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Sample records for central solenoid magnet

  1. Central Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The Central Solenoid (CS) is a single layer coil wound internally in a supporting cylinder housed in the cryostat of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter. It was successfully tested at Toshiba in December 2000 and was delivered to CERN in September 2001 ready for integration in the LAr Calorimeter in 2003. An intermediate test of the chimney and proximity cryogenics was successfully performed in June 2002.

  2. Performance of a proximity cryogenic system for the ATLAS central solenoid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Y; Makida, Y; Kondo, Y; Kawai, M; Aoki, K; Haruyama, T; Kondo, T; Mizumaki, S; Wachi, Y; Mine, S; Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Passardi, Giorgio; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet has been designed and constructed as a collaborative work between KEK and CERN for the ATLAS experiment in the LHC project The solenoid provides an axial magnetic field of 2 Tesla at the center of the tracking volume of the ATLAS detector. The solenoid is installed in a common cryostat of a liquid-argon calorimeter in order to minimize the mass of the cryostat wall. The coil is cooled indirectly by using two-phase helium flow in a pair of serpentine cooling line. The cryogen is supplied by the ATLAS cryogenic plant, which also supplies helium to the Toroid magnet systems. The proximity cryogenic system for the solenoid has two major components: a control dewar and a valve unit In addition, a programmable logic controller, PLC, was prepared for the automatic operation and solenoid test in Japan. This paper describes the design of the proximity cryogenic system and results of the performance test. (7 refs).

  3. The ATLAS central solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, A; Ruber, R; Doi, Y; Haruyama, T; Haug, F; ten Kate, H; Kawai, M; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Metselaar, J; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Pavlov, O; Ravat, S; Sbrissa, E; Tanaka, K; Taylor, T; Yamaoka, H

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the CERN LHC is equipped with a superconducting magnet system consisting of three large toroids and a solenoid. The 2.3 m diameter, 5.3 m long solenoid is located at the heart of the experiment where it provides a 2 T field for spectrometry of the particles emanating from the interaction of the counter-rotating beams of hadrons. As the electromagnetic calorimeter of the experiment is situated outside the solenoid, the coil must be as transparent as possible to traversing particles. The magnet, which was designed at KEK, incorporates progress in technology coming from the development of previous solenoids of this type, in particular that of a new type of reinforced superconductor addressing the requirement of transparency. Special attention has been paid to ensuring reliability and ease of operation of the magnet, through the application of sufficiently conservative guidelines for the mechanical and electrical design, stringent testing during manufacture, and a comprehensive commissioning...

  4. Magnetic latching solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.; Albano, R.K.; Morrison, J.L. Jr.

    1995-11-28

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized. 2 figs.

  5. Magnetic latching solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Albano, Richard K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Morrison, Jr., John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1995-01-01

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized.

  6. Central Solenoid On-surface Test

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    2004-01-01

    A full scale on-surface test of the central solenoid has been performed before its final installation in the ATLAS cavern starting in November. The successful integration of the central solenoid into the barrel cryostat, as reported in the March 2004 ATLAS eNews, was hardly finished when testing started. After a six-week period to cool down the LAr calorimeter, the solenoid underwent a similar procedure. Cooling it down to 4.6 Kelvin from room temperature took just over five and a half days. Cold and superconducting, it was time to validate the functionality of the control and safety systems. These systems were largely the same as the systems to be used in the final underground installation, and will be used not only for the solenoid and toroid magnets, but parts of it also for other LHC experiments. This solenoid test was the first occasion to test the system functionality in a real working environment. Several days were spent to fine tune the systems, especially the critical safety system, which turned out...

  7. First Operation of the Central Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R.

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. It was cooled down from the 17th to 23th May 2006, and the first kA was put into it the same evening as it was cold and superconductive. That makes our solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas. The Central Solenoid in its final position at the heart of ATLAS. The coil current (red line) and voltage (blue line) showing the operation at nominal current of 7.73 kA for a magnetic field of 2.0 T and the subsequent successful commissioning up to 8 kAT The cool down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems and was achieved in perfect collaboration with the liquid argon detector with which it shares the Barrel Cryostat. Powering up to nominal current had to wait until the last week of July when the End-Cap Calorimeters were in closed position. The Tile Barrel and E...

  8. Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Smirnov, Alexandre [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by

  9. ITER Central Solenoid Module Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, John [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-09-23

    The fabrication of the modules for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) has started in a dedicated production facility located in Poway, California, USA. The necessary tools have been designed, built, installed, and tested in the facility to enable the start of production. The current schedule has first module fabrication completed in 2017, followed by testing and subsequent shipment to ITER. The Central Solenoid is a key component of the ITER tokamak providing the inductive voltage to initiate and sustain the plasma current and to position and shape the plasma. The design of the CS has been a collaborative effort between the US ITER Project Office (US ITER), the international ITER Organization (IO) and General Atomics (GA). GA’s responsibility includes: completing the fabrication design, developing and qualifying the fabrication processes and tools, and then completing the fabrication of the seven 110 tonne CS modules. The modules will be shipped separately to the ITER site, and then stacked and aligned in the Assembly Hall prior to insertion in the core of the ITER tokamak. A dedicated facility in Poway, California, USA has been established by GA to complete the fabrication of the seven modules. Infrastructure improvements included thick reinforced concrete floors, a diesel generator for backup power, along with, cranes for moving the tooling within the facility. The fabrication process for a single module requires approximately 22 months followed by five months of testing, which includes preliminary electrical testing followed by high current (48.5 kA) tests at 4.7K. The production of the seven modules is completed in a parallel fashion through ten process stations. The process stations have been designed and built with most stations having completed testing and qualification for carrying out the required fabrication processes. The final qualification step for each process station is achieved by the successful production of a prototype coil. Fabrication of the first

  10. CERN tests largest superconducting solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "CERN's Compacts Muon Solenoid (CMS) - the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet - has reached full field in testing. The instrument is part of the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, located in a giant subterranean chamber at Cessy on the Franco-Swiss border." (1 page)

  11. Insulating process for HT-7U central solenoid model coils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The HT-7U superconducting Tokamak is a whole superconducting magnetically confined fusion device. The insulating system of its central solenoid coils is critical to its properties. In this paper the forming of the insulating system and the vacuum-pressure-impregnating (VPI) are introduced, and the whole insulating process is verified under the superconducting experiment condition.

  12. Compact muon solenoid magnet reaches full field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Scientist of the U.S. Department of Energy in Fermilab and collaborators of the US/CMS project announced that the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet has reached full field in tests at CERN. (1 apge)

  13. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  14. Fabrication and mechanical performance of the ATLAS central solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Mizumaki, S; Kobayashi, T; Yamaoka, H; Kondo, Y; Kawai, M; Doi, Y; Haruyama, T; Mine, S; Takano, H; Yamamoto, A; Kondo, T; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    Fabrication of the central solenoid for ATLAS detector in the CERN- LHC project was completed, and the performance test has been successfully carried out in Japan. The solenoid has arrived at CERN to be assembled with the LAr calorimeter. This paper describes the fabrication and mechanical, performance of the ATLAS central solenoid. (10 refs).

  15. Successful mapping of the solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Aleksa, M.

    The ATLAS solenoid coil is about 5.3m long, has a diameter of 2.5m and is designed to deliver a magnetic field of approximately 2T for the ATLAS inner detector. The superconducting solenoid coil has been integrated inside the LAr barrel cryostat and was installed at its final position inside the cavern in November 2005. This summer - after completion of the extended barrel calorimeters and before the installation of the inner detector - the end cap calorimeters (LAr end caps and Tile extended barrels) were moved for the first time into their final position in order to create conditions as close as possible to final for the solenoid tests and for mapping the field inside the solenoid bore. Design and construction of the mapping machine The requirement on the absolute precision of the field measurements are 0.05% on the field integrals seen by particles; if this is achieved the momentum error coming from insufficient knowledge of the magnetic field will be negligible compared to the error stemming from the inn...

  16. Design of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, Tim

    2013-10-15

    The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a small linear accelerator at DESY in Hamburg, which produces short, low emittance electron bunches. It is originally designed and built for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) within the framework of the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL). Additionally, two future experiments are planned at REGAE. First, an external injection experiment for Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWA) will be performed in the framework of the LAOLA collaboration (LAboratory fOr Laser- and beam-driven plasma Acceleration). This experiment will provide a method for the reconstruction of the electric field distribution within a linear plasma wakefield. Second, a time resolving high energy Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) will be implemented. Among others it is designed to allow for living cell imaging. Both experiments require strong focusing magnets inside the new target chamber at REGAE. Permanent magnetic solenoids (PMSs) can provide the needed focusing strength due to their enormous surface current density, while having compact dimensions at the same time. The present thesis deals with the design of such strong focusing PMSs. Since short and strong solenoids, as required for REGAE, exhibit a distinct non-linearity, the induced emittance growth is relatively large. This emittance growth is investigated and minimized for different set-ups with axially and radially magnetized annular magnets. Furthermore a magnetic shielding is developed. Together with a mechanical lifting system it assures that magnetic leakage fields do not disturb experiments, where the PMSs are removed from the beamline.

  17. Qualification of the Joints for the ITER Central Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N; Berryhill, A; Kenney, S

    2011-09-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid has 36 interpancake joints, 12 bus joints, and 12 feeder joints in the magnet. The joints are required to have resistance below 4 nOhm at 45 kA at 4.5 K. The US ITER Project Office developed two different types of interpancake joints with some variations in details in order to find a better design, qualify the joints, and establish a fabrication process. We built and tested four samples of the sintered joints and two samples with butt-bonded joints (a total of eight joints). Both designs met the specifications. Results of the joint development, test results, and selection of the baseline design are presented and discussed in the paper. The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) consists of six modules. Each module is composed of six wound hexapancakes and one quadrapancake. The multipancakes are connected electrically and hydraulically by in-line interpancake joints. The joints are located at the outside diameter (OD) of the module. Cable in conduit conductor (CICC) high-current joints are critical elements in the CICC magnets. In addition to low resistivity, the CS joints must fit a space envelope equivalent to the regular conductor cross section and must have low hydraulic impedance and enough structural strength to withstand the hoop and compressive forces during operation, including cycling. This paper is the continuation of the work reported on the intermodule joints.

  18. Magnetic design constraints of helical solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Krave, S. T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Tompkins, J. C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Flanagan, G. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Kahn, S. A. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Melconian, K. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-01-30

    Helical solenoids have been proposed as an option for a Helical Cooling Channel for muons in a proposed Muon Collider. Helical solenoids can provide the required three main field components: solenoidal, helical dipole, and a helical gradient. In general terms, the last two are a function of many geometric parameters: coil aperture, coil radial and longitudinal dimensions, helix period and orbit radius. In this paper, we present design studies of a Helical Solenoid, addressing the geometric tunability limits and auxiliary correction system.

  19. An elementary argument for the magnetic field outside a solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Aritro

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation of the magnetic field inside and outside a uniform current density infinite solenoid of uniform cross-section is an elementary problem in classical electrodynamics that all undergraduate Physics students study. Symmetry properties of the cylinder and the judicious use of Ampere’s circuital law leads to correct results; however it does not explain why the field is non zero for a finite length solenoid, and why it vanishes as the solenoid becomes infinitely long. An argument is provided in Farley and Price (2001 Am. J. Phys. 69 751), explaining how the magnetic field behaves outside the solenoid and not too far from it, as a function of the length of the solenoid. A calculation is also outlined for obtaining the field just outside the circular cross section solenoid, in the classic text Classical Electrodynamics by Jackson, 3rd edn (John Wiley and Sons, Inc.), problems 5.3-5.5. The purpose of this paper is to provide an elementary argument for why the field becomes negligible as the length of the solenoid is increased. A quantitative analysis is provided for the field outside the solenoid, at radial distances large compared to the linear dimension of the solenoid cross section.

  20. Residual magnetism holds solenoid armature in desired position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, R. P.

    1967-01-01

    Holding solenoid uses residual magnetism to hold its armature in a desired position after excitation current is removed from the coil. Although no electrical power or mechanical devices are used, the solenoid has a low tolerance to armature displacement from the equilibrium position.

  1. Development of a permanent magnet alternative for a solenoidal ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, J.; Fahy, A.; Barr, M. [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Jardine, A.; Allison, W. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Dastoor, P.C., E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    The most sensitive desktop-sized ionizer utilising electron bombardment is currently the solenoidal ion source. We present an alternate design for such an ion source whereby the solenoidal windings of the electromagnet are replaced by a shaped cylindrical permanent magnet in order to reduce the complexity and running costs of the instrument. Through finite element modelling of the magnetic field in COMSOL and experimental measurements on a small-scale prototype magnet stack, we demonstrate the required shape of the permanent magnet in order to generate the needed field, and the necessity of soft iron collars to smooth fluctuations along the central axis.

  2. An elementary argument for the magnetic field outside a solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Pathak, Aritro

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of the magnetic field inside and outside a uniform current density infinite solenoid of uniform cross-section is an elementary problem in classical electrodynamics that all undergraduate Physics students study. Symmetry properties of the cylinder and the judicious use of Ampere's circuital law leads to correct results; however it does not explain why the field is non zero for a finite length solenoid, and why it vanishes as the solenoid becomes infinitely long. An argument is provided in (American Journal of Physics 69, 751 (2001)) by Farley and Price, explaining how the magnetic field behaves outside the solenoid and not too far from it, as a function of the length of the solenoid. A calculation is also outlined for obtaining the field just outside the circular cross section solenoid, in the classic text Classical Electrodynamics by J.D.Jackson, 3rd ed, (John Wiley and Sons, INC) Problems 5.3, 5.4, 5.5. The purpose of this letter is to provide an elementary argument for why the field becomes n...

  3. The External Magnetic Field Created by the Superposition of Identical Parallel Finite Solenoids

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Melody Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Using superposition and numerical approximations of a published analytical expression for the magnetic field generated by a finite solenoid, we show that the magnetic field external to parallel identical solenoids can be nearly uniform and substantial, even when the solenoids have lengths that are large compared to their radii. We study two arrangements of solenoids---a ring of parallel solenoids whose surfaces are tangent to a common cylindrical surface and to nearest neighbours, and a large finite hexagonal array of parallel solenoids---and summarize how the magnitude and uniformity of the resultant external field depend on the solenoid length and distances between solenoids. We also report some novel results about single solenoids, e.g., that the energy stored in the internal magnetic field exceeds the energy stored in the spatially infinite external magnetic field for even short solenoids. These results should be broadly interesting to undergraduates learning about electricity and magnetism as novel examp...

  4. Design and characterization of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, M., E-mail: max.hachmann@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Flöttmann, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Gehrke, T. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum DKFZ, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Mayet, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    REGAE is a small electron linear accelerator at DESY. In order to focus short and low charged electron bunches down to a few μm permanent magnetic solenoids were designed, assembled and field measurements were done. Due to a shortage of space close to the operation area an in-vacuum solution has been chosen. Furthermore a two-ring design made of wedges has been preferred in terms of beam dynamic issues. To keep the field quality of a piecewise built magnet still high a sorting algorithm for the wedge arrangement including a simple magnetic field model has been developed and used for the construction of the magnets. The magnetic field of these solenoids has been measured with high precision and compared to simulations. - Highlights: • presenting a two-ring radially magnetized permanent magnetic solenoid design. • development of a analytical field description and field quality factor. • development of a sorting algorithm for permanent magnetic pieces to form a magnet. • performing a high-precision field measurement of a high gradient field.

  5. An electric arc in the magnetic field of a solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungurs, I.A.; Shilova, Ye.I.

    1982-01-01

    A qualitative experiment is described, enabling investigation of the structure of the arc discharge between rod and ring electrodes, and evaluation of the speed of the axial flux created by electromagnetic forces. It is shown that placement of the plasma stream during discharge in the magnetic field of the solenoid provides the possibility of controlling this stream.

  6. On-surface integration and test of the ATLAS central solenoid and its proximity cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruber, Roger J M Y; Cipolla, G; Deront, L; Doi, Y; Haruyama, T; Haug, F; Kanahara, T; Kawai, M; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Kopeykin, N; Mizumaki, S; Metselaar, J; Park, A; Pavlov, O V; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Ravat, S; Sbrissa, E; Stepanov, V; ten Kate, H H J; Yamamoto, A

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector for the LHC at CERN requires a superconducting solenoid, which provides the magnetic field for the inner detector. The ATLAS Central Solenoid and its associated proximity cryogenics system has been designed by KEK in collaboration with CERN. Following construction and preliminary tests at Toshiba in Japan the equipment has been shipped to CERN. The system is being prepared for the integration in the common cryostat with the LAr calorimeter, whereafter a full on-surface test has to be completed before its final installation 100 m underground in the ATLAS cavern. For this purpose a provisional set-up for commissioning of the final proximity cryogenics, the connecting chimney and the solenoid has been established. A number of tests and simulations have been conducted in applying a new process control system to validate the cryogenics functionalities, the electrical powering scheme as well as the magnet control and safety systems. The present status of the solenoid project and the results of th...

  7. Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-04-01

    A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 {micro}m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

  8. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Okamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Megumi; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  9. Results of the ATLAS solenoid magnetic field map

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksa, M; Chevalier, L; Giudici, P A; Hart, J C; Kehrli, A; Losasso, M; Miyagawa, P S; Pons, X; Sandaker, H; Snow, S W

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to explore a wide range of particle physics topics at the Large Hadron Collider. A crucial component to the success of ATLAS will be a precise knowledge of the magnetic field produced by the ATLAS solenoid. To achieve this, a special field mapping machine was built and deployed to measure the solenoid magnetic field. This paper describes the mapping machine, the field mapping campaign, and the subsequent analysis of the field map data. After a series of small corrections, some taken from surveys and some derived from the data itself, were applied to the recorded data, the corrected data were fitted with a function obeying Maxwell's equations. The resulting field residuals had an rms of less than 0.5 mT, and the systematic error on the measurement of track sagitta due to the field uncetainty was estimated to range fom 2-12 × 10-4, depending on the tack rapidity.

  10. R108 view inside the solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    One can see the four sets of cylindrical drift chambers and, between the vacuum tubes, a small device for the detection of magnetic monopoles introduced as a "parasite" experiment by another Collaboration (R109, by Rome-CERN Collaboration)

  11. Integration of RFQ beam coolers and solenoidal magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavenago, M.; Romé, M.; Maggiore, M.; Porcellato, A. M.; Maero, G.; Chiurlotto, F.; Comunian, M.; Galatà, A.; Cavaliere, F.

    2016-02-01

    Electromagnetic traps are a flexible and powerful method of controlling particle beams, possibly of exotic nuclei, with cooling (of energy spread and transverse oscillations) provided by collisions with light gases as in the Radio Frequency Quadrupole Cooler (RFQC). A RFQC prototype can be placed inside the existing Eltrap solenoid, capable of providing a magnetic flux density component Bz up to 0.2 T, where z is the solenoid axis. Confinement in the transverse plane is provided both by Bz and the rf voltage Vrf (up to 1 kV at few MHz). Transport is provided by a static electric field Ez (order of 100 V/m), while gas collisions (say He at 1 Pa, to be maintained by differential pumping) provide cooling or heating depending on Vrf. The beamline design and the major parameters Vrf, Bz (which affect the beam transmission optimization) are here reported, with a brief description of the experimental setup.

  12. Development of the Butt Joint for the ITER Central Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N N

    2006-08-23

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) requires compact and reliable joints for its Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC). The baseline design is a diffusion bonded butt joint. In such a joint the mating cables are compacted to a very low void fraction in a copper sleeve and then heat treated. After the heat treatment the ends are cut, polished and aligned against each other and then diffusion bonded under high compression in a vacuum chamber at 750 C. The jacket is then welded on the conductor to complete the joint, which remarkably does not require more room than a regular conductor. This joint design is based on a proven concept developed for the ITER CS Model Coil that was successfully tested in the previous R&D phase.

  13. Using Experiment and Computer Modeling to Determine the Off-Axis Magnetic Field of a Solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietor-Santos, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    The study of the ideal solenoid is a common topic among introductory-based physics textbooks and a typical current arrangement in laboratory hands-on experiences where the magnetic field inside a solenoid is determined at different currents and at different distances from its center using a magnetic probe. It additionally provides a very simple…

  14. Superconducting Solenoid and Press for Permanent Magnet Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, T. M.; Hull, J. R.

    2002-08-01

    For the first time, a superconducting solenoid (SCM) was used to increase the remnant magnetization of sintered NdFeB permanent magnets (PMs). In particular, improved magnetic alignment of commercial-grade PM powder was achieved, as it was axial die pressed into 12.7-mm diameter cylindrical compacts in the 76.2-mm warm bore of a 9-T SCM. The press used to compact the powder is unique and was specifically designed for use with the SCM. Although the press was operated in the batch mode for this proof of concept study, its design is intended to enable automated production. In operation, a simple die and punch set made of nonmagnetic materials was filled with powder and loaded into a nonmagnetic press tube. The cantilevered press tube was inserted horizontally, on a carrier manually advanced along a track, into the SCM. The robustness of the mechanical components and the SCM, in its liquid helium dewar, were specifically designed to allow for insertion and extraction of the magnetic powder and compacts, while operating at 9 T.

  15. ATLAS Solenoid Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    Last month the central solenoid was installed in the barrel cryostat, which it shares with the liquid argon calorimeter. Figure 1: Some members of the solenoid and liquid argon teams proudly pose in front of the barrel cryosat, complete with detector and magnet. Some two years ago the central solenoid arrived at CERN after being manufactured and tested in Japan. It was kept in storage until last October when it was finally moved to the barrel cryostat integration area. Here a position survey of the solenoid (with respect to the cryostat's inner warm vessel) was performed. Figure 2: The alignment survey by Dirk Mergelkuhl and Aude Wiart. (EST-SU) At the start of the New Year the solenoid was moved to the cryostat insertion stand. Figure 3: The solenoid on the insertion stand, with Akira Yamamoto the solenoid designer and project leader. Figure 4: Taka Kondo, ATLAS Japan spokesperson, and Shoichi Mizumaki, Toshiba project engineer for the ATLAS solenoid, celebrate the insertion. Aft...

  16. Design of a Solenoid Actuator with a Magnetic Plunger for Miniaturized Segment Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Woo Song

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We develop a solenoid actuator with a ferromagnetic plunger to generate both rectilinear and turning motions of a multi-segmented robot. Each segment of the miniaturized robot is actuated by a pair of solenoids, and in-phase and out-of-phase actuations of the solenoid pair cause the linear and turning motions. The theoretical analysis on the actuation force by the solenoid with the magnetic plunger is implemented based on the Biot-Savart law. The optimal design parameters of the solenoid are determined to actuate a segmented body. We manufacture the miniaturized robot consisting of two segments and a pair of solenoids. Experiments are performed to measure the linear and angular displacements of the two-segmented robot for various frictional conditions.

  17. Extensive characterisation of advanced manufacturing solutions for the ITER Central Solenoid pre-compression system

    CERN Document Server

    Langeslag, S.A.E.; Libeyre, P.; Marcinek, D.J.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS), positioned in the center of the ITER tokamak, will provide a magnetic field, contributing to the confinement of the plasma. The 13 m high CS consists of a vertical stack of 6 independently driven modules, dynamically activated. Resulting opposing currents can lead to high separation forces. A pre-compression structure is implemented to counteract these opposing forces, by realising a continuous 180 MN coil-to-coil contact loading. Preload is applied by mechanical fastening via 9 subunits, positioned along the coil stack, each consisting of 2 outer and 1 inner tie plate. The tie plates therefore need to feature outstanding mechanical behaviour in a large temperature range. High strength, Nitronic®-50 type F XM-19 austenitic stainless steel is selected as candidate material. The linearised stress distribution reaches approximately 250 MPa, leading to a required yield strength of 380 MPa at room temperature. Two different manufacturing methods are being studied for the procuremen...

  18. ATLAS solenoid operates underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. Teams monitoring the cooling and powering of the ATLAS solenoid in the control room. The solenoid was cooled down to 4.5 K from 17 to 23 May. The first current was established the same evening that the solenoid became cold and superconductive. 'This makes the ATLAS Central Solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas!', said Takahiko Kondo, professor at KEK. Though the current was limited to 1 kA, the cool-down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all of the control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems-a milestone reached by the hard work and many long evenings invested by various teams from ATLAS, all of CERN's departments and several large and small companies. Since the Central Solenoid and the barrel liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter share the same cryostat vacuum vessel, this achievement was only possible in perfe...

  19. An implantable RF solenoid for magnetic resonance microscopy and microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, D S; Cohen, M S; Clark, W G; Chu, A C; Nunnally, R L; Smith, J; Mills, D; Judy, J W

    2012-08-01

    Miniature solenoids routinely enhance small volume nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy; however, no such techniques exist for patients. We present an implantable microcoil for diverse clinical applications, with a microliter coil volume. The design is loosely based on implantable depth electrodes, in which a flexible tube serves as the substrate, and a metal stylet is inserted into the tube during implantation. The goal is to provide enhanced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of structures that are not easily accessed by surface coils. The first-generation prototype was designed for implantation up to 2 cm, and provided initial proof-of-concept for microscopy. Subsequently, we optimized the design to minimize the influence of lead inductances, and to thereby double the length of the implantable depth (4 cm). The second-generation design represents an estimated SNR improvement of over 30% as compared to the original design when extended to 4 cm. Impedance measurements indicate that the device is stable for up to 24 h in body temperature saline. We evaluated the SNR and MR-related heating of the device at 3T. The implantable microcoil can differentiate fat and water peaks, and resolve submillimeter features.

  20. ANALYSIS OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD MEASURED BY A ROTATING HALL PROBE IN A SOLENOID TO LOCATE ITS MAGNETIC AXIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KPONOU,A.; PIKIN,A.; BEEBE,E.; ALESSI,J.

    2000-11-06

    We have analyzed the motion of a Hall probe, which is rotated about an axis that is arbitrarily displaced and oriented with respect to the magnetic axis of a solenoid. We outline how the magnetic field measured by the rotating Hall probe can be calculated. We show how to compare theoretical results with actual measurements, to determine the displacement and orientation of the axis of rotation of the probe from the magnetic axis. If the center of rotation of the probe is known by surveying, the corresponding point on the magnetic axis of the solenoid can be located. This is applied to a solenoid that was built for BNL by Oxford Instruments.

  1. Test of the ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil and CS Insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N; Michael, P; Minervini, J; Radovinsky, A; Takayasu, M; Gung, C Y; Thome, R; Ando, T; Isono, T; Hamada, K; Kato, T; Kawano, K; Koizumi, N; Matsui, K; Nakajima, H; Nishijima, G; Nunoya, Y; Sugimoto, M; Takahasi, Y; Hsuji, H; Bessette, D; Okuno, K; Mitchell, N; Ricci, M; Zanino, R; Savoldi, L; Arai, K; Ninomiya, A

    2001-09-25

    The Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) was designed and built from 1993 to 1999 by an ITER collaboration between the US and Japan, with contributions from the European Union and the Russian Federation. The main goal of the project was to establish the superconducting magnet technology necessary for a large-scale fusion experimental reactor. Three heavily instrumented insert coils were built to cover a wide operational space for testing. The CS Insert, built by Japan, was tested in April-August of 2000. The TF Insert, built by Russian Federation, will be tested in the fall of 2001. The NbAl Insert, built by Japan, will be tested in 2002. The testing takes place in the CSMC Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Japan. The CSMC was charged successfully without training to its design current of 46 kA to produce 13 T in the magnet bore. The stored energy at 46 kA was 640 MJ. This paper presents the main results of the CSMC and the CS Insert testing--magnet critical parameters, ac losses, joint performance, quench characteristics and some results of the post-test analysis.

  2. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S., E-mail: ikeda.s.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Takahashi, K. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2137 (Japan); Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Horioka, K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  3. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, M.; Horioka, K.

    2016-02-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  4. Development of cryocooler-cooled solenoid magnet fabricated with Bi-2212 ROSAT wire; Bi-2212 ROSAT wire wo mochiita reitoki dendo reikyaku sorenoido magunetto no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azuma, K.; Morita, H.; Hara, N.; Okada, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Sato, J. [Hitachi Cable Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kitaguchi, H.; Kumakura, H.; Togano, K. [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    The asymmetry for external magnetic field is a small wire rod, while Bi-2212 ROSATwire keeps the transport current characteristics which tape wire rod is excellent. And, the wind ability becomes good by choosing the round cross section, and it is a wire rod, which is suitable for solenoidal coil. At present, refrigerating machine conduction cooling type solenoid magnet, which can generate central magnetic field 8T using this wire rod is developed. This time, the internal layer coil was manufactured, and the excitation test was carried out by the cooling system for the test. (NEDO)

  5. Jefferson Lab CLAS12 Superconducting Solenoid magnet Requirements and Design Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Hogan, John P. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Fair, Ruben J. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Ghoshal, Probir K. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Luongo, Cesar [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Elouadrhiri, Latifa [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA

    2014-12-01

    As part of the Jefferson Lab 12GeV accelerator upgrade project, one of the experimental halls (Hall B) requires two superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet system consisting of 5 coils. In this presentation the physics requirements for the 5 T solenoid magnet, design constraints, conductor decision, and cooling choice will be discussed. The various design iterations to meet the specification will also be discussed in this presentation.

  6. Rotation of the solenoid magnet of the CMS experiment before the insertion into its cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2005-01-01

    At one side of the 27 km ring of the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the 230 tonne solenoid magnet for the CMS experiment has been rotated through 90° prior to insertion into its cryostat - the jacket that will cool the magnet to 4.2 K (-269° C).

  7. Design and Construction of a Prototype Solenoid Coil for MICE Coupling Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, XiaoKun; Wu, Hong; Zheng, ShiXian; Green, Michael A; Li, Derun; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Michael

    2010-06-28

    A superconducting coupling solenoid mounted around four conventional RF cavities, which produces up to 2.6 T central magnetic field to keep the muons within the cavities, is to be used for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The coupling coil made from copper matrix NbTi conductors is the largest of three types of magnets in MICE both in terms of 1.5 m inner diameter and about 13MJ stored magnetic energy at full operation current of 210A. The stress induced inside the coil assembly during cool down and magnet charging is relatively high. In order to validate the design method and develop the coil winding technique with inside-wound SC splices required for the coupling coil, a prototype coil made from the same conductor and with the same diameter and thickness but only one-fourth long as the coupling coil was designed and fabricated by ICST. The prototype coil was designed to be charged to strain conditions that are equivalent or greater than would be encountered in the coupling coil. This paper presents detailed design of the prototype coil as well as developed coil winding skills. The analyses on stress in the coil assembly and quench process were carried out.

  8. Test of the ITER TF Insert and Central Solenoid Model Coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, N; Takayasu, M; Minervini, J; Isono, T; Sugimoto, M; Kato, T; Kawano, K; Koisumi, N; Nakajima, H; Nunova, Y; Okuno, K; Tsuji, H; Oshikiri, M; Mitchell, N; Takahashi, Y; Egorov, S; Rodin, I; Zanino, R; Savoldi, L

    2002-07-29

    The Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) was designed and built by ITER collaboration between the European Union, Japan, Russian Federation and the United States in 1993-2001. Three heavily instrumented insert coils have been also built for testing in the background field of the CSMC to cover a wide operational space. The TF Insert was designed and built by the Russian Federation to simulate the conductor performance under the ITER TF coil conditions. The TF Insert Coil was tested in the CSMC Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Japan in September-October 2001. Some measurements were performed also on the CSMC to study effects of electromagnetic and cooldown cycles. The TF Insert coil was charged successfully, without training, in the background field of the CSMC to the design current of 46 kA at 13 T peak field. The TF Insert met or exceeded all design objectives, however some interesting results require thorough analyses. This paper presents the overview of main results of the testing--magnet critical parameters, ac losses, joint performance, effect of cycles on performance, quench and thermo-hydraulic characteristics and some results of the post-test analysis.

  9. GigaGauss solenoidal magnetic field inside bubbles excited in under-dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécz, Zs.; Konoplev, I. V.; Seryi, A.; Andreev, A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel and effective method for generating GigaGauss level, solenoidal quasi-static magnetic fields in under-dense plasma using screw-shaped high intensity laser pulses. This method produces large solenoidal fields that move with the driving laser pulse and are collinear with the accelerated electrons. This is in contrast with already known techniques which rely on interactions with over-dense or solid targets and generates radial or toroidal magnetic field localized at the stationary target. The solenoidal field is quasi-stationary in the reference frame of the laser pulse and can be used for guiding electron beams. It can also provide synchrotron radiation beam emittance cooling for laser-plasma accelerated electron and positron beams, opening up novel opportunities for designs of the light sources, free electron lasers, and high energy colliders based on laser plasma acceleration.

  10. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  11. The Magnetic Field inside a Long Solenoid--A New Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David; Carlton, Kevin; Lisgarten, David

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a technique for measuring the magnetic field inside a long solenoid using computer data logging. This is a new approach to a standard student practical. The design and construction of the sensors is described; they significantly reduce the cost of the apparatus. The approach of the practical is for the students to…

  12. Magnetic Field, Force, and Inductance Computations for an Axially Symmetric Solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Immer, Christopher D.; Simpson, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The pumping of liquid oxygen (LOX) by magnetic fields (B field), using an array of electromagnets, is a current topic of research and development at Kennedy Space Center, FL. Oxygen is paramagnetic so that LOX, like a ferrofluid, can be forced in the direction of a B field gradient. It is well known that liquid oxygen has a sufficient magnetic susceptibility that a strong magnetic gradient can lift it in the earth's gravitational field. It has been proposed that this phenomenon can be utilized in transporting (i.e., pumping) LOX not only on earth, but on Mars and in the weightlessness of space. In order to design and evaluate such a magnetic pumping system, it is essential to compute the magnetic and force fields, as well as inductance, of various types of electromagnets (solenoids). In this application, it is assumed that the solenoids are air wrapped, and that the current is essentially time independent.

  13. Finite Element Analysis on the Pre-load Structures of the Central Solenoid for the HT-7U Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The central solenoid is an important part of the HT-7U device. In this paper, the computational analysis of the stress and the displacement on the pre-load structures of the central solenoid have been made by the finite element analysis system COSMOS/M2.0 under room and/or operating temperature. According to the analytical results, the clip aprons and compression plates are all satisfied with safety design criteria.

  14. Mach Number Dependence of Turbulent Magnetic Field Amplification: Solenoidal versus Compressive Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Schober, Jennifer; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S; Schleicher, Dominik R G; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.114504

    2011-01-01

    We study the growth rate and saturation level of the turbulent dynamo in magnetohydrodynamical simulations of turbulence, driven with solenoidal (divergence-free) or compressive (curl-free) forcing. For models with Mach numbers ranging from 0.02 to 20, we find significantly different magnetic field geometries, amplification rates, and saturation levels, decreasing strongly at the transition from subsonic to supersonic flows, due to the development of shocks. Both extreme types of turbulent forcing drive the dynamo, but solenoidal forcing is more efficient, because it produces more vorticity.

  15. Optimal Design on the Magnetic Field of the High-speed Response Solenoid Valve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    As an integrated control unit that directly transfo rm s digital electric signals into analogy hydraulic signals, High-speed response solenoid valve (HSV) plays an important role in determining an electro-hydrauli c automatic system's overall performance. In the process of designing an HSV, o ne should well understand that various soft magnetic material properties and geo metries greatly affect HSV's magnetic field design that accordingly has a direc t influence on HSV's electric performance. As an approac...

  16. The AC loss evaluation of central solenoid model coil for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yi, E-mail: shiyi@ipp.ac.cn; Wu, Yu; Hao, QiangWang; Liu, Bo; Yang, Yilin

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • In this study, The AC loss of CFETR CSMC is calculated. • The main AC losses type and mechanics of CFETR CSMC are introduced, where the hysteresis and coupling loss of Nb{sub 3}Sn and NbTi coil are estimated. • The low frequency eddy current loss calculation of stainless steel structural components is carried out by ANSYS with 3-D separate model. • In the case of conductor joints, a 3-D ANSYS code is also used to obtain the eddy current losses for the metal components. - Abstract: The AC loss of Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) of China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is calculated in order to be able to determine the allowable excitation current shape in time with respect to the available cooling capacity at liquid helium temperature. Firstly, the structure and operation parameters of CFETR CSMC are summarized including the superconductor, conductor and magnetic field distribution characteristic. Secondly, the main AC losses type and mechanics of CFETR CSMC are introduced, where the hysteresis and coupling loss of Nb{sub 3}Sn and NbTi coil are estimated using of the model data and a calculation flux density distribution in the cross-section of model coil by ANSYS 2-D model. Thirdly, the low frequency eddy current loss calculation of stainless steel structural components is carried out by ANSYS/EMAG code with 3-D separately for tension rods, plates and beams model. The interaction between several components is not considered. In the case of conductor joints, a 3-D ANSYS code is also used with current force to obtain the eddy current losses for the metal components. Lastly, the individual loss components are summed up. The significant conclusions are made which can provide the valuable guidance for safe operation of CSMC.

  17. NdFeB Magnets Aligned in a 9-T Superconducting Solenoid (asterisk)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, T. M.; Hull, J. R.

    2002-08-01

    Commercial-grade magnet powder (Magnequench UG) was uniaxial die-pressed into cylindrical compacts, while being aligned in the 1-T to 8-T DC field of a superconducting solenoid at Argonne National Laboratory. Then, the compacts were added to normal Magnequench UG production batches for sintering and annealing. The variations in magnet properties for different strengths of alignment fields are reported for 15.88-mm (5/8-in.) diameter compacts made with length-to-diameter (L/D) ratios in the range 3 0.25 and L 1. The best magnets were produced when the powder-filled die was inserted into the active field of the solenoid and then pressed. Improvements in the residual flux density of 8% and in the energy product of 16% were achieved by increasing the alignment field beyond the typical 2-T capabilities of electromagnets. The most improvement was achieved for the compacts with the smallest L/D ratio. The ability to make very strong magnets with small L/D, where self-demagnetization effects during alignment are greatest, would benefit most the production of near-final-shape magnets. Compaction of the magnet powder using a horizontal die and a continuously active superconducting solenoid was not a problem. Although the press was operated in the batch mode for this proof-of-concept study, its design is intended to enable automated production.

  18. Design, fabrication, and characterization of a solenoid system to generate magnetic field for an ECR proton source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Jain; P A Naik; P R Hannurkar

    2010-08-01

    Solenoid coils with iron jacket (electromagnets) have been designed and developed for generation and confinement of the plasma produced by an electron cyclotron resonance source operating at 2450 MHz frequency. The magnetic field configurations designed using the solenoid coils are off-resonance, mirror, and flat, satisfying electron cyclotron resonance condition along the axis of the plasma chamber. 2D Poisson software was used for designing. Details of design, fabrication, and magnetic field mapping of the solenoid coils are presented in this paper.

  19. A single-solenoid pulsed-magnet system for single-crystal scattering studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Zahirul; Capatina, Dana; Ruff, Jacob P C; Das, Ritesh K; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Narumi, Yasuo; Welp, Ulrich; Canfield, Paul C

    2012-03-01

    We present a pulsed-magnet system that enables x-ray single-crystal diffraction in addition to powder and spectroscopic studies with the magnetic field applied on or close to the scattering plane. The apparatus consists of a single large-bore solenoid, cooled by liquid nitrogen. A second independent closed-cycle cryostat is used for cooling samples near liquid helium temperatures. Pulsed magnetic fields close to ~30 T with a zero-to-peak-field rise time of ~2.9 ms are generated by discharging a 40 kJ capacitor bank into the magnet coil. The unique characteristic of this instrument is the preservation of maximum scattering angle (~23.6°) on the entrance and exit sides of the magnet bore by virtue of a novel double-funnel insert. This instrument will facilitate x-ray diffraction and spectroscopic studies that are impractical, if not impossible, to perform using split-pair and narrow-opening solenoid magnets. Furthermore, it offers a practical solution for preserving optical access in future higher-field pulsed magnets.

  20. Progress on Design and Construction of a MuCool Coupling Solenoid Magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L.; Liu, Xiao Kun; Xu, FengYu; Li, S.; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, Xinglong; Zheng, ShiXian; Li, Derun; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Mike; Green, M.A.

    2010-06-28

    The MuCool program undertaken by the US Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration is to study the behavior of muon ionization cooling channel components. A single superconducting coupling solenoid magnet is necessary to pursue the research and development work on the performance of high gradient, large size RF cavities immersed in magnetic field, which is one of the main challenges in the practical realization of ionization cooling of muons. The MuCool coupling magnet is to be built using commercial copper based niobium titanium conductors and cooled by two cryo-coolers with each cooling capacity of 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The solenoid magnet will be powered by using a single 300A power supply through a single pair of binary leads that are designed to carry a maximum current of 210A. The magnet is to be passively protected by cold diodes and resistors across sections of the coil and by quench back from the 6061 Al mandrel in order to lower the quench voltage and the hot spot temperature. The magnet is currently under construction. This paper presents the updated design and fabrication progress on the MuCool coupling magnet.

  1. Effect Of The LEBT Solenoid Magnetic Field On The Beam Generation For Particle Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Yarmohammadi Satri, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2013-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV H- linear accelerator which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac2 for upgrade of the LHC injectors with higher intensity and eventually an increase of the LHC luminosity. Linac4 structure is a source, a 45 keV low energy beam transport line (LEBT) with two solenoids, a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ), a Medium Energy Beam Transport line (MEBT), a 50 Mev DTL, a 100 Mev CCDTL and PIMS up to 160 Mev. We use Travel v4.07 and PathManager code for simulation. Firstly, we need to a file as a source and defining the beginning point (last point in tracking back) of simulation. We recognise the starting point base on the solenoid magnetic property of LEBT.

  2. Coherent and semiclassical states in magnetic field in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Bagrov, V G; Gitman, D M; Filho, D P Meira

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to constructing coherent states (CS) and semiclassical states (SS) in magnetic-solenoid field is proposed. The main idea is based on the fact that the AB solenoid breaks the translational symmetry in the xy-plane, this has a topological effect such that there appear two types of trajectories which embrace and do not embrace the solenoid. Due to this fact, one has to construct two different kinds of CS/SS, which correspond to such trajectories in the semiclassical limit. Following this idea, we construct CS in two steps, first the instantaneous CS (ICS) and the time dependent CS/SS as an evolution of the ICS. The construction is realized for nonrelativistic and relativistic, spinning and spinless particles both in (2+1)- and (3+1)- dimensions and gives a non-trivial example of SS/CS for systems with a nonquadratic Hamiltonian. It is stressed that CS depending on their parameters (quantum numbers) describe both pure quantum and semiclassical states. An analysis is represented that classifies para...

  3. ATLAS's superconducting solenoid takes up position

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting solenoid was moved to its final destination on 16 January. It has taken up position opposite the ATLAS liquid argon barrel cryostat, which will house the electromagnetic calorimeter. All that remains to do now is to slide it into the insulation vacuum, this will be done in the next few weeks. Built by Toshiba, under responsibility of KEK in Japan, the central solenoid is 2.4 metres in diameter, 5.3 metres long and weighs 5.5 tonnes. "It will provide an axial magnetic field of 2 Tesla that will deflect particles inside the inner detector," as Roger Ruber, on-site project coordinator, explains. The inner detector, which consists of three sub-detectors, will be installed inside the solenoid later. The solenoid during one of the transport operations. Securely attached to the overhead travelling crane, the solenoid is situated in front of the opening to the liquid argon calorimeter, it will be inserted soon.

