubules that signals stable biorientation of chromosomes? To answer this, we uncoupled these two processes by expressing a non-phosphorylatable version of the main microtubule-binding protein at kinetochores (HEC1-9A), causing stabilization of incorrect kinetochore-microtubule attachments despite persistent activity of the error-correction machinery. The SAC is fully functional in HEC1-9A-expressing cells, yet cells in which chromosomes cannot biorient but are stably attached to microtubules satisfy the SAC and exit mitosis. SAC satisfaction requires neither intra-kinetochore stretching nor dynamic microtubules. Our findings support the hypothesis that in human cells the end-on interactions of microtubules with kinetochores are sufficient to satisfy the SAC without the need for microtubule-based pulling forces. PMID:26621779

  12. Kinetochore–microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint

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    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kuijt, Timo E. F.; Kops, Geert J. P. L.

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome–spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore–microtubule attachment or the force generated by dynamic microtubules that signals stable biorientation of chromosomes? To answer this, we uncoupled these two processes by expressing a non-phosphorylatable version of the main microtubule-binding protein at kinetochores (HEC1-9A), causing stabilization of incorrect kinetochore–microtubule attachments despite persistent activity of the error-correction machinery. The SAC is fully functional in HEC1-9A-expressing cells, yet cells in which chromosomes cannot biorient but are stably attached to microtubules satisfy the SAC and exit mitosis. SAC satisfaction requires neither intra-kinetochore stretching nor dynamic microtubules. Our findings support the hypothesis that in human cells the end-on interactions of microtubules with kinetochores are sufficient to satisfy the SAC without the need for microtubule-based pulling forces. PMID:26621779

  13. 50 ways to build a spindle: the complexity of microtubule generation during mitosis.

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    Duncan, Tommy; Wakefield, James G

    2011-04-01

    The accurate segregation of duplicated chromosomes, essential for the development and viability of a eukaryotic organism, requires the formation of a robust microtubule (MT)-based spindle apparatus. Entry into mitosis or meiosis precipitates a cascade of signalling events which result in the activation of pathways responsible for a dramatic reorganisation of the MT cytoskeleton: through changes in the properties of MT-associated proteins, local concentrations of free tubulin dimer and through enhanced MT nucleation. The latter is generally thought to be driven by localisation and activation of γ-tubulin-containing complexes (γ-TuSC and γ-TuRC) at specific subcellular locations. For example, upon entering mitosis, animal cells concentrate γ-tubulin at centrosomes to tenfold the normal level during interphase, resulting in an aster-driven search and capture of chromosomes and bipolar mitotic spindle formation. Thus, in these cells, centrosomes have traditionally been perceived as the primary microtubule organising centre during spindle formation. However, studies in meiotic cells, plants and cell-free extracts have revealed the existence of complementary mechanisms of spindle formation, mitotic chromatin, kinetochores and nucleation from existing MTs or the cytoplasm can all contribute to a bipolar spindle apparatus. Here, we outline the individual known mechanisms responsible for spindle formation and formulate ideas regarding the relationship between them in assembling a functional spindle apparatus. PMID:21484448

  14. A mitotic SKAP isoform regulates spindle positioning at astral microtubule plus ends.

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    Kern, David M; Nicholls, Peter K; Page, David C; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2016-05-01

    The Astrin/SKAP complex plays important roles in mitotic chromosome alignment and centrosome integrity, but previous work found conflicting results for SKAP function. Here, we demonstrate that SKAP is expressed as two distinct isoforms in mammals: a longer, testis-specific isoform that was used for the previous studies in mitotic cells and a novel, shorter mitotic isoform. Unlike the long isoform, short SKAP rescues SKAP depletion in mitosis and displays robust microtubule plus-end tracking, including localization to astral microtubules. Eliminating SKAP microtubule binding results in severe chromosome segregation defects. In contrast, SKAP mutants specifically defective for plus-end tracking facilitate proper chromosome segregation but display spindle positioning defects. Cells lacking SKAP plus-end tracking have reduced Clasp1 localization at microtubule plus ends and display increased lateral microtubule contacts with the cell cortex, which we propose results in unbalanced dynein-dependent cortical pulling forces. Our work reveals an unappreciated role for the Astrin/SKAP complex as an astral microtubule mediator of mitotic spindle positioning. PMID:27138257

  15. Mto2 multisite phosphorylation inactivates non-spindle microtubule nucleation complexes during mitosis.

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    Borek, Weronika E; Groocock, Lynda M; Samejima, Itaru; Zou, Juan; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Sawin, Kenneth E

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule nucleation is highly regulated during the eukaryotic cell cycle, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. During mitosis in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytoplasmic microtubule nucleation ceases simultaneously with intranuclear mitotic spindle assembly. Cytoplasmic nucleation depends on the Mto1/2 complex, which binds and activates the γ-tubulin complex and also recruits the γ-tubulin complex to both centrosomal (spindle pole body) and non-centrosomal sites. Here we show that the Mto1/2 complex disassembles during mitosis, coincident with hyperphosphorylation of Mto2 protein. By mapping and mutating multiple Mto2 phosphorylation sites, we generate mto2-phosphomutant strains with enhanced Mto1/2 complex stability, interaction with the γ-tubulin complex and microtubule nucleation activity. A mutant with 24 phosphorylation sites mutated to alanine, mto2[24A], retains interphase-like behaviour even in mitotic cells. This provides a molecular-level understanding of how phosphorylation 'switches off' microtubule nucleation complexes during the cell cycle and, more broadly, illuminates mechanisms regulating non-centrosomal microtubule nucleation.

  16. Stable kinetochore–microtubule attachment is sufficient to silence the spindle assembly checkpoint in human cells

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    Tauchman, Eric C.; Boehm, Frederick J.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.

    2015-01-01

    During mitosis, duplicated sister chromatids attach to microtubules emanating from opposing sides of the bipolar spindle through large protein complexes called kinetochores. In the absence of stable kinetochore–microtubule attachments, a cell surveillance mechanism known as the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) produces an inhibitory signal that prevents anaphase onset. Precisely how the inhibitory SAC signal is extinguished in response to microtubule attachment remains unresolved. To address this, we induced formation of hyper-stable kinetochore–microtubule attachments in human cells using a non-phosphorylatable version of the protein Hec1, a core component of the attachment machinery. We find that stable attachments are sufficient to silence the SAC in the absence of sister kinetochore bi-orientation and strikingly in the absence of detectable microtubule pulling forces or tension. Furthermore, we find that SAC satisfaction occurs despite the absence of large changes in intra-kinetochore distance, suggesting that substantial kinetochore stretching is not required for quenching the SAC signal. PMID:26620470

  17. The kinesin-13 KLP10A motor regulates oocyte spindle length and affects EB1 binding without altering microtubule growth rates

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    Kevin K. Do

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinesin-13 motors are unusual in that they do not walk along microtubules, but instead diffuse to the ends, where they remove tubulin dimers, regulating microtubule dynamics. Here we show that Drosophila kinesin-13 klp10A regulates oocyte meiosis I spindle length and is haplo-insufficient – KLP10A, reduced by RNAi or a loss-of-function P element insertion mutant, results in elongated and mispositioned oocyte spindles, and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates. KLP10A knockdown by RNAi does not significantly affect microtubule growth rates in oocyte spindles, but, unexpectedly, EB1 binding and unbinding are slowed, suggesting a previously unobserved role for kinesin-13 in mediating EB1 binding interactions with microtubules. Kinesin-13 may regulate spindle length both by disassembling subunits from microtubule ends and facilitating EB1 binding to plus ends. We also observe an increased number of paused microtubules in klp10A RNAi knockdown spindles, consistent with a reduced frequency of microtubule catastrophes. Overall, our findings indicate that reduced kinesin-13 decreases microtubule disassembly rates and affects EB1 interactions with microtubules, rather than altering microtubule growth rates, causing spindles to elongate and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates to form.

  18. Using Photobleaching to Measure Spindle Microtubule Dynamics in Primary Cultures of Dividing Drosophila Meiotic Spermatocytes.

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    Savoian, Matthew S

    2015-07-01

    In dividing animal cells, a microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle governs chromosome movement. Current models propose that the spindle facilitates and/or generates translocating forces by regionally depolymerizing the kinetochore fibers (k-fibers) that bind each chromosome. It is unclear how conserved these sites and the resultant chromosome-moving mechanisms are between different dividing cell types because of the technical challenges of quantitatively studying MTs in many specimens. In particular, our knowledge of MT kinetics during the sperm-producing male meiotic divisions remains in its infancy. In this study, I use an easy-to-implement photobleaching-based assay for measuring spindle MT dynamics in primary cultures of meiotic spermatocytes isolated from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. By use of standard scanning confocal microscopy features, fiducial marks were photobleached on fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged MTs. These were followed by time-lapse imaging during different division stages, and their displacement rates were calculated using public domain software. I find that k-fibers continually shorten at their poles during metaphase and anaphase A through the process of MT flux. Anaphase chromosome movement is complemented by Pac-Man, the shortening of the k-fiber at its chromosomal interface. Thus, Drosophila spermatocytes share the sites of spindle dynamism and mechanisms of chromosome movement with mitotic cells. The data reveal the applicability of the photobleaching assay for measuring MT dynamics in primary cultures. This approach can be readily applied to other systems. PMID:25802491

  19. MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 is required for mouse meiotic spindle assembly and kinetochore-microtubule attachment.

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    Ju Yuan

    Full Text Available MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2, a direct substrate of p38 MAPK, plays key roles in multiple physiological functions in mitosis. Here, we show for the first time the unique distribution pattern of MK2 in meiosis. Phospho-MK2 was localized on bipolar spindle minus ends and along the interstitial axes of homologous chromosomes extending over centromere regions and arm regions at metaphase of first meiosis (MI stage in mouse oocytes. At metaphase of second meiosis (MII stage, p-MK2 was localized on the bipolar spindle minus ends and at the inner centromere region of sister chromatids as dots. Knockdown or inhibition of MK2 resulted in spindle defects. Spindles were surrounded by irregular nondisjunction chromosomes, which were arranged in an amphitelic or syntelic/monotelic manner, or chromosomes detached from the spindles. Kinetochore-microtubule attachments were impaired in MK2-deficient oocytes because spindle microtubules became unstable in response to cold treatment. In addition, homologous chromosome segregation and meiosis progression were inhibited in these oocytes. Our data suggest that MK2 may be essential for functional meiotic bipolar spindle formation, chromosome segregation and proper kinetochore-microtubule attachments.

  20. Human chromokinesins promote chromosome congression and spindle microtubule dynamics during mitosis.

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    Wandke, Cornelia; Barisic, Marin; Sigl, Reinhard; Rauch, Veronika; Wolf, Frank; Amaro, Ana C; Tan, Chia H; Pereira, Antonio J; Kutay, Ulrike; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick; Geley, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    Chromokinesins are microtubule plus end-directed motor proteins that bind to chromosome arms. In Xenopus egg cell-free extracts, Xkid and Xklp1 are essential for bipolar spindle formation but the functions of the human homologues, hKID (KIF22) and KIF4A, are poorly understood. By using RNAi-mediated protein knockdown in human cells, we find that only co-depletion delayed progression through mitosis in a Mad2-dependent manner. Depletion of hKID caused abnormal chromosome arm orientation, delayed chromosome congression, and sensitized cells to nocodazole. Knockdown of KIF4A increased the number and length of microtubules, altered kinetochore oscillations, and decreased kinetochore microtubule flux. These changes were associated with failures in establishing a tight metaphase plate and an increase in anaphase lagging chromosomes. Co-depletion of both chromokinesins aggravated chromosome attachment failures, which led to mitotic arrest. Thus, hKID and KIF4A contribute independently to the rapid and correct attachment of chromosomes by controlling the positioning of chromosome arms and the dynamics of microtubules, respectively. PMID:22945934

  1. NuMA-microtubule interactions are critical for spindle orientation and the morphogenesis of diverse epidermal structures.

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    Seldin, Lindsey; Muroyama, Andrew; Lechler, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is used to generate cell fate diversity and drive proper tissue morphogenesis. A complex of NuMA and dynein/dynactin is required for robust spindle orientation in a number of cell types. Previous research proposed that cortical dynein/dynactin was sufficient to generate forces on astral microtubules (MTs) to orient the spindle, with NuMA acting as a passive tether. In this study, we demonstrate that dynein/dynactin is insufficient for spindle orientation establishment in keratinocytes and that NuMA's MT-binding domain, which targets MT tips, is also required. Loss of NuMA-MT interactions in skin caused defects in spindle orientation and epidermal differentiation, leading to neonatal lethality. In addition, we show that NuMA-MT interactions are also required in adult mice for hair follicle morphogenesis and spindle orientation within the transit-amplifying cells of the matrix. Loss of spindle orientation in matrix cells results in defective differentiation of matrix-derived lineages. Our results reveal an additional and direct function of NuMA during mitotic spindle positioning, as well as a reiterative use of spindle orientation in the skin to build diverse structures. PMID:26765568

  2. JMJD5 (Jumonji Domain-containing 5) Associates with Spindle Microtubules and Is Required for Proper Mitosis.

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    He, Zhimin; Wu, Junyu; Su, Xiaonan; Zhang, Ye; Pan, Lixia; Wei, Huimin; Fang, Qiang; Li, Haitao; Wang, Da-Liang; Sun, Fang-Lin

    2016-02-26

    Precise mitotic spindle assembly is a guarantee of proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Chromosome instability caused by disturbed mitosis is one of the major features of various types of cancer. JMJD5 has been reported to be involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the nucleus, but little is known about its function in mitotic process. Here we report the unexpected localization and function of JMJD5 in mitotic progression. JMJD5 partially accumulates on mitotic spindles during mitosis, and depletion of JMJD5 results in significant mitotic arrest, spindle assembly defects, and sustained activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Inactivating SAC can efficiently reverse the mitotic arrest caused by JMJD5 depletion. Moreover, JMJD5 is found to interact with tubulin proteins and associate with microtubules during mitosis. JMJD5-depleted cells show a significant reduction of α-tubulin acetylation level on mitotic spindles and fail to generate enough interkinetochore tension to satisfy the SAC. Further, JMJD5 depletion also increases the susceptibility of HeLa cells to the antimicrotubule agent. Taken together, these results suggest that JMJD5 plays an important role in regulating mitotic progression, probably by modulating the stability of spindle microtubules.

  3. An anillin-Ect2 complex stabilizes central spindle microtubules at the cortex during cytokinesis.

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    Paul Frenette

    Full Text Available Cytokinesis occurs due to the RhoA-dependent ingression of an actomyosin ring. During anaphase, the Rho GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor Ect2 is recruited to the central spindle via its interaction with MgcRacGAP/Cyk-4, and activates RhoA in the central plane of the cell. Ect2 also localizes to the cortex, where it has access to RhoA. The N-terminus of Ect2 binds to Cyk-4, and the C-terminus contains conserved DH (Dbl homologous and PH (Pleckstrin Homology domains with GEF activity. The PH domain is required for Ect2's cortical localization, but its molecular function is not known. In cultured human cells, we found that the PH domain interacts with anillin, a contractile ring protein that scaffolds actin and myosin and interacts with RhoA. The anillin-Ect2 interaction may require Ect2's association with lipids, since a novel mutation in the PH domain, which disrupts phospholipid association, weakens their interaction. An anillin-RacGAP50C (homologue of Cyk-4 complex was previously described in Drosophila, which may crosslink the central spindle to the cortex to stabilize the position of the contractile ring. Our data supports an analogous function for the anillin-Ect2 complex in human cells and one hypothesis is that this complex has functionally replaced the Drosophila anillin-RacGAP50C complex. Complexes between central spindle proteins and cortical proteins could regulate the position of the contractile ring by stabilizing microtubule-cortical interactions at the division plane to ensure the generation of active RhoA in a discrete zone.

  4. The Drosophila Microtubule-Associated Protein Mars Stabilizes Mitotic Spindles by Crosslinking Microtubules through Its N-Terminal Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gang; Beati, Hamze; Nilsson, Jakob;

    2013-01-01

    reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function....... Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs....

  5. Titin in insect spermatocyte spindle fibers associates with microtubules, actin, myosin and the matrix proteins skeletor, megator and chromator.

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    Fabian, Lacramioara; Xia, Xuequin; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen; Andrew, Deborah J; Forer, Arthur

    2007-07-01

    Titin, the giant elastic protein found in muscles, is present in spindles of crane-fly and locust spermatocytes as determined by immunofluorescence staining using three antibodies, each raised against a different, spatially separated fragment of Drosophila titin (D-titin). All three antibodies stained the Z-lines and other regions in insect myofibrils. In western blots of insect muscle extract the antibodies reacted with high molecular mass proteins, ranging between rat nebulin (600-900 kDa) and rat titin (3000-4000 kDa). Mass spectrometry of the high molecular mass band from the Coomassie-Blue-stained gel of insect muscle proteins indicates that the protein the antibodies bind to is titin. The pattern of staining in insect spermatocytes was slightly different in the two species, but in general all three anti-D-titin antibodies stained the same components: the chromosomes, prophase and telophase nuclear membranes, the spindle in general, along kinetochore and non-kinetochore microtubules, along apparent connections between partner half-bivalents during anaphase, and various cytoplasmic components, including the contractile ring. That the same cellular components are stained in close proximity by the three different antibodies, each against a different region of D-titin, is strong evidence that the three antibodies identify a titin-like protein in insect spindles, which we identified by mass spectrometry analysis as being titin. The spindle matrix proteins skeletor, megator and chromator are present in many of the same structures, in positions very close to (or the same as) D-titin. Myosin and actin also are present in spindles in close proximity to D-titin. The varying spatial arrangements of these proteins during the course of division suggest that they interact to form a spindle matrix with elastic properties provided by a titin-like protein. PMID:17591688

  6. Gamma-tubulin is required for bipolar spindle assembly and for proper kinetochore microtubule attachments during prometaphase I in Drosophila oocytes.

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    Stacie E Hughes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In many animal species the meiosis I spindle in oocytes is anastral and lacks centrosomes. Previous studies of Drosophila oocytes failed to detect the native form of the germline-specific γ-tubulin (γTub37C in meiosis I spindles, and genetic studies have yielded conflicting data regarding the role of γTub37C in the formation of bipolar spindles at meiosis I. Our examination of living and fixed oocytes carrying either a null allele or strong missense mutation in the γtub37C gene demonstrates a role for γTub37C in the positioning of the oocyte nucleus during late prophase, as well as in the formation and maintenance of bipolar spindles in Drosophila oocytes. Prometaphase I spindles in γtub37C mutant oocytes showed wide, non-tapered spindle poles and disrupted positioning. Additionally, chromosomes failed to align properly on the spindle and showed morphological defects. The kinetochores failed to properly co-orient and often lacked proper attachments to the microtubule bundles, suggesting that γTub37C is required to stabilize kinetochore microtubule attachments in anastral spindles. Although spindle bipolarity was sometimes achieved by metaphase I in both γtub37C mutants, the resulting chromosome masses displayed highly disrupted chromosome alignment. Therefore, our data conclusively demonstrate a role for γTub37C in both the formation of the anastral meiosis I spindle and in the proper attachment of kinetochore microtubules. Finally, multispectral imaging demonstrates the presences of native γTub37C along the length of wild-type meiosis I spindles.

  7. Mitotic Spindle Positioning in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Accomplished by Antagonistically Acting Microtubule Motor Proteins

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    Cottingham, Frank R.; Hoyt, M. Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Proper positioning of the mitotic spindle is often essential for cell division and differentiation processes. The asymmetric cell division characteristic of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, requires that the spindle be positioned at the mother–bud neck and oriented along the mother–bud axis. The single dynein motor encoded by the S. cerevisiae genome performs an important but nonessential spindle-positioning role. We demonstrate that kinesin-related Kip3p makes a major contribution to...

  8. csi2p modulates microtubule dynamics and organizes the bipolar spindle for chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Judite; Fu, Chuanhai; Khare, V. Mohini; Tran, Phong T.

    2014-01-01

    Proper chromosome segregation is of paramount importance for proper genetic inheritance. Defects in chromosome segregation can lead to aneuploidy, which is a hallmark of cancer cells. Eukaryotic chromosome segregation is accomplished by the bipolar spindle. Additional mechanisms, such as the spindle assembly checkpoint and centromere positioning, further help to ensure complete segregation fidelity. Here we present the fission yeast csi2 +. csi2p localizes to the spindle poles, where it regul...

  9. Spindle formation and microtubule organization during first division in reconstructed rat embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Ikuo; Mizutani, Eiji; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Atsushi; Inai, Kentaro; Sasada, Hiroshi; Sato, Eimei

    2007-08-01

    The present study was conducted to demonstrate the spindle formation and behavior of chromosomes and microtubules during first division in reconstructed rat embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with cumulus cell nuclei. To demonstrate the effect of oocyte aging after ovulation on the cleavage of SCNT embryos, micromanipulation was carried out 11, 15 and 18 h after injection of hCG. SCNT oocytes were activated by incubation in culture medium supplemented with 5 microM ionomycin for 5 min followed by treatment with 2 mM 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP) in mR1ECM for 2-3 h. For immunocytochemical observation, the SCNT embryos were incubated with monoclonal anti-alpha-tubulin antibody and then fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG. Cleavage rates were significantly higher for oocytes collected after 15 and 18 h rather than for those collected 11 h after injection of hCG (56 and 53%, respectively vs. 28%; P<0.05). Premature chromosome condensation occurred before activation of the SCNT oocytes, but adequate spindle formation was only rarely observed. The distribution of microtubules in SCNT embryos after activation was different from those of fertilized and parthenogenic oocytes, i.e., a dense microtubule organization shaped like a ring was observed. Eighteen to 20 h post-activation, most SCNT embryos were in the 2-cell stage, but no nucleoli were clearly visible, which was quite different from the fertilized oocytes. In addition, first division with and without small cellular bodies containing DNA was observed in the rat SCNT embryos in some cases. The present study suggests that reorganization of transferred nuclei in rat SCNT embryos may be inadequate in terms of formation of the mitotic assembly and nucleolar reorganization. PMID:17446658

  10. Mechanisms of Microtubule-Based Kinetochore Positioning in the Yeast Metaphase Spindle

    OpenAIRE

    Sprague, Brian L.; Pearson, Chad G.; Maddox, Paul S.; Bloom, Kerry S.; Salmon, E. D.; Odde, David J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that spatial gradients in kMT dynamic instability facilitate mitotic spindle formation and chromosome movement. To test this hypothesis requires the analysis of kMT dynamics, which have not been resolved at the single kMT level in living cells. The budding yeast spindle offers an attractive system in which to study kMT dynamics because, in contrast to animal cells, there is only one kMT per kinetochore. To visualize metaphase kMT plus-end dynamics in yeast, a strain c...

  11. Mitotic spindle perturbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tame, Mihoko Amy

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are major components of the cytoskeleton and form the bipolar spindle apparatus during mitosis. The mitotic spindle consists of highly dynamic microtubule polymers that are under constant modulation, controlled by multiple motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins. This tight s

  12. Phosphorylation of microtubule-binding protein Hec1 by mitotic kinase Aurora B specifies spindle checkpoint kinase Mps1 signaling at the kinetochore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tongge; Dou, Zhen; Qin, Bo; Jin, Changjiang; Wang, Xinghui; Xu, Leilei; Wang, Zhaoyang; Zhu, Lijuan; Liu, Fusheng; Gao, Xinjiao; Ke, Yuwen; Wang, Zhiyong; Aikhionbare, Felix; Fu, Chuanhai; Ding, Xia; Yao, Xuebiao

    2013-12-13

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a quality control device to ensure accurate chromosome attachment to spindle microtubule for equal segregation of sister chromatid. Aurora B is essential for SAC function by sensing chromosome bi-orientation via spatial regulation of kinetochore substrates. However, it has remained elusive as to how Aurora B couples kinetochore-microtubule attachment to SAC signaling. Here, we show that Hec1 interacts with Mps1 and specifies its kinetochore localization via its calponin homology (CH) domain and N-terminal 80 amino acids. Interestingly, phosphorylation of the Hec1 by Aurora B weakens its interaction with microtubules but promotes Hec1 binding to Mps1. Significantly, the temporal regulation of Hec1 phosphorylation orchestrates kinetochore-microtubule attachment and Mps1 loading to the kinetochore. Persistent expression of phosphomimetic Hec1 mutant induces a hyperactivation of SAC, suggesting that phosphorylation-elicited Hec1 conformational change is used as a switch to orchestrate SAC activation to concurrent destabilization of aberrant kinetochore attachment. Taken together, these results define a novel role for Aurora B-Hec1-Mps1 signaling axis in governing accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis.

  13. Tumor suppressor protein DAB2IP participates in chromosomal stability maintenance through activating spindle assembly checkpoint and stabilizing kinetochore-microtubule attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Abdisalaam, Salim; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Gupta, Arun; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Saha, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Defects in kinetochore-microtubule (KT-MT) attachment and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) during cell division are strongly associated with chromosomal instability (CIN). CIN has been linked to carcinogenesis, metastasis, poor prognosis and resistance to cancer therapy. We previously reported that the DAB2IP is a tumor suppressor, and that loss of DAB2IP is often detected in advanced prostate cancer (PCa) and is indicative of poor prognosis. Here, we report that the loss of DAB2IP results in impaired KT-MT attachment, compromised SAC and aberrant chromosomal segregation. We discovered that DAB2IP directly interacts with Plk1 and its loss inhibits Plk1 kinase activity, thereby impairing Plk1-mediated BubR1 phosphorylation. Loss of DAB2IP decreases the localization of BubR1 at the kinetochore during mitosis progression. In addition, the reconstitution of DAB2IP enhances the sensitivity of PCa cells to microtubule stabilizing drugs (paclitaxel, docetaxel) and Plk1 inhibitor (BI2536). Our findings demonstrate a novel function of DAB2IP in the maintenance of KT-MT structure and SAC regulation during mitosis which is essential for chromosomal stability. PMID:27568005

  14. Mitosis. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K; Magiera, Maria M; Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Pereira, Ana L; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Maiato, Helder

    2015-05-15

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells, they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E)/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically toward the equator. We found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific posttranslational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules, and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination. PMID:25908662

  15. New spindle morphogenesis model by Dynein,Nudel, and the spindle matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Lih Lee; Patricia Wadsworth

    2009-01-01

    @@ It is well established that the mi-totic spindle, the organeile responsible for chromosome segregation during mitosis, is built from microtubules, motor proteins, and associated struc-tural and regulatory molecules. More controversial is the existence and identity of non-microtubule spindle components, collectively referred to as the matrix.

  16. The spindle protein CHICA mediates localization of the chromokinesin Kid to the mitotic spindle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santamaria, Anna; Nagel, Susanna; Sillje, Herman H W; Nigg, Erich A

    2008-01-01

    Microtubule-based motor proteins provide essential forces for bipolar organization of spindle microtubules and chromosome movement, prerequisites of chromosome segregation during the cell cycle. Here, we describe the functional characterization of a novel spindle protein, termed "CHICA," that was or

  17. Mechanical design principles of a mitotic spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan J; Roque, Hélio; Antony, Claude; Nédélec, François

    2014-12-18

    An organised spindle is crucial to the fidelity of chromosome segregation, but the relationship between spindle structure and function is not well understood in any cell type. The anaphase B spindle in fission yeast has a slender morphology and must elongate against compressive forces. This 'pushing' mode of chromosome transport renders the spindle susceptible to breakage, as observed in cells with a variety of defects. Here we perform electron tomographic analyses of the spindle, which suggest that it organises a limited supply of structural components to increase its compressive strength. Structural integrity is maintained throughout the spindle's fourfold elongation by organising microtubules into a rigid transverse array, preserving correct microtubule number and dynamically rescaling microtubule length.

  18. Maloriented Bivalents Have Metaphase Positions at the Spindle Equator with More Kinetochore Microtubules to One Pole than to the OtherV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    LaFountain, James R.; Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2004-01-01

    To test the “traction fiber” model for metaphase positioning of bivalents during meiosis, kinetochore fibers of maloriented bivalents, induced during recovery from cold arrest, were analyzed with a liquid crystal polarizing microscope. The measured birefringence retardation of kinetochore fibers is proportional to the number of microtubules in a fiber. Five of the 11 maloriented bivalents analyzed exhibited bipolar malorientations that had at least four times more kinetochore microtubules to ...

  19. Visualizing and Analyzing Branching Microtubule Nucleation Using Meiotic Xenopus Egg Extracts and TIRF Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew; Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic and meiotic spindles consist primarily of microtubules, which originate from centrosomes and within the vicinity of chromatin. Indirect evidence suggested that microtubules also originate throughout the spindle, but the high microtubule density within the spindle precludes the direct observation of this phenomenon. By using meiotic Xenopus laevis egg extract and employing total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, microtubule nucleation from preexisting microtubules could be demonstrated and analyzed. Branching microtubule nucleation is an ideal mechanism to assemble and maintain a mitotic spindle, because microtubule numbers are amplified while preserving their polarity. Here, we describe the assays that made these findings possible and the experiments that helped identify the key molecular players involved. PMID:27193844

  20. Tipping the spindle into the right position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmanova, Anna; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-05-01

    The position of the mitotic spindle determines the cleavage plane in animal cells, but what controls spindle positioning? Kern et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201510117) demonstrate that the microtubule plus end-associated SKAP/Astrin complex participates in this process, possibly by affecting dynein-dependent pulling forces exerted on the tips of astral microtubules. PMID:27138251

  1. Mechanisms of Centrosome Separation and Bipolar Spindle Assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Medema, Rene H.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division is accomplished through the assembly of a bipolar microtubule-based structure called the mitotic spindle. Work over the past two decades has identified a core regulator of spindle bipolarity, the microtubule motor protein kinesin-5. However, a

  2. Reconstitution of Basic Mitotic Spindles in Spherical Emulsion Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleugel, Mathijs; Roth, Sophie; Groenendijk, Celebrity F; Dogterom, Marileen

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle assembly, positioning and orientation depend on the combined forces generated by microtubule dynamics, microtubule motor proteins and cross-linkers. Growing microtubules can generate pushing forces, while depolymerizing microtubules can convert the energy from microtubule shrinkage into pulling forces, when attached, for example, to cortical dynein or chromosomes. In addition, motor proteins and diffusible cross-linkers within the spindle contribute to spindle architecture by connecting and sliding anti-parallel microtubules. In vivo, it has proven difficult to unravel the relative contribution of individual players to the overall balance of forces. Here we present the methods that we recently developed in our efforts to reconstitute basic mitotic spindles bottom-up in vitro. Using microfluidic techniques, centrosomes and tubulin are encapsulated in water-in-oil emulsion droplets, leading to the formation of geometrically confined (double) microtubule asters. By additionally introducing cortically anchored dynein, plus-end directed microtubule motors and diffusible cross-linkers, this system is used to reconstitute spindle-like structures. The methods presented here provide a starting point for reconstitution of more complete mitotic spindles, allowing for a detailed study of the contribution of each individual component, and for obtaining an integrated quantitative view of the force-balance within the mitotic spindle. PMID:27584979

  3. Human ASPM participates in spindle organisation, spindle orientation and cytokinesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods C Geoffrey

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the Abnormal Spindle Microcephaly related gene (ASPM are the commonest cause of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH a disorder characterised by a small brain and associated mental retardation. ASPM encodes a mitotic spindle pole associated protein. It is suggested that the MCPH phenotype arises from proliferation defects in neural progenitor cells (NPC. Results We show that ASPM is a microtubule minus end-associated protein that is recruited in a microtubule-dependent manner to the pericentriolar matrix (PCM at the spindle poles during mitosis. ASPM siRNA reduces ASPM protein at the spindle poles in cultured U2OS cells and severely perturbs a number of aspects of mitosis, including the orientation of the mitotic spindle, the main determinant of developmental asymmetrical cell division. The majority of ASPM depleted mitotic cells fail to complete cytokinesis. In MCPH patient fibroblasts we show that a pathogenic ASPM splice site mutation results in the expression of a novel variant protein lacking a tripeptide motif, a minimal alteration that correlates with a dramatic decrease in ASPM spindle pole localisation. Moreover, expression of dominant-negative ASPM C-terminal fragments cause severe spindle assembly defects and cytokinesis failure in cultured cells. Conclusions These observations indicate that ASPM participates in spindle organisation, spindle positioning and cytokinesis in all dividing cells and that the extreme C-terminus of the protein is required for ASPM localisation and function. Our data supports the hypothesis that the MCPH phenotype caused by ASPM mutation is a consequence of mitotic aberrations during neurogenesis. We propose the effects of ASPM mutation are tolerated in somatic cells but have profound consequences for the symmetrical division of NPCs, due to the unusual morphology of these cells. This antagonises the early expansion of the progenitor pool that underpins cortical

  4. Astral microtubule pivoting promotes their search for cortical anchor sites during mitosis in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Baumgärtner

    Full Text Available Positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for proper cell division. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two mechanisms contribute to spindle positioning. In the Kar9 pathway, astral microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body interact via the linker protein Kar9 with the myosin Myo2, which moves the microtubule along the actin cables towards the neck. In the dynein pathway, astral microtubules off-load dynein onto the cortical anchor protein Num1, which is followed by dynein pulling on the spindle. Yet, the mechanism by which microtubules target cortical anchor sites is unknown. Here we quantify the pivoting motion of astral microtubules around the spindle pole bodies, which occurs during spindle translocation towards the neck and through the neck. We show that this pivoting is largely driven by the Kar9 pathway. The microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body pivot faster than those at the mother-bound spindle pole body. The Kar9 pathway reduces the time needed for an astral microtubule inside the daughter cell to start pulling on the spindle. Thus, we propose a new role for microtubule pivoting: By pivoting around the spindle pole body, microtubules explore the space laterally, which helps them search for cortical anchor sites in the context of spindle positioning in budding yeast.

  5. What generates flux of tubulin in kinetochore microtubules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forer, Arthur; Pickett-Heaps, Jeremy D; Spurck, Tim

    2008-01-01

    We discuss models for production of tubulin flux in kinetochore microtubules. Current models concentrate solely on microtubules and their associated motors and enzymes. For example, in some models the driving force for flux is enzymes at the poles and the kinetochores; in others the driving force is motor molecules that are associated with a stationary spindle matrix. We present a different viewpoint, that microtubules are propelled poleward by forces arising from the spindle matrix, that the forces on the microtubules "activate" polymerising and depolymerising enzymes at kinetochores and poles, that matrix forces utilise actin, myosin, and microtubule motors, and that the matrix itself may not necessarily be static. PMID:18421550

  6. Cep57, a NEDD1-binding pericentriolar material component, is essential for spindle pole integrity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qixi Wu; Runsheng He; Haining Zhou; Albert CH Yu; Bo Zhang; Junlin Teng; Jianguo Chen

    2012-01-01

    Formation of a bipolar spindle is indispensable for faithful chromosome segregation and cell division.Spindle integrity is largely dependent on the centrosome and the microtubule network.Centrosome protein Cep57 can bundle microtubules in mammalian cells.Its related protein (Cep57R) in Xenopus was characterized as a stabilization factor for microtubule-kinetochore attachment.Here we show that Cep57 is a pericentriolar material (PCM) component.Its interaction with NEDD1 is necessary for the centrosome localization of Cep57.Depletion of Cep57 leads to unaligned chromosomes and a multipolar spindle,which is induced by PCM fragmentation.In the absence of Cep57,centrosome microtubule array assembly activity is weakened,and the spindle length and microtubule density decrease.As a spindle microtubule-binding protein,Cep57 is also responsible for the proper organization of the spindle microtubule and localization of spindle pole focusing proteins.Collectively,these results suggest that Cep57,as a NEDD1binding centrosome component,could function as a spindle pole- and microtubule-stabilizing factor for establishing robust spindle architecture.

  7. Purification of fluorescently labeled Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spindle Pole Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Trisha N.

    2016-01-01

    Centrosomes are components of the mitotic spindle responsible for organizing microtubules and establishing a bipolar spindle for accurate chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the centrosome is called the spindle pole body, a highly organized tri-laminar structure embedded in the nuclear envelope. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of fluorescently labeled spindle pole bodes from S. cerevisiae. Spindle pole bodies are purified from yeast using a TAP-tag purification followed by velocity sedimentation. This highly reproducible TAP-tag purification method improves upon previous techniques and expands the scope of in vitro characterization of yeast spindle pole bodies. The genetic flexibility of this technique allows for the study of spindle pole body mutants as well as the study of spindle pole bodies during different stages of the cell cycle. The ease and reproducibility of the technique makes it possible to study spindle pole bodies using a variety of biochemical, biophysical, and microscopic techniques. PMID:27193850

  8. Spindle Size Scaling Contributes to Robust Silencing of Mitotic Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis hinges on proper assembly of the microtubule spindle that establishes bipolar attachment to each chromosome. Experiments demonstrate allometry of mitotic spindles and a universal scaling relationship between spindle size and cell size across metazoans, which indicates a conserved principle of spindle assembly at play during evolution. However, the nature of this principle is currently unknown. Researchers have focused on deriving the mechanistic underpinning of the size scaling from the mechanical aspects of the spindle assembly process. In this work we take a different standpoint and ask: What is the size scaling for? We address this question from the functional perspectives of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). SAC is the critical surveillance mechanism that prevents premature chromosome segregation in the presence of unattached or misattached chromosomes. The SAC signal gets silenced after and only after the last chromosome-spindle attachment in mitosis. We previously established a model that explains the robustness of SAC silencing based on spindle-mediated spatiotemporal regulation of SAC proteins. Here, we refine the previous model, and find that robust and timely SAC silencing entails proper size scaling of mitotic spindle. This finding provides, to our knowledge, a novel, function-oriented angle toward understanding the observed spindle allometry, and the universal scaling relationship between spindle size and cell size in metazoans. In a broad sense, the functional requirement of robust SAC silencing could have helped shape the spindle assembly mechanism in evolution. PMID:27602734

  9. Attachment issues : kinetochore transformations and spindle checkpoint silencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kops, Geert Jpl

    2016-01-01

    Cell division culminates in the segregation of duplicated chromosomes in opposite directions prior to cellular fission. This process is guarded by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which prevents the anaphase of cell division until stable connections between spindle microtubules and the kinetoc

  10. Mitotic spindle assembly: May the force be with you

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesbeen, R.G.H.P. van

    2015-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on multiple pathways required for assembly of a bipolar mitotic spindle. Proper assembly of a bipolar mitotic spindle is essential for the generation of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments and correct segregation of the sister chromatids. Defec

  11. Timely anaphase onset requires a novel spindle and kinetochore complex comprising Ska1 and Ska2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanisch, Anja; Silljé, Herman H W; Nigg, Erich A

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis requires chromosomes to undergo bipolar attachment on spindle microtubules (MTs) and subsequent silencing of the spindle checkpoint. Here, we describe the identification and characterisation of a novel spindle and kinetochore (KT)-associated complex that is requ

  12. MICROTUBULE ORGANIZATION 1 Regulates Structure and Function of Microtubule Arrays during Mitosis and Cytokinesis in the Arabidopsis Root1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Eiko; Himmelspach, Regina; Rashbrooke, Madeleine C.; Whittington, Angela T.; Gale, Kevin R.; Collings, David A.; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.

    2006-01-01

    MICROTUBULE ORGANIZATION 1 (MOR1) is a plant member of the highly conserved MAP215/Dis1 family of microtubule-associated proteins. Prior studies with the temperature-sensitive mor1 mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which harbor single amino acid substitutions in an N-terminal HEAT repeat, proved that MOR1 regulates cortical microtubule organization and function. Here we demonstrate by use of live cell imaging and immunolabeling that the mor1-1 mutation generates specific defects in the microtubule arrays of dividing vegetative cells. Unlike the universal cortical microtubule disorganization in elongating mor1-1 cells, disruption of mitotic and cytokinetic microtubule arrays was not detected in all dividing cells. Nevertheless, quantitative analysis identified distinct defects in preprophase bands (PPBs), spindles, and phragmoplasts. In nearly one-half of dividing cells at the restrictive temperature of 30°C, PPBs were not detected prior to spindle formation, and those that did form were often disrupted. mor1-1 spindles and phragmoplasts were short and abnormally organized and persisted for longer times than in wild-type cells. The reduced length of these arrays predicts that the component microtubule lengths are also reduced, suggesting that microtubule length is a critical determinant of spindle and phragmoplast structure, orientation, and function. Microtubule organizational defects led to aberrant chromosomal arrangements, misaligned or incomplete cell plates, and multinucleate cells. Antiserum raised against an N-terminal MOR1 sequence labeled the full length of microtubules in interphase arrays, PPBs, spindles, and phragmoplasts. Continued immunolabeling of the disorganized and short microtubules of mor1-1 at the restrictive temperature demonstrated that the mutant mor1-1L174F protein loses function without dissociating from microtubules, providing important insight into the mechanism by which MOR1 may regulate microtubule length. PMID:16377747

  13. Anastral spindle assembly and γ-tubulin in Drosophila oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallen Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anastral spindles assemble by a mechanism that involves microtubule nucleation and growth from chromatin. It is still uncertain whether γ-tubulin, a microtubule nucleator essential for mitotic spindle assembly and maintenance, plays a role. Not only is the requirement for γ-tubulin to form anastral Drosophila oocyte meiosis I spindles controversial, but its presence in oocyte meiosis I spindles has not been demonstrated and is uncertain. Results We show, for the first time, using a bright GFP fusion protein and live imaging, that the Drosophila maternally-expressed γTub37C is present at low levels in oocyte meiosis I spindles. Despite this, we find that formation of bipolar meiosis I spindles does not require functional γTub37C, extending previous findings by others. Fluorescence photobleaching assays show rapid recovery of γTub37C in the meiosis I spindle, similar to the cytoplasm, indicating weak binding by γTub37C to spindles, and fits of a new, potentially more accurate model for fluorescence recovery yield kinetic parameters consistent with transient, diffusional binding. Conclusions The FRAP results, together with its mutant effects late in meiosis I, indicate that γTub37C may perform a role subsequent to metaphase I, rather than nucleating microtubules for meiosis I spindle formation. Weak binding to the meiosis I spindle could stabilize pre-existing microtubules or position γ-tubulin for function during meiosis II spindle assembly, which follows rapidly upon oocyte activation and completion of the meiosis I division.

  14. Integrin-linked kinase regulates interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Lim

    Full Text Available Integrin-linked kinase (ILK localizes to both focal adhesions and centrosomes in distinct multiprotein complexes. Its dual function as a kinase and scaffolding protein has been well characterized at focal adhesions, where it regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesion, spreading, migration and signaling. At the centrosomes, ILK regulates mitotic spindle organization and centrosome clustering. Our previous study showed various spindle defects after ILK knockdown or inhibition that suggested alteration in microtubule dynamics. Since ILK expression is frequently elevated in many cancer types, we investigated the effects of ILK overexpression on microtubule dynamics. We show here that overexpressing ILK in HeLa cells was associated with a shorter duration of mitosis and decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent that suppresses microtubule dynamics. Measurement of interphase microtubule dynamics revealed that ILK overexpression favored microtubule depolymerization, suggesting that microtubule destabilization could be the mechanism behind the decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, which is known to stabilize microtubules. Conversely, the use of a small molecule inhibitor selective against ILK, QLT-0267, resulted in suppressed microtubule dynamics, demonstrating a new mechanism of action for this compound. We further show that treatment of HeLa cells with QLT-0267 resulted in higher inter-centromere tension in aligned chromosomes during mitosis, slower microtubule regrowth after cold depolymerization and the presence of a more stable population of spindle microtubules. These results demonstrate that ILK regulates microtubule dynamics in both interphase and mitotic cells.

  15. Kinase signaling in the spindle checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jungseog; Yu, Hongtao

    2009-06-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a cell cycle surveillance system that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation. In mitosis, it elicits the "wait anaphase" signal to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome until all chromosomes achieve bipolar microtubule attachment and align at the metaphase plate. Because a single kinetochore unattached to microtubules activates the checkpoint, the wait anaphase signal is thought to be generated by this kinetochore and is then amplified and distributed throughout the cell to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Several spindle checkpoint kinases participate in the generation and amplification of this signal. Recent studies have begun to reveal the activation mechanisms of these checkpoint kinases. Increasing evidence also indicates that the checkpoint kinases not only help to generate the wait anaphase signal but also actively correct kinetochore-microtubule attachment defects. PMID:19228686

  16. A versatile multivariate image analysis pipeline reveals features of Xenopus extract spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, Andrew W; Strzelecka, Magdalena; Crowder, Marina E; Helmke, Kara J; Schlaitz, Anne-Lore; Heald, Rebecca

    2016-04-11

    Imaging datasets are rich in quantitative information. However, few cell biologists possess the tools necessary to analyze them. Here, we present a large dataset ofXenopusextract spindle images together with an analysis pipeline designed to assess spindle morphology across a range of experimental conditions. Our analysis of different spindle types illustrates how kinetochore microtubules amplify spindle microtubule density. Extract mixing experiments reveal that some spindle features titrate, while others undergo switch-like transitions, and multivariate analysis shows the pleiotropic morphological effects of modulating the levels of TPX2, a key spindle assembly factor. We also apply our pipeline to analyze nuclear morphology in human cell culture, showing the general utility of the segmentation approach. Our analyses provide new insight into the diversity of spindle types and suggest areas for future study. The approaches outlined can be applied by other researchers studying spindle morphology and adapted with minimal modification to other experimental systems. PMID:27044897

  17. Rab11 endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle organization and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-03-10

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 endosomes in mitosis. Here, we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11 depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization, and generates robust spindles. This suggests a role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes cocontribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  18. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K.; Magiera, Maria M.; Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Pereira, Ana L.; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.; Maiato, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. CENP-E/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically towards the equator. Here we found that congression of pole-proximal c...

  19. Kinesin-12 motors cooperate to suppress microtubule catastrophes and drive the formation of parallel microtubule bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, Hauke; McAinsh, Andrew D

    2016-03-22

    Human Kinesin-12 (hKif15) plays a crucial role in assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. These functions of hKif15 are partially redundant with Kinesin-5 (Eg5), which can cross-link and drive the extensile sliding of antiparallel microtubules. Although both motors are known to be tetramers, the functional properties of hKif15 are less well understood. Here we reveal how single or multiple Kif15 motors can cross-link, transport, and focus the plus-ends of intersecting microtubules. During transport, Kif15 motors step simultaneously along both microtubules with relative microtubule transport driven by a velocity differential between motor domain pairs. Remarkably, this differential is affected by the underlying intersection geometry: the differential is low on parallel and extreme on antiparallel microtubules where one motor domain pair becomes immobile. As a result, when intersecting microtubules are antiparallel, canonical transport of one microtubule along the other is allowed because one motor is firmly attached to one microtubule while it is stepping on the other. When intersecting microtubules are parallel, however, Kif15 motors can drive (biased) parallel sliding because the motor simultaneously steps on both microtubules that it cross-links. These microtubule rearrangements will focus microtubule plus-ends and finally lead to the formation of parallel bundles. At the same time, Kif15 motors cooperate to suppress catastrophe events at polymerizing microtubule plus-ends, raising the possibility that Kif15 motors may synchronize the dynamics of bundles that they have assembled. Thus, Kif15 is adapted to operate on parallel microtubule substrates, a property that clearly distinguishes it from the other tetrameric spindle motor, Eg5.

  20. The role of actin and myosin in PtK2 spindle length changes induced by laser microbeam irradiations across the spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheykhani, Rozhan; Baker, Norman; Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Shah, Jagesh; Berns, Michael W; Forer, Arthur

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates spindle biomechanical properties to better understand how spindles function. In this report, laser microbeam cutting across mitotic spindles resulted in movement of spindle poles toward the spindle equator. The pole on the cut side moved first, the other pole moved later, resulting in a shorter but symmetric spindle. Intervening spindle microtubules bent and buckled during the equatorial movement of the poles. Because of this and because there were no detectable microtubules within the ablation zone, other cytoskeletal elements would seem to be involved in the equatorial movement of the poles. One possibility is actin and myosin since pharmacological poisoning of the actin-myosin system altered the equatorial movements of both irradiated and unirradiated poles. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that actin, myosin and monophosphorylated myosin are associated with spindle fibers and showed that some actin and monophosphorylated myosin remained in the irradiated regions. Overall, our experiments suggest that actin, myosin and microtubules interact to control spindle length. We suggest that actin and myosin, possibly in conjunction with the spindle matrix, cause the irradiated pole to move toward the equator and that cross-talk between the two half spindles causes the unirradiated pole to move toward the equator until a balanced length is obtained. PMID:23475753

  1. Cell shape impacts on the positioning of the mitotic spindle with respect to the substratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Müsch, Anne

    2015-04-01

    All known mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation rely on astral microtubules. We report that even in the absence of astral microtubules, metaphase spindles in MDCK and HeLa cells are not randomly positioned along their x-z dimension, but preferentially adopt shallow β angles between spindle pole axis and substratum. The nonrandom spindle positioning is due to constraints imposed by the cell cortex in flat cells that drive spindles that are longer and/or wider than the cell's height into a tilted, quasidiagonal x-z position. In rounder cells, which are taller, fewer cortical constraints make the x-z spindle position more random. Reestablishment of astral microtubule-mediated forces align the spindle poles with cortical cues parallel to the substratum in all cells. However, in flat cells, they frequently cause spindle deformations. Similar deformations are apparent when confined spindles rotate from tilted to parallel positions while MDCK cells progress from prometaphase to metaphase. The spindle disruptions cause the engagement of the spindle assembly checkpoint. We propose that cell rounding serves to maintain spindle integrity during its positioning. PMID:25657320

  2. CENP-32 is required to maintain centrosomal dominance in bipolar spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Wood, Laura; Toramoto, Iyo; Yagyu, Ken-Ichi; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-04-01

    Centrosomes nucleate spindle formation, direct spindle pole positioning, and are important for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis in most animal cells. We previously reported that centromere protein 32 (CENP-32) is required for centrosome association with spindle poles during metaphase. In this study, we show that CENP-32 depletion seems to release centrosomes from bipolar spindles whose assembly they had previously initiated. Remarkably, the resulting anastral spindles function normally, aligning the chromosomes to a metaphase plate and entering anaphase without detectable interference from the free centrosomes, which appear to behave as free asters in these cells. The free asters, which contain reduced but significant levels of CDK5RAP2, show weak interactions with spindle microtubules but do not seem to make productive attachments to kinetochores. Thus CENP-32 appears to be required for centrosomes to integrate into a fully functional spindle that not only nucleates astral microtubules, but also is able to nucleate and bind to kinetochore and central spindle microtubules. Additional data suggest that NuMA tethers microtubules at the anastral spindle poles and that augmin is required for centrosome detachment after CENP-32 depletion, possibly due to an imbalance of forces within the spindle. PMID:25657325

  3. Chromosome misalignments induce spindle-positioning defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tame, Mihoko A; Raaijmakers, Jonne A; Afanasyev, Pavel; Medema, René H

    2016-03-01

    Cortical pulling forces on astral microtubules are essential to position the spindle. These forces are generated by cortical dynein, a minus-end directed motor. Previously, another dynein regulator termed Spindly was proposed to regulate dynein-dependent spindle positioning. However, the mechanism of how Spindly regulates spindle positioning has remained elusive. Here, we find that the misalignment of chromosomes caused by Spindly depletion is directly provoking spindle misorientation. Chromosome misalignments induced by CLIP-170 or CENP-E depletion or by noscapine treatment are similarly accompanied by severe spindle-positioning defects. We find that cortical LGN is actively displaced from the cortex when misaligned chromosomes are in close proximity. Preventing the KT recruitment of Plk1 by the depletion of PBIP1 rescues cortical LGN enrichment near misaligned chromosomes and re-establishes proper spindle orientation. Hence, KT-enriched Plk1 is responsible for the negative regulation of cortical LGN localization. In summary, we uncovered a compelling molecular link between chromosome alignment and spindle orientation defects, both of which are implicated in tumorigenesis. PMID:26882550

  4. CENP-W plays a role in maintaining bipolar spindle structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kaczmarczyk

    Full Text Available The CENP-W/T complex was previously reported to be required for mitosis. HeLa cells depleted of CENP-W displayed profound mitotic defects, with mitotic timing delay, disorganized prometaphases and multipolar spindles as major phenotypic consequences. In this study, we examined the process of multipolar spindle formation induced by CENP-W depletion. Depletion of CENP-W in HeLa cells labeled with histone H2B and tubulin fluorescent proteins induced rapid fragmentation of originally bipolar spindles in a high proportion of cells. CENP-W depletion was associated with depletion of Hec1 at kinetochores. The possibility of promiscuous centrosomal duplication was ruled out by immunofluorescent examination of centrioles. However, centrioles were frequently observed to be abnormally split. In addition, a large proportion of the supernumerary poles lacked centrioles, but were positively stained with different centrosomal markers. These observations suggested that perturbation in spindle force distribution caused by defective kinetochores could contribute to a mechanical mechanism for spindle pole disruption. 'Spindle free' nocodazole arrested cells did not exhibit pole fragmentation after CENP-W depletion, showing that pole fragmentation is microtubule dependent. Inhibition of centrosome separation by monastrol reduced the incidence of spindle pole fragmentation, indicating that Eg5 plays a role in spindle pole disruption. Surprisingly, CENP-W depletion rescued the monopolar spindle phenotype of monastrol treatment, with an increased frequency of bipolar spindles observed after CENP-W RNAi. We overexpressed the microtubule cross-linking protein TPX2 to create spindle poles stabilized by the microtubule cross-linking activity of TPX2. Spindle pole fragmentation was suppressed in a TPX2-dependent fashion. We propose that CENP-W, by influencing proper kinetochore assembly, particularly microtubule docking sites, can confer spindle pole resistance to traction

  5. The nucleation of microtubules in Aspergillus nidulans germlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Monteiro Cristina de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are filaments composed of dimers of alpha- and beta-tubulins, which have a variety of functions in living cells. In fungi, the spindle pole bodies usually have been considered to be microtubule-organizing centers. We used the antimicrotubule drug Benomyl in block/release experiments to depolymerize and repolymerize microtubules in Aspergillus nidulans germlings to learn more about the microtubule nucleation process in this filamentous fungus. Twenty seconds after release from Benomyl short microtubules were formed from several bright (immunofluorescent dots distributed along the germlings, suggesting that microtubule nucleation is randomly distributed in A. nidulans germlings. Since nuclear movement is dependent on microtubules in A. nidulans we analyzed whether mutants defective in nuclear distribution along the growing hyphae (nud mutants have some obvious microtubule defect. Cytoplasmic, astral and spindle microtubules were present and appeared to be normal in all nud mutants. However, significant changes in the percentage of short versus long mitotic spindles were observed in nud mutants. This suggests that some of the nuclei of nud mutants do not reach the late stage of cell division at normal temperatures.

  6. Mitosis: spindle evolution and the matrix model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett-Heaps, Jeremy; Forer, Art

    2009-03-01

    Current spindle models explain "anaphase A" (movement of chromosomes to the poles) in terms of a motility system based solely on microtubules (MTs) and that functions in a manner unique to mitosis. We find both these propositions unlikely. An evolutionary perspective suggests that when the spindle evolved, it should have come to share not only components (e.g., microtubules) of the interphase cell but also the primitive motility systems available, including those using actin and myosin. Other systems also came to be involved in the additional types of motility that now accompany mitosis in extant spindles. The resultant functional redundancy built reliability into this critical and complex process. Such multiple mechanisms are also confusing to those who seek to understand how chromosomes move. Narrowing this commentary down to just anaphase A, we argue that the spindle matrix participates with MTs in anaphase A and that this matrix may contain actin and myosin. The diatom spindle illustrates how such a system could function. This matrix may be motile and work in association with the MT cytoskeleton, as it does with the actin cytoskeleton during cell ruffling and amoeboid movement. Instead of pulling the chromosome polewards, the kinetochore fibre's role might be to slow polewards movement to allow correct chromosome attachment to the spindle. Perhaps the earliest eukaryotic cell was a cytoplast organised around a radial MT cytoskeleton. For cell division, it separated into two cytoplasts via a spindle of overlapping MTs. Cytokinesis was actin-based cleavage. As chromosomes evolved into individual entities, their interaction with the dividing cytoplast developed into attachment of the kinetochore to radial (cytoplast) MTs. We believe it most likely that cytoplasmic motility systems participated in these events. PMID:19255823

  7. Cell adhesion molecule control of planar spindle orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Polarized epithelial cells align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet to maintain tissue integrity and to prevent malignant transformation. The orientation of the spindle apparatus is regulated by the immobilization of the astral microtubules at the lateral cortex and depends on the precise localization of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex which captures microtubule plus ends and generates pulling forces towards the centrosomes. Recent developments indicate that signals derived from intercellular junctions are required for the stable interaction of the dynein-dynactin complex with the cortex. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells and we illustrate how different cell adhesion molecules through distinct and non-overlapping mechanisms instruct the cells to align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet. PMID:26698907

  8. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  9. Mechanical stability of bipolar spindle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2016-07-01

    Assembly and stability of mitotic spindle are governed by the interplay of various intra-cellular forces, e.g. the forces generated by motor proteins by sliding overlapping anti-parallel microtubules (MTs) polymerized from the opposite centrosomes, the interaction of kinetochores with MTs, and the interaction of MTs with the chromosome arms. We study the mechanical behavior and stability of spindle assembly within the framework of a minimal model which includes all these effects. For this model, we derive a closed-form analytical expression for the force acting between the centrosomes as a function of their separation distance and we show that an effective potential can be associated with the interactions at play. We obtain the stability diagram of spindle formation in terms of parameters characterizing the strength of motor sliding, repulsive forces generated by polymerizing MTs, and the forces arising out of the interaction of MTs with kinetochores. The stability diagram helps in quantifying the relative effects of the different interactions and elucidates the role of motor proteins in formation and inhibition of spindle structures during mitotic cell division. We also predict a regime of bistability for a certain parameter range, wherein the spindle structure can be stable for two different finite separation distances between centrosomes. This occurrence of bistability also suggests the mechanical versatility of such self-assembled spindle structures.

  10. Direct Microtubule-Binding by Myosin-10 Orients Centrosomes toward Retraction Fibers and Subcortical Actin Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Mijung; Bagonis, Maria; Danuser, Gaudenz; Pellman, David

    2015-08-10

    Positioning of centrosomes is vital for cell division and development. In metazoan cells, spindle positioning is controlled by a dynamic pool of subcortical actin that organizes in response to the position of retraction fibers. These actin "clouds" are proposed to generate pulling forces on centrosomes and mediate spindle orientation. However, the motors that pull astral microtubules toward these actin structures are not known. Here, we report that the unconventional myosin, Myo10, couples actin-dependent forces from retraction fibers and subcortical actin clouds to centrosomes. Myo10-mediated centrosome positioning requires its direct microtubule binding. Computational image analysis of large microtubule populations reveals a direct effect of Myo10 on microtubule dynamics and microtubule-cortex interactions. Myo10's role in centrosome positioning is distinct from, but overlaps with, that of dynein. Thus, Myo10 plays a key role in integrating the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to position centrosomes and mitotic spindles. PMID:26235048

  11. AMPK regulates mitotic spindle orientation through phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaiparambil, Jose T; Eggers, Carrie M; Marcus, Adam I

    2012-08-01

    The proper orientation of the mitotic spindle is essential for mitosis; however, how these events unfold at the molecular level is not well understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates energy homeostasis in eukaryotes, and AMPK-null Drosophila mutants have spindle defects. We show that threonine(172) phosphorylated AMPK localizes to the mitotic spindle poles and increases when cells enter mitosis. AMPK depletion causes a mitotic delay with misoriented spindles relative to the normal division plane and a reduced number and length of astral microtubules. AMPK-depleted cells contain mitotic actin bundles, which prevent astral microtubule-actin cortex attachments. Since myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) is an AMPK downstream target and mediates actin function, we investigated whether AMPK signals through MRLC to control spindle orientation. Mitotic levels of serine(19) phosphorylated MRLC (pMRLC(ser19)) and spindle pole-associated pMRLC(ser19) are abolished when AMPK function is compromised, indicating that AMPK is essential for pMRLC(ser19) spindle pole activity. Phosphorylation of AMPK and MRLC in the mitotic spindle is dependent upon calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CamKK) activity in LKB1-deficient cells, suggesting that CamKK regulates this pathway when LKB1 function is compromised. Taken together, these data indicate that AMPK mediates spindle pole-associated pMRLC(ser19) to control spindle orientation via regulation of actin cortex-astral microtubule attachments.

  12. How do Plants Organize Microtubules Without a Centrosome?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A microtubule nucleates from a γ-tubulin complex, which consists of γ-tubulin, proteins from the SPC97/SPC98 family, and the WD40 motif protein GCP-WD. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of the genes encoding these proteins and found that the components of this complex are widely conserved among land plants and other eukaryotes. By contrast,the interphase and mitotic arrays of microtubules in land plants differ from those in other eukaryotes. In the interphase cortical array, the majority of microtubules nucleate on existing microtubules in the absence of conspicuous microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs), such as a centrosome. During mitosis, the spindle also forms in the absence of conspicuous MTOCs. Both poles of the spindle are broad, and branched structures of microtubules called microtubule converging centers form at the poles. In this review, we hypothesize that the microtubule converging centers form via microtubuledependent microtubule nucleation, as in the case of the interphase arrays. The evolutionary insights arising from the molecular basis of the diversity in microtubule organization are discussed.

  13. Mechanical stability of bipolar spindle assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Malgaretti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Assembly and stability of mitotic spindle is governed by the interplay of various intra-cellular forces, e.g. the forces generated by motor proteins by sliding overlapping anti-parallel microtubules (MTs) polymerized from the opposite centrosomes, the interaction of kinetochores with MTs, and the interaction of MTs with the chromosomes arms. We study the mechanical behavior and stability of spindle assembly within the framework of a minimal model which includes all these effects. For this model, we derive a closed--form analytical expression for the force acting between the centrosomes as a function of their separation distance and we show that an effective potential can be associated with the interactions at play. We obtain the stability diagram of spindle formation in terms of parameters characterizing the strength of motor sliding, repulsive forces generated by polymerizing MTs, and the forces arising out of interaction of MTs with kinetochores. The stability diagram helps in quantifying the relative effec...

  14. IL-6 and mouse oocyte spindle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jashoman Banerjee

    Full Text Available Interleukin 6 (IL-6 is considered a major indicator of the acute-phase inflammatory response. Endometriosis and pelvic inflammation, diseases that manifest elevated levels of IL-6, are commonly associated with higher infertility. However, the mechanistic link between elevated levels of IL-6 and poor oocyte quality is still unclear. In this work, we explored the direct role of this cytokine as a possible mediator for impaired oocyte spindle and chromosomal structure, which is a critical hurdle in the management of infertility. Metaphase-II mouse oocytes were exposed to recombinant mouse IL-6 (50, 100 and 200 ng/mL for 30 minutes and subjected to indirect immunofluorescent staining to identify alterations in the microtubule and chromosomal alignment compared to untreated controls. The deterioration in microtubule and chromosomal alignment were evaluated utilizing both fluorescence and confocal microscopy, and were quantitated with a previously reported scoring system. Our results showed that IL-6 caused a dose-dependent deterioration in microtubule and chromosomal alignment in the treated oocytes as compared to the untreated group. Indeed, IL-6 at a concentration as low as 50 ng/mL caused deterioration in the spindle structure in 60% of the oocytes, which increased significantly (P<0.0001 as IL-6 concentration was increased. In conclusion, elevated levels of IL-6 associated with endometriosis and pelvic inflammation may reduce the fertilizing capacity of human oocyte through a mechanism that involves impairment of the microtubule and chromosomal structure.