  4. Analysis of the cooldown of the ITER central solenoid model coil and insert coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifetto, R.; Brighenti, A.; Isono, T.; Martovetsky, N.; Kawano, K.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2017-01-01

    A series of superconducting insert coils (ICs) made of different materials has been tested since 2000 at JAEA Naka in the bore of the central solenoid model coil at fields up to 13 T and currents up to several tens of kA, fully representative of the ITER operating conditions. Here we focus on the 2015 test of the presently last IC of the series, the central solenoid (CS) insert coil, which was aimed at confirming the performance and properties of the Nb3Sn conductor, manufactured in Japan and used to wind the ITER CS modules in the US. As typical for these large scale applications, the cooldown (CD) from ambient to supercritical He temperature may take a long time, of the order of several weeks, so that it should be useful, also in the perspective of future IC tests, to optimize it. To that purpose, a comprehensive CD model implemented in the 4C code is developed and presented in this paper. The model is validated against the experimental data of an actual CD scenario, showing a very good agreement between simulation and measurements, from 300 to 4.5 K. The maximum temperature difference across the coil, which can only be roughly estimated from the measurements, is then extracted from the results of the simulation and shown to be much larger than the maximum value of 50 K, prescribed on the basis of the allowable thermal stress on the materials. An optimized CD scenario is finally designed using the model for the initial phase of the CD between 300 and 80 K, which allows reducing the needed time by ∼20%, while still satisfying the major constraints. Recommendations are also given for a better location/choice of the thermometers to be used for the monitoring of the maximum temperature difference across the coil.

  5. Design, Fabrication, and Test of a Superconducting Dipole Magnet Based on Tilted Solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Ferracin, P.; Finney, N. R.; Fuery, M. J.; Gourlay, S. A.; Hafalia, A. R.

    2007-06-01

    It can be shown that, by superposing two solenoid-like thin windings that are oppositely skewed (tilted) with respect to the bore axis, the combined current density on the surface is 'cos-theta' like and the resulting magnetic field in the bore is a pure dipole. As a proof of principle, such a magnet was designed, built and tested as part of a summer undergraduate intern project. The measured field in the 25mm bore, 4 single strand layers using NbTi superconductor, exceeded 1 T. The simplicity of this high field quality design, void of typical wedges end-spacers and coil assembly, is especially suitable for insert-coils using High Temperature Superconducting wire as well as for low cost superconducting accelerator magnets for High Energy Physics. Details of the design, construction and test are reported.

  6. SolCalc: A Suite for the Calculation and the Display of Magnetic Fields Generated by Solenoid Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. L. [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    SolCalc is a software suite that computes and displays magnetic fields generated by a three dimensional (3D) solenoid system. Examples of such systems are the Mu2e magnet system and Helical Solenoids for muon cooling systems. SolCalc was originally coded in Matlab, and later upgraded to a compiled version (called MEX) to improve solving speed. Matlab was chosen because its graphical capabilities represent an attractive feature over other computer languages. Solenoid geometries can be created using any text editor or spread sheets and can be displayed dynamically in 3D. Fields are computed from any given list of coordinates. The field distribution on the surfaces of the coils can be displayed as well. SolCalc was benchmarked against a well-known commercial software for speed and accuracy and the results compared favorably.

  7. Final design of the Switching Network Units for the JT-60SA Central Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampasi, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.lampasi@enea.it [National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Frascati (Italy); Coletti, Alberto; Novello, Luca [Fusion for Energy (F4E) Broader Fusion Development Department, Garching (Germany); Matsukawa, Makoto [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka Fusion Institute, Mukouyama, Naka-si, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Burini, Filippo; Taddia, Giuseppe; Tenconi, Sandro [OCEM Energy Technology, San Giorgio Di Piano (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    This paper describes the approved detailed design of the four Switching Network Units (SNUs) of the superconducting Central Solenoid of JT-60SA, the satellite tokamak that will be built in Naka, Japan, in the framework of the “Broader Approach” cooperation agreement between Europe and Japan. The SNUs can interrupt a current of 20 kA DC in less than 1 ms in order to produce a voltage of 5 kV. Such performance is obtained by inserting an electronic static circuit breaker in parallel to an electromechanical contactor and by matching and coordinating their operations. Any undesired transient overvoltage is limited by an advanced snubber circuit optimized for this application. The SNU resistance values can be adapted to the specific operation scenario. In particular, after successful plasma breakdown, the SNU resistance can be reduced by a making switch. The design choices of the main SNU elements are justified by showing and discussing the performed calculations and simulations. In most cases, the developed design is expected to exceed the performances required by the JT-60SA project.

  8. Thermal Stability of Large Al-stabilized Superconducting Magnets Theoritical Analysis of CMS Solenoid.

    CERN Document Server

    Juster, F P

    1998-01-01

    The CMS detector magnet presently under design for the future Large Hadron Collider at CERN is an epoxy-impregnated structure, indirectly cooled by two-phase flow liquid helium. This magnet, based on aluminum-stabilized, mechanically reinforced conductor, is not cryostable : the heat generated by a thermal disturbance can be removed only by thermal diffusivity through the windings. In order to study the thermal stability of the magnet, we have developed numerical codes able to predict the thermal behaviour of an anisotropic and non-homogeneous medium against thermal perturbations due to friction or epoxy cracking. Our 3D finite element codes can calculate the propagation or the recovery of a normal zone in a superconducting magnet, taking into account the current diffusion effect, which strongly affects the heat generated by a transition in the case of large Al-stabilized conductors. Two different codes, CASTEM 2000 and HEATING are described in this paper. We present the results of the CMS Solenoid magnet sta...

  9. Inserting the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The huge superconducting solenoid for CMS is inserted into the cryostat barrel. CMS uses the world's largest thin solenoid, in terms of energy stored, and is 12 m long, with a diameter of 6 m and weighing 220 tonnes. When turned on the magnet will produce a field strength of 4 T using superconducting niobium-titanium material at 4.5 K.

  10. Plasma current start-up experiments without a central solenoid in the iron core STOR-M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, O.; Tomney, G.; Rohollohi, A.; Lewis, E.; McColl, D.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2015-06-01

    Reproducible plasma current start-up without a central solenoid (CS) has been demonstrated using the outer ohmic heating (OH) coils in the iron core STOR-M tokamak (Mitarai et al 2014 Fusion Eng. Des. 89 2467-71). Although the outer OH coil current saturates the iron core eventually, it has been demonstrated that the plasma current can be maintained during the iron core saturation phase. In this work, further studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of the turn number of the outer OH coils (N = 4 or N = 6) in the CS-less discharges and to evaluate the plasma stability with respect to the n-decay index of the vertical magnetic field. For the loose coupling of the iron core with N = 4 turns, the plasma current can be sustained after the additional third capacitor bank is applied near the iron core saturation phase, showing the slow transition from the unsaturated to the partially saturated phase. For the case of stronger coupling of N = 6 turns, the plasma current is increased at the same fast bank voltage, but the main discharge is shortened from 35 to 20 ms. As the magnetizing current is smaller due to stronger coupling between the OH coils and the plasma current, the transition from the unsaturated to the saturated phase is slightly difficult at present. The present experimental results suggest a feasible operation scenario in a future spherical tokamak (ST) at least using loose iron core coupling for smoother transition from the unsaturated to the saturated iron core phase. Thus, a reliable plasma current start-up by the outer OH coils and the current ramp-up to a steady state by additional heating power and vertical field coils could be considered as an operation scenario for future ST reactors with an iron core transformer.

  11. The CMS superconducting solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The huge solenoid that will generate the magnetic field for the CMS experiment at the LHC is shown stored in the assembly hall above the experimental cavern. The solenoid is made up of five pieces totaling 12.5 m in length and 6 m in diameter. It weighs 220 tonnes and will produce a 4 T magnetic field, 100 000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field, storing enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance at 310 MHz in a superconducting solenoid; Resonance magnetique nucleaire a 310 MHz dans un solenoide supra-conducteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunand, J.J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    The realisation of an NMR spectrometer with a superconducting magnet is presented in the first section. The methods to attain the best possible homogeneity of the magnetic field and to minimize the error in the spectrometer are described. The second section is devoted to the study of elastomers and nitr-oxides free radicals. A shift of the transition temperature with the magnetic field appears for the elastomers. The increasing paramagnetic shift has allowed a complete study by NMR of piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nitroxide free radicals. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie est exposee la realisation d'un spectrometre de RMN utilisant un solenoide supraconducteur. Des solutions sont donnees pour obtenir la meilleure homogeneite possible du champ magnetique et pour minimiser les sources d'erreur apportees par le spectrometre. La deuxieme partie est consacree a l'etude d'elastomeres et de radicaux libres nitroxydes. Une variation de la temperature de transition avec le champ magnetique est mise en evidence pour les elastomeres. L'accroissement du deplacement paramagnetique a permis une etude complete par RMN des radicaux libres nitroxydes piperidiniques et pyrrolidiniques. (auteur)

  13. INDUCTION HEATING OF NON-MAGNETIC SHEET METALS IN THE FIELD OF A FLAT CIRCULAR MULTITURN SOLENOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Batygin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of electromagnetic processes in the system for induction heating presented by a flat circular multiturn solenoid positioned above a plane of thin sheet non-magnetic metal has been conducted. The calculated dependences for the current induced in a metal sheet blank and ratio of transformation determined have been obtained. The maximal value of the transformation ratio with regard to spreading the eddy-currents over the whole area of the sheet metal has been determined.

  14. LCLS Gun Solenoid Design Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmerge, John

    2010-12-10

    The LCLS photocathode rf gun requires a solenoid immediately downstream for proper emittance compensation. Such a gun and solenoid have been operational at the SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) for over eight years. Based on magnetic measurements and operational experience with the GTF gun solenoid multiple modifications are suggested for the LCLS gun solenoid. The modifications include adding dipole and quadrupole correctors inside the solenoid, increasing the bore to accommodate the correctors, decreasing the mirror plate thickness to allow the solenoid to move closer to the cathode, cutouts in the mirror plate to allow greater optical clearance with grazing incidence cathode illumination, utilizing pancake coil mirror images to compensate the first and second integrals of the transverse fields and incorporating a bipolar power supply to allow for proper magnet standardization and quick polarity changes. This paper describes all these modifications plus the magnetic measurements and operational experience leading to the suggested modifications.

  15. Commissioning and Testing the 1970's Era LASS Solenoid Magnet in JLab's Hall D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballard, Joshua T. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Biallas, George H. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Brown, G.; Butler, David E. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Carstens, Thomas J. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Chudakov, Eugene A. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Creel, Jonathan D. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Egiyan, Hovanes [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Martin, F.; Qiang, Yi [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Smith, Elton S. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Stevens, Mark A. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Spiegel, Scot L. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Whitlatch, Timothy E. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Wolin, Elliott J. [Carnegie Mellon University , Pittsburgh, PA; Ghoshal, Probir K. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA

    2015-06-01

    JLab refurbished and reconfigured the LASS1, 1.85m bore Solenoid and installed it as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The magnet contains four superconducting coils within an iron yoke. The magnet was built in the early1970's at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and used a second time at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The coils were extensively refurbished and individually tested by JLab. A new Cryogenic Distribution Box provides cryogens and their control valving, current distribution bus, and instrumentation pass-through. A repurposed CTI 2800 refrigerator system and new transfer line complete the system. We describe the re-configuration, the process and problems of re-commissioning the magnet and the results of testing the completed magnet.

  16. Development of cryocooler-cooled solenoid magnet fabricated with Bi-2212 ROSAT wire (2); Bi-2212 ROSAT wire wo mochiita reitoki dendo reikyaku sorenoido magunetto no kaihatsu (2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, H.; Tanaka, K.; Hara, N. [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (JP)] [and others

    2000-05-29

    The asymmetry for external magnetic field is a small wire rod, while Bi-2212ROSATwire keeps the transport current characteristics which tape wire rod is excellent. And, the windability becomes good by choosing the round cross section, and it is goodwill wire rod in the solenoidal coil. At present, it develops refrigerating machine conduction cooling type solenoid magnet system using this wire rod. This time, it produced refrigerating machine conduction cooling system, which could install new internal layer coil using the wire rod improved and magnet of 3 layers. (NEDO)

  17. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of Tcs measurement in conductor 1A of the ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil using the M&M code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2000-08-01

    We present a first study of current sharing temperature ( Tcs) tests performed over the last few months in the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) experiment at JAERI, Naka, Japan. The CSMC is a superconducting magnet, layer-wound two-in-hand using 18 layers of Nb 3Sn two-channel cable-in-conduit conductors, which very recently reached a record 13 T at 46 kA DC operation. Here we apply the multi-conductor Mithrandir (M&M) code to a selected set of shots with different transport currents (30, 40, and 46 kA) and we concentrate on conductor 1A on the innermost (i.e., with highest magnetic field) layer. In the test, resistive heaters located upstream of layers 1 and 2 are used to progressively and quasi-steadily increase the supercritical helium inlet temperature in the coil. The Tcs is reached when a threshold of 0.5 mV resistive voltage is measured across the coil, after which the heaters are turned off and the coil current is dumped. Computed results are compared with experimental data, showing good agreement in the inlet and outlet temperatures of all four heated conductors, both as Tcs is reached (30, 40 kA) and during the whole hour-long transient from nominal conditions to Tcs reached (46 kA).

  18. Motions of CMS detector structures due to the magnetic field forces as observed by the Link alignment system during the test of the 4 T magnet solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Moral, L.A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Martinez, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (IFCA), CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Sobron, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (IFCA), CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain)], E-mail: sobron@ifca.unican.es; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)] (and others)

    2009-07-21

    This document describes results obtained from the Link alignment system data recorded during the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by a discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotations of detector structures (from microradians to milliradians). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic field intensity. In addition, the reconstructed positions of active element sensors are compared to their positions as measured by photogrammetry and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described.

  19. Cross section of the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2005-01-01

    The pictures show a cross section of the CMS solenoid. One can see four layers of the superconducting coil, each of which contains the superconductor (central part, copper coloured - niobium-titanium strands in a copper coating, made into a "Rutherford cable"), surrounded by an ultra-pure aluminium as a magnetic stabilizer, then an aluminium alloy as a mechanical stabilizer. Besides the four layers there is an aluminium mechanical piece that includes pipes that transport the liquid helium.

  20. Inauguration of the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    In early 2005 the final piece of the CMS solenoid magnet arrived, marked by this ceremony held in the CMS assembly hall at Cessy, France. The solenoid is made up of five pieces totaling 12.5 m in length and 6 m in diameter. Weighing 220 tonnes, it will produce a 4 T magnetic field, 100 000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field and store enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold.

  1. Improving sintered NdFeB permanent magnets by powder compaction in a 9 T superconducting solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, T. M.; Hull, J. R.; Rozendaal, E.; Wise, J. H.; Turner, L. R.

    2003-05-01

    Commercial-grade magnet powder (Magnequench UG) was axial die pressed in the 76.2 mm warm bore of a 9 T superconducting solenoid. Otherwise, processing was performed as part of normal factory operations. This pressing was done to improve the alignment of the anisotropic single-crystal particles of the compact and, thus, the remanent magnetization of the sintered cylindrical permanent magnets (12.7 mm diameter). Although the press was operated in batch mode for this proof-of-concept study, its design enables automated production. Improvements of up to 8% in magnetization and 16% in energy products were obtained, as the alignment field H was increased above the 2 T maximum field of electromagnets used in industry. The greatest improvements were obtained for magnets with the smallest length-to-diameter ratios, L/D<0.5. The production of quality magnets in this near-final-shape size range is currently being pursued by industry to eliminate expensive machining steps. To understand the potential for 2-8 T alignment fields to overcome the distortions created in the otherwise uniform field by the self-field of short compacts, electromagnetic code (Opera) calculations were made. A simple material model was used to predict the distortions. The trends in the predicted field-line inclinations, with L/D and H, compare to trends in the improvement of the magnetic properties.

  2. Measurements of the temporal onset of mega-Gauss magnetic fields in a laser-driven solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyon, Clement; Polllock, B. B.; Turnbull, D. T.; Hazi, A.; Ross, J. S.; Mariscal, D. A.; Patankar, S.; Williams, G. J.; Farmer, W. A.; Moody, J. D.; Fujioka, S.; Law, K. F. F.

    2016-10-01

    We report on experimental results obtained at Omega EP showing a nearly linear increase of the B-field up to about 2 mega-Gauss in 0.75 ns in a 1 mm3 region. The field is generated using 1 TW of 351 nm laser power ( 8*1015 W/cm2) incident on a laser-driven solenoid target. The coil target converts about 1% of the laser energy into the B-field measured both inside and outside the coil using proton deflectometry with a grid and Faraday rotation of probe beam through SiO2 glass. Proton data indicates a current rise up to hundreds of kA with a spatial distribution in the Au solenoid conductor evolving in time. These results give insight into the generating mechanism of the current between the plates and the time behavior of the field. These experiments are motivated by recent efforts to understand and utilize High Energy Density (HED) plasmas in the presence of external magnetic fields in areas of research from Astrophysics to Inertial Confinement Fusion. We will describe the experimental results and scale them to a NIF hohlraum size. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. ATLAS Solenoid Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    Last month the central solenoid was installed in the barrel cryostat, which it shares with the liquid argon calorimeter. Some two years ago the central solenoid arrived at CERN after being manufactured and tested in Japan. It was kept in storage until last October when it was finally moved to the barrel cryostat integration area. Here a position survey of the solenoid (with respect to the cryostat's inner warm vessel) was performed. At the start of the New Year the solenoid was moved to the cryostat insertion stand. After a test insertion on 6th February and a few weeks of preparation work it was finally inserted on 27th February. A couple of hectic 24-hours/7-day weeks followed in order to connect all services in the cryostat bulkhead. But last Monday, 15th March, both warm flanges of the cryostat could be closed. In another week's time we expect to finish the connection of the cryogenic cooling lines and the superconducting bus lines with the external services. Then the cool-down and test will commence... ...

  4. Technical Design Report for the PANDA Solenoid and Dipole Spectrometer Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Erni, W; Krusche, B; Steinacher, M; Heng, Y; Liu, Z; Liu, H; Shen, X; Wang, O; Xu, H; Becker, J; Feldbauer, F; Heinsius, F -H; Held, T; Koch, H; Kopf, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Wiedner, U; Zhong, J; Bianconi, A; Bragadireanu, M; Pantea, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; De Napoli, M; Giacoppo, F; Raciti, G; Rapisarda, E; Sfienti, C; Bialkowski, E; Budzanowski, A; Czech, B; Kistryn, M; Kliczewski, S; Kozela, A; Kulessa, P; Pysz, K; Schäfer, W; Siudak, R; Szczurek, A; zycki, W Czy; Domagala, M; Hawryluk, M; Lisowski, E; Lisowski, F; Wojnar, L; Gil, D; Hawranek, P; Kamys, B; Kistryn, St; Korcyl, K; Krzemien, W; Magiera, A; Moskal, P; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Smyrski, J; Wronska, A; Al-Turany, M; Augustin, I; Deppe, H; Flemming, H; Gerl, J; Goetzen, K; Hohler, R; Lehmann, D; Lewandowski, B; Lühning, J; Maas, F; Mishra, D; Orth, H; Peters, K; Saitô, T; Schepers, G; Schmidt, C J; Schmitt, L; Schwarz, C; Voss, B; Wieczorek, P; Wilms, A; Brinkmann, K -T; Freiesleben, H; Jaekel, R; Kliemt, R; Wuerschig, T; Zaunick, H -G; Abazov, V M; Alexeev, G; Arefev, A; Astakhov, V I; Barabanov, M Yu; Batyunya, B V; Davydov, Yu I; Dodokhov, V Kh; Efremov, A A; Fedunov, A G; Feshchenko, A A; Galoyan, A S; Grigorian, S; Karmokov, A; Koshurnikov, E K; Kudaev, V Ch; Lobanov, V I; Lobanov, Yu Yu; Makarov, A F; Malinina, L V; Malyshev, V L; Mustafaev, G A; Olshevski, A; Pasyuk, M A; Perevalova, E A; Piskun, A A; Pocheptsov, T A; Pontecorvo, G; Rodionov, V K; Rogov, Yu N; Salmin, R A; Samartsev, A G; Sapozhnikov, M G; Shabratova, A; Shabratova, G S; Skachkova, A N; Skachkov, N B; Strokovsky, E A; Suleimanov, M K; Teshev, R Sh; Tokmenin, V V; Uzhinsky, V V; Vodopyanov, A S; Zaporozhets, S A; Zhuravlev, N I; Zorin, A G; Branford, D; Föhl, K; Glazier, D; Watts, D; Woods, P; Eyrich, W; Lehmann, A; Teufel, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K; Tann, B; Tomaradze, A G; Bettoni, D; Carassiti, V; Cecchi, A; Dalpiaz, P; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Negrini, M; Savri`e, M; Stancari, G; Dulach, B; Gianotti, P; Guaraldo, C; Lucherini, V; Pace, E; Bersani, A; Macri, M; Marinelli, M; Parodi, R F; Brodski, I; Döring, W; Drexler, P; Düren, M; Gagyi-Palffy, Z; Hayrapetyan, A; Kotulla, M; Kühn, W; Lange, S; Liu, M; Metag, V; Nanova, M; Novotny, R; Salz, C; Schneider, J; Schoenmeier, P; Schubert, R; Spataro, S; Stenzel, H; Strackbein, C; Thiel, M; Thoering, U; Yang, S; Clarkson, T; Cowie, E; Downie, E; Hill, G; Hoek, M; Ireland, D; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Lehmann, I; Livingston, K; Lumsden, S; MacGregor, D; McKinnon, B; Murray, M; Protopopescu, D; Rosner, G; Seitz, B; Yang, G; Babai, M; Biegun, A K; Bubak, A; Guliyev, E; Jothi, V S; Kavatsyuk, M; Löhner, H; Messchendorp, J; Smit, H; van der Weele, J C; García, F; Riska, D -O; Büscher, M; Dosdall, R; Dzhygadlo, R; Gillitzer, A; Grunwald, D; Jha, V; Kemmerling, G; Kleines, H; Lehrach, A; Maier, R; Mertens, M; Ohm, H; Prasuhn, D; Randriamalala, T; Ritman, J; Roeder, M; Stockmanns, T; Wintz, P; Wüstner, P; Kisiel, J; Li, S; Li, Z; Sun, Z; Xu, H; Fissum, S; Hansen, K; Isaksson, L; Lundin, M; Schröder, B; Achenbach, P; Espi, M C Mora; Pochodzalla, J; Sanchez, S; Sanchez-Lorente, A; Dormenev, V I; Fedorov, A A; Korzhik, M V; Missevitch, O V; Balanutsa, V; Chernetsky, V; Demekhin, A; Dolgolenko, A; Fedorets, P; Gerasimov, A; Goryachev, V; Boukharov, A; Malyshev, O; Marishev, I; Semenov, A; Hoeppner, C; Ketzer, B; Konorov, I; Mann, A; Neubert, S; Paul, S; Weitzel, Q; Khoukaz, A; Rausmann, T; Täschner, A; Wessels, J; Varma, R; Baldin, E; Kotov, K; Peleganchuk, S; Tikhonov, Yu; Boucher, J; Hennino, T; Kunne, R; Ong, S; Pouthas, J; Ramstein, B; Rosier, P; Sudol, M; Van de Wiele, J; Zerguerras, T; Dmowski, K; Korzeniewski, R; Przemyslaw, D; Slowinski, B; Boca, G; Braghieri, A; Costanza, S; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Lavezzi, L; Montagna, P; Rotondi, A; Belikov, N I; Davidenko, A M; Derevshchikov, A A; Goncharenko, Yu M; Grishin, V N; Kachanov, V A; Konstantinov, D A; Kormilitsin, V A; Kravtsov, V I; Matulenko, Yu A; Melnik, Y M; Meshchanin, A P; Minaev, N G; Mochalov, V V; Morozov, D A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Ryazantsev, A V; Semenov, P A; Soloviev, L F; Uzunian, A V; Vasilev, A N; Yakutin, A E; Baeck, T; Cederwall, B; Bargholtz, C; Geren, L; Tegnér, P E; Belostotskii, S; Gavrilov, G; Itzotov, A; Kiselev, A; Kravchenko, P; Manaenkov, S; Miklukho, O; Naryshkin, Yu; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Zhadanov, A; Fava, L; Panzieri, D; Alberto, D; Amoroso, A; Botta, E; Bressani, T; Bufalino, S; Bussa, M P; Busso, L; De Mori, F; Destefanis, M; Ferrero, L; Grasso, A; Greco, M; Kugathasan, T; Maggiora, M; Marcello, S; Serbanut, G; Sosio, S; Bertini, R; Calvo, D; Coli, S; De Remigis, P; Feliciello, A; Filippi, A; Giraudo, G; Mazza, G; Rivetti, A; Szymanska, K; Tosello, F; Wheadon, R; Morra, O; Agnello, M; Iazzi, F; Szymanska, K; Birsa, R; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Martin, A

    2009-01-01

    This document is the Technical Design Report covering the two large spectrometer magnets of the PANDA detector set-up. It shows the conceptual design of the magnets and their anticipated performance. It precedes the tender and procurement of the magnets and, hence, is subject to possible modifications arising during this process.

  5. Technical Design Report for the PANDA Solenoid and Dipole Spectrometer Magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erni, W.; Keshelashvili, I; Krusche, B.

    2009-01-01

    This document is the Technical Design Report covering the two large spectrometer magnets of the PANDA detector set-up. It shows the conceptual design of the magnets and their anticipated performance. It precedes the tender and procurement of the magnets and, hence, is subject to possible modificatio

  6. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  7. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke, E-mail: shunsuke.ikeda@riken.jp; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Riken, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Romanelli, Mark [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cinquegrani, David [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kumaki, Masafumi [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Horioka, Kazuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  8. Analysis and simulation of magnetic field of a long straight solenoid%长直螺线管的电磁场分析与仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红; 侯国栋

    2013-01-01

    根据电磁感应定律和螺线管电流磁场的特点,建立长直螺线管内部和表面的磁场的有限元模型.依据比奥-萨法尔定律和安培环路定理,对长直螺线管磁场进行理论分析和数学推导,得到其磁场分布的特点及其解析解.利用Ansoft Maxwell 3D工程电磁场有限元软件对其进行仿真,验证了结果的一致性及利用ANSYS软件进行电磁场分析的直观性和便利性.%According to the law of electromagnetic induction and the characteristics of current magnetic field of solenoid, a finite element model of the magnetic field on the surface or the interior of long straight solenoid was established. By means of theoretical deduction and numerical analysis based on the law of biot savart and Ampere circuital theorem of magnetic field in a straight solenoid, the characteristics of distribution of magnetic field and its analytical solution were obtained. The simulation was carried out on using of Ansoft Maxwell 3 D engineering electromagnetic field finite element software, the consistency of the result and the intuitive and convenient of using ANSYS software for electromagnetic field analysis were verified.

  9. A Deep Analysis of the Magnetic Field Produced by a Current-Carrying Straight Solenoid%长直螺线管磁场的深入分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾晓英; 杨昌虎; 杨昶

    2001-01-01

    将长直螺线管磁场看作直线电流磁场和圆线圈电流磁场迭加。在此基础上,对螺线管磁场进行了深入分析和精确计算,给出了一般情形下近似描述长直螺线管磁场需满足的结构条件。%Decomposing the magnetic filed of a current-carrying strainght solenoid into that of straight current and that of circular curr ent, deep analysis and exact calculation of the field are proposed, and the approximation conditions have been derived for the description of the magnetic field of a straight solenoid in simplified case.

  10. Analysis of off-axis solenoid fields using the magnetic scalar potential: An application to a Zeeman-slower for cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Sérgio R.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Bhattacharya, M.

    2015-06-01

    In a region free of currents, magnetostatics can be described by the Laplace equation of a scalar magnetic potential, and one can apply the same methods commonly used in electrostatics. Here, we show how to calculate the general vector field inside a real (finite) solenoid, using only the magnitude of the field along the symmetry axis. Our method does not require integration or knowledge of the current distribution and is presented through practical examples, including a nonuniform finite solenoid used to produce cold atomic beams via laser cooling. These examples allow educators to discuss the nontrivial calculation of fields off-axis using concepts familiar to most students, while offering the opportunity to introduce themes of current modern research.

  11. Solenoidality of the Magnetic Induction Field and Conservation of the Total Momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Severini, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    The present scientific paper treats the case for which space interested by the electromagnetic field (e.m.) is completely vacuum except where the sources are located. By the way, we point out that the Maxwell's second equation is released from the definition of momentum density for the e.m. field, as this is the only equation that is not used in the formal introduction of Maxwell's stress tensor. For the first time in scientific literature, to the best of our knowledge, we demonstrate that the solenoidalily of magnetic induction field can be deduced from the conservation of total momentum due to the matter and field.

  12. 8T螺线管型高温超导磁体的电磁优化与分析%Electromagnetism optimization and analyses of 8T high temperature superconducting solenoid magnet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙林煜; 李鹏远

    2014-01-01

    介绍了一种强磁场高温超导螺线管磁体电磁性能的优化方法。通过编写Matlab数据处理程序优化了一个中心磁感应强度为8T、内径为20cm的磁体。利用有限元分析法分析已优化磁体的磁场分布,得到磁体在垂直方向的最大磁感应强度值与Matlab数据处理程序计算的结果基本吻合。%An optimization method of electromagnetic performance of high temperature superconducting solenoid magnet in high magnetic field is introduced. A Matlab code is written for optimizing the performance of the magnet with the central magnetic field of 8T and the inner diameter of 20 cm. Besides, the magnetic field distribution of the optimized magnet is analyzed by FEM software, and the value of the maximum magnetic induction in the axial direction is almost the same as the result calculated by the Matlab code.

  13. HB+ inserted into the CMS Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2006-01-01

    The first half of the barrel hadron calorimeter (HB+) has been inserted into the superconducting solenoid of CMS, in preparation for the magnet test and cosmic challenge. The operation went smoothly, lasting a couple of days.

  14. Finite element computation of 2-D magnetic field of solenoid with current%通电螺线管2维磁场有限元计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭斓; 杨中海; 胡权; 黄桃; 李斌

    2011-01-01

    Finite element computation of 2-D magnetic field of solenoid with current has been implemented. It adopted first or second order interpolation based finite element method to solve the 2-D magnetic field of the solenoid. The single solenoid model and the periodic structure model were analyzed and simulated. The results were compared with the results of Ansoft Maxwell 2D. It is shown that, compared with the first order interpolation based finite element method, the second order interpolation one has a faster convergence rate and a better accuracy on the axis of symmetry.%通过对通电螺线管磁系统理论分析,实现了通电螺线管2维磁场计算.该算法是采用一次、二次插值函数计算螺线管模型磁场的有限元算法,用于求解螺线管内外任意位置处的磁感应强度分布.实现了螺线管及周期结构的计算,并将结果与Ansoft Maxwell 2-D的计算结果进行了对比.结果表明:较一次插值函数有限元算法相比,二次插值函数算法在对称轴上轴向磁感应强度的分布更准确,体现了该算法的优越性,具有显著的工程应用价值.

  15. Arrival of the ATLAS solenoid from Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 01: L. to r.: Photo 01: L. to r.: Herman ten Kate (Magnet Project Leader), Takahiko Kondo (KEK, Solenoid Project Leader), Peter Jenni (Spokesperson). Photo 02: (truck on the right side) with the LAr barrel calorimeter cryostat (also built in Japan) on the left side. From left to right are the following ATLAS people: Herman ten Kate (Magnet Project Leader), Marzio Nessi (Technical Coordinator), Takahiko Kondo (KEK, Solenoid Project Leader), Peter Jenni (Spokesperson)

  16. First detector installed inside the ALICE solenoid...

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    ALICE's emblematic red magnet welcomed its first detector on 23 September, when the array of seven Cherenkov detectors, named HMPID, was successfully installed. ALICE team members standing in front of the completed HMPID detector.The red magnet, viewed from its front opening. The HMPID unit, seen from the back (top right corner of photo) is placed on a frame and lifted onto a platform during the installation. After the installation of the ACORDE scintillator array and the muon trigger and tracking chambers, the ALICE collaboration fitted the first detector inside the solenoid. The HMPID, for High Momentum Particle Identification, was installed at the 2 o'clock position in the central and most external region of the space frame, just below the solenoid yoke. It will be used to extend the hadron identification capability of the ALICE experiment up to 5 GeV/c, thus complementing the reach of the other particle identification systems (ITS, TPC and TOF). The HMPID is a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector in a...

  17. Magnetic axis control techniques of large size solenoid%大尺寸螺线管线圈的磁轴控制技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代志勇; 廖树清; 刘云龙; 谢宇彤; 王永伟; 臧宗旸; 肖贝禾

    2013-01-01

    从匀场环结构参数优化设计、线圈线包材料规格的选择、绕制工艺探索、超大幅面二极校正线圈研制、全新准直方法的磁轴检测技术等多方面研究大尺寸螺线管线圈的磁轴控制技术.突破了磁轴倾斜小于等于1 mrad的技术指标,成功研制出磁轴倾斜小于等于0.5 mrad的大尺寸聚焦线圈,解决了其中的关键单元部件研制的核心技术问题.%The magnetic-axis tilt,which is the most critical indicator of the focusing solenoid,is always the focus of researchers in related research fields.In this paper,many aspects,such as optimization of field-homogenizer design,the choice of material specifications,exploration of winding technology,design of super large size dipole steering coils,and magnetic-axis measurement technique are studied using new alignment method.The technical bottleneck of tilt less than 1.0 mrad is broken through and a large size focus solenoid whose magnetic-axis tilt is less than 0.5 mrad is successfully developed.

  18. Solenoid-Simulation Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Electrical properties of solenoids imitated for tests of control circuits. Simulation circuit imitates voltage and current responses of two engine-controlling solenoids. Used in tests of programs of digital engine-control circuits, also provides electronic interface with circuits imitating electrical properties of pressure sensors and linear variable-differential transformers. Produces voltages, currents, delays, and discrete turnon and turnoff signals representing operation of solenoid in engine-control relay. Many such circuits used simulating overall engine circuitry.

  19. Concept of a Staged FEL Enabled by Fast Synchrotron Radiation Cooling of Laser-Plasma Accelerated Beam by Solenoidal Magnetic Fields in Plasma Bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei; Andreev, Alexander; Konoplev, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for generating GigaGauss solenoidal field in laser-plasma bubble, using screw-shaped laser pulses, has been recently presented in arXiv:1604.01259 [physics.plasm-ph]. Such magnetic fields enable fast synchrotron radiation cooling of the beam emittance of laser-plasma accelerated leptons. This recent finding opens a novel approach for design of laser-plasma FELs or colliders, where the acceleration stages are interleaved with laser-plasma emittance cooling stages. In this concept paper we present an outline of how a staged plasma-acceleration FEL could look like and discuss further studies needed to investigate the feasibility of the concept in detail.

  20. Processing and characterization of superconducting solenoids made of Bi-2212/Ag-alloy multifilament round wire for high field magnet applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng

    As the only high temperature superconductor with round wire (RW) geometry, Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi-2212) superconducting wire has the advantages of being multi-filamentary, macroscopically isotropic and twistable. With overpressure (OP) processing techniques recently developed by our group at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), the engineering current density (Je) of Bi-2212 RW can be dramatically increased. For example, Je of more than 600 A/mm 2 (4.2 K and 20 T) is achieved after 100 bar OP processing. With these intrinsically beneficial properties and recent processing progress, Bi-2212 RW has become very attractive for high field magnet applications, especially for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnets and accelerator magnets etc. This thesis summarizes my graduate study on Bi-2212 solenoids for high field and high homogeneity NMR magnet applications, which mainly includes performance study of Bi-2212 RW insulations, 1 bar and OP processing study of Bi-2212 solenoids, and development of superconducting joints between Bi-2212 RW conductors. Electrical insulation is one of the key components of Bi-2212 coils to provide sufficient electrical standoff within coil winding pack. A TiO 2/polymer insulation offered by nGimat LLC was systematically investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dielectric property measurements, and transport critical current (Ic) property measurements. About 29% of the insulation by weight is polymer. When the Bi-2212 wire is fully heat treated, this decomposes with slow heating to 400 °C in flowing O2. After the full reaction, we found that the TiO2 did not degrade the critical current properties, adhered well to the conductor, and provided a breakdown voltage of more than 100 V. A Bi-2212 RW wound solenoid coil was built using this insulation being offered by nGimat LLC. The coil resistance was constant through coil winding, polymer burn

  1. THE ANTI-SOLENOID COMPENSATION OF THE CLIC DETECTOR SOLENOID USING IRSYN

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B

    2011-01-01

    The detector solenoid of CLIC causes a range of aberrations on the beam at the interaction point, particularly due to its overlap with the final focus magnets. These effects are corrected using antisolenoid correction coils on the final quadrupole before the collision point. In this note, we use the interaction region beam dynamics code IRSYN to compute the impact of the SiD solenoid on the beam and benchmark the anti-solenoid correction. We find the correction is achieved, with a small residual amount of beam aberration which is correctable using the beam delivery system. This provides a validation of the correction and a benchmark of IRSYN to existing codes.

  2. Measuring low frequency alternating magnetic field in solenoid by two Hall sensors%利用双霍尔探头测螺线管中低频交变磁场

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立辉; 张攀; 乐宏昊

    2014-01-01

    A method of measuring magnetic field with two Hall sensors in the Hall Effect experi-ment was proposed .The low frequency alternating magnetic field in a solenoid was studied after cali-bration .The features of the low frequency alternating magnetic field in the solenoid were analyzed .It offered a new thought for students in measuring weak low frequency electromagnetic radiation .%在霍尔效应实验中利用双霍尔探头测磁场,通过对磁场定标,研究了螺线管中低频交变磁场,并分析了螺线管中低频交变磁场的分布特征,为学生测量低频弱电磁辐射提供了新的思路。

  3. Central compact objects in magnetic lethargy

    CERN Document Server

    Viganò, Daniele; Perna, Rosalba

    2013-01-01

    Central Compact Objects are peculiar young neutron stars, with very low external magnetic fields combined with high fluxes in the X-ray band and surface temperature anisotropies. However, in their crust the magnetic field can be strong, result of its burial during a short post-supernova hypercritical accretion episode. The implications of this latter scenario for the temperature anisotropy, pulsed fraction and luminosity are discussed.

  4. Bent Solenoids with Superimposed Dipole Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinke, Rainer, B.; Goodzeit, Carl, L.

    2000-03-21

    A conceptual design and manufacturing technique were developed for a superconducting bent solenoid magnet with a superimposed dipole field that would be used as a dispersion device in the cooling channel of a future Muon Collider. The considered bent solenoid is equivalent to a 180° section of a toroid with a major radius of ~610 mm and a coil aperture of ~416 mm. The required field components of this magnet are 4 tesla for the solenoid field and 1 tesla for the superimposed dipole field. A magnet of this size and shape, operating at these field levels, has to sustain large Lorentz forces resulting in a maximum magnetic pressure of about 2,000 psi. A flexible round mini-cable with 37 strands of Cu-NbTi was selected as the superconductor. Detailed magnetic analysis showed that it is possible to obtain the required superimposed dipole field by tilting the winding planes of the solenoid by ~25°. A complete structural analysis of the coil support system and the helium containment vessel under thermal, pressure, and Lorentz force loads was carried out using 3D finite element models of the structures. The main technical issues were studied and solutions were worked out so that a highly reliable magnet of this type can be produced at an affordable cost.

  5. Approximate theory the electromagnetic energy of solenoid in special relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastyaningrum, I.; Kartikaningsih, S.

    2017-01-01

    Solenoid is a device that is often used in electronic devices. A solenoid is electrified will cause a magnetic field. In our analysis, we just focus on the electromagnetic energy for solenoid form. We purpose to analyze by the theoretical approach in special relativity. Our approach is begun on the Biot Savart law and Lorentz force. Special theory relativity can be derived from the Biot Savart law, and for the energy can be derived from Lorentz for, by first determining the momentum equation. We choose the solenoid form with the goal of the future can be used to improve the efficiency of the electrical motor.

  6. 直动型电磁阀吸力可靠性分析%Reliability Analyzing Method for Magnetic Suction of a Direct-Acting Solenoid Valve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾玥; 李宝盛

    2014-01-01

    A direct current solenoid valve was studied in this paper. Adopting finite element analysis software “Ansoft Maxwell” to build the 2D models of the solenoid valve, the magnetic induction intensity, mangnetic lines and suction curves under static magnet field were gained. The electromagnet suctions of all targets were calculated by orthogonal design method, using Ansoft Maxwell software; and then the reliability evaluation and factor analysis were applied on the simulation results. Also, the reliability evaluation was applied on the electromagnet suction data which were gained by testing. Finally, the simulation results and test data of electromagnet suction were compared and analyzed. The results proved that, after improving the simulation methods and narrowing down the range of each factor, the simulation results can authentically reflect the suction reliability.%以直流螺线管电磁阀为研究对象,利用电磁有限元软件Ansoft Maxwell对某种直动型电磁阀进行二维建模,并得出磁感应强度、磁力线分布图及静磁场下的吸力特性曲线。用正交设计法通过Ansoft Maxwell软件进行各指标的吸力计算,对得出吸力仿真计算值进行可靠性评估和因素分析;通过试验测试得到电磁阀吸力数据,对得出的吸力实测值也进行可靠性评估;后续对电磁阀吸力仿真计算值的可靠性评估和吸力实测值的可靠性评估进行了对比和分析。结果表明,通过改进仿真方法及缩小仿真计算时各因素取值范围,吸力仿真计算结果能真实地反映吸力可靠性。

  7. A METHOD FOR PRODUCING A HIGH QUALITY SOLENOIDAL FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinberg, B.; Brown, I.G.; Halbach, K.; Kunkel, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    A relatively simple and inexpensive device is described which can be used to provide a highly homogeneous solenoidal magnetic field when the solenoid windings are inadequate. Design considerations and experimental measurements are presented. A field straightness of approximately 10{sup -4} radians has been achieved.

  8. Mu2e production solenoid cryostat conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, T.H.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.M.; Peterson, T.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    Mu2e is a muon-to-electron conversion experiment being designed by an international collaboration of more than 65 scientists and engineers from more than 20 research institutions for installation at Fermilab. The experiment is comprised of three large superconducting solenoid magnet systems, production solenoid (PS), transport solenoid (TS) and detector solenoid (DS). A 25 kW, 8 GeV proton beam strikes a target located in the PS creating muons from the decay of secondary particles. These muons are then focused in the PS and the resultant muon beam is transported through the TS towards the DS. The production solenoid presents a unique set of design challenges as the result of high radiation doses, stringent magnetic field requirements, and large structural forces. This paper describes the conceptual design of the PS cryostat and will include discussions of the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multi-layer insulation, cooling system, cryogenic piping, and suspension system.

  9. Efficient transfer of positrons from a buffer-gas-cooled accumulator into an orthogonally oriented superconducting solenoid for antihydrogen studies

    CERN Document Server

    Comeau, D; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Gabrielse, G; Kalra, R; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Mullers, A; Walz, J

    2012-01-01

    Positrons accumulated in a room-temperature buffer-gas-cooled positron accumulator are efficiently transferred into a superconducting solenoid which houses the ATRAP cryogenic Penning trap used in antihydrogen research. The positrons are guided along a 9 m long magnetic guide that connects the central field lines of the 0.15 T field in the positron accumulator to the central magnetic field lines of the superconducting solenoid. Seventy independently controllable electromagnets are required to overcome the fringing field of the large-bore superconducting solenoid. The guide includes both a 15 degrees upward bend and a 105 degrees downward bend to account for the orthogonal orientation of the positron accumulator with respect to the cryogenic Penning trap. Low-energy positrons ejected from the accumulator follow the magnetic field lines within the guide and are transferred into the superconducting solenoid with nearly 100% efficiency. A 7 m long 5 cm diameter stainless-steel tube and a 20 mm long, 1.5 mm diamet...

  10. Validation of Quench Simulation and Simulation of the TWIN Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Pots, Rosalinde Hendrika

    2015-01-01

    For the Future Circular Collider at CERN a multi-purpose detector is proposed. The 6T TWIN Solenoid, a very large magnet system with a stored energy of 53 GJ, is being designed. It is important to protect the magnet against quenches in the system. Therefore several existing quench protection systems are evaluated and simulations have be performed on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid. The simulations on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid have been performed with promising results; the hotspot temperatures do not exceed 120 K and layer to layer voltages stay below 500 V. Adding quench heaters to the system might improve the quench protection system further.