  15. Aurora A, MCAK, and Kif18b promote Eg5-independent spindle formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heesbeen, Roy G H P; Raaijmakers, Jonne A; Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Halim, Vincentius A; Lelieveld, Daphne; Lieftink, Cor; Heck, Albert J R; Egan, David A; Medema, René H

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the microtubule (MT) motor protein Eg5 results in a mitotic arrest due to the formation of monopolar spindles, making Eg5 an attractive target for anti-cancer therapies. However, Eg5-independent pathways for bipolar spindle formation exist, which might promote resistance to treatment w

  16. Movement of chromosomes with severed kinetochore microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forer, Arthur; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen

    2015-05-01

    Experiments dating from 1966 and thereafter showed that anaphase chromosomes continued to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed by ultraviolet microbeam irradiation. These observations were initially met with scepticism as they contradicted the prevailing view that kinetochore fibre microtubules pulled chromosomes to the pole. However, recent experiments using visible light laser microbeam irradiations have corroborated these earlier experiments as anaphase chromosomes again were shown to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed. Thus, multiple independent studies using different techniques have shown that chromosomes can indeed move poleward without direct microtubule connections to the pole, with only a kinetochore 'stub' of microtubules. An issue not yet settled is: what propels the disconnected chromosome? There are two not necessarily mutually exclusive proposals in the literature: (1) chromosome movement is propelled by the kinetochore stub interacting with non-kinetochore microtubules and (2) chromosome movement is propelled by a spindle matrix acting on the stub. In this review, we summarise the data indicating that chromosomes can move with severed kinetochore microtubules and we discuss proposed mechanisms for chromosome movement with severed kinetochore microtubules. PMID:25576435

  17. Anillin interacts with microtubules and is part of the astral pathway that defines cortical domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostende Triplet, Chloe; Jaramillo Garcia, Melina; Haji Bik, Husni; Beaudet, Daniel; Piekny, Alisa

    2014-09-01

    Cytokinesis occurs by the ingression of an actomyosin ring that separates the cell into two daughter cells. The mitotic spindle, comprising astral and central spindle microtubules, couples contractile ring ingression with DNA segregation. Cues from the central spindle activate RhoA, the upstream regulator of the contractile ring. However, additional cues from the astral microtubules also reinforce the localization of active RhoA. Using human cells, we show that astral and central spindle microtubules independently control the localization of contractile proteins during cytokinesis. Astral microtubules restrict the accumulation and localization of contractile proteins during mitosis, whereas the central spindle forms a discrete ring by directing RhoA activation in the equatorial plane. Anillin stabilizes the contractile ring during cytokinesis. We show that human anillin interacts with astral microtubules and that this interaction is competed by the cortical recruitment of anillin by active RhoA. Anillin restricts the localization of myosin to the equatorial cortex and that of NuMA (part of the microtubule-tethering complex that regulates spindle position) to the polar cortex. The sequestration of anillin by astral microtubules might alter the organization of cortical proteins to polarize cells for cytokinesis. PMID:24994938

  18. The forces that center the mitotic spindle in the C. elegans embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The precise positioning of the mitotic spindle to the cell center during mitosis is a fundamental process for chromosome segregation and the division plane definition. Despite its importance, the mechanism for spindle centering remains elusive. To study this mechanism, the dynamic of the microtubules was characterized at the bulk and at the cortex in the C. elegans embryo. Then, this dynamic was correlated to the centering forces of the spindle that were studied by applying calibrated magneti...

  19. Disruption of microtubules uncouples budding and nuclear division in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Naomi S; Sibley, L David

    2002-03-01

    The tachyzoite stage of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii has two populations of microtubules: spindle microtubules and subpellicular microtubules. To determine how these two microtubule populations are regulated, we investigated microtubule behavior during the cell cycle following treatment with microtubule-disrupting drugs. Previous work had established that the microtubule populations are individually nucleated by two distinct microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs): the apical polar ring for the subpellicular microtubules and spindle pole plaques/centrioles for the spindle microtubules. When replicating tachyzoites were treated with 0.5 microM oryzalin or 1.0 mM colchicine they retained the capacity to form a spindle and undergo nuclear division. Although these parasites could complete budding, they lost the bulk of their subpellicular microtubules and the ability to reinvade host cells. Both nascent spindle and subpellicular microtubules were disrupted in 2.5 microM oryzalin or 5.0 mM colchicine. Under these conditions, parasites grew in size and replicated their genome but were incapable of nuclear division. After removal from 0.5 microM oryzalin, Toxoplasma tachyzoites were able to restore normal subpellicular microtubules and a fully invasive phenotype. When oryzalin was removed from Toxoplasma tachyzoites treated with 2.5 microM drug, the parasites attempted to bud as crescent-shaped tachyzoites. Because the polyploid nuclear mass could not be correctly segregated, many daughter parasites lacked nuclei altogether although budding and scission from the maternal mass was able to be completed. Multiple MTOCs permit Toxoplasma tachyzoites to control nuclear division independently from cell polarity and cytokinesis. This unusual situation grants greater cell cycle flexibility to these parasites but abolishes the checks for coregulation of nuclear division and cytokinesis found in other eukaryotes. PMID:11870220

  20. F-actin asymmetry and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated TCC-1 protein contribute to stereotypic spindle movements in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, C.W.H.; Muñoz, J.; Portegijs, V.C.; Schmidt, R.; Grigoriev, I.S.; Boxem, M.; Akhmanova, A.S.; Heck, A.J.R.; van den Heuvel, S.

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule spindle apparatus dictates the plane of cell cleavage in animal cells. During development, dividing cells control the position of the spindle to determine the size, location, and fate of daughter cells. Spindle positioning depends on pulling forces that act between the cell periphery

  1. Self-organization mechanisms in the assembly and maintenance of bipolar spindles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Kendra Stewart

    Anastral, meiotic spindles are thought to be organized differently from astral, mitotic spindles, but the field has lacked basic structural information required to describe and model them, including the location of microtubule nucleating sites and minus ends. How the various components of spindles act together to establish and maintain the dynamic bipolar structure of spindles is not understood. We measure the distributions of oriented microtubules (MTs) in metaphase anastral spindles in Xenopus extracts by fluorescence speckle microscopy and cross-correlation analysis. We localized plus ends by tubulin incorporation and combined this with the orientation data to infer the localization of minus ends. We find that minus ends are localized throughout the spindle, sparsely at the equator and at higher concentrations near the poles. This dads to the surprising conclusion that spindles contained many short MTs, not connected to the spindle poles. Based on these data, we propose a slide-and-cluster model based on four known molecular activities: MT nucleation near chromosomes, the sliding of MTs by a plus-enddirected motor, the clustering of their minus ends by a minus-end-directed motor, and the loss of MTs by dynamic instability. This work demonstrates how the interplay between two types of motors together with continual nucleation of MTs by chromosomes could organize the MTs into spindles. Our model applies to overlapping, nonkinetochore MTs in anastral spindles, and perhaps also to interpolar MTs in astral spindles. We show mathematically that the slide-and-cluster mechanism robustly forms bipolar spindles a stable steady-state length, sometimes with sharp poles. This model accounts for several experimental observations that were difficult to explain with existing models, and is the first self contained model for anastral spindle assembly, MT sliding (known as poleward flux), and spindle bistability. Our experimental results support the slide-and-cluster scenario

  2. Identification of a TPX2-like microtubule-associated protein in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohta Goshima

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis relies on the spindle and the functions of numerous microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs. One of the best-studied spindle MAPs is the highly conserved TPX2, which has been reported to have characteristic intracellular dynamics and molecular activities, such as nuclear localisation in interphase, poleward movement in the metaphase spindle, microtubule nucleation, microtubule stabilisation, microtubule bundling, Aurora A kinase activation, kinesin-5 binding, and kinesin-12 recruitment. This protein has been shown to be essential for spindle formation in every cell type analysed so far. However, as yet, TPX2 homologues have not been found in the Drosophila genome. In this study, I found that the Drosophila protein Ssp1/Mei-38 has significant homology to TPX2. Sequence conservation was limited to the putative spindle microtubule-associated region of TPX2, and intriguingly, D-TPX2 (Ssp1/Mei-38 lacks Aurora A- and kinesin-5-binding domains, which are highly conserved in other animal and plant species, including many insects such as ants and bees. D-TPX2 uniformly localised to kinetochore microtubule-enriched regions of the metaphase spindle in the S2 cell line, and it had microtubule binding and bundling activities in vitro. In comparison with other systems, the contribution of D-TPX2 to cell division seems to be minor; live cell imaging of microtubules and chromosomes after RNAi knockdown identified significant delay in chromosome congression in only 18% of the cells. Thus, while this conserved spindle protein is present in Drosophila, other mechanisms may largely compensate for its spindle assembly and chromosome segregation functions.

  3. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization. PMID:25664600

  4. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization.

  5. Mitotic rounding alters cell geometry to ensure efficient bipolar spindle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Oscar M; Le Berre, Maël; Dimitracopoulos, Andrea; Bonazzi, Daria; Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz, Ewa; Picone, Remigio; Duke, Thomas; Piel, Matthieu; Baum, Buzz

    2013-05-13

    Accurate animal cell division requires precise coordination of changes in the structure of the microtubule-based spindle and the actin-based cell cortex. Here, we use a series of perturbation experiments to dissect the relative roles of actin, cortical mechanics, and cell shape in spindle formation. We find that, whereas the actin cortex is largely dispensable for rounding and timely mitotic progression in isolated cells, it is needed to drive rounding to enable unperturbed spindle morphogenesis under conditions of confinement. Using different methods to limit mitotic cell height, we show that a failure to round up causes defects in spindle assembly, pole splitting, and a delay in mitotic progression. These defects can be rescued by increasing microtubule lengths and therefore appear to be a direct consequence of the limited reach of mitotic centrosome-nucleated microtubules. These findings help to explain why most animal cells round up as they enter mitosis.

  6. The dual specificity phosphatase Cdc14B bundles and stabilizes microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumley, Hyekyung [ORNL; Liu, Yie [ORNL; Gomez, Marla V [ORNL; Wang, Yisong [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    The Cdc14 dual-specificity phosphatases regulate key events in the eukaryotic cell cycle. However, little is known about the function of mammalian CDC14B family members. Here, we demonstrate that subcellular localization of CDC14B protein is cell cycle regulated. CDC14B can bind, bundle, and stabilize microtubules in vitro independently of its catalytic activity. Basic amino acid residues within the nucleolar targeting domain are important for both retaining CDC14B in the nucleolus and preventing microtubule bundling. Overexpression of CDC14B resulted in the formation of cytoplasmic CDC14B and microtubule bundles in interphase cells. These microtubule bundles were resistant to microtubule depolymerization reagents and enriched in acetylated -tubulin. Expression of cytoplasmic forms of CDC14B impaired microtubule nucleation from the microtubule organization center. CDC14B is thus a novel microtubule-bundling and -stabilizing protein, whose regulated subcellular localization may help modulate spindle and microtubule dynamics in mitosis.

  7. Microtubule networks for plant cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Keijzer, Jeroen; Mulder, Bela M; Janson, Marcel E

    2014-09-01

    During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of a cell is divided to form two daughter cells. In animal cells, the existing plasma membrane is first constricted and then abscised to generate two individual plasma membranes. Plant cells on the other hand divide by forming an interior dividing wall, the so-called cell plate, which is constructed by localized deposition of membrane and cell wall material. Construction starts in the centre of the cell at the locus of the mitotic spindle and continues radially towards the existing plasma membrane. Finally the membrane of the cell plate and plasma membrane fuse to form two individual plasma membranes. Two microtubule-based cytoskeletal networks, the phragmoplast and the pre-prophase band (PPB), jointly control cytokinesis in plants. The bipolar microtubule array of the phragmoplast regulates cell plate deposition towards a cortical position that is templated by the ring-shaped microtubule array of the PPB. In contrast to most animal cells, plants do not use centrosomes as foci of microtubule growth initiation. Instead, plant microtubule networks are striking examples of self-organizing systems that emerge from physically constrained interactions of dispersed microtubules. Here we will discuss how microtubule-based activities including growth, shrinkage, severing, sliding, nucleation and bundling interrelate to jointly generate the required ordered structures. Evidence mounts that adapter proteins sense the local geometry of microtubules to locally modulate the activity of proteins involved in microtubule growth regulation and severing. Many of the proteins and mechanisms involved have roles in other microtubule assemblies as well, bestowing broader relevance to insights gained from plants. PMID:25136380

  8. Attachment issues: kinetochore transformations and spindle checkpoint silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kops, Geert J P L

    2016-04-01

    Cell division culminates in the segregation of duplicated chromosomes in opposite directions prior to cellular fission. This process is guarded by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which prevents the anaphase of cell division until stable connections between spindle microtubules and the kinetochores of all chromosomes are established. The anaphase inhibitor is generated at unattached kinetochores and inhibitor production is prevented when microtubules are captured. Understanding the molecular changes in the kinetochore that are evoked by microtubule attachments is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of SAC signaling and silencing. Here, we highlight the most recent findings on these events, pinpoint some remaining mysteries, and argue for incorporating holistic views of kinetochore dynamics in order to understand SAC silencing. PMID:26947988

  9. Spatial organization of the Ran pathway by microtubules in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Doogie; Yu, Che-Hang; Needleman, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    Concentration gradients of soluble proteins are believed to be responsible for control of morphogenesis of subcellular systems, but the mechanisms that generate the spatial organization of these subcellular gradients remain poorly understood. Here, we use a newly developed multipoint fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy technique to study the ras-related nuclear protein (Ran) pathway, which forms soluble gradients around chromosomes in mitosis and is thought to spatially regulate microtubule behaviors during spindle assembly. We found that the distribution of components of the Ran pathway that influence microtubule behaviors is determined by their interactions with microtubules, resulting in microtubule nucleators being localized by the microtubules whose formation they stimulate. Modeling and perturbation experiments show that this feedback makes the length of the spindle insensitive to the length scale of the Ran gradient, allows the spindle to assemble outside the peak of the Ran gradient, and explains the scaling of the spindle with cell size. Such feedback between soluble signaling pathways and the mechanics of the cytoskeleton may be a general feature of subcellular organization. PMID:27439876

  10. Regulation of mitotic spindle orientation: an integrated view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Pietro, Florencia; Echard, Arnaud; Morin, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is essential for cell fate decisions, epithelial maintenance, and tissue morphogenesis. In most animal cell types, the dynein motor complex is anchored at the cell cortex and exerts pulling forces on astral microtubules to position the spindle. Early studies identified the evolutionarily conserved Gαi/LGN/NuMA complex as a key regulator that polarizes cortical force generators. In recent years, a combination of genetics, biochemistry, modeling, and live imaging has contributed to decipher the mechanisms of spindle orientation. Here, we highlight the dynamic nature of the assembly of this complex and discuss the molecular regulation of its localization. Remarkably, a number of LGN-independent mechanisms were described recently, whereas NuMA remains central in most pathways involved in recruiting force generators at the cell cortex. We also describe the emerging role of the actin cortex in spindle orientation and discuss how dynamic astral microtubule formation is involved. We further give an overview on instructive external signals that control spindle orientation in tissues. Finally, we discuss the influence of cell geometry and mechanical forces on spindle orientation. PMID:27432284

  11. Regulation of a Spindle Positioning Factor at Kinetochores by SUMO-Targeted Ubiquitin Ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiggert, Jörg; Stevermann, Lea; Panigada, Davide; Kammerer, Daniel; Liakopoulos, Dimitris

    2016-02-22

    Correct function of the mitotic spindle requires balanced interplay of kinetochore and astral microtubules that mediate chromosome segregation and spindle positioning, respectively. Errors therein can cause severe defects ranging from aneuploidy to developmental disorders. Here, we describe a protein degradation pathway that functionally links astral microtubules to kinetochores via regulation of a microtubule-associated factor. We show that the yeast spindle positioning protein Kar9 localizes not only to astral but also to kinetochore microtubules, where it becomes targeted for proteasomal degradation by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) Slx5-Slx8. Intriguingly, this process does not depend on preceding sumoylation of Kar9 but rather requires SUMO-dependent recruitment of STUbLs to kinetochores. Failure to degrade Kar9 leads to defects in both chromosome segregation and spindle positioning. We propose that kinetochores serve as platforms to recruit STUbLs in a SUMO-dependent manner in order to ensure correct spindle function by regulating levels of microtubule-associated proteins. PMID:26906737

  12. Novel insights into mammalian embryonic neural stem cell division: focus on microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Huttner, Wieland B

    2015-12-01

    During stem cell divisions, mitotic microtubules do more than just segregate the chromosomes. They also determine whether a cell divides virtually symmetrically or asymmetrically by establishing spindle orientation and the plane of cell division. This can be decisive for the fate of the stem cell progeny. Spindle defects have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, yet the role of spindle orientation for mammalian neurogenesis has remained controversial. Here we explore recent advances in understanding how the microtubule cytoskeleton influences mammalian neural stem cell division. Our focus is primarily on the role of spindle microtubules in the development of the cerebral cortex. We also highlight unique characteristics in the architecture and dynamics of cortical stem cells that are tightly linked to their mode of division. These features contribute to setting these cells apart as mitotic "rule breakers," control how asymmetric a division is, and, we argue, are sufficient to determine the fate of the neural stem cell progeny in mammals.

  13. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, S; Basu, S; Paul, R

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed. PMID:26565279

  14. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, S.; Basu, S.; Paul, R.

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed.

  15. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition.

  16. Paired arrangement of kinetochores together with microtubule pivoting and dynamics drive kinetochore capture in meiosis I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojoc, Gheorghe; Florescu, Ana-Maria; Krull, Alexander; Klemm, Anna H; Pavin, Nenad; Jülicher, Frank; Tolić, Iva M

    2016-01-01

    Kinetochores are protein complexes on the chromosomes, whose function as linkers between spindle microtubules and chromosomes is crucial for proper cell division. The mechanisms that facilitate kinetochore capture by microtubules are still unclear. In the present study, we combine experiments and theory to explore the mechanisms of kinetochore capture at the onset of meiosis I in fission yeast. We show that kinetochores on homologous chromosomes move together, microtubules are dynamic and pivot around the spindle pole, and the average capture time is 3-4 minutes. Our theory describes paired kinetochores on homologous chromosomes as a single object, as well as angular movement of microtubules and their dynamics. For the experimentally measured parameters, the model reproduces the measured capture kinetics and shows that the paired configuration of kinetochores accelerates capture, whereas microtubule pivoting and dynamics have a smaller contribution. Kinetochore pairing may be a general feature that increases capture efficiency in meiotic cells. PMID:27166749

  17. Paired arrangement of kinetochores together with microtubule pivoting and dynamics drive kinetochore capture in meiosis I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojoc, Gheorghe; Florescu, Ana-Maria; Krull, Alexander; Klemm, Anna H; Pavin, Nenad; Jülicher, Frank; Tolić, Iva M

    2016-01-01

    Kinetochores are protein complexes on the chromosomes, whose function as linkers between spindle microtubules and chromosomes is crucial for proper cell division. The mechanisms that facilitate kinetochore capture by microtubules are still unclear. In the present study, we combine experiments and theory to explore the mechanisms of kinetochore capture at the onset of meiosis I in fission yeast. We show that kinetochores on homologous chromosomes move together, microtubules are dynamic and pivot around the spindle pole, and the average capture time is 3-4 minutes. Our theory describes paired kinetochores on homologous chromosomes as a single object, as well as angular movement of microtubules and their dynamics. For the experimentally measured parameters, the model reproduces the measured capture kinetics and shows that the paired configuration of kinetochores accelerates capture, whereas microtubule pivoting and dynamics have a smaller contribution. Kinetochore pairing may be a general feature that increases capture efficiency in meiotic cells.

  18. Stabilizing versus Destabilizing the Microtubules: A Double-Edge Sword for an Effective Cancer Treatment Option?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Fanale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are dynamic and structural cellular components involved in several cell functions, including cell shape, motility, and intracellular trafficking. In proliferating cells, they are essential components in the division process through the formation of the mitotic spindle. As a result of these functions, tubulin and microtubules are targets for anticancer agents. Microtubule-targeting agents can be divided into two groups: microtubule-stabilizing, and microtubule-destabilizing agents. The former bind to the tubulin polymer and stabilize microtubules, while the latter bind to the tubulin dimers and destabilize microtubules. Alteration of tubulin-microtubule equilibrium determines the disruption of the mitotic spindle, halting the cell cycle at the metaphase-anaphase transition and, eventually, resulting in cell death. Clinical application of earlier microtubule inhibitors, however, unfortunately showed several limits, such as neurological and bone marrow toxicity and the emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells. Here we review several natural and synthetic microtubule-targeting agents, which showed antitumor activity and increased efficacy in comparison to traditional drugs in various preclinical and clinical studies. Cryptophycins, combretastatins, ombrabulin, soblidotin, D-24851, epothilones and discodermolide were used in clinical trials. Some of them showed antiangiogenic and antivascular activity and others showed the ability to overcome multidrug resistance, supporting their possible use in chemotherapy.

  19. Stabilizing versus destabilizing the microtubules: a double-edge sword for an effective cancer treatment option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, Daniele; Bronte, Giuseppe; Passiglia, Francesco; Calò, Valentina; Castiglia, Marta; Di Piazza, Florinda; Barraco, Nadia; Cangemi, Antonina; Catarella, Maria Teresa; Insalaco, Lavinia; Listì, Angela; Maragliano, Rossella; Massihnia, Daniela; Perez, Alessandro; Toia, Francesca; Cicero, Giuseppe; Bazan, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic and structural cellular components involved in several cell functions, including cell shape, motility, and intracellular trafficking. In proliferating cells, they are essential components in the division process through the formation of the mitotic spindle. As a result of these functions, tubulin and microtubules are targets for anticancer agents. Microtubule-targeting agents can be divided into two groups: microtubule-stabilizing, and microtubule-destabilizing agents. The former bind to the tubulin polymer and stabilize microtubules, while the latter bind to the tubulin dimers and destabilize microtubules. Alteration of tubulin-microtubule equilibrium determines the disruption of the mitotic spindle, halting the cell cycle at the metaphase-anaphase transition and, eventually, resulting in cell death. Clinical application of earlier microtubule inhibitors, however, unfortunately showed several limits, such as neurological and bone marrow toxicity and the emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells. Here we review several natural and synthetic microtubule-targeting agents, which showed antitumor activity and increased efficacy in comparison to traditional drugs in various preclinical and clinical studies. Cryptophycins, combretastatins, ombrabulin, soblidotin, D-24851, epothilones and discodermolide were used in clinical trials. Some of them showed antiangiogenic and antivascular activity and others showed the ability to overcome multidrug resistance, supporting their possible use in chemotherapy.

  20. Stabilizing versus Destabilizing the Microtubules: A Double-Edge Sword for an Effective Cancer Treatment Option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, Daniele; Bronte, Giuseppe; Passiglia, Francesco; Calò, Valentina; Castiglia, Marta; Di Piazza, Florinda; Barraco, Nadia; Cangemi, Antonina; Catarella, Maria Teresa; Insalaco, Lavinia; Listì, Angela; Maragliano, Rossella; Massihnia, Daniela; Perez, Alessandro; Toia, Francesca; Cicero, Giuseppe; Bazan, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic and structural cellular components involved in several cell functions, including cell shape, motility, and intracellular trafficking. In proliferating cells, they are essential components in the division process through the formation of the mitotic spindle. As a result of these functions, tubulin and microtubules are targets for anticancer agents. Microtubule-targeting agents can be divided into two groups: microtubule-stabilizing, and microtubule-destabilizing agents. The former bind to the tubulin polymer and stabilize microtubules, while the latter bind to the tubulin dimers and destabilize microtubules. Alteration of tubulin-microtubule equilibrium determines the disruption of the mitotic spindle, halting the cell cycle at the metaphase-anaphase transition and, eventually, resulting in cell death. Clinical application of earlier microtubule inhibitors, however, unfortunately showed several limits, such as neurological and bone marrow toxicity and the emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells. Here we review several natural and synthetic microtubule-targeting agents, which showed antitumor activity and increased efficacy in comparison to traditional drugs in various preclinical and clinical studies. Cryptophycins, combretastatins, ombrabulin, soblidotin, D-24851, epothilones and discodermolide were used in clinical trials. Some of them showed antiangiogenic and antivascular activity and others showed the ability to overcome multidrug resistance, supporting their possible use in chemotherapy. PMID:26484003

  1. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, David M.; Nannas, Natalie J.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation. PMID:27610117

  2. Characterization of ring-like F-actin structure as a mechanical partner for spindle positioning in mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Lu

    Full Text Available Proper spindle positioning and orientation are essential for accurate mitosis which requires dynamic interactions between microtubule and actin filament (F-actin. Although mounting evidence demonstrates the role of F-actin in cortical cytoskeleton dynamics, it remains elusive as to the structure and function of F-actin-based networks in spindle geometry. Here we showed a ring-like F-actin structure surrounding the mitotic spindle which forms since metaphase and maintains in MG132-arrested metaphase HeLa cells. This cytoplasmic F-actin structure is relatively isotropic and less dynamic. Our computational modeling of spindle position process suggests a possible mechanism by which the ring-like F-actin structure can regulate astral microtubule dynamics and thus mitotic spindle orientation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting Plk1, Mps1 or Myosin, and disruption of microtubules or F-actin polymerization perturbs the formation of the ring-like F-actin structure and alters spindle position and symmetric division. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized but important link between mitotic spindle and ring-like F-actin network in accurate mitosis and enables the development of a method to theoretically illustrate the relationship between mitotic spindle and cytoplasmic F-actin.

  3. EB1 is required for spindle symmetry in mammalian mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Brüning-Richardson

    Full Text Available Most information about the roles of the adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC and its binding partner EB1 in mitotic cells has come from siRNA studies. These suggest functions in chromosomal segregation and spindle positioning whose loss might contribute to tumourigenesis in cancers initiated by APC mutation. However, siRNA-based approaches have drawbacks associated with the time taken to achieve significant expression knockdown and the pleiotropic effects of EB1 and APC gene knockdown. Here we describe the effects of microinjecting APC- or EB1- specific monoclonal antibodies and a dominant-negative EB1 protein fragment into mammalian mitotic cells. The phenotypes observed were consistent with the roles proposed for EB1 and APC in chromosomal segregation in previous work. However, EB1 antibody injection also revealed two novel mitotic phenotypes, anaphase-specific cortical blebbing and asymmetric spindle pole movement. The daughters of microinjected cells displayed inequalities in microtubule content, with the greatest differences seen in the products of mitoses that showed the severest asymmetry in spindle pole movement. Daughters that inherited the least mobile pole contained the fewest microtubules, consistent with a role for EB1 in processes that promote equality of astral microtubule function at both poles in a spindle. We propose that these novel phenotypes represent APC-independent roles for EB1 in spindle pole function and the regulation of cortical contractility in the later stages of mitosis. Our work confirms that EB1 and APC have important mitotic roles, the loss of which could contribute to CIN in colorectal tumour cells.

  4. Leading at the Front: How EB Proteins Regulate Microtubule Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Taviare

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules are the most rigid of the cytoskeletal filaments, they provide the cell's scaffolding, form the byways on which motor proteins transport intracellular cargo and reorganize to form the mitotic spindle when the cell needs to divide. These biopolymers are composed of alpha and beta tubulin monomers that create hollow cylindrical nanotubes with an outer diameter of 25 nm and an inner diameter of 17 nm. At steady state concentrations, microtubules undergo a process known as dynamic instability. During dynamic instability the length of individual microtubules is changing as the filament alternates between periods of growth to shrinkage (catastrophe) and shrinkage to growth (rescue). This process can be enhanced or diminished with the addition of microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). MAPs are microtubule binding proteins that stabilize, destabilize, or nucleate microtubules. We will discuss the effects of the stabilizing end-binding proteins (EB1, EB2 and EB3), on microtubule dynamics observed in vitro. The EBs are a unique family of MAPs known to tip track and enhance microtubule growth by stabilizing the ends. This is a different mechanism than those employed by structural MAPs such as tau or MAP4.

  5. Highly Transient Molecular Interactions Underlie the Stability of Kinetochore–Microtubule Attachment During Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I.; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis is mediated by spindle microtubules that attach to chromosomal kinetochores with strong yet labile links. The exact molecular composition of the kinetochore–microtubule interface is not known but microtubules are thought to bind to kinetochores via the specialized microtubule-binding sites, which contain multiple microtubule-binding proteins. During prometaphase the lifetime of microtubule attachments is short but in metaphase it increases 3-fold, presumably owing to dephosphorylation of the microtubule-binding proteins that increases their affinity. Here, we use mathematical modeling to examine in quantitative and systematic manner the general relationships between the molecular properties of microtubule-binding proteins and the resulting stability of microtubule attachment to the protein-containing kinetochore site. We show that when the protein connections are stochastic, the physiological rate of microtubule turnover is achieved only if these molecular interactions are very transient, each lasting fraction of a second. This “microscopic” time is almost four orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time of kinetochore–microtubule attachment. Cooperativity of the microtubule-binding events further increases the disparity of these time scales. Furthermore, for all values of kinetic parameters the microtubule stability is very sensitive to the minor changes in the molecular constants. Such sensitivity of the lifetime of microtubule attachment to the kinetics and cooperativity of molecular interactions at the microtubule-binding site may hinder the accurate regulation of kinetochore–microtubule stability during mitotic progression, and it necessitates detailed experimental examination of the microtubule-binding properties of kinetochore-localized proteins. PMID:24376473

  6. Highly Transient Molecular Interactions Underlie the Stability of Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment During Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L

    2013-12-13

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis is mediated by spindle microtubules that attach to chromosomal kinetochores with strong yet labile links. The exact molecular composition of the kinetochore-microtubule interface is not known but microtubules are thought to bind to kinetochores via the specialized microtubule-binding sites, which contain multiple microtubule-binding proteins. During prometaphase the lifetime of microtubule attachments is short but in metaphase it increases 3-fold, presumably owing to dephosphorylation of the microtubule-binding proteins that increases their affinity. Here, we use mathematical modeling to examine in quantitative and systematic manner the general relationships between the molecular properties of microtubule-binding proteins and the resulting stability of microtubule attachment to the protein-containing kinetochore site. We show that when the protein connections are stochastic, the physiological rate of microtubule turnover is achieved only if these molecular interactions are very transient, each lasting fraction of a second. This "microscopic" time is almost four orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time of kinetochore-microtubule attachment. Cooperativity of the microtubule-binding events further increases the disparity of these time scales. Furthermore, for all values of kinetic parameters the microtubule stability is very sensitive to the minor changes in the molecular constants. Such sensitivity of the lifetime of microtubule attachment to the kinetics and cooperativity of molecular interactions at the microtubule-binding site may hinder the accurate regulation of kinetochore-microtubule stability during mitotic progression, and it necessitates detailed experimental examination of the microtubule-binding properties of kinetochore-localized proteins. PMID:24376473

  7. Fission yeast Scp3 potentially maintains microtubule orientation through bundling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Ozaki

    Full Text Available Microtubules play important roles in organelle transport, the maintenance of cell polarity and chromosome segregation and generally form bundles during these processes. The fission yeast gene scp3+ was identified as a multicopy suppressor of the cps3-81 mutant, which is hypersensitive to isopropyl N-3-chlorophenylcarbamate (CIPC, a poison that induces abnormal multipolar spindle formation in higher eukaryotes. In this study, we investigated the function of Scp3 along with the effect of CIPC in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Microscopic observation revealed that treatment with CIPC, cps3-81 mutation and scp3+ gene deletion disturbed the orientation of microtubules in interphase cells. Overexpression of scp3+ suppressed the abnormal orientation of microtubules by promoting bundling. Functional analysis suggested that Scp3 functions independently from Ase1, a protein largely required for the bundling of the mitotic spindle. A strain lacking the ase1+ gene was more sensitive to CIPC, with the drug affecting the integrity of the mitotic spindle, indicating that CIPC has a mitotic target that has a role redundant with Ase1. These results suggested that multiple systems are independently involved to ensure microtubule orientation by bundling in fission yeast.

  8. Aurora A kinase regulates proper spindle positioning in C. elegans and in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotak, Sachin; Afshar, Katayon; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Accurate spindle positioning is essential for error-free cell division. The one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo has proven instrumental for dissecting mechanisms governing spindle positioning. Despite important progress, how the cortical forces that act on astral microtubules to properly position the spindle are modulated is incompletely understood. Here, we report that the PP6 phosphatase PPH-6 and its associated subunit SAPS-1, which positively regulate pulling forces acting on spindle poles, associate with the Aurora A kinase AIR-1 in C. elegans embryos. We show that acute inactivation of AIR-1 during mitosis results in excess pulling forces on astral microtubules. Furthermore, we uncover that AIR-1 acts downstream of PPH-6-SAPS-1 in modulating spindle positioning, and that PPH-6-SAPS-1 negatively regulates AIR-1 localization at the cell cortex. Moreover, we show that Aurora A and the PP6 phosphatase subunit PPP6C are also necessary for spindle positioning in human cells. There, Aurora A is needed for the cortical localization of NuMA and dynein during mitosis. Overall, our work demonstrates that Aurora A kinases and PP6 phosphatases have an ancient function in modulating spindle positioning, thus contributing to faithful cell division. PMID:27335426

  9. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division.

  10. The transcription factor Egr3 is a putative component of the microtubule organizing center in mouse oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyejin Shin

    Full Text Available The early growth response (Egr family of zinc finger transcription factors consists of 4 members. During an investigation of Egr factor localization in mouse ovaries, we noted that Egr3 exhibits a subcellular localization that overlaps with the meiotic spindle in oocytes. Using Egr3-specific antibodies, we establish that Egr3 co-localizes with the spindle and cytosolic microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs in oocytes during meiotic maturation. Notably, the Egr3 protein appears to accumulate around γ-tubulin in MTOCs. Nocodazole treatment, which induces microtubule depolymerization, resulted in the disruption of spindle formation and Egr3 localization, suggesting that Egr3 localization is dependent on the correct configuration of the spindle. Shortly after warming of vitrified oocytes, growing arrays of microtubules were observed near large clusters of Egr3. An in vitro microtubule interaction assay showed that Egr3 does not directly interact with polymerized microtubules. Egr3 localization on the spindle was sustained in early preimplantation mouse embryos, but this pattern did not persist until the blastocyst stage. Collectively, our result shows for the first time that the Egr3 a transcription factor may play a novel non-transcriptional function during microtubule organization in mouse oocytes.

  11. "Artificial mitotic spindle" generated by dielectrophoresis and protein micropatterning supports bidirectional transport of kinesin-coated beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppalapati, Maruti; Huang, Ying-Ming; Aravamuthan, Vidhya; Jackson, Thomas N; Hancock, William O

    2011-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is a dynamic assembly of microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins that controls the directed movement of chromosomes during cell division. Because proper segregation of the duplicated genome requires that each daughter cell receives precisely one copy of each chromosome, numerous overlapping mechanisms have evolved to ensure that every chromosome is transported to the cell equator during metaphase. However, due to the inherent redundancy in this system, cellular studies using gene knockdowns or small molecule inhibitors have an inherent limit in defining the sufficiency of precise molecular mechanisms as well as quantifying aspects of their mechanical performance. Thus, there exists a need for novel experimental approaches that reconstitute important aspects of the mitotic spindle in vitro. Here, we show that by microfabricating Cr electrodes on quartz substrates and micropatterning proteins on the electrode surfaces, AC electric fields can be used to assemble opposed bundles of aligned and uniformly oriented microtubules as found in the mitotic spindle. By immobilizing microtubule ends on each electrode, analogous to anchoring at centrosomes, solutions of motor or microtubule binding proteins can be introduced and their resulting dynamics analyzed. Using this "artificial mitotic spindle" we show that beads functionalized with plus-end kinesin motors move in an oscillatory manner analogous to the movements of chromosomes and severed chromosome arms during metaphase. Hence, features of directional instability, an established characteristic of metaphase chromosome dynamics, can be reconstituted in vitro using a pair of uniformly oriented microtubule bundles and a plus-end kinesin functionalized bead.

  12. Intracellular spatial localization regulated by the microtubule network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available The commonly recognized mechanisms for spatial regulation inside the cell are membrane-bounded compartmentalization and biochemical association with subcellular organelles. We use computational modeling to investigate another spatial regulation mechanism mediated by the microtubule network in the cell. Our results demonstrate that the mitotic spindle can impose strong sequestration and concentration effects on molecules with binding affinity for microtubules, especially dynein-directed cargoes. The model can recapitulate the essence of three experimental observations on distinct microtubule network morphologies: the sequestration of germ plasm components by the mitotic spindles in the Drosophila syncytial embryo, the asymmetric cell division initiated by the time delay in centrosome maturation in the Drosophila neuroblast, and the diffusional block between neighboring energids in the Drosophila syncytial embryo. Our model thus suggests that the cell cycle-dependent changes in the microtubule network are critical for achieving different spatial regulation effects. The microtubule network provides a spatially extensive docking platform for molecules and gives rise to a "structured cytoplasm", in contrast to a free and fluid environment.

  13. Regulation of cell cycle by the anaphase spindle midzone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sluder Greenfield

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of proteins accumulate in the spindle midzone and midbody of dividing animal cells. Besides proteins essential for cytokinesis, there are also components essential for interphase functions, suggesting that the spindle midzone and/or midbody may play a role in regulating the following cell cycle. Results We microsurgically severed NRK epithelial cells during anaphase or telophase, such that the spindle midzone/midbody was associated with only one of the daughter cells. Time-lapse recording of cells severed during early anaphase indicated that the cell with midzone underwent cytokinesis-like cortical contractions and progressed normally through the interphase, whereas the cell without midzone showed no cortical contraction and an arrest or substantial delay in the progression of interphase. Similar microsurgery during telophase showed a normal progression of interphase for both daughter cells with or without the midbody. Microsurgery of anaphase cells treated with cytochalasin D or nocodazole indicated that interphase progression was independent of cortical ingression but dependent on microtubules. Conclusions We conclude that the mitotic spindle is involved in not only the separation of chromosomes but also the regulation of cell cycle. The process may involve activation of components in the spindle midzone that are required for the cell cycle, and/or degradation of components that are required for cytokinesis but may interfere with the cell cycle.

  14. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule-motor-protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate-consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation.

  15. The effect of magnesium on mitotic spindle formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uz, Gulsen; Sarikaya, Aysegul Topal

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+), an essential ion for cells and biological systems, is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including the formation and breakdown of microtubules. The results of a previous investigation suggested that as cells grow the intracellular Mg2+ concentration falls, thereby stimulating formation of the mitotic spindle. In the present work, we used a Mg2+-deficient Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain GA2, in which two essential membrane Mg2+ transporter genes (homologs of ALR1 and ALR2 in Saccharomyces cerevisae) were deleted, and its parental strain Sp292, to examine the extent to which low Mg2+ concentrations can affect mitotic spindle formation. The two S. pombe strains were transformed with a plasmid carrying a GFP-α2-tubulin construct to fluorescently label microtubules. Using the free Mg2+-specific fluorescent probe mag-fura-2, we confirmed that intracellular free Mg2+ levels were lower in GA2 than in the parental strain. Defects in interphase microtubule organization, a lower percentage of mitotic spindle formation and a reduced mitotic index were also observed in the GA2 strain. Although there was interphase microtubule polymerization, the lower level of mitotic spindle formation in the Mg2+-deficient strain suggested a greater requirement for Mg2+ in this phenomenon than previously thought. PMID:27560651

  16. Central Spindle Self-Organization and Cytokinesis in Artificially Activated Sea Urchin Eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, John H; Buckley, Mary W; Yeterian, Mesrob; Weeks, Richard M; Simerly, Calvin R; Shuster, Charles B

    2016-04-01

    The ability of microtubules of the mitotic apparatus to control the positioning and initiation of the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis was first established from studies on early echinoderm embryos. However, the identity of the microtubule population that imparts cytokinetic signaling is unclear. The two main--and not necessarily mutually exclusive--candidates are the central spindle and the astral rays. In the present study, we examined cytokinesis in ammonia-activated sea urchin eggs, which lack paternally derived centrosomes and undergo mitosis mediated by unusual anastral, bipolar mini-spindles. Live cell imaging and immunolabeling for microtubules and the centralspindlin constituent and kinesin-related protein, MKLP1, demonstrated that furrowing in ammonia-activated eggs was associated with aligned arrays of centralspindlin-linked, opposed bundles of antiparallel microtubules. These autonomous, zipper-like arrays were not associated with a mitotic apparatus, but did possess characteristics similar to the central spindle region of control, fertilized embryos. Our results highlight the self-organizing nature of the central spindle region and its ability to induce cytokinesis-like furrowing, even in the absence of a complete mitotic apparatus. PMID:27132131

  17. Mitosis and microtubule organizational changes in rice root-tip cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUSHIXIONG(SYZEE); CHUNGUILI; CHENGZHU

    1993-01-01

    The pattern of change of the microtubule cytoskeleton of the root-tip cells of rice during mitosis was studied using immunofluorescence technic and confocal laser scanning microscopy. All the major stages of ceil division including preprophase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase were observed. The most significant finding was that in the preprophase cells microtubules radiating from the nuclear surface to the cortex were frequently seen. During development these microtubules became closely associated with the preprophase band and prophase spindie indicating that the microtubules radiating from the nuclear surface, the preprophase band and the prophazc spindle were structurally and functionally closely related to each other. Granule-like anchorage sites for the radiating microtubules at the muclear surface were often seen and the possibility that these gramle-like anchorage sites might represent the microtubule organizing centres was discussed.

  18. The Mother Centriole Appendage Protein Cenexin Modulates Lumen Formation through Spindle Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hui-Fang; Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    Establishing apical-basal polarity is instrumental in the functional shaping of a solitary lumen within an acinus. By exploiting micropatterned slides, wound healing assays, and three-dimensional culture systems, we identified a mother centriole subdistal appendage protein, cenexin, as a critical player in symmetric lumen expansion through the control of microtubule organization. In this regard, cenexin was required for both centrosome positioning in interphase cells and proper spindle orientation during mitosis. In contrast, the essential mother centriole distal appendage protein CEP164 did not play a role in either process, demonstrating the specificity of subdistal appendages for these events. Importantly, upon closer examination we found that cenexin depletion decreased astral microtubule length, disrupted astral microtubule minus-end organization, and increased levels of the polarity protein NuMA at the cell cortex. Interestingly, spindle misorientation and NuMA mislocalization were reversed by treatment with a low dose of the microtubule-stabilizing agent paclitaxel. Taken together, these results suggest that cenexin modulates microtubule organization and stability to mediate spindle orientation. PMID:26948879

  19. Microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a reduction in dimensionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noujaim, Michael; Bechstedt, Susanne; Wieczorek, Michal; Brouhard, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    Aurora-B is the kinase subunit of the Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC), a key regulator of mitotic progression that corrects improper kinetochore attachments and establishes the spindle midzone. Recent work has demonstrated that the CPC is a microtubule-associated protein complex and that microtubules are able to activate the CPC by contributing to Aurora-B auto-phosphorylation in trans. Aurora-B activation is thought to occur when the local concentration of Aurora-B is high, as occurs when Aurora-B is enriched at centromeres. It is not clear, however, whether distributed binding to large structures such as microtubules would increase the local concentration of Aurora-B. Here we show that microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a "reduction in dimensionality." We find that microtubules increase the kinase activity of Aurora-B toward microtubule-associated substrates while reducing the phosphorylation levels of substrates not associated to microtubules. Using the single molecule assay for microtubule-associated proteins, we show that a minimal CPC construct binds to microtubules and diffuses in a one-dimensional (1D) random walk. The binding of Aurora-B to microtubules is salt-dependent and requires the C-terminal tails of tubulin, indicating that the interaction is electrostatic. We show that the rate of Aurora-B auto-activation is faster with increasing concentrations of microtubules. Finally, we demonstrate that microtubules lose their ability to stimulate Aurora-B when their C-terminal tails are removed by proteolysis. We propose a model in which microtubules act as scaffolds for the enzymatic activity of Aurora-B. The scaffolding activity of microtubules enables rapid Aurora-B activation and efficient phosphorylation of microtubule-associated substrates.

  20. Redundant mechanisms for anaphase chromosome movements: crane-fly spermatocyte spindles normally use actin filaments but also can function without them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Lacramioara; Forer, Arthur

    2005-10-01

    Actin inhibitors block or slow anaphase chromosome movements in crane-fly spermatocytes, but stopping of movement is only temporary; we assumed that cells adapt to loss of actin by switching to mechanism(s) involving only microtubules. To test this, we produced actin-filament-free spindles: we added latrunculin B during prometaphase, 9-80 min before anaphase, after which chromosomes generally moved normally during anaphase. We confirmed the absence of actin filaments by staining with fluorescent phalloidin and by showing that cytochalasin D had no effect on chromosome movement. Thus, actin filaments are involved in normal anaphase movements, but in vivo, spindles nonetheless can function normally without them. We tested whether chromosome movements in actin-filament-free spindles arise via microtubules by challenging such spindles with anti-myosin drugs. Y-27632 and BDM (2,3-butanedione monoxime), inhibitors that affect myosin at different regulatory levels, blocked chromosome movement in normal spindles and in actin-filament-free spindles. We tested whether BDM has side effects on microtubule motors. BDM had no effect on ciliary and sperm motility or on ATPase activity of isolated ciliary axonemes, and thus it does not directly block dynein. Nor does it block kinesin, assayed by a microtubule sliding assay. BDM could conceivably indirectly affect these microtubule motors, though it is unlikely that it would have the same side effect on the motors as Y-27632. Since BDM and Y-27632 both affect chromosome movement in the same way, it would seem that both affect spindle myosin; this suggests that spindle myosin interacts with kinetochore microtubules, either directly or via an intermediate component. PMID:16228898

  1. An organelle-exclusion envelope assists mitosis and underlies distinct molecular crowding in the spindle region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Nina; Pawar, Nisha; Weiss, Matthias; Maiato, Helder

    2015-08-31

    The mitotic spindle is a microtubular assembly required for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Additionally, a spindle matrix has long been proposed to assist this process, but its nature has remained elusive. By combining live-cell imaging with laser microsurgery, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, we uncovered a microtubule-independent mechanism that underlies the accumulation of molecules in the spindle region. This mechanism relies on a membranous system surrounding the mitotic spindle that defines an organelle-exclusion zone that is conserved in human cells. Supported by mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that organelle exclusion by a membrane system causes spatio-temporal differences in molecular crowding states that are sufficient to drive accumulation of mitotic regulators, such as Mad2 and Megator/Tpr, as well as soluble tubulin, in the spindle region. This membranous "spindle envelope" confined spindle assembly, and its mechanical disruption compromised faithful chromosome segregation. Thus, cytoplasmic compartmentalization persists during early mitosis to promote spindle assembly and function.

  2. An astral simulacrum of the central spindle accounts for normal, spindle-less, and anucleate cytokinesis in echinoderm embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kuan-Chung; Bement, William M; Petronczki, Mark; von Dassow, George

    2014-12-15

    Cytokinesis in animal cells depends on spindle-derived spatial cues that culminate in Rho activation, and thereby actomyosin assembly, in a narrow equatorial band. Although the nature, origin, and variety of such cues have long been obscure, one component is certainly the Rho activator Ect2. Here we describe the behavior and function of Ect2 in echinoderm embryos, showing that Ect2 migrates from spindle midzone to astral microtubules in anaphase and that Ect2 shapes the pattern of Rho activation in incipient furrows. Our key finding is that Ect2 and its binding partner Cyk4 accumulate not only at normal furrows, but also at furrows that form in the absence of associated spindle, midzone, or chromosomes. In all these cases, the cell assembles essentially the same cytokinetic signaling ensemble—opposed astral microtubules decorated with Ect2 and Cyk4. We conclude that if multiple signals contribute to furrow induction in echinoderm embryos, they likely converge on the same signaling ensemble on an analogous cytoskeletal scaffold. PMID:25298401

  3. Microtubules, Tubulins and Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raxworthy, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews much of what is known about microtubules, which are biopolymers consisting predominantly of subunits of the globular protein, tubulin. Describes the functions of microtubules, their structure and assembly, microtube associated proteins, and microtubule-disrupting agents. (TW)

  4. Contributions of microtubule dynamic instability and rotational diffusion to kinetochore capture

    CERN Document Server

    Blackwell, Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Gergely, Zachary R; Flynn, Patrick J; Montes, Salvador; Crapo, Ammon; Doostan, Alireza; McIntosh, J Richard; Glaser, Matthew A; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule dynamic instability allows search and capture of kinetochores during spindle formation, an important process for accurate chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent work has found that microtubule rotational diffusion about minus-end attachment points contributes to kinetochore capture in fission yeast, but the relative contributions of dynamic instability and rotational diffusion are not well understood. We have developed a biophysical model of kinetochore capture in small fission-yeast nuclei using hybrid Brownian dynamics/kinetic Monte Carlo simulation techniques. With this model, we have studied the importance of dynamic instability and microtubule rotational diffusion for kinetochore capture, both to the lateral surface of a microtubule and at or near its end. Over a range of biologically relevant parameters, microtubule rotational diffusion decreased capture time, but made a relatively small contribution compared to dynamic instability. At most, rotational diffusion reduced capture ...

  5. LIMK1 activity is required for MTOC localization and spindle bipolarity establishment during meiosis in mouse oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiaoyun; Li Xin; Ma Wei

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploid embryo generally leads to infertility, spontaneous abortion and birth defects, mainly resulting from abnormal chromosome segregation during maternal oocytes meiosis. Chromosome division is conducted by bipolar spindle which formed through an acentrosomal way, dependent on a unique microtubule organizing center ( MTOC) in mammalian oocytes, however, the molecular composition and functional regulation of MTOC is still not fully ex-plored. LIM kinases 1 (LIMK1) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase, a major regulator of actin and microtubule dynamics, involved in microtubule stability and spindle positioning during mitosis. So far little is known about LIMK1 protein expression and its roles in oocytes during meiosis. We reported here the protein expression and sub-cellular distribution of LIMK1 in mouse oocytes during meiosis. Western blot procedure detected high and stable expression of LIMK1 in mouse oocytes from germinal vesicle ( GV) stage to metaphase II ( MII) . In contrast, acti-vated LIMK1 ( phosphorylated at Thr508 , pLIMK1 Thr508 ) was only observed after germinal vesicle breakdown ( GVBD) , and gradually increased with peak levels at metaphase I ( MI) and MII. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that LIMK1 was co-localized with microtubules on the whole spindle structure, while pLIMK1Thr508 was con- centrated with key components of MTOC,pericentrin and -Tubulin, on spindle poles in mouse oocytes. Inhibition of LIMK1 activity by BMS3, a specific ATPase competitive inhibitor, distroyed the formation of bipolar spindle structure, disturbed MTOC integrity and MTOC proteins recruitment to spindle poles. Moreover, LIMK1 inhibition caused chromosome misalignment and meiotic progression arrest at MI stage. Therefore, LIMK1 activity is required for formation and maintenance of bipolar spindle in mouse oocytes,importantly, pLIMK1T508 is MTOC-associated protein,involved in establishment and positioning of MTOC.

  6. DDA3 targets Cep290 into the centrosome to regulate spindle positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haiyu; Park, Ji Eun; Jang, Chang-Young

    The centrosome is an important cellular organelle which nucleates microtubules (MTs) to form the cytoskeleton during interphase and the mitotic spindle during mitosis. The Cep290 is one of the centrosomal proteins and functions in cilia formation. Even-though it is in the centrosome, the function of Cep290 in mitosis had not yet been evaluated. In this study, we report a novel function of Cep290 that is involved in spindle positioning. Cep290 was identified as an interacting partner of DDA3, and we confirmed that Cep290 specifically localizes in the mitotic centrosome. Depletion of Cep290 caused a reduction of the astral spindle, leading to misorientation of the mitotic spindle. MT polymerization also decreased in Cep290-depleted cells, suggesting that Cep290 is involved in spindle nucleation. Furthermore, DDA3 stabilizes and transports Cep290 to the centrosome. Therefore, we concluded that DDA3 controls astral spindle formation and spindle positioning by targeting Cep290 to the centrosome. PMID:25998387

  7. The GTPase Gem and its partner Kif9 are required for chromosome alignment, spindle length control, and mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu, Guillaume; Quaranta, Muriel; Leprince, Corinne; Hatzoglou, Anastassia

    2012-12-01

    Within the Ras superfamily, Gem is a small GTP-binding protein that plays a role in regulating Ca(2+) channels and cytoskeletal remodeling in interphase cells. Here, we report for the first time that Gem is a spindle-associated protein and is required for proper mitotic progression. Functionally, loss of Gem leads to misaligned chromosomes and prometaphase delay. On the basis of different experimental approaches, we demonstrate that loss of Gem by RNA interference induces spindle elongation, while its enforced expression results in spindle shortening. The spindle length phenotype is generated through deregulation of spindle dynamics on Gem depletion and requires the expression of its downstream effector, the kinesin Kif9. Loss of Kif9 induces spindle abnormalities similar to those observed when Gem expression is repressed by siRNA. We further identify Kif9 as a new regulator of spindle dynamics. Kif9 depletion increases the steady-state levels of spindle α-tubulin by increasing the rate of microtubule polymerization. Overall, this study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which Gem contributes to the mitotic progression by maintaining correct spindle length through the kinesin Kif9.

  8. TOG Proteins Are Spatially Regulated by Rac-GSK3β to Control Interphase Microtubule Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn P Trogden

    Full Text Available Microtubules are regulated by a diverse set of proteins that localize to microtubule plus ends (+TIPs where they regulate dynamic instability and mediate interactions with the cell cortex, actin filaments, and organelles. Although individual +TIPs have been studied in depth and we understand their basic contributions to microtubule dynamics, there is a growing body of evidence that these proteins exhibit cross-talk and likely function to collectively integrate microtubule behavior and upstream signaling pathways. In this study, we have identified a novel protein-protein interaction between the XMAP215 homologue in Drosophila, Mini spindles (Msps, and the CLASP homologue, Orbit. These proteins have been shown to promote and suppress microtubule dynamics, respectively. We show that microtubule dynamics are regionally controlled in cells by Rac acting to suppress GSK3β in the peripheral lamellae/lamellipodium. Phosphorylation of Orbit by GSK3β triggers a relocalization of Msps from the microtubule plus end to the lattice. Mutation of the Msps-Orbit binding site revealed that this interaction is required for regulating microtubule dynamic instability in the cell periphery. Based on our findings, we propose that Msps is a novel Rac effector that acts, in partnership with Orbit, to regionally regulate microtubule dynamics.

  9. An epigenetic regulator emerges as microtubule minus-end binding and stabilizing factor in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sylvain; Shvedunova, Maria; Van Nguyen, Nhuong; Avila, Leonor; Vernos, Isabelle; Akhtar, Asifa

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary conserved NSL complex is a prominent epigenetic regulator controlling expression of thousands of genes. Here we uncover a novel function of the NSL complex members in mitosis. As the cell enters mitosis, KANSL1 and KANSL3 undergo a marked relocalisation from the chromatin to the mitotic spindle. By stabilizing microtubule minus ends in a RanGTP-dependent manner, they are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Moreover, we identify KANSL3 as a microtubule minus-end-binding protein, revealing a new class of mitosis-specific microtubule minus-end regulators. By adopting distinct functions in interphase and mitosis, KANSL proteins provide a link to coordinate the tasks of faithful expression and inheritance of the genome during different phases of the cell cycle.

  10. Tank binding kinase 1 is a centrosome-associated kinase necessary for microtubule dynamics and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Smitha; Nguyen, Jonathan; Johnson, Joseph; Haura, Eric; Coppola, Domenico; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2015-01-01

    TANK Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) is a non-canonical IκB kinase that contributes to KRAS-driven lung cancer. Here we report that TBK1 plays essential roles in mammalian cell division. Specifically, levels of active phospho-TBK1 increase during mitosis and localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and midbody, and selective inhibition or silencing of TBK1 triggers defects in spindle assembly and prevents mitotic progression. TBK1 binds to the centrosomal protein CEP170 and to the mitotic apparatus protein NuMA, and both CEP170 and NuMA are TBK1 substrates. Further, TBK1 is necessary for CEP170 centrosomal localization and binding to the microtubule depolymerase Kif2b, and for NuMA binding to dynein. Finally, selective disruption of the TBK1-CEP170 complex augments microtubule stability and triggers defects in mitosis, suggesting that TBK1 functions as a mitotic kinase necessary for microtubule dynamics and mitosis.

  11. The kinetochore protein Kis1/Eic1/Mis19 ensures the integrity of mitotic spindles through maintenance of kinetochore factors Mis6/CENP-I and CENP-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hayato; Arai, Kunio; Kariyazono, Ryo; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sato, Masamitsu

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules play multiple roles in a wide range of cellular phenomena, including cell polarity establishment and chromosome segregation. A number of microtubule regulators have been identified, including microtubule-associated proteins and kinases, and knowledge of these factors has contributed to our molecular understanding of microtubule regulation of each relevant cellular process. The known regulators, however, are insufficient to explain how those processes are linked to one another, underscoring the need to identify additional regulators. To find such novel mechanisms and microtubule regulators, we performed a screen that combined genetics and microscopy for fission yeast mutants defective in microtubule organization. We isolated approximately 900 mutants showing defects in either microtubule organization or the nuclear envelope, and these mutants were classified into 12 categories. We particularly focused on one mutant, kis1, which displayed spindle defects in early mitosis. The kis1 mutant frequently failed to assemble a normal bipolar spindle. The responsible gene encoded a kinetochore protein, Mis19 (also known as Eic1), which localized to the interface of kinetochores and spindle poles. We also found that the inner kinetochore proteins Mis6/CENP-I and Cnp1/CENP-A were delocalized from kinetochores in the kis1 cells and that kinetochore-microtubule attachment was defective. Another mutant, mis6, also displayed similar spindle defects. We conclude that Kis1 is required for inner kinetochore organization, through which Kis1 ensures kinetochore-microtubule attachment and spindle integrity. Thus, we propose an unexpected relationship between inner kinetochore organization and spindle integrity. PMID:25375240

  12. The kinetochore protein Kis1/Eic1/Mis19 ensures the integrity of mitotic spindles through maintenance of kinetochore factors Mis6/CENP-I and CENP-A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Hirai

    Full Text Available Microtubules play multiple roles in a wide range of cellular phenomena, including cell polarity establishment and chromosome segregation. A number of microtubule regulators have been identified, including microtubule-associated proteins and kinases, and knowledge of these factors has contributed to our molecular understanding of microtubule regulation of each relevant cellular process. The known regulators, however, are insufficient to explain how those processes are linked to one another, underscoring the need to identify additional regulators. To find such novel mechanisms and microtubule regulators, we performed a screen that combined genetics and microscopy for fission yeast mutants defective in microtubule organization. We isolated approximately 900 mutants showing defects in either microtubule organization or the nuclear envelope, and these mutants were classified into 12 categories. We particularly focused on one mutant, kis1, which displayed spindle defects in early mitosis. The kis1 mutant frequently failed to assemble a normal bipolar spindle. The responsible gene encoded a kinetochore protein, Mis19 (also known as Eic1, which localized to the interface of kinetochores and spindle poles. We also found that the inner kinetochore proteins Mis6/CENP-I and Cnp1/CENP-A were delocalized from kinetochores in the kis1 cells and that kinetochore-microtubule attachment was defective. Another mutant, mis6, also displayed similar spindle defects. We conclude that Kis1 is required for inner kinetochore organization, through which Kis1 ensures kinetochore-microtubule attachment and spindle integrity. Thus, we propose an unexpected relationship between inner kinetochore organization and spindle integrity.

  13. Dynamics of Microtubule Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Antal, T; Redner, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of an idealized model of microtubule growth that evolves by: (i) attachment of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) at rate lambda, (ii) conversion of GTP to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) at rate 1, and (iii) detachment of GDP at rate mu. As a function of these rates, a microtubule can grow steadily or its length can fluctuate wildly. For mu=0, we find the exact tubule and GTP cap length distributions, and power-law length distributions of GTP and GDP islands. For mu=infinity, we argue that the time between catastrophes, where the microtubule shrinks to zero length, scales as exp(lambda). We also find the phase boundary between a growing and shrinking microtubule.

  14. Micromechanical modeling of microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Arslan, Melis

    2010-01-01

    Microtubules serve as one of the structural components of the cell and take place in some of the important cellular functions such as mitosis and vesicular transport. Microtubules comprise of tubulin subunits tubulin dimers arranged in a cylindrical beta and formed by alpha hollow tube structure with a diameter of 20nm. They are typically comprised of 13 or 14 protofilaments arranged in spiral configurations. The longitudinal bonds between the tubulin dimers are much stiffer and stronger than...

  15. A mutation of the fission yeast EB1 overcomes negative regulation by phosphorylation and stabilizes microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iimori, Makoto; Ozaki, Kanako [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Chikashige, Yuji [Kobe Advanced ICT Research Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe, 651-2492 (Japan); Habu, Toshiyuki [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 (Japan); Hiraoka, Yasushi [Kobe Advanced ICT Research Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe, 651-2492 (Japan); Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 1-3 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 (Japan); Maki, Takahisa; Hayashi, Ikuko [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, Tsurumi, Yokohama, 230-0045 (Japan); Obuse, Chikashi [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomohiro, E-mail: tmatsumo@house.rbc.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Mal3 is a fission yeast homolog of EB1, a plus-end tracking protein (+ TIP). We have generated a mutation (89R) replacing glutamine with arginine in the calponin homology (CH) domain of Mal3. Analysis of the 89R mutant in vitro has revealed that the mutation confers a higher affinity to microtubules and enhances the intrinsic activity to promote the microtubule-assembly. The mutant Mal3 is no longer a + TIP, but binds strongly the microtubule lattice. Live cell imaging has revealed that while the wild type Mal3 proteins dissociate from the tip of the growing microtubules before the onset of shrinkage, the mutant Mal3 proteins persist on microtubules and reduces a rate of shrinkage after a longer pausing period. Consequently, the mutant Mal3 proteins cause abnormal elongation of microtubules composing the spindle and aster. Mal3 is phosphorylated at a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the CH and EB1-like C-terminal motif domains. The phosphorylation occurs in a microtubule-dependent manner and reduces the affinity of Mal3 to microtubules. We propose that because the 89R mutation is resistant to the effect of phosphorylation, it can associate persistently with microtubules and confers a stronger stability of microtubules likely by reinforcing the cylindrical structure. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize a mutation (mal3-89R) in fission yeast homolog of EB1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mutation enhances the activity to assemble microtubules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mal3 is phosphorylated in a microtubule-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylation negatively regulates the Mal3 activity.

  16. Automated high-throughput quantification of mitotic spindle positioning from DIC movies of Caenorhabditis embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cluet

    Full Text Available The mitotic spindle is a microtubule-based structure that elongates to accurately segregate chromosomes during anaphase. Its position within the cell also dictates the future cell cleavage plan, thereby determining daughter cell orientation within a tissue or cell fate adoption for polarized cells. Therefore, the mitotic spindle ensures at the same time proper cell division and developmental precision. Consequently, spindle dynamics is the matter of intensive research. Among the different cellular models that have been explored, the one-cell stage C. elegans embryo has been an essential and powerful system to dissect the molecular and biophysical basis of spindle elongation and positioning. Indeed, in this large and transparent cell, spindle poles (or centrosomes can be easily detected from simple DIC microscopy by human eyes. To perform quantitative and high-throughput analysis of spindle motion, we developed a computer program ACT for Automated-Centrosome-Tracking from DIC movies of C. elegans embryos. We therefore offer an alternative to the image acquisition and processing of transgenic lines expressing fluorescent spindle markers. Consequently, experiments on large sets of cells can be performed with a simple setup using inexpensive microscopes. Moreover, analysis of any mutant or wild-type backgrounds is accessible because laborious rounds of crosses with transgenic lines become unnecessary. Last, our program allows spindle detection in other nematode species, offering the same quality of DIC images but for which techniques of transgenesis are not accessible. Thus, our program also opens the way towards a quantitative evolutionary approach of spindle dynamics. Overall, our computer program is a unique macro for the image- and movie-processing platform ImageJ. It is user-friendly and freely available under an open-source licence. ACT allows batch-wise analysis of large sets of mitosis events. Within 2 minutes, a single movie is processed

  17. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the mitotic spindle and dense plaques in three species of Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureña, F

    1986-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the mitotic nucleus in Leishmania braziliensis braziliensis, L. mexicana and L. donovani was studied by serial thin sections and three-dimensional reconstructions of each divisional stage. The structures of the interphase and four stages of dividing nuclei were described. Attention was paid to dense plaques and spindle microtubules. At the beginning of the nuclear division, a set of six dense plaques was found in association with spindle microtubules in the vicinity of the equatorial region of the nucleus. The number of the plaques was the same in the three species examined. Each plaque was divided into two, forming hemiplaques at the elongational stage of the division; these two sets then migrate to the poles. The plaques appeared to correspond with centromeres of metazoan cells and play an important role in the process of nuclear division.

  18. The Aurora B kinase in chromosome biorientation and spindle checkpoint signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eKrenn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aurora B, a member of the Aurora family of serine/threonine protein kinases, is a key player in chromosome segregation. As part of a macromolecular complex known as the chromosome passenger complex, Aurora B concentrates early during mitosis in the proximity of centromeres and kinetochores, the sites of attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules. There, it contributes to a number of processes that impart fidelity to cell division, including kinetochore stabilization, kinetochore-microtubule attachment, and the regulation of a surveillance mechanism named the spindle assembly checkpoint. In the regulation of these processes, Aurora B is the fulcrum of a remarkably complex network of interactions that feed back on its localization and activation state. In this review we discuss the multiple roles of Aurora B during mitosis, focusing in particular on its role at centromeres and kinetochores. Many details of the network of interactions at these locations remain poorly understood, and we focus here on several crucial outstanding questions.

  19. Do prokaryotes contain microtubules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudes, D.; Hinkle, G.; Margulis, L.

    1994-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, microtubules are 24-nm-diameter tubular structures composed of a class of conserved proteins called tubulin. They are involved in numerous cell functions including ciliary motility, nerve cell elongation, pigment migration, centrosome formation, and chromosome movement. Although cytoplasmic tubules and fibers have been observed in bacteria, some with diameters similar to those of eukaryotes, no homologies to eukaryotic microtubules have been established. Certain groups of bacteria including azotobacters, cyanobacteria, enteric bacteria, and spirochetes have been frequently observed to possess microtubule-like structures, and others, including archaebacteria, have been shown to be sensitive to drugs that inhibit the polymerization of microtubules. Although little biochemical or molecular biological information is available, the differences observed among these prokaryotic structures suggest that their composition generally differs among themselves as well as from that of eukaryotes. We review the distribution of cytoplasmic tubules in prokaryotes, even though, in all cases, their functions remain unknown. At least some tend to occur in cells that are large, elongate, and motile, suggesting that they may be involved in cytoskeletal functions, intracellular motility, or transport activities comparable to those performed by eukaryotic microtubules. In Escherichia coli, the FtsZ protein is associated with the formation of a ring in the division zone between the newly forming offspring cells. Like tubulin, FtsZ is a GTPase and shares with tubulin a 7-amino-acid motif, making it a promising candidate in which to seek the origin of tubulins.

  20. Regulation of NDR1 activity by PLK1 ensures proper spindle orientation in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Maomao; Chu, Lingluo; Qin, Bo; Wang, Zhikai; Liu, Xing; Jin, Changjiang; Zhang, Guanglan; Gomez, Marta; Hergovich, Alexander; Chen, Zhengjun; He, Ping; Gao, Xinjiao; Yao, Xuebiao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis requires the physical separation of sister chromatids which depends on correct position of mitotic spindle relative to membrane cortex. Although recent work has identified the role of PLK1 in spindle orientation, the mechanisms underlying PLK1 signaling in spindle positioning and orientation have not been fully illustrated. Here, we identified a conserved signaling axis in which NDR1 kinase activity is regulated by PLK1 in mitosis. PLK1 phosphorylates NDR1 at three putative threonine residues (T7, T183 and T407) at mitotic entry, which elicits PLK1-dependent suppression of NDR1 activity and ensures correct spindle orientation in mitosis. Importantly, persistent expression of non-phosphorylatable NDR1 mutant perturbs spindle orientation. Mechanistically, PLK1-mediated phosphorylation protects the binding of Mob1 to NDR1 and subsequent NDR1 activation. These findings define a conserved signaling axis that integrates dynamic kinetochore-microtubule interaction and spindle orientation control to genomic stability maintenance.

  1. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-01-01

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin(-/-) mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division. PMID:26406118

  2. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-09-25

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin(-/-) mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division.

  3. PLK1-dependent activation of LRRK1 regulates spindle orientation by phosphorylating CDK5RAP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafusa, Hiroshi; Kedashiro, Shin; Tezuka, Motohiro; Funatsu, Motoki; Usami, Satoshi; Toyoshima, Fumiko; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2015-08-01

    Correct formation of the cell division axis requires the initial precise orientation of the mitotic spindle. Proper spindle orientation depends on centrosome maturation, and Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is known to play a crucial role in this process. However, the molecular mechanisms that function downstream of PLK1 are not well understood. Here we show that LRRK1 is a PLK1 substrate that is phosphorylated on Ser 1790. PLK1 phosphorylation is required for CDK1-mediated activation of LRRK1 at the centrosomes, and this in turn regulates mitotic spindle orientation by nucleating the growth of astral microtubules from the centrosomes. Interestingly, LRRK1 in turn phosphorylates CDK5RAP2(Cep215), a human homologue of Drosophila Centrosomin (Cnn), in its γ-tubulin-binding motif, thus promoting the interaction of CDK5RAP2 with γ-tubulin. LRRK1 phosphorylation of CDK5RAP2 Ser 140 is necessary for CDK5RAP2-dependent microtubule nucleation. Thus, our findings provide evidence that LRRK1 regulates mitotic spindle orientation downstream of PLK1 through CDK5RAP2-dependent centrosome maturation. PMID:26192437

  4. Radmis, a novel mitotic spindle protein that functions in cell division of neural progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Yumoto

    Full Text Available Developmental dynamics of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs are crucial for embryonic and adult neurogenesis, but its regulatory factors are not fully understood. By differential subtractive screening with NSPCs versus their differentiated progenies, we identified the radmis (radial fiber and mitotic spindle/ckap2l gene, a novel microtubule-associated protein (MAP enriched in NSPCs. Radmis is a putative substrate for the E3-ubiquitin ligase, anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C, and is degraded via the KEN box. Radmis was highly expressed in regions of active neurogenesis throughout life, and its distribution was dynamically regulated during NSPC division. In embryonic and perinatal brains, radmis localized to bipolar mitotic spindles and radial fibers (basal processes of dividing NSPCs. As central nervous system development proceeded, radmis expression was lost in most brain regions, except for several neurogenic regions. In adult brain, radmis expression persisted in the mitotic spindles of both slowly-dividing stem cells and rapid amplifying progenitors. Overexpression of radmis in vitro induced hyper-stabilization of microtubules, severe defects in mitotic spindle formation, and mitotic arrest. In vivo gain-of-function using in utero electroporation revealed that radmis directed a reduction in NSPC proliferation and a concomitant increase in cell cycle exit, causing a reduction in the Tbr2-positive basal progenitor population and shrinkage of the embryonic subventricular zone. Besides, radmis loss-of-function by shRNAs induced the multipolar mitotic spindle structure, accompanied with the catastrophe of chromosome segregation including the long chromosome bridge between two separating daughter nuclei. These findings uncover the indispensable role of radmis in mitotic spindle formation and cell-cycle progression of NSPCs.

  5. LOX is a novel mitotic spindle-associated protein essential for mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufraqech, Myriem; Wei, Darmood; Weyemi, Urbain; Zhang, Lisa; Quezado, Martha; Kalab, Petr; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-01-01

    LOX regulates cancer progression in a variety of human malignancies. It is overexpressed in aggressive cancers and higher expression of LOX is associated with higher cancer mortality. Here, we report a new function of LOX in mitosis. We show that LOX co-localizes to mitotic spindles from metaphase to telophase, and p-H3(Ser10)-positive cells harbor strong LOX staining. Further, purification of mitotic spindles from synchronized cells show that LOX fails to bind to microtubules in the presence of nocodazole, whereas paclitaxel treated samples showed enrichment in LOX expression, suggesting that LOX binds to stabilized microtubules. LOX knockdown leads to G2/M phase arrest; reduced p-H3(Ser10), cyclin B1, CDK1, and Aurora B. Moreover, LOX knockdown significantly increased sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that target microtubules. Our findings suggest that LOX has a role in cancer cell mitosis and may be targeted to enhance the activity of microtubule inhibitors for cancer therapy. PMID:27296552

  6. Microtubule distribution during meiosis I in flea-beetle [Alagoasa (Oedionychus)] spermatocytes: evidence for direct connections between unpaired sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Paula J; Forer, Arthur; Wise, Dwayne

    2003-04-01

    The meiosis-I spindle in flea-beetle spermatocytes is unusual in that the autosomes and univalent sex chromosomes are separated by a mitochondrial sheath and move polewards at different times. To help understand the basis for this interesting chromosome behaviour, and to gather more detailed information about it, we studied microtubule distributions throughout meiosis I using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and took careful measurements of pole and kinetochore positions at all stages of division. Our results show that, by late prophase, there is a spindle-shaped cytoplasmic array of microtubules in the central part of the cell, with the nucleus at the periphery. Following nuclear envelope breakdown, both autosomes and sex chromosomes become associated with cytoplasmic microtubules, although only the autosomes move centrally to the 'cytoplasmic spindle'. The two unpaired sex chromosomes remain at the cell periphery and appear to be connected to each other by a microtubule bundle extending between their kinetochores. These bundles often persist into anaphase. Analysis of measurements taken from fixed/stained cells supports previous observations that sex chromosomes move part way to the pole in early prometaphase and then stop. The measurements also suggest that during autosomal anaphase, spindle elongation precedes autosome movement to the poles and polewards movement of sex chromosomes is limited or absent when autosomes are moving polewards. PMID:12615966

  7. Microtubule's conformational cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chretien, D.; Janosi, I.; Taveau, J.C.;

    1999-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that allow elongation of the unstable microtubule lattice remain unclear. It is usually thought that the GDP-liganded tubulin lattice is capped by a small layer of GTP- or GDP-P(i)-liganded molecules, the so called "GTP-cap". Here, we point-out that the elastic properties...

  8. Moderate intensity static magnetic fields affect mitotic spindles and increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU and Taxol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan; Ji, Xinmiao; Liu, Juanjuan; Li, Zhiyuan; Wang, Wenchao; Chen, Wei; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Microtubules are the fundamental components in mitotic spindle, which plays essential roles in cell division. It was well known that purified microtubules could be affected by static magnetic fields (SMFs) in vitro because of the diamagnetic anisotropy of tubulin. However, whether these effects lead to cell division defects was unknown. Here we find that 1T SMFs induce abnormal mitotic spindles and increase mitotic index. Synchronization experiments show that SMFs delay cell exit from mitosis and cause mitotic arrest. These mimic the cellular effects of a microtubule-targeting drug Paclitaxel (Taxol), which is frequently used in combination with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Cisplatin in cancer treatment. Using four different human cancer cell lines, HeLa, HCT116, CNE-2Z and MCF7, we find that SMFs increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not Cisplatin, which indicates that the SMF-induced combinational effects with chemodrugs are drug-specific. Our study not only reveals the effect of SMFs on microtubules to cause abnormal mitotic spindles and delay cells exit from mitosis, but also implies the potential applications of SMFs in combination with chemotherapy drugs 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not with Cisplatin in cancer treatment.

  9. Inhibition of clathrin by pitstop 2 activates the spindle assembly checkpoint and induces cell death in dividing HeLa cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Charlotte M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During metaphase clathrin stabilises the mitotic spindle kinetochore(K-fibres. Many anti-mitotic compounds target microtubule dynamics. Pitstop 2™ is the first small molecule inhibitor of clathrin terminal domain and inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We investigated its effects on a second function for clathrin in mitosis. Results Pitstop 2 did not impair clathrin recruitment to the spindle but disrupted its function once stationed there. Pitstop 2 trapped HeLa cells in metaphase through loss of mitotic spindle integrity and activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint, phenocopying clathrin depletion and aurora A kinase inhibition. Conclusions Pitstop 2 is therefore a new tool for investigating clathrin spindle dynamics. Pitstop 2 reduced viability in dividing HeLa cells, without affecting dividing non-cancerous NIH3T3 cells, suggesting that clathrin is a possible novel anti-mitotic drug target.

  10. Arl2- and Msps-dependent microtubule growth governs asymmetric division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Keng; Koe, Chwee Tat; Xing, Zhanyuan Benny; Tian, Xiaolin; Rossi, Fabrizio; Wang, Cheng; Tang, Quan; Zong, Wenhui; Hong, Wan Jin; Taneja, Reshma; Yu, Fengwei; Gonzalez, Cayetano; Wu, Chunlai; Endow, Sharyn; Wang, Hongyan

    2016-03-14

    Asymmetric division of neural stem cells is a fundamental strategy to balance their self-renewal and differentiation. It is long thought that microtubules are not essential for cell polarity in asymmetrically dividing Drosophila melanogaster neuroblasts (NBs; neural stem cells). Here, we show that Drosophila ADP ribosylation factor like-2 (Arl2) and Msps, a known microtubule-binding protein, control cell polarity and spindle orientation of NBs. Upon arl2 RNA intereference, Arl2-GDP expression, or arl2 deletions, microtubule abnormalities and asymmetric division defects were observed. Conversely, overactivation of Arl2 leads to microtubule overgrowth and depletion of NBs. Arl2 regulates microtubule growth and asymmetric division through localizing Msps to the centrosomes in NBs. Moreover, Arl2 regulates dynein function and in turn centrosomal localization of D-TACC and Msps. Arl2 physically associates with tubulin cofactors C, D, and E. Arl2 functions together with tubulin-binding cofactor D to control microtubule growth, Msps localization, and NB self-renewal. Therefore, Arl2- and Msps-dependent microtubule growth is a new paradigm regulating asymmetric division of neural stem cells.

  11. Altered nucleotide-microtubule coupling and increased mechanical output by a kinesin mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Lei Liu

    Full Text Available Kinesin motors hydrolyze ATP to produce force and do work in the cell--how the motors do this is not fully understood, but is thought to depend on the coupling of ATP hydrolysis to microtubule binding by the motor. Transmittal of conformational changes from the microtubule- to the nucleotide-binding site has been proposed to involve the central β-sheet, which could undergo large structural changes important for force production. We show here that mutation of an invariant residue in loop L7 of the central β-sheet of the Drosophila kinesin-14 Ncd motor alters both nucleotide and microtubule binding, although the mutated residue is not present in either site. Mutants show weak-ADP/tight-microtubule binding, instead of tight-ADP/weak-microtubule binding like wild type--they hydrolyze ATP faster than wild type, move faster in motility assays, and assemble long spindles with greatly elongated poles, which are also produced by simulations of assembly with tighter microtubule binding and faster sliding. The mutated residue acts like a mechanochemical coupling element--it transmits changes between the microtubule-binding and active sites, and can switch the state of the motor, increasing mechanical output by the motor. One possibility, based on our findings, is that movements by the residue and the loop that contains it could bend or distort the central β-sheet, mediating free energy changes that lead to force production.

  12. Phospholipase d activation correlates with microtubule reorganization in living plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhonukshe, Pankaj; Laxalt, Ana M; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Munnik, Teun

    2003-11-01

    A phospholipase D (PLD) was shown recently to decorate microtubules in plant cells. Therefore, we used tobacco BY-2 cells expressing the microtubule reporter GFP-MAP4 to test whether PLD activation affects the organization of plant microtubules. Within 30 min of adding n-butanol, a potent activator of PLD, cortical microtubules were released from the plasma membrane and partially depolymerized, as visualized with four-dimensional confocal imaging. The isomers sec- and tert-butanol, which did not activate PLD, did not affect microtubule organization. The effect of treatment on PLD activation was monitored by the in vivo formation of phosphatidylbutanol, a specific reporter of PLD activity. Tobacco cells also were treated with mastoparan, xylanase, NaCl, and hypoosmotic stress as reported activators of PLD. We confirmed the reports and found that all treatments induced microtubule reorganization and PLD activation within the same time frame. PLD still was activated in microtubule-stabilized (taxol) and microtubule-depolymerized (oryzalin) situations, suggesting that PLD activation triggers microtubular reorganization and not vice versa. Exogenously applied water-soluble synthetic phosphatidic acid did not affect the microtubular cytoskeleton. Cell cycle studies revealed that n-butanol influenced not just interphase cortical microtubules but also those in the preprophase band and phragmoplast, but not those in the spindle structure. Cell growth and division were inhibited in the presence of n-butanol, whereas sec- and tert-butanol had no such effects. Using these novel insights, we propose a model for the mechanism by which PLD activation triggers microtubule reorganization in plant cells.

  13. Do nuclear envelope and intranuclear proteins reorganize during mitosis to form an elastic, hydrogel-like spindle matrix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Kristen M; Forer, Arthur; Yao, Changfu; Girton, Jack; Johansen, Jørgen

    2011-04-01

    The idea of a spindle matrix has long been proposed in order to account for poorly understood features of mitosis. However, its molecular nature and structural composition have remained elusive. Here, we propose that the spindle matrix may be constituted by mainly nuclear-derived proteins that reorganize during the cell cycle to form an elastic gel-like matrix. We discuss this hypothesis in the context of recent observations from phylogenetically diverse organisms that nuclear envelope and intranuclear proteins form a highly dynamic and malleable structure that contributes to mitotic spindle function. We suggest that the viscoelastic properties of such a matrix may constrain spindle length while at the same time facilitating microtubule growth and dynamics as well as chromosome movement. A corollary to this hypothesis is that a key determinant of spindle size may be the amount of nuclear proteins available to form the spindle matrix. Such a matrix could also serve as a spatial regulator of spindle assembly checkpoint proteins during open and semi-open mitosis. PMID:21274615

  14. Formin-mediated actin polymerization cooperates with Mushroom body defect (Mud)-Dynein during Frizzled-Dishevelled spindle orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher A; Manning, Laurina; Lu, Michelle S; Golub, Ognjen; Doe, Chris Q; Prehoda, Kenneth E

    2013-10-01

    To position the mitotic spindle, cytoskeletal components must be coordinated to generate cortical forces on astral microtubules. Although the dynein motor is common to many spindle orientation systems, 'accessory pathways' are often also required. In this work, we identified an accessory spindle orientation pathway in Drosophila that functions with Dynein during planar cell polarity, downstream of the Frizzled (Fz) effector Dishevelled (Dsh). Dsh contains a PDZ ligand and a Dynein-recruiting DEP domain that are both required for spindle orientation. The Dsh PDZ ligand recruits Canoe/Afadin and ultimately leads to Rho GTPase signaling mediated through RhoGEF2. The formin Diaphanous (Dia) functions as the Rho effector in this pathway, inducing F-actin enrichment at sites of cortical Dsh. Chimeric protein experiments show that the Dia-actin accessory pathway can be replaced by an independent kinesin (Khc73) accessory pathway for Dsh-mediated spindle orientation. Our results define two 'modular' spindle orientation pathways and show an essential role for actin regulation in Dsh-mediated spindle orientation.

  15. Bub3 is a spindle assembly checkpoint protein regulating chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Li

    Full Text Available In mitosis, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC prevents anaphase onset until all chromosomes have been attached to the spindle microtubules and aligned correctly at the equatorial metaphase plate. The major checkpoint proteins in mitosis consist of mitotic arrest-deficient (Mad1-3, budding uninhibited by benzimidazole (Bub1, Bub3, and monopolar spindle 1(Mps1. During meiosis, for the formation of a haploid gamete, two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation occur with only one round of DNA replication. To pull homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles during meiosis I, both sister kinetochores of a homologue must face toward the same pole which is very different from mitosis and meiosis II. As a core member of checkpoint proteins, the individual role of Bub3 in mammalian oocyte meiosis is unclear. In this study, using overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi approaches, we analyzed the role of Bub3 in mouse oocyte meiosis. Our data showed that overexpressed Bub3 inhibited meiotic metaphase-anaphase transition by preventing homologous chromosome and sister chromatid segregations in meiosis I and II, respectively. Misaligned chromosomes, abnormal polar body and double polar bodies were observed in Bub3 knock-down oocytes, causing aneuploidy. Furthermore, through cold treatment combined with Bub3 overexpression, we found that overexpressed Bub3 affected the attachments of microtubules and kinetochores during metaphase-anaphase transition. We propose that as a member of SAC, Bub3 is required for regulation of both meiosis I and II, and is potentially involved in kinetochore-microtubule attachment in mammalian oocytes.

  16. Nap sleep spindle correlates of intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Ujma, Péter P.; Róbert Bódizs; Ferenc Gombos; Johannes Stintzing; Konrad, Boris N.; Lisa Genzel; Axel Steiger; Martin Dresler

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, that play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Several studies with full-night sleep recordings have reported a positive association between sleep spindles and fluid intelligence scores, however more recently it has been shown that only few sleep spindle measures correlate with intelligence in females, and none in males. Sleep spindle regulation underlies a...

  17. Visualizing the spindle checkpoint in Drosophila spermatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Rebollo, Elena; González, Cayetano

    2000-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint detects defects in spindle structure or in the alignment of the chromosomes on the metaphase plate and delays the onset of anaphase until defects are corrected. Thus far, the evidence regarding the presence of a spindle checkpoint during meiosis in male Drosophila has been indirect and contradictory. On the one hand, chromosomes without pairing partners do not prevent meiosis progression. On the other hand, some conserved components of the spindle checkpoint ma...

  18. MLL5 maintains spindle bipolarity by preventing aberrant cytosolic aggregation of PLK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Deng, Lih-Wen

    2016-03-28

    Faithful chromosome segregation with bipolar spindle formation is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. Perturbation of this process often leads to severe mitotic failure, contributing to tumorigenesis. MLL5 has been demonstrated to play vital roles in cell cycle progression and the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we identify a novel interaction between MLL5 and PLK1 in the cytosol that is crucial for sustaining spindle bipolarity during mitosis. Knockdown of MLL5 caused aberrant PLK1 aggregation that led to acentrosomal microtubule-organizing center (aMTOC) formation and subsequent spindle multipolarity. Further molecular studies revealed that the polo-box domain (PBD) of PLK1 interacted with a binding motif on MLL5 (Thr887-Ser888-Thr889), and this interaction was essential for spindle bipolarity. Overexpression of wild-type MLL5 was able to rescue PLK1 mislocalization and aMTOC formation in MLL5-KD cells, whereas MLL5 mutants incapable of interacting with the PBD failed to do so. We thus propose that MLL5 preserves spindle bipolarity through maintaining cytosolic PLK1 in a nonaggregated form. PMID:27002166

  19. P21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4) is required for metaphase spindle positioning and anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompard, G; Rabeharivelo, G; Cau, J; Abrieu, A; Delsert, C; Morin, N

    2013-02-14

    The oncogenic kinase PAK4 was recently found to be involved in the regulation of the G1 phase and the G2/M transition of the cell cycle. We have also identified that PAK4 regulates Ran GTPase activity during mitosis. Here, we show that after entering mitosis, PAK4-depleted cells maintain a prolonged metaphase-like state. In these cells, chromosome congression to the metaphase plate occurs with normal kinetics but is followed by an extended period during which membrane blebbing and spindle rotation are observed. These bipolar PAK4-depleted metaphase-like spindles have a defective astral microtubule (MT) network and are not centered in the cell but are in close contact with the cell cortex. As the metaphase-like state persists, centrosome fragmentation occurs, chromosomes scatter from the metaphase plate and move toward the spindle poles with an active spindle assembly checkpoint, a phenotype that is reminiscent of cohesion fatigue. PAK4 also regulates the acto-myosin cytoskeleton and we report that PAK4 depletion results in the induction of cortical membrane blebbing during prometaphase arrest. However, we show that membrane blebs, which are strongly enriched in phospho-cofilin, are not responsible for the poor anchoring of the spindle. As PAK4 depletion interferes with the localization of components of the dynein/dynactin complexes at the kinetochores and on the astral MTs, we propose that loss of PAK4 could induce a change in the activities of motor proteins. PMID:22450748

  20. Pins is not required for spindle orientation in the Drosophila wing disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstralh, Dan T; Lovegrove, Holly E; Kujawiak, Izabela; Dawney, Nicole S; Zhu, Jinwei; Cooper, Samantha; Zhang, Rongguang; St Johnston, Daniel

    2016-07-15

    In animal cells, mitotic spindles are oriented by the dynein/dynactin motor complex, which exerts a pulling force on astral microtubules. Dynein/dynactin localization depends on Mud/NUMA, which is typically recruited to the cortex by Pins/LGN. In Drosophila neuroblasts, the Inscuteable/Baz/Par-6/aPKC complex recruits Pins apically to induce vertical spindle orientation, whereas in epithelial cells Dlg recruits Pins laterally to orient the spindle horizontally. Here we investigate division orientation in the Drosophila imaginal wing disc epithelium. Live imaging reveals that spindle angles vary widely during prometaphase and metaphase, and therefore do not reliably predict division orientation. This finding prompted us to re-examine mutants that have been reported to disrupt division orientation in this tissue. Loss of Mud misorients divisions, but Inscuteable expression and aPKC, dlg and pins mutants have no effect. Furthermore, Mud localizes to the apical-lateral cortex of the wing epithelium independently of both Pins and cell cycle stage. Thus, Pins is not required in the wing disc because there are parallel mechanisms for Mud localization and hence spindle orientation, making it a more robust system than in other epithelia. PMID:27287805

  1. The Clathrin-dependent Spindle Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sushma R; Flores-Rodriguez, Neftali; Page, Scott L; Wong, Chin; Robinson, Phillip J; Chircop, Megan

    2016-08-01

    The mitotic spindle is required for chromosome congression and subsequent equal segregation of sister chromatids. These processes involve a complex network of signaling molecules located at the spindle. The endocytic protein, clathrin, has a "moonlighting" role during mitosis, whereby it stabilizes the mitotic spindle. The signaling pathways that clathrin participates in to achieve mitotic spindle stability are unknown. Here, we assessed the mitotic spindle proteome and phosphoproteome in clathrin-depleted cells using quantitative MS/MS (data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001603). We report a spindle proteome that consists of 3046 proteins and a spindle phosphoproteome consisting of 5157 phosphosites in 1641 phosphoproteins. Of these, 2908 (95.4%) proteins and 1636 (99.7%) phosphoproteins are known or predicted spindle-associated proteins. Clathrin-depletion from spindles resulted in dysregulation of 121 proteins and perturbed signaling to 47 phosphosites. The majority of these proteins increased in mitotic spindle abundance and six of these were validated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Functional pathway analysis confirmed the reported role of clathrin in mitotic spindle stabilization for chromosome alignment and highlighted possible new mechanisms of clathrin action. The data also revealed a novel second mitotic role for clathrin in bipolar spindle formation. PMID:27174698

  2. Perturbing microtubule integrity blocks AMP-activated protein kinase-induced meiotic resumption in cultured mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya, Ru; Downs, Stephen M

    2014-02-01

    The oocyte meiotic spindle is comprised of microtubules (MT) that bind chromatin and regulate both metaphase plate formation and karyokinesis during meiotic maturation; however, little information is known about their role in meiosis reinitiation. This study was conducted to determine if microtubule integrity is required for meiotic induction and to ascertain how it affects activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important participant in the meiotic induction process. Treatment with microtubule-disrupting agents nocodazole and vinblastine suppressed meiotic resumption in a dose-dependent manner in both arrested cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes (CEO) stimulated with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and arrested denuded oocytes (DO) stimulated with the AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR). This effect coincided with suppression of AMPK activation as determined by western blotting and germinal vesicle immunostaining. Treatment with the MT stabilizer paclitaxel also suppressed meiotic induction. Targeting actin filament polymerization had only a marginal effect on meiotic induction. Immunolocalization experiments revealed that active AMPK colocalized with γ-tubulin during metaphase I and II stages, while it localized at the spindle midzone during anaphase. This discrete localization pattern was dependent on MT integrity. Treatment with nocodazole led to disruption of proper spindle pole localization of active AMPK, while paclitaxel induced excessive polymerization of spindle MT and formation of ectopic asters with accentuated AMPK colocalization. Although stimulation of AMPK increased the rate of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVB), spindle formation and polar body (PB) extrusion, the kinase had no effect on peripheral movement of the spindle. These data suggest that the meiosis-inducing action and localization of AMPK are regulated by MT spindle integrity during mouse oocyte maturation. PMID:23199370

  3. B-type nuclear lamin and the nuclear pore complex Nup107-160 influences maintenance of the spindle envelope required for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Tanabe, Karin; Katsube, Hiroka

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In higher eukaryotes, nuclear envelope (NE) disassembly allows chromatin to condense and spindle microtubules to access kinetochores. The nuclear lamina, which strengthens the NE, is composed of a polymer meshwork made of A- and B-type lamins. We found that the B-type lamin (Lam) is not fully disassembled and continues to localize along the spindle envelope structure during Drosophila male meiosis I, while the A-type lamin (LamC) is completely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Among the nuclear pore complex proteins, Nup107 co-localized with Lam during this meiotic division. Surprisingly, Lam depletion resulted in a higher frequency of cytokinesis failure in male meiosis. We also observed the similar meiotic phenotype in Nup107-depleted cells. Abnormal localization of Lam was found in the Nup-depleted cells at premeiotic and meiotic stages. The central spindle microtubules became abnormal and recruitment of a contractile ring component to the cleavage sites was disrupted in Lam-depleted cells and Nup107-depleted cells. Therefore, we speculate that both proteins are required for a reinforcement of the spindle envelope, which supports the formation of central spindle microtubules essential for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis. PMID:27402967

  4. B-type nuclear lamin and the nuclear pore complex Nup107-160 influences maintenance of the spindle envelope required for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Hayashi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In higher eukaryotes, nuclear envelope (NE disassembly allows chromatin to condense and spindle microtubules to access kinetochores. The nuclear lamina, which strengthens the NE, is composed of a polymer meshwork made of A- and B-type lamins. We found that the B-type lamin (Lam is not fully disassembled and continues to localize along the spindle envelope structure during Drosophila male meiosis I, while the A-type lamin (LamC is completely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Among the nuclear pore complex proteins, Nup107 co-localized with Lam during this meiotic division. Surprisingly, Lam depletion resulted in a higher frequency of cytokinesis failure in male meiosis. We also observed the similar meiotic phenotype in Nup107-depleted cells. Abnormal localization of Lam was found in the Nup-depleted cells at premeiotic and meiotic stages. The central spindle microtubules became abnormal and recruitment of a contractile ring component to the cleavage sites was disrupted in Lam-depleted cells and Nup107-depleted cells. Therefore, we speculate that both proteins are required for a reinforcement of the spindle envelope, which supports the formation of central spindle microtubules essential for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis.

  5. B-type nuclear lamin and the nuclear pore complex Nup107-160 influences maintenance of the spindle envelope required for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Tanabe, Karin; Katsube, Hiroka; Inoue, Yoshihiro H

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, nuclear envelope (NE) disassembly allows chromatin to condense and spindle microtubules to access kinetochores. The nuclear lamina, which strengthens the NE, is composed of a polymer meshwork made of A- and B-type lamins. We found that the B-type lamin (Lam) is not fully disassembled and continues to localize along the spindle envelope structure during Drosophila male meiosis I, while the A-type lamin (LamC) is completely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Among the nuclear pore complex proteins, Nup107 co-localized with Lam during this meiotic division. Surprisingly, Lam depletion resulted in a higher frequency of cytokinesis failure in male meiosis. We also observed the similar meiotic phenotype in Nup107-depleted cells. Abnormal localization of Lam was found in the Nup-depleted cells at premeiotic and meiotic stages. The central spindle microtubules became abnormal and recruitment of a contractile ring component to the cleavage sites was disrupted in Lam-depleted cells and Nup107-depleted cells. Therefore, we speculate that both proteins are required for a reinforcement of the spindle envelope, which supports the formation of central spindle microtubules essential for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis. PMID:27402967

  6. Chromokinesin: Kinesin superfamily regulating cell division through chromosome and spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ai; Tan, Fu-Qing; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-09-01

    Material transportation is essential for appropriate cellular morphology and functions, especially during cell division. As a motor protein moving along microtubules, kinesin has several intracellular functions. Many kinesins play important roles in chromosome condensation and separation and spindle organization during the cell cycle. Some of them even can directly bind to chromosomes, as a result, these proteins are called chromokinesins. Kinesin-4 and kinesin-10 family are two major families of chromokinesin and many members can regulate some processes, both in mitosis and meiosis. Their functions have been widely studied. Here, we summarize current knowledge about known chromokinesins and introduce their intracellular features in accordance with different families. Furthermore, we have also introduced some new-found but unconfirmed kinesins which may have a relationship with chromosomes or the cell cycle. PMID:27196062

  7. Spectrotemporal receptive fields during spindling and non-spindling epochs in cat primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britvina, T; Eggermont, J J

    2008-07-17

    It was often thought that synchronized rhythmic epochs of spindle waves disconnect thalamo-cortical system from incoming sensory signals. The present study addresses this issue by simultaneous extracellular action potential and local field potential (LFP) recordings from primary auditory cortex of ketamine-anesthetized cats during spindling activity. We compared cortical spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRF) obtained during spindling and non-spindling epochs. The basic spectro-temporal parameters of "spindling" and "non-spindling" STRFs were similar. However, the peak-firing rate at the best frequency was significantly enhanced during spindling epochs. This enhancement was mainly caused by the increased probability of a stimulus to evoke spikes (effectiveness of stimuli) during spindling as compared with non-spindling epochs. Augmented LFPs associated with effective stimuli and increased single-unit pair correlations during spindling epochs suggested higher synchrony of thalamo-cortical inputs during spindling that resulted in increased effectiveness of stimuli presented during spindling activity. The neuronal firing rate, both stimulus-driven and spontaneous, was higher during spindling as compared with non-spindling epochs. Overall, our results suggests that thalamic cells during spindling respond to incoming stimuli-related inputs and, moreover, cause more powerful stimulus-related or spontaneous activation of the cortex. PMID:18515012

  8. Assembly of bipolar microtubule structures by passive cross-linkers and molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, D.; Goswami, D.; Kruse, K.

    2016-06-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. The spindle contains the midzone, a stable region of overlapping antiparallel microtubules, that is essential for maintaining bipolarity. Although a lot is known about the molecular players involved, the mechanism underlying midzone formation and maintenance is still poorly understood. We study the interaction of polar filaments that are cross-linked by molecular motors moving directionally and by passive cross-linkers diffusing along microtubules. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross-linkers can generate a stable finite overlap between a pair of antiparallel polar filaments. We develop a mean-field theory to study this mechanism in detail and investigate the influence of steric interactions between motors and passive cross-linkers on the overlap dynamics. In the presence of interspecies steric interactions, passive cross-linkers mimic the behavior of molecular motors and stable finite overlaps are generated even for non-cross-linking motors. Finally, we develop a mean-field theory for a bundle of aligned polar filaments and show that they can self-organize into a spindlelike pattern. Our work suggests possible ways as to how cells can generate spindle midzones and control their extensions.

  9. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenq-Wei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  10. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  11. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yueyang [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Munger, Karl, E-mail: kmunger@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore-microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the nuclear and mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons.

  12. Cenp-meta is required for sustained spindle checkpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rubin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cenp-E is a kinesin-like motor protein required for efficient end-on attachment of kinetochores to the spindle microtubules. Cenp-E immunodepletion in Xenopus mitotic extracts results in the loss of mitotic arrest and massive chromosome missegregation, whereas its depletion in mammalian cells leads to chromosome segregation defects despite the presence of a functional spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. Cenp-meta has previously been reported to be the Drosophila homolog of vertebrate Cenp-E. In this study, we show that cenp-metaΔ mutant neuroblasts arrest in mitosis when treated with colchicine. cenp-metaΔ mutant cells display a mitotic delay. Yet, despite the persistence of the two checkpoint proteins Mad2 and BubR1 on unattached kinetochores, these cells eventually enter anaphase and give rise to highly aneuploid daughter cells. Indeed, we find that cenp-metaΔ mutant cells display a slow but continuous degradation of cyclin B, which eventually triggers the mitotic exit observed. Thus, our data provide evidence for a role of Cenp-meta in sustaining the SAC response.

  13. Peloruside A, a microtubule-stabilizing agent, induces aneuploidy in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ariane; Singh, A Jonathan; Northcote, Peter T; Miller, John H

    2016-08-01

    To ensure proper chromosome segregation, mitosis is tightly regulated by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Low concentrations of microtubule-stabilizing agents can induce aneuploid populations of cells in the absence of G2/M block, suggesting pertubation of the spindle checkpoint. We investigated the effects of peloruside A, a microtubule-stabilizing agent, on expression levels of several key cell cycle proteins, MAD2, BUBR1, p55CDC and cyclin B1. Synchronized 1A9 ovarian carcinoma cells were allowed to progress through the cell cycle in the presence or absence of peloruside A. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blotting were used to probe the cell cycle kinetics of MAD2 and BUBR1 dissociation from p55CDC. Using confocal microscopy, we investigated whether premature dissociation of MAD2 and BUBR1 at low (40 nM) but not high (100 nM) concentrations of peloruside A was caused by defects in the attachment of chromosomes to the mitotic spindle. An increased frequency of polar chromosomes was observed at low concentrations of peloruside A, suggesting that an increased frequency of pseudo-metaphase cells, which are not detected by the spindle assembly checkpoint, may be underlying the induction of aneuploidy. PMID:27155614

  14. Modeling microtubule oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jobs, E.; Wolf, D.E.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of molecular reactions in a macroscopic volume may cause the volume's physical properties to change dynamically and thus reveal much about the reactions. As an example, experimental time series for so-called microtubule oscillations are analyzed in terms of a minimal model...... for this complex polymerization-depolymerization cycle. The model reproduces well the qualitatively different time series that result from different experimental conditions, and illuminates the role and importance of individual processes in the cycle. Simple experiments are suggested that can further test...... and define the model and the polymer's reaction cycle....

  15. Fibrillarin redistributes to the spindle poles and partially colocalizes with NuMA during mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Fibrillarin, a major protein in the nucleolus, is known to redistribute during mitosis from the nucleolus to the cytosol, and is related to the dynamics of post-mitotic reassembly of the nucleolus. To better understand the dynamic behavior and the relationship with other cytoplasmic structures, we have now expressed fibrillarin-pDsRed1 fusion protein in HeLa cells. The results showed that a part of fibrillarin was associated with mitotic spindle poles in the mitotic cells. Nocodazole-induced microtubule depolymerization resulted in fibrillarin redistribution throughout the cytoplasm, and removal of nocodazole resulted in relocalization of fibrillarin at the polar region during the mitotic spindles reassembly. In a mitotic cell free system, fibrillarin was found in the center of taxol-induced microtubule asters. Moreover, fibrillarin was found to colocalize with the nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) at the poles of mitotic cells. Therefore, it is postulated that the polar redistribution of fibrillarin is mediated by microtubules.

  16. Assessment of meiotic spindle configuration and post-warming bovine oocyte viability using polarized light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caamaño, J N; Díez, C; Trigal, B; Muñoz, M; Morató, R; Martín, D; Carrocera, S; Mogas, T; Gómez, E

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the efficiency of polarized light microscopy (PLM) in detecting microtubule-polymerized protein in in vitro-matured bovine oocytes; to examine its effects on oocyte developmental competence; and to assess the meiotic spindle of in vitro-matured oocytes after vitrification/warming and further assessment of oocyte developmental competence. In the first experiment, the presence of microtubule-polymerized protein (MPP) was confirmed as a positive PLM signal detected in 99.1% of analysed oocytes (n = 115), which strongly correlated (r = 1; p PLM for 10 min and then fertilized and cultured in vitro. Oocytes exposed to PLM did not significantly differ from controls with regard to cleavage, total blastocyst and expanded blastocyst rates and cell numbers. In the third experiment, meiotic spindles were detected in 145 of 182 oocytes (79.6%) following vitrification and warming. Interestingly, after parthenogenetic activation and in vitro culture, oocytes that displayed a positive PLM signal PLM(+) differed significantly from PLM(-) in cleavage and Day 8 blastocyst rates. These results suggest that polarized light microscopy is an efficient system to detect microtubule-polymerized protein in in vitro-matured bovine oocytes and does not exert detrimental effects on bovine oocyte developmental competence. Moreover, PLM could be used as a tool to assess post-warming viability in vitrified bovine oocytes.

  17. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Tiriac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves; accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems.

  18. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10-15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches-and their associated spindle bursts-occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  19. Next generation spindles for micromilling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Jay P. (Machine Tool Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Payne, Scott W. T. (Machine Tool Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Gill, David Dennis; Ziegert, John C. (Machine Tool Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.

    2004-12-01

    There exists a wide variety of important applications for micro- and meso-scale mechanical systems in the commercial and defense sectors, which require high-strength materials and complex geometries that cannot be produced using current MEMS fabrication technologies. Micromilling has great potential to fill this void in MEMS technology by adding the capability of free form machining of complex 3D shapes from a wide variety and combination of traditional, well-understood engineering alloys, glasses and ceramics. Inefficiencies in micromilling result from the relationships between a cutting tool's breaking strength, the applied cutting force, and the metal removal rate. Because machining times in mesofeatures scale inversely to the part size, a feature 1/10th as large will take 10 times as long to machine. Also, required chip sizes of 1 m or less are cut with tools having edge radius of 2-3 m, the cutting edge effectively has a highly negative rake angle, cutting forces are increased significantly causing chip loads to be further reduced and the machining takes even longer than predicted above. However, cutting forces do not increase with cutting speed, so faster spindles with reduced tool runout are the path to achieve efficient mesoscale milling. This research explored the development of new ultra-high speed micromilling spindles. A novel air-bearing spindle design is discussed that will run at very high speeds (450,000 rpm) and provide very minimal runout allowing the best use of micromilling cutters and reducing overall machining time drastically. Two generations of this spindle design were completed; one with an air bearing supported tool shaft and one with a novel rolling element bearing supported tool shaft. Both designs utilized friction-drive systems that relied on diameter differences between the drive wheel (operating at speeds up to 90,000 rpm) and the tool shaft to achieve high rotational tool speeds. Runout, stiffness, and machining tests were

  20. The Katanin Microtubule Severing Protein in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Katanin is a heterodimeric microtubule (MT) severing protein that uses energy from ATP hydrolysis to generate internal breaks along MTs. Katanin p60, one of the two subunits, possesses ATPase and MT-bindinglsevering activities, and the p80 subunit is responsible for targeting of katanin to certain subcellular locations. In animals, katanin plays an important role in the release of MTs from their nucleation sites in the centrosome. It is also involved in severing MTs into smaller fragments which can serve as templates for further polymerization to increase MT number during meiotic and mitotic spindle assembly. Katanin homologs are present in a wide variety of plant species. The Arabidopsis katanin homolog has been shown to possess ATP-dependent MT severing activity in vitro and exhibit a punctate localization pattern at the cell cortex and the perinuclear region. Disruption of katanin functions by genetic mutations causes a delay in the disappearance of the perinuclear MT array and results in an aberrant organization of cortical MTs in elongating cells. Consequently, katanin mutations lead to defects in cell elongation, cellulose microfibril deposition, and hormonal responses. Studies of katanin in plants provide new insights into our understanding of its roles in cellular functions.

  1. The transforming parasite Theileria co-opts host cell mitotic and central spindles to persist in continuously dividing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad von Schubert

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Theileria inhabits the host cell cytoplasm and possesses the unique capacity to transform the cells it infects, inducing continuous proliferation and protection against apoptosis. The transforming schizont is a multinucleated syncytium that resides free in the host cell cytoplasm and is strictly intracellular. To maintain transformation, it is crucial that this syncytium is divided over the two daughter cells at each host cell cytokinesis. This process was dissected using different cell cycle synchronization methods in combination with the targeted application of specific inhibitors. We found that Theileria schizonts associate with newly formed host cell microtubules that emanate from the spindle poles, positioning the parasite at the equatorial region of the mitotic cell where host cell chromosomes assemble during metaphase. During anaphase, the schizont interacts closely with host cell central spindle. As part of this process, the schizont recruits a host cell mitotic kinase, Polo-like kinase 1, and we established that parasite association with host cell central spindles requires Polo-like kinase 1 catalytic activity. Blocking the interaction between the schizont and astral as well as central spindle microtubules prevented parasite segregation between the daughter cells during cytokinesis. Our findings provide a striking example of how an intracellular eukaryotic pathogen that evolved ways to induce the uncontrolled proliferation of the cells it infects usurps the host cell mitotic machinery, including Polo-like kinase 1, one of the pivotal mitotic kinases, to ensure its own persistence and survival.

  2. The Spindle Cell Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell neoplasms are defined as neoplasms that consist of spindle-shaped cells in the histopathology. Spindle cell neoplasms can affect the oral cavity. In the oral cavity, the origin of the spindle cell neoplasms may be traced to epithelial, mesenchymal and odontogenic components. This article aims to review the spindle cell neoplasms of the oral cavity with emphasis on histopathology.

  3. Dynamic Response Analysis of Motorized Spindle System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; LUO Yi-chao; XU Juan; XIAO Ru-feng; LI Xian-hui

    2013-01-01

    As to motorized spindle system, this paper builds a simplified 3D model of spindle and bearing, performs structure modal analysis, reveals its dynamic characteristics under the free model;furthermore, modifies bearing radial stiffness and number of model, and studies the change of modal parameters. On this basis, through the harmonic response analysis of the finite element model, dy-namic response characteristic caused by imbalance of monitored spindle system and law of vibration response to different amount of unbalance is analyzed.

  4. Concomitant binding of Afadin to LGN and F-actin directs planar spindle orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carminati, Manuel; Gallini, Sara; Pirovano, Laura; Alfieri, Andrea; Bisi, Sara; Mapelli, Marina

    2016-02-01

    Polarized epithelia form by oriented cell divisions in which the mitotic spindle aligns parallel to the epithelial plane. To orient the mitotic spindle, cortical cues trigger the recruitment of NuMA-dynein-based motors, which pull on astral microtubules via the protein LGN. We demonstrate that the junctional protein Afadin is required for spindle orientation and correct epithelial morphogenesis of Caco-2 cysts. Molecularly, Afadin binds directly and concomitantly to F-actin and to LGN. We determined the crystallographic structure of human Afadin in complex with LGN and show that it resembles the LGN-NuMA complex. In mitosis, Afadin is necessary for cortical accumulation of LGN and NuMA above the spindle poles, in an F-actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our results depict Afadin as a molecular hub governing the enrichment of LGN and NuMA at the cortex. To our knowledge, Afadin is the first-described mechanical anchor between dynein and cortical F-actin. PMID:26751642

  5. Short exposure to paclitaxel induces multipolar spindle formation and aneuploidy through promotion of acentrosomal pole assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a widely used microtubule drug and cancer medicine. Here we report that by short exposure to paclitaxel at a low dose, multipolar spindles were induced in mitotic cells without centrosome amplification. Both TPX2 depletion and Aurora-A overexpression antagonized the multipolarity. Live cell imaging showed that some paclitaxel-treated cells accomplished multipolar cell division and a portion of the daughter cells went on to the next round of mitosis. The surviving cells grew into clones with varied genome content. The results indicated that an aneuploidy population could be induced by short exposure to paclitaxel at a low dose, implicating potential side effects of paclitaxel.

  6. Left Supraclavicular Spindle Cell Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladejo Olaleye

    2010-01-01

    This case highlights a rare presentation of SCL and the need for pre-operative diagnosis. Case Report. A 63-year-old gentleman presented with a pre-existing left supraclavicular mass that had recently increased in size. FNA and CT Scans were performed and results discussed in the mutidisciplinary team meeting. Excisional biopsy was recommended. Radiology. CT neck showed a left supraclavicular mass of fatty density with fine internal septations. A low-grade liposarcoma could not be excluded. Histopathology. FNA was indeterminate. Histology of specimen showed bland spindle cells with no evidence of malignancy. Immuno-histochemistry showed SCL with CD34 positivity and negative staining on CDK4 and p16. Management. Excision biopsy of the mass was performed which was technically difficult as the mass invaginated around the brachial plexus. The patient recovered well post-operatively with no neurological deficits. Conclusion. Spindle cell lipoma is a rare benign tumour and a pre-operative diagnosis based on the clinical context, imaging and immuno-histochemistry is crucial to management.

  7. Synthesis and high content cell-based profiling of simplified analogues of the microtubule stabilizer (+)-discodermolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguez, Jose M; Giuliano, Kenneth A; Balachandran, Raghavan; Madiraju, Charitha; Curran, Dennis P; Day, Billy W

    2002-12-01

    (+)-Discodermolide, a C24:4, trihydroxylated, octamethyl, carbamate-bearing fatty acid lactone originally isolated from a Caribbean sponge, has proven to be the most potent of the microtubule-stabilizing agents. Recent studies suggest that it or its analogues may have advantages over other classes of microtubule-stabilizing agents. (+)-Discodermolide's complex molecular architecture has made structure-activity relationship analysis in this class of compounds a formidable task. The goal of this study was to prepare simplified analogues of (+)-discodermolide and to analyze their biological activities to expand structure-activity relationships. A small library of analogues was prepared wherein the (+)-discodermolide methyl groups at C-14 and C-16 and the C-7 hydroxyl were removed, and the lactone was replaced by simple esters. The library components were analyzed for microtubule-stabilizing actions in vitro, antiproliferative activity against a small panel of human carcinoma cells, and cell signaling, microtubule architecture and mitotic spindle alterations by a multiparameter fluorescence cell-based screening technique. The results show that even drastic structural simplification can lead to analogues with actions related to microtubule targeting and signal transduction, but that these subtle effects were illuminated only through the high information content cell-based screen.

  8. Nap sleep spindle correlates of intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ujma, P.P.; Bodizs, R.; Gombos, F.; Stintzing, J.; Konrad, B.N.; Genzel, L.; Steiger, A.; Dresler, M.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, that play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Several studies with full-night sleep recordings have reported a positive association between sleep spindles and fl

  9. Visualizing the spindle checkpoint in Drosophila spermatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollo, Elena; González, Cayetano

    2000-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint detects defects in spindle structure or in the alignment of the chromosomes on the metaphase plate and delays the onset of anaphase until defects are corrected. Thus far, the evidence regarding the presence of a spindle checkpoint during meiosis in male Drosophila has been indirect and contradictory. On the one hand, chromosomes without pairing partners do not prevent meiosis progression. On the other hand, some conserved components of the spindle checkpoint machinery are expressed in these cells and behave as their homologue proteins do in systems with an active spindle checkpoint. To establish whether the spindle checkpoint is active in Drosophila spermatocytes we have followed meiosis progression by time-lapse microscopy under conditions where the checkpoint is likely to be activated. We have found that the presence of a relatively high number of misaligned chromosomes or a severe disruption of the meiotic spindle results in a significant delay in the time of entry into anaphase. These observations provide the first direct evidence substantiating the activity of a meiotic spindle checkpoint in male Drosophila. PMID:11256627

  10. Optimization Study of the Efficient Spindle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the field of yam dyeing, the most generally employed method is a type of package dyeing which uses a package of cheese stacked on a spindle made of a perforated robe. Spindles up to now, have been designed without considering the characteristics of dyeing liquid, focusing only on the geometric configuration which cause many problems such as lack of level dyeing. To improve the level dyeing and find the appropriate spindle configuration for the most effective dyeing process, this study examines the spindle flow-field in detail, using a computational method. Flow characteristics inside the spindle have been investigated with varying in porosity, porous diameter and the velocity of the flow. The results show that the total pressure of the flow through the spindle is used to overcom e body force. The characteristics of the flow from the porous spindle could also be observed. Based on the results from this study, an effective spindle configuration for level-dyeing has been proposed.

  11. Anti-Microtubule Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Stefan; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule drugs that target microtubules (MTs), many of them natural products, have long been important tools in the MT field. Indeed, tubulin (Tb) was discovered, in part, as the protein binding partner of colchicine. Several anti-MT drug classes also have important medical uses, notably colchicine, which is used to treat gout, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), and pericarditis, and the vinca alkaloids and taxanes, which are used to treat cancer. Anti-MT drugs have in common that they bind specifically to Tb in the dimer, MT or some other form. However, their effects on polymerization dynamics and on the human body differ markedly. Here we briefly review the most-studied molecules, and comment on their uses in basic research and medicine. Our focus is on practical applications of different anti-MT drugs in the laboratory, and key points that users should be aware of when designing experiments. We also touch on interesting unsolved problems, particularly in the area of medical applications. In our opinion, the mechanism by which any MT drug cures or treats any disease is still unsolved, despite decades of research. Solving this problem for particular drug-disease combinations might open new uses for old drugs, or provide insights into novel routes for treatment. PMID:27193863

  12. Cep192 controls the balance of centrosome and non-centrosomal microtubules during interphase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P O'Rourke

    Full Text Available Cep192 is a centrosomal protein that contributes to the formation and function of the mitotic spindle in mammalian cells. Cep192's mitotic activities stem largely from its role in the recruitment to the centrosome of numerous additional proteins such as gamma-tubulin and Pericentrin. Here, we examine Cep192's function in interphase cells. Our data indicate that, as in mitosis, Cep192 stimulates the nucleation of centrosomal microtubules thereby regulating the morphology of interphase microtubule arrays. Interestingly, however, cells lacking Cep192 remain capable of generating normal levels of MTs as the loss of centrosomal microtubules is augmented by MT nucleation from other sites, most notably the Golgi apparatus. The depletion of Cep192 results in a significant decrease in the level of centrosome-associated gamma-tubulin, likely explaining its impact on centrosome microtubule nucleation. However, in stark contrast to mitosis, Cep192 appears to maintain an antagonistic relationship with Pericentrin at interphase centrosomes. Interphase cells depleted of Cep192 display significantly higher levels of centrosome-associated Pericentrin while overexpression of Cep192 reduces the levels of centrosomal Pericentrin. Conversely, depletion of Pericentrin results in elevated levels of centrosomal Cep192 and enhances microtubule nucleation at centrosomes, at least during interphase. Finally, we show that depletion of Cep192 negatively impacts cell motility and alters normal cell polarization. Our current working hypothesis is that the microtubule nucleating capacity of the interphase centrosome is determined by an antagonistic balance of Cep192, which promotes nucleation, and Pericentrin, which inhibits nucleation. This in turn determines the relative abundance of centrosomal and non-centrosomal microtubules that tune cell movement and shape.

  13. Sustained spindle-assembly checkpoint response requires de novo transcription and translation of cyclin B1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Mena

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microtubule-targeting drugs induce mitotic delay at pro-metaphase by preventing the spindle assembly checkpoint to be satisfied. However, especially after prolonged treatments, cells can escape this arrest in a process called mitotic slippage. The mechanisms underlying the spindle assembly checkpoint and slippage are not fully understood. It has been generally accepted that during mitosis there is a temporary shutdown of high-energy-consuming processes, such as transcription and translation. However, the synthesis of specific proteins is maintained or up-regulated since protein synthesis is necessary for entry into and progression through mitosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work we investigated whether the mitotic arrest caused by the mitotic checkpoint is independent of transcription and translation. By using immunofluorescent microscopy and western blotting, we demonstrate that inhibition of either of these processes induces a shortening of the mitotic arrest caused by the nocodazole treatment, and ultimately leads to mitotic slippage. Our western blotting and RTQ-PCR results show that inhibition of transcription during mitotic arrest does not affect the expression of the spindle checkpoint proteins, whereas it induces a significant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of Cyclin B1. The exogenous expression of Cyclin B1 substantially rescued the mitotic phenotype in nocodazole cells treated with the inhibitors of transcription and translation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work emphasizes the importance of transcription and translation for the maintenance of the spindle assembly checkpoint, suggesting the existence of a mechanism dependent on cyclin B1 gene regulation during mitosis. We propose that continuous transcription of mitotic regulators is required to sustain the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

  14. In-silico modeling of the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Ibrahim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Mitotic Spindle Assembly Checkpoint ((MSAC is an evolutionary conserved mechanism that ensures the correct segregation of chromosomes by restraining cell cycle progression from entering anaphase until all chromosomes have made proper bipolar attachments to the mitotic spindle. Its malfunction can lead to cancer. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We have constructed and validated for the human (MSAC mechanism an in silico dynamical model, integrating 11 proteins and complexes. The model incorporates the perspectives of three central control pathways, namely Mad1/Mad2 induced Cdc20 sequestering based on the Template Model, MCC formation, and APC inhibition. Originating from the biochemical reactions for the underlying molecular processes, non-linear ordinary differential equations for the concentrations of 11 proteins and complexes of the (MSAC are derived. Most of the kinetic constants are taken from literature, the remaining four unknown parameters are derived by an evolutionary optimization procedure for an objective function describing the dynamics of the APC:Cdc20 complex. MCC:APC dissociation is described by two alternatives, namely the "Dissociation" and the "Convey" model variants. The attachment of the kinetochore to microtubuli is simulated by a switching parameter silencing those reactions which are stopped by the attachment. For both, the Dissociation and the Convey variants, we compare two different scenarios concerning the microtubule attachment dependent control of the dissociation reaction. Our model is validated by simulation of ten perturbation experiments. CONCLUSION: Only in the controlled case, our models show (MSAC behaviour at meta- to anaphase transition in agreement with experimental observations. Our simulations revealed that for (MSAC activation, Cdc20 is not fully sequestered; instead APC is inhibited by MCC binding.

  15. F-actin asymmetry and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated TCC-1 protein contribute to stereotypic spindle movements in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berends, Christian W H; Muñoz, Javier; Portegijs, Vincent; Schmidt, Ruben; Grigoriev, Ilya; Boxem, Mike; Akhmanova, Anna; Heck, Albert J R; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2013-07-01

    The microtubule spindle apparatus dictates the plane of cell cleavage in animal cells. During development, dividing cells control the position of the spindle to determine the size, location, and fate of daughter cells. Spindle positioning depends on pulling forces that act between the cell periphery and astral microtubules. This involves dynein recruitment to the cell cortex by a heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit in complex with a TPR-GoLoco motif protein (GPR-1/2, Pins, LGN) and coiled-coil protein (LIN-5, Mud, NuMA). In this study, we searched for additional factors that contribute to spindle positioning in the one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. We show that cortical actin is not needed for Gα-GPR-LIN-5 localization and pulling force generation. Instead, actin accumulation in the anterior actually reduces pulling forces, possibly by increasing cortical rigidity. Examining membrane-associated proteins that copurified with GOA-1 Gα, we found that the transmembrane and coiled-coil domain protein 1 (TCC-1) contributes to proper spindle movements. TCC-1 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and interacts with UNC-116 kinesin-1 heavy chain in yeast two-hybrid assays. RNA interference of tcc-1 and unc-116 causes similar defects in meiotic spindle positioning, supporting the concept of TCC-1 acting with kinesin-1 in vivo. These results emphasize the contribution of membrane-associated and cortical proteins other than Gα-GPR-LIN-5 in balancing the pulling forces that position the spindle during asymmetric cell division.

  16. F-actin asymmetry and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated TCC-1 protein contribute to stereotypic spindle movements in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berends, Christian W H; Muñoz, Javier; Portegijs, Vincent; Schmidt, Ruben; Grigoriev, Ilya; Boxem, Mike; Akhmanova, Anna; Heck, Albert J R; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2013-07-01

    The microtubule spindle apparatus dictates the plane of cell cleavage in animal cells. During development, dividing cells control the position of the spindle to determine the size, location, and fate of daughter cells. Spindle positioning depends on pulling forces that act between the cell periphery and astral microtubules. This involves dynein recruitment to the cell cortex by a heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit in complex with a TPR-GoLoco motif protein (GPR-1/2, Pins, LGN) and coiled-coil protein (LIN-5, Mud, NuMA). In this study, we searched for additional factors that contribute to spindle positioning in the one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. We show that cortical actin is not needed for Gα-GPR-LIN-5 localization and pulling force generation. Instead, actin accumulation in the anterior actually reduces pulling forces, possibly by increasing cortical rigidity. Examining membrane-associated proteins that copurified with GOA-1 Gα, we found that the transmembrane and coiled-coil domain protein 1 (TCC-1) contributes to proper spindle movements. TCC-1 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and interacts with UNC-116 kinesin-1 heavy chain in yeast two-hybrid assays. RNA interference of tcc-1 and unc-116 causes similar defects in meiotic spindle positioning, supporting the concept of TCC-1 acting with kinesin-1 in vivo. These results emphasize the contribution of membrane-associated and cortical proteins other than Gα-GPR-LIN-5 in balancing the pulling forces that position the spindle during asymmetric cell division. PMID:23699393

  17. Three-dimensional tracking of plus-tips by lattice light-sheet microscopy permits the quantification of microtubule growth trajectories within the mitotic apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Norio; Morita, Masahiko; Legant, Wesley R.; Chen, Bi-Chang; Betzig, Eric; Yokota, Hideo; Mimori-Kiyosue, Yuko

    2015-10-01

    Mitotic apparatus, which comprises hundreds of microtubules, plays an essential role in cell division, ensuring the correct segregation of chromosomes into each daughter cell. To gain insight into its regulatory mechanisms, it is essential to detect and analyze the behavior of individual microtubule filaments. However, the discrimination of discrete microtubule filaments within the mitotic apparatus is beyond the capabilities of conventional light microscopic technologies. Recently, we detected three-dimensional (3-D) microtubule growth dynamics within the cellular cytoplasmic space using lattice light-sheet microscopy in conjunction with microtubule growth marker protein end-binding 1, a microtubule plus-end-tracking protein, which was fused to green fluorescent protein (EB1-GFP). This technique enables high-resolution 3-D imaging at subsecond intervals. We adapted mathematical computing and geometric representation techniques to analyze spatial variations in microtubule growth dynamics within the mitotic spindle apparatus. Our analytical approach enabled the different dynamic properties of individual microtubules to be determined, including the direction and speed of their growth, and their growth duration within a 3-D spatial map. Our analysis framework provides an important step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms driving cellular machinery at the whole-cell level.