  11. Motions of CMS Detector structures due to the magnetic field forces as observed by the Link Alignment System during the Test of the 4 Tesla Magnet Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Calderón, Alicia; González-Sánchez, F J; Martínez-Rivero, C; Matorras, Francisco; Rodrigo, Teresa; Martínez, P; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobrón, M; Vila, Ivan; Virto, A L; Alberdi, Javier; Arce, Pedro; Barcala, Jose Miguel; Calvo, Enrique; Ferrando, Antonio; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Molinero, Antonio; Navarrete, Jose Javier; Oller, Juan Carlos; Yuste, Ceferino

    2008-01-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotations of detector structures (from microradians to milliradians). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic field intensity. In addition, the reconstructed positions of active element sensors are compared to their positions as measured by photogrammetry and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described.

  12. Solenoid-free plasma start-up in spherical tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R.; Shevchenko, V. F.

    2014-10-01

    The central solenoid is an intrinsic part of all present-day tokamaks and most spherical tokamaks. The spherical torus (ST) confinement concept is projected to operate at high toroidal beta and at a high fraction of the non-inductive bootstrap current as required for an efficient reactor system. The use of a conventional solenoid in a ST-based fusion nuclear facility is generally believed to not be a possibility. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is therefore an area of extensive worldwide research activity. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is also relevant to steady-state tokamak operation, as the central transformer coil of a conventional aspect ratio tokamak reactor would be located in a high radiation environment but would be needed only during the initial discharge initiation and current ramp-up phases. Solenoid-free operation also provides greater flexibility in the selection of the aspect ratio and simplifies the reactor design. Plasma start-up methods based on induction from external poloidal field coils, helicity injection and radio frequency current drive have all made substantial progress towards meeting this important need for the ST. Some of these systems will now undergo the final stages of test in a new generation of large STs, which are scheduled to begin operations during the next two years. This paper reviews research to date on methods for inducing the initial start-up current in STs without reliance on the conventional central solenoid.

  13. Study of high-pressure high-speed on-off solenoid using permanent magnet shield%永磁屏蔽式耐高压高速开关电磁铁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    满军; 丁凡; 李其朋; 笪靖; 邵森寅

    2012-01-01

    To increase electromagnetic force and to speed up response time, this paper proposed a high-pressure high-speed on-off solenoid using permanent magnet (PM) shield. By reducing flux leakage, the rare-earth NdFeB PM shield improves the dynamic response. A dynamic model of solenoid based on finite element analysis was established. The results from a simulation based on the model were verified by those from experiments while response error was 3. 2%. The dynamic simulation analysis of the main structure parameters - such as PM length, PM thickness, PM direction, basin height, pressure ring thickness, nonmagnetic spacer length, front ring angle, and back ring angle - were performed for the PM shield type solenoid. Based on optimal design parameters selection and engineering practice, the response time of the high-pressure long-stroke high-speed solenoid with PM shield is 2. 20 ms with a stroke of 0. 6 mm.%为了提高电磁力、加快响应速度,提出一种永磁屏蔽式耐高压高速开关电磁铁,采用NdFeB稀土永磁材料作为磁屏蔽元件,减少漏磁并加快了动态响应.基于有限元方法建立电磁铁的动态数学模型,并通过实验进行验证,实验与仿真基本吻合,响应误差为3.2%,验证模型的有效性.在此基础上,对该高速开关电磁铁进行动态仿真,探讨永磁体长度、厚度、激磁方向,盆口高,耐压环厚度,隔磁片长度,前隔磁角和后隔磁角等结构参数对响应时间的影响规律.结合实际设计要求,结果表明,采用优化后的结构参数研制的永磁屏蔽式耐高压高速开关电磁铁在0.6 mm行程时的响应时间为2.20 ms.

  14. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-05-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  15. Magnet design technical report---ITER definition phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, C. (ed.)

    1989-04-28

    This report contains papers on the following topics: conceptual design; radiation damage of ITER magnet systems; insulation system of the magnets; critical current density and strain sensitivity; toroidal field coil structural analysis; stress analysis for the ITER central solenoid; and volt-second capabilities and PF magnet configurations.

  16. Simulation analysis of high-speed on-off solenoid returned by permanent magnetic force%磁回复高速开关电磁铁仿真分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李威; 胡旭东; 李其朋

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at the mechanical spring of the hign-speed on-off electromagnetic solenoid, a high-speed on-off solenoid returned by permanent magnetic force was proposed. The magnetic spring was used instead of mechanical spring to simplify the mechanical structure of the high-speed on-off solenoid, and problems of the high-speed on-off solenoid were solved because of mechanical spring fatigue failure. The simulation analysis of the main structure parameters, such as the annular permanent magnet length, countersink's radius of plunger,the groove's depth and width of endcover.were performed using Ansoft/Maxwell. The results indicate that the annular permanent magnet length, the groove's depth and width increase, force of armature increases and has a maximal value; countersink's depth of plunger increases, force of armature decreases and has a minimal value. Considering the force condition of the armature and optimal design parameters selection, the output characteristics of push rod is good with the annular permanent magnet's length of 5 mm, the groove's depth and width of 10 mm and 4 mm,and counterbore's depth of 2 mm.%针对高速开关电磁铁的机械弹簧回复机构存在的问题,提出了一种新型的磁回复高速开关电磁铁.采用磁弹簧替代机械弹簧,简化了高速开关电磁铁的机械结构,并解决了因机械弹簧疲劳破坏而导致高速开关电磁铁失效的问题;基于Ansoft/Maxwell仿真建模平台,建立了磁回复高速开关电磁铁的仿真计算模型,分析并探讨了环形永磁体的长度、衔铁端面的沉孔深度以及后端盖深V槽的槽深和深V型槽的槽宽等关键结构参数与衔铁受力之间的关系.研究结果表明:永磁体长度、深V槽深度和宽度增大,衔铁受力增加,且增加到一定值后,受力趋于饱和;沉孔深度增大,衔铁受力减少,且减少到一定值后,受力趋于平缓.综合考虑衔铁的受力情况以及实际设计要求,当环形永磁体长5 mm

  17. Mu2e Transport Solenoid Cold-Mass Alignment Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. [Fermilab; Ambrosio, G. [Fermilab; Badgley, K. [Fermilab; Bradascio, F. [Fermilab; Brandt, J. [Fermilab; Evbota, D. [Fermilab; Hocker, A. [Fermilab; Lamm, M. [Fermilab; Lombardo, V. [Fermilab; Miller, J. [Boston U.; Nicol, T. [Fermilab; Kutschke, R. [Fermilab; Vellidis, C. [Fermilab; Wands, R. [Fermilab; Wenk, E. [Fermilab

    2016-10-01

    The Muon-to-electron conversion experiment (Mu2e) at Fermilab is designed to explore charged lepton flavor violation. It is composed of three large superconducting solenoids: the Production Solenoid (PS), the Transport Solenoid (TS) and the Detector Solenoid (DS). The TS is formed by two magnets: TS upstream (TSu) and downstream (TSd). Each has its own cryostat and power supply. Tolerance sensitivity studies of the position and angular alignment of each coil in this magnet system were performed in the past with the objective to demonstrate that the magnet design meets all the field requirements. The alignment of the cold-masses is critical to maximize the transmission of muons and to avoid possible backgrounds that would reduce the sensitivity of the experiment. Each TS magnet cold-mass can be individually aligned. In this work, we discuss implications of the alignment of the TS cold-masses in terms of the displacement of the magnetic center. Consideration of the practical mechanical limits are also presented.

  18. Three dimensional multilayer solenoid microcoils inside silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) solenoid microcoils could generate uniform magnetic field. Multilayer solenoid microcoils are highly pursued for strong magnetic field and high inductance in advanced magnetic microsystems. However, the fabrication of the 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils is still a challenging task. In this paper, 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils with uniform diameters and high aspect ratio were fabricated in silica glass. An alloy (Bi/In/Sn/Pb) with high melting point was chosen as the conductive metal to overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The inductance of the three layers microcoils was measured, and the value is 77.71 nH at 100 kHz and 17.39 nH at 120 MHz. The quality factor was calculated, and it has a value of 5.02 at 120 MHz. This approach shows an improvement method to achieve complex 3D metal microstructures and electronic components, which could be widely integrated in advanced magnetic microsystems.

  19. LPI: pulsed solenoid for positron focusing in LIL

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1993-01-01

    The solenoid for the initial focusing of the positrons emerging from the conversion target is mounted inside the vacuum, immediately after the target. Pulsed with a current of 6 kA for some 7 microseconds, it produces a longitudinal magnetic field of 1.5 T.

  20. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of transients in the HELIOS loop including a CICC section representative of the JT-60SA Central Solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carli, S.; Bonifetto, R.; Hoa, C.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2015-12-01

    The HELIOS facility at CEA Grenoble is a supercritical helium (SHe) loop which is being used to investigate the effects on the cryogenic cooling system of the pulsed heat loads which are typical of superconducting tokamak operation. In the standard configuration, the magnet heat load is simulated by electrical heaters wrapped around a section of cryoline. In the present work, the resistively heated section is substituted in the HELIOS model of the 4C code, already validated for the standard configuration of HELIOS, by a sub-size winding structure made of JT-60SA Cable-In-Conduit Conductors (CICCs). The new model is then used to highlight the differences in the circuit behaviour when the heated pipe is substituted by an actual magnet wound with CICCs, checking the representativeness of the control strategies developed for the present HELIOS configuration. The use of CICCs will be shown to produce an intrinsic smoothing of the temperature profiles which is not affecting the capability of the control strategies to smooth the heat loads to the cryoplant.

  1. Optimal Bitter Coil Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Kobelev, V

    2016-01-01

    Bitter coil is an electromagnet used for the generation of exceptionally strong magnetic fields. The upper bound of magnet flux density is restricted by several factors. One principal restriction is the high stresses due to Lorentz forces in the coil. The Lorentz forces generate the distributed body force, which acts as the pressure of magnetic field. The common radial thickness profile of the Bitter coil is constant. In this paper the possibility of optimization by means of non-constant radial thickness profile of the Bitter coil is studied. The close form expression for optimal thickness profile is obtained. Both designs are compared and the considerable improvement of magnetic flux density is demonstrated. Moreover, the optimal design improves the shape of cooling channels. Namely, the highest cross-section of cooling channel is at the most thermally loaded inner surface of the coil.

  2. Quench Analysis of the PANDA Target Spectrometer Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Deelen, Nikkie

    2014-01-01

    A quench analysis of the PANDA Target Solenoid has been performed. The characteristic time of the fast discharge is $12\\ \\text{s}$. The peak temperature and peak voltage during a quench are $30\\ \\text{K}$ and $160\\ \\text{V}$ respectively. During a quench the energy stored in the magnetic field is mostly dissipated in the dump resistor. The slow discharge of the PANDA solenoid takes approximately $1950\\ \\text{s}$ during which nearly all the energy is dissipated in the diodes of the quench protection circuit.

  3. Weak magnetic fields in central stars of planetary nebulae?

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, M; Todt, H; Schöller, M; Hamann, W -R; Sandin, C; Schönberner, D

    2014-01-01

    It is not yet clear whether magnetic fields play an essential role in shaping planetary nebulae (PNe), or whether stellar rotation alone and/or a close binary companion can account for the variety of the observed nebular morphologies. In a quest for empirical evidence verifying or disproving the role of magnetic fields in shaping PNe, we follow up on previous attempts to measure the magnetic field in a representative sample of PN central stars. We obtained low-resolution polarimetric spectra with FORS 2 at VLT for a sample of twelve bright central stars of PNe with different morphology, including two round nebulae, seven elliptical nebulae, and three bipolar nebulae. Two targets are Wolf-Rayet type central stars. For the majority of the observed central stars, we do not find any significant evidence for the existence of surface magnetic fields. However, our measurements may indicate the presence of weak mean longitudinal magnetic fields of the order of 100 Gauss in the central star of the young elliptical pla...

  4. Improvements and Performance of the Fermilab Solenoid Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orris, Darryl; et al.

    2016-09-02

    The Solenoid Test Facility at Fermilab was built using a large vacuum vessel for testing of conduction-cooled superconducting solenoid magnets, and was first used to determine the performance of the MICE Coupling Coil [1, 2]. The facility was modified recently to enable testing of solenoid magnets for the Mu2e experiment, which operate at much higher current than the Coupling Coil. One pair of low current conduction-cooled copper and NbTi leads was replaced with two pairs of 10 kA HTS leads cooled by heat exchange with liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. The new design, with additional control and monitoring capability, also provides helium cooling of the superconducting magnet leads by conduction. A high current power supply with energy extraction was added, and several improvements to the quench protection and characterization system were made. Here we present details of these changes and report on performance results from a test of the Mu2e prototype Transport Solenoid (TS) module. Progress on additional improvements in preparation for production TS module testing will be presented.

  5. ATLAS Solenoid placed in its final position

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting solenoid during one of the transport operations. Securely attached to the overhead crane, the solenoid is situated in front of the opening to the liquid-argon electromagnetic calorimeter, where it will soon be inserted.

  6. GROWING MAGNETIC FIELDS IN CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Bernal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudiamos el efecto de un modelo de crecimiento del campo magnético en los llamados Objetos Compactos Centrales (OCCs. Tal evolución del campo magnético no es una idea nueva (Blandford, Applegate, & Hernquist 1983 pero sus implicaciones evolutivas no han sido estudiadas completamente (Michel 1994. Discutimos las nuevas clases de estrellas de neutrones, las cuales se presentan en cinco tipos reconocidos en los últimos diez años. Comentamos la posibilidad de que un pulsar magnetizado, débilmente rotante, pueda haberse formado en SN1987A.

  7. Motions of CMS Detector Structures as Observed by the Link Alignment System during the Test of the 4 Tesla Magnet Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferramdp, A.; Josa, M. I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.; Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F. J.; Martin-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.

    2008-07-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micro metres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotation of detector structures (from microradiants to milliradiants). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic fi eld intensity. In addition, a comparison of the reconstructed position of active element sensors with respect to their position as measured by photogrammetry is made and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described. (Author) 19 refs.

  8. Cosmic Solenoids Minimal Cross-Section and Generalized Flux Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, A; Davidson, Aharon; Karasik, David

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent general relativistic configuration describing a finite cross-section magnetic flux tube is constructed. The cosmic solenoid is modeled by an elastic superconductive surface which separates the Melvin core from the surrounding flat conic structure. We show that a given amount $\\Phi$ of magnetic flux cannot be confined within a cosmic solenoid of circumferential radius smaller than $\\frac{\\sqrt{3G}}{2\\pi c^2}\\Phi$ without creating a conic singularity. Gauss-Codazzi matching conditions are derived by means of a self-consistent action. The source term, representing the surface currents, is sandwiched between internal and external gravitational surface terms. Surface superconductivity is realized by means of a Higgs scalar minimally coupled to projective electromagnetism. Trading the 'magnetic' London phase for a dual 'electric' surface vector potential, the generalized quantization condition reads: $e/{hc} \\Phi + 1/e Q=n$ with $Q$ denoting some dual 'electric' charge, thereby allowing for a non-...

  9. Magnetically inferred basement structure in central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Peter R.; Stewart, Ian C. F.

    1995-05-01

    A compilation of magnetic data acquired during the past three decades for a region in central Saudi Arabia where Precambrian basement is partly exposed on the Arabian shield and partly concealed by overlying Phanerozoic strata, shows a central sector of conspicuous N-S-trending anomalies, a heterogeneous western sector of short-wavelength, high-intensity anomalies, and an eastern sector of low- to moderate-intensity broad-wavelength anomalies. Anomalies in the western and central sectors correlate with Neoproterozoic metavolcanic, metasedimentary, and intrusive rocks of the Arabian shield and are interpreted as delineating extensions of shield-type rocks down-dip beneath Phanerozoic cover. These rocks constitute terranes making up part of a Neoproterozoic orogenic belt that underlies Northeast Africa and western Arabia and it is proposed that their magnetically indicated easternmost extent marks the concealed eastern edge of the orogenic belt in central Arabia. The flat magnetic signature of the eastern sector, not entirely accounted for as an effect of deep burial, may reflect the presence of a crustal block different in character to the terranes of the orogenic belt and, speculatively, may outline a continental block that, according to some tectonic models of the region, collided with the Neoproterozoic terranes and thereby caused their deformation and tectonic accretion.

  10. The influence of the iron shield of the solenoid on spin tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toprek Dragan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the iron shield of the solenoid on spin tracking is studied in this paper. In the case of the 200 MeV proton, the study has been numerically done in the ZGOUBI code. The distribution of the magnetic field was done by POISSON. We have come to the conclusion that the influence of the solenoid’s shielding on spin tracking is the same at its entrance and exit and that is directly proportional to the intensity of the magnetic induction B on the axis of the solenoid. We have also determined that the influence of the solenoid’s shielding is much stronger on transversal components of the spin than on its longitudinal component. The differences between components of the spin for the shielded and not-shielded solenoid diminish with the in crease in the distance from the solenoid.

  11. Analytical Study of Stress State in HTS Solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzi, E.; Terzini, E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    A main challenge for high field solenoids made of in High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) is the large stress developed in the conductor. This is especially constraining for BSCCO, a brittle and strain sensitive ceramic material. To find parametric correlations useful in magnet design, analytical models can be used. A simple model is herein proposed to obtain the radial, azimuthal and axial stresses in a solenoid as a function of size, i.e. self-field, and of the engineering current density for a number of different constraint hypotheses. The analytical model was verified against finite element modeling (FEM) using the same hypotheses of infinite rigidity of the constraints and room temperature properties. FEM was used to separately evaluate the effect of thermal contractions at 4.2 K for BSCCO and YBCO coils. Even though the analytical model allows for a finite stiffness of the constraints, it was run using infinite stiffness. For this reason, FEM was again used to determine how much stresses change when considering an outer stainless steel skin with finite rigidity for both BSCCO and YBCO coils. For a better understanding of the actual loads that high field solenoids made of HTS will be subject to, we have started some analytical studies of stress state in solenoids for a number of constraint hypotheses. This will hopefully show what can be achieved with the present conductor in terms of self-field. The magnetic field (B) exerts a force F = B x J per unit volume. In superconducting magnets, where the field and current density (J) are both high, this force can be very large, and it is therefore important to calculate the stresses in the coil.

  12. First Generation Final Focusing Solenoid For NDCX-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W.

    2011-11-09

    This report describes the prototype final focus solenoid (FFS-1G), or 1st generation FFS. In order to limit eddy currents, the solenoid winding consists of Litz wire wound on a non-conductive G-10 tube. For the same reason, the winding pack was inserted into an electrically insulating, but thermally conducting Polypropylene (Cool- Poly© D1202) housing and potted with highly viscous epoxy (to be able to wick the single strands of the Litz wire). The magnet is forced-air cooled through cooling channels. The magnet was designed for water cooling, but he cooling jacket cracked, and therefore cooling (beyond natural conduction and radiation) was exclusively by forced air. Though the design operating point was 8 Tesla, for the majority of running on NDCX-1 it operated up to about 5 Tesla. This was due mostly from limitations of voltage holding at the leads, where discharges at higher pulsed current damaged the leads. Generation 1 was replaced by the 2nd generation solenoid (FFS-2G) about a year later, which has operated reliably up to 8 Tesla, with a better lead design and utilizes water cooling. At this point, FFS-1G was used for plasma source R&D by LBNL and PPPL. The maximum field for those experiments was reduced to 3 Tesla due to continued difficulty with the leads and because higher field was not essential for those experiments. The pulser for the final focusing solenoid is a SCR-switched capacitor bank which produces a half-sine current waveform. The pulse width is ~800us and a charge voltage of 3kV drives ~20kA through the magnet producing ~8T field.

  13. Therapeutic approaches of magnetic nanoparticles for the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnawaz, Fahima; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) represent one of the fastest growing areas of concern requiring urgent medical attention. Treatment of CNS ailments is hindered owing to different physiological barriers including the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which limits the accessibility of potential drugs. With the assistance of a nanotechnology-based drug delivery strategy, the problems could be overcome. Recently, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have proven immensely useful as drug carriers for site-specific delivery and as contrast agents owing to their magnetic susceptibility and biocompatibility. By utilizing MNPs, diagnosis and treatment of CNS diseases have progressed by overcoming the hurdles of the BBB. In this review, the therapeutic aspect and the future prospects related to the theranostic approach of MNPs are discussed.

  14. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Romanelli, M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Kumaki, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan); Fuwa, Y. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kanesue, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hayashizaki, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); Lambiase, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Okamura, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  15. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  16. Impact of detector solenoid on the Compact Linear Collider luminosity performance

    CERN Document Server

    Levinsen, Yngve Inntjore; Tomas, Rogelio; Schulte, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain the necessary luminosity with a reasonable amount of beam power, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design includes an unprecedented collision beam size of {\\sigma} = 1 nm vertically and {\\sigma} = 45 nm horizontally. Given the small and very flat beams, the luminosity can be significantly degraded from the impact of the experimental solenoid field in combination with a large crossing angle. Main effects include y-x'-coupling and increase of vertical dispersion. Additionally, Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation (ISR) from the orbit deflection created by the solenoid field, increases the beam emittance. A detailed study of the impact from a realistic solenoid field and the associated correction techniques for the CLIC Final Focus is presented. In particular, the impact of techniques to compensate the beam optics distortions due to the detector solenoid main field and its overlap with the final focus magnets are shown. The unrecoverable luminosity loss due to ISR has been evaluated, and found to...

  17. Magnetic Circuit Structure Optimization Design for Injection Solenoid Valve Based on Ansoft%基于Ansoft的喷油电磁阀磁路结构优化设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦禹; 刘京; 庞宝麟; 蔡胜年

    2013-01-01

    To realize the requirements of high speed response for injection solenoid valve in diesel engine common rail type injec-tion system,injection solenoid valve 2D model was established using Ansoft finite element analysis soft.The main factors affecting re-sponse of the injection solenoid valve were simulated and analyzed from structure.The simulation results show that using the optimiza-tion structure,the injection solenoid valve fast response velocity is increased 65.4%.%为实现柴油机共轨式喷油系统中的喷油电磁阀的高速响应要求,利用Ansoft有限元分析软件建立喷油电磁阀的二维模型,从电磁阀的结构出发,对影响喷油电磁阀响应的主要因素进行了静、动态仿真分析,得到了优化后的喷油电磁阀结构。仿真计算结果表明,采用优化后的结构,柴油机喷油电磁阀的快速响应性提高了65.4%。

  18. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-11-01

    In this report we calculate time-independent fields of solenoidal magnets that are suitable for ion beam transport and focusing. There are many excellent Electricity and Magnetism textbooks that present the formalism for magnetic field calculations and apply it to simple geometries [1-1], but they do not include enough relevant detail to be used for designing a charged particle transport system. This requires accurate estimates of fringe field aberrations, misaligned and tilted fields, peak fields in wire coils and iron, external fields, and more. Specialized books on magnet design, technology, and numerical computations [1-2] provide such information, and some of that is presented here. The AIP Conference Proceedings of the US Particle Accelerator Schools [1-3] contain extensive discussions of design and technology of magnets for ion beams - except for solenoids. This lack may be due to the fact that solenoids have been used primarily to transport and focus particles of relatively low momenta, e.g. electrons of less than 50 MeV and protons or H- of less than 1.0 MeV, although this situation may be changing with the commercial availability of superconducting solenoids with up to 20T bore field [1-4]. Internal reports from federal laboratories and industry treat solenoid design in detail for specific applications. The present report is intended to be a resource for the design of ion beam drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy [1-5] and Warm Dense Matter experiments [1-6], although it should also be useful for a broader range of applications. The field produced by specified currents and material magnetization can always be evaluated by solving Maxwell's equations numerically, but it is also desirable to have reasonably accurate, simple formulas for conceptual system design and fast-running beam dynamics codes, as well as for general understanding. Most of this report is devoted to such formulas, but an introduction to the Tosca{copyright} code [1-7] and some

  19. A Magnetic Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Ebe

    2006-01-01

    Two recent articles in this journal described how an air core solenoid connected to an ac power source may restore the magnetization of a bar magnet with an alternating magnetic field (see Figs. 1 and 2). Although we are quite accustomed to using a constant magnetic field in an air core solenoid to remagnetize a ferromagnet, it is puzzling that we…

  20. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S., E-mail: ikeda.s.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 216-8502 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kumaki, M. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  1. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  2. Hybrid design method for air-core solenoid with axial homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li; Lee, Sang Jin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Suk Jin [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, a hybrid method is proposed to design an air-core superconducting solenoid system for 6 T axial uniform magnetic field using Niobium Titanium (NbTi) superconducting wire. In order to minimize the volume of conductor, the hybrid optimization method including a linear programming and a nonlinear programming was adopted. The feasible space of solenoid is divided by several grids and the magnetic field at target point is approximated by the sum of magnetic field generated by an ideal current loop at the center of each grid. Using the linear programming, a global optimal current distribution in the feasible space can be indicated by non-zero current grids. Furthermore the clusters of the non-zero current grids also give the information of probable solenoids in the feasible space, such as the number, the shape, and so on. Applying these probable solenoids as the initial model, the final practical configuration of solenoids with integer layers can be obtained by the nonlinear programming. The design result illustrates the efficiency and the flexibility of the hybrid method. And this method can also be used for the magnet design which is required the high homogeneity within several ppm (parts per million)

  3. CMS - The Compact Muon Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Bergauer, T; Waltenberger, W; Kratschmer, I; Treberer-treberspurg, W; Rahbaran, B; Andreeva, I; Innocente, V; Camporesi, T; Malgeri, L; Marchioro, A; Moneta, L; Weingarten, W; Cimmino, A; Rovere, M; Castello, R; Jafari, A; Lange, C G; Pantaleo, F; Reis, T; Favre-felix, R J R; Cucciati, G; Alipour tehrani, N; Novotny, P; Stakia, A; Pizzichemi, M; Pinna, D; Rauco, G; Zhang, S; Hu, T; Yazgan, E; Zhang, H; Thomas-wilsker, J; Wu, M; Li, C; Reithler, H K V; Philipps, B; Merschmeyer, M K; Heidemann, C A; Mukherjee, S; Geenen, H; Kuessel, Y; Weingarten, S; Nehrkorn, A; Gallo, E; Schwanenberger, C; Kalogeropoulos, A; Walsh bastos rangel, R; Beernaert, K S; Connor, P; Lelek, A A; Wichmann, K H; Myronenko, V; Kovalchuk, N; Bein, S L; Dreyer, T; Scharf, C; Quast, G; Dierlamm, A H; Barth, C; Mol, X; Kudella, S; Matorras, F; Calderon tazon, A; Garcia ferrero, J; Bercher, M J; Sirois, Y; Jo, M; Antropov, I; Callier, S; Depasse, P; Laktineh, I B; Grenier, G; Boudoul, G; Heath, G P; Brooke, J J; Hartley, D A; Beck, L M G; Quinton, S; Tomalin, I R; Harder, K; Francis, V B; Thea, A; Zhang, Z; Loukas, D; Topsis giotis, I; Hernath, S T; Colaleo, A; Maggi, G P; Maggi, M; Loddo, F; Campanini, R; Cuffiani, M; D'antone, I; Grandi, C; Guiducci, L; Tosi, N; Gulmini, M; Longo, E; Meridiani, P; Gelli, S; Schizzi, A; Song, S; Rhee, J; Kim, Y; Cho, S; Ha, S; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Md halid, M F B; Yusli, M N B; Dominik, W M; Bunkowski, K; Olszewski, M; Byszuk, A P; Rasteiro da silva, J C; Varela, J; Leong, Q; Sulimov, V; Vorobyev, A; Denisov, A; Murzin, V; Egorov, A; Lukyanenko, S; Mesyats, G; Postoev, V; Pashenkov, A; Solovey, A; Rubakov, V; Troitsky, S; Kirpichnikov, D; Lychkovskaya, N; Safronov, G; Fedotov, A; Toms, M; Barniakov, M; Olimov, K; Fazilov, M; Umaraliev, A; Dumanoglu, I; Bakirci, N M; Dozen, C; Demiroglu, Z S; Oglakci, M; Isik, C; Zeyrek, M; Yalvac, M; Ozkorucuklu, S; Chang, Y; Dolgopolov, A; Gottschalk, E E; Maeshima, K; Heavey, A E; Kramer, T; Kwan, S W L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S M; Mokhov, N; Marraffino, J M; Mrenna, S; Yarba, V; Banerjee, B; Elvira, V D; Gray, L A; Holzman, B; Dagenhart, W; Canepa, A; Dumitrescu, C L; Ryu, S C; Strobbe, N C; Adelman-mc carthy, J K; Contescu, A C; Andre, J O; Wu, J; Bucinskaite, I; Zhang, J; Karchin, P E; Thapa, P; Zaleski, S G; Dishaw, A L; Gran, J L; Wang, S; Patterson, A S; Zilizi, G; Raics, P P; Bhardwaj, A; Smiljkovic, N; Stojanovic, M; Brandao malbouisson, H; De oliveira martins, C P; Tonelli manganote, E J; Medina jaime, M; Thiel, M; Laurila, S H; Wu, X; Graehling, P; Tonon, N; Blekman, F; De bruyn, I H J; Lenzi, T; Zhang, F; Postiau, N J S; Leroux, P J; Van remortel, N; Janssen, X J; Di croce, D; Aleksandrov, A; Shopova, M F; Dogra, S M; Shinoda, A A; Arce, P; Daniel, M; Navarrete marin, J J; Redondo fernandez, I; Guirao elias, A; Cela ruiz, J M; Lottin, J; Gras, P; Kircher, F; Levesy, B; Payn, A; Guilloux, F; Negro, G; Leloup, C; Pasztor, G; Bhatnagar, V; Maity, M; Bruzzi, M; Sciortino, S; Starodubtsev, O; Sciacca, C; Meola, S; Berruti, G M; Saccomanno, A; Esposito, M; Azzi, P; Conti, E; Lacaprara, S; Margoni, M; Rossin, R; Re, V; Zucca, S; Fallavollita, F; Fano', L; Lucaroni, A; Biino, C; Dattola, D; Rotondo, F; Ballestrero, A; Obertino, M M; Gomez ambrosio, R; Kiani, M B; Paterno, A; Magana villalba, R; Ramirez garcia, M; Reyes almanza, R; Gorski, M; Wrochna, G; Bluj, M J; Zarubin, A; Nozdrin, M; Ladygin, V; Malakhov, A; Golunov, A; Skrypnik, A; Sotnikov, A; Evdokimov, N; Lokhtin, I; Ershov, A; Platonova, M; Tyurin, N; Slabospitskii, S; Talov, V; Belikov, N; Ryazanov, A; Chao, Y; Tsai, J; Richardson, C A; Foord, A; Wood, D R; Orimoto, T J; Luckey, P D; Gomez ceballos retuerto, G; Jaditz, S H; Stephans, G S; Darlea, G L; Di matteo, L; Maier, B; Trovato, M; Bhattacharya, S; Roberts, J B; Padley, P B; Adair, A H; Tu, Z; Rorie, J T; Clarida, W J; Tiras, E; Khristenko, V; Cerizza, G; Pieri, M; Sharma, V A; Krutelyov, V; Saiz santos, M D; Klein, D S; Derdzinski, M; Murray, M J; Gray, J A; Minafra, N; Forthomme, L; Castle, J R; Bowen, J L S; Buterbaugh, K; Morrow, S I; Bunn, J; Newman, H; Spiropulu, M; Balcas, J; Lawhorn, J M; Thomas, S D; Panwalkar, S M; Kyriacou, S; Xie, Z; Ojalvo, I R; Laird, E M; Wimpenny, S J; Lacroix, F S; Yates, B R; Perry, T M; Ackert, A K; Schiber, C C; Mesic, B; Kolosova, M; Wang, M; Snow, G R; Lundstedt, C; Johnston, D; Zvada, M; Weitzel, D J; Damgov, J V; Giammanco, A; David, P N Y; Cabrera jamoulle, J B; Missiroli, M; Nash, J A; Evans, L; Nikitenko, A; Ryan, M J; Huffman, M A J; Styliaris, E; Evangelou, I; Sharan, M K; Roy, A; Rout, P K; Bagliesi, G; Braccini, P L; Ligabue, F; Boccali, T; Rizzi, A; Minuti, M; Yu, G B; Oh, S; Kim, J; Sen, S; Boz evinay, M; Xiao, M; Jensen, F O; Mulholland, T D; Kumar, A; Jones, M; Roozbahani, B H; Neu, C C; Thacker, H B; Wolfe, E M; Jabeen, S; Gilmore, J; Winer, B L; Rush, C J; Luo, W; Alimena, J M; Wulsin, H W; Lefeld, A J; Ko, W; Lander, R; Shalhout, S Z; Broadley, W H; Shi, M; Low, J F; Mei, H; Alexander, J P; Chaves, J E; Zientek, M E; Conway, J V; Padilla fuentes, Y L; Florent, A H; Bravo, C B; Crotty, I M; Cook, J R; Wenman, D L; Ghabrous larrea, C; Gomber, B; Smith, N C; Long, K D; Roberts, J M; Hildreth, M D; Jessop, C P; Karmgard, D J; Ferbel, T; Zielinski, M; Cooper, S I; Jung, A; Fagot, A; Valchkova-georgieva, F K; Dimitrov, D S; Roumenin, T S; Podrasky, V; Branson, A B; Odeh, M; Soomro, K; Romaniuk, R; Teodorescu, L; Krofcheck, D; Anderson, N G; Bell, S T; Salazar ibarguen, H A; Kudinov, V; Onishchenko, S; Naujikas, R; Damarackas, M; Gimbutas, A; Lyubynskiy, V; Sobolev, O; Khan, M S; Adeel-ur-rehman, A; Ali, I; Kreuzer, P K; Robson, A J; Gadrat, S G; Ivanov, A; Mendis, D; Howard, A S; Da silva di calafiori, D R; Kasieczka, G; Zeinali, M; Behnamian, H; Moroni, L; Malvezzi, S; Manzoni, R A; Park, I; Pastika, N J; Elkhateeb, E A A; Elmetenawee, W; Mohammed, Y; Tayel, E S A; Magradze, E; Oikashvili, B; Shingade, P; Shukla, R A; Banerjee, S; Kumar, S; Jashal, B K; Adam, W; Ero, J; Fabjan, C; Jeitler, M; Rad, N K; Konig, A; Auffray hillemanns, E; Charkiewicz, A; Fartoukh, S; Garcia de enterria adan, D; Girone, M; Glege, F; Lasseur, C; Loos, R; Mannelli, M; Meijers, F; Sciaba, A; Tsesmelis, E; Meschi, E; Ricci, D; Petrucciani, G; Daguin, J; Vazquez velez, C; Tosi, M; Kortelainen, M J; Karavakis, E; Rabady, D S; Lucchini, M T; Chaze, O; Ceresa, D; Karacheban, O; Van besien, B T L; Beguin, M; Kilminster, B J; Ke, Z; Meng, X; Zhang, Y; Tao, J; Romeo, F; Spiezia, A; Cheng, L; Zhukov, V; Feld, L W; Gueth, A; Fischer, R; Brodski, M; Kress, T H; Hansen, K; Schoerner-sadenius, T M; Marfin, I; Keaveney, J M; Diez pardos, C; Roland, B; Muhl, C W; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Defranchis, M M; Poehlsen, J A; Vanelderen, L; Stober, F M H; Vormwald, B R; Kripas, V; Gonzalez vazquez, D; Kurz, S T; Niemeyer, C; Rieger, J O; Shvetsov, I; Sieber, G; Caspart, R; Sander, O; Ardila perez, L E; Ruiz jimeno, A; Fernandez garcia, M; Scodellaro, L; Gonzalez sanchez, J F; Curras rivera, E; Semeniouk, I; Cornat, R J N; Ochando, C; Regnard, S J; Bedjidian, M; Giraud, N A; 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Wittich, P; Riley, D S; Skinnari, L A; Chu, J Y; Dittmer, S J; Ignatenko, M; Lindgren, M A; Saltzberg, D P; Peck, A N; Herve, A A M; Loveless, R; Savin, A; Herndon, M F; Mason, W P; Martirosyan, S; Sarangi, T R; Levine, A G; Grahl, J; Hansen, P D; Mueller, C N; Suh, I S; Hurtado anampa, K P; De barbaro, P J; Garcia-bellido alvarez de miranda, A A; Korjenevski, S K; Moolekamp, F E; Fallon, C T; Acosta castillo, J G; Gutay, L; Barker, A W; Gough, E; Poyraz, D; Van driessche, W G M; Verbeke, W L M; Beniozef, I S; Krasteva, R L; Winn, D R; Munir, K; Shamdasani, J; Rao, A M; Fenyvesi, A C; Makovec, A; Munro, C G; Sanchez cruz, S; Bernardino rodrigues, N A; Lokhovitskiy, A; Uribe estrada, C; Rivera martinez, R C; Rebane, L; Racioppi, A; Kim, H; Kim, T; Puljak, I; Boyaryntsev, A; Saeed, M; Tanwir, S; Butt, U; Hussain, A; Nawaz, A; Khurshid, T; Imran, M; Sultan, A; Naeem, M; Kaadze, K; Saini, L K; Taylor, R D; Zhang, A; Grab, C; Nessi-tedaldi, F; Baeni, L; Fischer, J; Zagozdzinska-bochenek, A A; Berger, P; Hashemi, M; Rezaei hosseinabadi, F; Mehrabpour, H; Paganoni, M; Farina, F M; Joshi, Y R; Avila bernal, C A; Cabrera mora, A L; Gonzalez hernandez, C F; Asavapibhop, B; U-ruekolan, S; Kim, G; Choi, M; Oropeza barrera, C; Aly, S; Sawy, F H; Elkomous mekhail, A E; El sawy, M; Aboamer, O; Tavkhelidze, D; Hegde, V; Bylinkin, A; Aziz, T; Sur, N; Sutar, B J; Sarkar, T; Ghete, V M; Dragicevic, M G; Brandstetter, J; Marques moraes, A; Molina insfran, J A; Aspell, P; Baillon, P; Barney, D; Delikaris, D; Honma, A; Pape, L; Sakulin, H; Macpherson, A L; Bangert, N; Guida, R; Petrova, P; De gruttola, M; Steggemann, J; Voutsinas, G G; Verweij, M; Da silva gomes, D; Ben mimoun bel hadj, F; Bonnaud, J Y R; Canelli, F M; Bai, J; Qiu, J; Bian, J; Cheng, Y; Wang, C; Kukulies, C; Erdmann, M; Hebbeker, T; Zantis, F; Scheuch, F; Fluegge, G; Erdogan, Y; Campbell, A J; Kasemann, M; Lange, W; Raspiareza, A; Melzer-pellmann, I; Aldaya martin, M; Lewendel, B; Schmidt, R S; Dooling, S K; Lipka, E; Grados luyando, J M; Shevchenko, R; Steinbrueck, G; Peiffer, T; Vanhoefer, A; Stover, M; Niedziela, M A; Simonis, H J; Katkov, I; Colombo, F; Kassel, F R; Marco de lucas, R J; Lopez virto, A M; Jaramillo echeverria, R W; Hennion, P; Zghiche, A; Chiron, A; Romanteau, T; Beaudette, F; Valiyavalappil kizhakkepura, A A; Lobanov, A; Grasseau, G J; Pigard, P; Cadamuro, L; Pierre-emile, T B; El mamouni, H; Gouzevitch, M; Goldstein, J; Cussans, D G; Seif el nasr, S A; Aggleton, R C; Smith, D; Titterton, A S; Ford, P J W; Olaiya, E O; Salisbury, J G; Paspalaki, G; Hidas, P; Kiss, T N; Zalan, P; Bartok, M; Shukla, P; Abbrescia, M; De filippis, N; Donvito, G; Radogna, R; Cristella, L; Miniello, G; Gelmi, A; Capiluppi, P; Marcellini, S; Odorici, F; Bonacorsi, D; Genta, C; Ferri, G; Saviano, G; Ferrini, M; Minutoli, S; Fabbricatore, P; Tosi, S; Diemoz, M; Baccaro, S; Bartoloni, A; Margaroli, F; Talamo, I G; Cipriani, M; Kim, J Y; Oh, G; Lim, J H; Lee, J; Mohamad idris, F B; Md ali, M A B; Gani, A B; Cwiok, M; Doroba, K; Pyskir, A D; Martins galinhas, B E; Kim, V; Krivshich, A; Vorobyev, A; Ivanov, Y; Tarakanov, V; Lobodenko, A; Obikhod, T; Isayev, O; Kurov, O; Leonidov, A; Lvova, N; Kirsanov, M; Suvorova, O; Karneyeu, A; Demidov, S; Konoplyannikov, A; Popov, V; Pakhlov, P; Blinov, V; Skovpen, I; Chatrchyan, S; Grigorian, N; Kayis topaksu, A; Sunar cerci, D; Hos, I; Girgis chyla, S; Guler, Y; Kiminsu, U; Serin, M; Deniz, M; Turan, I; Eryol, F; Pozdnyakov, A; Liu, Z; Doan, T H; Genser, K; Hanlon, J E; Mcbride, P L; Pal, I; Verzocchi, M; Garren, L; Oleynik, G; Harris, R M; Bolla, G; Kowalkowski, J B; Evans, D E; Vaandering, E W; Patrick, J F; Rechenmacher, R; Prosser, A G; Messer, T A; Tiradani, A R; Rivera, R A; Jayatilaka, B A; Duarte, J M; Todri, A; Ballesteros villamizar, D A; Harr, R F; Richman, J D; Bhandari, R; Cirkovic, P; Mora herrera, C; Rosa lopes zachi, A; De paula carvalho, W; Kinnunen, R L A; Lehti, S T; Maeenpaeae, T H; Bloch, D; Chabert, E C; Rudolf, N G; Devroede, O; Skovpen, K; Deroover, K; Moreels, L; Lontkovskyi, D; De wolf, E A; Van mechelen, P; Van spilbeeck, A B E; Georgiev, L S; Novaes, S F; Vaz da silva filho, M; Horisberger, R P; De la cruz, B; Willmott, C; Perez-calero yzquierdo, A M; Escalante del valle, A; Dejardin, M M; Bansal, S; Mehta, A; Albergo, S; Barbagli, G; Focardi, E; Lista, L; Passeggio, G; Thyssen, F D M; Breglio, G; Bacchetta, N; Gasparini, U; Pantano, D; Sgaravatto, M; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Candelori, A; Pozzobon, N; Boletti, A; Benato, L; Ionica, M; Servoli, L; Postolache, V; Rossi, A; Ciangottini, D; Alunni solestizi, L; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Amapane, N C; Lopez fernandez, R; Sanchez hernandez, A; Heredia de la cruz, I; Matveev, V; Kracikova, T; Shmatov, S; Vasilev, S; Kurenkov, A; Oleynik, D; Vasil'ev, T; Verkheev, A; Voytishin, N; Proskuryakov, A; Bogdanova, G; Bagaturia, I; Tsamalaidze, Z; Fiori, F; Zhao, Z; Arcaro, D J; Barberis, E; Teixeira de lima, R; Ralph, D K; Velasco, M M; Anastassov, A I; Odell, N J; Sevova, S; Li, W; Merlo, J; Onel, Y; Mermerkaya, H; Moeller, A R; Haytmyradov, M; Bugg, W M; Ragghianti, G C; Delannoy sotomayor, A G; Thapa, K; Yagil, A; Gerosa, R A; Schmitz, E J; Kapustinsky, J S; Greene, S V; Zhang, L; Vlimant, J V; Mughal, A; Cury siqueira, S; Gershtein, Y; Arora, S R R; Lin, W X; Stickland, D P; Mc donald, K T; Pivarski, J M C; Higginbotham, S L; Rosenfield, M; Long, O R; Alvarez jr, G; Johnson, K F; Adams, T; Susa, T; Rykaczewski, H; Ge, Y; Liu, S; Li, J; Bloom, K A; Monroy montanez, J A; Kunori, S; Wang, Z; Favart, D; Maltoni, F; Vidal marono, M; Francois, B A L; Delcourt, M; Markov, S I; Seez, C; Richards, A J; Ferguson, W; Winterbottom, D; Saoulidou, N; Chatziangelou, M; Karathanasis, G; Jones, J A; Strologas, J; Katsoulis, P; Dutt, S; Roy chowdhury, S; Bhardwaj, R; Purohit, A; Behera, P K; Spagnolo, P; Tonelli, G E; Verdini, P G; Giannini, L; Poulios, S; Groote, J F; Untuc, B; Oztirpan, F O; Pak, N K; Luiggi lopez, E E; Krohn, M D; Hadley, N J; Shin, Y H; Safonov, A; Eusebi, R; Rose, A K; Erbacher, R D; Funk, G N; Pilot, J R; Klimenko, S; Matchev, K; Gleyzer, S; Wang, J; Bortignon, P; Curry, D A; Wilcox, S M; Sun, W M; Soffi, L; Lantz, S R; Wright, D; Cline, D; Cousins jr, R D; Yang, X; Schnaible, C J; Dasgupta, A; Bradley, D C; Duric, S; Monzat, D; Dodd, L M; Tikalsky, J L; Kapusta, J; Gilbert, W J; Lesko, Z J; Marinelli, N; Wayne, M R; Heering, A H; Galanti, M; Han, J Y; Duh, Y; Roy, A; Arabgol, M; Hacker, T J; Salva, S; Petrov, V; Barychevski, V; Drobychev, G; Lobko, A; Conte, E R E; Gattaz, O; Kasprowicz, G H; Kyberd, P; Cole, J E; Reid, I D; Lopez, J M; Benzon, A M; Pelagio, L; Walsh, M F; Carpinteyro bernardino, S; Postnov, A; Lelas, D; Vaitkus, J V; Jurciukonis, D; Bacevieius, G; Sulmanas, B; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, W; Jalil, S H; Saleem, R; Kahl, W E; Taylor, D R; Choi, Y I; Roy, T; Schoenenberger, M A; Khateri, P; Safarzadeh samani, B; Etesami, S M; Kokabi, A; Fiorini, E; Pullia, A; Magni, S; Fiorendi, S; Brianza, L; Sanabria arenas, J C; Florez bustos, C A; Holguin coral, A; Mendez, H; Srimanobhas, N; Jaikar, A H; Arteche gonzalez, F J; Call, K R; Calderon monroy, M A; Bakhet, N; Aly mohamed mahmoud mohamed, R; Elkafrawy, T; Hammad, A H A; Abdelmaguid, A; Mal, P K; Yuan, L; Al kindi, A; Lomidze, I; Prangishvili, I; Adamov, G; Dube, S S; Dugad, S; Mohanty, G B; Bhat, M A

    CMS is a general purpose proton-proton detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the LHC. It is also well adapted for studies at the initially lower luminosities. The CMS Collaboration consists of over 1800 scientists and engineers from 151 institutes in 31 countries. The main design goals of CMS are: \\begin{enumerate} \\item a highly performant muon system, \\item the best possible electromagnetic calorimeter \\item high quality central tracking \\item hermetic calorimetry \\item a detector costing less than 475 MCHF. \\end{enumerate} All detector sub-systems have started construction. Engineering Design Reviews of parts of these sub-systems have been successfully carried-out. These are held prior to granting authorization for purchase. The schedule for the LHC machine and the experiments has been revised and CMS will be ready for first collisions now expected in April 2006. \\\\\\\\ ~~~~$\\bullet$ Magnet \\\\ The detector (see Figure) will be built around a long (13~m) and large bore ($\\phi$=5.9~m) high...