  18. Phosphorylated ERK5/BMK1 transiently accumulates within division spindles in mouse oocytes and preimplantation embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Ciemerych

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available MAP kinases of the ERK family play important roles in oocyte maturation, fertilization, and early embryo development. The role of the signaling pathway involving ERK5 MAP kinase during meiotic and mitotic M-phase of the cell cycle is not well known. Here, we studied the localization of the phosphorylated, and thus potentially activated, form of ERK5 in mouse maturing oocytes and mitotically dividing early embryos. We show that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, i.e. likely activation/inactivation of ERK5, correlates with M-phase progression. Phosphorylated form of ERK5 accumulates in division spindle of both meiotic and mitotic cells, and precisely co-localizes with spindle microtubules at metaphase. This localization changes drastically in the anaphase, when phospho-ERK5 completely disappears from microtubules and transits to the cytoplasmic granular, vesicle-like structures. In telophase oocytes it becomes incorporated into the midbody. Dynamic changes in the localization of phospho-ERK5 suggests that it may play an important role both in meiotic and mitotic division. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 3, 528–534

  19. The WD40 repeat protein NEDD1 functions in microtubule organization during cell division in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C J Tracy; Lee, Y-R Julie; Liu, Bo

    2009-04-01

    Although cells of flowering plants lack a structurally defined microtubule-organizing center like the centrosome, organization of the spindles and phragmoplasts in mitosis is known to involve the evolutionarily conserved gamma-tubulin complex. We have investigated the function of Arabidopsis thaliana NEDD1, a WD40 repeat protein related to the animal NEDD1/GCP-WD protein, which interacts with the gamma-tubulin complex. The NEDD1 protein decorates spindle microtubules (MTs) preferentially toward spindle poles and phragmoplast MTs toward their minus ends. A T-DNA insertional allele of the single NEDD1 gene was isolated and maintained in heterozygous sporophytes, and NEDD1's function in cell division was analyzed in haploid microspores produced by the heterozygote. In approximately half of the dividing microspores exhibiting aberrant MT organization, spindles were no longer restricted to the cell periphery and became abnormally elongated. After mitosis, MTs aggregated between reforming nuclei but failed to appear in a bipolar configuration. Consequently, defective microspores did not form a continuous cell plate, and two identical nuclei were produced with no differentiation into generative and vegetative cells. Our results support the notion that the plant NEDD1 homolog plays a critical role in MT organization during mitosis, and its function is likely linked to that of the gamma-tubulin complex. PMID:19383896

  20. Cyclin B1 is localized to unattached kinetochores and contributes to efficient microtubule attachment and proper chromosome alignment during mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Chen; Xiaoyan Zhang; Qing Jiang; Paul R Clarke; Chuanmao Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Cyclin Bl is a key regulatory protein controlling cell cycle progression in vertebrates. Cyclin Bl binds CDK1, a cyclin-dependent kinase catalytic subunit, forming a complex that orchestrates mitosis through phosphorylation of key proteins. Cyclin Bl regulates both the activation of CDK1 and its subcellular localization, which may be critical for substrate selection. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin Bl is concentrated on the outer plate of the kinetochore during prometaphase. This localization requires the cyclin box region of the protein. Cyclin Bl is displaced from individual kinetochores to the spindle poles by microtubule attachment to the kinetochores, and this displacement is dependent on the dynein/dynactin complex. Depletion of cyclin Bl by vector-based siRNA causes inefficient attachment between kinetochores and microtubules, and chromosome alignment defects, and delays the onset of anaphase. We conclude that cyclin Bl accumulates at kinetochores during prometaphase, where it contributes to the correct attachment of microtubules to kinetochores and efficient alignment of the chromosomes, most likely through localized phosphorylation of specific substrates by cyclin B1-CDK1. Cyclin Bl is then transported from each kinetochore as microtubule attachment is completed, and this relocalization may redirect the activity of cyclin B1-CDK1 and contribute to inactivation of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

  1. Yeast GSK-3 kinase regulates astral microtubule function through phosphorylation of the microtubule-stabilizing kinesin Kip2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, Hauke; Tan, Ann Na; Liakopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-11-01

    The S. cerevisiae kinesin Kip2 stabilises astral microtubules (MTs) and facilitates spindle positioning through transport of MT-associated proteins, such as the yeast CLIP-170 homologue Bik1, dynein and the adenomatous-polyposis-coli-related protein Kar9 to the plus ends of astral MTs. Here, we show that Kip2 associates with its processivity factor Bim1, the yeast homologue of the plus-end-tracking protein EB1. This interaction requires an EB1-binding motif in the N-terminal extension of Kip2 and is negatively regulated by phosphorylation through Mck1, the yeast glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, Mck1-dependent phosphorylation decreases the intrinsic MT affinity of Kip2. Reduction in Kip2 phosphorylation leads to stabilisation of astral MTs, and accumulation of Kip2, dynein and Kar9 at MT plus ends, whereas loss of Mck1 function leads to defects in spindle positioning. Furthermore, we provide evidence that a subpopulation of Mck1 at the bud-cortex phosphorylates Kip2. We propose that yeast GSK-3 spatially controls astral MT dynamics and the loading of dynein and Kar9 on astral MT plus ends by regulating Kip2 interactions with Bim1 and MTs. PMID:26395399

  2. Disruption of cytoplasmic microtubules by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of cultured human skin fibroblasts causes the disassembly of their microtubules. Using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, we have now investigated whether damage to the microtubule precursor pool may contribute to the disruption of microtubules. Exposure to polychromatic UV radiation inhibits the reassembly of microtubules during cellular recovery from cold treatment. In addition, the ability of taxol to promote microtubule polymerization and bundling is inhibited in UV-irradiated cells. However, UV irradiation of taxol-pretreated cells or in situ detergent-extracted microtubules fails to disrupt the microtubule network. These data suggest that damage to dimeric tubulin, or another soluble factor(s) required for polymerization, contributes to the disassembly of microtubules in UV-irradiated human skin fibroblasts

  3. Spindle activity phase-locked to sleep slow oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinzing, Jens G; Mölle, Matthias; Weber, Frederik; Supp, Gernot; Hipp, Jörg F; Engel, Andreas K; Born, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The right hemisphere did not reveal any signs of a concurrent lateralization of spindle activity co-occurring with these SOs. Our data are consistent with the concept of the neocortical SO exerting top-down control over thalamic spindle generation. However, they call into question the notion that SOs locally coordinate spindles and thereby inform spindle-related memory processing. PMID:27103135

  4. Suppression of microtubule dynamics by discodermolide by a novel mechanism is associated with mitotic arrest and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honore, Stéphane; Kamath, Kathy; Braguer, Diane; Wilson, Leslie; Briand, Claudette; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2003-12-01

    Discodermolide is a new microtubule-targeted drug in Phase I clinical trials that inhibits tumor growth and induces G(2)-M cell cycle arrest. It is effective against paclitaxel-resistant cell lines and acts synergistically in combination with paclitaxel. Suppression of microtubule dynamics by microtubule-targeted drugs has been hypothesized to be responsible for their ability to inhibit mitotic progression and cell proliferation. To determine whether discodermolide blocks mitosis by an effect on microtubule dynamics, we analyzed the effects of discodermolide on microtubule dynamics in living A549 human lung cancer cells during interphase at concentrations that block mitosis and inhibit cell proliferation. We found that discodermolide (7-166 nM) significantly suppressed microtubule dynamic instability. At the IC(50) for proliferation (7 nM discodermolide, 72 h), overall dynamicity was reduced by 23%. The principal parameters of dynamic instability suppressed by discodermolide were the microtubule shortening rate and length shortened. In addition, discodermolide markedly increased the frequency of rescued catastrophes. At the discodermolide concentration that resulted in 50% of maximal mitotic block (83 nM, 20 h), most microtubules were completely non-dynamic, no anaphases occurred, and all spindles were abnormal. The dynamicity of the remaining dynamic microtubules was reduced by 62%. The results indicate that a principal mechanism of inhibition of cell proliferation and mitotic block by discodermolide is suppression of microtubule dynamics. Importantly, the results indicate significant additional stabilizing effects of discodermolide on microtubule dynamics as compared with those of paclitaxel that may in turn reflect differences in their binding sites and their effects on tubulin conformation.

  5. In vivo FRET imaging revealed a regulatory role of RanGTP in kinetochore-microtubule attachments via Aurora B kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoke-Peng Lee

    Full Text Available Under the fluctuating circumstances provided by the innate dynamics of microtubules and opposing tensions resulted from microtubule-associated motors, it is vital to ensure stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments for accurate segregation. However, a comprehensive understanding of how this regulation is mechanistically achieved remains elusive. Using our newly designed live cell FRET time-lapse imaging, we found that post-metaphase RanGTP is crucial in the maintenance of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments by regulating Aurora B kinase via the NES-bearing Mst1. More importantly, our study demonstrates that by ensuring stable alignment of metaphase chromosomes prior to segregation, RanGTP is indispensible in governing the genomic integrity and the fidelity of cell cycle progression. Our findings suggest an additional role of RanGTP beyond its known function in mitotic spindle assembly during the prometaphase-metaphase transition.

  6. Cep70 promotes microtubule assembly in vitro by increasing microtubule elongation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingjuan Shi; Jun Wang; Yunfan Yang; Yuan Ren; Jun Zhou; Dengwen Li

    2012-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic cytoskeletal polymers present in all eukaryotic cells,In animal cells,they are organized by the centrosome,the major microtubule-organizing center.Many centrosomal proteins act coordinately to modulate microtubule assembly and organization.Our previous work has shown that Cep70,a novel centrosomal protein regulates microtubule assembly and organization in mammalian cells.However,the molecular details remain to be investigated,in this study,we investigated the molecular mechanism of how Cep70 regulates microtubule assembly using purified proteins.Our data showed that Cep70 increased the microtubule length without affecting the microtubule number in the purified system.These results demonstrate that Cep70 could directly regulate microtubule assembly by promoting microtubule elongation instead of microtubule nucleation.

  7. SBDS expression and localization at the mitotic spindle in human myeloid progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Orelio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SDS is a hereditary disease caused by mutations in the SBDS gene. SDS is clinically characterized by pancreatic insufficiency, skeletal abnormalities and bone marrow dysfunction. The hematologic abnormalities include neutropenia, neutrophil chemotaxis defects, and an increased risk of developing Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML. Although several studies have suggested that SBDS as a protein plays a role in ribosome processing/maturation, its impact on human neutrophil development and function remains to be clarified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed that SBDS RNA and protein are expressed in the human myeloid leukemia PLB-985 cell line and in human hematopoietic progenitor cells by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. SBDS expression is downregulated during neutrophil differentiation. Additionally, we observed that the differentiation and proliferation capacity of SDS-patient bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells in a liquid differentiation system was reduced as compared to control cultures. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that SBDS co-localizes with the mitotic spindle and in vitro binding studies reveal a direct interaction of SBDS with microtubules. In interphase cells a perinuclear enrichment of SBDS protein which co-localized with the microtubule organizing center (MTOC was observed. Also, we observed that transiently expressed SDS patient-derived SBDS-K62 or SBDS-C84 mutant proteins could co-localize with the MTOC and mitotic spindle. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SBDS co-localizes with the mitotic spindle, suggesting a role for SBDS in the cell division process, which corresponds to the decreased proliferation capacity of SDS-patient bone marrow CD34(+ hematopoietic progenitor cells in our culture system and also to the neutropenia in SDS patients. A role in chromosome missegregation has not been clarified, since similar spatial and time-dependent localization is observed when

  8. High Temperature Resistant Exhaust Valve Spindle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Uffe Ditlev

    of the engine, new high temperature alloys are required for a specific engine component, the exhaust valve spindle. Two alloys are used for an exhaust valve spindle; one for the bottom of the spindle, and one for the spindle seat. Being placed in the exhaust gas stream, combustion products such as V2O5 and Na2...... of the current valve seat alloy, Alloy 718 (Ni-based, 19 wt% Cr, 18 wt% Fe, 5.1 wt% Nb, 3 wt% Mo, 1 wt% Ti and 0.6 wt% Al), and thereby to obtain a more hot corrosion resistant alloy. To validate these calculations, 16 Ni-based alloys, containing 40 wt% Cr and Nb, Ta and Ti in varying levels, were produced...

  9. A CEP215-HSET complex links centrosomes with spindle poles and drives centrosome clustering in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Pavithra L; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Barr, Alexis R; Tátrai, Péter; Taylor, Chris; Papachristou, Evaggelia K; Woods, C Geoffrey; Chavali, Sreenivas; Gergely, Fanni

    2016-01-01

    Numerical centrosome aberrations underlie certain developmental abnormalities and may promote cancer. A cell maintains normal centrosome numbers by coupling centrosome duplication with segregation, which is achieved through sustained association of each centrosome with a mitotic spindle pole. Although the microcephaly- and primordial dwarfism-linked centrosomal protein CEP215 has been implicated in this process, the molecular mechanism responsible remains unclear. Here, using proteomic profiling, we identify the minus end-directed microtubule motor protein HSET as a direct binding partner of CEP215. Targeted deletion of the HSET-binding domain of CEP215 in vertebrate cells causes centrosome detachment and results in HSET depletion at centrosomes, a phenotype also observed in CEP215-deficient patient-derived cells. Moreover, in cancer cells with centrosome amplification, the CEP215-HSET complex promotes the clustering of extra centrosomes into pseudo-bipolar spindles, thereby ensuring viable cell division. Therefore, stabilization of the centrosome-spindle pole interface by the CEP215-HSET complex could promote survival of cancer cells containing supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:26987684

  10. Loss of the Greatwall Kinase Weakens the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diril, M Kasim; Bisteau, Xavier; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Caldez, Matias J; Wee, Sheena; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kaldis, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    The Greatwall kinase/Mastl is an essential gene that indirectly inhibits the phosphatase activity toward mitotic Cdk1 substrates. Here we show that although Mastl knockout (MastlNULL) MEFs enter mitosis, they progress through mitosis without completing cytokinesis despite the presence of misaligned chromosomes, which causes chromosome segregation defects. Furthermore, we uncover the requirement of Mastl for robust spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) maintenance since the duration of mitotic arrest caused by microtubule poisons in MastlNULL MEFs is shortened, which correlates with premature disappearance of the essential SAC protein Mad1 at the kinetochores. Notably, MastlNULL MEFs display reduced phosphorylation of a number of proteins in mitosis, which include the essential SAC kinase MPS1. We further demonstrate that Mastl is required for multi-site phosphorylation of MPS1 as well as robust MPS1 kinase activity in mitosis. In contrast, treatment of MastlNULL cells with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA) rescues the defects in MPS1 kinase activity, mislocalization of phospho-MPS1 as well as Mad1 at the kinetochore, and premature SAC silencing. Moreover, using in vitro dephosphorylation assays, we demonstrate that Mastl promotes persistent MPS1 phosphorylation by inhibiting PP2A/B55-mediated MPS1 dephosphorylation rather than affecting Cdk1 kinase activity. Our findings establish a key regulatory function of the Greatwall kinase/Mastl->PP2A/B55 pathway in preventing premature SAC silencing. PMID:27631493

  11. Role of the Number of Microtubules in Chromosome Segregation during Cell Division

    CERN Document Server

    Bertalan, Zsolt; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Faithful segregation of genetic material during cell division requires alignment of chromosomes between two spindle poles and attachment of their kinetochores to each of the poles. Failure of these complex dynamical processes leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), a characteristic feature of several diseases including cancer. While a multitude of biological factors regulating chromosome congression and bi-orientation have been identified, it is still unclear how they are integrated so that coherent chromosome motion emerges from a large collection of random and deterministic processes. Here we address this issue by a three dimensional computational model of motor-driven chromosome congression and bi-orientation during mitosis. Our model reveals that successful cell division requires control of the total number of microtubules: if this number is too small bi-orientation fails, while if it is too large not all the chromosomes are able to congress. The optimal number of microtubules predicted by our model compa...

  12. XTACC3-XMAP215 association reveals an asymmetric interaction promoting microtubule elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortuza, Gulnahar B; Cavazza, Tommaso; Garcia-Mayoral, Maria Flor;

    2014-01-01

    215 (chTOG), dissecting the mechanism by which their interaction promotes microtubule elongation during spindle assembly. Using SAXS, we show that the TACC domain (TD) is an elongated structure that mediates the interaction with the C terminus of XMAP215. Our data suggest that one TD and two XMAP215...... molecules associate to form a four-helix coiled-coil complex. A hybrid methods approach was used to define the precise regions of the TACC heptad repeat and the XMAP215 C terminus required for assembly and functioning of the complex. We show that XTACC3 can induce the recruitment of larger amounts of XMAP...

  13. Axis establishment and microtubule-mediated waves prior to first cleavage in Beroe ovata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houliston, E; Carré, D; Johnston, J A; Sardet, C

    1993-01-01

    microtubule asters in the region of the nucleus or spindle during both first and second cell cycles. The observed wave of change may thus reflect the local appearance and spreading of mitotic activity as the zygote nucleus approaches mitosis. PMID:18800449

  14. Regulation of microtubule dynamic instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van der Vaart (Babet); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); A. Straube (Anne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractProper regulation of MT (microtubule) dynamics is essential for various vital processes, including the segregation of chromosomes, directional cell migration and differentiation. MT assembly and disassembly is modulated by a complex network of intracellular factors that co-operate or ant

  15. Natural product Celastrol destabilizes tubulin heterodimer and facilitates mitotic cell death triggered by microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakryul Jo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microtubule drugs are effective anti-cancer agents, primarily due to their ability to induce mitotic arrest and subsequent cell death. However, some cancer cells are intrinsically resistant or acquire a resistance. Lack of apoptosis following mitotic arrest is thought to contribute to drug resistance that limits the efficacy of the microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs. Genetic or pharmacological agents that selectively facilitate the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells present opportunities to strengthen the therapeutic efficacy. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a natural product Celastrol targets tubulin and facilitates mitotic cell death caused by microtubule drugs. First, in a small molecule screening effort, we identify Celastrol as an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis. Subsequent time-lapse imaging analyses reveal that inhibition of microtubule-mediated cellular processes, including cell migration and mitotic chromosome alignment, is the earliest events affected by Celastrol. Disorganization, not depolymerization, of mitotic spindles appears responsible for mitotic defects. Celastrol directly affects the biochemical properties of tubulin heterodimer in vitro and reduces its protein level in vivo. At the cellular level, Celastrol induces a synergistic apoptosis when combined with conventional microtubule-targeting drugs and manifests an efficacy toward Taxol-resistant cancer cells. Finally, by time-lapse imaging and tracking of microtubule drug-treated cells, we show that Celastrol preferentially induces apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells in a caspase-dependent manner. This selective effect is not due to inhibition of general cell survival pathways or mitotic kinases that have been shown to enhance microtubule drug-induced cell death. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We provide evidence for new cellular pathways that, when perturbed, selectively induce the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cancer cells, identifying a

  16. Gene organization, evolution and expression of the microtubule-associated protein ASAP (MAP9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgi Dominique

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ASAP is a newly characterized microtubule-associated protein (MAP essential for proper cell-cycling. We have previously shown that expression deregulation of human ASAP results in profound defects in mitotic spindle formation and mitotic progression leading to aneuploidy, cytokinesis defects and/or cell death. In the present work we analyze the structure and evolution of the ASAP gene, as well as the domain composition of the encoded protein. Mouse and Xenopus cDNAs were cloned, the tissue expression characterized and the overexpression profile analyzed. Results Bona fide ASAP orthologs are found in vertebrates with more distantly related potential orthologs in invertebrates. This single-copy gene is conserved in mammals where it maps to syntenic chromosomal regions, but is also clearly identified in bird, fish and frog. The human gene is strongly expressed in brain and testis as a 2.6 Kb transcript encoding a ~110 KDa protein. The protein contains MAP, MIT-like and THY domains in the C-terminal part indicative of microtubule interaction, while the N-terminal part is more divergent. ASAP is composed of ~42% alpha helical structures, and two main coiled-coil regions have been identified. Different sequence features may suggest a role in DNA damage response. As with human ASAP, the mouse and Xenopus proteins localize to the microtubule network in interphase and to the mitotic spindle during mitosis. Overexpression of the mouse protein induces mitotic defects similar to those observed in human. In situ hybridization in testis localized ASAP to the germ cells, whereas in culture neurons ASAP localized to the cell body and growing neurites. Conclusion The conservation of ASAP indicated in our results reflects an essential function in vertebrates. We have cloned the ASAP orthologs in mouse and Xenopus, two valuable models to study the function of ASAP. Tissue expression of ASAP revealed a high expression in brain and testis, two

  17. Structure of kinetochore fibres in crane-fly spermatocytes after irradiation with an ultraviolet microbeam: neither microtubules nor actin filaments remain in the irradiated region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forer, Arthur; Spurck, Tim; Pickett-Heaps, Jeremy D; Wilson, Paula J

    2003-11-01

    We studied chromosome movement after kinetochore microtubules were severed. Severing a kinetochore fibre in living crane-fly spermatocytes with an ultraviolet microbeam creates a kinetochore stub, a birefringent remnant of the spindle fibre connected to the kinetochore and extending only to the edge of the irradiated region. After the irradiation, anaphase chromosomes either move poleward led by their stubs or temporarily stop moving. We examined actin and/or microtubules in irradiated cells by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy or serial-section reconstructions from electron microscopy. For each cell thus examined, chromosome movement had been recorded continuously until the moment of fixation. Kinetochore microtubules were completely severed by the ultraviolet microbeam in cells in which chromosomes continued to move poleward after the irradiation: none were seen in the irradiated regions. Similarly, actin filaments normally present in kinetochore fibres were severed by the ultraviolet microbeam irradiations: the irradiated regions contained no actin filaments and only local spots of non-filamentous actin. There was no difference in irradiated regions when the associated chromosomes continued to move versus when they stopped moving. Thus, one cannot explain motion with severed kinetochore microtubules in terms of either microtubules or actin-filaments bridging the irradiated region. The data seem to negate current models for anaphase chromosome movement and support a model in which poleward chromosome movement results from forces generated within the spindle matrix that propel kinetochore fibres or kinetochore stubs poleward. PMID:14569597

  18. Microtubule-microtubule sliding by kinesin-1 is essential for normal cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen; Winding, Michael; Lakonishok, Margot; Wildonger, Jill; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2016-08-23

    Cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes is a microtubule-based bulk cytoplasmic movement. Streaming efficiently circulates and localizes mRNAs and proteins deposited by the nurse cells across the oocyte. This movement is driven by kinesin-1, a major microtubule motor. Recently, we have shown that kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC) can transport one microtubule on another microtubule, thus driving microtubule-microtubule sliding in multiple cell types. To study the role of microtubule sliding in oocyte cytoplasmic streaming, we used a Khc mutant that is deficient in microtubule sliding but able to transport a majority of cargoes. We demonstrated that streaming is reduced by genomic replacement of wild-type Khc with this sliding-deficient mutant. Streaming can be fully rescued by wild-type KHC and partially rescued by a chimeric motor that cannot move organelles but is active in microtubule sliding. Consistent with these data, we identified two populations of microtubules in fast-streaming oocytes: a network of stable microtubules anchored to the actin cortex and free cytoplasmic microtubules that moved in the ooplasm. We further demonstrated that the reduced streaming in sliding-deficient oocytes resulted in posterior determination defects. Together, we propose that kinesin-1 slides free cytoplasmic microtubules against cortically immobilized microtubules, generating forces that contribute to cytoplasmic streaming and are essential for the refinement of posterior determinants.

  19. p600 regulates spindle orientation in apical neural progenitors and contributes to neurogenesis in the developing neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Belzil

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Apical neural progenitors (aNPs drive neurogenesis by means of a program consisting of self-proliferative and neurogenic divisions. The balance between these two manners of division sustains the pool of apical progenitors into late neurogenesis, thereby ensuring their availability to populate the brain with terminal cell types. Using knockout and in utero electroporation mouse models, we report a key role for the microtubule-associated protein 600 (p600 in the regulation of spindle orientation in aNPs, a cellular event that has been associated with cell fate and neurogenesis. We find that p600 interacts directly with the neurogenic protein Ndel1 and that aNPs knockout for p600, depleted of p600 by shRNA or expressing a Ndel1-binding p600 fragment all display randomized spindle orientation. Depletion of p600 by shRNA or expression of the Ndel1-binding p600 fragment also results in a decreased number of Pax6-positive aNPs and an increased number of Tbr2-positive basal progenitors destined to become neurons. These Pax6-positive aNPs display a tilted mitotic spindle. In mice wherein p600 is ablated in progenitors, the production of neurons is significantly impaired and this defect is associated with microcephaly. We propose a working model in which p600 controls spindle orientation in aNPs and discuss its implication for neurogenesis.

  20. Evidence for two distinct binding sites for tau on microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Makrides, Victoria; Massie, Michelle R.; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Lew, John

    2004-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau regulates diverse and essential microtubule functions, from the nucleation and promotion of microtubule polymerization to the regulation of microtubule polarity and dynamics, as well as the spacing and bundling of axonal microtubules. Thermodynamic studies show that tau interacts with microtubules in the low- to mid-nanomolar range, implying moderate binding affinity. At the same time, it is well established that microtubule-bound tau does not undergo ex...

  1. Carbofuran alters centrosome and spindle organization, and delays cell division in oocytes and mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Ozgur; Semiz, Olcay; Can, Alp

    2015-04-01

    Although many countries banned of its usage, carbofuran (CF) is still one of the most commonly used carbamate derivative insecticides against insects and nematodes in agriculture and household, threatening the human and animal health by contaminating air, water, and food. Our goal was to evaluate the potential toxic effects of CF on mammalian oocytes besides mitotic cells. Caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway was assessed by immunofluorescence and western blot techniques. Alterations in the meiotic spindle formation after CF exposure throughout the in vitro maturation of mice oocyte-cumulus complexes (COCs) were analyzed by using a 3D confocal laser microscope. Maturation efficiency and kinetics were assessed by direct observation of the COCs. Results indicated that the number of TUNEL-positive cells increased in CF-exposed groups, particularly higher doses (>250 µM) in a dose-dependent fashion. The ratio of anticleaved caspase-3 labeled cells in those groups positively correlated with TUNEL-positivity. Western blot analysis confirmed a significant increase in active caspase-3 activity. CF caused a dose-dependent accumulation of oocytes at prometaphase-I (PM-I) of meiosis. Partial loss of spindle microtubules (MTs) was noted, which consequently gave rise to a diamond shape spindle. Aberrant pericentrin foci were noted particularly in PM-I and metaphase-I (M-I) stages. Conclusively, CF (1) induces programmed cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and (2) alters spindle morphology most likely through a mechanism that interacts with MT assembly and/or disorientation of pericentriolar proteins. Overall, data suggest that CF could give rise to aneuploidy or cell death in higher doses, therefore reduce fertilization and implantation rates.

  2. A novel microtubule inhibitor 4SC-207 with anti-proliferative activity in taxane-resistant cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bausch

    Full Text Available Microtubule inhibitors are invaluable tools in cancer chemotherapy: taxanes and vinca alkaloids have been successfully used in the clinic over the past thirty years against a broad range of tumors. However, two factors have limited the effectiveness of microtubule inhibitors: toxicity and resistance. In particular, the latter is highly unpredictable, variable from patient to patient and is believed to be the cause of treatment failure in most cases of metastatic cancers. For these reasons, there is an increasing demand for new microtubule inhibitors that can overcome resistance mechanisms and that, at the same time, have reduced side effects. Here we present a novel microtubule inhibitor, 4SC-207, which shows strong anti-proliferative activity in a large panel of tumor cell lines with an average GI50 of 11 nM. In particular, 4SC-207 is active in multi-drug resistant cell lines, such as HCT-15 and ACHN, suggesting that it is a poor substrate for drug efflux pumps. 4SC-207 inhibits microtubule growth in vitro and in vivo and promotes, in a dose dependent manner, a mitotic delay/arrest, followed by apoptosis or aberrant divisions due to chromosome alignment defects and formation of multi-polar spindles. Furthermore, preliminary data from preclinical studies suggest low propensity towards bone marrow toxicities at concentrations that inhibit tumor growth in paclitaxel-resistant xenograft models. In summary, our results suggest that 4SC-207 may be a potential anti-cancer agent.

  3. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbakel, Werner, E-mail: werner.verbakel@chem.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Carmeliet, Geert, E-mail: geert.carmeliet@med.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Experimental Medicine and Endocrinology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49, Bus 902, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Engelborghs, Yves, E-mail: yves.engelborghs@fys.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. {yields} This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. {yields} NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. {yields} The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase Nu

  4. Optogenetically induced sleep spindle rhythms alter sleep architectures in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Angela; Latchoumane, Charles; Lee, Soojung; Kim, Guk Bae; Cheong, Eunji; Augustine, George J.; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2012-01-01

    Sleep spindles are rhythmic patterns of neuronal activity generated within the thalamocortical circuit. Although spindles have been hypothesized to protect sleep by reducing the influence of external stimuli, it remains to be confirmed experimentally whether there is a direct relationship between sleep spindles and the stability of sleep. We have addressed this issue by using in vivo photostimulation of the thalamic reticular nucleus of mice to generate spindle oscillations that are structura...

  5. Microtubule nucleation and organization in dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delandre, Caroline; Amikura, Reiko; Moore, Adrian W

    2016-07-01

    Dendrite branching is an essential process for building complex nervous systems. It determines the number, distribution and integration of inputs into a neuron, and is regulated to create the diverse dendrite arbor branching patterns characteristic of different neuron types. The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical to provide structure and exert force during dendrite branching. It also supports the functional requirements of dendrites, reflected by differential microtubule architectural organization between neuron types, illustrated here for sensory neurons. Both anterograde and retrograde microtubule polymerization occur within growing dendrites, and recent studies indicate that branching is enhanced by anterograde microtubule polymerization events in nascent branches. The polarities of microtubule polymerization events are regulated by the position and orientation of microtubule nucleation events in the dendrite arbor. Golgi outposts are a primary microtubule nucleation center in dendrites and share common nucleation machinery with the centrosome. In addition, pre-existing dendrite microtubules may act as nucleation sites. We discuss how balancing the activities of distinct nucleation machineries within the growing dendrite can alter microtubule polymerization polarity and dendrite branching, and how regulating this balance can generate neuron type-specific morphologies. PMID:27097122

  6. Association of Microtubule Dynamics with Chronic Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Hu, Yida; Xiong, Yan; Li, Zhonggui; Wang, Wei; Du, Chao; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Yanke; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 30 % of epilepsy cases are refractory to current pharmacological treatments through unknown mechanisms. Much work has been done on the role of synaptic components in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, but relatively little attention has been given to the potential role of the microtubules. We investigated the level of microtubule dynamic in 30 human epileptic tissues and two different chronic epilepsy rat models. The administration of microtubule-modulating agent attenuated the progression of chronic epilepsy. By contrast, microtubule-depolymerizing agent aggravated the progression of chronic epilepsy. The electrophysiological index by whole-cell clamp was used to investigate the neuronal excitation and inhibitory synaptic transmission in brain slices after administration of microtubule-modulating agent and microtubule-depolymerizing agent. Interestingly, we found that microtubule-modulating agent significantly increased the frequency of action potential firing in interneurons, and significantly promoted the amplitudes and frequencies of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Microtubule-depolymerizing agent had an opposite effect. These findings suggest that modulating hyperdynamic microtubules may take an anti-epileptic effect via postsynaptic mechanisms in interneurons. It could represent a potential pharmacologic target in epilepsy treatment. PMID:26377107

  7. Expression of Nucleolin Affects Microtubule Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gaume

    Full Text Available Nucleolin is present in diverse cellular compartments and is involved in a variety of cellular processes from nucleolar structure and function to intracellular trafficking, cell adhesion and migration. Recently, nucleolin has been localized at the mature centriole where it is involved in microtubule nucleation and anchoring. Although this new function of nucleolin linked to microtubule regulation has been identified, the global effects of nucleolin on microtubule dynamics have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we analyzed the roles of nucleolin protein levels on global microtubule dynamics by tracking the EB3 microtubule plus end binding protein in live cells. We have found that during microtubule growth phases, nucleolin affects both the speed and life time of polymerization and by analyzing catastrophe events, we showed that nucleolin reduces catastrophe frequency. This new property of nucleolin was then confirmed in a cold induced microtubule depolymerization experiment in which we have found that cold resistant microtubules were totally destabilized in nucleolin depleted cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate a new function of nucleolin on microtubule stabilization, thus bringing novel insights into understanding the multifunctional properties of nucleolin in healthy and cancer cells.

  8. Expression of Nucleolin Affects Microtubule Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Xavier; Place, Christophe; Delage, Helene; Mongelard, Fabien; Monier, Karine; Bouvet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolin is present in diverse cellular compartments and is involved in a variety of cellular processes from nucleolar structure and function to intracellular trafficking, cell adhesion and migration. Recently, nucleolin has been localized at the mature centriole where it is involved in microtubule nucleation and anchoring. Although this new function of nucleolin linked to microtubule regulation has been identified, the global effects of nucleolin on microtubule dynamics have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we analyzed the roles of nucleolin protein levels on global microtubule dynamics by tracking the EB3 microtubule plus end binding protein in live cells. We have found that during microtubule growth phases, nucleolin affects both the speed and life time of polymerization and by analyzing catastrophe events, we showed that nucleolin reduces catastrophe frequency. This new property of nucleolin was then confirmed in a cold induced microtubule depolymerization experiment in which we have found that cold resistant microtubules were totally destabilized in nucleolin depleted cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate a new function of nucleolin on microtubule stabilization, thus bringing novel insights into understanding the multifunctional properties of nucleolin in healthy and cancer cells. PMID:27309529

  9. Sustaining the spindle assembly checkpoint to improve cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Roberta; Della Monica, Rosa; Grieco, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    To prevent chromosome segregation errors, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until proper spindle assembly. We found that the FCP1 phosphatase and its downstream target WEE1 kinase oppose the SAC, promoting mitosis exit despite malformed spindles. We further showed that targeting this pathway might be useful for cancer therapy. PMID:27308561

  10. Dynamic localization of C. elegans TPR-GoLoco proteins mediates mitotic spindle orientation by extrinsic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werts, Adam D; Roh-Johnson, Minna; Goldstein, Bob

    2011-10-01

    Cell divisions are sometimes oriented by extrinsic signals, by mechanisms that are poorly understood. Proteins containing TPR and GoLoco-domains (C. elegans GPR-1/2, Drosophila Pins, vertebrate LGN and AGS3) are candidates for mediating mitotic spindle orientation by extrinsic signals, but the mechanisms by which TPR-GoLoco proteins may localize in response to extrinsic cues are not well defined. The C. elegans TPR-GoLoco protein pair GPR-1/2 is enriched at a site of contact between two cells - the endomesodermal precursor EMS and the germline precursor P(2) - and both cells align their divisions toward this shared cell-cell contact. To determine whether GPR-1/2 is enriched at this site within both cells, we generated mosaic embryos with GPR-1/2 bearing a different fluorescent tag in different cells. We were surprised to find that GPR-1/2 distribution is symmetric in EMS, where GPR-1/2 had been proposed to function as an asymmetric cue for spindle orientation. Instead, GPR-1/2 is asymmetrically distributed only in P(2). We demonstrate a role for normal GPR-1/2 localization in P(2) division orientation. We show that MES-1/Src signaling plays an instructive role in P(2) for asymmetric GPR-1/2 localization and normal spindle orientation. We ruled out a model in which signaling localizes GPR-1/2 by locally inhibiting LET-99, a GPR-1/2 antagonist. Instead, asymmetric GPR-1/2 distribution is established by destabilization at one cell contact, diffusion, and trapping at another cell contact. Once the mitotic spindle of P(2) is oriented normally, microtubule-dependent removal of GPR-1/2 prevented excess accumulation, in an apparent negative-feedback loop. These results highlight the role of dynamic TPR-GoLoco protein localization as a key mediator of mitotic spindle alignment in response to instructive, external cues.

  11. Dgp71WD is required for the assembly of the acentrosomal Meiosis I spindle, and is not a general targeting factor for the γ-TuRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard F. Reschen

    2012-03-01

    Dgp71WD/Nedd1 proteins are essential for mitotic spindle formation. In human cells, Nedd1 targets γ-tubulin to both centrosomes and spindles, but in other organisms the function of Dgp71WD/Nedd1 is less clear. In Drosophila cells, Dgp71WD plays a major part in targeting γ-tubulin to spindles, but not centrosomes, while in Xenopus egg extracts, Nedd1 acts as a more general microtubule (MT organiser that can function independently of γ-tubulin. The interpretation of these studies, however, is complicated by the fact that some residual Dgp71WD/Nedd1 is likely present in the cells/extracts analysed. Here we generate a Dgp71WD null mutant lacking all but the last 12 nucleotides of coding sequence. The complete loss of Dgp71WD has no quantifiable effect on γ-tubulin or Centrosomin recruitment to the centrosome in larval brain cells. The recruitment of γ-tubulin to spindle MTs, however, is severely impaired, and spindle MT density is reduced in a manner that is indistinguishable from cells lacking Augmin or γ-TuRC function. In contrast, the absence of Dgp71WD leads to defects in the assembly of the acentrosomal female Meiosis I spindle that are more severe than those seen in Augmin or γ-TuRC mutants, indicating that Dgp71WD has additional functions that are independent of these complexes in oocytes. Moreover, the localisation of bicoid RNA during oogenesis, which requires γ-TuRC function, is unperturbed in Dgp71WD120 mutants. Thus, Dgp71WD is not simply a general cofactor required for γ-TuRC and/or Augmin targeting, and it appears to have a crucial role independent of these complexes in the acentrosomal Meiosis I spindle.

  12. Microtubule heterogeneity of Ornithogalum umbellatum ovary epidermal cells: non-stable cortical microtubules and stable lipotubuloid microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kwiatkowska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Lipotubuloids, structures containing lipid bodies and microtubules, are described in ovary epidermalcells of Ornithogalum umbellatum. Microtubules of lipotubuloids can be fixed in electron microscope fixativecontaining only buffered OsO4 or in glutaraldehyde with OsO4 post-fixation, or in a mixture of OsO4 and glutaraldehyde[1]. None of these substances fixes cortical microtubules of ovary epidermis of this plant which ischaracterized by dynamic longitudinal growth. However, cortical microtubules can be fixed with cold methanolaccording immunocytological methods with the use of b-tubulin antibodies and fluorescein. The existence ofcortical microtubules has also been evidenced by EM observations solely after the use of taxol, microtubulestabilizer, and fixation in a glutaraldehyde/OsO4 mixture. These microtubules mostly lie transversely, sometimesobliquely, and rarely parallel to the cell axis. Staining, using Ruthenium Red and silver hexamine, has revealedthat lipotubuloid microtubules surface is covered with polysaccharides. The presumption has been made thatthe presence of a polysaccharide layer enhances the stability of lipotubuloid microtubules.

  13. Taxifolin enhances andrographolide-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells via spindle assembly checkpoint activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Rong Zhang

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (Andro suppresses proliferation and triggers apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. Taxifolin (Taxi has been proposed to prevent cancer development similar to other dietary flavonoids. In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of the addition of Andro alone and Andro and Taxi together on human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells were assessed. Andro inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation by mitotic arrest and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Although the effect of Taxi alone on DU145 cell proliferation was not significant, the combined use of Taxi with Andro significantly potentiated the anti-proliferative effect of increased mitotic arrest and apoptosis by enhancing the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase, and caspases-7 and -9. Andro together with Taxi enhanced microtubule polymerization in vitro, and they induced the formation of twisted and elongated spindles in the cancer cells, thus leading to mitotic arrest. In addition, we showed that depletion of MAD2, a component in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, alleviated the mitotic block induced by the two compounds, suggesting that they trigger mitotic arrest by SAC activation. This study suggests that the anti-cancer activity of Andro can be significantly enhanced in combination with Taxi by disrupting microtubule dynamics and activating the SAC.

  14. +TIP EB1 downregulates paclitaxel‑induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer cells through inhibition of paclitaxel binding on microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Geethu Emily; Sreeja, Jamuna S; Gireesh, K K; Gupta, Hindol; Manna, Tapas K

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule plus‑end‑binding protein (+TIP) EB1 has been shown to be upregulated in breast cancer cells and promote breast tumor growth in vivo. However, its effect on the cellular actions of microtubule‑targeted drugs in breast cancer cells has remained poorly understood. By using cellular and biochemical assays, we demonstrate that EB1 plays a critical role in regulating the sensitivity of breast cancer cells to anti‑microtubule drug, paclitaxel (PTX). Cell viability assays revealed that EB1 expression in the breast cancer cell lines correlated with the reduction of their sensitivity to PTX. Knockdown of EB1 by enzymatically‑prepared siRNA pools (esiRNAs) increased PTX‑induced cytotoxicity and sensitized cells to PTX‑induced apoptosis in three breast cancer cell lines, MCF‑7, MDA MB‑231 and T47D. Apoptosis was associated with activation of caspase‑9 and an increase in the cleavage of poly(ADP‑ribose) polymerase (PARP). p53 and Bax were upregulated and Bcl2 was downregulated in the EB1‑depleted PTX‑treated MCF‑7 cells, indicating that the apoptosis occurs via a p53‑dependent pathway. Following its upregulation, the nuclear accumulation of p53 and its association with cellular microtubules were increased. EB1 depletion increased PTX‑induced microtubule bundling in the interphase cells and induced formation of multiple spindle foci with abnormally elongated spindles in the mitotic MCF‑7 cells, indicating that loss of EB1 promotes PTX‑induced stabilization of microtubules. EB1 inhibited PTX‑induced microtubule polymerization and diminished PTX binding to microtubules in vitro, suggesting that it modulates the binding sites of PTX at the growing microtubule ends. Results demonstrate that EB1 downregulates inhibition of PTX‑induced proliferation and apoptosis in breast cancer cells through a mechanism in which it impairs PTX‑mediated stabilization of microtubule polymerization and inhibits PTX binding on microtubules

  15. Cellulose-Microtubule Uncoupling Proteins Prevent Lateral Displacement of Microtubules during Cellulose Synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zengyu; Schneider, Rene; Kesten, Christopher; Zhang, Yi; Somssich, Marc; Zhang, Youjun; Fernie, Alisdair R; Persson, Staffan

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth and is the major contributor to plant morphogenesis. Cellulose is synthesized by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). Nascent cellulose microfibrils become entangled in the cell wall, and further catalysis therefore drives the CSC forward through the membrane: a process guided by cortical microtubules via the protein CSI1/POM2. Still, it is unclear how the microtubules can withstand the forces generated by the motile CSCs to effectively direct CSC movement. Here, we identified a family of microtubule-associated proteins, the cellulose synthase-microtubule uncouplings (CMUs), that located as static puncta along cortical microtubules. Functional disruption of the CMUs caused lateral microtubule displacement and compromised microtubule-based guidance of CSC movement. CSCs that traversed the microtubules interacted with the microtubules via CSI1/POM2, which prompted the lateral microtubule displacement. Hence, we have revealed how microtubules can withstand the propulsion of the CSCs during cellulose biosynthesis and thus sustain anisotropic plant cell growth. PMID:27477947

  16. Inter-domain Cooperation in INCENP Promotes Aurora B Relocation from Centromeres to Microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando van der Horst

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosomal passenger complex is essential for error-free chromosome segregation and proper execution of cytokinesis. To coordinate nuclear division with cytoplasmic division, its enzymatic subunit, Aurora B, relocalizes from centromeres in metaphase to the spindle midzone in anaphase. In budding yeast, this requires dephosphorylation of the microtubule-binding (MTB domain of the INCENP analog Sli15. The mechanistic basis for this relocalization in metazoans is incompletely understood. We demonstrate that the putative coiled-coil domain within INCENP drives midzone localization of Aurora B via a direct, electrostatic interaction with microtubules. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the CPC multimerizes via INCENP’s centromere-targeting domain (CEN box, which increases the MTB affinity of INCENP. In (prometaphase, the MTB affinity of INCENP is outcompeted by the affinity of its CEN box for centromeres, while at anaphase onset—when the histone mark H2AT120 is dephosphorylated—INCENP and Aurora B switch from centromere to microtubule localization.

  17. Mobility of Taxol in Microtubule Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J.

    2003-06-01

    Mobility of taxol inside microtubules was investigated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) on flow-aligned bundles. Bundles were made of microtubules with either GMPCPP or GTP at the exchangeable site on the tubulin dimer. Recovery times were sensitive to bundle thickness and packing, indicating that taxol molecules are able to move laterally through the bundle. The density of open binding sites along a microtubule was varied by controlling the concentration of taxol in solution for GMPCPP samples. With > 63% sites occupied, recovery times were independent of taxol concentration and, therefore, inversely proportional to the microscopic dissociation rate, k_{off}. It was found that 10*k_{off} (GMPCPP) ~ k_{off} (GTP), consistent with, but not fully accounting for, the difference in equilibrium constants for taxol on GMPCPP and GTP microtubules. With taxol along the microtubule interior is hindered by rebinding events when open sites are within ~7 nm of each other.

  18. Physical Basis of Large Microtubule Aster Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Ishihara, Keisuke; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule asters - radial arrays of microtubules organized by centrosomes - play a fundamental role in the spatial coordination of animal cells. The standard model of aster growth assumes a fixed number of microtubules originating from the centrosomes. However, aster morphology in this model does not scale with cell size, and we recently found evidence for non-centrosomal microtubule nucleation. Here, we combine autocatalytic nucleation and polymerization dynamics to develop a biophysical model of aster growth. Our model predicts that asters expand as traveling waves and recapitulates all major aspects of aster growth. As the nucleation rate increases, the model predicts an explosive transition from stationary to growing asters with a discontinuous jump of the growth velocity to a nonzero value. Experiments in frog egg extract confirm the main theoretical predictions. Our results suggest that asters observed in large frog and amphibian eggs are a meshwork of short, unstable microtubules maintained by autoca...

  19. Phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A Maintains Spindle Pole Integrity during Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Ju Chou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CPAP is required for centriole elongation during S/G2 phase, but the role of CPAP in mitosis is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CPAP maintains spindle pole integrity through its phosphorylation by Aurora-A during mitosis. Depletion of CPAP induced a prolonged delay in mitosis, pericentriolar material (PCM dispersion, and multiple mitotic abnormalities. Further studies demonstrated that CPAP directly interacts with and is phosphorylated by Aurora-A at serine 467 during mitosis. Interestingly, the dispersal of the PCM was effectively rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type CPAP or a phospho-mimic CPAP-S467D mutant, but not a non-phosphorylated CPAP-S467A mutant. Finally, we found that CPAP-S467D has a low affinity for microtubule binding but a high affinity for PCM proteins. Together, our results support a model wherein CPAP is required for proper mitotic progression, and phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A is essential for maintaining spindle pole integrity.

  20. Phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A Maintains Spindle Pole Integrity during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, En-Ju; Hung, Liang-Yi; Tang, Chieh-Ju C; Hsu, Wen-Bin; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Pao-Chi; Tang, Tang K

    2016-03-29

    CPAP is required for centriole elongation during S/G2 phase, but the role of CPAP in mitosis is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CPAP maintains spindle pole integrity through its phosphorylation by Aurora-A during mitosis. Depletion of CPAP induced a prolonged delay in mitosis, pericentriolar material (PCM) dispersion, and multiple mitotic abnormalities. Further studies demonstrated that CPAP directly interacts with and is phosphorylated by Aurora-A at serine 467 during mitosis. Interestingly, the dispersal of the PCM was effectively rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type CPAP or a phospho-mimic CPAP-S467D mutant, but not a non-phosphorylated CPAP-S467A mutant. Finally, we found that CPAP-S467D has a low affinity for microtubule binding but a high affinity for PCM proteins. Together, our results support a model wherein CPAP is required for proper mitotic progression, and phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A is essential for maintaining spindle pole integrity.

  1. A cell cycle timer for asymmetric spindle positioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K McCarthy Campbell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The displacement of the mitotic spindle to one side of a cell is important for many cells to divide unequally. While recent progress has begun to unveil some of the molecular mechanisms of mitotic spindle displacement, far less is known about how spindle displacement is precisely timed. A conserved mitotic progression mechanism is known to time events in dividing cells, although this has never been linked to spindle displacement. This mechanism involves the anaphase-promoting complex (APC, its activator Cdc20/Fizzy, its degradation target cyclin, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK. Here we show that these components comprise a previously unrecognized timer for spindle displacement. In the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote, mitotic spindle displacement begins at a precise time, soon after chromosomes congress to the metaphase plate. We found that reducing the function of the proteasome, the APC, or Cdc20/Fizzy delayed spindle displacement. Conversely, inactivating CDK in prometaphase caused the spindle to displace early. The consequence of experimentally unlinking spindle displacement from this timing mechanism was the premature displacement of incompletely assembled components of the mitotic spindle. We conclude that in this system, asymmetric positioning of the mitotic spindle is normally delayed for a short time until the APC inactivates CDK, and that this delay ensures that the spindle does not begin to move until it is fully assembled. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that mitotic progression times spindle displacement in the asymmetric division of an animal cell. We speculate that this link between the cell cycle and asymmetric cell division might be evolutionarily conserved, because the mitotic spindle is displaced at a similar stage of mitosis during asymmetric cell divisions in diverse systems.

  2. Intranuclear bundles of microfilaments and microtubules in chromaffin cells of the auricle of the heart of a lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, D W; Adriaensen, D; De Groodt-Lasseel, M H

    1988-01-01

    Intranuclear microtubular-microfilamentous rod-like inclusions were investigated in chromaffin cells of the auricle of the heart of lungfishes. In conventional electron microscopy, these inclusions reveal a wide variety in appearance, depending on their orientation to the plane of sectioning. Whereas originally they were merely interpreted as a bundle of microfilaments, application of a goniometer stage showed the rod- or spindle-shaped intranuclear inclusions to have a basic substructure of parallel arranged microtubules among microfilaments, which are clearly connected to chromatin granules, occasionally penetrating dense areas of chromatin. The chemical nature and biological significance of these structures, which so far remain enigmatic, are discussed. PMID:3227775

  3. Dynein Light Intermediate Chain 2 Facilitates the Metaphase to Anaphase Transition by Inactivating the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar P Mahale

    Full Text Available The multi-functional molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein performs diverse essential roles during mitosis. The mechanistic importance of the dynein Light Intermediate Chain homologs, LIC1 and LIC2 is unappreciated, especially in the context of mitosis. LIC1 and LIC2 are believed to exist in distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes as obligate subunits. LIC1 had earlier been reported to be required for metaphase to anaphase progression by inactivating the kinetochore-microtubule attachment-sensing arm of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. However, the functional importance of LIC2 during mitosis remains elusive. Here we report prominent novel roles for the LIC2 subunit of cytoplasmic dynein in regulating the spindle assembly checkpoint. LIC2 depletion in mammalian cells led to prolonged metaphase arrest in the presence of an active SAC and also to stretched kinetochores, thus implicating it in SAC inactivation. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy of SAC components revealed accumulation of both attachment- and tension-sensing checkpoint proteins at metaphase kinetochores upon LIC2 depletion. These observations support a stronger and more diverse role in checkpoint inactivation for LIC2 in comparison to its close homolog LIC1. Our study uncovers a novel functional hierarchy during mitotic checkpoint inactivation between the closely related but homologous LIC subunits of cytoplasmic dynein. These subtle functional distinctions between dynein subpopulations could be exploited to study specific aspects of the spindle assembly checkpoint, which is a key mediator of fidelity in eukaryotic cell division.

  4. Dynein Light Intermediate Chain 2 Facilitates the Metaphase to Anaphase Transition by Inactivating the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, Sagar P.; Sharma, Amit; Mylavarapu, Sivaram V. S.

    2016-01-01

    The multi-functional molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein performs diverse essential roles during mitosis. The mechanistic importance of the dynein Light Intermediate Chain homologs, LIC1 and LIC2 is unappreciated, especially in the context of mitosis. LIC1 and LIC2 are believed to exist in distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes as obligate subunits. LIC1 had earlier been reported to be required for metaphase to anaphase progression by inactivating the kinetochore-microtubule attachment-sensing arm of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). However, the functional importance of LIC2 during mitosis remains elusive. Here we report prominent novel roles for the LIC2 subunit of cytoplasmic dynein in regulating the spindle assembly checkpoint. LIC2 depletion in mammalian cells led to prolonged metaphase arrest in the presence of an active SAC and also to stretched kinetochores, thus implicating it in SAC inactivation. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy of SAC components revealed accumulation of both attachment- and tension-sensing checkpoint proteins at metaphase kinetochores upon LIC2 depletion. These observations support a stronger and more diverse role in checkpoint inactivation for LIC2 in comparison to its close homolog LIC1. Our study uncovers a novel functional hierarchy during mitotic checkpoint inactivation between the closely related but homologous LIC subunits of cytoplasmic dynein. These subtle functional distinctions between dynein subpopulations could be exploited to study specific aspects of the spindle assembly checkpoint, which is a key mediator of fidelity in eukaryotic cell division. PMID:27441562

  5. Spindle cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D DeLacure

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Spindle cell carcinoma (SpCC is a unique variant of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. SpCC confined to the nasal cavity is extremely rare, with only one case having been previously reported. We present a case report of nasal cavity SpCC and review the literature on this rare entity. A 29-year-old male presented with intermittent epistaxis from the left nasal cavity. On physical examination, the patient had an ulcerated mass in the left nasal vestibule and a biopsy showed a proliferation of spindle and epitheliod cells. The patient underwent wide local excision of the mass via a lateral alotomy approach and reconstruction with a composite conchal bowl skin and cartilage graft. Histologically, the mass had dyplastic squamous epithelium and spindle-shaped cells admixed with epitheliod cells. Immunohistochemistry was only positive for pancytokeratin AE1/AE3 and vimentin. Six months after surgery, the patient continues to have no evidence of disease. On literature review, only one previous case of SpCC confined to the nasal cavity was identified. We present a rare case of nasal cavity SpCC. No definite treatment protocol exists for this unique entity, but we believe that this tumor should primarily be treated with aggressive, wide local excision. Adjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy have also been used anecdotally.

  6. Pins homolog LGN regulates meiotic spindle organization in mouse oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinzheng Guo; Shaorong Gao

    2009-01-01

    Mouse oocytes undergo polarization during meiotic maturation, and this polarization is essential for asymmetric cell divisions that maximize retention of maternal components required for early development. Without conventional centrosomes, the meiotic spindle has less focused poles and is barrel-shaped. The migration of meiotic spindles to the cortex is accompanied by a local reorganization and polarization of the cortex. LGN is a conserved protein involved in cell polarity and regulation of spindle organization. In the present study, we characterized the localization dynam-ics of LGN during mouse oocyte maturation and analyzed the effects of LGN upregulation and downregulation on meiotic spindle organization. At the germinal vesicle stage, LGN is distributed both cytoplasmically and at the cor-tex. During maturation, LGN localizes to the meiotic spindle apparatus and cortical LGN becomes less concentrated at the actin cap region. Excessive LGN induces meiotic spindle organization defects by elongating the spindle and enhancing pole focusing, whereas depletion of LGN by RNA interference results in meiotic spindle deformation and chromosome misalignment. Furthermore, the N-terminus of LGN has the ability of full-length LGN to regulate spin-dle organization, whereas the C-terminus of LGN controls cortical localization and polarization. Our results reveal that LGN is cortically polarized in mouse oocytes and is critical for meiotic spindle organization.

  7. Presence of Meiotic Spindles Indicates Early Cleavage of Embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the detection of the meiotic spindle could anticipate the appearance of early cleavage.Methods Oocytes were obtained from stimulated ovaries of consenting patients undergoing oocytes retrieval for ICSI.Spindles were imaged with the Polscope.After ICSI,oocytes with or without spindles were cultured for examination of early cleavage and embryo development.A total of 328 oocytes from 50 cycles were examined with the Polscope and inseminated by ICSI.Results Spindles were imaged in 81.7% of oocytes.After ICSI,more oocytes with spindles (78.4%) fertilized normally than oocytes without spindles (53.3%)(P<0.001).At 25-27 h post ICSI.more fertilized oocytes developed from oocytes with spindles (81.9%) were detected early cleavage than those from oocytes without spindles(28.1%)(P<0.001).Significantly more embryos with early cleavage (82.2%) developed to high quality embryos at d 3 compared with the embryos without early cleavage(48.3%)(P=0.001).The value of rs related to the relationship between spindles and early cleavage was 0.420(P<0.0001).Conclusion The existing of the early cleavage may have a predictive value on the opportunity of high quality embryos and the existing of the spindle may have a predictive value in the appearance of early cleavage.

  8. Insights into Antiparallel Microtubule Crosslinking by PRC1, a Conserved Nonmotor Microtubule Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Radhika; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Arthur, Christopher P.; Bick, Matthew J.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Darst, Seth A.; Milligan, Ronald A.; Kapoor, Tarun M. (Scripps); (Rockefeller)

    2010-09-03

    Formation of microtubule architectures, required for cell shape maintenance in yeast, directional cell expansion in plants and cytokinesis in eukaryotes, depends on antiparallel microtubule crosslinking by the conserved MAP65 protein family. Here, we combine structural and single molecule fluorescence methods to examine how PRC1, the human MAP65, crosslinks antiparallel microtubules. We find that PRC1's microtubule binding is mediated by a structured domain with a spectrin-fold and an unstructured Lys/Arg-rich domain. These two domains, at each end of a homodimer, are connected by a linkage that is flexible on single microtubules, but forms well-defined crossbridges between antiparallel filaments. Further, we show that PRC1 crosslinks are compliant and do not substantially resist filament sliding by motor proteins in vitro. Together, our data show how MAP65s, by combining structural flexibility and rigidity, tune microtubule associations to establish crosslinks that selectively mark antiparallel overlap in dynamic cytoskeletal networks.

  9. A Thermodynamic Model of Microtubule Assembly and Disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard M A G Piette; Junli Liu; Kasper Peeters; Andrei Smertenko; Timothy Hawkins; Michael Deeks; Roy Quinlan; Zakrzewski, Wojciech J.; Hussey, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo mode...

  10. Microtubule dynamics: Caps, catastrophes, and coupled hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Holy, T.E.; Leibler, S.

    1996-01-01

    An effective theory is formulated for the dynamics of the guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cap believed to stabilize growing microtubules. The theory provides a ''coarse-grained'' description of the cap's dynamics. ''Microscopic'' details, such as the microtubule lattice structure and the fate of its...... data. A constant nonzero catastrophe rare, identical for both microtubule ends, is predicted at large growth rates. The delay time for dilution-induced catastrophes is stochastic with a simple distribution that fits the experimental one and, like the experimental one, does not depend on the rate of....... A recent experimental result for the size of the minimal cap that can stabilize a microtubule is shown to agree with the result predicted by the cap model, after its parameters have been extracted from previous experimental results. Thus the effective theory and cap model presented here provide a...

  11. One-parameter nonrelativistic supersymmetry for microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Rosu, H C

    2003-01-01

    The simple supersymmetric model of Caticha [PRA 51, 4264 (1995)], as used by Rosu [PRE 55, 2038 (1997)] for microtubules, is generalized to the case of Mielnik's one-parameter nonrelativistic susy [JMP 25, 3387 (1984)

  12. Combination spindle-drive system for high precision machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth, Howard L.

    1977-07-26

    A combination spindle-drive is provided for fabrication of optical quality surface finishes. Both the spindle-and-drive utilize the spindle bearings for support, thereby removing the conventional drive-means bearings as a source of vibration. An airbearing spindle is modified to carry at the drive end a highly conductive cup-shaped rotor which is aligned with a stationary stator to produce torque in the cup-shaped rotor through the reaction of eddy currents induced in the rotor. This arrangement eliminates magnetic attraction forces and all force is in the form of torque on the cup-shaped rotor.

  13. An antitubulin agent BCFMT inhibits proliferation of cancer cells and induces cell death by inhibiting microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Rai

    Full Text Available Using cell based screening assay, we identified a novel anti-tubulin agent (Z-5-((5-(4-bromo-3-chlorophenylfuran-2-ylmethylene-2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one (BCFMT that inhibited proliferation of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa (IC(50, 7.2 ± 1.8 µM, human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7 (IC(50, 10.0 ± 0.5 µM, highly metastatic breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231 (IC(50, 6.0 ± 1 µM, cisplatin-resistant human ovarian carcinoma (A2780-cis (IC(50, 5.8 ± 0.3 µM and multi-drug resistant mouse mammary tumor (EMT6/AR1 (IC(50, 6.5 ± 1 µM cells. Using several complimentary strategies, BCFMT was found to inhibit cancer cell proliferation at G2/M phase of the cell cycle apparently by targeting microtubules. In addition, BCFMT strongly suppressed the dynamics of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells. At its half maximal proliferation inhibitory concentration (10 µM, BCFMT reduced the rates of growing and shortening phases of microtubules in MCF-7 cells by 37 and 40%, respectively. Further, it increased the time microtubules spent in the pause (neither growing nor shortening detectably state by 135% and reduced the dynamicity (dimer exchange per unit time of microtubules by 70%. In vitro, BCFMT bound to tubulin with a dissociation constant of 8.3 ± 1.8 µM, inhibited tubulin assembly and suppressed GTPase activity of microtubules. BCFMT competitively inhibited the binding of BODIPY FL-vinblastine to tubulin with an inhibitory concentration (K(i of 5.2 ± 1.5 µM suggesting that it binds to tubulin at the vinblastine site. In cultured cells, BCFMT-treatment depolymerized interphase microtubules, perturbed the spindle organization and accumulated checkpoint proteins (BubR1 and Mad2 at the kinetochores. BCFMT-treated MCF-7 cells showed enhanced nuclear accumulation of p53 and its downstream p21, which consequently activated apoptosis in these cells. The results suggested that BCFMT inhibits proliferation of several types of cancer cells including drug

  14. Evidence for two distinct binding sites for tau on microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrides, Victoria; Massie, Michelle R.; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Lew, John

    2004-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau regulates diverse and essential microtubule functions, from the nucleation and promotion of microtubule polymerization to the regulation of microtubule polarity and dynamics, as well as the spacing and bundling of axonal microtubules. Thermodynamic studies show that tau interacts with microtubules in the low- to mid-nanomolar range, implying moderate binding affinity. At the same time, it is well established that microtubule-bound tau does not undergo exchange with the bulk medium readily, suggesting that the tau-microtubule interaction is essentially irreversible. Given this dilemma, we investigated the mechanism of interaction between tau and microtubules in kinetic detail. Stopped-flow kinetic analysis reveals moderate binding affinity between tau and preassembled microtubules and rapid dissociation/association kinetics. In contrast, when microtubules are generated by copolymerization of tubulin and tau, a distinct population of microtubule-bound tau is observed, the binding of which seems irreversible. We propose that reversible binding occurs between tau and the surface of preassembled microtubules, whereas irreversible binding results when tau is coassembled with tubulin into a tau-microtubule copolymer. Because the latter is expected to be physiologically relevant, its characterization is of central importance. PMID:15096589

  15. 烟草小孢子母细胞减数分裂过程中微管分布变化%Microtubule Distribution and Change during Meiosis of Microspore Mother Cells of Nicotiana tabacum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雅英; 张亚楠; 王宏毅; 林石明; 田惠桥

    2011-01-01

    The organization of microtubule cytoskeleton during tobacco microsporogenesis was observed.At the prophase of meiosis Ⅰ of microspore mother cell (MMC), the microtubules in the cell are short and dispersive in cytoplasm. At the metaphase of meiosis Ⅰ, the microtubules in the cell set up a spindle which makes chromosomes move at equatorial plate. When MMCs enter the anaphase of meiosis Ⅰ, the spindle microtubules break. At the metaphase of meiosis Ⅱ, the microtubules form two spindles in the same cytoplasm. In the telophase of meiosis Ⅱ,spindle microtubules depolymerize and change from short segment to tubulin. Then the MMC begins to cytokinesis by cytoplasmic constriction to form contractile furrows, which separate four nuclei into four microspores. There was not evidence to show that microtubules participate in the cytokinesis directly.%应用间接免疫荧光标记技术和激光共聚焦扫描显微镜成像技术观察了烟草小孢子母细胞减数分裂过程中微管的分布变化.在减数分裂前期,小孢子母细胞中的微管较短,随机分散在细胞质中.在减数分裂中期,细胞质中微管形成纺锤体,控制染色体的分布.进入减数分裂Ⅰ后期,部分纺锤体微管将两组染色体拉向两级.在减数分裂Ⅱ中期,细胞中的微管又形成两个纺锤体.在减数分裂Ⅱ后期,纺锤体微管解聚为微管蛋白分散在细胞质中.胞质分裂发生在四个细胞核形成之后.通过细胞核之间的质膜向内缢缩分隔四个细胞核,产生四个小孢子.

  16. Sleep spindles and intelligence: evidence for a sexual dimorphism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ujma, P.P.; Konrad, B.N.; Genzel, L.; Bleifuss, A.; Simor, P.; Potari, A.; Kormendi, J.; Gombos, F.; Steiger, A.; Bodizs, R.; Dresler, M.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in nonrapid eye movement sleep, which play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Sleep spindle features are stable within and vary between individuals, with, for example, females having a higher number o

  17. Correlations Between Adolescent Processing Speed and Specific Spindle Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Nader

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are waxing and waning thalamocortical oscillations with accepted frequencies of between 11 and 16 Hz and a minimum duration of 0.5 seconds. Our research has suggested that there is spindle activity in all of the sleep stages, and thus for the present analysis we examined the link between spindle activity (Stage 2, REM and SWS and waking cognitive abilities in 32 healthy adolescents. After software was used to filter frequencies outside the desired range, slow spindles (11.00-13.50 Hz, fast spindles (13.51-16.00 Hz and spindle-like activity (16.01-18.50 Hz were observed in Stage 2, SWS and REM sleep. Our analysis suggests that these specific EEG frequencies were significantly related to processing speed, which is one of the subscales of the intelligence score, in adolescents. The relationship was prominent in SWS and REM sleep. Further, the spindle-like activity (16.01-18.50 Hz that occurred during SWS was strongly related to processing speed. Results suggest that the ability of adolescents to respond to tasks in an accurate, efficient and timely manner is related to their sleep quality. These findings support earlier research reporting relationships between learning, learning potential and sleep spindle activity in adults and adolescents.

  18. Sleep Spindles as Biomarker for Early Detection of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to the use of sleep spindles as a novel biomarker for early diagnosis of synucleinopathies, in particular Parkinson's disease (PD). The method is based on automatic detection of sleep spindles. The method may be combined with measurements of one or more further...

  19. Dynamics and regulation of plant interphase microtubules: a comparative view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takashi

    2003-12-01

    Microtubule and actin cytoskeletons are fundamental to a variety of cellular activities within eukaryotic organisms. Extensive information on the dynamics and functions of microtubules, as well as on their regulatory proteins, have been revealed in fungi and animals, and corresponding pictures are now slowly emerging in plants. During interphase, plant cells contain highly dynamic cortical microtubules that organize into ordered arrays, which are apparently regulated by distinct groups of microtubule regulators. Comparison with fungal and animal microtubules highlights both conserved and unique mechanisms for the regulation of the microtubule cytoskeleton in plants.

  20. First observation of a muscle spindle in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, N; Miyoshi, S; Toh, H

    1983-03-01

    In many groups of vertebrates, the muscle spindle is a specialized sensory organ for the detection of muscle stretching. The structure of the spindle varies among vertebrate classes. Moreover, Barker has asserted that Amphibia are the most primitive vertebrates to possess muscle spindles. Extensive studies, made mainly on the locomotor myotome, seem to show that the muscle receptors of fish are less specialized than those of more advanced animals, and that muscle spindles are absent. However, little attention has been paid to the jaw-closing muscle. We report here our finding of a very simple muscle spindle with a single intrafusal fibre in the well-developed jaw-closing muscle, adductor mandibulae, in a primitive teleostean, Oncorhynchus masou (Brevoort).

  1. Taxol crystals can masquerade as stabilized microtubules.

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    Margit Foss

    Full Text Available Taxol is a potent anti-mitotic drug used in chemotherapy, angioplastic stents, and cell biology research. By binding and stabilizing microtubules, Taxol inhibits their dynamics, crucial for cell division, motility, and survival. The drug has also been reported to induce formation of asters and bundles composed of stabilized microtubules. Surprisingly, at commonly used concentrations, Taxol forms crystals that rapidly bind fluorescent tubulin subunits, generating structures with an uncanny resemblance to microtubule asters and bundles. Kinetic and topological considerations suggest that tubulin subunits, rather than microtubules, bind the crystals. This sequestration of tubulin from the subunit pool would be expected to shift the equilibrium of free to polymerized tubulin to disfavor assembly. Our results imply that some previously reported Taxol-induced asters or bundles could include or be composed of tubulin-decorated Taxol crystals. Thus, reevaluation of certain morphological, chemical, and physical properties of Taxol-treated microtubules may be necessary. Moreover, our findings suggest a novel mechanism for chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity in non-dividing cells, with far-reaching medical implications.

  2. A study of microtubule dipole lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shubhendu

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal protein polymers orchestrating a host of important cellular functions including, but not limited to, cell support, cell division, cell motility and cell transport. In this thesis, we construct a toy-model of the microtubule lattice composed of vector Ising spins representing tubulin molecules, the building block of microtubules. Nearest-neighbor and next-to-nearest neighbor interactions are considered within an anisotropic dielectric medium. As a consequence of the helical topology, we observe that certain spin orientations render the lattice frustrated with nearest neighbor ferroelectric and next-to-nearest neighbor antiferroelectric bonds. Under these conditions, the lattice displays the remarkable property of stabilizing certain spin patterns that are robust to thermal fluctuations. We model this behavior in the framework of a generalized Ising model known as the J1 - J2 model and theoretically determine the set of stable patterns. Employing Monte-Carlo methods, we demonstrate the stability of such patterns in the microtubule lattice at human physiological temperatures. This suggests a novel biological mechanism for storing information in living organisms, whereby the tubulin spin (dipole moment) states become information bits and information gets stored in microtubules in a way that is robust to thermal fluctuations.

  3. Sleep spindles predict stress-related increases in sleep disturbances

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    Thien Thanh eDang-Vu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Predisposing factors place certain individuals at higher risk for insomnia, especially in the presence of precipitating conditions such as stressful life events. Sleep spindles have been shown to play an important role in the preservation of sleep continuity. Lower spindle density might thus constitute an objective predisposing factor for sleep reactivity to stress. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the relationship between baseline sleep spindle density and the prospective change in insomnia symptoms in response to a standardized academic stressor. Methods: 12 healthy students had a polysomnography (PSG recording during a period of lower stress at the beginning of the academic semester, along with an assessment of insomnia complaints using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI. They completed a second ISI assessment at the end of the semester, a period coinciding with the week prior to final examinations and thus higher stress. Spindle density, amplitude, duration and frequency, as well as sigma power were computed from C4-O2 electroencephalography (EEG derivation during stages N2-N3 of non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM sleep, across the whole night and for each NREM sleep period. To test for the relationship between spindle density and changes in insomnia symptoms in response to academic stress, spindle measurements at baseline were correlated with changes in ISI across the academic semester.Results: Spindle density (as well as spindle amplitude and sigma power, particularly during the first NREM sleep period, negatively correlated with changes in ISI (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Lower spindle activity, especially at the beginning of the night, prospectively predicted larger increases in insomnia symptoms in response to stress. This result indicates that individual differences in sleep spindle activity contribute to the differential vulnerability to sleep disturbances in the face of precipitating factors.

  4. Low-dose laulimalide represents a novel molecular probe for investigating microtubule organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Melissa J; Chan, Gordon K; Rattner, J B; Schriemer, David C

    2012-08-15

    Laulimalide is a natural product that has strong taxoid-like properties but binds to a distinct site on β-tubulin in the microtubule (MT) lattice. At elevated concentrations, it generates MTs that are resistant to depolymerization, and it induces a conformational state indistinguishable from taxoid-treated MTs. In this study, we describe the effect of low-dose laulimalide on various stages of the cell cycle and compare these effects to docetaxel as a representative of taxoid stabilizers. No evidence of MT bundling in interphase was observed with laulimalide, in spite of the fact that MTs are stabilized at low dose. Cells treated with laulimalide enter mitosis but arrest at prometaphase by generating multiple asters that coalesce into supernumerary poles and interfere with the integrity of the metaphase plate. Cells with a preformed bipolar spindle exist under heightened tension under laulimalide treatment, and chromosomes rapidly shear from the plate, even though the bipolar spindle is well-preserved. Docetaxel generates a similar phenotype for HeLa cells entering mitosis, but when treated at metaphase, cells undergo chromosomal fragmentation and demonstrate reduced centromere dynamics, as expected for a taxoid. Our results suggest that laulimalide represents a new class of molecular probe for investigating MT-mediated events, such as kinetochore-MT interactions, which may reflect the location of the ligand binding site within the interprotofilament groove. PMID:22871740

  5. Cell cycle-dependent microtubule-based dynamic transport of cytoplasmic dynein in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytoplasmic dynein complex is a large multi-subunit microtubule (MT-associated molecular motor involved in various cellular functions including organelle positioning, vesicle transport and cell division. However, regulatory mechanism of the cell-cycle dependent distribution of dynein has not fully been understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report live-cell imaging of cytoplasmic dynein in HeLa cells, by expressing multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP-tagged 74-kDa intermediate chain (IC74. IC74-mfGFP was successfully incorporated into functional dynein complex. In interphase, dynein moved bi-directionally along with MTs, which might carry cargos such as transport vesicles. A substantial fraction of dynein moved toward cell periphery together with EB1, a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs, suggesting +TIPs-mediated transport of dynein. In late-interphase and prophase, dynein was localized at the centrosomes and the radial MT array. In prometaphase and metaphase, dynein was localized at spindle MTs where it frequently moved from spindle poles toward chromosomes or cell cortex. +TIPs may be involved in the transport of spindle dyneins. Possible kinetochore and cortical dyneins were also observed. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cytoplasmic dynein is transported to the site of action in preparation for the following cellular events, primarily by the MT-based transport. The MT-based transport may have greater advantage than simple diffusion of soluble dynein in rapid and efficient transport of the limited concentration of the protein.

  6. N-terminus-modified Hec1 suppresses tumour growth by interfering with kinetochore-microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orticello, M; Fiore, M; Totta, P; Desideri, M; Barisic, M; Passeri, D; Lenzi, J; Rosa, A; Orlandi, A; Maiato, H; Del Bufalo, D; Degrassi, F

    2015-06-01

    Mitotic proteins are attractive targets to develop molecular cancer therapeutics due to the intimate interdependence between cell proliferation and mitosis. In this work, we have explored the therapeutic potential of the kinetochore (KT) protein Hec1 (Highly Expressed in Cancer protein 1) as a molecular target to produce massive chromosome missegregation and cell death in cancer cells. Hec1 is a constituent of the Ndc80 complex, which mediates KT-microtubule (MT) attachments at mitosis and is upregulated in various cancer types. We expressed Hec1 fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) at its N-terminus MT-interaction domain in HeLa cells and showed that expression of this modified Hec1, which localized at KTs, blocked cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis in tumour cells. EGFP-Hec1 was extremely potent in tumour cell killing and more efficient than siRNA-induced Hec1 depletion. In striking contrast, normal cells showed no apparent cell proliferation defects or cell death following EGFP-Hec1 expression. Live-cell imaging demonstrated that cancer cell death was associated with massive chromosome missegregation within multipolar spindles after a prolonged mitotic arrest. Moreover, EGFP-Hec1 expression was found to increase KT-MT attachment stability, providing a molecular explanation for the abnormal spindle architecture and the cytotoxic activity of this modified protein. Consistent with cell culture data, EGFP-Hec1 expression was found to strongly inhibit tumour growth in a mouse xenograft model by disrupting mitosis and inducing multipolar spindles. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that stimulation of massive chromosome segregation defects can be used as an anti-cancer strategy through the activation of mitotic catastrophe after a multipolar mitosis. Importantly, this study represents a clear proof of concept that targeting KT proteins required for proper KT-MT attachment dynamics constitutes a powerful approach in cancer therapy. PMID

  7. Synthesis and biological assessment of simplified analogues of the potent microtubule stabilizer (+)-discodermolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mínguez, José M; Kim, Sun-Young; Giuliano, Kenneth A; Balachandran, Raghavan; Madiraju, Charitha; Day, Billy W; Curran, Dennis P

    2003-07-31

    An efficient, convergent and stereocontrolled synthesis of simplified analogues of the potent antimitotic agent (+)-discodermolide has been achieved and several small libraries have been prepared. In all the libraries, the discodermolide methyl groups at C14 and C16 and the C7 hydroxy group were removed and the lactone was replaced by simple esters. Other modifications introduced in each series of analogues were related to C11, C17 and C19 of the natural product. Key elements of the synthetic strategy included (a) elaboration of the main subunits from a common intermediate and (b) fragment couplings using Wittig reactions to install the (Z)-olefins. Library components were analyzed for microtubule-stabilizing actions in vitro, for displacement of [3H]paclitaxel from its binding site on tubulin, for antiproliferative activity against human carcinoma cells, and for cell signaling and mitotic spindle alterations by a multiparameter fluorescence cell-based screening technique. The results show that even significant structural simplification can lead to analogues with actions related to microtubule targeting.

  8. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B

    2014-02-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo.

  9. Observation of microtubule-based motor protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloboda, Roger D

    2015-02-01

    It is possible to detect the presence of motor proteins that have the ability to translocate particles along microtubules. The two procedures described here were developed to detect microtubule-dependent motor protein activity in cell lysates or of purified proteins. In the first procedure, latex beads bound to the putative motor protein are assayed for their ability to translocate along microtubules in an ATP-dependent fashion. If motor protein activity is present, it will bind to the beads and translocate them unidirectionally along the microtubules. In the second procedure, motor proteins induce microtubule gliding over a glass coverslip surface that is coated with active motor protein. Because the mass of a microtubule is negligible compared to that of a coverslip or slide, the microtubule glides over the glass surface when the surface is coated with active motor protein. Also included here are descriptions of assays designed to determine the directionality of movement of microtubule-based motor proteins. PMID:25646501

  10. Sleep spindling and fluid intelligence across adolescent development: sex matters

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    Róbert eBódizs

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Evidence supports the intricate relationship between sleep electroencephalogram (EEG spindling and cognitive abilities in children and adults. Although sleep EEG changes during adolescence index fundamental brain reorganization, a detailed analysis of sleep spindling and the spindle-intelligence relationship was not yet provided for adolescents. Therefore, adolescent development of sleep spindle oscillations were studied in a home polysomnographic study focusing on the effects of chronological age and developmentally acquired overall mental efficiency (fluid IQ with sex as a potential modulating factor. Subjects were 24 healthy adolescents (12 males with an age range of 15–22 years (mean: 18 years and fluid IQ of 91-126 (mean: 104.12, Raven Progressive Matrices Test. Slow spindles (SSs and fast spindles (FSs were analyzed in 21 EEG derivations by using the individual adjustment method. A significant age-dependent increase in average FS density (r = .57; p = .005 was found. Moreover, fluid IQ correlated with FS density (r = .43; p = .04 and amplitude (r = .41; p = .049. The latter effects were entirely driven by particularly reliable FS-IQ correlations in females [r = .80 (p = .002 and r = .67 (p = .012, for density and amplitude, respectively]. Region-specific analyses revealed that these correlations peak in the fronto-central regions. The control of the age-dependence of FS measures and IQ scores did not considerably reduce the spindle-IQ correlations with respect to FS density. The only positive spindle-index of fluid IQ in males turned out to be the frequency of FSs (r = .60, p = .04. Increases in FS density during adolescence may index reshaped structural connectivity related to white matter maturation in the late developing human brain. The continued development over this age range of cognitive functions is indexed by specific measures of sleep spindling unravelling gender differences in adolescent brain maturation and perhaps cognitive

  11. A Single-phase Spindle Motor Design for DVD Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A. single phase brushless spindle motor with innovative design has been deyeloped for application in a DVD drive. The methods used to reduce the cogging torque and to improve the dynamic performance of this new design motor are proposed in this paper. The single phase brushless spindle motor is usually applied for cooling fan, pump and blower before the performance is improved by the reengineering process. The stator configuration and the drive circuit have been remodeled in order to meet the requirements of the spindle motor used in the DVD applications.

  12. Modelling the mitotic apparatus. From the discovery of the bipolar spindle to modern concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourret, J P

    1995-06-01

    This bibliographical review of the modelling of the mitotic apparatus covers a period of one hundred and twenty years, from the discovery of the bipolar mitotic spindle up to the present day. Without attempting to be fully comprehensive, it will describe the evolution of the main ideas that have left their mark on a century of experimental and theoretical research. Fol and Bütschli's first writings date back to 1873, at a time when Schleiden and Schwann's cell theory was rapidly gaining ground throughout Germany. Both mitosis and chromosomes were to be discovered within the space of thirty years, along with the two key events in the animal and plant reproductive cycle, namely fecondation and meiosis. The mitotic pole, a term still in use to this day, was employed to describe a morphological fact which was noted as early as 1876, namely that the lines and the dots of the karyokinetic figure, with its spindle and asters, looks remarkably like the lines of force around a bar magnet. This was to lead to models designed to explain the movements of chromosomes which take place when the cell nucleus appears to cease to exist as an organelle during mitosis. The nature of those mechanisms and the origin of the forces behind the chromosomes' ordered movements were central to the debate. Auguste Prenant, in a remarkable bibliographical synthesis published in 1910, summed up the opposing viewpoints of the 'vitalists', on the one hand, who favoured the theory of contractility or extensility in spindle fibres, and of those who believed in models based on physical phenomena, on the other. The latter subdivided into two groups: some, like Bütschli, Rhumbler or Leduc, referred to diffusion, osmosis and superficial tension, whilst the others, led by Gallardo and Hartog, focussed on the laws of electromagnetism. Lillie, Kuwada and Darlington followed up this line of research. The mid-20th century was a major turning point. Most of the modelling mentioned above was criticized and

  13. The Ability to Survive Mitosis in the Presence of Microtubule Poisons Differs Significantly Between Human Nontransformed (RPE-1) and Cancer (U2OS, HeLa) Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Daniela A; Rieder, Conly L.

    2009-01-01

    We used live cell imaging to compare the fate of human nontransformed (RPE-1) and cancer (HeLa, U2OS) cells as they entered mitosis in nocodazole or taxol. In the same field, and in either drug, a cell in all lines could die in mitosis, exit mitosis and die within 10 h, or exit mitosis and survive ≥10 h. Relative to RPE-1 cells, significantly fewer HeLa or U2OS cells survived mitosis or remained viable after mitosis: in nocodazole concentrations that inhibit spindle microtubule assembly, or i...

  14. Transient phosphorylation of tumor associated microtubule associated protein (TMAP)/cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2) at Thr-596 during early phases of mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Choi, Yong-Bock; Lee, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Kwon, Hye-Rim; Seong, Yeon-Sun; KIM, HEUNG TAE; Park, Joobae; Bae, Chang-Dae; Hong, Kyeong-Man

    2008-01-01

    Tumor associated microtubule associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2) is a mitotic spindle-associated protein whose expression is cell cycle-regulated and also frequently deregulated in cancer cells. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against TMAP/CKAP2 were produced: B-1-13 and D-12-3. Interestingly, the reactivity of mAb D-12-3 to TMAP/CKAP2 was markedly decreased specifically in mitotic cell lysate. The epitope mapping study showed that mAb D-12-3 re...

  15. Microtubules guide root hair tip growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Esseling, J.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to establish cell polarity is crucial to form and function of an individual cell. Polarity underlies critical processes during cell development, such as cell growth, cell division, cell differentiation and cell signalling. Interphase cytoplasmic microtubules in tip-growing fission yeast

  16. Electrostatically biased binding of kinesin to microtubules.

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    Barry J Grant

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules.

  17. Par1b induces asymmetric inheritance of plasma membrane domains via LGN-dependent mitotic spindle orientation in proliferating hepatocytes.

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    Christiaan L Slim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The development and maintenance of polarized epithelial tissue requires a tightly controlled orientation of mitotic cell division relative to the apical polarity axis. Hepatocytes display a unique polarized architecture. We demonstrate that mitotic hepatocytes asymmetrically segregate their apical plasma membrane domain to the nascent daughter cells. The non-polarized nascent daughter cell can form a de novo apical domain with its new neighbor. This asymmetric segregation of apical domains is facilitated by a geometrically distinct "apicolateral" subdomain of the lateral surface present in hepatocytes. The polarity protein partitioning-defective 1/microtubule-affinity regulating kinase 2 (Par1b/MARK2 translates this positional landmark to cortical polarity by promoting the apicolateral accumulation of Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched protein (LGN and the capture of nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA-positive astral microtubules to orientate the mitotic spindle. Proliferating hepatocytes thus display an asymmetric inheritance of their apical domains via a mechanism that involves Par1b and LGN, which we postulate serves the unique tissue architecture of the developing liver parenchyma.

  18. Acrylamide effects on kinesin-related proteins of the mitotic/meiotic spindle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microtubule (MT) motor protein kinesin is a vital component of cells and organs expressing acrylamide (ACR) toxicity. As a mechanism of its potential carcinogenicity, we determined whether kinesins involved in cell division are inhibited by ACR similar to neuronal kinesin [Sickles, D.W., Brady, S.T., Testino, A.R., Friedman, M.A., and Wrenn, R.A. (1996). Direct effect of the neurotoxicant acrylamide on kinesin-based microtubule motility. Journal of Neuroscience Research 46, 7-17.] Kinesin-related genes were isolated from rat testes [Navolanic, P.M., and Sperry, A.O. (2000). Identification of isoforms of a mitotic motor in mammalian spermatogenesis. Biology of Reproduction 62, 1360-1369.], their kinesin-like proteins expressed in bacteria using recombinant DNA techniques and the effects of ACR, glycidamide (GLY) and propionamide (a non-neurotoxic metabolite) on the function of two of the identified kinesin motors were tested. KIFC5A MT bundling activity, required for mitotic spindle formation, was measured in an MT-binding assay. Both ACR and GLY caused a similar concentration-dependent reduction in the binding of MT; concentrations of 100 μM ACR or GLY reduced its activity by 60%. KRP2 MT disassembling activity was assayed using the quantity of tubulin disassembled from taxol-stabilized MT. Both ACR and GLY inhibited KRP2-induced MT disassembly. GLY was substantially more potent; significant reductions of 60% were achieved by 500 μM, a comparable inhibition by ACR required a 5 mM concentration. Propionamide had no significant effect on either kinesin, except KRP2 at 10 mM. This is the first report of ACR inhibition of a mitotic/meiotic motor protein. ACR (or GLY) inhibition of kinesin may be an alternative mechanism to DNA adduction in the production of cell division defects and potential carcinogenicity. We conclude that ACR may act on multiple kinesin family members and produce toxicities in organs highly dependent on microtubule-based functions

  19. Nuclear and microtubule remodeling and in vitro development of nuclear transferred cat oocytes with skin fibroblasts of the domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus) and leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, X J; Lee, Y H; Jin, J Y; Kim, N H; Kong, I K

    2006-10-01

    The leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis), a member of the felidae family, is a threatened animal in South Korea. In terms of protecting endangered felids, nuclear transfer (NT) is a potentially valuable technique for assuring the continuation of species with dwindling numbers. In the present experiment, nuclear and microtubule remodeling and the in vitro developmental potential of enucleated domestic cat oocytes reconstructed with nuclei of somatic cells from either domestic cat fibroblast (DCF) or leopard cat fibroblast (LCF) were evaluated. Microtubule aster is allocated to de-condensed chromatin following nuclear transfer (3h after activation) of fibroblast cells from both domestic and leopard cats, suggesting the introduction of a somatic cell centrosome. The transferred fibroblast nuclei formed a large, swollen, pronuclear-like structure in most reconstructed oocytes, in the cat or leopard cat. At 18h following nuclear transfer, mitosis occurred, and according to the photo (F) it appears that spindle microtubules and two asters were observed. The percentages of blastocyst formation from nuclear transfer embryos derived from domestic cat fibroblasts (4/46, 8.6%) were not significantly different than those for nuclear transfer embryos constructed with leopard cat fibroblasts (4/52, 7.6%). These results indicate that nuclear and microtubule remodeling processes and in vitro developmental ability are similar in reconstructed cat oocytes following transfer of nuclei from either domestic or leopard cats. PMID:16310987

  20. Discodermolide interferes with the binding of tau protein to microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Santwana; Florence, Gordon J; Paterson, Ian; Amos, Linda A

    2003-03-27

    We investigated whether discodermolide, a novel antimitotic agent, affects the binding to microtubules of tau protein repeat motifs. Like taxol, the new drug reduces the proportion of tau that pellets with microtubules. Despite their differing structures, discodermolide, taxol and tau repeats all bind to a site on beta-tubulin that lies within the microtubule lumen and is crucial in controlling microtubule assembly. Low concentrations of tau still bind strongly to the outer surfaces of preformed microtubules when the acidic C-terminal regions of at least six tubulin dimers are available for interaction with each tau molecule; otherwise binding is very weak.

  1. Robustness of Improving Active Maglev Motorized Spindle Equilibrium Position

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    Zhang Yanhong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium position of active maglev motorized spindle had great influence on the industrial processing accuracy, in order to improve the performance of active maglev motorized spindle and processing accuracy, a new control method and control device of active maglev was put forward based on H∞ mixed sensitivity. Firstly, a mathematical model was established among the electromagnetic force on the rotor, control current and position displacement of the rotor center. Secondly, the H∞ mixed sensitivity control method was used, the selection method of weighting function was discussed and H∞ robust controller was designed, the experimental results showed that for active maglev motorized spindle, the designed controller had better static and dynamic performance, position precision, so that the robustness of the motorized spindle equilibrium position was further improved, which met the requirement of high precision industrial process.  

  2. Asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Miseon; Chang, Jaerak; Chang, Sunghoe; Lee, Kyung S; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2014-02-21

    CPAP is an essential component for centriole formation. Here, we report that CPAP is also critical for symmetric spindle pole formation during mitosis. We observed that pericentriolar material between the mitotic spindle poles were asymmetrically distributed in CPAP-depleted cells even with intact numbers of centrioles. The length of procentrioles was slightly reduced by CPAP depletion, but the length of mother centrioles was not affected. Surprisingly, the young mother centrioles of the CPAP-depleted cells are not fully matured, as evidenced by the absence of distal and subdistal appendage proteins. We propose that the selective absence of centriolar appendages at the young mother centrioles may be responsible for asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted cells. Our results suggest that the neural stem cells with CPAP mutations might form asymmetric spindle poles, which results in premature initiation of differentiation.

  3. Spindle extraction method for ISAR image based on Radon transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xia; Zheng, Sheng; Zeng, Xiangyun; Zhu, Daoyuan; Xu, Gaogui

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a method of spindle extraction of target in inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) image is proposed which depends on Radon Transform. Firstly, utilizing Radon Transform to detect all straight lines which are collinear with these line segments in image. Then, using Sobel operator to detect image contour. Finally, finding all intersections of each straight line and image contour, the two intersections which have maximum distance between them is the two ends of this line segment and the longest line segment of all line segments is spindle of target. According to the proposed spindle extraction method, one hundred simulated ISAR images which are respectively rotated 0 degrees, 10 degrees, 20 degrees, 30 degrees and 40 degrees in counterclockwise are used to do experiment and the proposed method and the detection results are more close to the real spindle of target than the method based on Hough Transform .

  4. The conserved Wdr8-hMsd1/SSX2IP complex localises to the centrosome and ensures proper spindle length and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Akiko; Morand, Agathe; Ikebe, Chiho; Frith, David; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Toda, Takashi

    The centrosome plays a pivotal role in a wide range of cellular processes and its dysfunction is causally linked to many human diseases including cancer and developmental and neurological disorders. This organelle contains more than one hundred components, and yet many of them remain uncharacterised. Here we identified a novel centrosome protein Wdr8, based upon the structural conservation of the fission yeast counterpart. We showed that Wdr8 constitutively localises to the centrosome and super resolution microscopy uncovered that this protein is enriched at the proximal end of the mother centriole. Furthermore, we identified hMsd1/SSX2IP, a conserved spindle anchoring protein, as one of Wdr8 interactors by mass spectrometry. Wdr8 formed a complex and partially colocalised with hMsd1/SSX2IP. Intriguingly, knockdown of Wdr8 or hMsd1/SSX2IP displayed very similar mitotic defects, in which spindle microtubules became shortened and misoriented. Indeed, Wdr8 depletion resulted in the reduced recruitment of hMsd1/SSX2IP to the mitotic centrosome, though the converse is not true. Together, we propose that the conserved Wdr8-hMsd1/SSX2IP complex plays a critical role in controlling proper spindle length and orientation. PMID:26545777

  5. The deafferented reticular thalamic nucleus generates spindle rhythmicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steriade, M; Domich, L; Oakson, G; Deschênes, M

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that nucleus reticularis thalami (RE) is the generator of spindle rhythmicity during electroencephalogram (EEG) synchronization was tested in acutely prepared cats. Unit discharges and focal waves were extracellularly recorded in the rostral pole of RE nucleus, which was completely disconnected by transections from all other thalamic nuclei. In some experiments, additional transections through corona radiata created a triangular island in which the rostral RE pole survived with the caudate nucleus, putamen, basal forebrain nuclei, prepyriform area, and the adjacent cortex. Similar results were obtained in two types of experiments: brain stem-transected preparations that exhibited spontaneous spindle sequences, and animals under ketamine anesthesia in which transient spindling was repeatedly precipitated during recording by very low doses of a short-acting barbiturate. Both spindle-related rhythms (7- to 16-Hz waves grouped in sequences that recur with a rhythm of 0.1-0.3 Hz) are seen in focal recordings of the deafferented RE nucleus. The presence of spindling rhythmicity in the disconnected RE nucleus contrasts with total absence of spindles in cortical EEG leads and in thalamic recordings behind the transection. Oscillations within the same frequency range as that of spontaneous spindles can be evoked in the deafferented RE nucleus by subcortical white matter stimulation. In deafferented RE cells, the burst structure consists of an initially biphasic acceleration-deceleration pattern, eventually leading to a long-lasting tonic tail. Quantitative group data show that the burst parameters of disconnected RE cells are very similar to those of RE neurons with intact connections. In the deafferented RE nucleus, spike bursts of RE neurons recur periodically (0.1-0.3 Hz) in close time-relation with simultaneously recorded focal spindle sequences. The burst occurrence of deafferented RE cells is greatly reduced after systemic administration of bicuculline

  6. The role of microtubule movement in bidirectional organelle transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kulić, Igor M; Kim, Hwajin; Kural, Comert; Blehm, Benjamin; Selvin, Paul R; Nelson, Philip C; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2008-01-01

    We study the role of microtubule movement in bidirectional organelle transport in Drosophila S2 cells and show that EGFP-tagged peroxisomes in cells serve as sensitive probes of motor induced, noisy cytoskeletal motions. Multiple peroxisomes move in unison over large time windows and show correlations with microtubule tip positions, indicating rapid microtubule fluctuations in the longitudinal direction. We report the first high-resolution measurement of longitudinal microtubule fluctuations performed by tracing such pairs of co-moving peroxisomes. The resulting picture shows that motor-dependent longitudinal microtubule oscillations contribute significantly to cargo movement along microtubules. Thus, contrary to the conventional view, organelle transport cannot be described solely in terms of cargo movement along stationary microtubule tracks, but instead includes a strong contribution from the movement of the tracks.

  7. A Novel Pathway that Coordinates Mitotic Exit with Spindle Position

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Scott A.; Cooper, John A.

    2007-01-01

    In budding yeast, the spindle position checkpoint (SPC) delays mitotic exit until the mitotic spindle moves into the neck between the mother and bud. This checkpoint works by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN), a signaling cascade initiated and controlled by Tem1, a small GTPase. Tem1 is regulated by a putative guanine exchange factor, Lte1, but the function and regulation of Lte1 remains poorly understood. Here, we identify novel components of the checkpoint that operate upstream of L...

  8. Augmin shapes the anaphase spindle for efficient cytokinetic furrow ingression and abscission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Ryota; Kamasaki, Tomoko; Hiruma, Shota; Poser, Ina; Yoda, Kinya; Yajima, Junichiro; Gerlich, Daniel W; Goshima, Gohta

    2016-03-01

    During anaphase, distinct populations of microtubules (MTs) form by either centrosome-dependent or augmin-dependent nucleation. It remains largely unknown whether these different MT populations contribute distinct functions to cytokinesis. Here we show that augmin-dependent MTs are required for the progression of both furrow ingression and abscission. Augmin depletion reduced the accumulation of anillin, a contractile ring regulator at the cell equator, yet centrosomal MTs were sufficient to mediate RhoA activation at the furrow. This defect in contractile ring organization, combined with incomplete spindle pole separation during anaphase, led to impaired furrow ingression. During the late stages of cytokinesis, astral MTs formed bundles in the intercellular bridge, but these failed to assemble a focused midbody structure and did not establish tight linkage to the plasma membrane, resulting in furrow regression. Thus augmin-dependent acentrosomal MTs and centrosomal MTs contribute to nonredundant targeting mechanisms of different cytokinesis factors, which are required for the formation of a functional contractile ring and midbody. PMID:26764096

  9. Resolving bundled microtubules using anti-tubulin nanobodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylova, Marina; Cloin, Bas M C; Finan, Kieran; van den Berg, Robert; Teeuw, Jalmar; Kijanka, Marta M; Sokolowski, Mikolaj; Katrukha, Eugene A; Maidorn, Manuel; Opazo, Felipe; Moutel, Sandrine; Vantard, Marylin; Perez, Frank; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Ewers, Helge; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2015-08-11

    Microtubules are hollow biopolymers of 25-nm diameter and are key constituents of the cytoskeleton. In neurons, microtubules are organized differently between axons and dendrites, but their precise organization in different compartments is not completely understood. Super-resolution microscopy techniques can detect specific structures at an increased resolution, but the narrow spacing between neuronal microtubules poses challenges because most existing labelling strategies increase the effective microtubule diameter by 20-40 nm and will thereby blend neighbouring microtubules into one structure. Here we develop single-chain antibody fragments (nanobodies) against tubulin to achieve super-resolution imaging of microtubules with a decreased apparent diameter. To test the resolving power of these novel probes, we generate microtubule bundles with a known spacing of 50-70 nm and successfully resolve individual microtubules. Individual bundled microtubules can also be resolved in different mammalian cells, including hippocampal neurons, allowing novel insights into fundamental mechanisms of microtubule organization in cell- and neurobiology.

  10. Motor protein accumulation on antiparallel microtubule overlaps

    CERN Document Server

    Kuan, Hui-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would na\\"ively expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center ...

  11. Topography-specific spindle frequency changes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Suzana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep spindles, as detected on scalp electroencephalography (EEG, are considered to be markers of thalamo-cortical network integrity. Since obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a known cause of brain dysfunction, the aim of this study was to investigate sleep spindle frequency distribution in OSA. Seven non-OSA subjects and 21 patients with OSA (11 mild and 10 moderate were studied. A matching pursuit procedure was used for automatic detection of fast (≥13Hz and slow (Hz spindles obtained from 30min samples of NREM sleep stage 2 taken from initial, middle and final night thirds (sections I, II and III of frontal, central and parietal scalp regions. Results Compared to non-OSA subjects, Moderate OSA patients had higher central and parietal slow spindle percentage (SSP in all night sections studied, and higher frontal SSP in sections II and III. As the night progressed, there was a reduction in central and parietal SSP, while frontal SSP remained high. Frontal slow spindle percentage in night section III predicted OSA with good accuracy, with OSA likelihood increased by 12.1%for every SSP unit increase (OR 1.121, 95% CI 1.013 - 1.239, p=0.027. Conclusions These results are consistent with diffuse, predominantly frontal thalamo-cortical dysfunction during sleep in OSA, as more posterior brain regions appear to maintain some physiological spindle frequency modulation across the night. Displaying changes in an opposite direction to what is expected from the aging process itself, spindle frequency appears to be informative in OSA even with small sample sizes, and to represent a sensitive electrophysiological marker of brain dysfunction in OSA.

  12. Self-Reduction Rate of a Microtubule

    OpenAIRE

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Matsui, Tetsuo; Sakakibara, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    We formulate and study a quantum field theory of a microtubule, a basic element of living cells. Following the quantum theory of consciousness by Hameroff and Penrose, we let the system to reduce to one of the classical states without measurement if certain conditions are satisfied(self-reductions), and calculate the self-reduction time $\\tau_N$ (the mean interval between two successive self-reductions) of a cluster consisting of more than $N$ neighboring tubulins (basic units composing a mic...

  13. Multi-frequency auditory stimulation disrupts spindling activity in anesthetized animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britvina, T; Eggermont, J J

    2008-02-01

    It is often implied that during the occurrence of spindle oscillations, thalamocortical neurons do not respond to signals from the outside world. Since recording of sound-evoked activity from cat auditory cortex is common during spindling this implies that sound stimulation changes the spindle-related brain state. Local field potentials and multi-unit activity recorded from cat primary auditory cortex under ketamine anesthesia during successive silence-stimulus-silence conditions were used to investigate the effect of sound on cortical spindle oscillations. Multi-frequency stimulation suppresses spindle waves, as shown by the decrease of spectral power within the spindle frequency range during stimulation as compared with the previous silent period. We show that the percentage suppression is independent of the power of the spindle waves during silence, and that the suppression of spindle power occurs very fast after stimulus onset. The global inter-spindle rhythm was not disturbed during stimulation. Spectrotemporal and correlation analysis revealed that beta waves (15-26 Hz), and to a lesser extent delta waves, were modulated by the same inter-spindle rhythm as spindle oscillations. The suppression of spindle power during stimulation had no effect on the spatial correlation of spindle waves. Firing rates increased under stimulation and spectro-temporal receptive fields could reliably be obtained. The possible mechanism of suppression of spindle waves is discussed and it is suggested that suppression likely occurs through activity of the specific auditory pathway. PMID:18164553

  14. Observations of microtubules and microtubule-microfilament associations in osmotically treated cells of Micrasterias denticulata Bréb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus-Url, G; Kiermayer, O

    1982-06-01

    As an extension of the observation and interpretation regarding the different microtubule systems of Micrasterias denticulata [12, 19], the existence of intertubular structures, such as microfilaments, which are strongly marked in osmotically treated cells, is especially interesting. The complex of microtubules and microfilaments occurs during post-telophase nuclear migration, probably engaged in the mechanism of movement. The arrangement of microtubules either parallel or perpendicular to the nuclear membrane is characteristic for the stage of nuclear migration. Another microtubule system, the microtubule band in the cortical protoplasm of the isthmus region [12], is described during morphogenesis of the new half cell. Osmotically treated cells in the stage of septum formation demonstrate the presence of cross-linked microtubules near the plasmalemma and microtubule bundles, situated in the protoplasm between the secondary wall and the chloroplast, probably representing the microtubule system in the cortical protoplasm of the old half cell described by Kiermayer [12, 16]. The frequent appearance of microtubules and intertubular structures in differentiating cells of Micrasterias denticulata after osmotic treatment is discussed along with implication for stabilization of microtubules, cross bridges, and microfilaments. PMID:6889505

  15. Mdb1, a fission yeast homolog of human MDC1, modulates DNA damage response and mitotic spindle function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wei

    Full Text Available During eukaryotic DNA damage response (DDR, one of the earliest events is the phosphorylation of the C-terminal SQ motif of histone H2AX (H2A in yeasts. In human cells, phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX is recognized by MDC1, which serves as a binding platform for the accumulation of a myriad of DDR factors on chromatin regions surrounding DNA lesions. Despite its important role in DDR, no homolog of MDC1 outside of metazoans has been described. Here, we report the characterization of Mdb1, a protein from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which shares significant sequence homology with human MDC1 in their C-terminal tandem BRCT (tBRCT domains. We show that in vitro, recombinant Mdb1 protein binds a phosphorylated H2A (γH2A peptide, and the phospho-specific binding requires two conserved phospho-binding residues in the tBRCT domain of Mdb1. In vivo, Mdb1 forms nuclear foci at DNA double strand breaks (DSBs induced by the HO endonuclease and ionizing radiation (IR. IR-induced Mdb1 focus formation depends on γH2A and the phospho-binding residues of Mdb1. Deleting the mdb1 gene does not overtly affect DNA damage sensitivity in a wild type background, but alters the DNA damage sensitivity of cells lacking another γH2A binder Crb2. Overexpression of Mdb1 causes severe DNA damage sensitivity in a manner that requires the interaction between Mdb1 and γH2A. During mitosis, Mdb1 localizes to spindles and concentrates at spindle midzones at late mitosis. The spindle midzone localization of Mdb1 requires its phospho-binding residues, but is independent of γH2A. Loss of Mdb1 or mutating its phospho-binding residues makes cells more resistant to the microtubule depolymerizing drug thiabendazole. We propose that Mdb1 performs dual roles in DDR and mitotic spindle regulation.

  16. Microtubule-Destabilizing Agents: Structural and Mechanistic Insights from the Interaction of Colchicine and Vinblastine with Tubulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigant, B.; Cormier, A.; Dorléans, A.; Ravelli, R. B. G.; Knossow, M.

    Microtubules (MTs) are dynamic structures of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton that, during cell division, form the mitotic spindle. Perturbing them leads to mitotic arrest and ultimately to cell death. Consistently, MTs and their building block, αβ tubulin, are one of the best characterized targets in anti-cancer chemotherapy. Drugs that interfere with MTs either stabilize or destabilize them. The latter class is the subject of this review. These ligands bind to the colchicine site or to the vinca domain, two distinct sites located at a distance from each other on tubulin. Nevertheless the effects of both classes of ligands share a common theme, they prevent the formation of MT specific contacts, therefore triggering their disassembly.

  17. The Role of Molecular Microtubule Motors and the Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Stress Granule Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Bartoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are cytoplasmic foci that appear in cells exposed to stress-induced translational inhibition. SGs function as a triage center, where mRNAs are sorted for storage, degradation, and translation reinitiation. The underlying mechanisms of SGs dynamics are still being characterized, although many key players have been identified. The main components of SGs are stalled 48S preinitiation complexes. To date, many other proteins have also been found to localize in SGs and are hypothesized to function in SG dynamics. Most recently, the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins have been demonstrated to function in SG dynamics. In this paper, we will discuss current literature examining the function of microtubules and the molecular microtubule motors in SG assembly, coalescence, movement, composition, organization, and disassembly.

  18. Dimer model for Tau proteins bound in microtubule bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Natalie; Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau is important in nucleating and maintaining microtubule spacing and structure in neuronal axons. Modification of tau is implicated as a later stage process in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the structure of tau in microtubule bundles. We present preliminary work on a proposed model for tau dimers in microtubule bundles (dimers are the minimal units since there is one microtubule binding domain per tau). First, a model of tau monomer was created and its characteristics explored using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation. Multiple simulations yield a partially collapsed form with separate positively/negatively charged clumps, but which are a factor of two smaller than required by observed microtubule spacing. We argue that this will elongate in dimer form to lower electrostatic energy at a cost of entropic ``spring'' energy. We will present preliminary results on steered molecular dynamics runs on tau dimers to estimate the actual force constant. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624.

  19. Microtubule Associated Proteins in Plants and the Processes They Manage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) are proteins that physically bind to microtubules in eukaryotes. MAPs play important roles in regulating the polymerization and organization of microtubules and in using the ensuing microtubule arrays to carry out a variety of cellular functions. In plants, MAPs manage the construction, repositioning, and dismantling of four distinct microtubule arrays throughout the cell cycle. Three of these arrays, the cortical array, the preprophase band,and the phragmoplast, are prominent to plants and are responsible for facilitating cell wall deposition and modification,transducing signals, demarcating the plane of cell division, and forming the new cell plate during cytokinesis, This review highlights important aspects of how MAPs in plants establish and maintain microtubule arrays as well as regulate cell growth, cell division, and cellular responses to the environment.

  20. Spindle neurons of the human anterior cingulate cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimchinsky, E. A.; Vogt, B. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Hof, P. R.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The human anterior cingulate cortex is distinguished by the presence of an unusual cell type, a large spindle neuron in layer Vb. This cell has been noted numerous times in the historical literature but has not been studied with modern neuroanatomic techniques. For instance, details regarding the neuronal class to which these cells belong and regarding their precise distribution along both ventrodorsal and anteroposterior axes of the cingulate gyrus are still lacking. In the present study, morphological features and the anatomic distribution of this cell type were studied using computer-assisted mapping and immunocytochemical techniques. Spindle neurons are restricted to the subfields of the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann's area 24), exhibiting a greater density in anterior portions of this area than in posterior portions, and tapering off in the transition zone between anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, a majority of the spindle cells at any level is located in subarea 24b on the gyral surface. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the neurofilament protein triple was present in a large percentage of these neurons and that they did not contain calcium-binding proteins. Injections of the carbocyanine dye DiI into the cingulum bundle revealed that these cells are projection neurons. Finally, spindle cells were consistently affected in Alzheimer's disease cases, with an overall loss of about 60%. Taken together, these observations indicate that the spindle cells of the human cingulate cortex represent a morphological subpopulation of pyramidal neurons whose restricted distribution may be associated with functionally distinct areas.

  1. Characteristics of motorized spindle supported by active magnetic bearings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Zhenyu; Yu Kun; Wen Liantang; Wang Xiao; Zhou Hongkai

    2014-01-01

    A motorized spindle supported by active magnetic bearings (AMBs) is generally used for ultra-high-speed machining. Iron loss of radial AMB is very great owing to high rotation speed, and it will cause severe thermal deformation. The problem is particularly serious on the occasion of large power application, such as all electric aero-engine. In this study, a prototype motorized spin-dle supported by five degree-of-freedom AMBs is developed. Homopolar and heteropolar AMBs are independently adopted as radial bearings. The influences of the two types of radial AMBs on the dynamic characteristics of the motorized spindle are comparatively investigated by theoretical analysis, test modal analysis and actual operation of the system. The iron loss of the two types of radial AMBs is analyzed by finite element software and verified through run-down experiments of the system. The results show that the structures of AMB have less influence on the dynamic char-acteristics of the motorized spindle. However, the homopolar structure can effectively reduce the iron loss of the radial AMB and it is useful for improving the overall performance of the motorized spindle.

  2. Sleep Spindle Deficit in Schizophrenia: Contextualization of Recent Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnovo, Anna; D'Agostino, Armando; Casetta, Cecilia; Sarasso, Simone; Ferrarelli, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    Sleep spindles are wax and waning brain oscillations at a frequency range of 11-16 Hz, lasting 0.5-2 s, that define non-rapid eye movement sleep stage 2. Over the past few years, several independent studies pointed to a decrease of sleep spindles in schizophrenia. The aim of this review is to contextualize these findings within the growing literature on these oscillations across other neuro-psychiatric disorders. Indeed, spindles reflect the coordinated activity of thalamocortical networks, and their abnormality can be observed in a variety of conditions that disrupt local or global thalamocortical connectivity. Although the broad methodological variability across studies limits the possibility of drawing firm conclusions, impaired spindling activity has been observed in several neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Despite such lack of specificity, schizophrenia remains the only condition with a typical late adolescence to young adulthood onset in which impaired spindling has been consistently reported. Further research is necessary to clearly define the pathogenetic mechanisms that lead to this deficit and the validity of its widespread use as a clinical biomarker. PMID:27299655

  3. Characteristics of motorized spindle supported by active magnetic bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Zhenyu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A motorized spindle supported by active magnetic bearings (AMBs is generally used for ultra-high-speed machining. Iron loss of radial AMB is very great owing to high rotation speed, and it will cause severe thermal deformation. The problem is particularly serious on the occasion of large power application, such as all electric aero-engine. In this study, a prototype motorized spindle supported by five degree-of-freedom AMBs is developed. Homopolar and heteropolar AMBs are independently adopted as radial bearings. The influences of the two types of radial AMBs on the dynamic characteristics of the motorized spindle are comparatively investigated by theoretical analysis, test modal analysis and actual operation of the system. The iron loss of the two types of radial AMBs is analyzed by finite element software and verified through run-down experiments of the system. The results show that the structures of AMB have less influence on the dynamic characteristics of the motorized spindle. However, the homopolar structure can effectively reduce the iron loss of the radial AMB and it is useful for improving the overall performance of the motorized spindle.

  4. GDP-Tubulin Incorporation into Growing Microtubules Modulates Polymer Stability.

    OpenAIRE

    Valiron, Odile; Arnal, Isabelle; Caudron, Nicolas; Job, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Microtubule growth proceeds through the endwise addition of nucleotide-bound tubulin dimers. The microtubule wall is composed of GDP-tubulin subunits, which are thought to come exclusively from the incorporation of GTP-tubulin complexes at microtubule ends followed by GTP hydrolysis within the polymer. The possibility of a direct GDP-tubulin incorporation into growing polymers is regarded as hardly compatible with recent structural data. Here, we have examined GTP-tubulin and GDP-tubulin inco...

  5. Microtubule-binding agents: a dynamic field of cancer therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Dumontet, Charles; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    International audience Microtubules are dynamic filamentous cytoskeletal proteins composed of tubulin and are an important therapeutic target in tumour cells. Agents that bind to microtubules have been part of the pharmacopoeia of anticancer therapy for decades and until the advent of targeted therapy, microtubules were the only alternative to DNA as a therapeutic target in cancer. The screening of a range of botanical species and marine organisms has yielded promising new antitubulin agen...

  6. Arabidopsis GCP3-interacting protein 1/MOZART 1 is an integral component of the γ-tubulin-containing microtubule nucleating complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masayoshi; Yagi, Noriyoshi; Kato, Takehide; Fujita, Satoshi; Kawashima, Noriyuki; Ehrhardt, David W; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    Microtubules in eukaryotic cells are nucleated from ring-shaped complexes that contain γ-tubulin and a family of homologous γ-tubulin complex proteins (GCPs), but the subunit composition of the complexes can vary among fungi, animals and plants. Arabidopsis GCP3-interacting protein 1 (GIP1), a small protein with no homology to the GCP family, interacts with GCP3 in vitro, and is a plant homolog of vertebrate mitotic-spindle organizing protein associated with a ring of γ-tubulin 1 (MOZART1), a recently identified component of the γ-tubulin complex in human cell lines. In this study, we characterized two closely related Arabidopsis GIP1s: GIP1a and GIP1b. Single mutants of gip1a and gip1b were indistinguishable from wild-type plants, but their double mutant was embryonic lethal, and showed impaired development of male gametophytes. Functional fusions of GIP1a with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used to purify GIP1a-containing complexes from Arabidopsis plants, which contained all the subunits (except NEDD1) previously identified in the Arabidopsis γ-tubulin complexes. GIP1a and GIP1b interacted specifically with Arabidopsis GCP3 in yeast. GFP-GIP1a labeled mitotic microtubule arrays in a pattern largely consistent with, but partly distinct from, the localization of the γ-tubulin complex containing GCP2 or GCP3 in planta. In interphase cortical arrays, the labeled complexes were preferentially recruited to existing microtubules, from which new microtubules were efficiently nucleated. However, in contrast to complexes labeled with tagged GCP2 or GCP3, their recruitment to cortical areas with no microtubules was rarely observed. These results indicate that GIP1/MOZART1 is an integral component of a subset of the Arabidopsis γ-tubulin complexes.

  7. Calculation of the Electromagnetic Field Around a Microtubule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Havelka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are important structures in the cytoskeleton which organizes the cell. A single microtubule is composed of electrically polar structures, tubulin heterodimers, which have a strong electric dipole moment. Vibrations are expected to be generated in microtubules, thus tubulin heterodimers oscillate as electric dipoles. This gives rise to an electromagnetic field which is detected around the cells. We calculate here the electromagnetic field of microtubules if they are excited at 1 GHz. This paper includes work done for the bachelor thesis of the first author. 

  8. Producing Conditional Mutants for Studying Plant Microtubule Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Cyr

    2009-09-29

    The cytoskeleton, and in particular its microtubule component, participates in several processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of microtubules into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. One of these, the cortical array, is notable for its role in directing the deposition of cellulose (the most prominent polymer in the biosphere). An understanding of how these arrays form, and the molecular interactions that contribute to their function, is incomplete. To gain a better understanding of how microtubules work, we have been working to characterize mutants in critical cytoskeletal genes. This characterization is being carried out at the subcellular level using vital microtubule gene constructs. In the last year of funding colleagues have discovered that gamma-tubulin complexes form along the lengths of cortical microtubules where they act to spawn new microtubules at a characteristic 40 deg angle. This finding complements nicely the finding from our lab (which was funded by the DOE) showing that microtubule encounters are angle dependent; high angles encounters results in catastrophic collisions while low angle encounters result in favorable zippering. The finding of a 40 deg spawn of new microtubules from extant microtubule, together with aforementioned rules of encounters, insures favorable co-alignment in the array. I was invited to write a New and Views essay on this topic and a PDF is attached (News and Views policy does not permit funding acknowledgments and so I was not allowed to acknowledge support from the DOE).

  9. Interplay between kinesin-1 and cortical dynein during axonal outgrowth and microtubule organization in Drosophila neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo, Urko; Winding, Michael; Lu, Wen; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2015-12-28

    In this study, we investigated how microtubule motors organize microtubules in Drosophila neurons. We showed that, during the initial stages of axon outgrowth, microtubules display mixed polarity and minus-end-out microtubules push the tip of the axon, consistent with kinesin-1 driving outgrowth by sliding antiparallel microtubules. At later stages, the microtubule orientation in the axon switches from mixed to uniform polarity with plus-end-out. Dynein knockdown prevents this rearrangement and results in microtubules of mixed orientation in axons and accumulation of microtubule minus-ends at axon tips. Microtubule reorganization requires recruitment of dynein to the actin cortex, as actin depolymerization phenocopies dynein depletion, and direct recruitment of dynein to the membrane bypasses the actin requirement. Our results show that cortical dynein slides 'minus-end-out' microtubules from the axon, generating uniform microtubule arrays. We speculate that differences in microtubule orientation between axons and dendrites could be dictated by differential activity of cortical dynein.

  10. Chromosome Bridges Maintain Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment throughout Mitosis and Rarely Break during Anaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampalona, Judit; Roscioli, Emanuele; Silkworth, William T; Bowden, Brent; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during cell division is essential to maintain genome stability, and chromosome segregation errors are causally linked to genetic disorders and cancer. An anaphase chromosome bridge is a particular chromosome segregation error observed in cells that enter mitosis with fused chromosomes/sister chromatids. The widely accepted Breakage/Fusion/Bridge cycle model proposes that anaphase chromosome bridges break during mitosis to generate chromosome ends that will fuse during the following cell cycle, thus forming new bridges that will break, and so on. However, various studies have also shown a link between chromosome bridges and aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. In this study, we investigated the behavior and properties of chromosome bridges during mitosis, with the idea to gain insight into the potential mechanism underlying chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. We find that only a small number of chromosome bridges break during anaphase, whereas the rest persist through mitosis into the subsequent cell cycle. We also find that the microtubule bundles (k-fibers) bound to bridge kinetochores are not prone to breakage/detachment, thus supporting the conclusion that k-fiber detachment is not the cause of chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. Instead, our data suggest that while the microtubules bound to the kinetochores of normally segregating chromosomes shorten substantially during anaphase, the k-fibers bound to bridge kinetochores shorten only slightly, and may even lengthen, during anaphase. This causes some of the bridge kinetochores/chromosomes to lag behind in a position that is proximal to the cell/spindle equator and may cause the bridged chromosomes to be segregated into the same daughter nucleus or to form a micronucleus.

  11. Dynamic Analysis of Axial Magnetic Forces for DVD Spindle Motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The axial magnetic force, induced by the complicated flux linkage distribution from rotor magnet and stator slotted, is constructed by different relative heights and calculated by 3D finite element method (FEM) to analyze the dynamic characteristics for a DVD spindle motor. The axial magnetic force is designed to provide an axial stiffness and govern the natural frequency of the dynamic performance. According to the simulation results and experimental measurements, the dynamic behaviors are significantly improved with a variation of relative height of rotor magnet and stator slotted on a DVD spindle motor.

  12. Imaging characteristics of spindle cell lipoma and its variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khashper, Alla; Zheng, Jiamin [McGill University Health Centre, Department of Radiology, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nahal, Ayoub [McGill University Health Centre, Department of Pathology, Montreal, QC (Canada); Discepola, Federico [Jewish General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    A spindle cell lipoma (SCL) is a relatively common tumor that can be challenging to the radiologist, pathologist, or surgeon to diagnose, particularly when internal fat content is scant or absent. Although these lesions may be found at various locations, the typical presentation for this lesion is a well-circumscribed and non-aggressive subcutaneous mass in the posterior neck presenting in a middle-aged to elderly man. In this article, the typical and atypical imaging characteristics of a spindle cell lipoma (SCL) will be reviewed. Knowledge of the common imaging and pathologic features of SCLs can help suggest the diagnosis and guide patient management. (orig.)

  13. Microtubules Have Opposite Orientation in Axons and Dendrites of Drosophila Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Michelle C.; Roegiers, Fabrice; Rolls, Melissa M

    2008-01-01

    In vertebrate neurons, axons have a uniform arrangement of microtubules with plus ends distal to the cell body (plus-end-out), and dendrites have equal numbers of plus- and minus-end-out microtubules. To determine whether microtubule orientation is a conserved feature of axons and dendrites, we analyzed microtubule orientation in invertebrate neurons. Using microtubule plus end dynamics, we mapped microtubule orientation in Drosophila sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. As expec...

  14. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  15. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-05-10

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new (to our knowledge) low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naïvely expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity. PMID:27166811

  16. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2016-05-01

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naively expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity.

  17. Beyond Rab GTPases Legionella activates the small GTPase Ran to promote microtubule polymerization, pathogen vacuole motility, and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbi, Hubert; Rothmeier, Eva; Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    Legionella spp. are amoebae-resistant environmental bacteria that replicate in free-living protozoa in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Upon transmission of Legionella pneumophila to the lung, the pathogens employ an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to grow in LCVs within alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires’ disease. LCV formation is a complex and robust process, which requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and involves the amazing number of 300 different translocated effector proteins. LCVs interact with the host cell's endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking pathway. Accordingly, in a proteomics approach as many as 12 small Rab GTPases implicated in endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking were identified and validated as LCV components. Moreover, the small GTPase Ran and its effector protein RanBP1 have been found to decorate the pathogen vacuole. Ran regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, spindle assembly, and cytokinesis, as well as the organization of non-centrosomal microtubules. In L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages, Ran and RanBP1 localize to LCVs, and the small GTPase is activated by the Icm/Dot substrate LegG1. Ran activation by LegG1 leads to microtubule stabilization and promotes intracellular pathogen vacuole motility and bacterial growth, as well as chemotaxis and migration of Legionella-infected cells. PMID:25496424

  18. Beyond Rab GTPases Legionella activates the small GTPase Ran to promote microtubule polymerization, pathogen vacuole motility, and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbi, Hubert; Rothmeier, Eva; Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    Legionella spp. are amoebae-resistant environmental bacteria that replicate in free-living protozoa in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Upon transmission of Legionella pneumophila to the lung, the pathogens employ an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to grow in LCVs within alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. LCV formation is a complex and robust process, which requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and involves the amazing number of 300 different translocated effector proteins. LCVs interact with the host cell's endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking pathway. Accordingly, in a proteomics approach as many as 12 small Rab GTPases implicated in endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking were identified and validated as LCV components. Moreover, the small GTPase Ran and its effector protein RanBP1 have been found to decorate the pathogen vacuole. Ran regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, spindle assembly, and cytokinesis, as well as the organization of non-centrosomal microtubules. In L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages, Ran and RanBP1 localize to LCVs, and the small GTPase is activated by the Icm/Dot substrate LegG1. Ran activation by LegG1 leads to microtubule stabilization and promotes intracellular pathogen vacuole motility and bacterial growth, as well as chemotaxis and migration of Legionella-infected cells.

  19. Stiffness Identification of Spindle-Toolholder Joint Based on Finite Difference Technique and Residual Compensation Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Zhifeng Liu; Xiaolei Song; Yongsheng Zhao; Ligang Cai; Hongsheng Guo; Jianchuan Ma

    2013-01-01

    The chatter vibration in high-speed machining mostly originates from the flexible connection of spindle and toolholder. Accurate identification of spindle-toolholder joint is crucial to predict machining stability of spindle system. This paper presents an enhanced stiffness identification method for the spindle-toolholder joint, in which the rotational degree of freedom (RDOF) is included. RDOF frequency response functions (FRFs) are formulated based on finite difference technique to construc...

  20. Automatic Sleep Spindle Detection and Genetic Influence Estimation Using Continuous Wavelet Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Marek eAdamczyk; Lisa eGenzel; Martin eDresler; Axel eSteiger; Elisabeth eFriess

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence for the role of sleep spindles in neuroplasticity has led to an increased interest in these non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep oscillations. It has been hypothesized that fast and slow spindles might play a different role in memory processing. Here, we present a new sleep spindle detection algorithm utilizing a continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and individual adjustment of slow and fast spindle frequency ranges. Eighteen nap recordings of ten subjects were used for algorit...

  1. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  2. Using a Quadrature Parameter Sinusoidal Model to Characterize the Structure of EEG Sleep Spindles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Jaleel ePalliyali

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are essentially non-stationary signals that display time and frequency-varying characteristics within their envelope, which makes it difficult to accurately identify its instantaneous frequency and amplitude. To allow a better parameterization of the structure of spindle, we propose modeling spindles using a Quadratic Parameter Sinusoid (QPS. The QPS is well suited to model spindle activity as it utilizes a quadratic representation to capture the inherent duration and frequency variations within spindles. The effectiveness of our proposed model and estimation technique was quantitatively evaluated in parameter determination experiments using simulated spindle-like signals and real spindles in the presence of background EEG. We used the QPS parameters to predict the energy and frequency of spindles with a mean accuracy of 92.34% and 97.73% respectively. We also show that the QPS parameters provide a quantification of the amplitude and frequency variations occurring within sleep spindles that can be observed visually and related to their characteristic ‘waxing and waning’ shape. We analyze the variations in the parameters values to present how they can be used to understand the inter- and intra-participant variations in spindle structure. Finally, we present a comparison of the QPS parameters of spindles and non-spindles, which shows a substantial difference in parameter values between the two classes.