  4. Solenoid and Synchrotron radiation effects in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Dalena, B; Tomás, R; Angal-Kalinin, D

    2010-01-01

    The emission of Synchrotron Radiation in the CLIC BDS is one of the major limitations of the machine performance. An extensive revision of this phenomenon is presented with special emphasis on the Interaction point (IP) solenoid.

  5. An Investigation into the Electromagnetic Interactions between a Superconducting Torus and Solenoid for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka [JLAB; Ghoshal, Probir K. [JLAB; Fair, Ruben J. [JLAB; Hogan, John P. [JLAB; Kashy, David H. [JLAB

    2015-06-01

    The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade in Hall B will need CLAS12 detector that requires two superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a Toroidal configuration (Torus) and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet (Solenoid). Both the torus and solenoid are located in close proximity to one another and are surrounded by sensitive detectors. This paper investigates the electromagnetic interactions between the two systems during normal operation as well as during various fault scenarios as part of a Risk Assessment and Mitigation (RAM).

  6. TESTING OF FRAMED STRUCTURE PARTS OF COMPACT MUON SOLENOID BY NONDESTRUCTIVE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Larchenkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspension parts of a compact muon solenoid for Large Hadron Collider have been tested in the paper. The paper describes a steady-state and cyclic “tension-compression” load created by superconducting electromagnet with energy of 3 GJ and magnetic induction of 4 tesla. A nondestructive testing method has been applied in the paper.

  7. The superconducting strand for the CMS solenoid conductor

    CERN Document Server

    Curé, B; Campi, D; Goodrich, L F; Horváth, I L; Kircher, F; Liikamaa, R; Seppälä, J; Smith, R P; Teuho, J; Vieillard, L

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the LHC project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. Approximately 2000 km of superconducting strand is under procurement for the conductor of the CMS superconducting solenoid. Each strand length is required to be an integral multiple of 2.75 km. The strand is composed of copper- stabilized multifilamentary Nb-Ti with Nb barrier. Individual strands are identified by distinctive patterns of Nb-Ti filaments selected during stacking of the monofilaments. The statistics of piece length, measurements of I/sub c/, n-value, copper RRR, (Cu+Nb)/Nb-Ti ratio, as well as the results of independent cross checks of these quantities, are presented. A study was performed on the CMS strands to investigate the critical current degradation due to various heat treatments. The degradation versus annealing temperature and duration are reported. (4 refs).

  8. Manufacture and Test of a Small Ceramic-Insulated Nb$_{3}$Sn Split Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Bordini, B; Rossi, L; Tommasini, D

    2008-01-01

    A small split solenoid wound with high-Jc Nb3Sn conductor, constituted by a 0.8 mm Rod Re-stack Process (RRP®) strand, was built and tested at CERN in order to study the applicability of: 1) ceramic wet glass braid insulation without epoxy impregnation of the magnet; 2) a new heat treatment devised at CERN and particularly suitable for reacting RRP® Nb3Sn strands. This paper briefly describes the solenoid and the experimental results obtained during 4.4 K and 1.9 K tests. The split solenoid consists of two coils (25 mm inner diameter, 51.1 mm outer diameter, 12.9 mm height). The coils were initially separately tested, in an iron mirror configuration, and then tested together in split solenoid configuration. In all the tests at 4.4 K the coils reached a current higher than 95 % of their short sample limits at the first quench; in split solenoid configuration the maximum field values in the coils and in the aperture were respectively 10.7 T and 12.5 T. At 1.9 K the coils had premature quenches due to self fi...

  9. Alternative Methods for Field Corrections in Helical Solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Krave, S. T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Tompkins, J. C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Flanagan, G. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Kahn, S. A. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Melconian, K. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Helical cooling channels have been proposed for highly efficient 6D muon cooling. Helical solenoids produce solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical gradient field components. Previous studies explored the geometric tunability limits on these main field components. In this paper we present two alternative correction schemes, tilting the solenoids and the addition of helical lines, to reduce the required strength of the anti-solenoid and add an additional tuning knob.

  10. Dynamic inversion enables external magnets to concentrate ferromagnetic rods to a central target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacev, A; Weinberg, I N; Stepanov, P Y; Kupfer, S; Mair, L O; Urdaneta, M G; Shimoji, M; Fricke, S T; Shapiro, B

    2015-01-14

    The ability to use magnets external to the body to focus therapy to deep tissue targets has remained an elusive goal in magnetic drug targeting. Researchers have hitherto been able to manipulate magnetic nanotherapeutics in vivo with nearby magnets but have remained unable to focus these therapies to targets deep within the body using magnets external to the body. One of the factors that has made focusing of therapy to central targets between magnets challenging is Samuel Earnshaw's theorem as applied to Maxwell's equations. These mathematical formulations imply that external static magnets cannot create a stable potential energy well between them. We posited that fast magnetic pulses could act on ferromagnetic rods before they could realign with the magnetic field. Mathematically, this is equivalent to reversing the sign of the potential energy term in Earnshaw's theorem, thus enabling a quasi-static stable trap between magnets. With in vitro experiments, we demonstrated that quick, shaped magnetic pulses can be successfully used to create inward pointing magnetic forces that, on average, enable external magnets to concentrate ferromagnetic rods to a central location.

  11. CMS central barrel yoke

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    The CMS experiment at CERN will use a massive solenoid housed within this return yoke, which will weigh 12 500 tonnes when completed. Magnetic fields generated within this structure will reach levels greater than any other magnet of this kind and will store enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold. Within the yoke is positioned the external vacuum chamber into which the solenoid will be placed.

  12. Advancing Non-Solenoidal Startup on the Pegasus ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, J. A.; Barr, J. L.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Pachicano, J. L.; Perry, J. M.; Richner, N. J.; Rodriguez Sanchez, C.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2016-10-01

    The Pegasus experiment utilizes compact, edge-localized current sources (Ainj 2 - 4 cm2, Iinj 10 kA, Vinj 1 kV) for non-solenoidal local helicity injection (LHI) startup. Recent campaigns are comparing two injector geometries that vary the differing relative contributions of DC helicity input and non-solenoidal inductive voltages. A predictive 0-D model that treats the plasma as a resistive element with time-varying inductance and enforces Ip limits from Taylor relaxation was tested with inward growth of the plasma current channel using injectors on the outboard midplane. Strong inductive drive arises from plasma shape evolution and poloidal field (PF) induction. A major unknown in the model is the resistive dissipation, and hence the electron confinement. Te (R) profile measurements in LHI show centrally-peaked Te > 100 eV while the plasma is coupled to the injectors, suggesting LHI confinement is not strongly stochastic. A second campaign utilizes new injectors in the lower divertor region. This geometry trades subtler relaxation field programming and reduced PF induction for higher HI rates. Present efforts are developing relaxation methods at high BT, with relaxation at BT , inj > 0.15 T achieved to date via higher Iinj and PF manipulation. Conceptual design studies of coaxial helicity injection (CHI) and ECH heating systems for Pegasus have been initiated to explore direct comparison of LHI to CHI with and without ECH assist. Supported by US DOE Grants DE-FG02-96ER54375, DE-SC0006928.

  13. Reference Design of the Mu2e Detector Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Feher, S; Brandt,, J; Cheban, S; Coleman, R; Dhanaraj, N; Fang, I; Lamm, M; Lombardo, V; Lopes, M; Miller, J; Ostojic, R ,; Orris, D; Page, T; Peterson, T; Tang, Z; Wands, R

    2014-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab has been approved by the Department of Energy to proceed developing the preliminary design. Integral to the success of Mu2e is the superconducting solenoid system. One of the three major solenoids is the Detector Solenoid that houses the stopping target and the detectors. The goal of the Detector Solenoid team is to produce detailed design specifications that are sufficient for vendors to produce the final design drawings, tooling and fabrication procedures and proceed to production. In this paper we summarize the Reference Design of the Detector Solenoid.

  14. COMPENSATION OF DETECTOR SOLENOID IN SUPER-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosochkov, Yuri; Bertsche, Kirk; Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The SUPER-B detector solenoid has a strong 1.5 T field in the Interaction Region (IR) area, and its tails extend over the range of several meters. The main effect of the solenoid field is coupling of the horizontal and vertical betatron motion which must be corrected in order to preserve the small design beam size at the Interaction Point. The additional effects are orbit and dispersion caused by the angle between the solenoid and beam trajectories. The proposed correction system provides local compensation of the solenoid effects independently for each side of the IR. It includes 'bucking' solenoids to remove the solenoid field tails and a set of skew quadrupoles, dipole correctors and anti-solenoids to cancel linear perturbations to the optics. Details of the correction system are presented.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Central Nervous System—An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Brant-Zawadzki, Michael; Norman, David; Newton, T. Hans; Kucharczyk, Walter

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has developed rapidly and now has superior ability to detect and to characterize disease in the central nervous system without any significant biologic hazard. It is becoming the screening method of choice in the diagnosis of neoplasm, ischemia, hemorrhage, infection and degenerative and demyelinating diseases involving the central nervous system.

  16. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  17. Fractional flux quanta in superconducting solenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá de Melo, C. A. R.

    1996-03-01

    The quantization of flux quanta in superconductors is revisited and analyzed in a new topology. The topology is that of a superconducting wire that winds N times around a fixed axis and has its end connected back to its beginning, thus producing an N-loop short circuited solenoid. In this case, fractional flux quanta can be measured through the center of the solenoid, provided that its cross-section radius is small enough. The Little-Parks experiment for an identical topology is discussed. The period of oscillation of the transition temperature of the wire is found to vary as 1/N in units of flux Φ relative to the flux quantum Φ0.

  18. Bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, H.; Deboi, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly and test of a development configuration bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve suitable for the control hydrazine and liquid fluorine to an 800 pound thrust rocket engine is described. The valve features a balanced poppet, utilizing metal bellows, a hard poppet/seat interface and a flexure support system for the internal moving components. This support system eliminates sliding surfaces, thereby rendering the valve free of self generated particles.

  19. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A. W.; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a ``hairline'' solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  20. Magnetic basement in the central Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, K.V.L.N; Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; Desa, M.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Krishna, K.S.; Rao, M.M.M.

    . The N10-12 degrees W trending subsurface 85 degrees E Ridge buried under 2 to 3 km thick sediments is a prominent tectonic feature. Offshore basins characterised by deeper magnetic basement (approx. 9 km) and 100-200 km wide are present on either sides...

  1. A new muon-pion collection and transport system design using superconducting solenoids based on CSNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ran; Liu, Yan-Fen; Xu, Wen-Zhen; Ni, Xiao-Jie; Pan, Zi-Wen; Ye, Bang-Jiao

    2016-05-01

    A new muon and pion capture system is proposed for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), currently under construction. Using about 4% of the pulsed proton beam (1.6 GeV, 4 kW and 1 Hz) of CSNS to bombard a cylindrical graphite target inside a superconducting solenoid, both surface muons and pions can be acquired. The acceptance of this novel capture system - a graphite target wrapped up by a superconducting solenoid - is larger than the normal muon beam lines using quadrupoles at one side of the separated muon target. The muon and pion production at different capture magnetic fields was calculated using Geant4. The bending angle of the capture solenoid with respect to the proton beam was also optimized in simulation to achieve more muons and pions. Based on the layout of the muon experimental area reserved at the CSNS project, a preliminary muon beam line was designed with multi-purpose muon spin rotation areas (surface, decay and low-energy muons). Finally, high-flux surface muons (108/s) and decay muons (109/s) simulated by G4beamline will be available at the end of the decay solenoid based on the first phase of CSNS. This collection and transport system will be a very effective beam line at a proton current of 2.5 μA. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11527811)

  2. Over Voltage in a Multi-sectioned Solenoid during a Quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xinglong; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Liu, Xiaokun; Chen, Anbin; Green, M.A.; Xu, F.Y.

    2009-06-21

    Accurate analysis of over voltage in the superconducting solenoid during a quench is one of the bases for quench protection system design. Classical quench simulation methods can only give rough estimation of the over voltage within a magnet coil. In this paper, for multi-sectioned superconducting solenoid, based on the classical assumption of ellipsoidal normal zone, three-dimension al temperature results are mapped to the one-dimension of the wire, the temperature distribution along the wire and the resistances of each turn are obtained. The coil is treated as circuit comprised of turn resistances, turn self and mutual inductances. The turn resistive voltage, turn inductive voltage, and turn resultant voltage along the wire are calculated. As a result, maximum internal voltages, the layer-to-layer voltages and the turn-to-turn voltages are better estimated. Utilizing this method, the over voltage of a small solenoid and a large solenoid during quenching have been studied. The result shows that this method can well improve the over voltage estimate, especially when the coil is larger.

  3. D0 Solenoid Upgrade Project: Vacuum Pumping Calculations for the D0 Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-08-02

    This engineering note documents the calculations done to determine the vacuum pumping speed for the D-Zero solenoid. The raw calculations are attached. A summary of the results are listed. The vacuum pumping speed of the solenoid is determined by the conductance of the pumping path. At higher pressure ranges during initial pumpdown, the conductances will be rather high. Calculations were not done for the transient pumpdown period, only the steady state type pumping situation. The pressure is assumed to be on the order of 10E-7 torr. This is the free molecular flow regime based on Knudsen number. This pressure regime is also where the pumping speed would be least. The conductances were calculated based on pumping helium gas at a temperature of 300 Kelvin. The total conductance of the pumping path from the solenoid to the inlet of the turbomolecular pump is 11.8 L/s. The effective pumping speed of a 1000 L/s turbo pump attached to this pumping path is 11.7 L/s. The minimum required pumping speed for design purposes was set at 4.3 L/s. This value was arrived at by assuming a warm leak size (10E-8 atm-cc/sec) was not detected during fabrication of the solenoid. It is then assumed that the leak leaks cold liquid helium into the vacuum space. With this leak rate, a 4.3 L/s pumping speed would be able to maintain a 2 x 10E-7 torr pressure in the solenoid vacuum jacket. The solenoid would be able to be operated with this small leak with continuous pumping.

  4. Aberrations due to solenoid focusing of a multiply charged high-current ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Grégoire, G; Lisi, N; Schnuriger, J C; Scrivens, R; Tambini, J

    2000-01-01

    At the output of a laser ion source, a high current of highly charged ions with a large range of charge states is available. The focusing of such a beam by magnetic elements causes a nonlinear space-charge field to develop which can induce large aberrations and emittance growth in the beam. Simulation of the beam from the CERN laser ion source will be presented for an ideal magnetic and electrostatic system using a radially symmetric model. In addition, the three dimensional software KOBRA3 is used for the simulation of the solenoid line. The results of these simulations will be compared with experiments performed on the CERN laser ion source with solenoids (resulting in a hollow beam) and a series of gridded electrostatic lenses. (5 refs).

  5. Circularly Inclined Solenoid Channel for 6D Ionization Cooling of Muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Ionization cooling is essential for realization of Muon Collider, muons beam based neutrino factories and other experiments involving muons. The simplest structure - absorber(s) immersed in alternating solenoidal magnetic field - provides only transverse cooling since the longitudinal motion in the most suitable momentum range (2-300MeV/c) is naturally anti-damped. To overcome this difficulty it is proposed to periodically tilt solenoids so that a rotating transverse magnetic field was created. By choosing the phase advance per period above a multiple of 2{pi} it is possible to ensure that muons with higher momentum make a longer path in the absorber (whether distributed or localized) thus providing longitudinal damping. Basic theory of such channel and results of tracking simulations are presented.

  6. Magnetic-resonance velocity mapping of the central circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise

    1994-01-01

    In magnetic-resonance (MR) velocity mapping there exists a linear relationship between the velocity and signal in each element of a tomographic image. The technique can be used for quantitative measurements of linear velocities (m s-1) and flow rates (1 min-1). By using cinematographic images...... the flow profile during the cardiac cycle can be determined. This allows quantification of forward flow, regurgitant volume and regurgitant fraction in cases of heart-valve insufficiency. In valvular stenosis the transvalvular pressure gradient and valve area can be determined. Magnetic-resonance velocity...... mapping may also provide information about diastolic function of left ventricular function. Together with other MR imaging techniques, velocity mapping gives an accurate assessment of the severity of aortic dissection. Recent studies indicate that MR velocity mapping provides quantification of renal blood...

  7. Functional and genomic analyses of alpha-solenoid proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fournier

    Full Text Available Alpha-solenoids are flexible protein structural domains formed by ensembles of alpha-helical repeats (Armadillo and HEAT repeats among others. While homology can be used to detect many of these repeats, some alpha-solenoids have very little sequence homology to proteins of known structure and we expect that many remain undetected. We previously developed a method for detection of alpha-helical repeats based on a neural network trained on a dataset of protein structures. Here we improved the detection algorithm and updated the training dataset using recently solved structures of alpha-solenoids. Unexpectedly, we identified occurrences of alpha-solenoids in solved protein structures that escaped attention, for example within the core of the catalytic subunit of PI3KC. Our results expand the current set of known alpha-solenoids. Application of our tool to the protein universe allowed us to detect their significant enrichment in proteins interacting with many proteins, confirming that alpha-solenoids are generally involved in protein-protein interactions. We then studied the taxonomic distribution of alpha-solenoids to discuss an evolutionary scenario for the emergence of this type of domain, speculating that alpha-solenoids have emerged in multiple taxa in independent events by convergent evolution. We observe a higher rate of alpha-solenoids in eukaryotic genomes and in some prokaryotic families, such as Cyanobacteria and Planctomycetes, which could be associated to increased cellular complexity. The method is available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/~ard2/.

  8. View through the CMS detector during the cooldown of the solenoid on February 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Breedon, UC Davis

    2006-01-01

    Image looking along the beam direction through CMS. One can see, from the inside out: the patch panels and cables for the Preshower and ECAL; the front of the endcap HCAL; some cathode strip chambers (CSCs) for detecting muons; the sealed solenoid (the first circular silver-coloured ring) currently being cooled to operating temperature and held by the central barrel yoke ring (red and orange); one of the other barrel yoke rings installed with many muon chambers (silver rectangular boxes).

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of sequelae of central pontine myelinolysis in chronic alcohol abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Akira; Kudo, Sho [Department of Radiology, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, 849-8501, Saga (Japan); Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Murakami, Masaru; Endoh, Koichi; Hiejima, Shigeto; Koga, Hiroshi [Center for Emotional and Behavional Disorders, Hizen National Hospital, 160 Mitsu, Higashisefuri, Kanzaki, 842-0192, Saga (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is one of the serious neurological complications of alcoholism. This study evaluated magnetic resonance images of sequelae of CPM. Approximately 600 alcoholic patients were examined by a 1.0-T magnetic resonance imaging device, and 11 patients were retrospectively found to have a central pontine lesion, a presumed sequela of CPM. The lesions had various shapes and most were cavitary. In 3 of the 11 patients bilateral symmetrical oval lesions were faintly visible in the middle cerebellar peduncles. These middle cerebellar peduncular lesions were diagnosed as having Wallerian degeneration of the pontocerebellar tract secondary to CPM. (orig.)

  10. Magnet® Hospital Recognition Linked to Lower Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Hilary; Rearden, Jessica; McHugh, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) are among the deadliest heathcare-associated infections, with an estimated 12-25% mortality rate. In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) began to penalize hospitals for poor performance with respect to selected hospital-acquired conditions, including CLABSI. A structural factor associated with high-quality nursing care and better patient outcomes is The Magnet Recognition Program®. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between Magnet status and hospital CLABSI rates. We used propensity score matching to match Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals with similar hospital characteristics. In a matched sample of 291 Magnet hospitals and 291 non-Magnet hospitals, logistic regression models were used to examine whether there was a link between Magnet status and CLABSI rates. Both before and after matching, Magnet hospital status was associated with better (lower than the national average) CLABSI rates (OR = 1.60, 95%CI: 1.10, 2.33 after matching). While established programs such as Magnet recognition are consistently correlated with high-quality nursing work environments and positive patient outcomes, additional research is needed to determine whether Magnet designation produces positive patient outcomes or rewards existing excellence.

  11. A quantitative investigation of the effect of a close-fitting superconducting shield on the coil factor of a solenoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarøe, Morten; Monaco, R.; Koshelet, V.;

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting shields are commonly used to suppress external magnetic interference. We show, that an error of almost an order of magnitude can occur in the coil factor in realistic configurations of the solenoid and the shield. The reason is that the coil factor is determined by not only...

  12. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system. Comparison with X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajima, Toshio; Kagawa, Yoshihiro; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1987-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) have been performed in 169 consecutive patients with central nervous system diseases. The findings from the two methods were compared for the capacity to defect lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive than or equivalent to X-ray CT in detecting lesions - especially detecting. Arnold-Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, spinal cord injury, and pituitary adenoma - in 158 patients (94 %). In six patients (10 %), lesion detection was possible only by MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging was inferior to X-ray CT in 11 patients (7 %) in detecting calcified lesions, meningioma, and cavernous hemangioma. (Namekawa, K.).

  14. Rock Magnetic Properties of a Late Pleistocene Paleosol From Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, J.; Ortega, B.; Solleiro, E.; Sedov, S.

    2005-05-01

    Rock-magnetic characteristics of a volcaniclastic-paleosol sequence from Tlaxcala, central Mexico, are analyzed in order to test the hypothesis of neo-formation of magnetic minerals as result of enhanced pedogenesis in A and B soil horizons, in comparison of the less affected or pedoganically unaltered parent material. Our study was carried out in a Chromic luvisol pedocomplex thought to have been formed during the last interglacial. The results show that, even if pedogenic fine grained magnetic minerals are present in the Bt horizons, these are destroyed in upper horizons, where pedogenesis has been more intense. Horizons A and E present the lowest magnetic susceptibility, however they also present the highest concentration of high coercivity hematite/goethite phases. In order to decode the paleoclimatic signal of this paleosol, rock-magnetism analysis in different pedogenetic materials as the soil itself, and cutans, cracks-filling material and humus found in soils, is in progress.

  15. Central swallowing in normal adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shasha Li; Cheng Luo; Chengqi He; Qiyong Gong; Dong Zhou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While brain-imaging studies in healthy adults have indicated that multiple cortical regions are involved in swallowing, these functional imaging techniques have not been extensively applied to the complete understand neurophysiology of swallowing in China. A full understanding of normal swallowing neurophysiology is important for improving functional outcomes for dysphagia due to neurologic disorders or damage with increasing age. Thus the interpretations of the functional contributions of various brain areas in swallowing should be scientifically researched.OBJECTIVE: To identify the activation and characteristic of swallowing center in healthy adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An uncontrolled neuroimaging study was performed at the Outpatient Clinic, Department of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University between March and November 2008.PARTICIPANTS: Ten healthy right-handed volunteers, aged over 20 years with a mean age of (34.2 ±8.1) years, a range of 25-45 years and including five males and five females participated. A medical history was obtained from all potential subjects and all subjects were free of systemic diseases and neurological disorders.METHODS: The healthy volunteers were examined with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging of blood oxygenation level-dependent while laryngeal swallow-related movements were recorded. Subjects were scanned during voluntary saliva swallowing and water bolus swallowing activation tasks. Data was processed using the General Linear Model. A voxel by voxel group comparison was performed using random effect analysis. Any cluster with a corrected P < 0.05 for spatial extent was considered significant.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The cerebral cortical activation maps of voluntary swallowing of saliva and swallowing of water bolus in healthy adults were observed.RESULTS: A multifocal cortical representation of swallowing was in the precentral gyrus

  16. Magnetic lineations, fracture zones and seamounts in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    KameshRaju, K.A.

    Magnetic and bathymetric data collected in the Central Indian Basin, between 8 degrees S and 16 degrees S lat., and 71 degrees E and 82 degrees E long. have been studied. The inferred fracture zones at 73 degrees E, 76 degrees 30'E and 79 degrees E...

  17. Radiation and thermal analysis of production solenoid for Mu2e experimental setup

    CERN Document Server

    Pronskikh, V S; Mokhov, N V

    2011-01-01

    The Muon-to-Electron (Mu2e) experiment at Fermilab, will seek the evidence of direct muon to electron conversion at the sensitivity level where it cannot be explained by the Standard Model. An 8-GeV 25-kW proton beam will be directed onto a tilted gold target inside a large-bore superconducting Production Solenoid (PS) with the peak field on the axis of ~5T. The negative muons resulting from the pion decay will be captured in the PS aperture and directed by an S-shaped Transport Solenoid towards the stopping target inside the Detector Solenoid. In order for the superconducting magnets to operate reliably and with a sufficient safety margin, the peak neutron flux entering the coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude that is achieved by means of a sophisticated absorber placed in the magnet aperture. The proposed absorber, consisting of W- and Cu-based alloy parts, is optimized for the performance and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of energy deposition and radiation are reported. The results of the P...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of a Case of Central Neurocytoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedushi, Kreshnike; Kabashi, Serbeze; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Ramadani, Naser; Mucaj, Sefedin; Zeqiraj, Kamber

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to investigate the MRI features of central neurocytoma. Case report: A 45 year old man with 3 months of worsening daily headaches. These headaches were diffuse, lasted for several hours, and mostly occurred in the morning. She was initially diagnosed and treated for migraines but later he had epileptic attack and diplopia and neurolog recomaded MRI. Methods: precontrast MRI; TSE/T2Wsequence in axial/coronal planes; 3D–Hi-resolution T1W sagittal; FLAIR/T2W axial; FLAIR/T2W and Flash/T2W oblique coronal plane (perpendicular to temporal lobes) GRE/T2W axial plane for detection of heme products. Post-contrast TSE/T1W sequence in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Diffusion weighted and ADC mapping MRI images for EPI sequence in axial plane. Results: A 23x12mm heterogeneous mass within aqueductus cerebri, with calcified and hemorrhagic foci and extending downwards till fourth ventricle. It’s originating from the right paramedian posterior aqueductal wall (tectum), and also extending to and involving the tegmentum of mesencephalon at its right paramedian aspect. CSF flow obstruction secondary to described aqueductal mass, with resultant triventricular hydrocephalus). Marked transependymal CSF leak can be noted at periventricular white matter, secondary to severe hydrocephalus. After IV injection of contrast media, this mass shows mild-to-moderate heterogenous speckled enhancement. Conclusion: MRI is helpful in defining tumor extension, which is important in preoperative planning. Although IN is a relatively rare lesion, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraventricular lesions in the presence of such typical MR findings. However, a definitive diagnosis requires immunochemical study and electron microscopy. PMID:28077908

  19. Electroplated solenoid-type inductors for CMOS rf CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Chul; Choi, Wonseo; Chun, KukJin

    2000-10-01

    A Solenoid-type Inductors have been realized using electroplating technique mainly used for 2 Ghz band CMOS RF VCO applications. The integrated spiral inductor has low Q factor due to substrate loss and skin effects. And it also occupies large area compared to solenoid-type inductor. The direction of flux of the solenoid-type inductor is parallel to the substrate, which can lower substrate loss and other interference with integrated passive components. In this research, Solenoid-type inductors are simulated and modeled as equivalent circuit for CMOS RF VCO based on extracted S- parameters. The electroplated solenoid-type inductors are fabricated on both a standard silicon substrate and glass substrate by thick PR photolithography and copper electroplating. The achieved inductance varies range from 1 nH to 5 nH, and maximum Q factor over 10. The inductors are scheduled to be integrated on CMOS RF VCO with RF MEMS capacitor for future.

  20. Beam Dynamics Based Design of Solenoid Channel for TAC Proton Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Kisoglu, H F

    2014-01-01

    Today a linear particle accelerator (linac), in which electric and magnetic fields are of vital importance, is one of the popular energy generation sources like Accelerator Driven System (ADS). A multipurpose, including primarily ADS, proton linac with energy of ~2 GeV is planned to constitute within the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) project collaborated by more than 10 Turkish universities. A Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) channel with two solenoids is a subcomponent of this linac. It transports the proton beam ejected by an ion source, and matches it with the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) that is an important part of the linac. The LEBT channel would be consisted of two focusing solenoids and some diagnostic elements such as faraday cup, BC transformers, etc. This paper includes a beam dynamical design and optimization study of LEBT channel for TAC proton linac done by using a beam dynamics simulation code PATH MANAGER and comparing of the simulation results with the theoretical expectations.

  1. On the Suitability of a Solenoid Horn for the ESS Neutrino Superbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Olvegård, Maja; Ruber, R; Ziemann, R; Koutchouk, J -P

    2015-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS), now under construction in Lund, Sweden, offers unique opportunities for experimental physics, not only in neutron science but potentially in particle physics. The ESS neutrino superbeam project plans to use a 5 MW proton beam from the ESS linac to generate a high intensity neutrino superbeam, with the final goal of detecting leptonic CP-violation in an underground megaton Cherenkov water detector. The neutrino production requires a second target station and a complex focusing system for the pions emerging from the target. The normal-conducting magnetic horns that are normally used for these applications cannot accept the 2.86 ms long proton pulses of the ESS linac, which means that pulse shortening in an accumulator ring would be required. That, in turn, requires H- operation in the linac to accommodate the high intensity. As an attractive alternative, we investigate the possibility of using superconducting solenoids for the pion focusing. This solenoid horn system needs ...

  2. A conduction-cooled, 680-mm-long warm bore, 3-T Nb3Sn solenoid for a Cerenkov free electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, W.A.J.; Ouden, den A.; Krooshoop, H.J.G.; Kate, ten H.H.J.; Wieland, J.; Slot, van der P.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A compact, cryocooler cooled Nb3Sn superconducting magnet system for a Cerenkov free electron laser has been designed, fabricated and tested. The magnet is positioned directly behind the electron gun of the laser system. The solenoidal field compresses and guides a tube-shaped 100 A, 500 kV electron

  3. Development of identification of the central sulcus in brain magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Norio; Sakuta, Keita; Minehiro, Kaori; Takanaga, Masako; Sanada, Shigeru; Suzuki, Masayuki; Miyati, Tosiaki; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Matsui, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful in the quantitative evaluation of brain atrophy, because the superior contrast resolution facilitates separation of the gray and white matter. Quantitative assessment of brain atrophy has mainly been performed by manual measurement, which requires considerable time and effort to determine the brain volume. Therefore, computer-aided quantitative measurement methods for the diagnosis of brain atrophy are required. We have developed a method of segmenting the cerebrum, cerebellum-brainstem, and temporal lobe simultaneously on MR images obtained in a single sequence. It is important to measure the volume of not only these regions but also the frontal lobe in clinical use. However, for segmenting the frontal lobe, it is necessary to identify the Sylvian fissure and the central sulcus, which represent boundaries. Here, we developed a method of identifying the central sulcus from MR images obtained with a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The brain and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) regions were segmented using semiautomated segmentation method on MR images. The central sulcus shows an oblique line from the inside to the outside on the convexity view. The almost straight appearance of the central sulcus was used for segmentation of the central sulcus from the segmented CSF images. The central sulcus was identified with this technique in 77% of the images obtained by all sequences. This technique for identifying the central sulcus is very important not only for volumetry, but also for clinical diagnosis.

  4. Note: A simple model for thermal management in solenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, E M; Ellis, J

    2013-11-01

    We describe a model of the dynamical temperature evolution in a solenoid winding. A simple finite element analysis is calibrated by accurately measuring the thermally induced resistance change of the solenoid, thus obviating the need for accurate knowledge of the mean thermal conductivity of the windings. The model predicts quasi thermal runaway for relatively modest current increases from the normal operating conditions. We demonstrate the application of this model to determine the maximum current that can be safely applied to solenoids used for helium spin-echo measurements.

  5. Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Günther, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schütrumpf, J.; Tampo, M.; Roth, M.

    2010-02-01

    This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 1012 could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  6. A new muon-pion collection and transport system design using superconducting solenoids based on CSNS

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Ran; Xu, Wenzhen; Ni, Xiaojie; Pan, Ziwen; Ye, Bangjiao

    2015-01-01

    A new muon and pion capture system was proposed at the under-conduction China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). Using about 4 % of the pulsed proton beam (1.6 GeV, 4 kW and 1 Hz) of CSNS to bombard a cylindrical graphite target inside a superconducting solenoid both surface muons and pions can be acquired. The acceptance of this novel capture system - a graphite target wrapped up by a superconducting solenoid - is larger than the normal muon beam lines using quadrupoles at one side of the separated muon target. The muon and pion production at different capture magnetic fields was calculated by Geant4, the bending angle of the capture solenoid with respect to the proton beam was also optimized in simulation to achieve more muons and pions and to reduce proton dosages to following beam elements. According to the layout of the muon experimental area reserved at the CSNS project, a preliminary muon beam line was designed with multi-propose muon spin rotation areas(surface, decay and low-energy muons). Finally, hi...

  7. Magnetic and gravity studies of Mono Lake, east-central, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athens, Noah D.; Ponce, David A.; Jayko, Angela S.; Miller, Matt; McEvoy, Bobby; Marcaida, Mae; Mangan, Margaret T.; Wilkinson, Stuart K.; McClain, James S.; Chuchel, Bruce A.; Denton, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    From August 26 to September 5, 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected more than 600 line-kilometers of shipborne magnetic data on Mono Lake, 20 line-kilometers of ground magnetic data on Paoha Island, 50 gravity stations on Paoha and Negit Islands, and 28 rock samples on Paoha and Negit Islands, in east-central California. Magnetic and gravity investigations were undertaken in Mono Lake to study regional crustal structures and to aid in understanding the geologic framework, in particular regarding potential geothermal resources and volcanic hazards throughout Mono Basin. Furthermore, shipborne magnetic data illuminate local structures in the upper crust beneath Mono Lake where geologic exposure is absent. Magnetic and gravity methods, which sense contrasting physical properties of the subsurface, are ideal for studying Mono Lake. Exposed rock units surrounding Mono Lake consist mainly of Quaternary alluvium, lacustrine sediment, aeolian deposits, basalt, and Paleozoic granitic and metasedimentary rocks (Bailey, 1989). At Black Point, on the northwest shore of Mono Lake, there is a mafic cinder cone that was produced by a subaqueous eruption around 13.3 ka. Within Mono Lake there are several small dacite cinder cones and flows, forming Negit Island and part of Paoha Island, which also host deposits of Quaternary lacustrine sediments. The typical density and magnetic properties of young volcanic rocks contrast with those of the lacustrine sediment, enabling us to map their subsurface extent.

  8. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The STAR Collaboration

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it`s experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  9. A conduction-cooled, 680-mm-long warm bore, 3-T Nb3Sn solenoid for a Cerenkov free electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Wessel, W. A. J.; Ouden, den, J.; Krooshoop, H. J. G.; Kate, ten, H.H.J.; Wieland, J.; Slot, van der, J.

    1999-01-01

    A compact, cryocooler cooled Nb3Sn superconducting magnet system for a Cerenkov free electron laser has been designed, fabricated and tested. The magnet is positioned directly behind the electron gun of the laser system. The solenoidal field compresses and guides a tube-shaped 100 A, 500 kV electron beam. A two-stage GM cryocooler, equipped with a first generation ErNi5 regenerator, cools the epoxy impregnated solenoid down to the operating temperature of about 7.5 K. This leaves a conservati...

  10. A detailed rock-magnetic and archeomagnetic study of lime-plasters from central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Arechalde, A. M.; Rodriguez, M.; Ramirez, O.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Caballero-Miranda, C.; Hueda-Tanabe, Y.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2003-04-01

    We carried out a reconnaissance rock-magnetic and archeomagnetic investigations of lime-plasters at some most important pre-Hispanic sites in Central Mexico. Both burned and unburned lime plasters (in total 30 samples) were analyzed from Teotihuacan, Tlatelolco, Santa Cruz Atizapan and Pañhu. The characteristic directions determined in this study are considered to be of primary origin. Thermomagnetic investigation show that the remanence is carried in most cases by magnetite or Ti-poor titanomagnetite. Unblocking temperature spectra and relatively high coercivity point to 'small' pseudo-single domain magnetic structure grains as responsible for remanent magnetization. Single-component, linear demagnetization plots were observed in most of cases. The mean site directions are consistent with the available reference master curve for Mesoamerica.

  11. Forced Two-Phase Helium Cooling Scheme for the Mu2e Transport Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatkowski, G. [Fermilab; Cheban, S. [Fermilab; Dhanaraj, N. [Fermilab; Evbota, D. [Fermilab; Lopes, M. [Fermilab; Nicol, T. [Fermilab; Sanders, R. [Fermilab; Schmitt, R. [Fermilab; Voirin, E. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid (TS) is an S-shaped magnet formed by two separate but similar magnets, TS-u and TS-d. Each magnet is quarter-toroid shaped with a centerline radius of approximately 3 m utilizing a helium cooling loop consisting of 25 to 27 horizontal-axis rings connected in series. This cooling loop configuration has been deemed adequate for cooling via forced single phase liquid helium; however it presents major challenges to forced two-phase flow such as “garden hose” pressure drop, concerns of flow separation from tube walls, difficulty of calculation, etc. Even with these disadvantages, forced two-phase flow has certain inherent advantages which make it a more attractive option than forced single phase flow. It is for this reason that the use of forced two-phase flow was studied for the TS magnets. This paper will describe the analysis using helium-specific pressure drop correlations, conservative engineering approach, helium properties calculated and updated at over fifty points, and how the results compared with those in literature. Based on the findings, the use of forced-two phase helium is determined to be feasible for steady-state cooling of the TS solenoids

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics in four dogs with central nervous system neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzefall, Birgit; Driver, Colin J; Benigni, Livia; Davies, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Neosporosis is a polysystemic disease that can affect dogs of any age and can cause inflammation of the central nervous system. Antemortem diagnosis can be challenging, as clinical and conventional laboratory test findings are often nonspecific. A previous report described cerebellar lesions in brain MRI studies of seven dogs and proposed that these may be characteristic for central nervous system Neosporosis. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe MRI characteristics in another group of dogs with confirmed central nervous system neosporosis and compare them with the previous report. The hospital's database was searched for dogs with confirmed central nervous system neosporosis and four observers recorded findings from each dog's MRI studies. A total of four dogs met inclusion criteria. Neurologic examination was indicative of a forebrain and cerebellar lesion in dog 2 and multifocal central nervous system disease in dogs 1, 3, and 4. Magnetic resonance imaging showed mild bilateral and symmetrical cerebellar atrophy in three of four dogs (dogs 2, 3, 4), intramedullary spinal cord changes in two dogs (dogs 3, 4) and a mesencephalic and metencephalic lesion in one dog (dog 2). Multifocal brain lesions were recognized in two dogs (dogs 1, 4) and were present in the thalamus, lentiform nucleus, centrum semiovale, internal capsule, brainstem and cortical gray matter of the frontal, parietal or temporal lobe. Findings indicated that central nervous system neosporosis may be characterized by multifocal MRI lesions as well as cerebellar involvement in dogs.

  13. The Compact Muon Solenoid Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a CERN multi-purpose experiment that exploits the physics of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The Detector Control System (DCS) ensures a safe, correct and efficient experiment operation, contributing to the recording of high quality physics data. The DCS is programmed to automatically react to the LHC changes. CMS sub-detector’s bias voltages are set depending on the machine mode and particle beam conditions. A protection mechanism ensures that the sub-detectors are locked in a safe mode whenever a potentially dangerous situation exists. The system is supervised from the experiment control room by a single operator. A small set of screens summarizes the status of the detector from the approximately 6M monitored parameters. Using the experience of nearly two years of operation with beam the DCS automation software has been enhanced to increase the system efficiency. The automation allows now for configuration commands that can be used to automatically pre-configure hardwar...

  14. Spherical aberration from trajectories in real and hard-edge solenoid fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BISWAS B

    2016-06-01

    For analytical, real and hard-edge solenoidal axial magnetic fields, the low-energy electron trajectories are obtained using the third-order paraxial ray equation. Using the particle trajectories, it is shown that the spherical aberration in the hard-edge model is high and it increases monotonously with hard edginess, although the focal length converges, in agreement with a recentfield and spherical aberration model. The model paved the way for a hard-edge approximation that gives correct focal length and spherical aberration, which is verified here by the trajectory method. In essence, we show that exact hard-edge fields give infinite spherical aberrations.