  3. Developmental Changes in Sleep Spindle Characteristics and Sigma Power across Early Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J. McClain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles, a prominent feature of the non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep electroencephalogram (EEG, are linked to cognitive abilities. Early childhood is a time of rapid cognitive and neurophysiological maturation; however, little is known about developmental changes in sleep spindles. In this study, we longitudinally examined trajectories of multiple sleep spindle characteristics (i.e., spindle duration, frequency, integrated spindle amplitude, and density and power in the sigma frequency range (10–16 Hz across ages 2, 3, and 5 years (n=8; 3 males. At each time point, nocturnal sleep EEG was recorded in-home after 13-h of prior wakefulness. Spindle duration, integrated spindle amplitude, and sigma power increased with age across all EEG derivations (C3A2, C4A1, O2A1, and O1A2; all ps < 0.05. We also found a developmental decrease in mean spindle frequency (p<0.05 but no change in spindle density with increasing age. Thus, sleep spindles increased in duration and amplitude but decreased in frequency across early childhood. Our data characterize early developmental changes in sleep spindles, which may advance understanding of thalamocortical brain connectivity and associated lifelong disease processes. These findings also provide unique insights into spindle ontogenesis in early childhood and may help identify electrophysiological features related to healthy and aberrant brain maturation.

  4. Involvement of Spindles in Memory Consolidation Is Slow Wave Sleep-Specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Roy; Hofman, Winni F.; Talamini, Lucia M.

    2012-01-01

    Both sleep spindles and slow oscillations have been implicated in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Whereas spindles occur during both light and deep sleep, slow oscillations are restricted to deep sleep, raising the possibility of greater consolidation-related spindle involvement during deep sleep. We assessed declarative memory retention…

  5. Automatic Sleep Spindle Detection and Genetic Influence Estimation Using Continuous Wavelet Transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamczyk, M.; Genzel, L.; Dresler, M.; Steiger, A.; Friess, E.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence for the role of sleep spindles in neuroplasticity has led to an increased interest in these non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep oscillations. It has been hypothesized that fast and slow spindles might play a different role in memory processing. Here, we present a new sleep spindle

  6. Dynamic microtubules regulate dendritic spine morphology and synaptic plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jaworski; L.C. Kapitein; S. Montenegro Gouveia; B.R. Dortland; P.S. Wulf; I. Grigoriev; P. Camera; S.A. Spangler; P. Di Stefano; J. Demmers; H. Krugers; P. Defilippi; A. Akhmanova; C.C. Hoogenraad

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the major sites of excitatory synaptic input, and their morphological changes have been linked to learning and memory processes. Here, we report that growing microtubule plus ends decorated by the microtubule tip-tracking protein EB3 enter spines and can modulate spine morpholog

  7. Pattern formation of cortical microtubules and cellulose microfibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we study the roles of microtubules at the plasma membrane and the cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall and how they are organized. This topic is introduces in chapter 1. In chapter 2 we study the formation of the transverse cortical microtubule array that is characteristic for elon

  8. Ice recovery assay for detection of Golgi-derived microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Ashley D; Fomicheva, Maria; Kaverina, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Proper organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton is essential for many cellular processes including maintenance of Golgi organization and cell polarity. Traditionally, the centrosome is considered to be the major microtubule organizing center (MTOC) of the cell; however, microtubule nucleation can also occur through centrosome-independent mechanisms. Recently, the Golgi has been described as an additional, centrosome-independent, MTOC with distinct cellular functions. Golgi-derived microtubules contribute to the formation of an asymmetric microtubule network, control Golgi organization, and support polarized trafficking and directed migration in motile cells. In this chapter, we present an assay using recovery from ice treatment to evaluate the potential of the Golgi, or other MTOCs, to nucleate microtubules. This technique allows for clear separation of distinct MTOCs and observation of newly nucleated microtubules at these locations, which are normally obscured by the dense microtubule network present at steady-state conditions. This type of analysis is important for discovery and characterization of noncentrosomal MTOCs and, ultimately, understanding of their unique cellular functions. PMID:24295320

  9. Molecular and Mechanical Causes of Microtubule Catastrophe and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Pavel; Gudimchuk, Nikita; Voevodin, Vladimir; Tikhonravov, Alexander; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L

    2015-12-15

    Tubulin polymers, microtubules, can switch abruptly from the assembly to shortening. These infrequent transitions, termed "catastrophes", affect numerous cellular processes but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We approached this complex stochastic system using advanced coarse-grained molecular dynamics modeling of tubulin-tubulin interactions. Unlike in previous simplified models of dynamic microtubules, the catastrophes in this model arise owing to fluctuations in the composition and conformation of a growing microtubule tip, most notably in the number of protofilament curls. In our model, dynamic evolution of the stochastic microtubule tip configurations over a long timescale, known as the system's "aging", gives rise to the nonexponential distribution of microtubule lifetimes, consistent with experiment. We show that aging takes place in the absence of visible changes in the microtubule wall or tip, as this complex molecular-mechanical system evolves slowly and asymptotically toward the steady-state level of the catastrophe-promoting configurations. This new, to our knowledge, theoretical basis will assist detailed mechanistic investigations of the mechanisms of action of different microtubule-binding proteins and drugs, thereby enabling accurate control over the microtubule dynamics to treat various pathologies. PMID:26682815

  10. Resolving bundled microtubules using anti-tubulin nanobodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikhaylova, Marina; Cloin, Bas M C; Finan, Kieran; van den Berg, Robert; Teeuw, Jalmar; Kijanka, Marta M; Sokolowski, Mikolaj; Katrukha, Eugene A; Maidorn, Manuel; Opazo, Felipe; Moutel, Sandrine; Vantard, Marylin; Perez, Frank; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Ewers, Helge; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are hollow biopolymers of 25-nm diameter and are key constituents of the cytoskeleton. In neurons, microtubules are organized differently between axons and dendrites, but their precise organization in different compartments is not completely understood. Super-resolution microscopy techn

  11. Structure and Function of Microtubule-depolymerizing Kin-I Kinesins%微管解聚型驱动蛋白的结构与功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋蕾蕾; 吴作基; 王春光

    2008-01-01

    Kin-I kinesins are one important class of microtubule regulatory proteins which can depolymerize microtubules in an ATP-dependent manner. They have critical functions in neuronal development, spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Over the past ten years, a big amount of studies have been done to understand Kin-I kinesins. Here, several aspects of Kin-I kinesins are reviewed briefly, including the structure, mechanism of microtubule depolymerization and their physiological functions.%Kin-I 驱动蛋白(Kin-I kinesins)是一类重要的微管调节蛋白,具有依赖ATP的微管解聚活性.这类驱动蛋白在神经元的发育、纺锤体的组装和染色体的分离过程中起着重要的作用.自被发现以来的十几年里,人们对Kin-I驱动蛋白做了大量的研究工作.现对Kin-I驱动蛋白的结构、微管解聚活性及生理功能等方面进行简要综述.

  12. Sleep spindle alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Nikolic, Miki; Warby, Simon C.;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify changes of sleep spindles (SS) in the EEG of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Five sleep experts manually identified SS at a central scalp location (C3-A2) in 15 PD and 15 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Each SS was given a confidence score...

  13. Spindle Oscillations in Sleep Disorders: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren M. Weiner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of sleep microarchitecture and neural oscillations is an increasingly popular technique for quantifying EEG sleep activity. Many studies have examined sleep spindle oscillations in sleep-disordered adults; however reviews of this literature are scarce. As such, our overarching aim was to critically review experimental studies examining sleep spindle activity between adults with and without different sleep disorders. Articles were obtained using a systematic methodology with a priori criteria. Thirty-seven studies meeting final inclusion criteria were reviewed, with studies grouped across three categories: insomnia, hypersomnias, and sleep-related movement disorders (including parasomnias. Studies of patients with insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing were more abundant relative to other diagnoses. All studies were cross-sectional. Studies were largely inconsistent regarding spindle activity differences between clinical and nonclinical groups, with some reporting greater or less activity, while many others reported no group differences. Stark inconsistencies in sample characteristics (e.g., age range and diagnostic criteria and methods of analysis (e.g., spindle bandwidth selection, visual detection versus digital filtering, absolute versus relative spectral power, and NREM2 versus NREM3 suggest a need for greater use of event-based detection methods and increased research standardization. Hypotheses regarding the clinical and empirical implications of these findings, and suggestions for potential future studies, are also discussed.

  14. Modelling muscle spindle dynamics for a proprioceptive prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ian; Constandinou, Timothy G

    2013-01-01

    Muscle spindles are found throughout our skeletal muscle tissue and continuously provide us with a sense of our limbs' position and motion (proprioception). This paper advances a model for generating artificial muscle spindle signals for a prosthetic limb, with the aim of one day providing amputees with a sense of feeling in their artificial limb. By utilising the Opensim biomechanical modelling package the relationship between a joint's angle and the length of surrounding muscles is estimated for a prosthetic limb. This is then applied to the established Mileusnic model to determine the associated muscle spindle firing pattern. This complete system model is then reduced to allow for a computationally efficient hardware implementation. This reduction is achieved with minimal impact on accuracy by selecting key mono-articular muscles and fitting equations to relate joint angle to muscle length. Parameter values fitting the Mileusnic model to human spindles are then proposed and validated against previously published human neural recordings. Finally, a model for fusimotor signals is also proposed based on data previously recorded from reduced animal experiments. PMID:24110089

  15. Spindle assembly checkpoint protein expression correlates with cellular proliferation and shorter time to recurrence in ovarian cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrogan, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal of the gynecological malignancies, often presenting at an advanced stage. Treatment is hampered by high levels of drug resistance. The taxanes are microtubule stabilizing agents, used as first-line agents in the treatment of OC that exert their apoptotic effects through the spindle assembly checkpoint. BUB1-related protein kinase (BUBR1) and mitotic arrest deficient 2 (MAD2), essential spindle assembly checkpoint components, play a key role in response to taxanes. BUBR1, MAD2, and Ki-67 were assessed on an OC tissue microarray platform representing 72 OC tumors of varying histologic subtypes. Sixty-one of these patients received paclitaxel and platinum agents combined; 11 received platinum alone. Overall survival was available for all 72 patients, whereas recurrence-free survival (RFS) was available for 66 patients. Increased BUBR1 expression was seen in serous carcinomas, compared with other histologies (P = .03). Increased BUBR1 was significantly associated with tumors of advanced stage (P = .05). Increased MAD2 and BUBR1 expression also correlated with increased cellular proliferation (P < .0002 and P = .02, respectively). Reduced MAD2 nuclear intensity was associated with a shorter RFS (P = .03), in ovarian tumors of differing histologic subtype (n = 66). In this subgroup, for those women who received paclitaxel and platinum agents combined (n = 57), reduced MAD2 intensity also identified women with a shorter RFS (P < .007). For the entire cohort of patients, irrespective of histologic subtype or treatment, MAD2 nuclear intensity retained independent significance in a multivariate model, with tumors showing reduced nuclear MAD2 intensity identifying patients with a poorer RFS (P = .05).

  16. Mean Lifetime of Microtubules Attached to Nucleating Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple two-phase (cap, no cap) macroscopic model describing the kinetic behavior at a labile tip of a microtubule has been proposed [Hill, T. L. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 6728-6732]. In the model, a microtubule exists either in a slowly growing phase (first-order rate constant α characterized by the existence of a GTP-tubulin cap at the growing tip; or the same microtubule exists in a rapidly shrinking phase (first-order rate constant, β ),, which is entered if/when the GTP-tubulin cap is lost through a fluctuation, thus exposing GDP-tubulin subunits, which constitute the body of the microtubule. Transition between the two phases-- i.e., loss of a cap (first-order rate constant, k) or formation of a new cap (first-order rate constant, k') occurs very infrequently and in a stochastic manner. In vitro experiments with centrosome-nucleated microtubules by Mitchison and Kirschner and Monte Carlo kinetic simulations, based on a realistic set of microscopic rate constants that apply to the end of a microtubule, suggest this alternation between two ``quasimacroscopic'' phases. In this paper, I outline the calculation of the mean lifetime of a microtubule nucleated on a centrosome by using Hill's model. For a microtubule M units long in the slowly growing phase, the mean lifetime for complete depolymerization is [M(k + k') + α +β ](β k - α k')-1, provided that β k > α k'. If the microtubule is in the rapidly shrinking phase, then the mean lifetime is M(k + k')(β k - α k')-1, provided that β k > α k'. In case β k < α k', the microtubule grows indefinitely, and the mean lifetime is infinite.

  17. Mitotic spindle defects and chromosome mis-segregation induced by LDL/cholesterol-implications for Niemann-Pick C1, Alzheimer's disease, and atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoneta Granic

    Full Text Available Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol is a risk factor for both Alzheimer's disease (AD and Atherosclerosis (CVD, suggesting a common lipid-sensitive step in their pathogenesis. Previous results show that AD and CVD also share a cell cycle defect: chromosome instability and up to 30% aneuploidy-in neurons and other cells in AD and in smooth muscle cells in atherosclerotic plaques in CVD. Indeed, specific degeneration of aneuploid neurons accounts for 90% of neuronal loss in AD brain, indicating that aneuploidy underlies AD neurodegeneration. Cell/mouse models of AD develop similar aneuploidy through amyloid-beta (Aß inhibition of specific microtubule motors and consequent disruption of mitotic spindles. Here we tested the hypothesis that, like upregulated Aß, elevated LDL/cholesterol and altered intracellular cholesterol homeostasis also causes chromosomal instability. Specifically we found that: 1 high dietary cholesterol induces aneuploidy in mice, satisfying the hypothesis' first prediction, 2 Niemann-Pick C1 patients accumulate aneuploid fibroblasts, neurons, and glia, demonstrating a similar aneugenic effect of intracellular cholesterol accumulation in humans 3 oxidized LDL, LDL, and cholesterol, but not high-density lipoprotein (HDL, induce chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy in cultured cells, including neuronal precursors, indicating that LDL/cholesterol directly affects the cell cycle, 4 LDL-induced aneuploidy requires the LDL receptor, but not Aß, showing that LDL works differently than Aß, with the same end result, 5 cholesterol treatment disrupts the structure of the mitotic spindle, providing a cell biological mechanism for its aneugenic activity, and 6 ethanol or calcium chelation attenuates lipoprotein-induced chromosome mis-segregation, providing molecular insights into cholesterol's aneugenic mechanism, specifically through its rigidifying effect on the cell membrane, and potentially explaining why ethanol

  18. Microtubules as a Critical Target for Arsenic Toxicity in Lung Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinzhi Zhao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available To understand mechanisms for arsenic toxicity in the lung, we examined effects of sodium m-arsenite (As3+ on microtubule (MT assembly in vitro (0–40 µM, in cultured rat lung fibroblasts (RFL6, 0–20 µM for 24 h and in the rat animal model (intratracheal instillation of 2.02 mg As/kg body weight, once a week for 5 weeks. As3+ induced a dose-dependent disassembly of cellular MTs and enhancement of the free tubulin pool, initiating an autoregulation of tubulin synthesis manifest as inhibition of steady-state mRNA levels of βI-tubulin in dosed lung cells and tissues. Spindle MT injuries by As3+ were concomitant with chromosomal disorientations. As3+ reduced the binding to tubulin of [3H]N-ethylmaleimide (NEM, an -SH group reagent, resulting in inhibition of MT polymerization in vitro with bovine brain tubulins which was abolished by addition of dithiothreitol (DTT suggesting As3+ action upon tubulin through -SH groups. In response to As3+, cells elevated cellular thiols such as metallothionein. Taxol, a tubulin polymerization agent, antagonized both As3+ and NEM induced MT depolymerization. MT–associated proteins (MAPs essential for the MT stability were markedly suppressed in As3+-treated cells. Thus, tubulin sulfhydryls and MAPs are major molecular targets for As3+ damage to the lung triggering MT disassembly cascades.

  19. PP2A regulates kinetochore-microtubule attachment during meiosis I in oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, An; Shi, Peiliang; Song, Anying; Zou, Dayuan; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Pengyu; Huang, Zan; Wang, Qinghua; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    Studies using in vitro cultured oocytes have indicated that the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major serine/threonine protein phosphatase, participates in multiple steps of meiosis. Details of oocyte maturation regulation by PP2A remain unclear and an in vivo model can provide more convincing information. Here, we inactivated PP2A by mutating genes encoding for its catalytic subunits (PP2Acs) in mouse oocytes. We found that eliminating both PP2Acs caused female infertility. Oocytes lacking PP2Acs failed to complete 1(st) meiotic division due to chromosome misalignment and abnormal spindle assembly. In mitosis, PP2A counteracts Aurora kinase B/C (AurkB/C) to facilitate correct kinetochore-microtubule (KT-MT) attachment. In meiosis I in oocyte, we found that PP2Ac deficiency destabilized KT-MT attachments. Chemical inhibition of AurkB/C in PP2Ac-null oocytes partly restored the formation of lateral/merotelic KT-MT attachments but not correct KT-MT attachments. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PP2Acs are essential for chromosome alignments and regulate the formation of correct KT-MT attachments in meiosis I in oocytes. PMID:27096707

  20. Genetic evidence for a microtubule-capture mechanism during polarised growth of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manck, Raphael; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Herrero, Saturnino; Takeshita, Norio; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Fischer, Reinhard

    2015-10-01

    The cellular switch from symmetry to polarity in eukaryotes depends on the microtubule (MT) and actin cytoskeletons. In fungi such as Schizosaccharomyces pombe or Aspergillus nidulans, the MT cytoskeleton determines the sites of actin polymerization through cortical cell-end marker proteins. Here we describe A. nidulans MT guidance protein A (MigA) as the first ortholog of the karyogamy protein Kar9 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in filamentous fungi. A. nidulans MigA interacts with the cortical ApsA protein and is involved in spindle positioning during mitosis. MigA is also associated with septal and nuclear MT organizing centers (MTOCs). Super-resolution photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) analyses revealed that MigA is recruited to assembling and retracting MT plus ends in an EbA-dependent manner. MigA is required for MT convergence in hyphal tips and plays a role in correct localization of the cell-end markers TeaA and TeaR. In addition, MigA interacts with a class-V myosin, suggesting that an active mechanism exists to capture MTs and to pull the ends along actin filaments. Hence, the organization of MTs and actin depend on each other, and positive feedback loops ensure robust polar growth. PMID:26272919

  1. Active Erk Regulates Microtubule Stability in H-ras-Transformed Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene E. Harrison

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that activated erk regulates cell functions, at least in part, by mechanisms that do not require gene transcription. Here we show that the map kinase, erk, decorates microtubules (MTs and mitotic spindles in both parental and mutant active rastransfected 10T1 /2 fibroblasts and MCF10A breast epithelial cells. Approximately 20% of total cellular erk decorated MTs in both cell lines. A greater proportion of activated erk was associated with MTs in the presence of mutant active H-ras than in parental cells. Activation of erk by the ras pathway coincided with a decrease in the stability of MT, as detected by a stability marker. The MKK1 inhibitor, PD98059 and transfection of a dominant negative MKK1 blocked ras-induced instability of MTs but did not modify the association of erk with MTs or affect MT stability of the parental cells. These results indicate that the subset of active erk kinase that associates with MTs contributes to their instability in the presence of a mutant active ras. The MT-associated subset of active erk likely contributes to the enhanced invasive and proliferative abilities of cells containing mutant active H-ras.

  2. Sleep Spindles as an Electrographic Element: Description and Automatic Detection Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindle is a peculiar oscillatory brain pattern which has been associated with a number of sleep (isolation from exteroceptive stimuli, memory consolidation) and individual characteristics (intellectual quotient). Oddly enough, the definition of a spindle is both incomplete and restrictive. In consequence, there is no consensus about how to detect spindles. Visual scoring is cumbersome and user dependent. To analyze spindle activity in a more robust way, automatic sleep spindle detection methods are essential. Various algorithms were developed, depending on individual research interest, which hampers direct comparisons and meta-analyses. In this review, sleep spindle is first defined physically and topographically. From this general description, we tentatively extract the main characteristics to be detected and analyzed. A nonexhaustive list of automatic spindle detection methods is provided along with a description of their main processing principles. Finally, we propose a technique to assess the detection methods in a robust and comparable way.

  3. Developmental Changes in Sleep Spindle Characteristics and Sigma Power across Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Ian J; Lustenberger, Caroline; Achermann, Peter; Lassonde, Jonathan M; Kurth, Salome; LeBourgeois, Monique K

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles, a prominent feature of the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), are linked to cognitive abilities. Early childhood is a time of rapid cognitive and neurophysiological maturation; however, little is known about developmental changes in sleep spindles. In this study, we longitudinally examined trajectories of multiple sleep spindle characteristics (i.e., spindle duration, frequency, integrated spindle amplitude, and density) and power in the sigma frequency range (10-16 Hz) across ages 2, 3, and 5 years (n = 8; 3 males). At each time point, nocturnal sleep EEG was recorded in-home after 13-h of prior wakefulness. Spindle duration, integrated spindle amplitude, and sigma power increased with age across all EEG derivations (C3A2, C4A1, O2A1, and O1A2; all ps ontogenesis in early childhood and may help identify electrophysiological features related to healthy and aberrant brain maturation. PMID:27110405

  4. Sleep Spindles as an Electrographic Element: Description and Automatic Detection Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothée Coppieters ’t Wallant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindle is a peculiar oscillatory brain pattern which has been associated with a number of sleep (isolation from exteroceptive stimuli, memory consolidation and individual characteristics (intellectual quotient. Oddly enough, the definition of a spindle is both incomplete and restrictive. In consequence, there is no consensus about how to detect spindles. Visual scoring is cumbersome and user dependent. To analyze spindle activity in a more robust way, automatic sleep spindle detection methods are essential. Various algorithms were developed, depending on individual research interest, which hampers direct comparisons and meta-analyses. In this review, sleep spindle is first defined physically and topographically. From this general description, we tentatively extract the main characteristics to be detected and analyzed. A nonexhaustive list of automatic spindle detection methods is provided along with a description of their main processing principles. Finally, we propose a technique to assess the detection methods in a robust and comparable way.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of C-terminal tails in cellular microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L.; Sataric, Bogdan M.; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Bugay, Aleksandr N.; Sataric, Miljko V.

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano-electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C-terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C-terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink-waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process.

  6. α-Synuclein is a Novel Microtubule Dynamase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartelli, Daniele; Aliverti, Alessandro; Barbiroli, Alberto; Santambrogio, Carlo; Ragg, Enzio M.; Casagrande, Francesca V.M.; Cantele, Francesca; Beltramone, Silvia; Marangon, Jacopo; De Gregorio, Carmelita; Pandini, Vittorio; Emanuele, Marco; Chieregatti, Evelina; Pieraccini, Stefano; Holmqvist, Staffan; Bubacco, Luigi; Roybon, Laurent; Pezzoli, Gianni; Grandori, Rita; Arnal, Isabelle; Cappelletti, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a presynaptic protein associated to Parkinson’s disease, which is unstructured when free in the cytoplasm and adopts α helical conformation when bound to vesicles. After decades of intense studies, α-Synuclein physiology is still difficult to clear up due to its interaction with multiple partners and its involvement in a pletora of neuronal functions. Here, we looked at the remarkably neglected interplay between α-Synuclein and microtubules, which potentially impacts on synaptic functionality. In order to identify the mechanisms underlying these actions, we investigated the interaction between purified α-Synuclein and tubulin. We demonstrated that α-Synuclein binds to microtubules and tubulin α2β2 tetramer; the latter interaction inducing the formation of helical segment(s) in the α-Synuclein polypeptide. This structural change seems to enable α-Synuclein to promote microtubule nucleation and to enhance microtubule growth rate and catastrophe frequency, both in vitro and in cell. We also showed that Parkinson’s disease-linked α-Synuclein variants do not undergo tubulin-induced folding and cause tubulin aggregation rather than polymerization. Our data enable us to propose α-Synuclein as a novel, foldable, microtubule-dynamase, which influences microtubule organisation through its binding to tubulin and its regulating effects on microtubule nucleation and dynamics. PMID:27628239

  7. Roles for microtubule and microfilament cytoskeletons in animal cell cytokinesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhongcai; CAI Shang; JIANG Qing; ZHANG Chuanmao; TANG Xiaowei

    2005-01-01

    Microtubule and microfilament cytoskeletons play key roles in the whole process of cytokinesis. Although a number of hypotheses have been proposed to elucidate the mechanism of cytokinesis by microtubule and actin filament cytoskeletons, many reports are conflicting. In our study, combining the cytoskeletons drug treatments with the time-lapse video technology, we retested the key roles of microtubule and actin filament in cytokinesis. The results showed that depolymerization of microtubules by Nocodazole after the initiation of furrowing would not inhibit the furrow ingression, but obviously decrease the stiffness of daughter cells. Depolymerizing actin filaments by Cytochalasin B before metaphase would inhibit the initiation of furrowing but not chromosome segregation, resulting in the formation of binucleate cells; however, depolymerizing actin filaments during anaphase would prevent furrowing and lead to the regress of established furrow, also resulting in the formation of binucleate cells. Further, depolymerizing microtubules and actin filaments simultaneously after metaphase would cause the quick regress of the furrow and the formation of binucleate cells. From these results we propose that a successful cytokinesis requires functions and coordination of both the microtubule and actin filament cytoskeletons. Microtubule cytoskeleton may function in the positioning and initiation of cleavage furrow, and the actin filament cytoskeleton may play key roles in the initiation and ingression of the furrow.

  8. A thermodynamic model of microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard M A G Piette

    Full Text Available Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo model of the assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We use thermodynamic laws to reduce the number of parameters of our model and, in particular, we take into account the contribution of water to the entropy of the system. We fit all parameters of the model from published experimental data using the GTP tubulin dimer attachment rate and the lateral and longitudinal binding energies of GTP and GDP tubulin dimers at both ends. Also we calculate and incorporate the GTP hydrolysis rate. We have applied our model and can mimic published experimental data, which formerly suggested a single layer GTP tubulin dimer microtubule cap, to show that these data demonstrate that the GTP cap can fluctuate and can be several microns long.

  9. α-Synuclein is a Novel Microtubule Dynamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartelli, Daniele; Aliverti, Alessandro; Barbiroli, Alberto; Santambrogio, Carlo; Ragg, Enzio M; Casagrande, Francesca V M; Cantele, Francesca; Beltramone, Silvia; Marangon, Jacopo; De Gregorio, Carmelita; Pandini, Vittorio; Emanuele, Marco; Chieregatti, Evelina; Pieraccini, Stefano; Holmqvist, Staffan; Bubacco, Luigi; Roybon, Laurent; Pezzoli, Gianni; Grandori, Rita; Arnal, Isabelle; Cappelletti, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a presynaptic protein associated to Parkinson's disease, which is unstructured when free in the cytoplasm and adopts α helical conformation when bound to vesicles. After decades of intense studies, α-Synuclein physiology is still difficult to clear up due to its interaction with multiple partners and its involvement in a pletora of neuronal functions. Here, we looked at the remarkably neglected interplay between α-Synuclein and microtubules, which potentially impacts on synaptic functionality. In order to identify the mechanisms underlying these actions, we investigated the interaction between purified α-Synuclein and tubulin. We demonstrated that α-Synuclein binds to microtubules and tubulin α2β2 tetramer; the latter interaction inducing the formation of helical segment(s) in the α-Synuclein polypeptide. This structural change seems to enable α-Synuclein to promote microtubule nucleation and to enhance microtubule growth rate and catastrophe frequency, both in vitro and in cell. We also showed that Parkinson's disease-linked α-Synuclein variants do not undergo tubulin-induced folding and cause tubulin aggregation rather than polymerization. Our data enable us to propose α-Synuclein as a novel, foldable, microtubule-dynamase, which influences microtubule organisation through its binding to tubulin and its regulating effects on microtubule nucleation and dynamics. PMID:27628239

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of C-terminal tails in cellular microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L; Sataric, Bogdan M; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Bugay, Aleksandr N; Sataric, Miljko V

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano-electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C-terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C-terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink-waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process. PMID:27475079

  11. A comparison of two sleep spindle detection methods based on all night averages: individually adjusted versus fixed frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Przemyslaw Ujma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are frequently studied for their relationship with state and trait cognitive variables, and they are thought to play an important role in sleep-related memory consolidation. Due to their frequent occurrence in NREM sleep, the detection of sleep spindles is only feasible using automatic algorithms, of which a large number is available. We compared subject averages of the spindle parameters computed by a fixed frequency (11-13 Hz for slow spindles, 13-15 Hz for fast spindles automatic detection algorithm and the individual adjustment method (IAM, which uses individual frequency bands for sleep spindle detection. Fast spindle duration and amplitude are strongly correlated in the two algorithms, but there is little overlap in fast spindle density and slow spindle parameters in general. The agreement between fixed and manually determined sleep spindle frequencies is limited, especially in case of slow spindles. This is the most likely reason for the poor agreement between the two detection methods in case of slow spindle parameters. Our results suggest that while various algorithms may reliably detect fast spindles, a more sophisticated algorithm primed to individual spindle frequencies is necessary for the detection of slow spindles as well as individual variations in the number of spindles in general.

  12. Tau mediates microtubule bundle architectures mimicking fascicles of microtubules found in the axon initial segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Peter J.; Song, Chaeyeon; Deek, Joanna; Miller, Herbert P.; Li, Youli; Choi, Myung Chul; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2016-01-01

    Tau, an intrinsically disordered protein confined to neuronal axons, binds to and regulates microtubule dynamics. Although there have been observations of string-like microtubule fascicles in the axon initial segment (AIS) and hexagonal bundles in neurite-like processes in non-neuronal cells overexpressing Tau, cell-free reconstitutions have not replicated either geometry. Here we map out the energy landscape of Tau-mediated, GTP-dependent ‘active' microtubule bundles at 37 °C, as revealed by synchrotron SAXS and TEM. Widely spaced bundles (wall-to-wall distance Dw–w≈25–41 nm) with hexagonal and string-like symmetry are observed, the latter mimicking bundles found in the AIS. A second energy minimum (Dw–w≈16–23 nm) is revealed under osmotic pressure. The wide spacing results from a balance between repulsive forces, due to Tau's projection domain (PD), and a stabilizing sum of transient sub-kBT cationic/anionic charge–charge attractions mediated by weakly penetrating opposing PDs. This landscape would be significantly affected by charge-altering modifications of Tau associated with neurodegeneration. PMID:27452526

  13. Tau Induces Cooperative Taxol Binding to Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jennifer; Santangelo, Christian; Victoria, Makrides; Fygenson, Deborah

    2004-03-01

    Taxol and tau are two ligands which stabilize the microtubule (MT) lattice. Taxol is an anti-mitotic drug that binds β tubulin in the MT interior. Tau is a MT-associated protein that binds both α and β tubulin on the MT exterior. Both taxol and tau reduce MT dynamics and promote tubulin polymerization. Tau alone also acts as a buttress to bundle, stiffen, and space MTs. A structural study recently suggested that taxol and tau may interact by binding to the same site. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that tau induces taxol to bind MTs cooperatively depending on the tau concentration. We develop a model that correctly fits the data in the absence of tau and yields a measure of taxol cooperativity when tau is present.

  14. Structural insights into microtubule doublet interactions inaxonemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Sui, Haixin

    2007-06-06

    Coordinated sliding of microtubule doublets, driven by dynein motors, produces periodic beating of the axoneme. Recent structural studies of the axoneme have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal new details of the interactions among some of the multitude of proteins that form the axoneme and regulate its movement. Connections among the several sets of dyneins, in particular, suggest ways in which their actions may be coordinated. Study of the molecular architecture of isolated doublets has provided a structural basis for understanding the doublet's mechanical properties that are related to the bending of the axoneme, and has also offered insight into its potential role in the mechanism of dynein activity regulation.

  15. Birefringence of single and bundled microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenbourg, R; Salmon, E D; Tran, P T

    1998-01-01

    We have measured the birefringence of microtubules (MTs) and of MT-based macromolecular assemblies in vitro and in living cells by using the new Pol-Scope. A single microtubule in aqueous suspension and imaged with a numerical aperture of 1.4 had a peak retardance of 0.07 nm. The peak retardance of a small bundle increased linearly with the number of MTs in the bundle. Axonemes (prepared from sea urchin sperm) had a peak retardance 20 times higher than that of single MTs, in accordance with the nine doublets and two singlets arrangement of parallel MTs in the axoneme. Measured filament retardance decreased when the filament was defocused or the numerical aperture of the imaging system was decreased. However, the retardance "area," which we defined as the image retardance integrated along a line perpendicular to the filament axis, proved to be independent of focus and of numerical aperture. These results are in good agreement with a theory that we developed for measuring retardances with imaging optics. Our theoretical concept is based on Wiener's theory of mixed dielectrics, which is well established for nonimaging applications. We extend its use to imaging systems by considering the coherence region defined by the optical set-up. Light scattered from within that region interferes coherently in the image point. The presence of a filament in the coherence region leads to a polarization dependent scattering cross section and to a finite retardance measured in the image point. Similar to resolution measurements, the linear dimension of the coherence region for retardance measurements is on the order lambda/(2 NA), where lambda is the wavelength of light and NA is the numerical aperture of the illumination and imaging lenses. PMID:9449366

  16. Structural microtubule cap: Stability, catastrophe, rescue, and third state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Chretien, D.; Janosi, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    Microtubules polymerize from GTP-liganded tubulin dinners, but are essentially made of GDP-liganded tubulin. We investigate the tug-of-war resulting from the fact that GDP-liganded tubulin favors a curved configuration, but is forced to remain in a straight one when part of a microtubule. We point...... of two well-established facts: protofilaments made of GDP-liganded tubulin have intrinsic curvature, and microtubules are elastic, made from material that can yield to forces, in casu its own intrinsic forces. We explore possible properties of this structural cap, and demonstrate 1) how it allows both...

  17. Leiodermatolide, a novel marine natural product, has potent cytotoxic and antimitotic activity against cancer cells, appears to affect microtubule dynamics, and exhibits antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Esther A; Xu, Qunli; Pitts, Tara P; Mitsuhashi, Kaoru Ogawa; Baker, Cheryl; Linley, Patricia A; Oestreicher, Judy; Tendyke, Karen; Winder, Priscilla L; Suh, Edward M; Wright, Amy E

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, has a negative prognosis because metastasis occurs before symptoms manifest. Leiodermatolide, a polyketide macrolide with antimitotic activity isolated from a deep water sponge of the genus Leiodermatium, exhibits potent and selective cytotoxicity toward the pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPC-1, PANC-1, BxPC-3, and MIA PaCa-2, and potent cytotoxicity against skin, breast and colon cancer cell lines. Induction of apoptosis by leiodermatolide was confirmed in the AsPC-1, BxPC-3 and MIA PaCa-2 cells. Leiodermatolide induces cell cycle arrest but has no effects on in vitro polymerization or depolymerization of tubulin alone, while it enhances polymerization of tubulin containing microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). Observations through confocal microscopy show that leiodermatolide, at low concentrations, causes minimal effects on polymerization or depolymerization of the microtubule network in interphase cells, but disruption of spindle formation in mitotic cells. At higher concentrations, depolymerization of the microtubule network is observed. Visualization of the growing microtubule in HeLa cells expressing GFP-tagged plus end binding protein EB-1 showed that leiodermatolide stopped the polymerization of tubulin. These results suggest that leiodermatolide may affect tubulin dynamics without directly interacting with tubulin and hint at a unique mechanism of action. In a mouse model of metastatic pancreatic cancer, leiodermatolide exhibited significant tumor reduction when compared to gemcitabine and controls. The antitumor activities of leiodermatolide, as well as the proven utility of antimitotic compounds against cancer, make leiodermatolide an interesting compound with potential chemotherapeutic effects that may merit further research. PMID:27376928

  18. A Chimeric Cetuximab-Functionalized Corona as a Potent Delivery System for Microtubule-Destabilizing Nanocomplexes to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells: A Focus on EGFR and Tubulin Intracellular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojari, Radhika; Kini, Sudarshan; Srivastava, Rohit; Panda, Dulal

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we have developed microtubule destabilizing agents combretastatin A4 (CA4) or 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) encapsulated poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) nanocomplexes for targeted delivery to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be overexpressed in HCC cells. Therefore, the targeting moiety cetuximab (Cet), an anti-EGFR chimeric monoclonal antibody, is functionalized on the surface of these diblock copolymeric coronas. Cetuximab is associated with the extracellular domain of the EGFR; therefore, the uptake of the cetuximab conjugated nanocomplexes occurred efficiently in EGFR overexpressing HCC cells indicating potent internalization of the complex. The cetuximab targeted-PLGA-b-PEG nanocomplexes encapsulating CA4 or 2ME strongly inhibited phospho-EGFR expression, depolymerized microtubules, produced spindle abnormalities, stalled mitosis, and induced apoptosis in Huh7 cells compared to the free drugs, CA4 or 2ME. Further, the combinatorial strategy of targeted nanocomplexes, Cet-PLGA-b-PEG-CA4 NP and Cet-PLGA-b-PEG-2ME NP, significantly reduced the migration of Huh7 cells, and markedly enhanced the anticancer effects of the microtubule-targeted drugs in Huh7 cells compared to the free drugs, CA4 or 2ME. The results indicated that EGFR receptor-mediated internalization via cetuximab facilitated enhanced uptake of the nanocomplexes leading to potent anticancer efficacy in Huh7 cells. Cetuximab-functionalized PLGA-b-PEG nanocomplexes possess a strong potential for the targeted delivery of CA4 or 2ME in EGFR overexpressed HCC cells, and the strategy may be useful for selectively targeting microtubules in these cells.

  19. Stability analysis of machine tool spindle under uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chatter is a harmful machining vibration that occurs between the workpiece and the cutting tool, usually resulting in irregular flaw streaks on the finished surface and severe tool wear. Stability lobe diagrams could predict chatter by providing graphical representations of the stable combinations of the axial depth of the cut and spindle speed. In this article, the analytical model of a spindle system is constructed, including a Timoshenko beam rotating shaft model and double sets of angular contact ball bearings with 5 degrees of freedom. Then, the stability lobe diagram of the model is developed according to its dynamic properties. The Monte Carlo method is applied to analyse the bearing preload influence on the system stability with uncertainty taken into account.

  20. Primary Spindle Cell Malignant Melanoma of Esophagus: An Unusual Finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawandale, Nirmalkumar A; Suryawanshi, Kishor H

    2016-02-01

    Malignant melanoma of esophagus is usually a metastatic tumour rather than a primary tumour. Primary malignant melanoma accounts for less than 0.2% of all esophageal neoplasm. We report a case of primary spindle cell malignant melanoma of esophagus in a 69-year-old male who presented with history of dysphagia since 1 month. Radiological examinations revealed polypoidal growth at lateral aspect of esophagus. Biopsy was reported as grade III squamous cell carcinoma. Video assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy was performed. Histopathological examination along with immunohistochemistry gave confirmed diagnosis of primary spindle cell malignant melanoma of esophagus. Though a rare entity, due to its aggressive nature and poor prognosis primary malignant melanoma should be one of the differential diagnoses in a patient with polypoidal esophageal mass lesion. Despite radical surgical treatment prognosis is extremely poor. PMID:27042502

  1. Radiation-induced spindle cell sarcoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Mubeen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has been known to induce malignant transformation in human beings. Radiation-induced sarcomas are a late sequel of radiation therapy. Most sarcomas have been reported to occur after exposure to a radiation dose of 55 Gray (Gy and above, with a dose ranging from 16 to 112 Gys. Spindle cell sarcomas, arising after radiotherapy given to treat the carcinoma of head and neck region is a very uncommon sequel. This is a rare case report of spindle cell sarcoma of left maxilla, in a 24-year-old male, occurring as a late complication of radiotherapy with Cobalt-60 given for the treatment of retinoblastoma of the left eye 21 years back.

  2. Spindle cell carcinoma of the larynx: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binayak Baruah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spindle cell carcinoma (SpCC of the larynx, a subtype and a more aggressive variant of the commonly occurring squamous cell carcinoma, is a unique and rare neoplasm. It comprises of 0.6–1.5% of all laryngeal cancers. Macroscopically, it usually presents as a large pedunculated, polypoidal mass with surface ulceration. Microscopically, however, it is considered as a biphasic tumor that has surface epithelial changes (in situ to invasive carcinoma and an underlying mesenchymal spindle shaped neoplastic proliferation. If detected early, it has a very good prognosis. We present a case of SpCC in a 70-year-old male, who presented with progressive hoarseness since 1 year. The mass was removed under videolaryngoscopic guidance and thereafter, the patient underwent cobalt 60 radiotherapy. His symptoms gradually improved, and he regained good control of his voice.

  3. Analysis on Failure Mode Severity of Machining Center Spindle System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guixiang Shen; Shuguang Sun; Yingzhi Zhang; Xiaoyan Qi; Bingkun Chen

    2015-01-01

    According to the subjectivity and fuzziness of analysis on failure mode severity about spindle system of machining center, an analysis model of the failure mode severity of such a system is proposed based on the new fault severity index system, improved analytic hierarchy process ( IAHP ) and entropy⁃based fuzzy comprehensive evaluation. IAHP and entropy methods are adopted to determine the comprehensive failure severity index weight. The evaluation result is obtained after the factor set, comment set, weight set, and other parameters are determined, and then the level of risk degree and numerical value order of every spindle system failure mode is given. By taking an example, we verify that the proposed method can quantify the qualitative problem comprehensively, obtain more accurate analysis results, and provide the theoretical reference for mechanization and sequencing of failure mode effect analysis in reliability analysis. The calculation results can also serve as the basis of failure mode, effects, and criticality analysis in the subsequent step.

  4. Modeling the Effects of Drug Binding on the Dynamic Instability of Microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Hinow, Peter; Lopus, Manu; Jordan, Mary Ann; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2010-01-01

    We propose a stochastic model that accounts for the growth, catastrophe and rescue processes of steady state microtubules assembled from MAP-free tubulin. Both experimentally and theoretically we study the perturbation of microtubule dynamic instability by S-methyl-D-DM1, a synthetic derivative of the microtubule-targeted agent maytansine and a potential anticancer agent. We find that to be an effective suppressor of microtubule dynamics a drug must primarily suppress the loss of GDP tubulin from the microtubule tip.

  5. Automatic sleep spindle detection and genetic influence estimation using continuous wavelet transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek eAdamczyk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence for the role of sleep spindles for neuroplasticity led to an increased interest in these NREM sleep oscillations. It has been hypothesized that fast and slow spindles might play a different role in memory processing. Here we present a new sleep spindle detection algorithm utilizing a continuous wavelet transform and individual adjustment of slow and fast spindle frequency ranges. 18 nap recordings of 10 subjects were used for algorithm validation. Our method was compared with human scorer and commercially available SIESTA spindle detector. For the validation set, mean agreement between our detector and human scorer measured during sleep stage 2 using kappa coefficient was 0.45, whereas mean agreement between our detector and SIESTA algorithm was 0.62. Our algorithm was also applied to sleep-related memory consolidation data previously analyzed with SIESTA detector and confirmed previous findings of significant correlation between spindle density and declarative memory consolidation. Then, we applied our method to a study in monozygotic (MZ and dizygotic (DZ twins examining the heritability of slow and fast sleep spindle parameters. Our analysis revealed strong genetic influence of all slow spindle parameters, weaker genetic effect on fast spindles and no effects on fast spindle density and number during stage 2 sleep.

  6. Mechanical Models of Microtubule Bundle Collapse in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendek, Austin; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid-beta aggregates initiate Alzheimer's disease, and downstream trigger degradation of tau proteins that act as microtubule bundle stabilizers and mechanical spacers. Currently it is unclear which of tau cutting by proteases, tau phosphorylation, or tau aggregation are responsible for cytoskeleton degradation., We construct a percolation simulation of the microtubule bundle using a molecular spring model for the taus and including depletion force attraction between microtubules and membrane/actin cytoskeletal surface tension. The simulation uses a fictive molecular dynamics to model the motion of the individual microtubules within the bundle as a result of random tau removal, and calculates the elastic modulus of the bundle as the tau concentration falls. We link the tau removal steps to kinetic tau steps in various models of tau degradation. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624

  7. Microtubule as a Transmission Line for Ionic Currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ILI(C) D.I.; SATARI(C) M.V.; RALEVI(C) N.

    2009-01-01

    We establish a new model for ionic waves along microtubules based on polyelectrolyte features of cylindrical biopolymers. The nonlinear transmission line described by a nonlinear differential equation is obtained with stable kink solution pertinent to the shape of the front of accompanying potential. The localized ionic wave could be used to explain the behavior of microtubules as biomolecular transistors capable of amplifying electrical information in neurons.

  8. Kinks and bell-type solitons in microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravković, Slobodan; Gligorić, Goran

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, we study the nonlinear dynamics of microtubules relying on the known u-model. As a mathematical procedure, we use the simplest equation method. We recover some solutions obtained earlier using less general methods. These are kink solitons. In addition, we show that the solution of the crucial differential equation, describing nonlinear dynamics of microtubules, can be a bell-type soliton. The discovery of this new solution is supported by numerical analysis. PMID:27368766

  9. Clathrin is spindle-associated but not essential for mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Borlido

    Full Text Available Clathrin is a multimeric protein involved in vesicle coat assembly. Recently clathrin distribution was reported to change during the cell cycle and was found to associate with the mitotic spindle. Here we test whether the recruitment of clathrin to the spindle is indicative of a critical functional contribution to mitosis.Previously a chicken pre-B lymphoma cell line (DKO-R was developed in which the endogenous clathrin heavy chain alleles were replaced with the human clathrin heavy chain under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter. Receptor-mediated and fluid-phase endocytosis were significantly inhibited in this line following clathrin knockout, and we used this to explore the significance of clathrin heavy chain expression for cell cycle progression. We confirmed using confocal microscopy that clathrin colocalised with tubulin at mitotic spindles. Using a propidium iodide flow cytometric assay we found no statistical difference in the cell cycle distribution of the knockout cells versus the wild-type. Additionally, we showed that the ploidy and the recovery kinetics following cell cycle arrest with nocodazole were unchanged by repressing clathrin heavy chain expression.We conclude that the association of clathrin with the mitotic spindle and the contribution of clathrin to endocytosis are evolutionarily conserved. However we find that the contribution of clathrin to mitosis is less robust and dependent on cellular context. In other cell-lines silencing RNA has been used by others to knockdown clathrin expression resulting in an increase in the mitotic index of the cells. We show an effect on the G2/M phase population of clathrin knockdown in HEK293 cells but show that repressing clathrin expression in the DKO-R cell-line has no effect on the size of this population. Consequently this work highlights the need for a more detailed molecular understanding of the recruitment and function of clathrin at the spindle, since the

  10. Ibuprofen regulation of microtubule dynamics in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymut, Sharon M; Kampman, Claire M; Corey, Deborah A; Endres, Tori; Cotton, Calvin U; Kelley, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    High-dose ibuprofen, an effective anti-inflammatory therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), has been shown to preserve lung function in a pediatric population. Despite its efficacy, few patients receive ibuprofen treatment due to potential renal and gastrointestinal toxicity. The mechanism of ibuprofen efficacy is also unclear. We have previously demonstrated that CF microtubules are slower to reform after depolymerization compared with respective wild-type controls. Slower microtubule dynamics in CF cells are responsible for impaired intracellular transport and are related to inflammatory signaling. Here, it is identified that high-dose ibuprofen treatment in both CF cell models and primary CF nasal epithelial cells restores microtubule reformation rates to wild-type levels, as well as induce extension of microtubules to the cell periphery. Ibuprofen treatment also restores microtubule-dependent intracellular transport monitored by measuring intracellular cholesterol transport. These effects are specific to ibuprofen as other cyclooxygenase inhibitors have no effect on these measures. Effects of ibuprofen are mimicked by stimulation of AMPK and blocked by the AMPK inhibitor compound C. We conclude that high-dose ibuprofen treatment enhances microtubule formation in CF cells likely through an AMPK-related pathway. These findings define a potential mechanism to explain the efficacy of ibuprofen therapy in CF. PMID:27317686

  11. EFFECT OF ANGELICA SINENSIS ON AFFERENT DISCHARGE OF SINGLE MUSCLE SPINDLE IN TOADS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高云芳; 樊小力

    2004-01-01

    Objective In drugs for invigorating blood circulation, to find a herb that can stimulate afferent discharge of muscle spindle. Methods A single muscle spindle was isolated from sartorial muscle of toad. Using air-gap technique, afferent discharge of the muscle spindle was recorded. Effects of Angelica Sinensis, Salvia Miltiorrhiza, and Safflower on afferent discharge of the muscle spindle were observed. Results Angelica Sinensis could distinctly increase afferent discharge frequency of the muscle spindle, and this increase was dose-dependent. But Salvia Miltiorrhiza and Safflower had no this excitatory effect. Conclusion It is known that Angelica Sinensis can invigorate blood circulation, and we have found its excitatory effect on muscle spindle which makes it possible to serve people with muscle atrophy if more evidences from clinical experiments are available.

  12. Surface shape control of the workpiece in a double-spindle triple-workstation wafer grinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianglong, Zhu; Renke, Kang; Zhigang, Dong; Guang, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Double-spindle triple-workstation (DSTW) ultra precision grinders are mainly used in production lines for manufacturing and back thinning large diameter (>= 300 mm) silicon wafers for integrated circuits. It is important, but insufficiently studied, to control the wafer shape ground on a DSTW grinder by adjusting the inclination angles of the spindles and work tables. In this paper, the requirements of the inclination angle adjustment of the grinding spindles and work tables in DSTW wafer grinders are analyzed. A reasonable configuration of the grinding spindles and work tables in DSTW wafer grinders are proposed. Based on the proposed configuration, an adjustment method of the inclination angle of grinding spindles and work tables for DSTW wafer grinders is put forward. The mathematical models of wafer shape with the adjustment amount of inclination angles for both fine and rough grinding spindles are derived. The proposed grinder configuration and adjustment method will provide helpful instruction for DSTW wafer grinder design.

  13. A theoretical model for attachment lifetimes of kinetochore-microtubules: Mechano-kinetic "catch-bond" mechanism for error-correction

    CERN Document Server

    Shtylla, Blerta

    2013-01-01

    Before cell division, two identical copies of chromosomes are pulled apart by microtubule (MT) filaments that approach the chromosomes from the opposite poles a mitotic spindle. Connection between the MTs and the chromosomes are mediated by a molecular complex called kinetochore. An externally applied tension can lead to detachment of the MTs from the kinetochore; the mean lifetime of such an attachment is essentially a mean first-passage time. In their in-vitro pioneering single-kinetochore experiments, Akiyoshi et al. (Nature 468, 576 (2010)), observed that the mean lifetimes of reconstituted MT-kinetochore attachments vary non-monotonically with increasing tension. The counter-intuitive stabilization of the attachments by small load forces was interpreted in terms of a catch-bond-like mechanism based on a phenomenological 2-state kinetic model. Here we develop the first detailed microscopic model for studying the dependence of the lifetime of the MT-kinetochore attachment on (a) the structure, (b) energeti...

  14. Microtubules, polarity and vertebrate neural tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cearns, Michael D; Escuin, Sarah; Alexandre, Paula; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are key cellular components, long known to participate in morphogenetic events that shape the developing embryo. However, the links between the cellular functions of MTs, their effects on cell shape and polarity, and their role in large-scale morphogenesis remain poorly understood. Here, these relationships were examined with respect to two strategies for generating the vertebrate neural tube: bending and closure of the mammalian neural plate; and cavitation of the teleost neural rod. The latter process has been compared with 'secondary' neurulation that generates the caudal spinal cord in mammals. MTs align along the apico-basal axis of the mammalian neuroepithelium early in neural tube closure, participating functionally in interkinetic nuclear migration, which indirectly impacts on cell shape. Whether MTs play other functional roles in mammalian neurulation remains unclear. In the zebrafish, MTs are important for defining the neural rod midline prior to its cavitation, both by localizing apical proteins at the tissue midline and by orienting cell division through a mirror-symmetric MT apparatus that helps to further define the medial localization of apical polarity proteins. Par proteins have been implicated in centrosome positioning in neuroepithelia as well as in the control of polarized morphogenetic movements in the neural rod. Understanding of MT functions during early nervous system development has so far been limited, partly by techniques that fail to distinguish 'cause' from 'effect'. Future developments will likely rely on novel ways to selectively impair MT function in order to investigate the roles they play.

  15. The Significance of Sigma Neurofeedback Training on Sleep Spindles and Aspects of Declarative Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Berner, I.; Schabus, M; Wienerroither, T.; Klimesch, W.

    2006-01-01

    The functional significance of sleep spindles for overnight memory consolidation and general learning aptitude as well as the effect of four 10-minute sessions of spindle frequency (11.6–16 Hz, sigma) neurofeedback-training on subsequent sleep spindle activity and overnight performance change was investigated. Before sleep, subjects were trained on a paired-associate word list task after having received either neurofeedback training (NFT) or pseudofeedback training (PFT).

  16. In vitro assembly of plant tubulin in the absence of microtubule-stabilizing reagents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The assembly of microtubules is essential for physiological functions of microtubules. Addition of microtubule-stabilizing reagents or microtubule "seeds" is usually necessary for plant tubulin assembly in vitro, which hinders the investigation of plant microtubule dynamics. In the present note, highly purified plant tubulins have been obtained from lily pollen, a non-microtubule-stabilizing reagent or microtubule "seed" system for plant tubulin assembly has been established and the analysis of plant tubulin assembly performed. Experiment results showed that purified tubulin polymerized in vitro, and a typical microtubule structure was observed with electron microscopy. The kinetics curve of tubulin assembly exhibited typical "parabola". The presence of taxol significantly altered the character of plant tubulin assembly, including that abnormal microtubules were assembled and the critical concentration for plant tubulin assembly was decreased exceedingly from 3 mg/mL in the absence of taxol to 0.043 mg/mL in the presence of taxol.

  17. On the significance of microtubule flexural behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative description of cell mechanics has challenged biological scientists for the past two decades. Various structural models have been attempted to analyze the structure of the cytoskeleton. One important aspect that has been largely ignored in all these modeling approaches is related to the flexural and buckling behavior of microtubular filaments. The objective of this paper is to explore the influence of this flexural and buckling behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.In vitro the microtubules are observed to buckle in the first mode, reminiscent of a free, simply-supported beam. In vivo images of microtubules, however, indicate that the buckling mostly occurs in higher modes. This buckling mode switch takes place mostly because of the lateral support of microtubules via their connections to actin and intermediate filaments. These lateral loads are exerted throughout the microtubule length and yield a considerable bending behavior that, unless properly accounted for, would produce erroneous results in the modeling and analysis of the cytoskeletal mechanics.One of the promising attempts towards mechanical modeling of the cytoskeleton is the tensegrity model, which simplifies the complex network of cytoskeletal filaments into a combination merely of tension-bearing actin filaments and compression-bearing microtubules. Interestingly, this discrete model can qualitatively explain many experimental observations in cell mechanics. However, evidence suggests that the simplicity of this model may undermine the accuracy of its predictions, given the model's underlying assumption that "every single member bears solely either tensile or compressive behavior," i.e. neglecting the flexural behavior of the microtubule filaments. We invoke an anisotropic continuum model for microtubules and compare the bending energy stored in a single microtubule with its axial strain energy at the verge of buckling. Our results suggest that the bending energy can exceed the axial energy

  18. On the significance of microtubule flexural behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Mehrbod

    Full Text Available Quantitative description of cell mechanics has challenged biological scientists for the past two decades. Various structural models have been attempted to analyze the structure of the cytoskeleton. One important aspect that has been largely ignored in all these modeling approaches is related to the flexural and buckling behavior of microtubular filaments. The objective of this paper is to explore the influence of this flexural and buckling behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.In vitro the microtubules are observed to buckle in the first mode, reminiscent of a free, simply-supported beam. In vivo images of microtubules, however, indicate that the buckling mostly occurs in higher modes. This buckling mode switch takes place mostly because of the lateral support of microtubules via their connections to actin and intermediate filaments. These lateral loads are exerted throughout the microtubule length and yield a considerable bending behavior that, unless properly accounted for, would produce erroneous results in the modeling and analysis of the cytoskeletal mechanics.One of the promising attempts towards mechanical modeling of the cytoskeleton is the tensegrity model, which simplifies the complex network of cytoskeletal filaments into a combination merely of tension-bearing actin filaments and compression-bearing microtubules. Interestingly, this discrete model can qualitatively explain many experimental observations in cell mechanics. However, evidence suggests that the simplicity of this model may undermine the accuracy of its predictions, given the model's underlying assumption that "every single member bears solely either tensile or compressive behavior," i.e. neglecting the flexural behavior of the microtubule filaments. We invoke an anisotropic continuum model for microtubules and compare the bending energy stored in a single microtubule with its axial strain energy at the verge of buckling. Our results suggest that the bending energy can

  19. LKB1 destabilizes microtubules in myoblasts and contributes to myoblast differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isma Mian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle myoblast differentiation and fusion into multinucleate myotubes is associated with dramatic cytoskeletal changes. We find that microtubules in differentiated myotubes are highly stabilized, but premature microtubule stabilization blocks differentiation. Factors responsible for microtubule destabilization in myoblasts have not been identified. FINDINGS: We find that a transient decrease in microtubule stabilization early during myoblast differentiation precedes the ultimate microtubule stabilization seen in differentiated myotubes. We report a role for the serine-threonine kinase LKB1 in both microtubule destabilization and myoblast differentiation. LKB1 overexpression reduced microtubule elongation in a Nocodazole washout assay, and LKB1 RNAi increased it, showing LKB1 destabilizes microtubule assembly in myoblasts. LKB1 levels and activity increased during myoblast differentiation, along with activation of the known LKB1 substrates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and microtubule affinity regulating kinases (MARKs. LKB1 overexpression accelerated differentiation, whereas RNAi impaired it. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced microtubule stability precedes myoblast differentiation and the associated ultimate microtubule stabilization seen in myotubes. LKB1 plays a positive role in microtubule destabilization in myoblasts and in myoblast differentiation. This work suggests a model by which LKB1-induced microtubule destabilization facilitates the cytoskeletal changes required for differentiation. Transient destabilization of microtubules might be a useful strategy for enhancing and/or synchronizing myoblast differentiation.

  20. Microtubules Are Essential for Guard-Cell Function in Vicia and Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William Eisinger; David Ehrhardt; Winslow Briggs

    2012-01-01

    Radially arranged cortical microtubules are a prominent feature of guard cells.Guard cells expressing GFPtubulin showed consistent changes in the appearance of microtubules when stomata opened or closed.Guard cells showed fewer microtubule structures as stomata closed,whether induced by transfer to darkness,ABA,hydrogen peroxide,or sodium hydrogen carbonate.Guard cells kept in the dark (closed stomata) showed increases in microtubule structures and stomatal aperture on light treatment.GFP-EB1,marking microtubule growing plus ends,showed no change in number of plus ends or velocity of assembly on stomatal closure.Since the number of growing plus ends and the rate of plus-end growth did not change when microtubule structure numbers declined,microtubule instability and/or rearrangement must be responsible for the apparent loss of microtubules.Guard cells with closed stomata showed more cytosolic GFP-fluorescence than those with open stomata as cortical microtubules became disassembled,although with a large net loss in total fluorescence.Microtubule-targeted drugs blocked guard-cell function in Vicia and Arabidopsis.Oryzalin disrupted guard-cell microtubules and prevented stomatal opening and taxol stabilized guard-cell microtubules and delayed stomatal closure.Gas exchange measurements indicated that the transgenes for fluorescent-labeled proteins did not disrupt normal stomatal function.These dynamic changes in guard-cell microtubules combined with our inhibitor studies provide evidence for an active role of microtubules in guard-cell function.

  1. Research on Control System of Spindle Drive for High Speed Spinning Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏建

    2001-01-01

    Through analyzing the principle of spindle drive of winding mechanism for high speed spinning machine,the article not only describes a kind of mode of spindle drive for take-up motion on the basis of control method of constant velocity winding, but also introduces the design technique of software and hardware for the control system of mechatronics of spindle drive mode for take- up motion on the basis of constant velocity winding for high speed spinning machine with single-chip microcomputer. The mathematical model to describe the spindle rotating speed is established. It is an important technology for high speed spinning machine and provides a feasible application way.

  2. Noninvasive three-dimensional live imaging methodology for the spindles at meiosis and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jing-gao; Huo, Tiancheng; Tian, Ning; Chen, Tianyuan; Wang, Chengming; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Fengying; Lu, Danyu; Chen, Dieyan; Ma, Wanyun; Sun, Jia-lin; Xue, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The spindle plays a crucial role in normal chromosome alignment and segregation during meiosis and mitosis. Studying spindles in living cells noninvasively is of great value in assisted reproduction technology (ART). Here, we present a novel spindle imaging methodology, full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). Without any dye labeling and fixation, we demonstrate the first successful application of FF-OCT to noninvasive three-dimensional (3-D) live imaging of the meiotic spindles within the mouse living oocytes at metaphase II as well as the mitotic spindles in the living zygotes at metaphase and telophase. By post-processing of the 3-D dataset obtained with FF-OCT, the important morphological and spatial parameters of the spindles, such as short and long axes, spatial localization, and the angle of meiotic spindle deviation from the first polar body in the oocyte were precisely measured with the spatial resolution of 0.7 μm. Our results reveal the potential of FF-OCT as an imaging tool capable of noninvasive 3-D live morphological analysis for spindles, which might be useful to ART related procedures and many other spindle related studies.

  3. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions--part I: an approach to compound naevoidal pattern lesions with spindle cell morphology and Spitzoid pattern lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Shachar; Al Habeeb, Ayman; Ghazarian, Danny

    2010-04-01

    Melanocytic lesions show great morphological diversity in their architecture and the cytomorphological appearance of their composite cells. Whereas functional melanocytes reveal a dendritic cytomorphology and territorial isolation, lesional naevomelanocytes and melanoma cells typically show epithelioid, spindled or mixed cytomorphologies and a range of architectural arrangements. Spindling is common to melanocytic lesions, and may be either a characteristic feature or a divergent appearance. The presence of spindle cells may mask the melanocytic nature of a lesion, and is often disconcerting, either because of its infrequent appearance in a particular lesion or its interpretation as a dedifferentiated phenotype. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions follow the full spectrum of potential biological outcomes, and difficulty may be experienced judging the nature of a lesion because of a lack of consistently reliable features to predict biological behaviour. Over time, recognition of numerous histomorphological features that may portend a more aggressive lesion have been identified. However, the translation of these features into a diagnostic entity requires a gestalt approach. Although most spindle cell melanocytic lesions can reliably be resolved with this standard approach, problem areas do exist and cause no end of grief to the surgical pathologist or dermatopathologist. In this review, the authors present their algorithmic approach to spindle cell melanocytic lesions and discuss each entity in turn, in order to (1) model a systematic approach to such lesions, and (2) provide familiarity with those melanocytic lesions that either typically or occasionally display a spindled cytomorphology.