  15. Tectonic imprint in magnetic fabrics in sediments from the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperch, P.; Arriagada, C.; Chauvin, A.; Carlotto, V.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic fabrics recorded by continental sediments from the Central Andes were systematically measured for about 200 sites also studied for tectonic rotation. Most sediments of Cenozoic age are fine-grained red beds with a significant content of magnetite of volcanoclastic origine. 80 sites were collected in the Puna and Argentinan Andes, 40 sites in the Bolivian Altiplano, 63 sites in the Abancay- Cusco region of Southern Peru and 27 sites in the Moquegua basin in the forearc of southern Peru. In the Moquegua basin where the sedimentary beds are nearly horizontal, samples from the Eocene - Oligocene Moquegua formation have an oblate magnetic fabrics parallel to bedding and scaterred lineations. In contast, to the east within the Altiplano and Puna Plateaus, a triaxial ellipsoid with a well-defined magnetic lineation is usually recorded. At most localities, the orientation of the magnetic lineation correlates with the orientation of fold axes. Along the Central Andes from north to south, the orientation of magnetic lineations rotates from NW-SE to NE-SW. Compaction and tectonic strain appear to be the two main factors controlling AMS in these continental red beds. The information related to the hydrodynamic conditions acting when the sediments were deposited appears to be fully overprinted. Incipient tectonic strain is recorded during the early stages of deformation. When the sediments are not strongly deformed, the magnetic lineation behaves apparently like a passive marker recording tectonic rotations about vertical and horizontal axes. In most paleomagnetic studies applied to tectonics, tilted sedimentary beds are assumed to have been rotated around an horizontal axis. Without a detailed local structural study, the classic tilt correction leads to an apparent rotation when a possible plunge of the fold axis is not detected (MacDonald, 1980). Non-horizontal magnetic lineation suggests either non-cylindrical folding and/or interference of two phases of compressive

  16. The magnetic low of central Europe: analysis and interpretation by a multi scale approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Maurizio; Fedi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this work is an interpretation of the European magnetic low (EML) which is the main magnetic anomaly characterizing the magnetic field of central Europe at high-altitude, extending from the eastern France to Poland and placed above the main geological boundary of Europe, the Trans European Suture Zone (TESZ), that separates the western and thinner Paleozoic platform from the eastern and thicker Precambrian platform. In particular, the EML has a relative magnetic high north-east of it, showing a reverse dipolar behavior that many authors tried to interpret in past also by high-altitude satellite exploration. We used an aeromagnetic dataset and employed a level-to-level upward continuation from 1 km up to 200 km, following a multiscale approach thanks to which the anomalies generated by sources placed at different depths can be discriminated. Low-altitude magnetic maps show a complex pattern of high-frequency anomalies up to an altitude of 50 km; then, increasing the altitude up to 200 km, the field simplifies gradually. In order to interpret the anomalies we generated the maps of the total gradient (|T|) of the field at each upward continued altitude, thanks to its property in localizing in a very simple way the edges of the sources and their horizontal position without specifying a priori information about source parameters. From the total gradient maps at low altitude we obtained information about the position of shallow and localized sources producing patterns of small anomalies. In central Europe, most of them have a reverse dipolar behavior, being related probably to metasedimentary rocks in the upper crust containing pyrrhotite and a strong remament component. At higher altitude the total gradient maps has been useful to give a more complex explanation of the EML taking in consideration the results obtained in previous studies. The maps at 150-200 km show that the maximum amplitude of |T| is exactly localized along the TESZ in the NW

  17. Shielded ADR Magnets For Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II program will concentrate on manufacturing of qualified low-current, light-weight, 10K ADR magnets for space application. Shielded ADR solenoidal magnets...

  18. Performance assessment of PEFP steering magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, S. H.; Jeo, Y. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    PEFP LEBT uses two solenoid and two steering magnets for the beam position and angle control at the RFQ match point. The dependence of magnetic field and coil temperature on time was assessed and the linearity was also measured.

  19. Depositional chronology and fabric of Siwalik group sediments in Central Nepal from magnetostratigraphy and magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Pitambar; Rösler, Wolfgang

    1999-12-01

    Magnetostratigraphic research, undertaken within the past 15 years in the Siwaliks distributed along 400 km of the Sub-Himalaya in central Nepal, has proved that the sediments possess highly reliable hematite-based primary detrital remanent magnetization suitable to determine depositional chronology. In order to bring out the polarity sequences in a common chronological frame, all available data are newly correlated to the latest global magnetic polarity time scale of Cande and Kent (S.C. Cande, D.V. Kent (1995) Revised calibration of the geomagnetic polarity timescale for the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic. Journal of Geophysical Research 100, 6093-6095). Chronological data presented are referred, in relation to the diverse lithological nomenclature, to the formations whose ages are not constrained by isotopic or paleontologic ages. The age of the sections dated by magnetostratigraphy ranges between 14 and <2 Ma. Sediment accumulation rates average to 32-50 cm kyr -1. Rock-magnetic parameters, e.g. initial susceptibility and isothermal remanent magnetization ratios, allow correlation with an accuracy of up to a few hundred meters among several kilometers thick adjacent sections. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data reveal a well-defined fabric contributed to by paramagnetic ( k=10 -5 to 3×10 -4 SI) as well as ferromagnetic minerals ( k=3×10 -4 to 10 -2 SI). AMS ellipsoids are mainly oblate along with some prolate ones and the degree of anisotropy is mostly low ( P'<1.2). The magnetic fabric is of pre-folding origin with tilt-corrected sub-vertical magnetic foliation poles. The magnetic lineations do not show parallelism to the expected paleocurrent directions. Rather, sub-parallelism between the clusters of magnetic lineation and the fold axes/bedding strikes/thrust fronts is observed. A superimposed fabric consisting of a sedimentary-compactional and an overprint induced by a mild deformation process is suggested. The latter process was active during

  20. The magnetic field structure of the central region in M31

    CERN Document Server

    Gießübel, René

    2014-01-01

    The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the nearest grand-design spiral galaxy. Thus far most studies in the radio regime concentrated on the 10 kpc ring. The central region of M31 has significantly different properties than the outer parts: The star formation rate is low, and inclination and position angle are largely different from the outer disk. The existing model of the magnetic field in the radial range 6<=r<=14 kpc is extended to the innermost part r<=0.5 kpc to ultimately achieve a picture of the entire magnetic field in M31. We combined observations taken with the VLA at 3.6 cm and 6.2 cm with data from the Effelsberg 100-m telescope to fill the missing spacings of the synthesis data. The resulting polarization maps were averaged in sectors to analyse the azimuthal behaviour of the polarized intensity (PI), rotation measure (RM), and apparent pitch angle (\\phi_obs). We developed a simplified 3-D model for the magnetic field in the central region to explain the azimuthal behaviour of the three observab...

  1. Highly sensitive giant magnetoimpedance in a solenoid containing FeCo-based ribbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Yun-Zhang; Xu Qi-Ming; Zheng Jin-Ju; Wu Feng-Min; Ye Hui-Qun; Si Jian-Xiao; Zheng Jian-Long; Fan Xiao-Zhen; Yang Xiao-Hong

    2012-01-01

    The highly sensitive giant magneto-impedance effect in a solenoid containing a magnetic core of Fe36Co36Nb4Si4.sB19.2 (FeCo-based) ribbon under a weak magnetic field (WMF) is presented in this paper. The FeCo-based amorphous ribbon is prepared by single roller quenching and annealed with Joule heat in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere.The giant magnetoimpedance effect in solenoid (GMIES) profiles are measured with an HP4294A impedance analyzer.The result shows that the GMIES responds to the WMF sensitively (as high as 1580 %/A·m-l).The high sensitivity can be obtained in a moderate narrow range of annealing current density (30-34 A/mm2) and closely depends on the driven current frequency.The highest sensitivity (1580 %/A.m-1) is obtained when the FeCobased amorphous ribbon is annealed at 32 A/mm2 for 10 min and then driven with an alterning current (AC) at the frequency of 350 kHz.The highly sensitive GMIES under the WMF may result from the multiple magnetic-anisotropic structure,which is induced by the temperature gradient produced during Joule-heating the ribbon.

  2. Electrical characterization of S/C conductor for the CMS solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Greco, Michela; Kircher, F; Musenich, R

    2005-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the LHC project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. The coil is wound from 20 high purity aluminum-stabilized NbTi conductors with a total length of 45 km. The main peculiarity of the CMS magnet among other existing thin detector solenoids is its sandwich-type aluminum-stabilized superconductor. This special feature was chosen in order to have a mechanically self-supporting winding structure. We measured the critical current of all the 21 finished conductors in fields up to 6 T using the Ma.Ri.S.A. test facility at INFN-Genova. We compare these results with the critical current of single strands measured by CEA- Saclay, extracted from the conductor after the co-extrusion. A comparison among the measurements provides information about the possible critical current degradation and assures an accurate quality control of the conductor pr...

  3. Design and fabrication of a 30 T superconducting solenoid using overpressure processed Bi2212 round wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Gene [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-18

    High field superconducting magnets are used in particle colliders, fusion energy devices, and spectrometers for medical imaging and advanced materials research. Magnets capable of generating fields of 20-30 T are needed by future accelerator facilities. A 20-30 T magnet will require the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) and therefore the challenges of high field HTS magnet development need to be addressed. Superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi2212) conductors fabricated by the oxide-powder-in-tube (OPIT) technique have demonstrated the capability to carry large critical current density of 105 A/cm2 at 4.2 K and in magnetic fields up to 45 T. Available in round wire multi-filamentary form, Bi2212 may allow fabrication of 20-50 T superconducting magnets. Until recently the performance of Bi2212 has been limited by challenges in realizing high current densities (Jc ) in long lengths. This problem now is solved by the National High Magnetic Field Lab using an overpressure (OP) processing technique, which uses external pressure to process the conductor. OP processing also helps remove the ceramic leakage that results when Bi-2212 liquid leaks out from the sheath material and reacts with insulation, coil forms, and flanges. Significant advances have also been achieved in developing novel insulation materials (TiO2 coating) and Ag-Al sheath materials that have higher mechanical strengths than Ag-0.2wt.% Mg, developing heat treatment approaches to broadening the maximum process temperature window, and developing high-strength, mechanical reinforced Bi-2212 cables. In the Phase I work, we leveraged these new opportunities to prototype overpressure processed solenoids and test them in background fields of up to 14 T. Additionally a design of a fully superconducting 30 T solenoid was produced. This work in conjunction with the future path outlined in the Phase II proposal would

  4. A design of novel type superconducting magnet for super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging by using the harmonic analysis method of magnetic vector potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俎栋林; 郭华; 宋枭禹; 包尚联

    2002-01-01

    The approach of expanding the magnetic scalar potential in a series of Legendre polynomials is suitable for designing a conventional superconducting magnetic resonance imaging magnet of distributed solenoidal configuration. Whereas the approach of expanding the magnetic vector potential in associated Legendre harmonics is suitable for designing a single-solenoid magnet that has multiple tiers, in which each tier may have multiple layers with different winding lengths. A set of three equations to suppress some of the lowest higher-order harmonics is found. As an example, a 4T single-solenoid magnetic resonance imaging magnet with 4 × 6 layers of superconducting wires is de signed The degree of homogeneity in the 0.5m diameter sphere volume is better than 5.8 ppm. The same degree of homogeneity is retained after optimal integralization of turns in each correction layer. The ratio Bm/Bo in the single-solenoid magnet is 30%lower than that in the conventional six-solenoid magnet. This tolerates higher rated superconducting current in the coil. The Lorentz force of the coil in the single-solenoid system is also much lower than in the six-solenoid system. This novel type of magnet possesses significant advantage over conventional magnets, especially when used as a super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging magnet.

  5. The LASS (Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.; Bienz, T.; Bierce, R.; Bird, F.; Bird, L.; Blockus, D.; Carnegie, R.K.; Chien, C.Y.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K and K interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly.

  6. GPR and Magnetic Modeling on an Archaeological Site in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, R. E.; Argote, D. L.; Camara, M. E.; Cifuentes, G.; Lopez, P.

    2007-05-01

    A geophysical study was carried out in an archaeological site called Los Teteles de Ocotitla, which means `bunch of rocks'. The area is located within the central portion of the Sierra de Ocotitla, towards the northeast of La Malinche volcano, in the municipality of Altzayanca, State of Tlaxcala. This site is conformed of several artificial terraces with evidence of human occupation, probably from the Teotihuacan or Tenanyecac phase. At first the presence of several hills, which are the remains of small pyramids can be seen. Also, some exposed walls and floors can be appreciated. The geophysical work included magnetic (vertical field) and GPR observations in five terraces. The magnetic data depicted a series of dipolar anomalies probably related to walls, and stairways. A report from a previous archaeological excavation carried out almost 30 years ago on an upper terrace, mentioned the discovery of an ancient burial. The tomb was a room (3x2x2 m3) to a depth of 1 m, where corpse remains were found, along other archaeological artifacts. Magnetic and GPR profiles were observed in this area to define geophysical signatures of the mentioned ancient structure, to later compare with anomalies obtained in other terraces. Two interesting anomalies were observed in two lower terraces that compared well with the signatures obtained. The magnetic anomalies were modeled employing a 3D inverse approach, assuming that the Earth is conformed of a series of magnetic dipoles. The final result produced a magnetic block of 5x3x3 m3 to a depth of 1.5 m, approximately. The GPR anomalies helped to constrain the initial geometry of the archaeological structure.

  7. Magnetic variation analysis for the June 1993 seismic events in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marchetti

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available A scientific collaboration between the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica (Italy and the Warsaw Academy of Science (Poland gave rise to the installation of a few stations for the long-term measurement of magnetotelluric fields in Central Italy. The investigation sites were determined following the individual seismic interest of each location. For this project, the magnetic observatory in L'Aquila was also equipped with electric lines, for simultaneous measurements of the telluric field. After a few years of experience some of the installed stations had to be removed for their high noise level that made this study almost impossible. A first time interval was considered from January 1992 to February 1993 and showed the existence of significant changes in magnetotelluric parameters related to earthquake occurrence time, an extension of that analysis was made to include the event of June 1993 using the magnetic field time variation.

  8. Magnetic anomalies across Bastar craton and Pranhita–Godavari basin in south of central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I V Radhakrishna Murthy; S Bangaru Babu

    2009-02-01

    Aeromagnetic anomalies over Bastar craton and Pranhita –Godavari (P –G)basin in the south of central India could be attributed to NW –SE striking mafic intrusives in both the areas at variable depths.Such intrusions can be explained considering the collision of the Bastar and Dharwar cratons by the end of the Archaean and the development of tensile regimes that followed in the Paleoproterozoic,facilitating intrusions of mafic dykes into the continental crust.The P –G basin area,being a zone of crustal weakness along the contact of the Bastar and Dharwar cratons, also experienced extensional tectonics.The inferred remanent magnetization of these dykes dips upwards and it is such that the dykes are oriented towards the east of the magnetic north at the time of their formation compared to their present NW –SE strike.Assuming that there was no imprint of magnetization of a later date,it is concluded that the Indian plate was located in the southern hemisphere,either independently or as part of a supercontinent,for some span of time during Paleoproterozoic and was involved in complex path of movement and rotation subsequently. The paper presents a case study of the utility of aeromagnetic anomalies in qualitatively deducing the palaeopositions of the landmasses from the interpreted remanent magnetism of buried intrusive bodies.

  9. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it's experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  10. A Magnetic Set-Up to Help Teach Newton's Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panijpan, Bhinyo; Sujarittham, Thanida; Arayathanitkul, Kwan; Tanamatayarat, Jintawat; Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai

    2009-01-01

    A set-up comprising a magnetic disc, a solenoid and a mechanical balance was used to teach first-year physics students Newton's third law with the help of a free body diagram. The image of a floating magnet immobilized by the solenoid's repulsive force should help dispel a common misconception of students as regards the first law: that stationary…

  11. Holocene ENSO-related cyclic storms recorded by magnetic minerals in speleothems of central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zongmin; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Xie, Shucheng; Bourne, Mark D.; Huang, Chunju; Hu, Chaoyong; Cheng, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Extreme hydrologic events such as storms and floods have the potential to severely impact modern human society. However, the frequency of storms and their underlying mechanisms are limited by a paucity of suitable proxies, especially in inland areas. Here we present a record of speleothem magnetic minerals to reconstruct paleoprecipitation, including storms, in the eastern Asian monsoon area over the last 8.6 ky. The geophysical parameter IRMsoft-flux represents the flux of soil-derived magnetic minerals preserved in stalagmite HS4, which we correlate with rainfall amount and intensity. IRMsoft-flux exhibits relatively higher values before 6.7 ky and after 3.4 ky and lower values in the intervening period, consistent with regional hydrological changes observed in independent records. Abrupt enhancements in the flux of pedogenic magnetite in the stalagmite agree well with the timing of known regional paleofloods and with equatorial El Niño‑Southern Oscillation (ENSO) patterns, documenting the occurrence of ENSO-related storms in the Holocene. Spectral power analyses reveal that the storms occur on a significant 500-y cycle, coincident with periodic solar activity and ENSO variance, showing that reinforced (subdued) storms in central China correspond to reduced (increased) solar activity and amplified (damped) ENSO. Thus, the magnetic minerals in speleothem HS4 preserve a record of the cyclic storms controlled by the coupled atmosphere‑oceanic circulation driven by solar activity.

  12. Note: An improved solenoid driver valve for miniature shock tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, P T

    2016-05-01

    A solenoid driver valve has been built to improve the operating performance of diaphragmless shock tubes, which are used for high pressure, high temperature chemical kinetics, and fluid mechanics studies. For shock tube driver application, the most important characteristics are those of sealing, strength, and quality of the generated shock waves and repeatability of opening characteristics and therefore subsequent post-shock conditions. The main features of the new driver valve are a face o-ring sealing design of the valve, the large internal volume, and through inserts near the solenoid core: adjustable opening characteristics of the valve.

  13. Measurement of liquid permittivity by solenoid self-resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Patrick; Mazzeo, Brian

    2010-10-01

    Permittivity of a liquid is an important macroscopic property which is dependent on the composition and physical state of the liquid. Measurement of liquid permittivity is usually performed using a parallel-plate capacitor or terminated coaxial line. In this study, a solenoid surrounding a column of liquid is used to measure permittivity changes. The inductance of the solenoid is not greatly affected by permittivity and conductivity changes for small diameters. However, the self-capacitance is greatly affected by changing solution conditions. The self-resonance, due to the changing self-capacitance, thus reveals properties of the solution. This is demonstrated on a variety of liquids with varying permittivity and conductivity.

  14. Dispersion in a bent-solenoid channel with symmetric focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chun-xi [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2001-08-21

    Longitudinal ionization cooling of a muon beam is essential for muon colliders and will be useful for neutrino factories. Bent-solenoid channels with symmetric focusing has been considered for beam focusing and for generating the required dispersion in the ``emittance exchange'' scheme of longitudinal cooling. In this paper, we derive the Hamiltonian that governs the linear beam dynamics of a bent-solenoid channel, solve the single-particle dynamics, and give equations for determining the lattice functions, in particular, the dispersion functions.

  15. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF ACUTE CENTRAL CORD SYNDROME: CORRELATION WITH PROGNOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴力扬

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of acute cervical central cord syndrome and to determine their correlation with the prognosis. Methods. MRI findings of 35 patients with acute central cord syndrome were studied and compared with the recovery rate of ASIA score at presentation and in follow-up. Results. MRI data demonstrated spinal cord compression for 32 patients, spinal cord swelling for 16 patients,and abnormal signal intensity within the spinal cord for 19 patients, including 14 with edema and 3 with hematoma. No significant difference of the recovery rate was noted between the patients treated nonoperatively and operatively ( P > 0. 05). There was a significant inverse correlation between the recovery rate and the degree of spinal cord compression as shown in MRI scans ( P < 0.01 ). The presence of hematoma in MRI scans was associated with poor prognosis, as demonstrated by a significant difference of the recovery rate ( P < 0. 01) among the patients with normal intensity, edema and hematoma within the spinal cord. Conclusions. MRI scans provide an efficient assistance for decision-making and accurate prognostic information regarding neurological function, and therefore should routinely be performed within the early phase of acute central cord syndrome.

  16. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF ACUTE CENTRAL CORD SYNDROME: CORRELATION WITH PROGNOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of acute cervical central cord syndrome and to determine their correlation with the prognosis. Methods. MRI findings of 35 patients with acute central cord syndrome were studied and compared with the recovery rate of ASIA score at presentation and in follow-up. Results. MRI data demonstrated spinal cord compression for 32 patients, spinal cord swelling for 16 patients, and abnormal signal intensity within the spinal cord for 19 patients, including 14 with edema and 3 with hematoma. No significant difference of the recovery rate was noted between the patients treated nonoperatively and operatively (P >0.05). There was a significant inverse correlation between the recovery rate and the degree of spinal cord compression as shown in MRI scans (P<0.01). The presence of hematoma in MRI scans was associated with poor prognosis, as demonstrated by a significant difference of the recovery rate (P< 0.01) among the patients with normal intensity, edema and hematoma within the spinal cord. Conclusions. MRI scans provide an efficient assistance for decision-making and accurate prognostic information regarding neurological function, and therefore should routinely be performed within the early phase of acute central cord syndrome.

  17. Thermal analysis of the cold mass of the 2T solenoid for the PANDA detector at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, G.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Dudarev, A.; Pais Da Silva, H.; Vodopyanov, A.; Schmitt, L.

    2015-12-01

    The superconducting solenoid of the PANDA experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt (Germany) is designed to provide a magnetic field of 2 T over a length of about 4 m in a bore of 1.9 m. To allow a warm target feed pipe oriented transversely to the solenoid axis and penetrating through the cryostat and solenoid cold mass, the magnet is split into 3 inter-connected coils fitted in a common support cylinder. During normal operation, cooling of the cold mass to the working temperature of 4.5 K will be achieved through the circulation by natural convection of two-phase helium in cooling pipes attached to the Al-alloy support cylinder. Pure aluminium strips acting as heat drains and glued to the inner surface of the three coils and thermally bonded to the cooling pipes allow minimizing the temperature gradient across the 6-layers coils. In this paper the thermal design of the cold mass during normal operation and current ramps up and down is validated using an analytical approximation and numerical simulation.

  18. Thermal analysis of the cold mass of the 2T solenoid for the PANDA detector at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Rolando, G; Dudarev, A; Pais Da Silva, H; Vodopyanov, A; Schmitt, L

    2015-01-01

    The superconducting solenoid of the PANDA experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt (Germany) is designed to provide a magnetic field of 2 T over a length of about 4 m in a bore of 1.9 m. To allow a warm target feed pipe oriented transversely to the solenoid axis and penetrating through the cryostat and solenoid cold mass, the magnet is split into 3 inter-connected coils fitted in a common support cylinder. During normal operation, cooling of the cold mass to the working temperature of 4.5 K will be achieved through the circulation by natural convection of two-phase helium in cooling pipes attached to the Al-alloy support cylinder. Pure aluminium strips acting as heat drains and glued to the inner surface of the three coils and thermally bonded to the cooling pipes allow minimizing the temperature gradient across the 6-layers coils. In this paper the thermal design of the cold mass during normal operation and current ramps up and down is validated using an analytical appro...

  19. ATLAS magnet common cryogenic, vacuum, electrical and control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Miele, P; Delruelle, N; Geich-Gimbel, C; Haug, F; Olesen, G; Pengo, R; Sbrissa, E; Tyrvainen, H; ten Kate, H H J

    2004-01-01

    The superconducting Magnet System for the ATLAS detector at the LHC at CERN comprises a Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and a Central Solenoid with overall dimensions of 20 m diameter by 26 m length and a stored energy of 1.6 GJ. Common proximity cryogenic and electrical systems for the toroids are implemented. The Cryogenic System provides the cooling power for the 3 toroid magnets considered as a single cold mass (600 tons) and for the CS. The 21 kA toroid and the 8 kA solenoid electrical circuits comprise both a switch-mode power supply, two circuit breakers, water cooled bus bars, He cooled current leads and the diode resistor ramp-down unit. The Vacuum System consists of a group of primary rotary pumps and sets of high vacuum diffusion pumps connected to each individual cryostat. The Magnet Safety System guarantees the magnet protection and human safety through slow and fast dump treatment. The Magnet Control System ensures control, regulation and monitoring of the operation of the magnets. The update...

  20. Electron gun for a multiple beam klystron with magnetic compression of the electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Tran, Hien T; Bui, Thuc; Attarian, Adam; Tallis, William; David, John; Forstall, Virginia; Andujar, Cynthia; Blach, Noah T; Brown, David B; Gadson, Sean E; Kiley, Erin M; Read, Michael

    2013-10-01

    A multi-beam electron gun provides a plurality N of cathode assemblies comprising a cathode, anode, and focus electrode, each cathode assembly having a local cathode axis and also a central cathode point defined by the intersection of the local cathode axis with the emitting surface of the cathode. Each cathode is arranged with its central point positioned in a plane orthogonal to a device central axis, with each cathode central point an equal distance from the device axis and with an included angle of 360/N between each cathode central point. The local axis of each cathode has a cathode divergence angle with respect to the central axis which is set such that the diverging magnetic field from a solenoidal coil is less than 5 degrees with respect to the projection of the local cathode axis onto a cathode reference plane formed by the device axis and the central cathode point, and the local axis of each cathode is also set such that the angle formed between the cathode reference plane and the local cathode axis results in minimum spiraling in the path of the electron beams in a homogenous magnetic field region of the solenoidal field generator.

  1. Fabrication of 3D solenoid microcoils in silica glass by femtosecond laser wet etch and microsolidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports a flexible fabrication method for 3D solenoid microcoils in silica glass. The method consists of femtosecond laser wet etching (FLWE) and microsolidics process. The 3D microchannel with high aspect ratio is fabricated by an improved FLWE method. In the microsolidics process, an alloy was chosen as the conductive metal. The microwires are achieved by injecting liquid alloy into the microchannel, and allowing the alloy to cool and solidify. The alloy microwires with high melting point can overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The geometry, the height and diameter of microcoils were flexibly fabricated by the pre-designed laser writing path, the laser power and etching time. The 3D microcoils can provide uniform magnetic field and be widely integrated in many magnetic microsystems.

  2. Measurement application for injector solenoid : measurement application for an injector solenoid in the Wärtsilä 46CR engine

    OpenAIRE

    Ohls, Tony Conny Christoffer

    2012-01-01

    This thesis was commissioned by Wärtsilä Finland Services and concerns creating an application with LabVIEW that will measure key values from an injector solenoid intended for a Wärtsilä 46CR engine. The application created will analyse two signals that are sampled with a frequency of 100 000 Hz and based on these signals, the key values will be calculated. The key values are: the time it takes for a valve to start opening from the moment power is fed into the solenoid, the time it takes...

  3. The Test Facility for the EAST Superconducting Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Weng, Peide

    2005-08-01

    A large facility for testing superconducting magnets has been in operation at the Institute of Plasma Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences since the completion of its construction that began in 1999. A helium refrigerator is used to cool the magnets and liquefy helium which can provide 3.8 K-4.5 K, 1.8 bar-5 bar, 20 g/s-40 g/s supercritical helium for the coils or a 150 L/h liquefying helium capacity. Other major parts include a large vacuum vessel (3.5 m in diameter and 6.1 m in height) with a liquid nitrogen temperature shield, two pairs of current lead, three sets of 14.5 kA-50 kA power supply with a fast dump quench protection circuitry, a data acquisition and control system, a vacuum pumping system, and a gas tightness inspecting devise. The primary goal of the test facility is to test the EAST TF and PF magnets in relation to their electromagnetic, stability, thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical performance. The construction of this facility was completed in 2002, followed by a series of systematic coil testing. By now ten TF magnets, a central solenoid model coil, a central solenoid prototype coil, and a model coil of the PF large coil have been successfully tested in the facility.

  4. The Test Facility for the EAST Superconducting Magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yu; Weng Peide

    2005-01-01

    A large facility for testing superconducting magnets has been in operation at the Institute of Plasma Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences since the completion of its construction that began in 1999. A helium refrigerator is used to cool the magnets and liquefy helium which can provide 3.8 K ~ 4.5 K, 1.8 bar ~ 5 bar, 20 g/s ~ 40 g/s supercritical helium for the coils or a 150 L/h liquefying helium capacity. Other major parts include a large vacuum vessel (3.5 m in diameter and 6.1 m in height) with a liquid nitrogen temperature shield, two pairs of current lead,three sets of 14.5 kA~ 50 kA power supply with a fast dump quench protection circuitry, a data acquisition and control system, a vacuum pumping system, and a gas tightness inspecting devise.The primary goal of the test facility is to test the EAST TF and PF magnets in relation to their electromagnetic, stability, thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical performance. The construction of this facility was completed in 2002, followed by a series of systematic coil testing. By now ten TF magnets, a central solenoid model coil, a central solenoid prototype coil, and a model coil of the PF large coil have been successfully tested in the facility.

  5. Magnetic Signatures and Curie Surface Trend Across an Arc-Continent Collision Zone: An Example from Central Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, Pearlyn C.; Dimalanta, Carla B.; Ramos, Noelynna T.; Faustino-Eslava, Decibel V.; Queaño, Karlo L.; Yumul, Graciano P.

    2016-05-01

    Ground and aeromagnetic data are combined to characterize the onshore and offshore magnetic properties of the central Philippines, whose tectonic setting is complicated by opposing subduction zones, large-scale strike-slip faulting and arc-continent collision. The striking difference between the magnetic signatures of the islands with established continental affinity and those of the islands belonging to the island arc terrane is observed. Negative magnetic anomalies are registered over the continental terrane, while positive magnetic anomalies are observed over the Philippine Mobile Belt. Several linear features in the magnetic anomaly map coincide with the trace of the Philippine Fault and its splays. Power spectral analysis of the magnetic data reveals that the Curie depth across the central Philippines varies. The deepest point of the magnetic crust is beneath Mindoro Island at 32 km. The Curie surface shallows toward the east: the Curie surface is 21 km deep between the islands of Sibuyan and Masbate, and 18 km deep at the junction of Buruanga Peninsula and Panay Island. The shallowest Curie surface (18 km) coincides with the boundary of the arc-continent collision, signifying the obduction of mantle rocks over the continental basement. Comparison of the calculated Curie depth with recent crustal thickness models reveals the same eastwards thinning trend and range of depths. The coincidence of the magnetic boundary and the density boundary may support the existence of a compositional boundary that reflects the crust-mantle interface.

  6. Approximations for the natural logarithm from solenoid-toroid correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Semiz, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    It seems reasonable that a toroid can be thought of approximately as a solenoid bent into a circle. The correspondence of the inductances of these two objects gives an approximation for the natural logarithm in terms of the average of two numbers. Different ways of averaging give different approximants. They are expressions simpler than Taylor polynomials, and are meaningful over a wider domain.

  7. Teichmüller theory of the punctured solenoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penner, Robert; Sari´c, Dragomir

    2008-01-01

    The punctured solenoid plays the role of an initial object for the category of punctured surfaces with morphisms given by finite covers branched only over the punctures. The (decorated) Teichmüller space of is introduced, studied, and found to be parametrized by certain coordinates on a fixed tri...

  8. Some New Integral Identities for Solenoidal Fields and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir I. Semenov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In spaces Rn, n ≥ 2, it has been proved that a solenoidal vector field and its rotor satisfy the series of new integral identities which have covariant form. The interest in them is explained by hydrodynamics problems for an ideal fluid.

  9. ACCELERATORS: Matching by solenoids in space charge dominated LEBTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Hai; Tang, Jing-Yu; Ouyang, Hua-Fu

    2009-10-01

    The betatron matching of a rotationally asymmetric beam in space charge dominated low-energy beam transports (LEBTs) where solenoids are used for the transverse matching has been studied. For better understanding, the coupling elements of a beam matrix are interpreted in special forms that are products of a term defined by the Larmor rotation angle and another by the difference between the beam matrix elements in the two transverse planes. The coupling form originally derived from the rotationally symmetric field in solenoids still holds when taking into account the rotationally asymmetric space charge forces that are due to the unequal emittance in the two transverse planes. It is shown in this paper that when an LEBT mainly comprising solenoids transports a beam having unequal emittance in the two transverse planes and the linear space charge force is taken into account, the initial Twiss parameters can be modified to obtain the minimum and equal emittance at the LEBT exit. The TRACE3D calculations also prove the principle. However, when quadrupoles that are also rotationally asymmetric are involved in between solenoids, the coupling between the two transverse planes becomes more complicated and the emittance increase is usually unavoidable. A matching example using the CSNS (China Spallation Neutron Source) LEBT conditions is also presented.

  10. Early afterglow, magnetized central engine, and a quasi-universal jet configuration for long GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Kobayashi, S; Lloyd-Ronning, N M; Mészáros, P; Dai, Xinyu; Kobayashi, Shiho; Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole M.; Meszaros, Peter; Zhang, Bing

    2003-01-01

    Two separate topics are discussed. (1) We describe the classifications of the long GRB early afterglow lightcurves within the framework of the fireball shock model, focusing on the interplay between the reverse and forward shock emission components. We will also provide evidence that the central engine of at least two bursts are entrained with strong magnetic fields, and discuss the implications of this result for our understanding of the GRB phenomenon; (2) We argue that the current gamma-ray burst (GRB) and X-ray flash (XRF) data are consistent with a picture that all GRB-XRF jets are structured and quasi-universal, with a typical Gaussian-like jet structure.

  11. Interpretation of magnetic data of the Laachach gossan (central Jebilets, Morocco: mining implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffal, M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the hercynian massif of Central Jebilets (Morocco, outcrop a large number of gossans which sometimes top economical orebodies (Kettara, Draa Sfar, etc.. The present study is devoted to the interpretation of magnetic data covering one of these iron hats, located near of the Laachach village, at about thirty kilometres north-westward of Marrakech. The magnetic map of Laachach highlights several anomalies which coincide with the outcrop of the gossan. Detailed analysis of reduced to the pole data allows us to conclude that these anomalies may be due to submeridian magnetic structures cut by a set of dextral transverse faults. These structures are generally dipping westward but they can be locally sub vertical. The Euler deconvolution of the magnetic data gives moderately deeping solutions (22 to 254 m. The quantitative interpretation of the two principal magnetic anomalies highlighted in the study area lead to better characterising of the deep structure of the Laachach magnetic bodies, that may correspond to massive sulphide occurrences, according to the geological and mining context of the study area. The two modelled bodies constitute priority recognition targets for any mining exploration program to be car ried out on the Laachach site.

    [fr] Le massif hercynien des Jebilets centrales (Maroc est caractérisé par l’affleurement de nombreux chapeaux de fer dont certains coiffent des amas sulfurés de grande importance économique (Kettara, Draa Sfar, etc.. Le présent travail porte sur l’interprétation de données magnétiques couvrant l’un de ces chapeaux de fer qui se situe près du village de Laachach à une trentaine de kilomètres au Nord- Ouest de Marrakech. La carte magnétique du secteur étudié met en évidence plusieurs anomalies qui coïncident avec l’affleurement du chapeau de fer. Après réduction au pôle des données, l’analyse détaillée de ces anomalies permet de conclure que celles-ci seraient dues à des

  12. Central engines of Gamma Ray Bursts. Magnetic mechanism in the collapsar model

    CERN Document Server

    Barkov, Maxim V

    2008-01-01

    In this study we explore the magnetic mechanism of hypernovae and relativistic jets of long duration gamma ray bursts within the collapsar scenario. This is an extension of our earlier work [1]. We track the collapse of massive rotating stars onto a rotating central black hole using axisymmetric general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code that utilizes a realistic equation of state and takes into account the cooling associated with emission of neutrinos and the energy losses due to dissociation of nuclei. The neutrino heating is not included. We describe solutions with different black hole rotation, mass accretion rate, and strength of progenitor's magnetic field. Some of them exhibits strong explosions driven by Poynting-dominated jets with power up to $12\\times10^{51} {erg s}^{-1}$. These jets originate from the black hole and powered via the Blandford-Znajek mechanism. A provisional criterion for explosion is derived. A number of simulation movies can be downloaded from http://www.maths.leeds.ac.uk/~serg...

  13. Transport and performance in DIII-D discharges with weak or negative central magnetic shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, C.M.; Schissel, D.P.; Stallard, B.W. [and others

    1996-12-01

    Discharges exhibiting the highest plasma energy and fusion reactivity yet realized in the DIII-D tokamak have been produced by combining the benefits of a hollow or weakly sheared central current profile with a high confinement (H-mode) edge. In these discharges, low power neutral beam injection heats the electrons during the initial current ramp, and {open_quotes}freezes in{close_quotes} a hollow or flat central current profile. When the neutral beam power is increased, formation of a region of reduced transport and highly peaked profiles in the core often results. Shortly before these plasmas would otherwise disrupt, a transition is triggered from the low (L-mode) to high (H-mode) confinement regimes, thereby broadening the pressure profile and avoiding the disruption. These plasmas continue to evolve until the high performance phase is terminated nondisruptively at much higher {beta}{sub T} (ratio of plasma pressure to toroidal magnetic field pressure) than would be attainable with peaked profiles and an L-mode edge. Transport analysis indicates that in this phase, the ion diffusivity is equivalent to that predicted by Chang-Hinton neoclassical theory over the entire plasma volume. This result is consistent with suppression of turbulence by locally enhanced E x B flow shear, and is supported by observations of reduced fluctuations in the plasma. Calculations of performance in these discharges extrapolated to a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture indicates that such plasmas could produce a DT fusion gain Q{sub DT} = 0.32.

  14. The link between solenoidal turbulence and slow star formation in G0.253+0.016

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, C; Longmore, S N; Kruijssen, J M D; Bally, J; Contreras, Y; Crocker, R M; Garay, G; Jackson, J M; Testi, L; Walsh, A J

    2016-01-01

    Star formation in the Galactic disc is primarily controlled by gravity, turbulence, and magnetic fields. It is not clear that this also applies to star formation near the Galactic Centre. Here we determine the turbulence and star formation in the CMZ cloud G0.253+0.016. Using maps of 3mm dust emission and HNCO intensity-weighted velocity obtained with ALMA, we measure the volume-density variance $\\sigma_{\\rho/\\rho_0} = 1.3 \\pm 0.5$ and turbulent Mach number $\\mathcal{M} = 11 \\pm 3$. Combining these with turbulence simulations to constrain the plasma $\\beta = 0.34 \\pm 0.35$, we reconstruct the turbulence driving parameter $b = 0.22 \\pm 0.12$ in G0.253+0.016. This low value of $b$ indicates solenoidal (divergence-free) driving of the turbulence in G0.253+0.016. By contrast, typical clouds in the Milky Way disc and spiral arms have a significant compressive (curl-free) driving component ($b > 0.4$). We speculate that shear causes the solenoidal driving in G0.253+0.016 and show that this may reduce the star forma...

  15. Origin of magnetic highs at ultramafic hosted hydrothermal systems: Insights from the Yokoniwa site of Central Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Masakazu; Okino, Kyoko; Sato, Taichi; Sato, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution vector magnetic measurements were performed on an inactive ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal vent field, called Yokoniwa Hydrothermal Field (YHF), using a deep-sea manned submersible Shinkai6500 and an autonomous underwater vehicle r2D4. The YHF has developed at a non-transform offset massif of the Central Indian Ridge. Dead chimneys were widely observed around the YHF along with a very weak venting of low-temperature fluids so that hydrothermal activity of the YHF was almost finished. The distribution of crustal magnetization from the magnetic anomaly revealed that the YHF is associated with enhanced magnetization, as seen at the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow and Ashadze-1 hydrothermal sites of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The results of rock magnetic analysis on seafloor rock samples (including basalt, dolerite, gabbro, serpentinized peridotite, and hydrothermal sulfide) showed that only highly serpentinized peridotite carries high magnetic susceptibility and that the natural remanent magnetization intensity can explain the high magnetization of Yokoniwa. These observations reflect abundant and strongly magnetized magnetite grains within the highly serpentinized peridotite. Comparisons with the Rainbow and Ashadze-1 suggest that in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, strongly magnetized magnetite and pyrrhotite form during the progression of hydrothermal alteration of peridotite. After the completion of serpentinization and production of hydrogen, pyrrhotites convert into pyrite or nonmagnetic iron sulfides, which considerably reduces their levels of magnetization. Our results revealed origins of the magnetic high and the development of subsurface chemical processes in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems. Furthermore, the results highlight the use of near-seafloor magnetic field measurements as a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  16. Construction of a stable and homogeneous magnetic field at 10 milligauss for neutron electric dipole moment measurements: preparatory phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravador, E.; Yoshiki, Hajime; Feizeng, H. [Ibaraki Univ., Mito (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    A superthermal UCN edm measuring machine is currently under construction at KEK. It utilizes a magnetically shielded superconducting solenoid at liquid helium temperature to generate a stable and homogeneous magnetic field at 10 milligauss. The design of the magnetic shield and solenoid and preliminary evaluation of shielding effectiveness is presented. (author)

  17. The Wallula fault and tectonic framework of south-central Washington, as interpreted from magnetic and gravity anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, Richard J. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sherrod, Brian [U.S. Geological Survey, Seattle, WA (United States); Weaver, Craig [U.S. Geological Survey, Seattle, WA (United States); Wells, Ray E. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rohay, Alan C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-13

    Magnetic and gravity data, collected in south-central Washington near the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt (YFTB) are used to model upper crustal structure, the extent of the late Columbia River Basalt flow named the Ice Harbor member, the vertical conduits (dikes) that the Ice Harbor erupted from, and whether the dikes are offset or affected by faulting on the Wallula Fault zone.

  18. Age of the Xalnene Ash, Central Mexico: A Rock Magnetic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Renne, P. R.; Waters, M. R.; Arroyo-Cabrales, J.; Ochoa-Castillo, P.; Perez-Campo, M.

    2007-05-01

    Features interpreted as human footprints ~40 ka old have been reported from the Toluquilla quarry near Valsequillo Reservoir, 15 km south of the city of Puebla in central Mexico (Gonzalez et al., 2006). The indentations were found in an indurated basaltic lapilli tuff informally known as the Xalnene Ash. The ~40 ka age of the tuff was based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) analysis of baked quartz-rich materials incorporated into the ash during eruption. If true, this ~40 ka age suggests that humans migrated into the Americas at a far earlier time than is currently believed. In contrast to the conclusions of Gonzalez et al. (2006), the age of the Xalnene ash was determined as 1.30 ± 0.03 Ma (2σ) based on highly reproducible 40Ar/39Ar analyses of homogenous basaltic lapilli (Renne et al., 2005). This age is further supported by paleomagnetic data, which shows a reversed polarity for the Xalnene Ash, consistent with deposition during chron C1r.2r (1.77 to 1.07 Ma). The magnetic mineralogy within the Xalnene Ash is not straightforward, and is a reflection of its volcanic origin modified by its subsequent hydrous alteration via prolonged exposure to varying water levels in Lake Valsequillo. Submicron titanomagnetite grains occur within the cores of the lapilli and are characterized by Curie temperatures between 400-500 °C corresponding to unoxidized compositions ranging from Fe2.82Ti0.18O4 to Fe2.68Ti0.32O4. Two components of magnetization were revealed during progressive alternating field (AF) demagnetization of oriented, individual lapilli: a low coercivity, reversed component that is typically removed after 15-20 mT, and a randomly oriented, but well-defined, higher coercivity component. The directions associated with the low coercivity component are consistent with the direction of the bulk rock characteristic remanent magnetization. This low coercivity component may have been acquired immediately after deposition during the final stages of cooling, or

  19. New ALPHA-2 magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    On 21 June, members of the ALPHA collaboration celebrated the handover of the first solenoid designed for the ALPHA-2 experiment. The magnet has since been successfully installed and is working well.   Khalid Mansoor, Sumera Yamin and Jeffrey Hangst in front of the new ALPHA-2 solenoid. “This was the first of three identical solenoids that will be installed between now and September, as the rest of the ALPHA-2 device is installed and commissioned,” explains ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst. “These magnets are designed to allow us to transfer particles - antiprotons, electrons and positrons - between various parts of the new ALPHA-2 device by controlling the transverse size of the particle bunch that is being transferred.” Sumera Yamin and Khalid Mansoor, two Pakistani scientists from the National Centre for Physics in Islamabad, came to CERN in February specifically to design and manufacture these magnets. “We had the chance to work on act...