  4. Spindle cell hemangioma: Unusual presentation of an uncommon tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalere Omoyosola Gbolahan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spindle cell hemangioma (SCH is an uncommon tumor that usually presents as subcutaneous or deep dermal nodule affecting the extremities and is typically <2 cm in size. A few cases have been reported in the head and neck region. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there are no previous reports of SCH occurring in the orbit in the English literature. We, therefore, report the case of a large SCH involving the right orbit of a healthy 9-year-old Nigerian girl.

  5. [Receptor adaptation of muscle spindles treated in different ways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalkind, V I; Rokotova, N A

    1978-11-01

    Comparison of the grades of 60 sensitive muscle spindle terminals on two actions: gradual stretch of the muscle and short intensive tetanization of the muscle nerve, showed that, irrespective of the mode of action, the character of adaptation remains the smae in majority of units. The speed of receptors adaptation depends not on the specific of testing precedures, but, apparently, on the means of connection of the sensitive terminals with different types of intrafusal muscle fibers with different elasticviscous properties. The possible reason for speedy adaptation of muscle receptors of elementary dynamic type, is discussed.

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Tau-Microtubule Interaction Using FRET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle L. Di Maïo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between the microtubule associated protein, tau and the microtubules is investigated. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay was used to determine the distance separating tau to the microtubule wall, as well as the binding parameters of the interaction. By using microtubules stabilized with Flutax-2 as donor and tau labeled with rhodamine as acceptor, a donor-to-acceptor distance of 54 ± 1 Å was found. A molecular model is proposed in which Flutax-2 is directly accessible to tau-rhodamine molecules for energy transfer. By titration, we calculated the stoichiometric dissociation constant to be equal to 1.0 ± 0.5 µM. The influence of the C-terminal tails of αβ-tubulin on the tau-microtubule interaction is presented once a procedure to form homogeneous solution of cleaved tubulin has been determined. The results indicate that the C-terminal tails of α- and β-tubulin by electrostatic effects and of recruitment seem to be involved in the binding mechanism of tau.

  7. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Carlier-Grynkorn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1+, a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics.

  8. Single molecule imaging reveals differences in microtubule track selection between Kinesin motors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawen Cai

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells generate diverse microtubule populations by polymerization of a common alpha/beta-tubulin building block. How microtubule associated proteins translate microtubule heterogeneity into specific cellular functions is not clear. We evaluated the ability of kinesin motors involved in vesicle transport to read microtubule heterogeneity by using single molecule imaging in live cells. We show that individual Kinesin-1 motors move preferentially on a subset of microtubules in COS cells, identified as the stable microtubules marked by post-translational modifications. In contrast, individual Kinesin-2 (KIF17 and Kinesin-3 (KIF1A motors do not select subsets of microtubules. Surprisingly, KIF17 and KIF1A motors that overtake the plus ends of growing microtubules do not fall off but rather track with the growing tip. Selection of microtubule tracks restricts Kinesin-1 transport of VSVG vesicles to stable microtubules in COS cells whereas KIF17 transport of Kv1.5 vesicles is not restricted to specific microtubules in HL-1 myocytes. These results indicate that kinesin families can be distinguished by their ability to recognize microtubule heterogeneity. Furthermore, this property enables kinesin motors to segregate membrane trafficking events between stable and dynamic microtubule populations.

  9. Interaction between microtubules and the Drosophila formin Cappuccino and its effect on actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth-Johnson, Elizabeth A; Vizcarra, Christina L; Bois, Justin S; Quinlan, Margot E

    2014-02-14

    Formin family actin nucleators are potential coordinators of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, as they can both nucleate actin filaments and bind microtubules in vitro. To gain a more detailed mechanistic understanding of formin-microtubule interactions and formin-mediated actin-microtubule cross-talk, we studied microtubule binding by Cappuccino (Capu), a formin involved in regulating actin and microtubule organization during Drosophila oogenesis. We found that two distinct domains within Capu, FH2 and tail, work together to promote high-affinity microtubule binding. The tail domain appears to bind microtubules through nonspecific charge-based interactions. In contrast, distinct residues within the FH2 domain are important for microtubule binding. We also report the first visualization of a formin polymerizing actin filaments in the presence of microtubules. Interestingly, microtubules are potent inhibitors of the actin nucleation activity of Capu but appear to have little effect on Capu once it is bound to the barbed end of an elongating filament. Because Capu does not simultaneously bind microtubules and assemble actin filaments in vitro, its actin assembly and microtubule binding activities likely require spatial and/or temporal regulation within the Drosophila oocyte.

  10. SPINDLE CELL SARCOMA OF VAGINA- A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankareswari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : Malignant tumors of vagina are rare accounting for 1 to 4 % of all genital malignancies. Rarest of rare is spindle cell sarcoma of vagina having a very poor prognosis. 47yrs old, regularly menstruating woman, completed f amily, presented with hard painful ulcerated swelling near the vaginal introitus and l ower vaginal wall of 4 months duration. On examination, 2x4cms sized ulcerated growth with exc avated base, covered with necrotic material, present in the left antero-lateral lower e nd of vagina, inner to hymenal ring which was tender, hard, indurated, infiltrating, fixed to bas e and did not bleed to touch. Another nodule of size 1x1cm tender, hard, fixed and necrotic was pres ent below the external urethral meatus. HPE revealed Amelanotic malignant melanoma of vagin a. Immunohistochemistry revealed Spindle cell sarcoma of vagina. Tumor board recommen ded neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (CT + EBRT. Of the recommended 50Gy, s he completed 46Gy in 23days and 1 course of chemotherapy (VAC. On review after 9 mont hs, the lesion disappeared clinically and she was advised to complete the treatment. Inspite o f radio and chemotherapy secondaries to lungs and brain could not be prevented and the patien t expired 20 months after the final diagnosis

  11. Novel ATP-competitive kinesin spindle protein inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Cynthia A; Adams, Nicholas D; Auger, Kurt R; Burgess, Joelle L; Carson, Jeffrey D; Chaudhari, Amita M; Copeland, Robert A; Diamond, Melody A; Donatelli, Carla A; Duffy, Kevin J; Faucette, Leo F; Finer, Jeffrey T; Huffman, William F; Hugger, Erin D; Jackson, Jeffrey R; Knight, Steven D; Luo, Lusong; Moore, Michael L; Newlander, Ken A; Ridgers, Lance H; Sakowicz, Roman; Shaw, Antony N; Sung, Chiu-Mei M; Sutton, David; Wood, Kenneth W; Zhang, Shu-Yun; Zimmerman, Michael N; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2007-10-01

    Kinesin spindle protein (KSP), an ATPase responsible for spindle pole separation during mitosis that is present only in proliferating cells, has become a novel and attractive anticancer target with potential for reduced side effects compared to currently available therapies. We report herein the discovery of the first known ATP-competitive inhibitors of KSP, which display a unique activity profile as compared to the known loop 5 (L5) allosteric KSP inhibitors that are currently under clinical evaluation. Optimization of this series led to the identification of biphenyl sulfamide 20, a potent KSP inhibitor with in vitro antiproliferative activity against human cells with either wild-type KSP (HCT116) or mutant KSP (HCT116 D130V). In a murine xenograft model with HCT116 D130V tumors, 20 showed significant antitumor activity following intraperitoneal dosing, providing in vivo proof-of-principle of the efficacy of an ATP-competitive KSP inhibitor versus tumors that are resistant to the other known KSP inhibitors. PMID:17725339

  12. Disruption of microtubule integrity initiates mitosis during CNS repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S; Fischer, Bettina; Russell, Steven; Shepherd, David

    2012-08-14

    Mechanisms of CNS repair have vital medical implications. We show that traumatic injury to the ventral midline of the embryonic Drosophila CNS activates cell divisions to replace lost cells. A pilot screen analyzing transcriptomes of single cells during repair pointed to downregulation of the microtubule-stabilizing GTPase mitochondrial Rho (Miro) and upregulation of the Jun transcription factor Jun-related antigen (Jra). Ectopic Miro expression can prevent midline divisions after damage, whereas Miro depletion destabilizes cortical β-tubulin and increases divisions. Disruption of cortical microtubules, either by chemical depolymerization or by overexpression of monomeric tubulin, triggers ectopic mitosis in the midline and induces Jra expression. Conversely, loss of Jra renders midline cells unable to replace damaged siblings. Our data indicate that upon injury, the integrity of the microtubule cytoskeleton controls cell division in the CNS midline, triggering extra mitosis to replace lost cells. The conservation of the identified molecules suggests that similar mechanisms may operate in vertebrates.

  13. Quantum Computation in Brain Microtubules? Decoherence and Biological Feasibility

    CERN Document Server

    Hagan, S; Tuszynski, J A

    2000-01-01

    The Penrose-Hameroff (`Orch OR') model of quantum computation in brain microtubules has been criticized as regards the issue of environmental decoherence. A recent report by Tegmark finds that microtubules can maintain quantum coherence for only $10^{-13}$ s, far too short to be neurophysiologically relevant. Here, we critically examine the assumptions behind Tegmark's calculation and find that: 1) Tegmark's commentary is not aimed at an existing model in the literature but rather at a hybrid that replaces the superposed protein conformations of the `Orch OR' theory with a soliton in superposition along the microtubule, 2) Tegmark predicts decreasing decoherence times at lower temperature, in direct contradiction of the observed behavior of quantum states, 3) recalculation after correcting Tegmark's equation for differences between his model and the `Orch OR' model (superposition separation, charge vs. dipole, dielectric constant) lengthens the decoherence time to $10^{-5} - 10^{-4}$ s and invalidates a criti...

  14. Sleep Spindles Characteristics in Insomnia Sufferers and Their Relationship with Sleep Misperception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier Normand

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical hyperarousal is higher in insomnia sufferers (INS than in good sleepers (GS and could be related to an alteration in sleep protection mechanisms, like reduced density or altered characteristics in sleep spindles. The deficient sleep protection mechanisms might in turn enhance underestimation of sleep. This study’s objective was to document sleep spindles characteristics in INS compared with GS and to investigate their potential role in sleep consolidation and misperception. Seventeen individuals with paradoxical insomnia (PARA-I, 24 individuals with psychophysiological insomnia (PSY-I, and 29 GS completed four consecutive polysomnographic nights in laboratory. Sleep spindles were detected automatically during stage 2 and SWS (3-4 on night 3. Number, density, duration, frequency, and amplitude of sleep spindles were calculated. A misperception index was used to determine the degree of discrepancy between subjective and objective total sleep times. Kruskal-Wallis H tests and post hoc tests revealed that PARA-I had significantly shorter sleep spindles than GS but that PSY-I and GS did not differ on spindles length. A standard multiple regression model revealed that neither sleep spindles characteristics nor objective sleep measures were predictive of sleep misperception. A longer duration of spindles could reflect a higher gating process but this hypothesis still needs to be confirmed in replication studies.

  15. Age-Dependent Increase of Absence Seizures and Intrinsic Frequency Dynamics of Sleep Spindles in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Sitnikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of neurological diseases increases with age. In WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy, the incidence of epileptic spike-wave discharges is known to be elevated with age. Considering close relationship between epileptic spike-wave discharges and physiologic sleep spindles, it was assumed that age-dependent increase of epileptic activity may affect time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles. In order to examine this hypothesis, electroencephalograms (EEG were recorded in WAG/Rij rats successively at the ages 5, 7, and 9 months. Spike-wave discharges and sleep spindles were detected in frontal EEG channel. Sleep spindles were identified automatically using wavelet-based algorithm. Instantaneous (localized in time frequency of sleep spindles was determined using continuous wavelet transform of EEG signal, and intraspindle frequency dynamics were further examined. It was found that in 5-months-old rats epileptic activity has not fully developed (preclinical stage and sleep spindles demonstrated an increase of instantaneous frequency from beginning to the end. At the age of 7 and 9 months, when animals developed matured and longer epileptic discharges (symptomatic stage, their sleep spindles did not display changes of intrinsic frequency. The present data suggest that age-dependent increase of epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats affects intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindle frequency.

  16. Spindle-shaped Microstructures: Potential Models for Planktonic Life Forms on Other Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Walsh, Maud M.; Sugitani, Kenichiro; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Spindle-shaped, organic microstructures ("spindles") are now known from Archean cherts in three localities (Figs. 1-4): The 3 Ga Farrel Quartzite from the Pilbara of Australia [1]; the older, 3.3-3.4 Ga Strelley Pool Formation, also from the Pilbara of Australia [2]; and the 3.4 Ga Kromberg Formation of the Barberton Mountain Land of South Africa [3]. Though the spindles were previously speculated to be pseudofossils or epigenetic organic contaminants, a growing body of data suggests that these structures are bona fide microfossils and further, that they are syngenetic with the Archean cherts in which they occur [1-2, 4-10]. As such, the spindles are among some of the oldest-known organically preserved microfossils on Earth. Moreover, recent delta C-13 study of individual spindles from the Farrel Quartzite (using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry [SIMS]) suggests that the spindles may have been planktonic (living in open water), as opposed to benthic (living as bottom dwellers in contact with muds or sediments) [9]. Since most Precambrian microbiotas have been described from benthic, matforming communities, a planktonic lifestyle for the spindles suggests that these structures could represent a segment of the Archean biosphere that is poorly known. Here we synthesize the recent work on the spindles, and we add new observations regarding their geographic distribution, robustness, planktonic habit, and long-lived success. We then discuss their potential evolutionary and astrobiological significance.

  17. Sleep Spindles Characteristics in Insomnia Sufferers and Their Relationship with Sleep Misperception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, Marie-Pier; St-Hilaire, Patrick; Bastien, Célyne H

    2016-01-01

    Cortical hyperarousal is higher in insomnia sufferers (INS) than in good sleepers (GS) and could be related to an alteration in sleep protection mechanisms, like reduced density or altered characteristics in sleep spindles. The deficient sleep protection mechanisms might in turn enhance underestimation of sleep. This study's objective was to document sleep spindles characteristics in INS compared with GS and to investigate their potential role in sleep consolidation and misperception. Seventeen individuals with paradoxical insomnia (PARA-I), 24 individuals with psychophysiological insomnia (PSY-I), and 29 GS completed four consecutive polysomnographic nights in laboratory. Sleep spindles were detected automatically during stage 2 and SWS (3-4) on night 3. Number, density, duration, frequency, and amplitude of sleep spindles were calculated. A misperception index was used to determine the degree of discrepancy between subjective and objective total sleep times. Kruskal-Wallis H tests and post hoc tests revealed that PARA-I had significantly shorter sleep spindles than GS but that PSY-I and GS did not differ on spindles length. A standard multiple regression model revealed that neither sleep spindles characteristics nor objective sleep measures were predictive of sleep misperception. A longer duration of spindles could reflect a higher gating process but this hypothesis still needs to be confirmed in replication studies. PMID:27478648

  18. Sleep Spindles Characteristics in Insomnia Sufferers and Their Relationship with Sleep Misperception

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cortical hyperarousal is higher in insomnia sufferers (INS) than in good sleepers (GS) and could be related to an alteration in sleep protection mechanisms, like reduced density or altered characteristics in sleep spindles. The deficient sleep protection mechanisms might in turn enhance underestimation of sleep. This study's objective was to document sleep spindles characteristics in INS compared with GS and to investigate their potential role in sleep consolidation and misperception. Seventeen individuals with paradoxical insomnia (PARA-I), 24 individuals with psychophysiological insomnia (PSY-I), and 29 GS completed four consecutive polysomnographic nights in laboratory. Sleep spindles were detected automatically during stage 2 and SWS (3-4) on night 3. Number, density, duration, frequency, and amplitude of sleep spindles were calculated. A misperception index was used to determine the degree of discrepancy between subjective and objective total sleep times. Kruskal-Wallis H tests and post hoc tests revealed that PARA-I had significantly shorter sleep spindles than GS but that PSY-I and GS did not differ on spindles length. A standard multiple regression model revealed that neither sleep spindles characteristics nor objective sleep measures were predictive of sleep misperception. A longer duration of spindles could reflect a higher gating process but this hypothesis still needs to be confirmed in replication studies.

  19. Constitutive Cdk2 activity promotes aneuploidy while altering the spindle assembly and tetraploidy checkpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Stephan C; Corsino, Patrick E; Davis, Bradley J;

    2013-01-01

    instability. Expression of these complexes in the MCF10A cell line leads to retinoblastoma protein (Rb) hyperphosphorylation, a subsequent increase in proliferation rate, and increased expression of the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2. This results in a strengthening of the spindle assembly...

  20. An allometric analysis of the number of muscle spindles in mammalian skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, R W

    2006-06-01

    An allometric analysis of the number of muscle spindles in relation to muscle mass in mammalian (mouse, rat, guinea-pig, cat, human) skeletal muscles is presented. It is shown that the trend to increasing number as muscle mass increases follows an isometric (length) relationship between species, whereas within a species, at least for the only essentially complete sample (human), the number of spindles scales, on average, with the square root rather than the cube root of muscle mass. An attempt is made to reconcile these apparently discrepant relationships. Use of the widely accepted spindle density (number of spindles g(-1) of muscle) as a measure of relative abundance of spindles in different muscles is shown to be grossly misleading. It is replaced with the residuals of the linear regression of ln spindle number against ln muscle mass. Significant differences in relative spindle abundance as measured by residuals were found between regional groups of muscles: the greatest abundance is in axial muscles, including those concerned with head position, whereas the least is in muscles of the shoulder girdle. No differences were found between large and small muscles operating in parallel, or between antigravity and non-antigravity muscles. For proximal vs. distal muscles, spindles were significantly less abundant in the hand than the arm, but there was no difference between the foot and the leg. PMID:16761976

  1. Dynamic characteristics of hard disk drive spindles supported by hydrodynamic bearings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Most hard disk spindles currently used are supported by grease lubricated deep-groove ball bearings.However, in the trend of increasing spindle speed and reducing size and cost, the shortcomings of ball bearing spin-dles, such as high non-repeatable run out, high acoustic noise and short life time at high running speed, make themunsuitable for high performance hard disk drives (HDD). On the contrary, the dynamic characteristics of hydrody-namic bearing spindles are superior to that of ball bearing spindles. Therefore, they are considered to be the substi-tute of ball bearing spindles in HDD. In this paper, a simulative setup of HDD is build up. The dynamic characteristicsof liquid lubricated spiral groove bearing(SGB) spindles are studied. The effects of both operating condition andbearing clearance are investigated. It is found that running speed of the spindle has significant influence on its dy-namic performance, while the load has little influence. The effect of clearance is also evident.

  2. CYLD Regulates Noscapine Activity in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Microtubule-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfan; Ran, Jie; Sun, Lei; Sun, Xiaodong; Luo, Youguang; Yan, Bing; Tala; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Zhang, Lei; Bao, Gang; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an orally administrable drug used worldwide for cough suppression and has recently been demonstrated to disrupt microtubule dynamics and possess anticancer activity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating noscapine activity remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that cylindromatosis (CYLD), a microtubule-associated tumor suppressor protein, modulates the activity of noscapine both in cell lines and in primary cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that CYLD increases the ability of noscapine to induce mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Examination of cellular microtubules as well as in vitro assembled microtubules shows that CYLD enhances the effect of noscapine on microtubule polymerization. Microtubule cosedimentation and fluorescence titration assays further reveal that CYLD interacts with microtubule outer surface and promotes noscapine binding to microtubules. These findings thus demonstrate CYLD as a critical regulator of noscapine activity and have important implications for ALL treatment. PMID:25897332

  3. Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and causes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Hellal (Farida); A. Hurtado (Andres); J. Ruschel (Jörg); K.C. Flynn (Kevin); C.J. Laskowski (Claudia); M. Umlauf (Martina); L.C. Kapitein (Lukas); D. Strikis (Dinara); V. Lemmon (Vance); J. Bixby (John); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); F. Bradke (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHypertrophic scarring and poor intrinsic axon growth capacity constitute major obstacles for spinal cord repair. These processes are tightly regulated by microtubule dynamics. Here, moderate microtubule stabilization decreased scar formation after spinal cord injury in rodents through va

  4. Microtubule stability and MAPI B upregulation control neuritogenesis in CAD cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen LI; Jin-tang XIA; Yue FENG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the role of microtubule dynamics and microtubule associated protein 1B (MAP1B) in regulation of the neurite extension in CAD catecholaminergic neuronal cell line. Methods: The neuritogenesis of the CAD cells was abolished by inhibiting microtubule polymerization with nocodazole and by blocking microtubule depolymerization with taxol. MAP1B and tubulin protein expression was detected by Western blot. Immunofluorescent staining of tubulins was observed by fluorescent and confocal microscopy. Results: Microtubule dynamics was essential for CAD neurite extension. Dosage analysis revealed that neurite extension was much more sensitive to nocodazole than to taxol, suggesting a functional requirement for highly active microtubule assembly. A remarkable upregulation of MAP1B protein was detected during neurite extension accompanied with increased microtubule stability. Conclusion: Upregulation of MAP1B leads to the stabilization of newly formed microtubules in the developing neurites, which in turn promotes neurite extension.

  5. Canoe binds RanGTP to promote Pins(TPR)/Mud-mediated spindle orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Brett; Johnston, Christopher A; Prehoda, Kenneth E; Doe, Chris Q

    2011-10-31

    Regulated spindle orientation maintains epithelial tissue integrity and stem cell asymmetric cell division. In Drosophila melanogaster neural stem cells (neuroblasts), the scaffolding protein Canoe (Afadin/Af-6 in mammals) regulates spindle orientation, but its protein interaction partners and mechanism of action are unknown. In this paper, we use our recently developed induced cell polarity system to dissect the molecular mechanism of Canoe-mediated spindle orientation. We show that a previously uncharacterized portion of Canoe directly binds the Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. The Canoe-Pins(TPR) interaction recruits Canoe to the cell cortex and is required for activation of the Pins(TPR)-Mud (nuclear mitotic apparatus in mammals) spindle orientation pathway. We show that the Canoe Ras-association (RA) domains directly bind RanGTP and that both the Canoe(RA) domains and RanGTP are required to recruit Mud to the cortex and activate the Pins/Mud/dynein spindle orientation pathway.

  6. S. pombe kinesins-8 promote both nucleation and catastrophe of microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Erent

    Full Text Available The kinesins-8 were originally thought to be microtubule depolymerases, but are now emerging as more versatile catalysts of microtubule dynamics. We show here that S. pombe Klp5-436 and Klp6-440 are non-processive plus-end-directed motors whose in vitro velocities on S. pombe microtubules at 7 and 23 nm s(-1 are too slow to keep pace with the growing tips of dynamic interphase microtubules in living S. pombe. In vitro, Klp5 and 6 dimers exhibit a hitherto-undescribed combination of strong enhancement of microtubule nucleation with no effect on growth rate or catastrophe frequency. By contrast in vivo, both Klp5 and Klp6 promote microtubule catastrophe at cell ends whilst Klp6 also increases the number of interphase microtubule arrays (IMAs. Our data support a model in which Klp5/6 bind tightly to free tubulin heterodimers, strongly promoting the nucleation of new microtubules, and then continue to land as a tubulin-motor complex on the tips of growing microtubules, with the motors then dissociating after a few seconds residence on the lattice. In vivo, we predict that only at cell ends, when growing microtubule tips become lodged and their growth slows down, will Klp5/6 motor activity succeed in tracking growing microtubule tips. This mechanism would allow Klp5/6 to detect the arrival of microtubule tips at cells ends and to amplify the intrinsic tendency for microtubules to catastrophise in compression at cell ends. Our evidence identifies Klp5 and 6 as spatial regulators of microtubule dynamics that enhance both microtubule nucleation at the cell centre and microtubule catastrophe at the cell ends.

  7. Kinesin-3 in the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis transports organelles along the entire microtubule array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Gero

    2015-01-01

    The molecular motor kinesin-3 transports early endosomes along microtubules in filamentous fungi. It was reported that kinesin-3 from the ascomycete fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa use a subset of post-translationally modified and more stable microtubules. Here, I show that kinesin-3 from the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis moves along all hyphal microtubules. This difference is likely due to variation in cell cycle control and associated organization of the microtubule array.

  8. Sliding of microtubules by a team of dynein motors: Understanding the effect of spatial distribution of motor tails and mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanumant Pratap; Takshak, Anjneya; Mall, Utkarsh; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-06-01

    Molecular motors are natural nanomachines that use the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis to generate mechanical forces. Cytoplasmic dynein motors often work collectively as a team to drive important processes such as axonal growth, proplatelet formation and mitosis, as forces generated by single motors are insufficient. A large team of dynein motors is used to slide cytoskeletal microtubules with respect to one another during the process of proplatelet formation and axonal growth. These motors attach to a cargo microtubule via their tail domains, undergo the process of detachment and reattachment of their head domains on another track microtubule, while sliding the cargo microtubule along the track. Traditional continuum/mean-field approaches used in the past are not ideal for studying the sliding mechanism of microtubules, as they ignore spatial and temporal fluctuations due to different possible distributions of motor tails on cargo filament, as well as binding/unbinding of motors from their track. Therefore, these models cannot be used to address important questions such as how the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, or how the mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks affects the sliding velocity of cargo microtubule. To answer these, here we use a computational stochastic model where we model each dynein motor explicitly. In our model, we use both random as well as uniform distributions of dynein motors on cargo microtubule, as well as mutual exclusion of motors on microtubule tracks. We find that sliding velocities are least affected by the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, whereas they are greatly affected by mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks. We also find that sliding velocity depends on the length of cargo microtubule if mutual exclusion among motor heads is considered.

  9. Expert and crowd-sourced validation of an individualized sleep spindle detection method employing complex demodulation and individualized normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eRay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A spindle detection method was developed that: 1 extracts the signal of interest (i.e., spindle-related phasic changes in sigma relative to ongoing background sigma activity using complex demodulation, 2 accounts for variations of spindle characteristics across the night, scalp derivations and between individuals, and 3 employs a minimum number of sometimes arbitrary, user-defined parameters. Complex demodulation was used to extract instantaneous power in the spindle band. To account for intra- and inter-individual differences, the signal was z-score transformed using a 60s sliding window, per channel, over the course of the recording. Spindle events were detected with a z-score threshold corresponding to a low probability (e.g., 99th percentile. Spindle characteristics, such as amplitude, duration and oscillatory frequency, were derived for each individual spindle following detection, which permits spindles to be subsequently and flexibly categorized as slow or fast spindles from a single detection pass. Spindles were automatically detected in 15 young healthy subjects. Two experts manually identified spindles from C3 during Stage 2 sleep, from each recording; one employing conventional guidelines, and the other, identifying spindles with the aid of a sigma (11-16 Hz filtered channel. These spindles were then compared between raters and to the automated detection to identify the presence of true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. This method of automated spindle detection resolves or avoids many of the limitations that complicate automated spindle detection, and performs well compared to a group of non-experts, and importantly, has good external validity with respect to the extant literature in terms of the characteristics of automatically detected spindles.

  10. Phospholipase D activation correlates with microtubule reorganization in living plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B. Dhonukshe; A.M. Laxalt; J. Goedhart; Th.W.J. Gadella; T. Munnik

    2003-01-01

    A phospholipase D (PLD) was shown recently to decorate microtubules in plant cells. Therefore, we used tobacco BY-2 cells expressing the microtubule reporter GFP-MAP4 to test whether PLD activation affects the organization of plant microtubules. Within 30 min of adding n-butanol, a potent activator

  11. Neurotrophin-3 and trkC in muscle are non-essential for the development of mouse muscle spindles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kucera, J; Fan, GP; Walro, J; Copray, S; Tessarollo, L; Jaenisch, R

    1998-01-01

    NEUROTROPHIN-3 (NT3) or TrkC null mutant mice were examined for the presence of muscle spindles. Muscles of mastication, but not limbs, contained spindles in newborn and adolescent mutants. The intramuscular distribution and morphological properties of spindles in mutant masticatory muscles were ind

  12. Airborne urban particles (Milan winter-PM2.5) cause mitotic arrest and cell death: Effects on DNA, mitochondria, AhR binding and spindle organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualtieri, Maurizio [Applied Cell Biology and Particles Effects, Department of Environmental Science, University Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Ovrevik, Johan [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Mollerup, Steen [Section for Toxicology, National Institute of Occupational Health, N-0033 Oslo (Norway); Asare, Nana [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Longhin, Eleonora [Applied Cell Biology and Particles Effects, Department of Environmental Science, University Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Dahlman, Hans-Jorgen [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Camatini, Marina [Applied Cell Biology and Particles Effects, Department of Environmental Science, University Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Centre Research POLARIS, Department of Environmental Science, University Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Holme, Jorn A., E-mail: jorn.holme@fhi.no [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: {yields} PM2.5 induces mitotic arrest in BEAS-2B cells. {yields} PM2.5 induces DNA damage and activates DNA damage response. {yields} AhR regulated genes (Cyp1A1, Cyp1B1 and AhRR) are upregulated after PM exposure. {yields} Mitotic spindle assembly is perturbed in PM exposed cells. - Abstract: Airborne particulate matter (PM) is considered to be an important contributor to lung diseases. In the present study we report that Milan winter-PM2.5 inhibited proliferation in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) by inducing mitotic arrest. The cell cycle arrest was followed by an increase in mitotic-apoptotic cells, mitotic slippage and finally an increase in 'classical' apoptotic cells. Exposure to winter-PM10 induced only a slight effect which may be due to the presence of PM2.5 in this fraction while pure combustion particles failed to disturb mitosis. Fewer cells expressing the mitosis marker phospho-histone H3 compared to cells with condensed chromosomes, suggest that PM2.5 induced premature mitosis. PM2.5 was internalized into the cells and often localized in laminar organelles, although particles without apparent plasma membrane covering were also seen. In PM-containing cells mitochondria and lysosomes were often damaged, and in mitotic cells fragmented chromosomes often appeared. PM2.5 induced DNA strands breaks and triggered a DNA-damage response characterized by increased phosphorylation of ATM, Chk2 and H2AX; as well as induced a marked increase in expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-regulated genes, CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and AhRR. Furthermore, some disturbance of the organization of microtubules was indicated. It is hypothesized that the induced mitotic arrest and following cell death was due to a premature chromosome condensation caused by a combination of DNA, mitochondrial and spindle damage.

  13. Airborne urban particles (Milan winter-PM2.5) cause mitotic arrest and cell death: Effects on DNA, mitochondria, AhR binding and spindle organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → PM2.5 induces mitotic arrest in BEAS-2B cells. → PM2.5 induces DNA damage and activates DNA damage response. → AhR regulated genes (Cyp1A1, Cyp1B1 and AhRR) are upregulated after PM exposure. → Mitotic spindle assembly is perturbed in PM exposed cells. - Abstract: Airborne particulate matter (PM) is considered to be an important contributor to lung diseases. In the present study we report that Milan winter-PM2.5 inhibited proliferation in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) by inducing mitotic arrest. The cell cycle arrest was followed by an increase in mitotic-apoptotic cells, mitotic slippage and finally an increase in 'classical' apoptotic cells. Exposure to winter-PM10 induced only a slight effect which may be due to the presence of PM2.5 in this fraction while pure combustion particles failed to disturb mitosis. Fewer cells expressing the mitosis marker phospho-histone H3 compared to cells with condensed chromosomes, suggest that PM2.5 induced premature mitosis. PM2.5 was internalized into the cells and often localized in laminar organelles, although particles without apparent plasma membrane covering were also seen. In PM-containing cells mitochondria and lysosomes were often damaged, and in mitotic cells fragmented chromosomes often appeared. PM2.5 induced DNA strands breaks and triggered a DNA-damage response characterized by increased phosphorylation of ATM, Chk2 and H2AX; as well as induced a marked increase in expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-regulated genes, CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and AhRR. Furthermore, some disturbance of the organization of microtubules was indicated. It is hypothesized that the induced mitotic arrest and following cell death was due to a premature chromosome condensation caused by a combination of DNA, mitochondrial and spindle damage.

  14. Prion protein inhibits microtubule assembly by inducing tubulin oligomerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A growing body of evidence points to an association of prion protein (PrP) with microtubular cytoskeleton. Recently, direct binding of PrP to tubulin has also been found. In this work, using standard light scattering measurements, sedimentation experiments, and electron microscopy, we show for First time the effect of a direct interaction between these proteins on tubulin polymerization. We demonstrate that full-length recombinant PrP induces a rapid increase in the turbidity of tubulin diluted below the critical concentration for microtubule assembly. This effect requires magnesium ions and is weakened by NaCl. Moreover, the PrP-induced light scattering structures of tubulin are cold-stable. In preparations of diluted tubulin incubated with PrP, electron microscopy revealed the presence of ∼50 nm disc-shaped structures not reported so far. These unique tubulin oligomers may form large aggregates. The effect of PrP is more pronounced under the conditions promoting microtubule formation. In these tubulin samples, PrP induces formation of the above oligomers associated with short protofilaments and sheets of protofilaments into aggregates. Noticeably, this is accompanied by a significant reduction of the number and length of microtubules. Hence, we postulate that prion protein may act as an inhibitor of microtubule assembly by inducing formation of stable tubulin oligomers

  15. Total synthesis of the potent microtubule-stabilizing agent (+)-discodermolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harried, Scott S; Lee, Christopher P; Yang, Ge; Lee, Tony I H; Myles, David C

    2003-08-22

    The total synthesis of the potent microtubule-stabilizing, antimitotic agent (+)-discodermolide is described. The convergent synthetic strategy takes advantage of the diastereoselective alkylation of a ketone enolate to establish the key C15-C16 bond. The synthesis is amenable to preparation of gram-scale quantities of (+)-discodermolide and analogues.

  16. Direct Modulation of Microtubule Stability Contributes to Anthracene General Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Daniel J.; Weiser, Brian P.; Psonis, John; Liao, Zhengzheng; Taratula, Olena; Fiamengo, Ashley; Wang, Xiaozhao; Sugasawa, Keizo; Smith, Amos B.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Dmochowski, Ivan J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we identified 1-aminoanthracene as a fluorescent general anesthetic. To investigate the mechanism of action, a photoactive analogue, 1-azidoanthracene, was synthesized. Administration of 1-azidoanthracene to albino stage 40–47 tadpoles was found to immobilize animals upon near-UV irradiation of the forebrain region. The immobilization was often reversible, but it was characterized by a longer duration consistent with covalent attachment of the ligand to functionally important targets. IEF/SDS-PAGE examination of irradiated tadpole brain homogenate revealed labeled protein, identified by mass spectrometry as β-tubulin. In vitro assays with aminoanthracene-cross-linked tubulin indicated inhibition of microtubule polymerization, similar to colchicine. Tandem mass spectrometry confirmed anthracene binding near the colchicine site. Stage 40–47 tadpoles were also incubated 1 h with microtubule stabilizing agents, epothilone D or discodermolide, followed by dosing with 1-aminoanthracene. The effective concentration of 1-aminoanthracene required to immobilize the tadpoles was significantly increased in the presence of either microtubule stabilizing agent. Epothilone D similarly mitigated the effects of a clinical neurosteroid general anesthetic, allopregnanolone, believed to occupy the colchicine site in tubulin. We conclude that neuronal microtubules are “on-pathway” targets for anthracene general anesthetics and may also represent functional targets for some neurosteroid general anesthetics. PMID:23484901

  17. Information transport by sine-Gordon solitons in microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, Elcio; Melgar, B C; Sedra, M B; Abdalla, Elcio; Maroufi, Bouchra; Melgar, Bertha Cuadros; Sedra, Moulay Brahim

    2001-01-01

    We study the problem of information propagation in brain microtubules. After considering the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a fluid of permanent electric dipoles, the problem reduces to the sine-Gordon wave equation in one space and one time dimensions. The problem of propagation of information is thus set.

  18. Dictyoceratidan poisons: Defined mark on microtubule-tubulin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanambal K, Mary Elizabeth; Lakshmipathy, Shailaja Vommi

    2016-03-01

    Tubulin/microtubule assembly and disassembly is characterized as one of the chief processes during cell growth and division. Hence drugs those perturb these process are considered to be effective in killing fast multiplying cancer cells. There is a collection of natural compounds which disturb microtubule/tubulin dis/assemblage and there have been a lot of efforts concerted in the marine realm too, to surveying such killer molecules. Close to half the natural compounds shooting out from marine invertebrates are generally with no traceable definite mechanisms of action though may be tough anti-cancerous hits at nanogram levels, hence fatefully those discoveries conclude therein without a capacity of translation from laboratory to pharmacy. Astoundingly at least 50% of natural compounds which have definite mechanisms of action causing disorders in tubulin/microtubule kinetics have an isolation history from sponges belonging to the Phylum: Porifera. Poriferans have always been a wonder worker to treat cancers with a choice of, yet precise targets on cancerous tissues. There is a specific order: Dictyoceratida within this Phylum which has contributed to yielding at least 50% of effective compounds possessing this unique mechanism of action mentioned above. However, not much notice is driven to Dictyoceratidans alongside the order: Demospongiae thus dictating the need to know its select microtubule/tubulin irritants since the unearthing of avarol in the year 1974 till date. Hence this review selectively pinpoints all the compounds, noteworthy derivatives and analogs stemming from order: Dictyoceratida focusing on the past, present and future. PMID:26874035

  19. Acidianus Tailed Spindle Virus: a New Archaeal Large Tailed Spindle Virus Discovered by Culture-Independent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, Rebecca A.; Amenabar, Maximiliano J.; Munson-McGee, Jacob H.; Boyd, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The field of viral metagenomics has expanded our understanding of viral diversity from all three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya). Traditionally, viral metagenomic studies provide information about viral gene content but rarely provide knowledge about virion morphology and/or cellular host identity. Here we describe a new virus, Acidianus tailed spindle virus (ATSV), initially identified by bioinformatic analysis of viral metagenomic data sets from a high-temperature (80°C) acidic (pH 2) hot spring located in Yellowstone National Park, followed by more detailed characterization using only environmental samples without dependency on culturing. Characterization included the identification of the large tailed spindle virion morphology, determination of the complete 70.8-kb circular double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viral genome content, and identification of its cellular host. Annotation of the ATSV genome revealed a potential three-domain gene product containing an N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain, followed by a likely posttranslation regulatory region consisting of high serine and threonine content, and a C-terminal ESCRT-III domain, suggesting interplay with the host ESCRT system. The host of ATSV, which is most closely related to Acidianus hospitalis, was determined by a combination of analysis of cellular clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas loci and dual viral and cellular fluorescence in situ hybridization (viral FISH) analysis of environmental samples and confirmed by culture-based infection studies. This work provides an expanded pathway for the discovery, isolation, and characterization of new viruses using culture-independent approaches and provides a platform for predicting and confirming virus hosts. IMPORTANCE Virus discovery and characterization have been traditionally accomplished by using culture-based methods. While a valuable approach, it is limited by the availability of culturable hosts. In

  20. Mcp6, a meiosis-specific coiled-coil protein of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, localizes to the spindle pole body and is required for horsetail movement and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takamune T; Tougan, Takahiro; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Kasama, Takashi; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2005-01-15

    We report here that a meiosis-specific gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe denoted mcp6+ (meiotic coiled-coil protein) encodes a protein that is required for the horsetail movement of chromosomes at meiosis I. The mcp6+ gene is specifically transcribed during the horsetail phase. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Mcp6 appears at the start of karyogamy, localizes to the spindle-pole body (SPB) and then disappears before chromosome segregation at meiosis I. In the mcp6Delta strain, the horsetail movement was either hampered (zygotic meiosis) or abolished (azygotic meiosis) and the pairing of homologous chromosomes was impaired. Accordingly, the allelic recombination rates of the mcp6Delta strain were only 10-40% of the wild-type rates. By contrast, the ectopic recombination rate of the mcp6Delta strain was twice the wild-type rate. This is probably caused by abnormal homologous pairing in mcp6Delta cells because of aberrant horsetail movement. Fluorescent microscopy indicates that SPB components such as Sad1, Kms1 and Spo15 localize normally in mcp6Delta cells. Because Taz1 and Swi6 also localized with Sad1 in mcp6Delta cells, Mcp6 is not required for telomere clustering. In a taz1Delta strain, which does not display telomere clustering, and the dhc1-d3 mutant, which lacks horsetail movement, Mcp6 localized with Sad1 normally. However, we observed abnormal astral microtubule organization in mcp6Delta cells. From these results, we conclude that Mcp6 is necessary for neither SPB organization nor telomere clustering, but is required for proper astral microtubule positioning to maintain horsetail movement. PMID:15654021

  1. A new method to measure circular runout of end-milling spindle based on cutting mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianlai; Liu, Shuchun

    2008-12-01

    A practical method is introduced to measure the circular runout of a end-milling spindle system at high speed rotations without the need of a reference sphere. A workpiece is held on a linear slide which moves along the axial direction of the spindle. The spindle is then programmed to run at a specific speed. A very sharp edge cutter must be used and the depth of cut will be very shallow in order to keep the cutting force very small. The workpiece is then fed into the end mill in order to make a cutting mark of teens μm in depth. The cutting marks are circular, and their diameters are related to the circular runout of the spindle system. The cutting mark that is generated at a specific speed is expected to contain information about the spindle circular runout at this speed. In practice the cutting marks are not perfectly circular. Therefore, a best-fit circle of a cutting mark is needed to determine its diameter. A high-resolution edge detector machine is used for this purpose. Quantitative precision analysis was carried out to confirm the accuracy and repeatability of this new measurement technique. It is demonstrated that this technique for the measurement of spindle circular runout is an effective tool in verifying the actual running accuracy of spindles at their actual operating speeds and can be accomplished without the need for a reference sphere.

  2. Alpha spindles as neurophysiological correlates indicating attentional shift in a simulated driving task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnleitner, Andreas; Simon, Michael; Kincses, Wilhelm E; Buchner, Axel; Schrauf, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to describe neurophysiological correlates of driver distraction with highly robust parameters in the EEG (i.e. alpha spindles). In a simulated driving task with two different secondary tasks (i.e. visuomotor, auditory), N=28 participants had to perform full stop brakes reacting to appearing stop signs and red traffic lights. Alpha spindle rate was significantly higher during an auditory secondary task and significantly lower during a visuomotor secondary task as compared to driving only. Alpha spindle duration was significantly shortened during a visuomotor secondary task. The results are consistent with the assumption that alpha spindles indicate active inhibition of visual information processing. Effects on the alpha spindles while performing secondary tasks on top of the driving task indicate attentional shift according to the task modality. As compared to alpha band power, both the measures of alpha spindle rate and alpha spindle duration were less vulnerable to artifacts and the effect sizes were larger, allowing for a more accurate description of the current driver state.

  3. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions: part II--an approach to intradermal proliferations and horizontally oriented lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Shachar; Al Habeeb, Ayman; Ghazarian, Danny

    2010-05-01

    Melanocytic lesions show great morphological diversity in their architecture and the cytomorphological appearance of their composite cells. Whereas functional melanocytes show a dendritic cytomorphology and territorial isolation, lesional nevomelanocytes and melanoma cells typically show epithelioid, spindled or mixed cytomorphologies, and a range of architectural arrangements. Spindling is common to melanocytic lesions, and may either be a characteristic feature or a divergent appearance. The presence of spindle cells may mask the melanocytic nature of a lesion, and is often disconcerting, either due to its infrequent appearance in a particular lesion or its interpretation as a dedifferentiated phenotype. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions follow the full spectrum of potential biological outcomes, and difficulty may be experienced judging the nature of a lesion due to a lack of consistently reliable features to predict biological behaviour. Over time, recognition of numerous histomorphological features that may portend a more aggressive lesion have been identified; however, the translation of these features into a diagnostic entity requires a gestalt approach. Although most spindle cell melanocytic lesions may reliably be resolved through this standard approach, problem areas do exist for the surgical pathologist or dermatopathologist. With this review (part II of II), we complete our discussion of spindle cell melanocytic lesions, in order to: (1) model a systematic approach to such lesions; and (2) provide familiarity with those melanocytic lesions which either typically or occasionally display a spindled cytomorphology.

  4. Rotation of Meiotic Spindle Is Controlled by Microfilaments in Mouse Oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-YuanChen; Jin-SongLi; LiLian; LeiLei; Zhi-MingHan; Qing-YuanSun

    2005-01-01

    The completion of meiosis requires the spatial and temporal coordination of cytokinesis and karyokirlesis. During meiotic maturation, many events, such as formation, location, and rotation of the meiotic spindle as well as chromosomal movement,Polar body extrusion,and pronuclear migration,are dependent on regulation of the cytoskeleton system.To study functions of microfilaments in meiosis,we induced metaphase Ⅱ(MII)mouse oocytes to resume meiosis by in vitro fertilization or parthenogenetic activation,and we treated such oocytes with cytochalasin B(CB).The changes of the meiotic spindle,as visualized in preparations stained for β-tubulin and chromation,were observed by fluorescent confocal microscopy.The meiotic spindle of Mll oocytes was observed to be parallel to the plasmalemma.After meiosis had resumed,the spindle rotated to the vertical position so that the second polar body could be extruded into the perivitelline space.When meiosis resumed and oocytes were treated with 10μg/ml of CB,the spindle rotation was inhibited.Consequently,the oocyte formed an extra pronucleus instead of extruding a second polar body.These results indicate that spindle rotation is essential for polar body extrusion;it is the microfilaments that play a crucial role in regulating rotation of the meiotic spindle.

  5. Meiosis in a triploid hybrid of Gossypium: high frequency of secondary bipolar spindles at metaphase II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mosareza Vafaie-Tabar; Shanti Chandrashekaran

    2007-01-01

    Studies on meiosis in pollen mother cells (PMCs) of a triploid interspecific hybrid ($3x = 39$ chromosomes, AAD) between tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum ($4n = 2x = 52$,AADD) and diploid G. arboreum ($2n = 2x = 26$,AA) are reported. During meiotic metaphase I, 13 AA bivalents and 13 D univalents are expected in the hybrid. However, only 28% of the PMCs had this expected configuration. The rest of the PMCs had between 8 and 12 bivalents and between 12 and 17 univalents. Univalents lagged at anaphase I, and at metaphase II one or a group of univalents remained scattered in the cytoplasm and failed to assemble at a single metaphase plate. Primary bipolar spindles organized around the bivalents and multivalents. In addition to the primary spindle, several secondary and smaller bipolar spindles organized themselves around individual univalents and groups of univalents. Almost all (97%) of the PMCs showed secondary spindles. Each spindle functioned independently and despite their multiple numbers in a cell, meiosis I proceeded normally, with polyad formation. These observations strongly support the view that in plant meiocytes bilateral kinetochore symmetry is not required for establishing a bipolar spindle and that single unpaired chromosomes can initiate and stabilize the formation of a functional bipolar spindle.

  6. A novel isoform of MAP4 organises the paraxial microtubule array required for muscle cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogessie, Binyam; Roth, Daniel; Rahil, Zainab; Straube, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical for muscle cell differentiation and undergoes reorganisation into an array of paraxial microtubules, which serves as template for contractile sarcomere formation. In this study, we identify a previously uncharacterised isoform of microtubule-associated protein MAP4, oMAP4, as a microtubule organising factor that is crucial for myogenesis. We show that oMAP4 is expressed upon muscle cell differentiation and is the only MAP4 isoform essential for normal progression of the myogenic differentiation programme. Depletion of oMAP4 impairs cell elongation and cell-cell fusion. Most notably, oMAP4 is required for paraxial microtubule organisation in muscle cells and prevents dynein- and kinesin-driven microtubule-microtubule sliding. Purified oMAP4 aligns dynamic microtubules into antiparallel bundles that withstand motor forces in vitro. We propose a model in which the cooperation of dynein-mediated microtubule transport and oMAP4-mediated zippering of microtubules drives formation of a paraxial microtubule array that provides critical support for the polarisation and elongation of myotubes. PMID:25898002

  7. Metallic Glass Wire Based Localization of Kinesin/Microtubule Bio-molecular Motility System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Sikora, A.; Yaginuma, S.; Nakayama, K. S.; Nakazawa, H.; Umetsu, M.; Hwang, W.; Teizer, W.

    2014-03-01

    We report electrophoretic accumulation of microtubules along metallic glass (Pd42.5Cu30Ni7.5P20) wires free-standing in solution. Microtubules are dynamic cytoskeletal filaments. Kinesin is a cytoskeletal motor protein. Functions of these bio-molecules are central to various dynamic cellular processes. Functional artificial organization of bio-molecules is a prerequisite for transferring their native functions into device applications. Fluorescence microscopy at the individual-microtubule level reveals microtubules aligning along the wire axis during the electrophoretic migration. Casein-treated electrodes are effective for releasing trapped microtubules upon removal of the external field. Furthermore, we demonstrate gliding motion of microtubules on kinesin-treated metallic glass wires. The reversible manner in the local adsorption of microtubules, the flexibility of wire electrodes, and the compatibility between the wire electrode and the bio-molecules are beneficial for spatio-temporal manipulation of the motility machinery in 3 dimensions.

  8. Cell edges accumulate gamma tubulin complex components and nucleate microtubules following cytokinesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ambrose

    Full Text Available Microtubules emanate from distinct organizing centers in fungal and animal cells. In plant cells, by contrast, microtubules initiate from dispersed sites in the cell cortex, where they then self-organize into parallel arrays. Previous ultrastructural evidence suggested that cell edges participate in microtubule nucleation but so far there has been no direct evidence for this. Here we use live imaging to show that components of the gamma tubulin nucleation complex (GCP2 and GCP3 localize at distinct sites along the outer periclinal edge of newly formed crosswalls, and that microtubules grow predominantly away from these edges. These data confirm a role for cell edges in microtubule nucleation, and suggest that an asymmetric distribution of microtubule nucleation factors contributes to cortical microtubule organization in plants, in a manner more similar to other kingdoms than previously thought.

  9. Dissecting the molecular mechanism underlying the intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and cortical microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eLei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A central question in plant cell development is how the cell wall determines directional cell expansion and therefore the final shape of the cell. As the major load-bearing component of the cell wall, cellulose microfibrils are laid down transversely to the axis of elongation, thus forming a spring-like structure that reinforces the cell laterally and while favoring longitudinal expansion in most growing cells. Mounting evidence suggests that cortical microtubules organize the deposition of cellulose microfibrils, but the precise molecular mechanisms linking microtubules to cellulose organization have remained unclear until the recent discovery of CSI1, a linker protein between the cortical microtubules and the cellulose biosynthesizing machinery. In this review, we will focus on the intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and cortical microtubules, in particular, we will discuss microtubule arrangement and cell wall architecture, the linkage between cellulose synthase complexes and microtubules, and the feedback mechanisms between cell wall and microtubules.

  10. Depolymerizing kinesins Kip3 and MCAK shape cellular microtubule architecture by differential control of catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Melissa K; Zanic, Marija; Gell, Christopher; Bormuth, Volker; Howard, Jonathon

    2011-11-23

    Microtubules are dynamic filaments whose ends alternate between periods of slow growth and rapid shortening as they explore intracellular space and move organelles. A key question is how regulatory proteins modulate catastrophe, the conversion from growth to shortening. To study this process, we reconstituted microtubule dynamics in the absence and presence of the kinesin-8 Kip3 and the kinesin-13 MCAK. Surprisingly, we found that, even in the absence of the kinesins, the microtubule catastrophe frequency depends on the age of the microtubule, indicating that catastrophe is a multistep process. Kip3 slowed microtubule growth in a length-dependent manner and increased the rate of aging. In contrast, MCAK eliminated the aging process. Thus, both kinesins are catastrophe factors; Kip3 mediates fine control of microtubule length by narrowing the distribution of maximum lengths prior to catastrophe, whereas MCAK promotes rapid restructuring of the microtubule cytoskeleton by making catastrophe a first-order random process.

  11. Globally visualizing the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Lin; Zhang, Li-Juan; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Wu, Qiu-Mei; Sun, En-Ze; Shi, Yun-Bo; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-04-15

    Understanding the microtubule-dependent behaviors of viruses in live cells is very meaningful for revealing the mechanisms of virus infection and endocytosis. Herein, we used a quantum dots-based single-particle tracking technique to dynamically and globally visualize the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells. We found that the intersection configuration of microtubules can interfere with the transport behaviors of the virus in live cells, which lead to the changing and long-time pausing of the transport behavior of viruses. Our results revealed that most of the viruses moved along straight microtubules rapidly and unidirectionally from the cell periphery to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) near the bottom of the cell, and the viruses were confined in the grid of microtubules near the top of the cell and at the MTOC near the bottom of the cell. These results provided deep insights into the influence of entire microtubule geometry on the virus infection.

  12. Tubulin bond energies and microtubule biomechanics determined from nanoindentation in silico

    CERN Document Server

    Kononova, Olga; Theisen, Kelly E; Marx, Kenneth A; Dima, Ruxandra I; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Barsegov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules, the primary components of the chromosome segregation machinery, are stabilized by longitudinal and lateral non-covalent bonds between the tubulin subunits. However, the thermodynamics of these bonds and the microtubule physico-chemical properties are poorly understood. Here, we explore the biomechanics of microtubule polymers using multiscale computational modeling and nanoindentations in silico of a contiguous microtubule fragment. A close match between the simulated and experimental force-deformation spectra enabled us to correlate the microtubule biomechanics with dynamic structural transitions at the nanoscale. Our mechanical testing revealed that the compressed MT behaves as a system of rigid elements interconnected through a network of lateral and longitudinal elastic bonds. The initial regime of continuous elastic deformation of the microtubule is followed by the transition regime, during which the microtubule lattice undergoes discrete structural changes, which include first the reversib...

  13. Sulfo-SMCC Prevents Annealing of Taxol-Stabilized Microtubules In Vitro

    CERN Document Server

    Prabhune, Meenakshi; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule structure and functions have been widely studied in vitro and in cells. Research has shown that cysteines on tubulin play a crucial role in the polymerization of microtubules. Here, we show that blocking sulfhydryl groups of cysteines in taxol-stabilized polymerized microtubules with a commonly used chemical crosslinker prevents temporal end-to-end annealing of microtubules in vitro. This can dramatically affect the length distribution of the microtubules. The crosslinker sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate, sulfo-SMCC, consists of a maleimide and a N-hydroxysuccinimide ester group to bind to sulfhydryl groups and primary amines, respectively. Interestingly, addition of a maleimide dye alone does not show the same prevention of annealing in stabilized microtubules. This study shows that the sulfhydryl groups of cysteines of tubulin that are vital for the polymerization are also important for the subsequent annealing of microtubules.

  14. Sleep-spindle detection: crowdsourcing and evaluating performance of experts, non-experts and automated methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warby, Simon C.; Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Welinder, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    to crowdsource spindle identification by human experts and non-experts, and we compared their performance with that of automated detection algorithms in data from middle- to older-aged subjects from the general population. We also refined methods for forming group consensus and evaluating the performance...... that crowdsourcing the scoring of sleep data is an efficient method to collect large data sets, even for difficult tasks such as spindle identification. Further refinements to spindle detection algorithms are needed for middle- to older-aged subjects....

  15. Genetic analysis of the spindle checkpoint genes san-1, mdf-2, bub-3 and the CENP-F homologues hcp-1 and hcp-2 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Landon L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spindle checkpoint delays the onset of anaphase until all sister chromatids are aligned properly at the metaphase plate. To investigate the role san-1, the MAD3 homologue, has in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos we used RNA interference (RNAi to identify genes synthetic lethal with the viable san-1(ok1580 deletion mutant. Results The san-1(ok1580 animal has low penetrating phenotypes including an increased incidence of males, larvae arrest, slow growth, protruding vulva, and defects in vulva morphogenesis. We found that the viability of san-1(ok1580 embryos is significantly reduced when HCP-1 (CENP-F homologue, MDF-1 (MAD-1 homologue, MDF-2 (MAD-2 homologue or BUB-3 (predicted BUB-3 homologue are reduced by RNAi. Interestingly, the viability of san-1(ok1580 embryos is not significantly reduced when the paralog of HCP-1, HCP-2, is reduced. The phenotype of san-1(ok1580;hcp-1(RNAi embryos includes embryonic and larval lethality, abnormal organ development, and an increase in abnormal chromosome segregation (aberrant mitotic nuclei, anaphase bridging. Several of the san-1(ok1580;hcp-1(RNAi animals displayed abnormal kinetochore (detected by MPM-2 and microtubule structure. The survival of mdf-2(RNAi;hcp-1(RNAi embryos but not bub-3(RNAi;hcp-1(RNAi embryos was also compromised. Finally, we found that san-1(ok1580 and bub-3(RNAi, but not hcp-1(RNAi embryos, were sensitive to anoxia, suggesting that like SAN-1, BUB-3 has a functional role as a spindle checkpoint protein. Conclusion Together, these data suggest that in the C. elegans embryo, HCP-1 interacts with a subset of the spindle checkpoint pathway. Furthermore, the fact that san-1(ok1580;hcp-1(RNAi animals had a severe viability defect whereas in the san-1(ok1580;hcp-2(RNAi and san-1(ok1580;hcp-2(ok1757 animals the viability defect was not as severe suggesting that hcp-1 and hcp-2 are not completely redundant.

  16. A ligand-independent integrin β1 mechanosensory complex guides spindle orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridou, Nicoletta I; Skourides, Paris A

    2016-01-01

    Control of spindle orientation is a fundamental process for embryonic development, morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, while defects are associated with tumorigenesis and other diseases. Force sensing is one of the mechanisms through which division orientation is determined. Here we show that integrin β1 plays a critical role in this process, becoming activated at the lateral regions of the cell cortex in a ligand-independent manner. This activation is force dependent and polar, correlating with the spindle capture sites. Inhibition of integrin β1 activation on the cortex and disruption of its asymmetric distribution leads to spindle misorientation, even when cell adhesion is β1 independent. Examining downstream targets reveals that a cortical mechanosensory complex forms on active β1, and regulates spindle orientation irrespective of cell context. We propose that ligand-independent integrin β1 activation is a conserved mechanism that allows cell responses to external stimuli. PMID:26952307

  17. Research Progress of Key Technology of High-Speed and High Precision Motorized Spindles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Wan-li; MI Hai-qing; HUANG Hon-gwu

    2005-01-01

    High speed machining and high precision machining are two tendencies of the manufacturing technology worldwide. The motorized spindle is the core component of the machine tools for achieving the high speed and high precise machining, which affects the general development level of the machine tools to a great extent. Progress of the key techniques is reviewed in this paper, in which the high speed and high precision spindle bearings, the dynamical and thermal characteristics of spindles, the design technique of the high frequency motors and the drivers, the anti-electromagnetic damage technique of the motors, and the machining and assembling technique are involved. Finally, tha development tendencies of the motorized spindles are presented.

  18. MINITYPE MACHINING SYSTEM FOR DIAMOND LAPPING & POLISHING BY USING BRUSHLESS DIRECT CURRENT MOTOR AS PRECISE SPINDLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Huinan; CHEN Dongsheng; ZHAO Yong; LIN Binquan

    2008-01-01

    A minitype precise spindle system which can machine precisely and stably in the process of diamond lapping and polishing is designed. In such minitype spindle system, the brushless DC spindle motor is used to drive the lapping finish table, which is built with fluid dynamic bearings. Some measures have been taken to make the lapping system dynamic balance, and a servo controller which can adjust the speed of motor from 1 200 r/min to 5 400 r/min is designed. Experiments show that the spindle system is reliable and stable for diamond polishing, and the detection results by atomic force microscope(AFM) show that the surfaces of diamond edge's Ra is 6.725 nm and whole diamond average Ra is 3.25 nm.

  19. Novel approach for determining the optimal axial preload of a simulating rotary table spindle system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Xiao-biao; XIE Tao; CHEN Wei-shan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new theoretical model to determine the optimal axial preload ora spindle system, for challenging the traditional method which relies heavily on experience of engineers. The axial preloading stiffness was treated as the sum of the spindle modal stiffness and the framework elastic stiffness, based on a novel concept that magnitude of preloads can be controlled by measuring the resonant frequency of a spindle system. By employing an example of a certain type of aircraft simulating rotary table, the modal stiffness was measured on the Agilent 35670A Dynamic Signal Analyzer by experimental modal analysis. The equivalent elastic stiffness was simulated by both finite element analysis in ANSYS(R) and a curve fitting in MATLAB(R). Results showed that the static preloading stiffness of the spindle was 7.2125×107 N/m, and that the optimal preloading force was 120.0848 N. Practical application proved the feasibility of our method.

  20. Automated three-dimensional single cell phenotyping of spindle dynamics, cell shape, and volume

    CERN Document Server

    Plumb, Kemp; Pelletier, Vincent; Kilfoil, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    We present feature finding and tracking algorithms in 3D in living cells, and demonstrate their utility to measure metrics important in cell biological processes. We developed a computational imaging hybrid approach that combines automated three-dimensional tracking of point-like features with surface determination from which cell (or nuclear) volume, shape, and planes of interest can be extracted. After validation, we applied the technique to real space context-rich dynamics of the mitotic spindle, and cell volume and its relationship to spindle length, in dividing living cells. These methods are additionally useful for automated segregation of pre-anaphase and anaphase spindle populations in budding yeast. We found that genetic deletion of the yeast kinesin-5 mitotic motor cin8 leads to large mother and daughter cells that were indistinguishable based on size, and that in those cells the spindle length becomes uncorrelated with cell size. The technique can be used to visualize and quantify tracked feature c...

  1. Illusion caused by vibration of muscle spindles reveals an involvement of muscle spindle inputs in regulating isometric contraction of masseter muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiboshi, Taisuke; Sato, Hajime; Tanaka, Yuto; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Morimoto, Toshifumi; Türker, Kemal Sitki; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kang, Youngnam

    2012-11-01

    Spindle Ia afferents may be differentially involved in voluntary isometric contraction, depending on the pattern of synaptic connections in spindle reflex pathways. We investigated how isometric contraction of masseter muscles is regulated through the activity of their muscle spindles that contain the largest number of intrafusal fibers among skeletal muscle spindles by examining the effects of vibration of muscle spindles on the voluntary isometric contraction. Subjects were instructed to hold the jaw at resting position by counteracting ramp loads applied on lower molar teeth. In response to the increasing-ramp load, the root mean square (RMS) of masseter EMG activity almost linearly increased under no vibration, while displaying a steep linear increase followed by a slower increase under vibration. The regression line of the relationship between the load and RMS was significantly steeper under vibration than under no vibration, suggesting that the subjects overestimated the ramp load and excessively counteracted it as reflected in the emergence of bite pressure. In response to the decreasing-ramp load applied following the increasing one, the RMS hardly decreased under vibration unlike under no vibration, leading to a generation of bite pressure even after the offset of the negative-ramp load until the vibration was ceased. Thus the subjects overestimated the increasing rate of the load while underestimating the decreasing rate of the load, due to the vibration-induced illusion of jaw opening. These observations suggest that spindle Ia/II inputs play crucial roles both in estimating the load and in controlling the isometric contraction of masseter muscles in the jaw-closed position.