  20. Central magnetic cooling and refrigeration machines (chiller) and their assessment. A feasibility study - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egolf, P. W.; Gonin, C. [University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, HEIG-VD, Yverdon-les Bains (Switzerland); Kitanovski, A. [University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-03-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a feasibility study made concerning magnetic cooling and refrigeration machines. This report presents a comprehensive thermodynamic and economic analysis of applications of rotary magnetic chillers. The study deals with magnetic chillers based on permanent magnets and superconducting magnets, respectively. The numerical design of permanent magnet assemblies with different magnetic flux densities is discussed. The authors note that superconducting magnetic chillers are feasible only in large-scale applications with over 1 MW of cooling power. This report describes new ideas for magnetic refrigeration technologies, which go beyond the state of the art. They show potential for a substantial reduction of costs and further improvements in efficiency. Rotary magnetic liquid chillers with 'wavy' structures and using micro tubes are discussed, as are superconducting magnetic chillers and future magneto-caloric technologies.

  1. Central pain processing in chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine G Boland

    Full Text Available Life expectancy in multiple myeloma has significantly increased. However, a high incidence of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN can negatively influence quality of life during this period. This study applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to compare areas associated with central pain processing in patients with multiple myeloma who had chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (MM-CIPN with those from healthy volunteers (HV. Twenty-four participants (n = 12 MM-CIPN, n = 12 HV underwent Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent (BOLD fMRI at 3T whilst noxious heat-pain stimuli were applied to the foot and then thigh. Patients with MM-CIPN demonstrated greater activation during painful stimulation in the precuneus compared to HV (p = 0.014, FWE-corrected. Patients with MM-CIPN exhibited hypo-activation of the right superior frontal gyrus compared to HV (p = 0.031, FWE-corrected. Significant positive correlation existed between the total neuropathy score (reduced version and activation in the frontal operculum (close to insular cortex during foot stimulation in patients with MM-CIPN (p = 0.03, FWE-corrected; adjusted R2 = 0.87. Painful stimuli delivered to MM-CIPN patients evoke differential activation of distinct cortical regions, reflecting a unique pattern of central pain processing compared with healthy volunteers. This characteristic activation pattern associated with pain furthers the understanding of the pathophysiology of painful chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy. Functional MRI provides a tool for monitoring cerebral changes during anti-cancer and analgesic treatment.

  2. Transverse emittance measurement at REGAE via a solenoid scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, Max

    2012-12-15

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required. A quantity to rate the beam quality is the beam emittance. In the course of this thesis transverse emittance measurements by a solenoid scan could be realized and beyond that an improved theoretical description of a solenoid was successful. The foundation of emittance measurements are constituted by theoretical models which describe the envelope of a beam. Two different models were derived. The first is an often used model to determine the transverse beam emittance without considering space charge effects. More interesting and challenging was the development of an envelope model taking space charge effects into account. It is introduced and cross checked with measurements and simulations.

  3. High luminosity interaction region design for collisions with detector solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Milardi, C; Raimondi, P; Sensolini, G; Sgamma, F

    2010-01-01

    An innovatory interaction region has been recently conceived and realized on the Frascati DA{\\Phi}NE lepton collider. The concept of tight focusing and small crossing angle adopted until now to achieve high luminosity in multibunch collisions has evolved towards enhanced beam focusing at the interaction point with large horizontal crossing angle, thanks to a new compensation mechanism for the beam-beam resonances. The novel configuration has been tested with a small detector without solenoidal field yielding a remarkable improvement in terms of peak as well as integrated luminosity. The high luminosity interaction region has now been modified to host a large detector with a strong solenoidal field which significantly perturbs the beam optics introducing new design challenges in terms of interaction region optics design, beam transverse coupling control and beam stay clear requirements

  4. Design of High Field Solenoids made of High Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalesi, Antonio; /Pisa U.

    2010-12-01

    This thesis starts from the analytical mechanical analysis of a superconducting solenoid, loaded by self generated Lorentz forces. Also, a finite element model is proposed and verified with the analytical results. To study the anisotropic behavior of a coil made by layers of superconductor and insulation, a finite element meso-mechanic model is proposed and designed. The resulting material properties are then used in the main solenoid analysis. In parallel, design work is performed as well: an existing Insert Test Facility (ITF) is adapted and structurally verified to support a coil made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS). Finally, a technological winding process was proposed and the required tooling is designed.

  5. Refurbishment and Testing of the 1970's Era LASS Solenoid Coils for JLab's Hall D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anumagalla, Ravi; Biallas, George; Brindza, Paul; Carstens, Thomas; Creel, Jonathan; Egiyan, Hovanes; Martin, Floyd; Qiang, Yi; Spiegel, Scot; Stevens, Mark; Wissmann, Mark

    2012-07-01

    JLab refurbished the LASS1, 1.85 m bore Solenoid, consisting of four superconducting coils to act as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The coils, built in 1971 at Stanford Linier Accelerator Center and used a second time at the MEGA Experiment at Los Alamos, had electrical shorts and leaks to the insulating vacuum along with deteriorated superinsulation & instrumentation. Root cause diagnosis of the problems and the repair methods are described along with the measures used to qualify the vessels and piping within the Laboratory's Pressure Safety Program (mandated by 10CFR851). The extraordinary refrigerator operational methods used to utilize the obsolete cryogenic apparatus gathered for the off-line, single coil tests are described.

  6. HIE-ISOLDE CRYO-MODULE Assembly - Superconducting Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Leclercq, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of the cryo-module components in SM18 cleanroom. The superconducting solenoid (housed inside its helium vessel) is cleaned, prepared then installed on the supporting frame of the cryo-module and connected to the helium tank, prior to the assembly of the RF cavities on the structure. The completed first 2 cryo-modules installed inside the HIE-ISOLDE-LINAC ready for beam operation is also shown.

  7. A feasibility study of high-strength Bi-2223 conductor for high-field solenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godeke, A.; Abraimov, D. V.; Arroyo, E.; Barret, N.; Bird, M. D.; Francis, A.; Jaroszynski, J.; Kurteva, D. V.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Marks, E. L.; Marshall, W. S.; McRae, D. M.; Noyes, P. D.; Pereira, R. C. P.; Viouchkov, Y. L.; Walsh, R. P.; White, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    We performed a feasibility study on a high-strength Bi{}2-xPb x Sr2Ca2Cu3O{}10-x(Bi-2223) tape conductor for high-field solenoid applications. The investigated conductor, DI-BSCCO Type HT-XX, is a pre-production version of Type HT-NX, which has recently become available from Sumitomo Electric Industries. It is based on their DI-BSCCO Type H tape, but laminated with a high-strength Ni-alloy. We used stress–strain characterizations, single- and double-bend tests, easy- and hard-way bent coil-turns at various radii, straight and helical samples in up to 31.2 T background field, and small 20-turn coils in up to 17 T background field to systematically determine the electro-mechanical limits in magnet-relevant conditions. In longitudinal tensile tests at 77 K, we found critical stress- and strain-levels of 516 MPa and 0.57%, respectively. In three decidedly different experiments we detected an amplification of the allowable strain with a combination of pure bending and Lorentz loading to ≥slant 0.92 % (calculated elastically at the outer tape edge). This significant strain level, and the fact that it is multi-filamentary conductor and available in the reacted and insulated state, makes DI-BSCCO HT-NX highly suitable for very high-field solenoids, for which high current densities and therefore high loads are required to retain manageable magnet dimensions.

  8. Fetal central nervous system anomalies: comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography for diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guang-bin; QU Lei; LI Hui-hua; SHAN Rui-qin; MA Yu-xiang; SHI Hao; CHEN Li-guang; LIU Wen; QIU Xiu-ling; WEI Yu-long; GUO Li

    2006-01-01

    Background Evaluation of fetal central nervous system (CNS) agenesis by ultrasonography (US) is frequentlylimited, but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has its own advantages and is gaining popularity in displayingsuspected fetal anomalies. The purpose of this study was to explore the value of MRI in detecting fetal CNSagenesis.Methods Thirty-four women (aged from 22 to 35 years, average 27 years) with complicated pregnancies (16-39 weeks of gestation, average 30 weeks) were examined with a 1.5 T superconductive MR unit within 24 hoursafter ultrasonography. Half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) T2-weighted imaging (T2WI)sequence were performed in all patients, and fast low angle shot (FLASH) T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) sequencewere applied sequentially in seven of them. Comparison of the results was made between the MRI and USfindings as well as autopsy or postnatal follow-up MRI findings.Results The gyrus, sulcus, corpus callosum, thalamus, cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord of fetus wereshown more clearly on T2-weighted MR images than on T1-weighted MR images. MRI corrected the diagnosis ofUS in 10 cases (10/34, 29.41%) and the diagnosis was missed only in 1 case (1/34, 2.94%).Conclusion MRI has advantages to US in detecting fetal CNS anomalies and is a supplement to US incomplicated pregnancies.

  9. How Does Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Influence Glial Cells in the Central Nervous System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Carlie L; Young, Kaylene M

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is widely used in the clinic, and while it has a direct effect on neuronal excitability, the beneficial effects experienced by patients are likely to include the indirect activation of other cell types. Research conducted over the past two decades has made it increasingly clear that a population of non-neuronal cells, collectively known as glia, respond to and facilitate neuronal signaling. Each glial cell type has the ability to respond to electrical activity directly or indirectly, making them likely cellular effectors of TMS. TMS has been shown to enhance adult neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation, but the effect on cell survival and differentiation is less certain. Furthermore there is limited information regarding the response of astrocytes and microglia to TMS, and a complete paucity of data relating to the response of oligodendrocyte-lineage cells to this treatment. However, due to the critical and yet multifaceted role of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS), the influence that TMS has on glial cells is certainly an area that warrants careful examination.

  10. Electric and magnetic energy at axion haloscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, B. R.; Themann, H.; Jang, W.; Choi, J.; Kim, D.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, J.; Won, E.; Semertzidis, Y. K.

    2016-12-01

    We review the electro-magnetic energy at axion haloscopes and find that the electric and the corresponding magnetic energy stored in the cavity modes or, equivalently, the mode dependent electric and magnetic form factors are the same regardless of the position of the cavity inside the solenoid. Furthermore, we extend our argument to the cases satisfying ∇→×B→external=0 , where B→external is a static magnetic field provided by a magnet at an axion haloscope. Two typical magnets, solenoidal and toroidal, satisfy ∇→×B→external=0 ; thus, the electric and the corresponding magnetic energy stored in the cavity modes are always the same in both cases. The energy, however, is independent of the position of the cavity in axion haloscopes with a solenoid, and depends on those with a toroidal magnet.

  11. Revisiting a historic human brain with magnetic resonance imaging – the first description of a divided central sulcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Renate; Helms, Gunther; Frahm, Jens

    2014-01-01

    In 1860 and 1862, the German physiologist Wagner published two studies, in which he compared the cortical surfaces of brain specimens. This provided the first account of a rare anatomical variation – bridges across the central sulci in both hemispheres connecting the forward and backward facing central convolutions in one of the brains. The serendipitous rediscovery of the preserved historic brain specimen in the collections at Göttingen University, being mistaken as the brain of the mathematician C.F. Gauss, allowed us to further investigate the morphology of the bridges Wagner had described with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). On the historic lithograph, current photographs and MRI surface reconstructions of the brain, a connection across the central sulcus can only be seen in the left hemisphere. In the right hemisphere, contrary to the description of Wagner, a connecting structure is only present across the post-central sulcus. MRI reveals that the left-hemispheric bridge extends into the depth of the sulcus, forming a transverse connection between the two opposing gyri. This rare anatomical variation, generally not associated with neurological symptoms, would nowadays be categorized as a divided central sulcus. The left-hemispheric connection seen across the post-central sulcus, represents the very common case of a segmented post-central sulcus. MRI further disclosed a connection across the right-hemispheric central sulcus, which terminates just below the surface of the brain and is therefore not depicted on the historical lithography. This explains the apparent inconsistency between the bilateral description of bridges across the central sulci and the unilateral appearance on the brain surface. The results are discussed based on the detailed knowledge of anatomists of the late 19th century, who already recognized the divided central sulcus as an extreme variation of a deep convolution within the central sulcus. PMID:24904304

  12. Revisiting a historic human brain with magnetic resonance imaging - the first description of a divided central sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Renate; Helms, Gunther; Frahm, Jens

    2014-01-01

    In 1860 and 1862, the German physiologist Wagner published two studies, in which he compared the cortical surfaces of brain specimens. This provided the first account of a rare anatomical variation - bridges across the central sulci in both hemispheres connecting the forward and backward facing central convolutions in one of the brains. The serendipitous rediscovery of the preserved historic brain specimen in the collections at Göttingen University, being mistaken as the brain of the mathematician C.F. Gauss, allowed us to further investigate the morphology of the bridges Wagner had described with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). On the historic lithograph, current photographs and MRI surface reconstructions of the brain, a connection across the central sulcus can only be seen in the left hemisphere. In the right hemisphere, contrary to the description of Wagner, a connecting structure is only present across the post-central sulcus. MRI reveals that the left-hemispheric bridge extends into the depth of the sulcus, forming a transverse connection between the two opposing gyri. This rare anatomical variation, generally not associated with neurological symptoms, would nowadays be categorized as a divided central sulcus. The left-hemispheric connection seen across the post-central sulcus, represents the very common case of a segmented post-central sulcus. MRI further disclosed a connection across the right-hemispheric central sulcus, which terminates just below the surface of the brain and is therefore not depicted on the historical lithography. This explains the apparent inconsistency between the bilateral description of bridges across the central sulci and the unilateral appearance on the brain surface. The results are discussed based on the detailed knowledge of anatomists of the late 19th century, who already recognized the divided central sulcus as an extreme variation of a deep convolution within the central sulcus.

  13. Thrust kinematics deduced by primary and secondary magnetizations in the Internal Sierras (Central Pyrenees, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, B.; Pueyo, E.

    2003-04-01

    The Central Southern Pyrenees are composed (from N to S) by the Axial Zone (made by several basement-involved nappes; (Gavarnie and Guarga), the Internal Sierras (IS) fold and thrust belt (Larra and Monte Perdido units), the Jaca piggyback basin (turbiditic and molassic) and the External Sierras. Several paleomagnetic studies have been carried out during the last decades in all units except for the IS. Different amounts of rotation were reported, usually from primary directions. This work shows paleomagnetic results derived from recent investigations in the IS. 78 sites were sampled in different thrust sheets in the Larra and Monte Perdido units. Sites were collected in Upper Cretaceous rocks; all of them were homogeneously distributed along the range strike. A N-S section through the Eocene turbiditic basin was also done (9 sites) to link our results to previous data. Stepwise thermal demagnetization every 25-50^oC was performed to unravel the NRM components. Magnetic mineralogy essays (IRM, IST and low temperature) confirm magnetite as the major magnetic carrier. Two paleomagnetic components can be distinguished; A) an intermediate direction unblocking from 350^o to 450^oC and B) a high temperature component (from 500^o -575^oC). The B component displays two polarities and a positive fold and reverse tests whereas the A component shows only reverse polarity and a pervasive negative fold test. The A component has been also found in the Eocene transect. Two major clues help to constrain the remagnetization age; on one hand the deformation age (Early-Middle Eocene in the Larra and Monte Perdido units) and, on the other hand, the age of the turbiditic rocks (Middle Eocene). Therefore the remagnetization process took place by the end of the IS thrust system configuration or in a later period. Since the rotation detected by the A and B components are similar, the rotation age can be constrained as younger than the remagnetization. All these deductions have important

  14. Fetal Central Nervous System Anomalies Detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Two-Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Sefidbakht

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is gradually becoming more common for thorough visualization of the fetus than ultrasound (US, especially for neurological anomalies, which are the most common indications for fetal MRI and are a matter of concern for both families and society. Objectives We investigated fetal MRIs carried out in our center for frequency of central nervous system anomalies. This is the first such report in southern Iran. Materials and Methods One hundred and seven (107 pregnant women with suspicious fetal anomalies in prenatal ultrasound entered a cross-sectional retrospective study from 2011 to 2013. A 1.5 T Siemens Avanto scanner was employed for sequences, including T2 HASTE and Trufisp images in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes to mother’s body, T2 HASTE and Trufisp relative to the specific fetal body part being evaluated, and T1 flash images in at least one plane based on clinical indication. We investigated any abnormality in the central nervous system and performed descriptive analysis to achieve index of frequency. Results Mean gestational age ± standard deviation (SD for fetuses was 25.54 ± 5.22 weeks, and mean maternal age ± SD was 28.38 ± 5.80 years Eighty out of 107 (74.7% patients who were referred with initial impression of borderline ventriculomegaly. A total of 18 out of 107 (16.82% patients were found to have fetuses with CNS anomalies and the remainder were neurologically normal. Detected anomalies were as follow: 3 (16.6% fetuses each had the Dandy-Walker variant and Arnold-Chiari II (with myelomeningocele. Complete agenesis of corpus callosum, partial agenesis of corpus callosum, and aqueductal stenosis were each seen in 2 (11.1% fetuses. Arnold-Chiari II without myelomeningocele, anterior spina bifida associated with neurenteric cyst, arachnoid cyst, lissencephaly, and isolated enlarged cisterna magna each presented in one (5.5% fetus. One fetus had concomitant schizencephaly and complete

  15. The Superconducting Magnets of the ILC Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; He, P.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; /Brookhaven; Nosochkov, Y.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2007-09-28

    The ILC Beam Delivery System (BDS) uses a variety of superconducting magnets to maximize luminosity and minimize background. Compact final focus quadrupoles with multifunction correction coils focus incoming beams to few nanometer spot sizes while focusing outgoing disrupted beams into a separate extraction beam line. Anti-solenoids mitigate effects from overlapping focusing and the detector solenoid field. Far from the interaction point (IP) strong octupoles help minimize IP backgrounds. A low-field but very large aperture dipole is integrated with the detector solenoid to reduce backgrounds from beamstrahlung pairs generated at the IP. Physics requirements and magnetic design solutions for the BDS superconducting magnets are reviewed in this paper.

  16. Evolution of magnetotelluric, total magnetic field, and VLF field parameters in Central Italy. Relations to local seismic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meloni, A.; Di Mauro, D.; Mele, G.; Palangio, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Ernst, T.; Teisseyre, R. [Institute of Geophysics, Warszawa (Poland)

    2001-04-01

    Magnetotelluric data were collected at Collemeluccio (41.72{sup 0}N, 14.37{sup 0}E) in Central Italy from summer 1991 to spring 1998. Analyzed by means of tensor decomposition on the geoelectric potential and robust estimation on the geomagnetic field, this set of data allowed the investigation of the electromagnetic induction, is presented here in its time evolution and compared to local and regional seismic activity. Tecto magnetic field observations from absolute magnetic field level in Central Italy were also made on data simultaneously recorded at four magnetometer stations, using L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory as a reference for differentiation. Recent results gathered from a system of two VLF search coil wide-band antennas, installed in the L'Aquila Observatory, are also discussed in relation to local seismic activity.

  17. REVIEW ARTICLE: In vivo magnetic resonance imaging: insights into structure and function of the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natt, Oliver; Frahm, Jens

    2005-04-01

    Spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques provide structural, metabolic and functional insights into the central nervous system and allow for repetitive in vivo studies of both humans and animals. Complementing its prominent role in diagnostic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into an indispensable research tool in system-oriented neurobiology where contributions to functional genomics and translational medicine bridge the gap from molecular biology to animal models and clinical applications. This review presents an overview on some of the most relevant advances in MRI. An introduction covering the basic principles is followed by a discussion of technological improvements in instrumentation and imaging sequences including recent developments in parallel acquisition techniques. Because MRI is noninvasive in contrast to most other imaging modalities, examples focus on in vivo studies of the central nervous system in a variety of species ranging from humans to mice and insects.

  18. Simple analysis of off-axis solenoid fields using the scalar magnetostatic potential: application to a Zeeman-slower for cold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Muniz, Sérgio R.; Bhattacharya, M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2010-01-01

    In a region free of currents, magnetostatics can be described by the Laplace equation of a scalar magnetic potential, and one can apply the same methods commonly used in electrostatics. Here we show how to calculate the general vector field inside a real (finite) solenoid, using only the magnitude of the field along the symmetry axis. Our method does not require integration or knowledge of the current distribution, and is presented through practical examples, including a non-uniform finite so...

  19. The levitation characteristics of the magnetic substances using trapped HTS bulk annuli with various magnetic field distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@ec.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima-Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Ikegami, T.; Matsunaga, J.; Fujii, Y. [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima-Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Onodera, H. [Japan Science and Technology Agency–Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (JST–CREST), Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The spherical solenoid magnet can make a various magnetic field distributions. •We generated a large magnetic gradient at inner space of HTS bulks. •The levitation height of samples was improved by the reapplied field method. •The levitation height depends on the variation rate of magnetic field gradient. -- Abstract: We have been investigating the levitation system without any mechanical contact which is composed of a field-cooled ring-shaped high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks [1]. In this proposed levitation system, the trapped magnetic field distributions of stacked HTS bulk are very important. In this paper, the spherical solenoid magnet composed of seven solenoid coils with different inner and outer diameters was designed and fabricated as a new magnetic source. The fabricated spherical solenoid magnet can easily make a homogeneous and various magnetic field distributions in inner space of stacked HTS bulk annuli by controlling the emerging currents of each coil. By using this spherical solenoid magnet, we tried to make a large magnetic field gradient in inner space of HTS bulk annuli, and it is very important on the levitation of magnetic substances. In order to improve the levitation properties of magnetic substances with various sizes, the external fields were reapplied to the initially trapped HTS bulk magnets. We could generate a large magnetic field gradient along the axial direction in inner space of HTS bulk annuli, and obtain the improved levitation height of samples by the proposed reapplied field method.

  20. Quench propagation and detection in the superconducting bus-bars of the ATLAS magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A; Baynham, D Elwyn; Courthold, M J D; Lesmond, C

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting magnet system comprising Barrel (BT) and End-Cap Toroids (ECT) and also Central Solenoid (CS) will store more than 1.5 GJ of magnetic energy. The magnet system will have many superconducting busbars, a few meters long each, running from the current leads to Central Solenoid and Toroids as well as between the coils of each Toroid. Quench development in the busbars, i.e., the normal zone propagation process along the busbar superconductors, is slow and exhibits very low voltages. Therefore, its timely and appropriate detection represents a real challenge. The temperature evolution in the busbars under quench is of primary importance. Conservative calculations of the temperature were performed for all the magnets. Also, a simple and effective method to detect a normal zone in a busbar is presented. A thin superconducting wire, whose normal resistance can be easily detected, is placed in a good thermal contact to busbar. Thus, the wire can operate as straightforward and low-noise quench-...

  1. Relationship between chemical composition and magnetic susceptibility in sediment cores from Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J N Pattan; G Parthiban; V K Banakar; A Tomer; M Kulkarni

    2008-04-01

    Three sediment cores in a north–south transect (3°N to 13°S) from different sediment types of the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) are studied to understand the possible relationship between magnetic susceptibility () and Al, Fe, Ti and Mn concentrations. The calcareous ooze core exhibit lowest (12.32 × 10-7m3 kg−1), Al (2.84%), Fe (1.63%) and Ti (0.14%), terrigenous clay core with moderate (29.9 × 10-7 m3 kg−1) but highest Al (6.84%), Fe (5.20%) and Ti (0.44%), and siliceous ooze core with highest (38.06 × 10-7 m3 kg−1) but moderate Al (4.49%), Fe (2.80%) and Ti (0.19%) contents. The distribution of and detrital proxy elements (Al, Fe, and Ti) are identical in both calcareous and siliceous ooze. Interestingly, in terrigenous core, the behaviour of is identical to only Ti content but not with Al and Fe suggesting possibility of Al and Fe having a non-detrital source. The occurrence of phillipsite in terrigenous clay is evident by the Al-K scatter plot where trend line intersects K axis at more than 50% of total K suggesting excess K in the form of phillipsite. Therefore, the presence of phillipsite might be responsible for negative correlation between and Al ( = −0.52). In siliceous ooze the strong positive correlations among , Alexc and Feexc suggest the presence of authigenic Fe-rich smectite. High Mn content (0.5%) probably in the form of manganese micronodules is also contributing to in both calcareous and siliceous ooze but not in the terrigenous core where mean Mn content (0.1%) is similar to crustal abundance. Thus, systematically records the terrigenous variation in both the biogenic sediments but in terrigenous clay it indirectly suggests the presence of authigenic minerals.

  2. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles highlight early involvement of the choroid plexus in central nervous system inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Infante‑Duarte

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation during multiple sclerosis involves immune cell infiltration and disruption of the BBB (blood–brain barrier. Both processes can be visualized by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging, in multiple sclerosis patients and in the animal model EAE (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We previously showed that VSOPs (very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles reveal CNS (central nervous system lesions in EAE which are not detectable by conventional contrast agents in MRI. We hypothesized that VSOP may help detect early, subtle inflammatory events that would otherwise remain imperceptible. To investigate the capacity of VSOP to reveal early events in CNS inflammation, we induced EAE in SJL mice using encephalitogenic T-cells, and administered VSOP prior to onset of clinical symptoms. In parallel, we administered VSOP to mice at peak disease, and to unmanipulated controls. We examined the distribution of VSOP in the CNS by MRI and histology. Prior to disease onset, in asymptomatic mice, VSOP accumulated in the choroid plexus and in spinal cord meninges in the absence of overt inflammation. However, VSOP was undetectable in the CNS of non-immunized control mice. At peak disease, VSOP was broadly distributed; we observed particles in perivascular inflammatory lesions with apparently preserved glia limitans. Moreover, at peak disease, VSOP was prominent in the choroid plexus and was seen in elongated endothelial structures, co-localized with phagocytes, and diffusely disseminated in the parenchyma, suggesting multiple entry mechanisms of VSOP into the CNS. Thus, using VSOP we were able to discriminate between inflammatory events occurring in established EAE and, importantly, we identified CNS alterations that appear to precede immune cell infiltration and clinical onset.

  3. Symmetrical central tegmental tract (CTT) hyperintense lesions on magnetic resonance imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shoko; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Akira [Kyoto City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Aida, Noriko [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Okano, Souzo; Matsushita, Hiroko [Kyoto City Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko; Yoshida, Naoko; Hirota, Haruyo [St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-02-15

    The central tegmental tract (CTT) is mainly the extrapyramidal tract connecting between the red nucleus and the inferior olivary nucleus. There are only a few case reports describing CTT abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children. Our purpose was to evaluate the frequency of CTT lesions and their characteristics on MRI, and to correlate the MR imaging findings with clinical features. We reviewed retrospectively the MR images of 392 children (215 boys and 177 girls) ranging in age from 1 to 6 years. To evaluate symmetrical CTT hyperintense lesions, we defined a CTT lesion as an area of bilateral symmetrical hyperintensity in the tegmentum pontis on both T2-weighted images and diffusion-weighted images in more than two slices. We measured the ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) values of symmetrical CTT hyperintensity, and compared them with those of children without CTT abnormality. CTT lesions were detected in 20 (5.1%) of the 392 children. The mean ADC value for these 20 children was significantly lower than that of the normal CTT (p<0.001). On MR imaging, other than CTT lesions, associated parenchymal lesion included: none (n=6); other abnormalities, including periventricular leukomalacia (n=3); thin corpus callosum (n=3); ventricular dilatation (n=2); encephalopathy (n=2). Clinically, cerebral palsy was the most frequent clinical diagnosis (n=6), accounting for 30%, which was significantly more frequent than the prevalence of cerebral palsy among children without CTT lesions (13%) (n<0.05). CTT lesions were detected in 5.1% of all the children examined. Cerebral palsy was the most frequent clinical diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Cortical excitability changes after high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for central poststroke pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomi, Koichi; Kishima, Haruhiko; Oshino, Satoru; Hirata, Masayuki; Tani, Naoki; Maruo, Tomoyuki; Yorifuji, Shiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Saitoh, Youichi

    2013-08-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP) is one of the most refractory chronic pain syndromes. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the primary motor cortex has been demonstrated to provide moderate pain relief for CPSP. However, the mechanism underlying the pain relief remains unclear. The objective of this study was to assess changes in cortical excitability in patients with intractable CPSP before and after rTMS of the primary motor cortex. Subjects were 21 patients with CPSP of the hand who underwent rTMS. The resting motor threshold, the amplitude of the motor evoked potential, duration of the cortical silent period, short interval intracortical inhibition, and intracortical facilitation were measured as parameters of cortical excitability before and after navigation-guided 5 Hz rTMS of the primary motor cortex corresponding to the painful hand. Pain reduction from rTMS was assessed with a visual analog scale. The same parameters were measured in both hemispheres of 8 healthy controls. Eight of 21 patients experienced ≥ 30% pain reduction after rTMS (responders). The resting motor threshold in the patients was higher than those in the controls at baseline (P=.035). Intracortical facilitation in the responders was lower than in the controls and the nonresponders at baseline (P=.035 and P=.019), and significantly increased after rTMS (P=.039). There were no significant differences or changes in the other parameters. Our findings suggest that restoration of abnormal cortical excitability might be one of the mechanisms underlying pain relief as a result of rTMS in CPSP.

  5. Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanoparticles Highlight Early Involvement of the Choroid Plexus in Central Nervous System Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Millward

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation during multiple sclerosis involves immune cell infiltration and disruption of the BBB (blood–brain barrier. Both processes can be visualized by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging, in multiple sclerosis patients and in the animal model EAE (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We previously showed that VSOPs (very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles reveal CNS (central nervous system lesions in EAE which are not detectable by conventional contrast agents in MRI. We hypothesized that VSOP may help detect early, subtle inflammatory events that would otherwise remain imperceptible. To investigate the capacity of VSOP to reveal early events in CNS inflammation, we induced EAE in SJL mice using encephalitogenic T-cells, and administered VSOP prior to onset of clinical symptoms. In parallel, we administered VSOP to mice at peak disease, and to unmanipulated controls. We examined the distribution of VSOP in the CNS by MRI and histology. Prior to disease onset, in asymptomatic mice, VSOP accumulated in the choroid plexus and in spinal cord meninges in the absence of overt inflammation. However, VSOP was undetectable in the CNS of non-immunized control mice. At peak disease, VSOP was broadly distributed; we observed particles in perivascular inflammatory lesions with apparently preserved glia limitans. Moreover, at peak disease, VSOP was prominent in the choroid plexus and was seen in elongated endothelial structures, co-localized with phagocytes, and diffusely disseminated in the parenchyma, suggesting multiple entry mechanisms of VSOP into the CNS. Thus, using VSOP we were able to discriminate between inflammatory events occurring in established EAE and, importantly, we identified CNS alterations that appear to precede immune cell infiltration and clinical onset.

  6. Involvement of the central nervous system in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: a clinical, electrophysiological and magnetic resonance imaging study.

    OpenAIRE

    Ormerod, I E; Waddy, H M; Kermode, A G; Murray, N M; Thomas, P. K.

    1990-01-01

    In a consecutive series of 30 patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) minor clinical evidence of CNS involvement was found in five. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 28 and revealed abnormalities consistent with demyelination in nine patients aged less than 50 years and abnormalities in five aged 50 years or over. Measurements of central motor conduction time (CMCT) were obtained in 18 and showed unilateral or bilateral abnormalities in s...

  7. A solenoid-based active hydraulic engine mount: modelling, analysis, and verification

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Ali

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on the design, modelling, identification, simulation, and experimental verification of a low-cost solenoid-based active hydraulic engine mount. To build an active engine mount, a commercial On-Off solenoid is modified to be used as an actuator and it is embedded inside a hydraulic engine mount. The hydraulic engine mount is modelled and tested, solenoid actuator is modelled and identified, and finally the models were integrated to obtain the analytical model of the...

  8. Glimpses of East Antarctica: Aeromagnetic and satellite magnetic view from the central Transantarctic Mountains of East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Carol A.; Goodge, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Aeromagnetic and satellite magnetic data provide glimpses of the crustal architecture within the Ross Sea sector of the enigmatic, ice-covered East Antarctic shield critical for understanding both global tectonic and climate history. In the central Transantarctic Mountains (CTAM), exposures of Precambrian basement, coupled with new high-resolution magnetic data, other recent aeromagnetic transects, and satellite magnetic and seismic tomography data, show that the shield in this region comprises an Archean craton modified both by Proterozoic magmatism and early Paleozoic orogenic basement reactivation. CTAM basement structures linked to the Ross Orogeny are imaged 50–100 km farther west than previously mapped, bounded by inboard upper crustal Proterozoic granites of the Nimrod igneous province. Magnetic contrasts between craton and rift margin sediments define the Neoproterozoic rift margin, likely reactivated during Ross orogenesis and Jurassic extension. Interpretation of satellite magnetic and aeromagnetic patterns suggests that the Neoproterozoic rift margin of East Antarctica is offset by transfer zones to form a stepwise series of salients tracing from the CTAM northward through the western margin of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin to the coast at Terre Adélie. Thinned Precambrian crust inferred to lie east of the rift margin cannot be imaged magnetically because of modification by Neoproterozoic and younger tectonic events.

  9. Effects of central metal on electronic structure, magnetic properties, infrared and Raman spectra of double-decker phthalocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Oku, Takeo

    2016-09-01

    The effects of the central metal in double-decker metal phthalocyanine on the electronic structure, magnetic properties, and infrared and Raman spectra of the complex were investigated. Electron density distributions were delocalized on the phthalocyanine rings. The narrow energy gap and infrared peaks observed in the ultra-violet-visible-near infrared spectra of the systems were attributed to phthalocyanine ring-ring interactions the between overlapping π-orbitals on each ring. The chemical shift behavior of the phthalocyanine rings was separated by the deformation of their structure owing to nuclear magnetic interaction of the nuclear quadrupole interaction as determined by the electronic field gradient and asymmetric parameters. The magnetic parameters of principle g-tensors were dependent on the perturbation of the crystal field by the hybridization of the d-spin in the central metal conjugated with nitrogen ligands. In the case of the vanadyl system, the IR vibration modes were shifted by the soft vibration mode for resolving the symmetrical structure. Inactive Raman vibration modes arose from no-polarization on the phthalocyanine rings. Double-decker metal phthalocyanines have great advantages for the control of the magnetic mechanism for quantum spin entanglement in the relaxation process.

  10. Magnet News

    CERN Multimedia

    Foussat, A; Ruber, R

    Central Solenoid Test The Central Solenoid (CS) and its associated Proximity Cryogenic System have been designed by KEK in collaboration with CERN. Following construction and extensive tests at the Toshiba manufacturing site in Yokohama, Japan, the equipment has been shipped to CERN. The CS is now being prepared for the integration in a common cryostat with the LAr calorimeter, after which a full on-surface test has to be completed before final installation 100m underground in the ATLAS cavern. For this purpose a provisional set-up for the re- commissioning of the final Proximity Cryogenics, the connecting Chimney and the Central Solenoid has been established. During the month of May the Proximity Cryogenics and Chimney with superconducting bus lines have been tested (figure1). The equipment was cooled down to 4.5K and a current of 9000 amperes was applied to the chimney. This is almost 20% above the nominal operational current of 7400 amperes. A number of tests and simulations have been successfully perf...

  11. Heavy ion physics at LHC with the Compact Muon Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedjidian, M.; Contardo, D.; Haroutunian, R. [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France)] [and others

    1995-07-15

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), is one of the two detectors proposed to achieve the primary goal of the LHC: the discovery of the Higgs boson(s). For this purpose, the detector is optimized for the precise measurement of muons, photons, electrons and jets. It is a clear motivation to investigate its ability to measure the hard processes probing the formation of a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) in ion collisions. It is the case of the heavy quark bound states, long predicted to be suppressed in a QGP. In CMS they can be detected, via their muonic decay according to the principle adopted for the p-p physics.

  12. Comparing superconducting and permanent magnets for magnetic refrigeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bjørk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We compare the cost of a high temperature superconducting (SC tape-based solenoid with a permanent magnet (PM Halbach cylinder for magnetic refrigeration. Assuming a five liter active magnetic regenerator volume, the price of each type of magnet is determined as a function of aspect ratio of the regenerator and desired internal magnetic field. It is shown that to produce a 1 T internal field in the regenerator a permanent magnet of hundreds of kilograms is needed or an area of superconducting tape of tens of square meters. The cost of cooling the SC solenoid is shown to be a small fraction of the cost of the SC tape. Assuming a cost of the SC tape of 6000 $/m2 and a price of the permanent magnet of 100 $/kg, the superconducting solenoid is shown to be a factor of 0.3-3 times more expensive than the permanent magnet, for a desired field from 0.5-1.75 T and the geometrical aspect ratio of the regenerator. This factor decreases for increasing field strength, indicating that the superconducting solenoid could be suitable for high field, large cooling power applications.

  13. Sediment Magnetic Proxies Reflect Post-Glacial Climate Change for East-Central New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, B. M.; Lopez, G.; Doner, L.; Fowler, B. K.; Geiss, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    The magnetic properties of lake sediments from Pea Porridge Pond in New Hampshire were analyzed in an attempt to reconstruct the paleoclimatic history of the region. Our suite of measurements included magnetic susceptibility (χ), anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM), S ratios, and coercivity distributions of IRM. Magnetic susceptibility reflects the ease in which sediments are magnetized when exposed to a magnetic field and is related to the concentration and composition of the material in the sample. ARM is heavily biased towards the presence of small (0.1-1 μm) single-domain grains and the ARM-ratio (ARM/IRM) can be used as a magnetic grainsize proxy. S-ratios, measured in backfields of 100 mT and 320 mT correspond to the combined effects of changes in magnetic grain-size and mineralogy. The oldest sediments (> 23m, > 13 ka) are characterized by high concentrations (high values of χ, ARM, IRM) of coarse-grained (low ARM-ratios) ferromagnetic (S-ratios ≈ 1) magnetic minerals, representing an influx of predominantly clastic material. The following transitional period (23 - 21 m, approx. 13 - 11 ka) is characterized by increasing organic matter and lower concentrations of ferromagnetic material. High ARM-ratios, however, indicate a large component of SD particles. Coercivity analyses reveal that these SD-grains are mostly of biogenic origin, produced by magnetotactic bacteria. The top of the core (< 21 m, < 11 ka) is characterized by organic-rich sediment containing little magnetizable material. This may be due to the surrounding wetlands acting as a filter preventing magnetic material to reach the center of the lake, or a general stabilization of the landscape decreasing clastic influx. High ARM-ratios suggest the presence of single-domain grains, and low S-ratios suggest a relative increase in high-coercivity material, though coercivity analyses for this part of the core remain ambiguous.

  14. Magnetic anomalies over fracture zones in the central North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twigt, W.

    1980-01-01

    The offset of a fracture zone leads to a configuration in which a strip of oceanic crust of one age will be juxtaposed axially to a strip of another age. Consequently, the polarity of the magnetic layer may be different on either side of the fracture zone. Next to this magnetic contrast the fracture

  15. Method and apparatus for monitoring armature position in direct-current solenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, J.C.; Haynes, H.D.

    1996-12-10

    A method for determining the position of an armature of a dc-powered solenoid is disclosed. Electrical circuitry is provided to introduce a small alternating current flow through the coil. As a result, the impedance and resistance of the solenoid coil can be measured to provide information indicative of the armature`s position. 5 figs.

  16. Origin of the Eastern Galicia Magnetic Anomaly (NW Spain). Implications for the Origin of Magnetic Anomalies in the Central Iberian Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayarza, P.; Martinez-Catalan, J. R.; Villalain, J. J.; Alvarez Lobato, F.; Martin Paramio, M.; Rodriguez Gómez, S.; Sanz López, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aeromagnetic map of Iberia features outstanding anomalies that have been key to define the Central Iberian Arc, a late-orogenic orocline in the western part of the Variscan belt. The most studied of them is the EGMA (Eastern Galicia Magnetic Anomaly), which follows the Lugo-Sanabria extensional dome and is probably associated with it. Among the existing models of this anomaly, those relating it with magnetite-rich inhomogeneous granites and migmatites formed during late-Variscan extension seem to be more plausible ones. However, this and other interpretations involving deep-seated mafic/ultramafic bodies lack resolution as they are based on the aeromagnetic dataset. New ground magnetic data have been acquired in the northern part of the Xistral Tectonic Window, at the core of the Lugo dome where its deepest rocks crop out. The resulting maps show that the anomaly ranges ~1000 nT (vs. 190 nT on the aeromagnetic map) and that the most important maxima lie on top of extensional detachments located on high-grade metasediments or inhomogeneous granites. 2D forward modeling indicates that the magnetization is carried by upper Neoproterozoic and early Cambrian metasediments, partially melted during late-Variscan high-T and low-P metamorphic event linked to the extensional collapse. Furthermore, the anomaly maxima are spatially related with detachments, where the metasediments were strongly sheared. Therefore, the P-T, redox and fluid pressure conditions necessary for the formation of magnetite seem related with the extensional process and the dynamics of its structures. Many magnetic anomalies of the Central Iberian Arc lie on top of Variscan extensional domes and accordingly may have a similar origin. Special attention is paid to the Gredos Magnetic Anomaly, coincident with the batholith of the same name. Preliminary magnetic mapping and modeling indicate that the anomaly is previous to the intrusion of the Jurassic Alentejo-Plasencia dyke and to the tardi

  17. Linking speleothem and soil magnetism in the Pau d'Alho cave (central South America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaqueto, Plinio; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Novello, Valdir F.; Cruz, Francisco W.; Karmann, Ivo; Strauss, Becky E.; Feinberg, Joshua M.

    2016-10-01

    Mineral magnetism of Pau d'Alho cave sediments, soils outside the cave, and in the stalagmite #6 (ALHO6) in Midwest Brazil is presented. This high growth-rate speleothem ( 168 mm/ka) encompasses the past 1355 years. Oxygen and carbon isotope data from the same stalagmite allow for a direct comparison of the magnetic signal with changes in paleoprecipitation and soil dynamics at the surface. Magnetic experiments include isothermal remanent magnetization, anhysteretic remanent magnetization, hysteresis loops, first-order reversal curves, and low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. The main magnetic remanence carriers in ALHO6 are magnetite and goethite, with a nearly constant relative proportion. Remanent coercivities of magnetite in all our samples are within 14-17 mT for an average grain-size of 1-2 µm, in the range of pedogenic magnetite, thus suggesting the detrital grains deposited in the stalagmite were produced in the soil above the cave. Magnetic remanence variations follow δ13C and δ18O data, suggesting a climatic control on the input of magnetic minerals into the Pau d'Alho cave system. The concentration of magnetic minerals in the stalagmite is governed by soil erosion above the cave, which by its turn is controlled by soil erosion and vegetation cover. Dry periods are associated with less stable soils and result in higher mineral fluxes carried into karst systems. Conversely, wetter periods are associated with soils topped by denser vegetation that retains micrometer-scale pedogenic minerals and thus reduces detrital fluxes into the cave.

  18. Magnetic anomalies across the southern Central Indian Ridge: evidence for a new transform fault

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A.K.; Krishna, K.S.; SubbaRaju, L.V.; Rao, D.G.

    the bathymetric trend observed along the ridge crest (Fig. 5). Deep bathymetric troughs and magnetic offsets are generally found at the intersection of a fracture zone with a section of oceanic ridge (HEEzEN and THAR~', 1965; MArrHEWS et al., 1965; SLEEP and Bm... axes, respectively, identified from the present study. Reduced effective magnetization of the marine magnetic source layer is noted in the fracture zones (SoIoUTEN and KLITGORD, 1982). On profile SK 20-4, well-developed anomaly numbers could...

  19. Simple analysis of off-axis solenoid fields using the scalar magnetostatic potential: application to a Zeeman-slower for cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Muniz, Sérgio R; Bagnato, Vanderlei S

    2010-01-01

    In a region free of currents, magnetostatics can be described by the Laplace equation of a scalar magnetic potential, and one can apply the same methods commonly used in electrostatics. Here we show how to calculate the general vector field inside a real (finite) solenoid, using only the magnitude of the field along the symmetry axis. Our method does not require integration or knowledge of the current distribution, and is presented through practical examples, including a non-uniform finite solenoid used to produce cold atomic beams via laser cooling. These examples allow educators to discuss the non-trivial calculation of fields off-axis using concepts familiar to most students, while offering the opportunity to introduce important advancements of current modern research.

  20. Magnetized Hypermassive Neutron Star Collapse: a candidate central engine for short-hard GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Stephens, Branson C; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L; Shibta, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Hypermassive neutron stars (HMNSs) are equilibrium configurations supported against collapse by rapid differential rotation and likely form as transient remnants of binary neutron star mergers. Though HMNSs are dynamically stable, secular effects such as viscosity or magnetic fields tend to bring HMNSs into uniform rotation and thus lead to collapse. We simulate the evolution of magnetized HMNSs in axisymmetry using codes which solve the Einstein-Maxwell-MHD system of equations. We find that magnetic braking and the magnetorotational instability (MRI) both contribute to the eventual collapse of HMNSs to rotating black holes surrounded by massive, hot accretion tori and collimated magnetic fields. Such hot tori radiate strongly in neutrinos, and the resulting neutrino-antineutrino annihilation could power short-hard GRBs.

  1. Magnetic transfer function entropy and the 2009 Mw = 6.3 L'Aquila earthquake (Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. X. Wu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of obtaining a deeper knowledge of the physical phenomena associated with the 2009 L'Aquila (Central Italy seismic sequence, culminating with a Mw = 6.3 earthquake on 6 April 2009, and possibly of identifying some kind of earthquake-related magnetic or geoelectric anomaly, we analyse the geomagnetic field components measured at the magnetic observatory of L'Aquila and their variations in time. In particular, trends of magnetic transfer functions in the years 2006–2010 are inspected. They are calculated from the horizontal to vertical magnetic component ratio in the frequency domain, and are very sensitive to deep and lateral geoelectric characteristics of the measurement site. Entropy analysis, carried out from the transfer functions with the so called transfer function entropy, points out clear temporal burst regimes of a few distinct harmonics preceding the main shock of the seismic sequence. A possible explanation is that they could be related to deep fluid migrations and/or to variations in the micro-/meso-fracturing that affected significantly the conductivity (ordered/disordered distribution in a large lithospheric volume under the seismogenic layer below L'Aquila area. This interpretation is also supported by the analysis of hypocentres depths before the main shock occurrence.

  2. Myelodysplastic syndrome complicated by central diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt wasting syndrome with peculiar change in magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Soichi; Yamagami, Keiko; Morikawa, Takashi; Yoshioka, Katsunobu

    2010-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) could occurs in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML), because of infiltration of leukemic cells into the neurohypophysis or some other reason and it is closely associated with abnormalities of chromosome 7. We report a case of MDS with abnormalities of chromosome 7, presenting as CDI followed by deterioration of polyuria and hyponatremia with a decreased extracellular fluid volume. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed symmetrically enhanced lesions in the hypothalamus. Fludrocortisone treatment normalized his serum sodium level and cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) was suspected.

  3. Failure Scenarios and Mitigations for the BABAR Superconducting Solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, EunJoo; Candia, A.; Craddock, W. W.; Racine, M.; Weisend, J. G.

    2006-04-01

    The cryogenic department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is responsible for the operation, troubleshooting, and upgrade of the 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid detector for the BABAR B-factory experiment. Events that disable the detector are rare but significantly impact the availability of the detector for physics research. As a result, a number of systems and procedures have been developed over time to minimize the downtime of the detector, for example improved control systems, improved and automatic backup systems, and spares for all major components. Together they can prevent or mitigate many of the failures experienced by the utilities, mechanical systems, controls and instrumentation. In this paper we describe various failure scenarios, their effect on the detector, and the modifications made to mitigate the effects of the failure. As a result of these modifications the reliability of the detector has increased significantly with only 3 shutdowns of the detector due to cryogenics systems over the last 2 years.

  4. TPC magnet cryogenic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A.; Burns, W.A.; Taylor, J.D.; Van Slyke, H.W.

    1980-03-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) magnet at LBL and its compensation solenoids are adiabatically stable superconducting solenoid magnets. The cryogenic system developed for the TPC magnet is discussed. This system uses forced two-phase tubular cooling with the two cryogens in the system. The liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are delivered through the cooled load by forced tubular flow. The only reservoirs of liquid cryogen exist in the control dewar (for liquid helium) and the conditioner dewar (for liquid nitrogen). The operation o these systems during virtually all phases of system operation are described. Photographs and diagrams of various system components are shown, and cryogenic system data are presented in the following sections: (1) heat leaks into the TPC coil package and the compensation solenoids; (2) heat leaks to various components of the TPC magnet cryogenics system besides the magnets and control dewar; (3) the control dewar and its relationship to the rest of the system; (4) the conditioner system and its role in cooling down the TPC magnet; (5) gas-cooled electrical leads and charging losses; and (6) a summation of the liquid helium and liquid nitrogen requirements for the TPC superconducting magnet system.

  5. Relationship between chemical composition and magnetic susceptibility in sediment cores from Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Parthiban, G.; Banakar, V.K.; Tomer, A.; Kulkarni, M.

    andnoefforthadbeenmade to correlate χ with detrital and authigenic fractions of individual elements. The χ variability in sedi- ments of the northern Indian Ocean was investi- gated to understand climate-driven changes during the Quaternary (Bloemendal and de Menocal... and discussion 3.1 Magnetic susceptibility The χ is directly related to magnetic material in the sediment and is the total contribution from all Fe-bearing minerals (Thomson and Oldfield 1986; Verosub and Roberts 1995) and is affected by dia- and para...

  6. INVESTIGATION ON THE DYNAMIC RESPONSE PERFORMANCE OF A NOVEL THREE-WAY SOLENOID VALVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wei; Su Ling; Wang Ying; Zhou Longbao; Liu Quanbing

    2006-01-01

    Objective A novel high-speed three-way solenoid valve is developed, which is used for the common-rail injection system equipped on DME powered engine. In order to improve the dynamic response performance of the three-way solenoid. Methods Experimental studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of spool stroke, drive voltage, negative demagnetizing pulse and two drive schemes on the dynamic response performance of the three-way solenoid valve. Results The results show that the dynamic response performance of the three-way solenoid valve can be remarkably improved by shortening the spool stroke and increasing the drive voltage. Simultaneously, the difference between the response time of closing valve and that of opening valve decreases. At each different drive voltage, there exists an optimal negative demagnetizing pulse corresponding to the same positive exciting pulse. At this optimal pulse,the dynamic response performance of the three-way solenoid valve is the best. In addition, the high drive voltage can lead to the smaller optimal negative demagnetizing pulse. It is also indicated from the experiments that the dynamic response performance of the three-way solenoid valve is better when the NO. 1 drive scheme is adopted. The lower drive voltage results in the larger difference between the dynamic response performances for the two drive schemes.Conclusion The dynamic response performance of a novel three-way solenoid valve is good.

  7. Design Construction and Test Results of a HTS Solenoid For Energy Recovery Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anerella, M; Ben-Zvi, I; Kayran, D; McIntyre, G; Muratore, J; Plate, S; Sampson, W; Cole, M

    2011-03-28

    An innovative feature of the proposed Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The use of HTS allows solenoid to be placed in close proximity to the cavity and thus provides early focusing of the electron beam. In addition, cryogenic testing at {approx}77 K is simpler and cheaper than 4 K testing. This paper will present the design, construction and test results of this HTS solenoid. The HTS solenoid in the proposed ERL will be situated in the transition region between the superconducting cavity at {approx}4 K and the cryostat at the room temperature. Solenoid inside the cryogenic structure provides an early focusing and hence low emittance beam. The temperature in the transition region will be too high for a conventional low temperature superconductor and resistive heat load from copper coils will be too high on cryogenic system. HTS coils also allow much higher current density and significant reduction in size as compared to copper coils. Hence HTS solenoid provide a unique and technically superior solution. The use of a HTS solenoid with superconducting cavity offers a unique option as it can be placed in a cold to warm transition region to provide early focussing without using additional space. Construction and test results so far are very encouraging for its use in the ERL project.

  8. Analysis of the electromagnetic field of direct action solenoid valve%直动电磁阀磁场特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘潜峰; 薄涵亮; 秦本科

    2009-01-01

    The Hydraulic Control Rod Drive Technology (HCRDT) is a newly invented patent of the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University with HCRDT's independent intellectual property rights. The integrated valve which is made up of three direct action solenoid valves is the key part of this technology, so the performance of the solenoid valve directly affects the function of the integrated valve and the HCRDT. Based on the abnormal conditions occurring in the operation of the Control Rod Hydraulic Drive System, the electromagnetic field of the direct action solenoid valve is analyzed using the ANSYS software. The result shows that the incorrect use of the magnetic material causes the change of magnetic circuit and the reverse of the magnetic force direction in some conditions, which leads to the malfunction of the solenoid valve and the Control Rod Hydraulic Drive System. Further more, the design of the direct action solenoid valve can be optimized by the analysis of electromagnetic field.%控制棒水压驱动技术是清华大学核能与新能源技术研究院具有自主知识产权的一项新型发明专利技术.组合阀属于该项技术的关键部件,组合阀是由三个直动电磁阀组成,电磁阀的性能直接影响组合阀的性能,从而影响控制棒水压驱动技术的运行性能.本文就控制棒水压驱动系统运行过程中所出现的异常工况,运用ANSYS电磁场分析软件,对其直动电磁阀的多种运行工况进行了电磁场特性分析.分析结果表明:导磁材料的不当使用形成磁路的改变,引起某些工况下磁力反向,使电磁阀在特定情况下出现故障,进而造成控制棒水压驱动系统异常;通过电磁场特性分析可以进一步优化直动电磁阀的设计.

  9. Design and Experimental Research of the Linear Bi-directional Force Solenoid for Electro-hydraulic Proportional Valve%比例阀线性双向电磁铁设计与试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴帅; 彭传龙; 焦宗夏; 王晓东; 王晓腾; 彭刚

    2014-01-01

    Proportional solenoid is the driving devices electromagnetic to control the action of the proportional valve. The overall performance of the proportional solenoid is largely determined by this part. The traditional solenoids have the following disadvantages. The linearity of the solenoid is poor. The effective stroke is short. And the barrier magnetic is installed difficulty. In view of the above the shortcomings, a new structure of the linear force solenoid is presented. The composite magnetic force generated by the permanent magnets and electromagnetic field is using to drive the armature. The barrier magnetic in the new solenoid is canceled, so the solenoid can assemble easily. Theoretical analysis and finite element simulation is done for its design optimization in this paper. One prototype is designed and manufactured, and the designed structure is verified by experiment.%比例电磁铁是控制比例阀先导级阀芯动作的电磁驱动元件,其性能在很大程度上决定比例阀的整体性能。针对传统比例电磁铁线性度差、比例范围短、隔磁环安装困难等不足,设计一种新型结构的比例电磁铁,这种比例电磁铁采用永磁体与线圈产生的复合磁场力驱动衔铁运动,同时新型结构的比例电磁铁中取消传统比例电磁铁的隔磁环结构,降低加工难度并且具有较传统的比例电磁铁更好的性能。对设计的新型电磁铁进行数学建模和理论分析验证其理论的可行性,并且对同等尺寸的比例电磁铁进行仿真优化设计,获得尺寸条件限制下的性能最佳的比例电磁铁设计。在理论分析的基础上,通过对样机的电磁力测试获得的试验数据与理论分析数据一致,验证了这种新型结构的比例电磁铁的实用性。

  10. Permanent magnet design methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leupold, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Design techniques developed for the exploitation of high energy magnetically rigid materials such as Sm-Co and Nd-Fe-B have resulted in a revolution in kind rather than in degree in the design of a variety of electron guidance structures for ballistic and aerospace applications. Salient examples are listed. Several prototype models were developed. These structures are discussed in some detail: permanent magnet solenoids, transverse field sources, periodic structures, and very high field structures.

  11. Paleomagnetic and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS analyses of the Plio-Pleistocene extensional Todi basin, Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alfonsi

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years paleomagnetic investigations within the Apennine chain have revealed that the area is characterized by a complex pattern of deformation, not linkable to a simple and homogeneous process. In order to estimate the amount, sense and timing of vertical axis rotations within the Central Apennines, Neogene continental basins have been investigated for paleomagnetic studies. The paleomagnetic results obtained in the Plio-Pleistocene Todi basin showed that the Upper Pliocene-Lower Pleistocene evolution, associated with major dip-slip tectonics, has not involved vertical axis rotation since that time. The Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility analysis (AMS, carried out on the same samples treated for paleomagnetic determination, revealed the presence of two groups of specimens characterized by different magnetic lineation directions. One direction trends NE-SW and is parallel to the orientation of the regional extension stress typical of the area. This direction is observed throughout the northern basin. The other, restricted to the southern basin, trends N-S and shows no links with the tectonic, hydrological-sedimentary conditions of the area. The results of the AMS analysis will be presented and discussed in the light of the rock magnetic results and the tectonic framework of the area.

  12. Multibeam bathymetric, gravity and magnetic studies over 79 degrees E fracture zone, central Indian basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    KameshRaju, K.A.; Ramprasad, T.; Kodagali, V.N.; Nair, R.R.

    A regional scale bathymetric map has been constructed for the 79 degrees E fracture zone (FZ) in the Central Indian Basin between 10 degrees 15'S and 14 degrees 45'S lat. and 78 degrees 55'E and 79 degrees 20'E long. using the high...

  13. Orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Siberian snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2016-02-01

    Two solenoid Siberian snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in the “spin transparency” mode of the NICA collider. The field integrals of the solenoid snakes for protons and deuterons at maximum momentum of 13.5 GeV/c are equal to 2×50 T·m and 2×160 T·m respectively. The snakes introduce strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in NICA collider with solenoid snakes are presented.

  14. Interdigital (Morton) neuroma: high-resolution MR imaging with a solenoid coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, S J; Canale, P B; Carrera, G F; Johnson, J E; Shereff, M J; Gould, J S; Hyde, J S; Jesmanowicz, A

    1991-12-01

    Fifteen patients (17 feet) with symptoms suggestive of plantar interdigital neuroma underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T with a solenoid forefoot coil with an 8-cm field of view. Surgery was subsequently performed on six feet. Fifteen interdigital masses were identified with MR imaging. Five of these, in feet that underwent surgery, were pathologically confirmed neuromas. In the remaining foot that underwent surgery, flexor tendon injury with probable inflammatory reaction was demonstrated with MR imaging but was interpreted as indeterminate for neuroma. No neuronal was identified at surgery, which otherwise confirmed the MR imaging findings. Neuromas were most conspicuous on T1-weighted images as foci of decreased signal intensity well demarcated from adjacent fat tissue. The lesions were poorly seen on T2-weighted images, where they appeared isointense or slightly hypointense to fat tissue in all cases. Prominent regions of increased signal intensity, presumably representing fluid in intermetatarsal bursae, were seen proximal to 10 of the 15 masses found with MR imaging.

  15. Superconducting magnetic control system for manipulation of particulate matter and magnetic probes in medical and industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yung Sheng; Hull, John R.; Askew, Thomas R.

    2006-07-11

    A system and method of controlling movement of magnetic material with at least first and second high temperature superconductors at spaced locations. A plurality of solenoids are associated with the superconductors to induce a persistent currents in preselected high temperature superconductors establishing a plurality of magnetic fields in response to pulsed currents introduced to one or more of the solenoids. Control mechanism in communication with said solenoids and/or said high temperature superconductors are used to demagnetize selected ones of the high temperature superconductors to reduce the magnetic fields substantially to zero. Magnetic material is moved between magnetic fields by establishing the presence thereof and thereafter reducing magnetic fields substantially to zero and establishing magnetic fields in other superconductors arranged in a predetermined configuration.

  16. Anisotropies of anhysteretic remanence and magnetic susceptibility of marly clays from Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sagnotti

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Marly clays from an Upper Pliocene unit at Valle Ricca (Rorne were investigated for their Anisotropy of Anhysteretic Remanence (AAR and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS. The study of AAR was accomplished for the first time in ltaly, developing a suitable laboratory technique and adapting a standard statistical procedure. The comparison between anhysteretic remanence and magnetic susceptibility anisotropies discriminates the fabric of the ferromagnetic fraction from that of the paramagnetic matrix of the rock. The separation of fabric components was applied to distinguish subsequent geological processes that affected the total rock fabric. The results indicate that the clayey units are particularly suitable for the empirical investigation of fabric to strain relationship in weakly deformed rocks.

  17. Magnetization of three Nubia Sandstone formations from Central Western Desert of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. El-Shayeb

    2013-06-01

    The first magnetic component obtained from the two older formations is considered primary, as the corresponding pole reflects the age when compared with the previously obtained Cretaceous poles for North Africa. On other hand, the second pole obtained from the Maghrabi formation (the younger is inconsistent with the Cretaceous pole positions for North Africa, but falls closer to the Eocene pole indicating that the rocks of this formation could have suffered remagnetization during the late Eocene time.

  18. Characterization of axially-symmetric magnetic elds

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087237; Buzio, Marco

    In solenoids for particle accelerators, the magnetic field is usually mapped by means of 3D Hall-sensing systems through a burdensome and costly procedure. A further problem arises from a coherent treatment between the beam physics requirements, the qualification of numerical models, the design and manufacturing of the magnet, and the magnetic measurements. For example, when the magnet is misaligned with respect to the longitudinal direction of the mapper, the fringe field shows spurious components. A method was therefore developed for measuring the magnetic field of axisymmetric magnets by exploiting their inherent symmetry. The method yields a measurement of the magnetic flux linked with a pair of sensing coils as a function of their longitudinal position. An induction transducer, sensitive to the longitudinal and radial components of the solenoid under test, has been designed and constructed. A transport system moves the transducer along the magnet axis, covering the full length of the magnet and including...

  19. The electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC. A Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddo, M.E.; Bielick, E.; Dawson, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others; The STAR EMC Collaboration

    1993-09-22

    This report discusses the following on the electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC: conceptual design; the physics of electromagnetic calorimetry in STAR; trigger capability; integration into STAR; and cost, schedule, manpower, and funding.

  20. Magnetically guided central nervous system delivery and toxicity evaluation of magneto-electric nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Jayant, Rahul D.; Nikkhah-Moshaie, Roozbeh; Bhardwaj, Vinay; Roy, Upal; Huang, Zaohua; Ruiz, Ariel; Yndart, Adriana; Atluri, Venkata; El-Hage, Nazira; Khalili, Kamel; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    Least component-based delivery of drug-tagged-nanocarriers across blood-brain-barriers (BBB) will allow site-specific and on-demand release of therapeutics to prevent CNS diseases. We developed a non-invasive magnetically guided delivery of magneto-electric nanocarriers (MENCs), ~20 nm, 10 mg/kg, across BBB in C57Bl/J mice. Delivered MENCs were uniformly distributed inside the brain, and were non-toxic to brain and other major organs, such as kidney, lung, liver, and spleen, and did not affect hepatic, kidney and neurobehavioral functioning. PMID:27143580

  1. Performance of solenoids versus quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications - for example in particle therapie or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics - requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. The scaling shows that above a few MeV a solenoid needs to be pulsed or super-conducting, whereas the quadrupoles can remai...

  2. Detecting Solenoid Valve Deterioration in In-Use Electronic Diesel Fuel Injection Control Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chyuan-Yow Tseng; Hsun-Heng Tsai

    2010-01-01

    The diesel engine is the main power source for most agricultural vehicles. The control of diesel engine emissions is an important global issue. Fuel injection control systems directly affect fuel efficiency and emissions of diesel engines. Deterioration faults, such as rack deformation, solenoid valve failure, and rack-travel sensor malfunction, are possibly in the fuel injection module of electronic diesel control (EDC) systems. Among these faults, solenoid valve failure is most likely to oc...

  3. Approach control of a gas exchange solenoid actuator for IC engines

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Chun-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Application of solenoid valve actuators in internal combustion engines can facilitate operations such as variable valve timing for improved efficiency and emission. Unfortunately, smooth solenoid valve landing is hard to achieve due to limited control authority, limited bandwidth, and time varying disturbances. The resultant valve impact causes unacceptable noise and component wear on the engine. To solve this ``soft seating" problem, the controller is further divided into approach and landin...

  4. Role of central nervous system in changing organ and tissue iodine content during exposure to variable magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsakova, N.V.

    In previous studies, the authors demonstrated the compensatory effect of a variable magnetic field (VMF) with intensity of 0.11 mT and frequency of 50 Hz on parameters of protein and carbohydrate metabolism in rat blood serum, on levels of copper and iodine in organs in the case of 3-day exposure to VMF. It was also reported that there was activation of the thyroid with 60-day exposure to VMF of rats kept on their regular diet. The authors assumed that these changes occurred as a result of the direct effect of VMF on the central nervous system. To check our hypothesis, the authors conducted an additional study, the purpose of which was to determine the role of the CNS in changing iodine content of organs and tissues during exposure to VMF.

  5. Regional gravity and magnetic studies over the continental margin of the Central West Coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SubbaRaju, L.V.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Rao, D.G.

    Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India Abstract Gravity studies over the continental margin of the central west coast of India show a sediment thickness of 2-3 km on the shelf associated with deeper hoest and graben structures, of 6 km... sequence ranges from Palaeocene to Recent. Stratigraphy as obtained from the explor atory wells BH-I, DCS-IA, HI2-1, and R6-110cated in the Bombay offshore basin is shown in Figure 2. Figure 3 depicts the seismogeological section of the Bombay offshore...

  6. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Kubik-Huch, Rahel; Marincek, Borut [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Wisser, Josef [Clinic for Obstetrics, University Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Martin, Ernst [Department of Neuroradiology and Magnetic Resonance, University Children' s Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-08-01

    Prenatal ultrasonography is the primary screening modality for the evaluation of fetal pathology. Ultrafast fetal MRI is a recent development that examines the fetus in utero. The short acquisition times (as short as 400 ms/slice) allow to picture freeze the fetus without the need for fetal sedation. The high spatial resolution, good contrast-to-noise ratio, and the multiplanar capabilities are especially advantageous in pathologies of the fetal central nervous system (CNS). Fetal MRI currently serves as a second-line imaging tool for complex fetal cerebral malformations and pathologies. Fetal ventriculomegaly, lesions within the posterior fossa, and abnormalities in cerebral myelination, migration, and sulcation are particularly well identified. (orig.)

  7. Non-Solenoidal Tokamak Startup via Inboard Local Helicity Injection on the Pegasus ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. M.; Barr, J. L.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Pachicano, J. L.; Reusch, J. A.; Rodriguez Sanchez, C.; Richner, N. J.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2016-10-01

    Local helicity injection (LHI) is a non-solenoidal startup technique utilizing small injectors at the plasma edge to source current along helical magnetic field lines. Unstable injected current streams relax to a tokamak-like configuration with high toroidal current multiplication. Flexible placement of injectors permits tradeoffs between helicity injection rate, poloidal field induction, and magnetic geometry requirements for initial relaxation. Experiments using a new set of large-area injectors in the lower divertor explore the efficacy of high-field-side (HFS) injection. The increased area (4 cm2) current source is functional up to full Pegasus toroidal field (BT , inj = 0.23 T). However, relaxation to a tokamak state is increasingly frustrated for BT , inj > 0.15 T with uniform vacuum vertical field. Paths to relaxation at increased field include: manipulation of vacuum poloidal field geometry; increased injector current; and plasma initiation with outboard injectors, subsequently transitioning to divertor injector drive. During initial tests of HFS injectors, achieved Vinj was limited to 600 V by plasma-material interactions on the divertor plate, which may be mitigated by increasing injector elevation. In experiments with helicity injection as the dominant current drive Ip 0.13 MA has been attained, with T̲e > 100 eV and ne 1019 m-3. Extrapolation to full BT, longer pulse length, and Vinj 1 kV suggest Ip > 0.25 MA should be attainable in a plasma dominated by helicity drive. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  8. the LHC Compact Muon Solenoid experiment detector control system

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN is a multi-purpose experiment designed to exploit the physics of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider collision energy (14TeV at centre of mass) over the full range of expected luminosities (up to 1034cm-2s-1). CMS detector control system (DCS) responsibility is to ensure a safe, correct and efficient operation of the detector so that high quality physics data can be recorded. The system is also required to make possible that inexperienced shifters can operate the detector and a small crew of experts can take care of the maintenance of its software and hardware infrastructure. The DCS large subsystems size sum up to more than a million parameters that need to be supervised. A cluster of roughly 100 servers is used to provide the required processing resources. A scalable approach has been chosen factorizing the DCS system as much as possible. CMS DCS has made clear division between its computing resources and functionality by creating a comput...

  9. First Cryogenic Testing of the ATLAS Superconducting Prototype Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Haug, F; Mayri, C; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Pirotte, O; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroids and the barrel toroid made of eight coils (BT) symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. All these magnets will be individually tested in an experimental area prior to their final installation in the underground cavern of the LHC collider. A dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed and built for this purpose. It mainly consists of a 1'200 W at 4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit, a cryostat housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps, a distribution valve box and transfer lines. Prior to the start of the series tests of the BT magnets, two model coils are used at this facility. The first one, the so-called B00 of comparatively small size, contains the three different types of superconductors used for the ATLAS magnets which are wound on a cylindrical mandrel. The second magnet, the B0, is a reduced model of basically identical design concept as the...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of miliary tuberculosis of the central nervous system in children with tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janse van Rensburg, Pieter; Andronikou, Savvas; Pienaar, Manana [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tygerberg (South Africa); Toorn, Ronald van [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2008-12-15

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is closely associated with miliary tuberculosis and a pathogenetic relationship is suspected, although it has been proposed that the two processes are unrelated. To describe miliary tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS) on MRI in children with TBM. A retrospective descriptive study of 32 paediatric TBM patients referred for MRI. The presence of miliary nodules in the CNS was recorded. Lesions were categorized according to their distribution, enhancement pattern, size and signal characteristics. A miliary distribution of nodules was present in 88% of patients. All patients with a miliary distribution had leptomeningeal nodules and 18% of these patients had deep parenchymal nodules in addition. At least one tuberculoma with central T2 hypointensity was identified in 39% of patients. The high prevalence of miliary leptomeningeal nodules in the CNS of children with TBM is significant because it points to a pathogenetic relationship that has long been suspected on epidemiological grounds. Our findings challenge the concept that miliary tuberculosis is only an incidental finding in TBM patients and suggest that it plays an integral part in the pathogenesis. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  12. Quantification of aquifer properties with surface nuclear magnetic resonance in the Platte River valley, central Nebraska, using a novel inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Trevor P.; Hobza, Christopher M.; Steele, Gregory V.; Abraham, Jared D.; Cannia, James C.; Woodward, Duane D.

    2012-01-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance, a noninvasive geophysical method, measures a signal directly related to the amount of water in the subsurface. This allows for low-cost quantitative estimates of hydraulic parameters. In practice, however, additional factors influence the signal, complicating interpretation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Central Platte Natural Resources District, evaluated whether hydraulic parameters derived from surface nuclear magnetic resonance data could provide valuable input into groundwater models used for evaluating water-management practices. Two calibration sites in Dawson County, Nebraska, were chosen based on previous detailed hydrogeologic and geophysical investigations. At both sites, surface nuclear magnetic resonance data were collected, and derived parameters were compared with results from four constant-discharge aquifer tests previously conducted at those same sites. Additionally, borehole electromagnetic-induction flowmeter data were analyzed as a less-expensive surrogate for traditional aquifer tests. Building on recent work, a novel surface nuclear magnetic resonance modeling and inversion method was developed that incorporates electrical conductivity and effects due to magnetic-field inhomogeneities, both of which can have a substantial impact on the data. After comparing surface nuclear magnetic resonance inversions at the two calibration sites, the nuclear magnetic-resonance-derived parameters were compared with previously performed aquifer tests in the Central Platte Natural Resources District. This comparison served as a blind test for the developed method. The nuclear magnetic-resonance-derived aquifer parameters were in agreement with results of aquifer tests where the environmental noise allowed data collection and the aquifer test zones overlapped with the surface nuclear magnetic resonance testing. In some cases, the previously performed aquifer tests were not designed fully to characterize

  13. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays from a Magnetized Strange Star Central Engine for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, O

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) have been tried to be related to the most varied and powerful sources known in the universe. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are natural candidates. Here, we argue that cosmic rays can be accelerated by large amplitude electromagnetic waves (LAEMWs) when the MHD approximation of the field in the wind generated by the GRB's magnetized central engine breaks down. The central engine considered here is a strange star born with differential rotation from the accretion induced conversion of a neutron star into a strange star in a low-mass X-ray binary system. The LAEMWs generated this way accelerate light ions to the highest energies $E = q\\eta\\Delta\\Phi_{max}$ with an efficiency $\\eta \\sim 10^{-1}$ that accounts for all plausible energy losses. Alternatively, we also consider the possibility that, once formed, the LAEMWs are unstable to creation of a relativistically strong electromagnetic turbulence due to an overturn instability. Under this assumption, a lower limit to the efficien...

  14. A compact spin-exchange optical pumping system for 3He polarization based on a solenoid coil, a VBG laser diode, and a cosine theta RF coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungman; Kim, Jongyul; Moon, Myung Kook; Lee, Kye Hong; Lee, Seung Wook; Ino, Takashi; Skoy, Vadim R.; Lee, Manwoo; Kim, Guinyun

    2013-02-01

    For use as a neutron spin polarizer or analyzer in the neutron beam lines of the HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr) nuclear research reactor, a 3He polarizer was designed based on both a compact solenoid coil and a VBG (volume Bragg grating) diode laser with a narrow spectral linewidth of 25 GHz. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal was measured and analyzed using both a built-in cosine radio-frequency (RF) coil and a pick-up coil. Using a neutron transmission measurement, we estimated the polarization ratio of the 3He cell as 18% for an optical pumping time of 8 hours.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system in diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Iain D; Selvarajah, Dinesh; Greig, Marni; Shillo, Pallai; Boland, Elaine; Gandhi, Rajiv; Tesfaye, Solomon

    2013-08-01

    Diabetic 'peripheral' neuropathy (DPN) is one of the common sequelae to the development of both type-1 and type-2 diabetes mellitus. Neuropathy has a major negative impact on quality of life. Abnormalities in both peripheral vasculature and nerve function are well documented and, in addition, evidence is emerging regarding changes within the central nervous system (CNS) that are concomitant with the presence of DPN. The often-resistant nature of DPN to medical treatment highlights the need to understand the role of the CNS in neuropathic symptomatology and progression, as this may modulate therapeutic approaches. Advanced neuroimaging techniques, especially those that can provide quantitative measures of structure and function, can provide objective markers of CNS status. With that comes great potential for not only furthering our understanding of involvement of the CNS in neuropathic etiology but also most importantly aiding the development of new and more effective, targeted, analgesic interventions.

  16. Consegnata al Cern l'ultima componente del magnete di Cms

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    It's the greatest superconducting solenoid in the world, which will be able to create a magnetic field 100 000 times more powerful than the terrestrial one. It will be used to search the Higgs Boson (1 page)

  17. How Does Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Influence Glial Cells in the Central Nervous System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlie L Cullen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is widely used in the clinic, and while it has a direct effect on neuronal excitability, the beneficial effects experienced by patients are likely to include the indirect activation of other cell types. Research conducted over the past two decades has made it increasingly clear that a population of non-neuronal cells, collectively known as glia, respond to and facilitate neuronal signalling. Each glial cell type has the ability to respond to electrical activity directly or indirectly, making them likely cellular effectors of TMS. TMS has been shown to enhance adult neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation, but the effect on cell survival and differentiation is less certain. Furthermore there is limited information regarding the response of astrocytes and microglia to TMS, and a complete paucity of data relating to the response of oligodendrocyte-lineage cells to this treatment. However, due to the critical and yet multifaceted role of glial cells in the CNS, the influence that TMS has on glial cells is certainly an area that warrants careful examination.

  18. Electromagnetic, mechanical and thermal performance analysis of the CFETR magnet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yong; Zhu, Jiawu; Gao, Xiang; Shen, Fengshun; Chen, Siming

    2015-09-01

    The Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) superconducting magnet system was designed by the National Integration Design Group for Magnetic Confinement Fusion Reactor. The CFETR magnet system consists mainly of a central solenoid (CS) coil with six modules, 16 toroidal field (TF) coils, 8 poloidal field (PF) coils, and a set of correction coils (CC). The electromagnetic stresses and stored magnetic energy are huge on the CFETR magnets since they experience both large current densities and high magnetic field. The electromagnetic, structural and thermal performance needs to be evaluated to ensure that the magnetic field, stress, and hot spot temperature of the magnet system are within the allowed criteria. The evaluation of the electromagnetic performance of the CFETR superconducting magnet system under normal operation and fault conditions was performed. The two-dimensional finite element method was adopted to analyse the stress/strain behaviour of the CFETR CS coils. In addition, the thermal-hydraulic behaviour on quench propagation performance of the CFETR CS and TF coils was analysed to evaluate the hot spot temperature of the cable and the helium pressure inside a jacket during a quench.

  19. The Hadron Calorimeter of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) (Proceedings to be published Nuclear Physics B)

    CERN Document Server

    Hagopian, V

    1997-01-01

    The Hadron Calorimeter of CMS is about 1,000 tons of copper and scintillator sandwich in a 4 tesla magnetic field. It will be built in three segments, the barrel surrounding the central portion and the two end caps. The scintillators will use a tower structure made of grooved megatiles with wavelength shifting ( WLS) fibers imbedded inside the grooves. The coverage extends to "eta" = 3.0 and is hermetic with very few gaps. The 1995 test beam data, taken inside a 3 tesla magnet, showed that it will work in a magnetic field and will require a tail catcher inside the muon system.

  20. ANALYSIS OF THE PROCESSES IN AN INDUCTOR SYSTEM WITH AN ATTRACTING SCREEN EXCITED BY THE EXTERNAL CIRCULAR SOLENOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Chaplygin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Developments in the field of magnetic-pulse treatment of metals (MPTM are increasingly used in the modern technologies of production and repair of the aviation, automotive and other machinery, as they are environmentally friendly and energy-efficient in comparison with classical approaches. One of the main components of the device MPTM is a tool – inductor or the inductor system with an attractive screen (ISAS. The calculated dependences to calculate the inductor system with an attractive screen were taken from previous works. The ratios were obtained for the low-frequency mode of the excited fields, when is place their significant penetration through a thin-walled metal screen and a deformed workpiece. As it was shown earlier this mode is the most efficient from point of view of a force action on the object of a processing. Purpose. The theoretical analysis of the spatial-temporal distributions of the induced currents and forces of an attraction in the inductor system with an attractive screen excited by a flat circular solenoid located on the outside of the auxiliary screen. Methodology. The calculations are shown that the induced currents both in the screen and the workpiece are unidirectional and their interaction, in accordance with the law of Ampere determines the amplitudes of excited forces of attraction. Let’s note the effective validity of the considered inductor system excited by an external circular solenoid. With sufficient simplicity of the design take place rather high values of the developed forces of attraction and their averages. Results. Physically, a higher power efficiency of the system with an «external» coil in comparison with a system where coil is located in the internal cavity, can be accounted for lade of «failure» in the radial distribution of the excited forces. This «failure» in the design with a coil between the sheet metal is caused by its screening action against the forces of attraction

  1. Electric and magnetic energy at axion haloscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, B R; Jang, W; Choi, J; Kim, D; Lee, M J; Lee, J; Won, E; Semertzidis, Y K

    2016-01-01

    We review a recent letter published in Phys. Rev. Lett. $\\textbf{116}$, 161804 (2016) of which the main argument is that the mode dependent magnetic form factors at axion haloscopes depend on the position of the cavity inside the solenoid while the corresponding electric form factors do not. We, however, find no such dependence, which is also equivalent to the statement that the electric and corresponding magnetic energy stored in the cavity modes are the same regardless of the position of the cavity inside the solenoid. Furthermore, we extend the statement to the cases satisfying $\\vec{\

  2. Implications for Fault and Basin Geometry in the Central California Coast Ranges from Preliminary Gravity and Magnetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Jachens, R. C.; Graymer, R. W.; Wentworth, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    Preliminary aeromagnetic and newly processed gravity data help define block-bounding faults and deep sedimentary basins in the central California Coast Ranges, ranging from the Hosgri fault east to the San Andreas fault and from Monterey Bay south to Pt. Conception. Interpretation of these data results in an improved framework for seismic hazard and groundwater studies. Aeromagnetic data include a new survey with a flight-line spacing of 800 m at a nominal 300 m above ground and covering 15,000 km2. More than 11,500 gravity measurements, reprocessed with terrain corrections calculated from 30-m DEMs, form a roughly 2-km grid over most of the study area. Combined potential-field data and existing geologic mapping, delineate major fault-bounded blocks in the central California Coast Ranges. Main block-bounding faults from west to east include the San Gregorio- Hosgri, San Luis-Willmar-Santa Maria River-Little Pine, Oceanic-West Huasna, Nacimiento, Rinconada-South Cuyama, San Juan-Chimineas-Morales, and San Andreas faults. Most of these faults have evidence of Quaternary activity. Gravity gradients indicate that the reach of the San Andreas fault bounding the Gabilan Range and the northern extension of the Rinconada fault bounding the Santa Lucia Range dip steeply southwestward and have a reverse component of slip. Magnetic and microseismicity data suggest that the northern reach of the Hosgri fault dips eastward. The potential-field data also delineate several deep sedimentary basins, such as the 3-4 km deep Cuyama basin, the Santa Maria basin, and several basins along and possibly offset by the Rinconada fault. Gravity data show that the main west-northwest-striking faults bounding the Cuyama basin dip away from the basin, indicating compression adjacent to the big bend in the San Andreas fault. Prominent gravity and magnetic highs northeast of the San Andreas fault immediately east of Cuyama Valley suggest that there the San Andreas fault dips southwest. Such dip

  3. Detecting Solenoid Valve Deterioration in In-Use Electronic Diesel Fuel Injection Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chyuan-Yow Tseng

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The diesel engine is the main power source for most agricultural vehicles. The control of diesel engine emissions is an important global issue. Fuel injection control systems directly affect fuel efficiency and emissions of diesel engines. Deterioration faults, such as rack deformation, solenoid valve failure, and rack-travel sensor malfunction, are possibly in the fuel injection module of electronic diesel control (EDC systems. Among these faults, solenoid valve failure is most likely to occur for in-use diesel engines. According to the previous studies, this failure is a result of the wear of the plunger and sleeve, based on a long period of usage, lubricant degradation, or engine overheating. Due to the difficulty in identifying solenoid valve deterioration, this study focuses on developing a sensor identification algorithm that can clearly classify the usability of the solenoid valve, without disassembling the fuel pump of an EDC system for in-use agricultural vehicles. A diagnostic algorithm is proposed, including a feedback controller, a parameter identifier, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT sensor, and a neural network classifier. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can accurately identify the usability of solenoid valves.

  4. Detecting solenoid valve deterioration in in-use electronic diesel fuel injection control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsun-Heng; Tseng, Chyuan-Yow

    2010-01-01

    The diesel engine is the main power source for most agricultural vehicles. The control of diesel engine emissions is an important global issue. Fuel injection control systems directly affect fuel efficiency and emissions of diesel engines. Deterioration faults, such as rack deformation, solenoid valve failure, and rack-travel sensor malfunction, are possibly in the fuel injection module of electronic diesel control (EDC) systems. Among these faults, solenoid valve failure is most likely to occur for in-use diesel engines. According to the previous studies, this failure is a result of the wear of the plunger and sleeve, based on a long period of usage, lubricant degradation, or engine overheating. Due to the difficulty in identifying solenoid valve deterioration, this study focuses on developing a sensor identification algorithm that can clearly classify the usability of the solenoid valve, without disassembling the fuel pump of an EDC system for in-use agricultural vehicles. A diagnostic algorithm is proposed, including a feedback controller, a parameter identifier, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) sensor, and a neural network classifier. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can accurately identify the usability of solenoid valves.

  5. Conceptual design for the superconducting magnet system of a pulsed DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchateau, J.-L., E-mail: jean-luc.duchateau@cea.fr [CEA/IRFM, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Hertout, P.; Saoutic, B.; Magaud, P.; Artaud, J.-F.; Giruzzi, G.; Bucalossi, J.; Johner, J.; Sardain, P.; Imbeaux, F.; Ané, J.-M.; Li-Puma, A. [CEA/IRFM, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► A 1D design approach of a pulsed DEMO reactor is presented. ► The main CS and TF conductor design criteria are presented. ► A typical major radius for a 2 GW DEMO is 9 m. ► A typical plasma magnetic field is 4.9 T. ► The pulse duration is 1.85 h for an aspect ratio of 3. -- Abstract: A methodology has been developed to consistently investigate, taking into account main reactor components, possible magnet solutions for a pulsed fusion reactor aiming at a large solenoid flux swing duration within the 2–3 h range. In a conceptual approach, investigations are carried out in the equatorial plane, taking into account the radial extension of the blanket-shielding zone, of the toroidal field magnet system inner leg and of the central solenoid for estimation of the pulsed swing. Design criteria are presented for the radial extension of the superconducting magnets, which is mostly driven by the structures (casings and conductor jacket). Typical available cable current densities are presented as a function of the magnetic field and of the temperature margin. The magnet design criteria have been integrated into SYCOMORE, a code for reactor modeling presently in development at CEA/IRFM in Cadarache, using the tools of the EFDA Integrated Tokamak Modeling task force. Possible solutions are investigated for a 2 GW fusion power reactor with different aspect ratios. The final adjustment of the DEMO pulsed reactor parameters will have to be consistently done, considering all reactor components, when the final goals of the machine will be completely clarified.

  6. Central pontine myelinolysis in a chronic alcoholic: A clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dujmović Irena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM is a noninflammatory, demyelinating lesion usually localised in the basis pontis. Chronic alcoholism is frequently associated with this condition which may have a variable clinical outcome. Until now, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI follow-up in alcoholic CPM cases after alcohol withdrawal has been rarely described. Case report. We reported a 30- year-old male with a 12-year history of alcohol abuse, who presented with inability to stand and walk, nausea, vomiting and somnolence. Neurological examination revealed: impared fixation on lateral gaze, dysarthria, mild spastic quadriparesis, truncal and extremity ataxia, sock-like hypesthesia and moderate decrease in vibration sense in legs. Brain MRI showed a trident-shaped non-enhancing pontine lesion highly suggestive of CPM. After an eight-month alcoholfree follow-up period, the patient’s clinical status significantly improved, while the extent of MRI pontine lesion was merely slightly reduced. Conclusion. The presented case demonstrates that CPM in chronic alcoholics may have a benign clinical course after alcohol withdrawal, which is not necessarily associated with the reduction of lesions on brain MRI. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175031

  7. Insufficiency of Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the Diagnosis of Intravascular Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Kawai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL is a rare type of extranodal lymphoma with an aggressive clinical course characterized by the proliferation of lymphoma cells within the lumen of small vessels. Diagnosis is often difficult because of marked variability in clinical presentation and nonspecific laboratory and radiological findings, especially when central nervous system (CNS symptoms are the only manifestation. Modern metabolic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET and 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS have been reported to be useful in the diagnosis of conventional primary CNS lymphoma. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented with a progressive leukoencephalopathic syndrome. The patient was examined by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 11C-methionine PET and MRS, but none of these examinations were able to show the presence of a tumor in the lesions or to clarify the tumor characteristics. Brain biopsy was the only way to obtain a definite diagnosis of IVL. The patient was treated intensively with standard immunochemotherapy but died 6 months after the diagnosis. Here, we discuss the insufficiency of modern metabolic imaging techniques, including PET and MRS, and recommend a rapid decision of brain biopsy in the diagnosis of IVL only involving the CNS.