  2. Sarcomatoid chordoma: chordoma with a massive malignant spindle-cell component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimitsu, Yosuke; Hashimoto, H. [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan). Dept. of Pathology and Oncology; Aoki, Takatoshi [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Yokoyama, Koichiro [Dept. of Orthopedics, National Kokura Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    We report a case of chordoma containing a spindle cell sarcomatoid component with a gradual transition from conventional chordoma. Immunohistochemically, many tumor cells in both conventional chordoma and sarcomatoid components were positive for cytokeratins (AE1/AE3, CAM5.2) and epithelial membrane antigen as well as vimentin. This report provides a rare example of sarcomatoid chordoma. Familiarity with this type of bone tumor should help to avoid confusion with dedifferentiated chordoma and other spindle cell sarcomas or carcinomas. (orig.)

  3. An AFM-based methodology for measuring axial and radial error motions of spindles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based methodology for measurement of axial and radial error motions of a high precision spindle. Based on a modified commercial AFM system, the AFM tip is employed as a cutting tool by which nano-grooves are scratched on a flat surface with the rotation of the spindle. By extracting the radial motion data of the spindle from the scratched nano-grooves, the radial error motion of the spindle can be calculated after subtracting the tilting errors from the original measurement data. Through recording the variation of the PZT displacement in the Z direction in AFM tapping mode during the spindle rotation, the axial error motion of the spindle can be obtained. Moreover the effects of the nano-scratching parameters on the scratched grooves, the tilting error removal method for both conditions and the method of data extraction from the scratched groove depth are studied in detail. The axial error motion of 124 nm and the radial error motion of 279 nm of a commercial high precision air bearing spindle are achieved by this novel method, which are comparable with the values provided by the manufacturer, verifying this method. This approach does not need an expensive standard part as in most conventional measurement approaches. Moreover, the axial and radial error motions of the spindle can both be obtained, indicating that this is a potential means of measuring the error motions of the high precision moving parts of ultra-precision machine tools in the future. (paper)

  4. Interphase adhesion geometry is transmitted to an internal regulator for spindle orientation via caveolin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumura, Shigeru; Kojidani, Tomoko; Kamioka, Yuji; Uchida, Seiichi; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Kimura, Akatsuki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Despite theoretical and physical studies implying that cell-extracellular matrix adhesion geometry governs the orientation of the cell division axis, the molecular mechanisms that translate interphase adhesion geometry to the mitotic spindle orientation remain elusive. Here, we show that the cellular edge retraction during mitotic cell rounding correlates with the spindle axis. At the onset of mitotic cell rounding, caveolin-1 is targeted to the retracting cortical region at the proximal end ...

  5. Sleep Spindles Characteristics in Insomnia Sufferers and Their Relationship with Sleep Misperception

    OpenAIRE

    Normand, Marie-Pier; St-Hilaire, Patrick; Célyne H. Bastien

    2016-01-01

    Cortical hyperarousal is higher in insomnia sufferers (INS) than in good sleepers (GS) and could be related to an alteration in sleep protection mechanisms, like reduced density or altered characteristics in sleep spindles. The deficient sleep protection mechanisms might in turn enhance underestimation of sleep. This study's objective was to document sleep spindles characteristics in INS compared with GS and to investigate their potential role in sleep consolidation and misperception. Sevente...

  6. Sleep Spindles Characteristics in Insomnia Sufferers and Their Relationship with Sleep Misperception

    OpenAIRE

    Normand, Marie-Pier; St-Hilaire, Patrick; Célyne H. Bastien

    2016-01-01

    Cortical hyperarousal is higher in insomnia sufferers (INS) than in good sleepers (GS) and could be related to an alteration in sleep protection mechanisms, like reduced density or altered characteristics in sleep spindles. The deficient sleep protection mechanisms might in turn enhance underestimation of sleep. This study’s objective was to document sleep spindles characteristics in INS compared with GS and to investigate their potential role in sleep consolidation and misperception. Sevente...

  7. Somatic and intramuscular distribution of muscle spindles and their relation to muscular angiotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkorogiannis, Theodoros

    2004-07-21

    The distribution pattern of muscle spindles in the skeletal musculature has been reviewed in a large number of muscles (using the literature data especially from cat and man), and the relation of spindle content to muscle mass was quantitatively examined in 36 cat and 140 human muscles. In both species, the number of spindles increases with increasing muscle mass in a power law fashion of the form y=bx+a, whereby y denotes the logarithm of spindle content within a muscle, and x is the logarithm of muscle mass. For the cat, slope b and intercept a were estimated as 0.39 and 1.53, and for man as 0.48 and 1.33, respectively. The results show that the spindle content of a muscle may be related to its mass, confirming a similar analysis made previously by Banks and Stacey (Mechano receptors, Plenum Press, New York, 1988, pp. 263-269) in a different data set. With regard to the histological profile of muscle fibers, (as it is already well documented by many groups) muscle spindles tend to be located in deeper muscle regions where oxidative fibers predominate, and are far scarcer in superficial and flat muscle regions where glycolytic fibers predominate. These discrete muscle regions differ also in the properties of the vessel tree supplying them, for which the term oxidative and glycolytic "angiotype" has been used. The results from these three aspects of analysis (relation to muscle mass, relation to muscle regions with high oxidative index and relation to muscle regions with dense vascular supply) were combined with histological findings showing that spindles may be in systematic anatomical contact to intramuscular vessels. Based on these data a hypothesis is proposed according to which, both the number and intramuscular placement of muscle spindles are related to the oxidative angiotype supplying the muscle territories rich in oxidative fibers. The hypothesis is discussed. PMID:15207480

  8. High-Speed Spindle Fault Diagnosis with the Empirical Mode Decomposition and Multiscale Entropy Method

    OpenAIRE

    Nan-Kai Hsieh; Wei-Yen Lin; Hong-Tsu Young

    2015-01-01

    The root mean square (RMS) value of a vibration signal is an important indicator used to represent the amplitude of vibrations in evaluating the quality of high-speed spindles. However, RMS is unable to detect a number of common fault characteristics that occur prior to bearing failure. Extending the operational life and quality of spindles requires reliable fault diagnosis techniques for the analysis of vibration signals from three axes. This study used empirical mode decomposition to decomp...

  9. Mitotic spindle asymmetry in rodents and primates: 2D vs. 3D measurement methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Delphine eDelaunay; Robini, Marc C.; Colette eDehay

    2015-01-01

    Recent data have uncovered that spindle size asymmetry (SSA) is a key component of asymmetric cell division (ACD) in the mouse cerebral cortex (Delaunay et al., 2014). In the present study we show that SSA is independent of spindle orientation and also occurs during cortical progenitor divisions in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the macaque cerebral cortex, pointing to a conserved mechanism in the mammalian lineage. Because SSA magnitude is smaller in cortical precursors than in invertebrate ne...

  10. Genes involved in centrosome-independent mitotic spindle assembly in Drosophila S2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho-Pereira, Sara; Stuurman, Nico; Afonso, Olga; Hornsveld, Marten; Aguiar, Paulo; Goshima, Gohta; Vale, Ronald D; Maiato, Helder

    2013-12-01

    Animal mitotic spindle assembly relies on centrosome-dependent and centrosome-independent mechanisms, but their relative contributions remain unknown. Here, we investigated the molecular basis of the centrosome-independent spindle assembly pathway by performing a whole-genome RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells lacking functional centrosomes. This screen identified 197 genes involved in acentrosomal spindle assembly, eight of which had no previously described mitotic phenotypes and produced defective and/or short spindles. All 197 genes also produced RNAi phenotypes when centrosomes were present, indicating that none were entirely selective for the acentrosomal pathway. However, a subset of genes produced a selective defect in pole focusing when centrosomes were absent, suggesting that centrosomes compensate for this shape defect. Another subset of genes was specifically associated with the formation of multipolar spindles only when centrosomes were present. We further show that the chromosomal passenger complex orchestrates multiple centrosome-independent processes required for mitotic spindle assembly/maintenance. On the other hand, despite the formation of a chromosome-enriched RanGTP gradient, S2 cells depleted of RCC1, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for Ran on chromosomes, established functional bipolar spindles. Finally, we show that cells without functional centrosomes have a delay in chromosome congression and anaphase onset, which can be explained by the lack of polar ejection forces. Overall, these findings establish the constitutive nature of a centrosome-independent spindle assembly program and how this program is adapted to the presence/absence of centrosomes in animal somatic cells.

  11. Variation and significance of microtubules in rat volume overload cardiac hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华胜; 马爱群; 王春梅; 刘勇; 田红燕; 白玲

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the function of microtubules in volume overload cardiac hypertrophy of rat. Methods The structure of microtubules was observed using an immunofluorescent microscope, while the pixel intensity and distribution of microtubule imaging was estimated from laser scanning confocal images of left ventricular cardiocytes immuno-labeled with an antibody to β-tubulin. Results The pixels of the microtubule image taken just after volume overload were not evenly distributed. At 6 hours after overload, the pixel intensity of the microtubule image was decreased to less than 150 (arbitrary units), which was the same as the pixel intensity and distribution of the colchicine depolymerized microtubule image. The changes were partially recovered to 200 (arbitrary units) after 4 more days. The pixel intensity of the control microtubule image was 250 (arbitrary units) and had an even distribution. The structuring of the microtubules was more disordered as volume overload hypertrophy developed. Conclusions There are disorders in the signal transduction pathways governing the hypertrophic response of cardiomyocytes in the hypertrophic myocardium and microtubule is one of the members of the signal transduction pathways governing the hypertrophic response of cardiomyocytes in the hypertrophic myocardium. The disordered microtubule array may be targeted during heart failure treatment.

  12. Taxol differentially modulates the dynamics of microtubules assembled from unfractionated and purified beta-tubulin isotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, W B; Wilson, L; Khan, I A; Luduena, R F; Jordan, M A

    1997-03-25

    Substoichiometric binding of taxol to tubulin in microtubules potently suppresses microtubule dynamics, which appears to be the most sensitive antiproliferative mechanism of taxol. To determine whether the beta-tubulin isotype composition of a microtubule can modulate sensitivity to taxol, we measured the effects of substoichiometric ratios of taxol bound to tubulin in microtubules on the dynamics of microtubules composed of purified alphabeta(II)-, alphabeta(III)-, or alphabeta(IV)-tubulin isotypes and compared the results with the effects of taxol on microtubules assembled from unfractionated tubulin. Substoichiometric ratios of bound taxol in microtubules assembled from purified beta-tubulin isotypes or unfractionated tubulin potently suppressed the shortening rates and the lengths shortened per shortening event. Correlation of the suppression of the shortening rate with the stoichiometry of bound taxol revealed that microtubules composed of purified alphabeta(II)-, alphabeta(III)-, and alphabeta(IV)-tubulin were, respectively, 1.6-, 7.4-, and 7.2-fold less sensitive to the effects of bound taxol than microtubules assembled from unfractionated tubulin. These results indicate that taxol differentially modulates microtubule dynamics depending upon the beta-tubulin isotype composition. The results are consistent with recent studies correlating taxol resistance in tumor cells with increased levels of beta(III0- and beta(IV)-tubulin expression and suggest that altered cellular expression of beta-tubulin isotypes can be an important mechanism by which tumor cells develop resistance to taxol.

  13. Motor-mediated cortical versus astral microtubule organization in lipid-monolayered droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Hella; Surrey, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The correct spatial organization of microtubules is of crucial importance for determining the internal architecture of eukaryotic cells. Microtubules are arranged in space by a multitude of biochemical activities and by spatial constraints imposed by the cell boundary. The principles underlying the establishment of distinct intracellular architectures are only poorly understood. Here, we studied the effect of spatial confinement on the self-organization of purified motors and microtubules that are encapsulated in lipid-monolayered droplets in oil, varying in diameter from 5-100 μm, which covers the size range of typical cell bodies. We found that droplet size alone had a major organizing influence. The presence of a microtubule-crosslinking motor protein decreased the number of accessible types of microtubule organizations. Depending on the degree of spatial confinement, the presence of the motor caused either the formation of a cortical array of bent microtubule bundles or the generation of single microtubule asters in the droplets. These are two of the most prominent forms of microtubule arrangements in plant and metazoan cells. Our results provide insights into the combined organizing influence of spatial constraints and cross-linking motor activities determining distinct microtubule architectures in a minimal biomimetic system. In the future, this simple lipid-monolayered droplet system characterized here can be expanded readily to include further biochemical activities or used as the starting point for the investigation of motor-mediated microtubule organization inside liposomes surrounded by a deformable lipid bilayer. PMID:24966327

  14. Changes in microtubule stability and density in myelin-deficient shiverer mouse CNS axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, L. L.; Witt, A. S.; Payne, H. R.; Shine, H. D.; Brady, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    Altered axon-Schwann cell interactions in PNS myelin-deficient Trembler mice result in changed axonal transport rates, neurofilament and microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation, neurofilament density, and microtubule stability. To determine whether PNS and CNS myelination have equivalent effects on axons, neurofilaments, and microtubules in CNS, myelin-deficient shiverer axons were examined. The genetic defect in shiverer is a deletion in the myelin basic protein (MBP) gene, an essential component of CNS myelin. As a result, shiverer mice have little or no compact CNS myelin. Slow axonal transport rates in shiverer CNS axons were significantly increased, in contrast to the slowing in demyelinated PNS nerves. Even more striking were substantial changes in the composition and properties of microtubules in shiverer CNS axons. The density of axonal microtubules is increased, reflecting increased expression of tubulin in shiverer, and the stability of microtubules is drastically reduced in shiverer axons. Shiverer transgenic mice with two copies of a wild-type myelin basic protein transgene have an intermediate level of compact myelin, making it possible to determine whether the actual level of compact myelin is an important regulator of axonal microtubules. Both increased microtubule density and reduced microtubule stability were still observed in transgenic mouse nerves, indicating that signals beyond synaptogenesis and the mere presence of compact myelin are required for normal regulation of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton.

  15. The non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and microtubule-disassembly activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle D Grode

    Full Text Available Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules.

  16. Doublecortin Is Excluded from Growing Microtubule Ends and Recognizes the GDP-Microtubule Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Andreas; van Haren, Jeffrey; Ribeiro, Susana A; Wittmann, Torsten

    2016-06-20

    Many microtubule (MT) functions are mediated by a diverse class of proteins (+TIPs) at growing MT plus ends that control intracellular MT interactions and dynamics and depend on end-binding proteins (EBs) [1]. Cryoelectron microscopy has recently identified the EB binding site as the interface of four tubulin dimers that undergoes a conformational change in response to β-tubulin GTP hydrolysis [2, 3]. Doublecortin (DCX), a MT-associated protein (MAP) required for neuronal migration during cortical development [4, 5], binds to the same site as EBs [6], and recent in vitro studies proposed DCX localization to growing MT ends independent of EBs [7]. Because this conflicts with observations in neurons [8, 9] and the molecular function of DCX is not well understood, we revisited intracellular DCX dynamics at low expression levels. Here, we report that DCX is not a +TIP in cells but, on the contrary, is excluded from the EB1 domain. In addition, we find that DCX-MT interactions are highly sensitive to MT geometry. In cells, DCX binding was greatly reduced at MT segments with high local curvature. Remarkably, this geometry-dependent binding to MTs was completely reversed in the presence of taxanes, which reconciles incompatible observations in cells [9] and in vitro [10]. We propose a model explaining DCX specificity for different MT geometries based on structural changes induced by GTP hydrolysis that decreases the spacing between adjacent tubulin dimers [11]. Our data are consistent with a unique mode of MT interaction in which DCX specifically recognizes this compacted GDP-like MT lattice.

  17. Doublecortin Is Excluded from Growing Microtubule Ends and Recognizes the GDP-Microtubule Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Andreas; van Haren, Jeffrey; Ribeiro, Susana A; Wittmann, Torsten

    2016-06-20

    Many microtubule (MT) functions are mediated by a diverse class of proteins (+TIPs) at growing MT plus ends that control intracellular MT interactions and dynamics and depend on end-binding proteins (EBs) [1]. Cryoelectron microscopy has recently identified the EB binding site as the interface of four tubulin dimers that undergoes a conformational change in response to β-tubulin GTP hydrolysis [2, 3]. Doublecortin (DCX), a MT-associated protein (MAP) required for neuronal migration during cortical development [4, 5], binds to the same site as EBs [6], and recent in vitro studies proposed DCX localization to growing MT ends independent of EBs [7]. Because this conflicts with observations in neurons [8, 9] and the molecular function of DCX is not well understood, we revisited intracellular DCX dynamics at low expression levels. Here, we report that DCX is not a +TIP in cells but, on the contrary, is excluded from the EB1 domain. In addition, we find that DCX-MT interactions are highly sensitive to MT geometry. In cells, DCX binding was greatly reduced at MT segments with high local curvature. Remarkably, this geometry-dependent binding to MTs was completely reversed in the presence of taxanes, which reconciles incompatible observations in cells [9] and in vitro [10]. We propose a model explaining DCX specificity for different MT geometries based on structural changes induced by GTP hydrolysis that decreases the spacing between adjacent tubulin dimers [11]. Our data are consistent with a unique mode of MT interaction in which DCX specifically recognizes this compacted GDP-like MT lattice. PMID:27238282

  18. Downregulation of nucleolar and spindle-associated protein 1 expression suppresses cell migration, proliferation and invasion in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lu; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Lei; Xiong, Hu; Ge, Yukun; Lu, Wei; Wu, Xun; Heng, Baoli; Yu, Dexin; Wu, Song

    2016-09-01

    Nucleolar and spindle-associated protein 1 (NUSAP1) is a microtubule-binding protein that plays an essential role in mitosis and cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated that NUSAP1 expression is relatively elevated in several malignancies. However, the biological roles of NUSAP1 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remain unknown. In the present study, we firstly performed reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis to reveal that the expression of NUSAP1 was relatively elevated in clear cell RCC (ccRCC) tissue specimens and RCC cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that upregulation of NUSAP1 was significantly correlated with Fuhrman grade (P<0.001), tumor size (P=0.016), clinical stage (P<0.001) and distant metastasis (P=0.023). Additionally, high expression of NUSAP1 was closely associated with a shorter overall survival time of the ccRCC patients (P=0.006). Furthermore, we investigated the biological behaviors of RCC cells in vitro, and we identified that NUSAP1 depletion inhibited RCC cell migration, proliferation and invasion, and apoptosis was induced and the cell cycle was arrested. On the basis of our studies, NUSAP1 was identified as a potential prognostic indicator and a novel therapeutic target for RCC patients. PMID:27461786

  19. Effects of 3-repeat tau on taxol mobility through microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjoo; Fygenson, Deborah; Kim, Mahn Won

    2005-03-01

    Both the anti-cancer drug taxol and the microtubule-associated protein tau suppress dynamics of microtubules (MT). We have observed taxol mobility with full-length 3-repeat tau, one of six tau isoforms, using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) on MTs and compare with earlier results on recombinant full-length adult 4-repeat tau. Taxol mobility becomes highly sensitive to taxol concentration in the presence of 3-repeat tau (up to 1:1 molar ratio) as it does in the presence of 4-repeat tau, but is 2 to 3 times faster at low taxol concentrations. Fitting to a mean-field binding reaction model [J.L. Ross et.al, PNAS 101:12910-5 (2004)] suggests that the presence of 3-repeat tau enhances taxol movement through pores in the MT walls.

  20. Nonlinear Dynamics of Dipoles in Microtubules: Pseudo-Spin Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Berman, Gennady P; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2016-01-01

    We perform a theoretical study of the dynamics of the electric field excitations in a microtubule by taking into consideration the realistic cylindrical geometry, dipole-dipole interactions of the tubulin-based protein heterodimers, the radial electric field produced by the solvent, and a possible degeneracy of energy states of individual heterodimers. The consideration is done in the frames of the classical pseudo-spin model. We derive the system of nonlinear dynamical ordinary differential equations of motion for interacting dipoles, and the continuum version of these equations. We obtain the solutions of these equations in the form of snoidal waves, solitons, kinks, and localized spikes. Our results will help to a better understanding of the functional properties of microtubules including the motor protein dynamics and the information transfer processes. Our considerations are based on classical dynamics. Some speculations on the role of possible quantum effects are also made.

  1. Spatiotemporal control of microtubule nucleation and assembly using magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Céline; Mazari, Elsa; Lallet, Sylvie; Le Borgne, Roland; Marchi, Valérie; Gosse, Charlie; Gueroui, Zoher

    2013-03-01

    Decisions on the fate of cells and their functions are dictated by the spatiotemporal dynamics of molecular signalling networks. However, techniques to examine the dynamics of these intracellular processes remain limited. Here, we show that magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with key regulatory proteins can artificially control, in time and space, the Ran/RCC1 signalling pathway that regulates the cell cytoskeleton. In the presence of a magnetic field, RanGTP proteins conjugated to superparamagnetic nanoparticles can induce microtubule fibres to assemble into asymmetric arrays of polarized fibres in Xenopus laevis egg extracts. The orientation of the fibres is dictated by the direction of the magnetic force. When we locally concentrated nanoparticles conjugated with the upstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor RCC1, the assembly of microtubule fibres could be induced over a greater range of distances than RanGTP particles. The method shows how bioactive nanoparticles can be used to engineer signalling networks and spatial self-organization inside a cell environment.

  2. The Feasibility of Coherent Energy Transfer in Microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Craddock, Travis John Adrian; Mane, Jonathan; Hameroff, Stuart; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2014-01-01

    It was once purported that biological systems were far too warm and wet to support quantum phenomena mainly due to thermal effects disrupting quantum coherence. However recent experimental results and theoretical analyses have shown that thermal energy may assist, rather than disrupt, quantum coherence, especially in the dry hydrophobic interiors of biomolecules. Specifically, evidence has been accumulating for the necessary involvement of quantum coherence and entanglement between uniquely arranged chromophores in light harvesting photosynthetic complexes. Amazingly, the tubulin subunit proteins, which comprise microtubules, also possess a distinct architecture of chromophores, namely aromatic amino acids including tryptophan. The geometry and dipolar properties of these aromatics are similar to those found in photosynthetic units indicating that tubulin may support coherent energy transfer. Tubulin aggregated into microtubule geometric lattices may support such energy transfer, which could be of import for ...

  3. Surface shape control of the workpiece in a double-spindle triple-workstation wafer grinder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Xianglong; Kang Renke; Dong Zhigang; Feng Guang

    2011-01-01

    Double-spindle triple-workstation (DSTW) ultra precision grinders are mainly used in production lines for manufacturing and back thinning large diameter (≥ 300 mm) silicon wafers for integrated circuits.It is important,but insufficiently studied,to control the wafer shape ground on a DSTW grinder by adjusting the inclination angles of the spindles and work tables.In this paper,the requirements of the inclination angle adjustment of the grinding spindles and work tables in DSTW wafer grinders are analyzed.A reasonable configuration of the grinding spindles and work tables in DSTW wafer grinders are proposed.Based on the proposed configuration,an adjustment method of the inclination angle of grinding spindles and work tables for DSTW wafer grinders is put forward.The mathematical models of wafer shape with the adjustment amount of inclination angles for both fine and rough grinding spindles are derived.The proposed grinder configuration and adjustment method will provide helpful instruction for DSTW wafer grinder design.

  4. A curved edge diffraction-utilized displacement sensor for spindle metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChaBum; Mahajan, Satish M.; Zhao, Rui; Jeon, Seongkyul

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new dimensional metrological sensing principle for a curved surface based on curved edge diffraction. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the spindle with non-contact sensors, typically a capacitive sensor (CS) or an eddy current sensor, pointed at the artifact. However, these sensors are designed for flat surface measurement. Therefore, measuring a target with a curved surface causes error. This is due to electric fields behaving differently between a flat and curved surface than between two flat surfaces. In this study, a laser is positioned incident to the cylindrical surface of the spindle, and a photodetector collects the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. The proposed sensor was compared with a CS within a range of 500 μm. The discrepancy between the proposed sensor and CS was 0.017% of the full range. Its sensing performance showed a resolution of 14 nm and a drift of less than 10 nm for 7 min of operation. This sensor was also used to measure dynamic characteristics of the spindle system (natural frequency 181.8 Hz, damping ratio 0.042) and spindle runout (22.0 μm at 2000 rpm). The combined standard uncertainty was estimated as 85.9 nm under current experiment conditions. It is anticipated that this measurement technique allows for in situ health monitoring of a precision spindle system in an accurate, convenient, and low cost manner.

  5. Sleep Spindle Characteristics in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Their Relation to Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Merrill S.

    2016-01-01

    Empirical evidence indicates that sleep spindles facilitate neuroplasticity and “off-line” processing during sleep, which supports learning, memory consolidation, and intellectual performance. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) exhibit characteristics that may increase both the risk for and vulnerability to abnormal spindle generation. Despite the high prevalence of sleep problems and cognitive deficits in children with NDD, only a few studies have examined the putative association between spindle characteristics and cognitive function. This paper reviews the literature regarding sleep spindle characteristics in children with NDD and their relation to cognition in light of what is known in typically developing children and based on the available evidence regarding children with NDD. We integrate available data, identify gaps in understanding, and recommend future research directions. Collectively, studies are limited by small sample sizes, heterogeneous populations with multiple comorbidities, and nonstandardized methods for collecting and analyzing findings. These limitations notwithstanding, the evidence suggests that future studies should examine associations between sleep spindle characteristics and cognitive function in children with and without NDD, and preliminary findings raise the intriguing question of whether enhancement or manipulation of sleep spindles could improve sleep-dependent memory and other aspects of cognitive function in this population.

  6. On the Free Vibration Modeling of Spindle Systems: A Calibrated Dynamic Stiffness Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Gaber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bearings on the vibrational behavior of machine tool spindles is investigated. This is done through the development of a calibrated dynamic stiffness matrix (CDSM method, where the bearings flexibility is represented by massless linear spring elements with tuneable stiffness. A dedicated MATLAB code is written to develop and to assemble the element stiffness matrices for the system’s multiple components and to apply the boundary conditions. The developed method is applied to an illustrative example of spindle system. When the spindle bearings are modeled as simply supported boundary conditions, the DSM model results in a fundamental frequency much higher than the system’s nominal value. The simply supported boundary conditions are then replaced by linear spring elements, and the spring constants are adjusted such that the resulting calibrated CDSM model leads to the nominal fundamental frequency of the spindle system. The spindle frequency results are also validated against the experimental data. The proposed method can be effectively applied to predict the vibration characteristics of spindle systems supported by bearings.

  7. The Contribution of Thalamocortical Core and Matrix Pathways to Sleep Spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantoni, Giovanni; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney S

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles arise from the interaction of thalamic and cortical neurons. Neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) inhibit thalamocortical neurons, which in turn excite the TRN and cortical neurons. A fundamental principle of anatomical organization of the thalamocortical projections is the presence of two pathways: the diffuse matrix pathway and the spatially selective core pathway. Cortical layers are differentially targeted by these two pathways with matrix projections synapsing in superficial layers and core projections impinging on middle layers. Based on this anatomical observation, we propose that spindles can be classified into two classes, those arising from the core pathway and those arising from the matrix pathway, although this does not exclude the fact that some spindles might combine both pathways at the same time. We find evidence for this hypothesis in EEG/MEG studies, intracranial recordings, and computational models that incorporate this difference. This distinction will prove useful in accounting for the multiple functions attributed to spindles, in that spindles of different types might act on local and widespread spatial scales. Because spindle mechanisms are often hijacked in epilepsy and schizophrenia, the classification proposed in this review might provide valuable information in defining which pathways have gone awry in these neurological disorders. PMID:27144033

  8. A curved edge diffraction-utilized displacement sensor for spindle metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChaBum; Mahajan, Satish M; Zhao, Rui; Jeon, Seongkyul

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new dimensional metrological sensing principle for a curved surface based on curved edge diffraction. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the spindle with non-contact sensors, typically a capacitive sensor (CS) or an eddy current sensor, pointed at the artifact. However, these sensors are designed for flat surface measurement. Therefore, measuring a target with a curved surface causes error. This is due to electric fields behaving differently between a flat and curved surface than between two flat surfaces. In this study, a laser is positioned incident to the cylindrical surface of the spindle, and a photodetector collects the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. The proposed sensor was compared with a CS within a range of 500 μm. The discrepancy between the proposed sensor and CS was 0.017% of the full range. Its sensing performance showed a resolution of 14 nm and a drift of less than 10 nm for 7 min of operation. This sensor was also used to measure dynamic characteristics of the spindle system (natural frequency 181.8 Hz, damping ratio 0.042) and spindle runout (22.0 μm at 2000 rpm). The combined standard uncertainty was estimated as 85.9 nm under current experiment conditions. It is anticipated that this measurement technique allows for in situ health monitoring of a precision spindle system in an accurate, convenient, and low cost manner. PMID:27475601

  9. The octarepeat region of hamster PrP (PrP51-91) enhances the formation of microtubule and antagonize Cu~(2+)-induced microtubule-disrupting activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoli Li; Chenfang Dong; Song Shi; Guirong Wang; Yuan Li; Xin Wang; Qi Shi; Chan Tian; Ruimin Zhou; Chen Gao; Xiaoping Dong

    2009-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is considered to associate with microtubule and its major component, tubulin. In the present study, octarepeat region of PrP (PrP51-91) was expressed in prokaryotic-expressing system. Using GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation, the mol-ecular interaction between PrP51-91 and tubulin was observed. Our data also demonstrated that PrP51-91 could efficiently stimulate microtubule assembly in vitro, indicating a potential effect of PrP on microtu-bule dynamics. Moreover, PrP51-91 was confirmed to be able to antagonize Cu~(2+)-induced microtubule-disrupt-ing activity in vivo, partially protecting against Cu~(2+) intoxication to culture cells and stabilize cellular micro-tubule structure. The association of the octarepeat region of PrP with tubulin may further provide insight into the biological function of PrP in the neurons.

  10. Age-related Changes In Sleep Spindles Characteristics During Daytime Recovery Following a 25-Hour Sleep Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaïna eRosinvil

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The mechanisms underlying sleep spindles (~11-15Hz; >0.5s help to protect sleep. With age, it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain sleep at a challenging time (e.g. daytime, even after sleep loss. This study compared spindle characteristics during daytime recovery and nocturnal sleep in young and middle-aged adults. In addition, we explored whether spindles characteristics in baseline nocturnal sleep were associated with the ability to maintain sleep during daytime recovery periods in both age groups.Methods: Twenty-nine young (15 women and 14 men; 27.3 ± 5.0 and 31 middle-aged (19 women and 13 men; 51.6 y ± 5.1 healthy subjects participated in a baseline nocturnal sleep and a daytime recovery sleep after 25 hours of sleep deprivation. Spindles were detected on artefact-free NREM sleep epochs. Spindle density (nb/min, amplitude (μV, frequency (Hz and duration (s were analyzed on parasagittal (linked-ears derivations. Results: In young subjects, spindle frequency increased during daytime recovery sleep as compared to baseline nocturnal sleep in all derivations, whereas middle-aged subjects showed spindle frequency enhancement only in the prefrontal derivation. No other significant interaction between age group and sleep condition was observed. Spindle density for all derivations and centro-occipital spindle amplitude decreased whereas prefrontal spindle amplitude increased from baseline to daytime recovery sleep in both age groups. Finally, no significant correlation was found between spindle characteristics during baseline nocturnal sleep and the marked reduction in sleep efficiency during daytime recovery sleep in both young and middle-aged subjects.Conclusion: These results suggest that the interaction between homeostatic and circadian pressure module spindle frequency differently in aging. Spindle characteristics do not seem to be linked with the ability to maintain daytime recovery sleep.

  11. Noise reduction on multi-spindle automatic lathes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, P.

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to define the major noise emitting sources in multi-spindle automatic lathes during machining and indexing operations. Noise levels as specified by the working ordinance (Arbeitsstattenverordnung) are to be obtained or reduce by secondary and predominantly primary actions. The following actions will lead towards considerable noise level reductions to obtain the above targets: (1) by boxing-in actions as additional and supplementary means for existing workshop places. Depending on the actions taken a noise level reduction of between 6 to 11 dB(A) will result; (2) by modifications in the design of head stock and gear boxes according to the principle of assignment division together with boxing-in actions of integrated parts. A comparable late model machine shows an improvement of a minimum of 6 dB(A) even after doubling the operating speed; (3) by design and manufacturing modification of machine parts as gears, clutches, cams and indexing devices. Improvement of the mostly impulse type noise peaks by approximately 1 to 4 dB (impulse sound).

  12. Ion pump using cylindrically symmetric spindle magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For all accelerators and many research and industries, excellent vacuum conditions are required and the highest possible pumping rates are necessary. For most applications the standard ion sputtering pump (ISP) meets these requirements and is optimal for financial point of view also. The physical principle of the ISP is well known and many companies manufacture variety of ISP. Most of them use dipole magnetic field produced by permanent magnet and electric dipole field between the electrodes in which tenuous plasma is created because of interaction of between the relatively fast electrons slow residual gas atoms. Performance of an ISP depends basically on the electron cloud density in between the titanium electrodes but in the available present configurations no consideration has been given to electron confinement which needs a mirror magnetic field. If this is incorporated it will make a robust ISP surely; furthermore, the requirement of constant feeding of high voltage to electrodes for supplying sufficient number of electrons will be reduced too. A study has been performed to create sufficient rotationally symmetric spindle magnetic field (SMF) with inherent presence of magnetic mirror effect to electron motion to confine them for longer time for enhancing the density of electron cloud between the electrodes. It will lessen the electric power feeding the electrodes and lengthen their life-time. Construction of further compact and robust ISP is envisaged herein. The field simulation using the commercially available permanent magnet together with simulation of electron motion in such field will be presented and discussed in the paper.

  13. Ion pump using cylindrically symmetric spindle magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, M. H.

    2012-11-01

    For all accelerators and many research and industries, excellent vacuum conditions are required and the highest possible pumping rates are necessary. For most applications the standard ion sputtering pump (ISP) meets these requirements and is optimal for financial point of view also. The physical principle of the ISP is well known and many companies manufacture variety of ISP. Most of them use dipole magnetic field produced by permanent magnet and electric dipole field between the electrodes in which tenuous plasma is created because of interaction of between the relatively fast electrons slow residual gas atoms. Performance of an ISP depends basically on the electron cloud density in between the titanium electrodes but in the available present configurations no consideration has been given to electron confinement which needs a mirror magnetic field. If this is incorporated it will make a robust ISP surely; furthermore, the requirement of constant feeding of high voltage to electrodes for supplying sufficient number of electrons will be reduced too. A study has been performed to create sufficient rotationally symmetric spindle magnetic field (SMF) with inherent presence of magnetic mirror effect to electron motion to confine them for longer time for enhancing the density of electron cloud between the electrodes. It will lessen the electric power feeding the electrodes and lengthen their life-time. Construction of further compact and robust ISP is envisaged herein. The field simulation using the commercially available permanent magnet together with simulation of electron motion in such field will be presented and discussed in the paper.

  14. GIT1 enhances neurite outgrowth by stimulating microtubule assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-sheng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GIT1, a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein, has been reported to be involved in neurite outgrowth. However, the neurobiological functions of the protein remain unclear. In this study, we found that GIT1 was highly expressed in the nervous system, and its expression was maintained throughout all stages of neuritogenesis in the brain. In primary cultured mouse hippocampal neurons from GIT1 knockout mice, there was a significant reduction in total neurite length per neuron, as well as in the average length of axon-like structures, which could not be prevented by nerve growth factor treatment. Overexpression of GIT1 significantly promoted axon growth and fully rescued the axon outgrowth defect in the primary hippocampal neuron cultures from GIT1 knockout mice. The GIT1 N terminal region, including the ADP ribosylation factor-GTPase activating protein domain, the ankyrin domains and the Spa2 homology domain, were sufficient to enhance axonal extension. Importantly, GIT1 bound to many tubulin proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, and it accelerated microtubule assembly in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that GIT1 promotes neurite outgrowth, at least partially by stimulating microtubule assembly. This study provides new insight into the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of GIT1-associated neurological diseases.

  15. Two-state mechanochemical model for microtubule growth

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a two-state mechanochemical model is presented to describe the dynamic properties of microtubule (MT) growth in cells. The MT switches between two states, assembly state and disassembly state. In assembly state, the growth of microtubule includes two processes: GTP-tubulin binding to the tip of protofilament (PF) and conformational change of PF, during which the penultimate GTP is hydrolyzed and the first tubulin unit that curls out the MT surface is rearranged into MT surface using the energy released from GTP hydrolysis. In disassembly state, the shortening of microtubule is also described by two processes, the release of GDP-tibulin from the tip of PF and one new tubulin unit curls out from the MT surface. Switches between these two states, which are usually called rescue and catastrophe, happen stochastically with external force dependent rates. Using this two-state model with parameters obtained by fitting the recent experimental data, detailed properties of MT growth are obtained, we find...

  16. The distribution of microtubules in differentiating cells of Micrasterias denticulata bréb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiermayer, O

    1968-09-01

    As an extension of earlier cytophysiological and morphological studies on differentiating cells of Micrasterias denticulata, a fine structural investigation of glutaraldehyde-osmium tetroxide fixed material has been made. Special emphasis has been placed on the distribution of cytoplasmic microtubules and on their possible role in the processes of growth and differentiation. Four distinct systems of microtubules were found: (a) a band in the cortical protoplasm of the isthmus region which surrounds the nucleus; (b) several bands in the cortical protoplasm of the old half cells, with rod-like cross bridges between individual microtubules and between the microtubules and the plasmalemma; (c) clusters of microtubules near the posttelophase nucleus, some separated by "intertubular structures" possibly fibrils; and (d) microtubules in the internal and cortical protoplasm of differentiating half cells. PMID:24519210

  17. The Microtubule-Associated Protein END BINDING1 Modulates Membrane Trafficking Pathways in Plant Root Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shahidi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    EB1 protein preferentially binds to the fast growing ends of microtubules where it regulates microtubule dynamics. In addition to microtubules, EB1 interacts with several additional proteins, and through these interactions modulates various cellular processes. Arabidopsis thaliana eb1 mutants have roots that exhibit aberrant responses to touch/gravity cues. Columella cells in the centre of the root cap are polarized and play key roles in these responses by functioning as sensors.I examined th...

  18. Modulating microtubule stability enhances the cytotoxic response of cancer cells to paclitaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Ahmed Ashour; Wang, Xiaoyan; Lu, Zhen; Goldsmith, Juliet,; Le, Xiao-Feng; Grandjean, Geoffrey; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey; Broom, Bradley; Bast, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    The extracellular matrix protein TGFBI enhances the cytotoxic response of cancer cells to paclitaxel by affecting integrin signals that stabilize microtubules. Extending the implications of this knowledge, we tested the more general hypothesis that cancer cell signals which increase microtubule stability before exposure to paclitaxel may increase its ability to stablize microtubules and thereby enhance its cytotoxicity. Toward this end, we performed an siRNA screen to evaluate how genetic dep...

  19. Motion Track Modeling and Analysis of Belt Spindle under Combined Effects of Bending Moment-Torque-Thermal Deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐向阳; 高卫国; 刘腾; 张大卫

    2015-01-01

    The motion track of belt spindle is important for the radial error of belt spindle. An analytical modeling method for the motion track of belt spindle under the combined effects of bending moment-torque-thermal deforma-tion is proposed in this paper. Three running phases of belt spindle have been analyzed and modeled:the start-up phase with leaping change due to the change in force and bending moment, the accelerating phase with axis deflection, and the constant speed phase with axis regression because of the combined effects of bending moment-torque-thermal de-formation. The simulation and test were completed on the belt spindle of SKVM850 machine tool, which illustrates the variation law of the radial error of belt spindle during the whole running phases.

  20. The Inner Centromere Protein (INCENP) Coil Is a Single α-Helix (SAH) Domain That Binds Directly to Microtubules and Is Important for Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC) Localization and Function in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samejima, Kumiko; Platani, Melpomeni; Wolny, Marcin; Ogawa, Hiromi; Vargiu, Giulia; Knight, Peter J; Peckham, Michelle; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-08-28

    The chromosome passenger complex (CPC) is a master regulator of mitosis. Inner centromere protein (INCENP) acts as a scaffold regulating CPC localization and activity. During early mitosis, the N-terminal region of INCENP forms a three-helix bundle with Survivin and Borealin, directing the CPC to the inner centromere where it plays essential roles in chromosome alignment and the spindle assembly checkpoint. The C-terminal IN box region of INCENP is responsible for binding and activating Aurora B kinase. The central region of INCENP has been proposed to comprise a coiled coil domain acting as a spacer between the N- and C-terminal domains that is involved in microtubule binding and regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Here we show that the central region (213 residues) of chicken INCENP is not a coiled coil but a ∼ 32-nm-long single α-helix (SAH) domain. The N-terminal half of this domain directly binds to microtubules in vitro. By analogy with previous studies of myosin 10, our data suggest that the INCENP SAH might stretch up to ∼ 80 nm under physiological forces. Thus, the INCENP SAH could act as a flexible "dog leash," allowing Aurora B to phosphorylate dynamic substrates localized in the outer kinetochore while at the same time being stably anchored to the heterochromatin of the inner centromere. Furthermore, by achieving this flexibility via an SAH domain, the CPC avoids a need for dimerization (required for coiled coil formation), which would greatly complicate regulation of the proximity-induced trans-phosphorylation that is critical for Aurora B activation.

  1. Inhibition of kinesin-5 improves regeneration of injured axons by a novel microtubule-based mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter W. Baas; Andrew J. Matamoros

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules have been identiifed as a powerful target for augmenting regeneration of injured adult axons in the central nervous system. Drugs that stabilize microtubules have shown some promise, but there are concerns that abnormally stabilizing microtubules may have only limited beneifts for regeneration, while at the same time may be detrimental to the normal work that microtubules perform for the axon. Kinesin-5 (also called kif11 or Eg5), a molecular motor protein best known for its crucial role in mitosis, acts as a brake on microtubule movements by other motor proteins in the axon. Drugs that inhibit kinesin-5, originally developed to treat cancer, result in greater mobility of microtubules in the axon and an overall shift in the forces on the microtubule array. As a result, the axon grows faster, retracts less, and more readily enters environments that are inhibitory to axonal regeneration. Thus, drugs that inhibit kinesin-5 offer a novel microtubule-based means to boost axonal regeneration without the concerns that ac-company abnormal stabilization of the microtubule array. Even so, inhibiting kinesin-5 is not without its own caveats, such as potential problems with navigation of the regenerating axon to its target, as well as morphological effects on dendrites that could affect learning and memory if the drugs reach the brain.

  2. Combing and self-assembly phenomena in dry films of Taxol-stabilized microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Franck

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMicrotubules are filamentous proteins that act as a substrate for the translocation of motor proteins. As such, they may be envisioned as a scaffold for the self-assembly of functional materials and devices. Physisorption, self-assembly and combing are here investigated as a potential prelude to microtubule-templated self-assembly. Dense films of self-assembled microtubules were successfully produced, as well as patterns of both dendritic and non-dendritic bundles of microtubules. They are presented in the present paper and the mechanism of their formation is discussed.

  3. Measurement of Breaking Force of Fluorescence Labelled Microtubules with Optical Tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-Xiang; GUO Hong-Lian; XU Chun-Hua; YUAN Ming; LI Znao-Lin; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Under illumination of excitation light, the force that can make fluorescent dye-labelled microtubules break up is measured by using dual-beam optical tweezers. It is found that this force is about several piconewtons, which is two orders of magnitude smaller than that without fluorescence label. Microtubules can be elongated about 20% and the increase of the tensile force is nonlinear with the microtubule elongation. Some qualitative explanations are given for the mechanisms about the breakup and elongation of microtubules exposed to excitation light.

  4. Microtubule polarity and the direction of pigment transport reverse simultaneously in surgically severed melanophore arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiven, M A; Wang, M; Porter, K R

    1984-07-01

    The transport of pigment through the long cytoplasmic extensions (arms) of teleost melanophores is a microtubule-dependent event. We have severed the arms from melanophores to test whether microtubules isolated from the centrosome maintain their original polarity and disposition. In addition, we have tested whether arms containing microtubules of mixed polarities alter the direction of pigment transport. We find that microtubules within severed arms eventually change their polarity and reorganize from the arm center as if to form a new minicell. Concomitant with this change is a reversal in the direction of pigment transport.

  5. Smurf2 as a novel mitotic regulator: From the spindle assembly checkpoint to tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Finola E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The execution of the mitotic program with high fidelity is dependent upon precise spatiotemporal regulation of posttranslational protein modifications. For example, the timely polyubiquitination of critical mitotic regulators by Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C is essential for the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents unscheduled activity of APC/C-Cdc20 in early mitosis, allowing bipolar attachment of kinetochores to mitotic spindle and facilitating equal segregation of sister chromatids. The critical effector of the spindle checkpoint, Mitotic arrest deficient 2 (Mad2, is recruited to unattached kinetochores forming a complex with other regulatory proteins to efficiently and cooperatively inhibit APC/C-Cdc20. A weakened and/or dysfunctional spindle checkpoint has been linked to the development of genomic instability in both cell culture and animal models, and evidence suggests that aberrant regulation of the spindle checkpoint plays a critical role in human carcinogenesis. Recent studies have illuminated a network of both degradative and non-degradative ubiquitination events that regulate the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. Within this context, our recent work showed that the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-terminus-family E3 ligase Smurf2 (Smad specific ubiquitin regulatory factor 2, known as a negative regulator of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling, is required for a functional spindle checkpoint by promoting the functional localization and stability of Mad2. Here we discuss putative models explaining the role of Smurf2 as a new regulator in the spindle checkpoint. The dynamic mitotic localization of Smurf2 to the centrosome and other critical mitotic structures provides implications about mitotic checkpoint control dependent on various ubiquitination events. Finally, deregulated Smurf2 activity may contribute to carcinogenesis by

  6. EGFR/MEK/ERK/CDK5-dependent integrin-independent FAK phosphorylated on serine 732 contributes to microtubule depolymerization and mitosis in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, K; Sensi, M; Anichini, A; Canevari, S; Tomassetti, A

    2013-01-01

    FAK is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase contributing to migration and proliferation downstream of integrin and/or growth factor receptor signaling of normal and malignant cells. In addition to well-characterized tyrosine phosphorylations, FAK is phosphorylated on several serines, whose role is not yet clarified. We observed that phosphorylated FAK on serine 732 (P-FAKSer732) is present at variable levels in vitro, in several melanoma, ovarian and thyroid tumor cell lines and in vivo, in tumor cells present in fresh ovarian cancer ascites. In vitro P-FAKSer732 was barely detectable during interphase while its levels strongly increased in mitotic cells upon activation of the EGFR/MEK/ERK axis in an integrin-independent manner. P-FAKSer732 presence was crucial for the maintenance of the proliferation rate and its levels were inversely related to the levels of acetylated α-tubulin. P-FAKSer732 localized at the microtubules (MTs) of the spindle, biochemically associated with MTs and contributed to MT depolymerization. The lack of the phosphorylation on Ser732 as well as the inhibition of CDK5 activity by roscovitine impaired mitotic spindle assembly and correct chromosome alignment during mitosis. We also identified, for the first time, that the EGF-dependent EGFR activation led to increased P-FAKSer732 and polymerized MTs. Our data shed light on the multifunctional roles of FAK in neoplastic cells, being involved not only in integrin-dependent migratory signaling but also in integrin-independent MT dynamics and mitosis control. These findings provide a new potential target for inhibiting the growth of tumor cells in which the EGFR/MEK/ERK/CDK5 pathway is active. PMID:24091658

  7. Conjugation in S. pombe: identification of a microtubule-organising centre, a requirement for microtubules and a role for Mad2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, J; Heitz, M J; Hagan, I M

    1998-08-27

    During the G1 phase of the cell cycle, cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe can be induced to mate by nitrogen starvation and the presence of mating pheromones. Polarised growth towards cells of the opposite mating type (P or M) leads to the formation of a projection tip and, upon contact, localised cell wall degradation results in conjugation and cell fusion [1]. Here, we have investigated the role of microtubules in this process. We describe a previously unidentified microtubule-organising centre (MTOC) that forms at projection tips upon cell-to-cell contact, before cells fuse. Treatment of mating cells with the microtubule-destabilising drug thiabendazole (TBZ) showed that microtubule integrity was required for mating at two distinct stages: during projection tip formation and cell fusion. Projection tip formation requires filamentous (F) actin function [2] and microtubules are required for the localisation of F actin to the projection tip. We also identify a role during mating for Mad2--a mitotic checkpoint protein that is required in all eukaryotes to maintain the mitotic state in response to microtubule depolymerisation [3]. S. pombe mad2 mutant cells were compromised in their ability to mate upon removal of TBZ, indicating that in fission yeast, in the absence of microtubules, Mad2 is also required to maintain mating competence.

  8. Dependency of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) for tubulin stability and assembly; use of estramustine phosphate in the study of microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridén, B; Wallin, M

    1991-07-10

    Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) were separated from tubulin with several different methods. The ability of the isolated MAPs to reinduce assembly of phosphocellulose purified tubulin differed markedly between the different methods. MAPs isolated by addition of 0.35 M NaCl to taxol-stabilized microtubules stimulated tubulin assembly most effectively, while addition of 0.6 M NaCl produced MAPs with a substantially lower ability to stimulate tubulin assembly. The second best preparation was achieved with phosphocellulose chromatographic separation of MAPs with 0.6 M NaCl elution. The addition of estramustine phosphate to microtubules reconstituted of MAPs prepared by 0.35 M NaCl or phosphocellulose chromatography, induced less disassembly than for microtubules assembled from unseparated proteins, and was almost without effect on microtubules reconstituted from MAPs prepared by taxol and 0.6 M NaCl. Estramustine phosphate binds to the tubulin binding part of the MAPs, and the results do therefore indicate that the MAPs are altered by the separation methods. Since the MAPs are regarded as highly stable molecules, one probable alteration could be aggregation of the MAPs, as also indicated by the results. The purified tubulin itself seemed not to be affected by the phosphocellulose purification, since the microtubule proteins were unchanged by the low buffer strenght used during the cromatography. However, the assembly competence after a prolonged incubation of the microtubule proteins at 4 degrees C was dependent on intact bindings between the tubulin and MAPs. PMID:1681420

  9. Feedback-Controlled Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation Reveals a Functional Role of Sleep Spindles in Motor Memory Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R; Alagapan, Sankaraleengam; Mellin, Juliann M; Vaughn, Bradley V; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2016-08-22

    Transient episodes of brain oscillations are a common feature of both the waking and the sleeping brain. Sleep spindles represent a prominent example of a poorly understood transient brain oscillation that is impaired in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, the causal role of these bouts of thalamo-cortical oscillations remains unknown. Demonstrating a functional role of sleep spindles in cognitive processes has, so far, been hindered by the lack of a tool to target transient brain oscillations in real time. Here, we show, for the first time, selective enhancement of sleep spindles with non-invasive brain stimulation in humans. We developed a system that detects sleep spindles in real time and applies oscillatory stimulation. Our stimulation selectively enhanced spindle activity as determined by increased sigma activity after transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) application. This targeted modulation caused significant enhancement of motor memory consolidation that correlated with the stimulation-induced change in fast spindle activity. Strikingly, we found a similar correlation between motor memory and spindle characteristics during the sham night for the same spindle frequencies and electrode locations. Therefore, our results directly demonstrate a functional relationship between oscillatory spindle activity and cognition. PMID:27476602

  10. Impaired prefrontal sleep spindle regulation of hippocampal-dependent learning in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Bryce A; Rao, Vikram; Lu, Brandon; Saletin, Jared M; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Jagust, William J; Walker, Matthew P

    2014-12-01

    A hallmark feature of cognitive aging is a decline in the ability to form new memories. Parallel to these cognitive impairments are marked disruptions in sleep physiology. Despite recent evidence in young adults establishing a role for sleep spindles in restoring hippocampal-dependent memory formation, the possibility that disrupted sleep physiology contributes to age-related decline in hippocampal-dependent learning remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that reduced prefrontal sleep spindles by over 40% in older adults statistically mediates the effects of old age on next day episodic learning, such that the degree of impaired episodic learning is explained by the extent of impoverished prefrontal sleep spindles. In addition, prefrontal spindles significantly predicted the magnitude of impaired next day hippocampal activation, thereby determining the influence of spindles on post-sleep learning capacity. These data support the hypothesis that disrupted sleep physiology contributes to age-related cognitive decline in later life, the consequence of which has significant treatment intervention potential. PMID:23901074

  11. Regulation of spindle orientation and neural stem cell fate in the Drosophila optic lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand Andrea H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice of a stem cell to divide symmetrically or asymmetrically has profound consequences for development and disease. Unregulated symmetric division promotes tumor formation, whereas inappropriate asymmetric division affects organ morphogenesis. Despite its importance, little is known about how spindle positioning is regulated. In some tissues cell fate appears to dictate the type of cell division, whereas in other tissues it is thought that stochastic variation in spindle position dictates subsequent sibling cell fate. Results Here we investigate the relationship between neural progenitor identity and spindle positioning in the Drosophila optic lobe. We use molecular markers and live imaging to show that there are two populations of progenitors in the optic lobe: symmetrically dividing neuroepithelial cells and asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts. We use genetically marked single cell clones to show that neuroepithelial cells give rise to neuroblasts. To determine if a change in spindle orientation can trigger a neuroepithelial to neuroblast transition, we force neuroepithelial cells to divide along their apical/basal axis by misexpressing Inscuteable. We find that this does not induce neuroblasts, nor does it promote premature neuronal differentiation. Conclusion We show that symmetrically dividing neuroepithelial cells give rise to asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts in the optic lobe, and that regulation of spindle orientation and division symmetry is a consequence of cell type specification, rather than a mechanism for generating cell type diversity.

  12. Review of the touch preparation cytology of spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Kijong; Rehman, Abdul; Jang, Se Min; Paik, Seung Sam

    2016-01-01

    We experienced a case of spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE) with touch preparation cytology performed during the intraoperative frozen section diagnosis in a 22-year-old woman. The tumor was partially encapsulated by fibrous capsule. It was a highly cellular biphasic tumor characterized by fasciculated spindle cells with streaming pattern and tubulopapillary epithelial component. The tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, vimentin, c-kit, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1). However, the tumor cells were negative for thyroglobulin, calcitonin, CD99, S-100 protein, CD34, smooth muscle actin, HBME-1, and galectin-3. The reviewed touch smears showed tight clusters with high cellularity. Most cellular clusters showed papillary configuration. However, some clusters showed spindle cells with streaming pattern. The spindle tumor cells showed elongated and cigar-shaped nuclei. Although the incidence is very rare, SETLLE should be included in the differential diagnosis when a spindle cell neoplasm is encountered in touch preparation cytology in young patients with a thyroid mass. PMID:27011438

  13. Inter-expert and intra-expert reliability in sleep spindle scoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Welinder, Peter; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To measure the inter-expert and intra-expert agreement in sleep spindle scoring, and to quantify how many experts are needed to build a reliable dataset of sleep spindle scorings. Methods The EEG dataset was comprised of 400 randomly selected 115 s segments of stage 2 sleep from 110...... with ‘substantial’ reliability (κ: 0.61–0.8), and 4 or more experts are needed to build a dataset with ‘almost perfect’ reliability (κ: 0.81–1). Significance Spindle scoring is a critical part of sleep staging, and spindles are believed to play an important role in development, aging, and diseases of the nervous...... sleeping subjects in the general population (57 ± 8, range: 42–72 years). To assess expert agreement, a total of 24 Registered Polysomnographic Technologists (RPSGTs) scored spindles in a subset of the EEG dataset at a single electrode location (C3-M2). Intra-expert and inter-expert agreements were...

  14. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles.

  15. Mitotic spindle asymmetry in rodents and primates:2D versus 3D measurement methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine eDelaunay

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent data have uncovered that spindle size asymmetry (SSA is a key component of asymmetric cell division in the mouse cerebral cortex (Delaunay et al., 2014. In the present study we show that SSA also occurs during cortical progenitor divisions in the ventricular zone of the macaque cerebral cortex, pointing to a conserved mechanism in the mammalian lineage. Because SSA magnitude is smaller in cortical precursors than in invertebrate neuroblasts, the unambiguous demonstration of volume differences between the two half spindles is considered to require 3D reconstruction of the mitotic spindle (Delaunay et al., 2014. Although straightforward, the 3D analysis of SSA is time consuming, which is likely to hinder SSA identification and prevent further explorations of SSA related mechanisms in generating asymmetric cell division. We therefore set out to develop an alternative method for accurately measuring spindle asymmetry. Based on the mathematically demonstrated linear relationship between 2D and 3D analysis, we show that 2D assessment of spindle size in metaphase cells is as accurate and reliable as 3D reconstruction provided a specific procedure is applied. We have examined the experimental accuracy of the two methods by applying them to different sets of in vivo and in vitro biological data, including mouse and primate cortical precursors. Linear regression analysis demonstrates that the results from 2D and 3D reconstructions are equally powerful. We therefore provide a reliable and efficient technique to measure SSA in mammalian cells.

  16. Measurement Research of Motorized Spindle Dynamic Stiffness under High Speed Rotating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed motorized spindle has become a key functional unit of high speed machine tools and effectively promotes the development of machine tool technology. The development of higher speed and more power puts forward the stricter requirement for the performance of motorized spindle, especially the dynamic performance which affects the machining accuracy, reliability, and production efficiency. To overcome the problems of ineffective loading and dynamic performance measurement of motorized spindle, a noncontact electromagnetic loading device is developed. The cutting load can be simulated by using electromagnetic force. A new method of measuring force by force sensors is presented, and the steady and transient loading force could be measured exactly. After the high speed machine spindle is tested, the frequency response curves of the spindle relative to machine table are collected at 0~12000 rpm; then the relationships between stiffness and speeds as well as between damping ratio and speeds are obtained. The result shows that not only the static and dynamic stiffness but also the damping ratio declined with the increase of speed.

  17. Thermal Error Modelling of the Spindle Using Data Transformation and Adaptive Neurofuzzy Inference System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new method for predicting spindle deformation based on temperature data. The method introduces the adaptive neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS, which is a neurofuzzy modeling approach that integrates the kernel and geometrical transformations. By utilizing data transformation, the number of ANFIS rules can be effectively reduced and the predictive model structure can be simplified. To build the predictive model, we first map the original temperature data to a feature space with Gaussian kernels. We then process the mapped data with the geometrical transformation and make the data gather in the square region. Finally, the transformed data are used as input to train the ANFIS. A verification experiment is conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Six Pt100 thermal resistances are used to monitor the spindle temperature, and a laser displacement sensor is used to detect the spindle deformation. Experimental results show that the proposed method can precisely predict the spindle deformation and greatly improve the thermal performance of the spindle. Compared with back propagation (BP networks, the proposed method is more suitable for complex working conditions in practical applications.

  18. Sensory-evoked and spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in neonatal rat motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shuming; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-08-13

    Self-generated neuronal activity originating from subcortical regions drives early spontaneous motor activity, which is a hallmark of the developing sensorimotor system. However, the neural activity patterns and role of primary motor cortex (M1) in these early movements are still unknown. Combining voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) with simultaneous extracellular multielectrode recordings in postnatal day 3 (P3)-P5 rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and M1 in vivo, we observed that tactile forepaw stimulation induced spindle bursts in S1 and gamma and spindle bursts in M1. Approximately 40% of the spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in M1 were driven by early motor activity, whereas 23.7% of the M1 bursts triggered forepaw movements. Approximately 35% of the M1 bursts were uncorrelated to movements and these bursts had significantly fewer spikes and shorter burst duration. Focal electrical stimulation of layer V neurons in M1 mimicking physiologically relevant 40 Hz gamma or 10 Hz spindle burst activity reliably elicited forepaw movements. We conclude that M1 is already involved in somatosensory information processing during early development. M1 is mainly activated by tactile stimuli triggered by preceding spontaneous movements, which reach M1 via S1. Only a fraction of M1 activity transients trigger motor responses directly. We suggest that both spontaneously occurring and sensory-evoked gamma and spindle bursts in M1 contribute to the maturation of corticospinal and sensorimotor networks required for the refinement of sensorimotor coordination.

  19. Recruitment of EB1, a master regulator of microtubule dynamics, to the surface of the Theileria annulata schizont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry L Woods

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan parasite Theileria annulata transforms infected host cells, inducing uncontrolled proliferation and clonal expansion of the parasitized cell population. Shortly after sporozoite entry into the target cell, the surrounding host cell membrane is dissolved and an array of host cell microtubules (MTs surrounds the parasite, which develops into the transforming schizont. The latter does not egress to invade and transform other cells. Instead, it remains tethered to host cell MTs and, during mitosis and cytokinesis, engages the cell's astral and central spindle MTs to secure its distribution between the two daughter cells. The molecular mechanism by which the schizont recruits and stabilizes host cell MTs is not known. MT minus ends are mostly anchored in the MT organizing center, while the plus ends explore the cellular space, switching constantly between phases of growth and shrinkage (called dynamic instability. Assuming the plus ends of growing MTs provide the first point of contact with the parasite, we focused on the complex protein machinery associated with these structures. We now report how the schizont recruits end-binding protein 1 (EB1, a central component of the MT plus end protein interaction network and key regulator of host cell MT dynamics. Using a range of in vitro experiments, we demonstrate that T. annulata p104, a polymorphic antigen expressed on the schizont surface, functions as a genuine EB1-binding protein and can recruit EB1 in the absence of any other parasite proteins. Binding strictly depends on a consensus SxIP motif located in a highly disordered C-terminal region of p104. We further show that parasite interaction with host cell EB1 is cell cycle regulated. This is the first description of a pathogen-encoded protein to interact with EB1 via a bona-fide SxIP motif. Our findings provide important new insight into the mode of interaction between Theileria and the host cell cytoskeleton.

  20. Evaluation of activity and combination strategies with the microtubule-targeting drug sagopilone in breast cancer cell lines

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    Julia eEschenbrenner

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecular heterogeneity of cancer calls for individualized therapies to become the standard of care. The development of new therapeutic agents needs to include integrative translational research as early as possible. Target-specific compounds require specific diagnostic biomarker support. Tailored treatment approaches, such as specific schedules or combinations, can improve the therapeutic outcome of drugs with more general mode of action, i.e. the classical chemotherapy. Results from translational research will allow to define the optimal patient population, to tailor individual treatment and to choose treatment combinations on a rational basis.Sagopilone, a fully synthetic epothilone, is a microtubule-stabilizing agent optimized for high in vitro and in vivo activity against a broad range of tumor models, including those resistant to paclitaxel and other systemic treatments. Sagopilone development was accompanied by translational research studies to evaluate the molecular mode of action, to recognize mechanisms leading to resistance, to identify predictive response biomarkers and to establish a rationale for combination with different therapies.Here, we present an RNAi drug modifier screen interrogating 300 genes in four cancer cell lines. Defects of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC were identified to cause resistance against sagopilone-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Potential biomarkers for resistance are SAC-defects like mutations in the SAC-kinase BUB1B and chromosomal heterogeneity and polyploidy since they imply an increased tolerance for aberrant mitosis. The RNAi drug modifier screen identified the enhancement of sagopilone-induced mitotic arrest by inhibition of the mitotic kinesin KIF2C (MCAK as potential combination strategy.These new findings are correlated with results from previous studies. We discuss successes and failures of our integrative preclinical development program and provide recommendations for future