  8. 基于ANSYS的电子提花机电磁阀性能研究%Study on Performance of Electronic Jacquard Solenoid Valve Based on ANSYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨霞

    2014-01-01

    This paper is purposed through establishing the electromagnetic analysis model based on ANSYS solenoid valve module to obtain the magnetic line of force, flux density, electromagnetic strength and electromagnetic force analyze the binary relation between electromagnetic force and voltage under the stable state, and get the relational expression of F/U through MATLAB, so as to optimum design the driving voltage and to optimum design the structure parameters of solenoid valve, such as shape of electromagnet, turns, suction area, magnetic material, reset spring, etc.%通过建立基于ANSYS电磁阀组件的电磁分析模型,得到其磁力线、磁通密度、电磁强度、电磁力,分析稳态状态下电磁力与电压的二次关系,并通过MATLAB建立F/U的拟合关系式,从而对驱动电压进行优化设计,并可对电磁阀组件的结构参数如电磁铁形状、线圈匝数、吸合面积、磁性材料、复位弹簧参数等进行优化设计。

  9. An improved billet on billet extrusion process of continuous aluminium alloy shapes for cryogenic applications in the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, S S

    2003-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the experiments being designed in the framework of the Large Hadron Collider accelerator at CERN. CMS will contain the largest and the most powerful superconducting solenoid magnet ever built in terms of stored energy. It will work at 4.2 K, will have a magnetic length of 12.5 m, with a free bore of 6m and will be manufactured as a layered and modular structure of NbTi cables embedded in a high purity (99.998%) Al- stabiliser. Each layer consists of a wound continuous length of 2.55 km. In order to withstand the high electromagnetic forces, two external aluminium alloy reinforcing sections are foreseen. These reinforcements, of 24 mm multiplied by 18 mm cross-section, will be continuously electron beam (EB) welded to the pure Al-stabiliser. The alloy EN AW-6082 has been selected for the reinforcements due to its excellent extrudability, high strength in the precipitation hardened state, high toughness and strength at cryogenic temperatures and ready EB weldability. Ea...

  10. Variety of molecular conformation of plasmid pUC18 DNA and solenoidally supercoiled DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄熙泰; 王照清; 吴永文; 樊廷玉; 王树荣; 王勖焜

    1996-01-01

    The plasmid pUC18 DNA isolated from Escherichia coli HB101 were analyzed by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis and hybridization. The results show that the DNA sample can be separated into six groups of different structural components. The plectonemically and solenoidally supercoiled pUC18 DNA coexist in it. These two different conformations of supercoiled DNA are interchangeable with the circumstances (ionic strength and type, etc.). The amount of solenoidally supercoiled pUC18 DNA in the samples can be changed by treatment of DNA topoisome rases. Under an electron microscope, the solenoidal supercoiling DNA has a round shape with an average diameter of 45 nm. The facts suggest that solenoidaUy supercoiled DNA be a structural entity independent of histones. The polymorphism of DNA structure may be important to packing of DNA in vivo.

  11. Performance of solenoids vs. quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications - for example in particle therapie or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics - requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. The scaling shows that above a few MeV a solenoid needs to be pulsed or super-conducting, whereas the quadrupoles can remain conventional. The transmission of the triplet is found only 25% lower than that of the equivalent solenoid. Both systems are equally suitable for energy selection based on their chromatic effect as is shown using an initial distribution following the RPA simulation model by Yan et al.\\cite{yan2009}.

  12. Application of High-speed Solenoid Valve to the Semi-active Control of Landing Gear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hui; Gu Hongbin; Chen Dawei

    2008-01-01

    To select or develop an appropriate actuator is one of the key and difficult issues in the study of semi-active controlled landing gear.Performance of the actuator may directly affect the effectiveness of semi-active control.In this article,parallel high-speed solenoid valves are chosen to be the actuators for the semi-active controlled landing gear and being studied.A nonlinear high-speed solenoid valve model is developed with the consideration of magnctic saturation characteristics and verified by test.According to the design rule of keeping the peak load as small as possible while absorbing the specified shock energy,a fuzzy PD control rule is designed.By the rule,controller parameters can be self-regulated.The simulation results indicate that the semi-active control based on high-speed solenoid valve can effectively improve the control performance and reduce impact load during landing.

  13. Ferrite-Cored Solenoidal Induction Coil Sensor for BUD (MM-1667)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, F.; Becker, A.; Conti, U.; Gasperikova, E.

    2011-06-15

    We have designed and lab tested a new ferrite cored induction coil sensor for measuring the secondary fields from metallic UXO with the BUD system. The objective was to replace the 5-inch diameter air-cored coils in the BUD system with smaller sensors that would allow the placement of multiple sensors in the smaller package of the new BUD hand-held system. A ferrite-cored solenoidal coil of length L can easily be made to have sensitivity and noise level roughly the same as an air-cored coil of a diameter on the same order as L. A ferrite-cored solenoidal coil can easily have a feedback configuration to achieve critical damping. The feedback configuration leads to a very stable response. Feedback ferrite-cored solenoidal coils show very little interaction as long as they are separated by one half their length.

  14. Interactive 3D forward modeling of total field surface and three-component borehole magnetic data for the Daye iron-ore deposit (Central China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yushan; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Tianyou; Zhan, Yinglin; Feng, Jie

    2011-10-01

    The ground magnetic response of deep ore bodies in the Daye iron-ore deposit is relatively weak, and sometimes concealed by the strong magnetic background of shallower sources. Apart from the low-quality ground magnetic data, another critical problem for reconstructing the deep skarn-type ore bodies is developing a versatile inversion scheme that can simultaneously resolve 3D sources with arbitrary shapes. In this case, we resort to interactive 3D forward modeling solution with the joint use of two data sets-total field surface and three-component borehole magnetic data. Joint inversion of the two data sets is expected to help resolve the ambiguity associated with either data set and greatly reduces the nonuniqueness of the magnetic inversion. Such nonuniqueness is especially severe when a 3-D distribution of magnetic susceptibility, instead of a simple body, is sought from the inversion. In this paper, we calculate the magnetic field on the surface and in the borehole caused by 3D arbitrarily-shaped bodies with the triple integral method. The complex 3D magnetic sources having arbitrary shapes are constructed with cross-sections, termination points and facets in our visualization technology. We specify, interactively and in a user-friendly environment, the outline of the sources in terms of geometric elements and their magnetic parameters. The method automatically fits the observations within a prescribed precision. If dissatisfied, the user can redefine the model parameters and proceed to a new inversion. The method's ability to interpret a complicated 3D geologic environment is demonstrated on synthetic models and real data profiles in the Daye iron-ore deposit in central China. The interactive forward modeling results in all tests demonstrate a good correlation of estimated magnetic sources with corresponding known geologic features.

  15. A detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic investigation of the Matuyama-Bruhnes geomagnetic reversal recorded in tephra-paleosol sequence of Tlaxcala(Central Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Arechalde, Ana; Goguitchaichvili, Avtandyl; Carrancho, Ángel; Sedov, Sergey; Caballero-Miranda, Cecilia; Ortega, Beatriz; Solís, Berenice; Morales Contreras, Juan; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Bautista, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic reversals are global phenomena, for about 50 years the paleomagnetists attempted to acquire as many detailed records as possible using the magnetic memory of sediments and lava flows. Yet, transitional field behavior remains poorly characterized largely because of sporadic aspect of volcanic eruptions. In some specific cases, paleosols such as those developed from alluvial or aeolian sediments, may also record the variations of the Geomagnetic Field across the polarity changes. Here, we report a detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic investigation on some radiometrically dated chromic luvisols located in Central Mexico carrying detrital or chemical remanent magnetization. The research was developed in order i) to demonstrate the primary origin of the magnetic remanence and ii) to show that paleosoils are good candidates to provide a high resolution record of the behavior of geomagnetic field during reversals. The lower part of the paleosoil sequence shows a clearly defined reverse polarity magnetization followed by geomagnetically unstable transitional field and ended by normal polarity remanence. Our AMS and rock magnetic data suggest that magnetization is acquired during the initial stage of soil formation in context of active volcanic activity since magnetic fabric is essentially sedimentary and reverse and normal polarity paleodirections are almost antipodal. Titanomagnetites are identified as main magnetic carriers of rock-magnetic measurements including thermomagnetics and hysteresis cycles. We propose that the transition recorded in this study correspond to the B-M boundary, considering the K-Ar datings available at the sequence bottom and that the chromic luvisols are potentially good recorders of the paleosecular variation. The identification of the B-M boundary within the studied sequence has fundamental significance for improving the chronological scale of Tlaxcala paleosol-sedimentary sequence and its correlation with the global proxies.

  16. A detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic investigation of the Matuyama-Bruhnes geomagnetic reversal recorded in tephra-paleosol sequence of Tlaxcala(Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Soler-Arechalde

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic reversals are global phenomena, for about 50 years the paleomagnetists attempted to acquire as many detailed records as possible using the magnetic memory of sediments and lava flows. Yet, transitional field behavior remains poorly characterized largely because of sporadic aspect of volcanic eruptions. In some specific cases, paleosols such as those developed from alluvial or aeolian sediments, may also record the variations of the Geomagnetic Field across the polarity changes. Here, we report a detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic investigation on some radiometrically dated chromic luvisols located in Central Mexico carrying detrital or chemical remanent magnetization. The research was developed in order i to demonstrate the primary origin of the magnetic remanence and ii to show that paleosoils are good candidates to provide a high resolution record of the behavior of geomagnetic field during reversals. The lower part of the paleosoil sequence shows a clearly defined reverse polarity magnetization followed by geomagnetically unstable transitional field and ended by normal polarity remanence. Our AMS and rock magnetic data suggest that magnetization is acquired during the initial stage of soil formation in context of active volcanic activity since magnetic fabric is essentially sedimentary and reverse and normal polarity paleodirections are almost antipodal. Titanomagnetites are identified as main magnetic carriers of rock-magnetic measurements including thermomagnetics and hysteresis cycles. We propose that the transition recorded in this study correspond to the B-M boundary, considering the K-Ar datings available at the sequence bottom and that the chromic luvisols are potentially good recorders of the paleosecular variation. The identification of the B-M boundary within the studied sequence has fundamental significance for improving the chronological scale of Tlaxcala paleosol-sedimentary sequence and its correlation with the

  17. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Kiyochi, M.; Nakao, N.; Fujita, M.; Imasaki, K.; Nakai, S.; Mima, K.

    1999-06-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field.

  18. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  19. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.; Okamura, M.

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (˜100 μA) with high charge (˜10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  20. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    CERN Document Server

    Ohigashi, N; Kiyochi, M; Nakao, N; Fujita, M; Imasaki, K; Nakai, S; Mima, K

    1999-01-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field.

  1. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B&K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter.

  2. Design and Comparison of a 1 MW / 5s HTS SMES with Toroidal and Solenoidal Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Morandi, Antonio; Gholizad, Babak; Grilli, Francesco; Sirois, Frédéric; Zermeño, Víctor M R

    2015-01-01

    The design of a HTS SMES coil with solenoidal and toroidal geometry is carried out based on a commercially available 2G HTS conductor. A SMES system of practical interest (1 MW / 5 s) is considered. The comparison between ideal toroidal and solenoidal geometry is first discussed and the criteria used for choosing the geometrical parameters of the coils' bore are explained. The design of the real coil is then carried out and the final amount of conductor needed is compared. A preliminary comparison of the two coils in terms of AC loss during one charge discharge cycle is also discussed.

  3. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size

  4. Iron-free detector magnet options for the future circular collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2092466; Dudarev, Alexey; Pais Da Silva, Helder Filipe; Rolando, Gabriella; Cure, Benoit; Gaddi, Andrea; Klyukhin, Slava; Gerwig, Hubert; Wagner, Udo; Ten Kate, Herman

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, several iron-free solenoid-based designs of a detector magnet for the future circular collider for hadron-hadron collisions (FCC-hh) are presented. The detector magnet designs for FCC-hh aim to provide bending power for particles over a wide pseudorapidity range (0 ≤ jηj ≤ 4). To achieve this goal, the main solenoidal detector magnet is combined with a forward magnet system, such as the previously presented force-and-torque-neutral dipole. Here, a solenoid-based alternative, the so-called balanced forward solenoid, is presented which comprises a larger inner solenoid for providing bending power to particles at jηj ≥ 2.5, in combination with a smaller balancing coil for ensuring that the net force and torque on each individual coil is minimized. The balanced forward solenoid is compared to the force-and-torqueneutral dipole and advantages and disadvantages are discussed. In addition, several conceptual solenoidbased detector magnet designs are shown, and quantitatively compared. The main...

  5. What Happened with Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A

    2010-05-27

    The spectrometer solenoid is supposed to be the first magnets installed in MICE [1]-[4]. This report described what happened during the test of the MICE spectrometer solenoid 2B. First, the report describes the temperatures in the magnet, the cooler top plate and the shield during the run where the magnet quenched at 258 A. During this quench, a lead between the bottom of the HTS leads and the diode bank burned out causing the magnet to quench. Second, three methods for measuring the net heat flow into the cold mass are described. Third, there is a discussion of possible resistive heating in the HTS leads between liquid helium temperature and the copper plate, which is at about 50 K. Fourth, there is a discussion of the measured first stage heat loads in the magnet, when there is no current in the magnet. The first stage heat load calculations are based on knowing the first stage temperatures of the three two-stage pulse tube coolers and the single stage GM cooler. Fifth, the estimated heat load to the first stage when the magnet has current in it is discussed. Sixth, there is a comparison of the stage 1 heat loads in magnet 1A [5], magnet 2A [6], and magnet 2B [7]. Finally there is a discussion of recommended changes for improving the spectrometer solenoids so that the coolers can keep them cold.

  6. The Wallula fault and tectonic framework of south-central Washington, as interpreted from magnetic and gravity anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Richard J.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Wells, Ray E.; Rohay, Alan C.

    2014-06-01

    The Yakima fold and thrust belt (YFTB) in central Washington has accommodated regional, mostly north-directed, deformation of the Cascadia backarc since prior to emplacement of Miocene flood basalt of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The YFTB consists of two structural domains. Northern folds of the YFTB strike eastward and terminate at the western margin of a 20-mGal negative gravity anomaly, the Pasco gravity low, straddling the North American continental margin. Southern folds of the YFTB strike southeastward, form part of the Olympic-Wallowa lineament (OWL), and pass south of the Pasco gravity low as the Wallula fault zone. An upper crustal model based on gravity and magnetic anomalies suggests that the Pasco gravity low is caused in part by an 8-km-deep Tertiary basin, the Pasco sub-basin, abutting the continental margin and concealed beneath CRBG. The Pasco sub-basin is crossed by north-northwest-striking magnetic anomalies caused by dikes of the 8.5 Ma Ice Harbor Member of the CRBG. At their northern end, dikes connect with the eastern terminus of the Saddle Mountains thrust of the YFTB. At their southern end, dikes are disrupted by the Wallula fault zone. The episode of NE-SW extension that promoted Ice Harbor dike injection apparently involved strike-slip displacement on the Saddle Mountains and Wallula faults. The amount of lateral shear on the OWL impacts the level of seismic hazard in the Cascadia region. Ice Harbor dikes, as mapped with aeromagnetic data, are dextrally offset by the Wallula fault zone a total of 6.9 km. Assuming that dike offsets are tectonic in origin, the Wallula fault zone has experienced an average dextral shear of 0.8 mm/y since dike emplacement 8.5 Ma, consistent with right-lateral stream offsets observed at other locations along the OWL. Southeastward, the Wallula fault transfers strain to the north-striking Hite fault, the possible location of the M 5.7 Milton-Freewater earthquake in 1936.

  7. Field trapping of Y-Ba-Cu-O single grain rings joined to form the geometry of a solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Y; Dennis, A R; Xu, Z; Campbell, A M; Cardwell, D A [Superconductivity Group, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Hari Babu, N, E-mail: ys206@cam.ac.u [Brunel Centre for Advanced Solidification Technology (BCAST), Brunel University, West London UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Large, single grain RE-Ba-Cu-O ((RE)BCO, where RE is a light rare earth element or yttrium) bulk superconductors have significant potential for a variety of engineering applications and are of considerable importance for theoretical research due to their ability to trap magnetic fields that are up to an order of magnitude higher than those generated by conventional, iron-based magnets. However, it is difficult to grow (RE)BCO in the form of very large grains or in the complex shapes and geometries that are required typically for practical devices and theoretical research. We report the fabrication and properties of a stack of rings (in the geometry of a solenoid) of YBCO single grains joined by a self-flux method. The trapped field at the top surface of the joined stack and within the resulting cylindrical cavity has been measured and the results compared with the predictions from a theoretical model that combines the Campbell equation and the Kim model.

  8. Determination of the static zero-field splitting of Gd3+ complexes in solution from the shifts of the central magnetic fields of their EPR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Pascal H; Belorizky, Elie

    2012-06-04

    In principle, the Redfield theory of EPR spectra applies only to fast-rotating complexes with rather small static zero-field splitting (ZFS) terms. However, at sufficiently high frequencies, typically of 35 GHz and above, it predicts values of the central magnetic fields which are surprisingly accurate well beyond its expected applicability range. This remarkable feature is demonstrated by showing that the Redfield EPR spectrum crosses its baseline at the same point as its "exact" simulated counterpart. It is shown that the shift of the central magnetic field with respect to its limiting value in the absence of ZFS terms is often simply proportional to the square of the magnitude of the static ZFS term divided by the spectrometer frequency. This property is used to determine the magnitude of the static ZFS term independently of its fluctuation dynamics and of the presence of the transient ZFS term.

  9. Investigation of Central Pb-Pb Interactions at Energies of 160 GeV/Nucleon with the Help of the Emulsion Magnetic Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % EMU15 \\\\ \\\\ The aim of this experiment is to investigate high energy heavy ion central collisions by the use of emulsion magnetic chamber with high spatial resolution. The emulsion chamber consists of 50~emulsion layers 50~microns thick each coated on 25~microns mylar base. A thin lead target plate 300~microns thick is installed immediately in front of the first emulsion layer. It is placed in the transverse magnetic field B~$\\sim$~2~Tesla and is to be installed perpendicularly to Pb nucleus beam. This set-up enables to measure full 3-momenta and charge signs of secondary particles. \\\\ \\\\Specific goal is to carry out detailed analysis of individual events with super high multiplicity of secondaries. These data are to be used for investigation of properties of super hot/dense matter, in particular to look for and analyze possible manifestations of quark-gluon plasma in central Pb-Pb collisions at energies of 160~GeV/nucleon.

  10. Experiments on the transportation of a magnetized plasma stream in the GOL-3 facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postupaev, V. V.; Batkin, V. I.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kuklin, K. N.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The program of the deep upgrade of the GOL-3 multiple-mirror trap is presented. The upgrade is aimed at creating a new GOL-NB open trap located at the GOL-3 site and intended to directly demonstrate the efficiency of using multiple-mirror magnetic cells to improve longitudinal plasma confinement in a gasdynamic open trap. The GOL-NB device will consist of a new central trap, adjoint cells with a multiple-mirror magnetic field, and end tanks (magnetic flux expanders). Plasma in the central trap will be heated by neutral beam injection with a power of up to 1.5 MW and duration of 1 ms. At present, physical experiments directed at developing plasma technologies that are novel for this facility are being carried out using the 6-m-long autonomous part of the GOL-3 solenoid. The aim of this work was to develop a method for filling the central trap with a low-temperature start plasma. Transportation of a plasma stream from an arc source over a distance of 3 m in a uniform magnetic field with an induction of 0.5-4.5 T is demonstrated. In these experiments, the axial plasma density was (1-4) × 1020 m-3 and the mirror ratio varied from 5 to 60. In general, the experiments confirmed the correctness of the adopted decisions for the start plasma source of the GOL-NB device.

  11. Rock magnetic and other geophysical signatures of relative sea level change in the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Formation, Drum Mountains, West-Central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgedahl, S. L.; Jarrard, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Wheeler Formation of West-Central Utah is a succession of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic rocks deposited during the Middle Cambrian along a passive continental margin of Laurentia (western margin, in today's coordinates). The depositional setting was a gentle ramp, bounded by a normal fault on the south. The present study focuses on the Wheeler Formation in the Drum Mountains, Utah, which is thought to have recorded Middle Cambrian sea level changes and which is known to yield exceptionally-preserved fossils with soft parts, similar to the famed Burgess shale. An integrated approach has been used here to investigate the following: (1) high-resolution changes in water depth (sea level changes?) with stratigraphic position; (2) where exceptionally preserved fossils are most likely to occur; and (3) mineralogical indicators of sea level change, such as magnetic susceptibility and other rock magnetic properties. Rocks consist of limestones, argillaceous limestones, and finely-bedded mudstones (shales). Methods used here are: measurements of magnetic susceptibility, natural remanent magnetization, and viscous remanent magnetization; hysteresis loops; spectral gamma ray; coulometry to determine calcite content; X-ray diffraction; and field mapping. In these rocks, mineralogical analyses indicate primarily a 2-component system of calcite and terrigenous minerals, mainly illite. Magnetic susceptibility, gamma ray, and coulometry results strongly indicate that magnetic susceptibility stems primarily from the paramagnetic clay component, namely, illite. Thus, both magnetic susceptibility and gamma ray increase linearly with decreasing calcite content throughout the section studied. Deep-water shales yield very high values of gamma ray and magnetic susceptibility; by contrast, carbonates with low gamma ray and low magnetic susceptibilities were deposited in relatively shallow water. These results lead to the following conclusions: (1) changes in relative water depth have

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  13. Magnetic parameter variations in the Chaona loess/paleosol sequences in the central Chinese Loess Plateau, and their significance for the middle Pleistocene climate transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yougui; Fang, Xiaomin; King, John W.; Li, Jijun; Naoto, Ishikawa; An, Zhisheng

    2014-05-01

    A high-resolution rock magnetic investigation was performed on the Chaona Quaternary loess/paleosol sequences in the Central Chinese Loess Plateau. Based on a newly developed independent unturned time scale and magnetic records, we reconstructed the history of the East Asia monsoons during the last 3 Ma and explored the middle Pleistocene climate transition (MPT). Rock magnetic results show that the loess layers are characterized by relatively high coercivity and remanent coercivity, lower magnetic susceptibility (MS), and that the paleosol layers are characterized by relatively high MS, saturation magnetization and remanent saturation magnetization. Spectrum analyses indicate that there are various periods in addition to orbital periodicities. According to the onset and stable appearance of 100 kyr period, we consider that the MPT recorded in this section began at ~ 1.26 Ma and was completed by ~ 0.53 Ma, which differs from previous investigations based on orbitally tuned time scales. The forcing mechanism for the MPT was more complicated than just the orbital forcing. We conclude that the rapid uplift of the Tibetan Plateau may have played an important role in the shift of periodicities during the middle Pleistocene.

  14. New stratigraphic, chronologic, and magnetic fabric constraints for Neogene and Quaternary ignimbrites in the Central Andes (South Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Rupelle, A.; Thouret, J. C.; Cubukcu, H. E.; Jicha, B.; Bréard, E.; Gerbe, M.-C.; Le Pennec, J.-L.; Diot, H.; Boivin, P.

    2012-04-01

    Central Andean deformation history in southern Peru is recorded in Neogene volcanic units of Ocoña and Cotahuasi canyons that cut across the western Cordillera. Acceleration (100 km3) Nazca (c.24.6 Ma), Alpabamba (19.4-18.0 Ma), and Huaylillas (14.25-12.7 Ma) ignimbrite sheets preceded the canyon incision, whereas sheets of smaller volume (welded, eutaxitic, crystal-rich facies overlain by a thick, multi-bedded ash-flow tuff and a lithic-rich, indurated flow unit. The Huaylillas ignimbrite sheet comprises a strongly welded, crystal-rich, lithic-poor, columnar lithofacies, with devitrified pumice. The Caraveli ignimbrite sheet has a jointed vitrophyre overlain by a welded, blocky, crystal-rich flow unit. A vacuolar, saccharolytic unit forms the top of the sequence. The Lower Sencca ignimbrite sheet comprises of a basal vitrophyre and a slightly welded, fibrous pumice-rich flow unit, which grades into a welded, vapor-phase unit that contains more crystals than pumice and lithics. The Upper Sencca ignimbrite sheet consists of a black vitrophyre, grading into a strongly welded, crystal-rich, eutaxitic cooling unit. The latter is capped by a slightly welded unit, and an indurated pumice-rich, crystal-poor vapour-phase facies. Quaternary valley-fill termed Las Lomas consists of unwelded, crystal-poor pumice-flow deposits. Eighteen new 40Ar/39Ar analyses have been carried out on feldspar/glass separates from pumice and lavas. Results for the Caraveli ignimbrite (9.35±0.06 Ma), Upper Barroso lavas (2.24±0.45 Ma) and Upper Sencca ignimbrite (2.00-2.06±0.09 Ma) are in good agreement with previous data. New ages for the Lower Barroso lavas (7.32±0.05; 5.36±0.12 Ma) and Lower Sencca ignimbrites (5.13±0.01, 5.09±0.03, 4.65±0.11, 4.36 ± 0.16) extend their temporal history towards older times. Lower Barroso lava flow activity occurred as early as~7.3 and lasted until 5.4 Ma just before the Lower Sencca eruptions. The Lower Sencca ignimbrites spanned at least 1.5 Ma and

  15. Central sensibility of human cases with different body mass during oral glucose tolerance test using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because of the limitation of technique, there are few researches on regulating function of central hypothalamus by metabolism, especially the researches on real-time function.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the response of hypothalamus to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in different body-weighted subjects by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) so as to investigate the relationship between the sensitivity of hypothalamus in glycoregulation and disturbance of carbohydrate metabolism.DESIGN: Paired design.SETTING: Department of Radiology and Beijing Geriatrics Institute, Beijing Hospital, National Public Health Bureau.PARTICIPANTS: A total of twenty healthy volunteers were selected from Beijing Geriatrics Institute,National Public Health Bureau, including 10 subjects with obesity (5 males and 5 females; body mass >28.0 kg/m2) and 10 subjects with normal body mass (5 males and 5 females; body mass from 18.5 to 23.9 kg/m2). All subjects gave written informed consent before participating in the study.METHODS: fMRI study was performed on GE 1.5 T Signa Twinspeed Infinity with Excite. Each volunteer was ingested of glucose during the fMRI scan. T2* images were acquired using a single-shot gradient echo (EPI) technique. The parameters of EPI included: TR 3 000 ms, TE 40 ms, Flip angle 90 ° , field of view (FOV) 24 cm × 24 cm, thickness 5 mm, gap 0 mm, matrix 64 × 64, number of excitation 1. All 10 subjects with normal body mass underwent a repeat fMRI scan after consuming an equivalent amount of water without glucose on a separate day. The procedure for the fMRI scan with water intake was the same as for glucose ingestion. fMRI data were processed with Intensity Averaging Method.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The central response of hypothalamus and feedback orientation during OGTT in different body-weighted subjects.RESULTS: An acute transient decrease of fMRI intensity in posterior inferior and anterior inferior of hypothalamus was observed in all

  16. New insights into the paleoclimatic interpretation of the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization of Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Jinbo; Fang, Xiaomin; Yan, Maodu; Li, Bingshuai

    2016-11-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility (χ-T curves) and magnetization (M-T curves) has been used as a routine rock magnetic tool to characterize the magnetic mineralogy and magnetic granulometry of Chinese loess/palaeosols. However, paleoclimatic interpretation of these thermomagnetic analyses remains controversial. In the present study, total organic carbon (TOC), thermomagnetic and low-temperature magnetic experiments on Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) have been conducted. We found that the M (T) cooling curves at room temperature were mostly lower than the corresponding heating curves, whereas for the χ (T) analyses the cooling curves at room temperature were always much higher than the heating curves. Low-temperature magnetic measurements demonstrated that a large amount of superparamagnetic ferrimagnetic particles were produced during the thermal treatment and resulted in the aforementioned differences. This finding further indicated that the use of the M - T curves to estimate the relative content of maghemite in the loess/paleosols from the CLP was problematic. In addition, a positive correlation exists between the TOC and the frequency-dependent susceptibility (χFD) in the CLP, suggesting that stronger pedogenesis would result in the simultaneous increase in the content of both maghemite and organic matter. Consequently, the parameters △χ1 (representing the relative content of pedogenic maghemite), △χ2 ([χph-χ] +△χ1) and χph (related to the organic matter concentration), which can be calculated from the χ - T analyses, can potentially be used as new indicators of pedogenesis and paleoclimate in Central Asia and the CLP.

  17. New insights into the palaeoclimatic interpretation of the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization of Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Jinbo; Fang, Xiaomin; Yan, Maodu; Li, Bingshuai

    2017-02-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility (χ-T curves) and magnetization (M-T curves) has been used as a routine rock magnetic tool to characterize the magnetic mineralogy and magnetic granulometry of Chinese loess/palaeosols. However, palaeoclimatic interpretation of these thermomagnetic analyses remains controversial. In the present study, total organic carbon (TOC), thermomagnetic and low-temperature magnetic experiments on Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) have been conducted. We found that the M (T) cooling curves at room temperature were mostly lower than the corresponding heating curves, whereas for the χ (T) analyses the cooling curves at room temperature were always much higher than the heating curves. Low-temperature magnetic measurements demonstrated that a large amount of superparamagnetic ferrimagnetic particles were produced during the thermal treatment and resulted in the aforementioned differences. This finding further indicated that the use of the M-T curves to estimate the relative content of maghemite in the loess/palaeosols from the CLP was problematic. In addition, a positive correlation exists between the TOC and the frequency-dependent susceptibility (χFD) in the CLP, suggesting that stronger pedogenesis would result in the simultaneous increase in the content of both maghemite and organic matter. Consequently, the parameters ▵χ1 (representing the relative content of pedogenic maghemite), ▵χ2 ([χph - χ] +▵χ1) and χph (related to the organic matter concentration), which can be calculated from the χ-T analyses, can potentially be used as new indicators of pedogenesis and palaeoclimate in Central Asia and the CLP.

  18. Instabilities of MHD Waves Produced by Coupling of Rotation and Gradient of Magnetic Field and its Possible Application in the Galactic Central Region

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ipsita

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of MHD wave propagating in a gravitating and rotating medium permeated by non-uniform magnetic field has been done. It has been found that the Gradient of Magnetic Field when coupled with Rotation becomes capable to generate few instabilities (Temporal or Spatial) leading to the damping or amplification of MHD waves. The Jean's criterion is not sufficient for stability always. Rather, the waves will suffer instability unless their wave length (frequency) is less (greater) than certain critical values. Otherwise, those will smoothly propagate outward. Out of different scenarioes depending on the direction of the magnetic field, its gradient, rotation and wave propagation three important Special Cases have been discussed and different stability criteria have been derived. Finally, using the above theory we have obtained the stability/instability criteria for the waves moving parallel and perpendicular to the galactic plane in the Core and Periphery of the Central Region of Galaxy (C.R.G.) due to the...

  19. Development of the superconductors for ITER magnet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikov, A.; Nikulin, A.; Silaev, A.; Vorobieva, A.; Pantsyrnyi, V.; Vedernikov, G.; Salunin, N.; Sudiev, S.

    1998-10-01

    A review is given of the present status of the development and production of Nb 3Sn and Nb-Ti superconductors for the Model Coils and the real Magnet System of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in the Russian Federation Home Team. It is shown that Nb 3Sn bronze processed superconductors produced for the Model Central Solenoid Coil insert meet the ITER joint Central Team requirements. In particular, the critical current density, measued in non-Cu area is not less than 550 A/mm 2 for 12 T at 4.2 K, the level of hysteresis losses is not in excess of 200 mJ/cm 3, and the Cu-stabilizing shell resistivity ratio of Cr-plated wire is 150. Internal tin Nb 3Sn superconductor development and test results are presented, confirming the possibility of their application for the ITER Magnet System winding. Nb-Ti superconductors for PF coils properties have also been considered. The possibility of Nb 3Sn and Nb-Ti superconductor manufacture with the use of large composite billets up to 300 mm in dia is shown, creating the possibility for large scale industrial production (several tens of tons/year) of these materials for the ITER Magnet System.

  20. The CERN Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel Toroid Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m2 experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and its ins...

  1. The CERN cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m/sup 2/ experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and i...

  2. Impact of detector solenoid on the Compact Linear Collider luminosity performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inntjore Levinsen, Y.; Dalena, B.; Tomás, R.; Schulte, D.

    2014-05-01

    In order to obtain the necessary luminosity with a reasonable amount of beam power, the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) design includes an unprecedented collision beam size of σy=1 nm vertically and σx=45 nm horizontally. With exceptionally small and flat beams, the luminosity can be significantly degraded due to the combination of the experimental solenoid field and a large crossing angle. The two main effects reducing the luminosity are y-x'-coupling and an increase of vertical dispersion. Additionally, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR) from the orbit deflection created by the solenoid field increases the beam emittance and results in unrecoverable luminosity degradation. A novel approach to evaluate the ISR effect from a realistic solenoid field without knowledge of the full compensation of the geometric aberrations is presented. This approach is confirmed by a detailed study of the correction techniques to compensate the beam optics distortions. The unrecoverable luminosity loss due to ISR for CLIC at 3 TeV has been evaluated, and found to be around 4% to 5% for the solenoid design under study.

  3. Performance of solenoids versus quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications—for example in particle therapy or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics—requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. Generally speaking, the two approaches are equivalent in focusing capability, if parameters are such that the solenoid length approximately equals its diameter. The scaling also shows that this is usually not the case above a few MeV; consequently, a solenoid needs to be pulsed or superconducting, whereas the quadrupoles can remain conventional. It is also important that the transmission of the triplet is found only 25% lower than that of the equivalent solenoid. Both systems are equally suitable for energy selection based on their chromatic effect as is shown using an initial distribution following the RPA simulation model by Yan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 135001 (2009PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.135001].

  4. Compact Muon Solenoid: largest physics experiment to be held in 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    Atkins, William

    2007-01-01

    "over the last fifteen years about 2'300 engineers and scientists from over 150 scientific institutions in 37 countries around the world have worked together to design and build a gigantic general-purpose particle detector, what is called the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS)." (1 page)

  5. Nonlinear Dynamic Model-Based Adaptive Control of a Solenoid-Valve System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DongBin Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nonlinear model-based adaptive control approach is proposed for a solenoid-valve system. The challenge is that solenoids and butterfly valves have uncertainties in multiple parameters in the nonlinear model; various kinds of physical appearance such as size and stroke, dynamic parameters including inertia, damping, and torque coefficients, and operational parameters especially, pipe diameters and flow velocities. These uncertainties are making the system not only difficult to adjust to the environment, but also further complicated to develop the appropriate control approach for meeting the system objectives. The main contribution of this research is the application of adaptive control theory and Lyapunov-type stability approach to design a controller for a dynamic model of the solenoid-valve system in the presence of those uncertainties. The control objectives such as set-point regulation, parameter compensation, and stability are supposed to be simultaneously accomplished. The error signals are first formulated based on the nonlinear dynamic models and then the control input is developed using the Lyapunov stability-type analysis to obtain the error bounded while overcoming the uncertainties. The parameter groups are updated by adaptation laws using a projection algorithm. Numerical simulation results are shown to demonstrate good performance of the proposed nonlinear model-based adaptive approach and to compare the performance of the same solenoid-valve system with a non-adaptive method as well.

  6. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, X. K.; Zheng, S. X.; Bradshaw, Thomas; Baynham, Elwyn; Cobb, John; Lau, Wing; Lau, Peter; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-09-09

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) consists of a target, a beam line, a pion decay channel, the MICE cooling channel. Superconducting magnets are used in the pion decay channel and the MICE cooling channel. This report describes the MICE cooling channel magnets and the progress in the design and fabrication of these magnets. The MICE cooling channel consists of three types of superconducting solenoids; the spectrometer solenoids, the coupling solenoids and the focusing solenoids. The three types of magnets are being fabricated in he United States, China, and the United Kingdom respectively. The spectrometer magnets are used to analyze the muon beam before and after muon cooling. The coupling magnets couple the focusing sections and keep the muon beam contained within the iris of the RF cavities that re used to recover the muon momentum lost during ionization cooling. The focusing magnets focus the muon beam in the center of a liquid hydrogen absorber. The first of the cooling channel magnets will be operational in MICE in the spring of 2010.

  7. Ultra-high-field superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoard, R.W.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Leber, R.L.; Hickman, R.B.; Lee, J.D.

    1983-08-01

    The following topics are considered: (1) superfluid helium for advanced magnets, (2) conductor reinforcement, (3) designing a 20-T, 2-m bore solenoidal coil, (4) coil size and conductor properties, (5) axial forces on the coil, (6) effect of radiation on the coil systems, and (7) helium-II transient heat transfer and coil protection. (MOW)

  8. Effect of axial magnetic field on a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet ECR ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T., E-mail: tsubasa@oshima-k.ac.jp; Wada, H.; Furuse, M. [National Institute of Technology, Oshima College, 1091-1 Komatsu, Suouoshima, Oshima, Yamaguchi 742-2193 (Japan); Asaji, T. [National Institute of Technology, Toyama College, 13 Hongo, Toyama 939-8630 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Herein, we conduct a fundamental study to improve the generation efficiency of a multi-charged ion source using argon. A magnetic field of our electron cyclotron resonance ion source is composed of a permanent magnet and a solenoid coil. Thereby, the axial magnetic field in the chamber can be tuned. Using the solenoid coil, we varied the magnetic field strength in the plasma chamber and measured the ion beam current extracted at the electrode. We observed an approximately three times increase in the Ar{sup 4+} ion beam current when the magnetic field on the extractor-electrode side of the chamber was weakened. From our results, we can confirm that the multi-charged ion beam current changes depending on magnetic field intensity in the plasma chamber.

  9. Modular transportable superconducting magnetic Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieurance, D.; Kimball, F.; Rix, C. [Martin Marietta Space Magnetics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Design and cost studies were performed for the magnet components of mid-size (1-5 MWh), cold supported SMES systems using alternative configurations. The configurations studied included solenoid magnets, which required onsite assembly of the magnet system, and toroid and racetrack configurations which consisted of factory assembled modules. For each configuration, design concepts and cost information were developed for the major features of the magnet system including the conductor, electrical insulation, and structure. These studies showed that for mid-size systems, the costs of solenoid and toroid magnet configurations are comparable and that the specific configuration to be used for a given application should be based upon customer requirements such as limiting stray fields or minimizing risks in development or construction.

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  13. Study on the characteristics of magnetic levitation for permanent magnets and ferromagnetic materials with various sizes using stacked HTS bulk annuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@elec.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima-Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Matsunaga, J.; Doi, A.; Ikegami, T. [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima-Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Onodera, H. [JST-CREST, K’s Gobancho 6F, 7 Gobancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► We achieved the stable levitation of irons by magnetized HTS bulk annuli. ► The relationship between magnetized field and sample size was cleared. ► The iron samples smaller than 1 mm diameter could not levitate stably. ► The spherical solenoid magnet was fabricated to levitate small iron samples. -- Abstract: We achieved stable levitation of cylindrical permanent magnets and irons using stacked ring-shaped high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks with 20 mm ID, 60 mm OD and 50 mm height, and those were magnetized by field cooling method. The levitation characteristics of permanent magnets and iron samples located in the inner space of that levitation system were investigated experimentally. Iron samples with needle-shape and smaller than 1 mm diameter could not levitate stably. However, we found that the high strength of magnetized field was not necessary to levitate small needle-shaped irons. In order to levitate them, we need a uniform magnetic field in radial direction, so, a spherical solenoid magnet that can easily make a homogeneous magnetic field in inner space of HTS bulk annuli was developed. The spherical solenoid magnet, composed of seven solenoid coils with different inner and outer diameters, was designed by an electromagnetic analysis and fabricated.

  14. An important step for the ATLAS toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment's prototype toroid coil arrives at CERN from the CEA laboratory in Saclay on 6 October. The world's largest superconducting toroid magnet is under construction for the ATLAS experiment. A nine-metre long fully functional prototype coil was delivered to CERN at the beginning of October and has since been undergoing tests in the West Area. Built mainly by companies in France and Italy under the supervision of engineers from the CEA-Saclay laboratory near Paris and Italy's INFN-LASA, the magnet is a crucial step forward in the construction of the ATLAS superconducting magnet system. Unlike any particle detector that has gone before, the ATLAS detector's magnet system consists of a large toroidal system enclosing a small central solenoid. The barrel part of the toroidal system will use eight toroid coils, each a massive 25 metres in length. These will dwarf the largest toroids in the world when ATLAS was designed, which measure about six metres. So the ATLAS collaboration decided to build a...

  15. Commissioning of the Cryogenic System for the ATLAS Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Bradshaw, T; Haug, F; ten Kate, H H J; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Rochford, J

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the test results of the helium cryoplant for the superconducting magnets of the ATLAS particle detector at CERN. It consists of two refrigerators used in common by all the magnets and of two proximity cryogenic systems (PCS) interfacing respectively the toroids and the central solenoid. Emphasis is given to the commissioning of the refrigerators: the main unit of 6 kW equivalent capacity at 4.5 K and the thermal shield refrigerator providing 20 kW between 40 K and 80 K. The first unit is used for refrigeration at 4.5 K and for the cooling of three sets of 20 kA current leads, while the second one provides, in addition to the 20 kW refrigeration of the thermal shields, 60 kW for the cool-down to 100 K of the 660 ton cold mass of the magnets. The tests, carried out with the equipment in the final underground configuration, are extended to the PCS that includes the large liquid helium centrifugal pumps (each providing 1.2 kg/s) for forced-flow cooling of the magnets and the complex distributi...

  16. BaBar technical design report: Chapter 9, Magnet coil and flux return

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connor, T.; The BaBar Collaboration

    1995-03-01

    The BaBar magnet is a thin, 1.5 T superconducting solenoid with a hexagonal flux return. This chapter discusses the physics requirements and performance goals for the magnet, describes key interfaces, and summarizes the projected magnet performance. It also presents the design of the superconducting solenoid, including magnetic design, cold mass design, quench protection and stability, cold mass cooling, cryostat design, and coil assembly and transportation. The cryogenic supply system and instrumentation are described briefly, and the flux return is described.

  17. A Conduction-Cooled Superconducting Magnet System-Design, Fabrication and Thermal Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Holbøll, Joachim; Wang, Qiuliang

    2015-01-01

    A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet system with an operating current of 105.5 A was designed, fabricated and tested for material processing applications. The magnet consists of two coaxial NbTi solenoid coils with an identical vertical height of 300 mm and is installed in a high-vacuumed c......A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet system with an operating current of 105.5 A was designed, fabricated and tested for material processing applications. The magnet consists of two coaxial NbTi solenoid coils with an identical vertical height of 300 mm and is installed in a high...

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  2. Explicit Representation of Roots on -Adic Solenoids and Non-Uniqueness of Embeddability into Rational One-Parameter Subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Peter Becker-Kern

    2007-11-01

    This note generalizes known results concerning the existence of roots and embedding one-parameter subgroups on -adic solenoids. An explicit representation of the roots leads to the construction of two distinct rational embedding one-parameter subgroups. The results contribute to enlighten the group structure of solenoids and to point out difficulties arising in the context of the embedding problem in probability theory. As a consequence, the uniqueness of embedding of infinitely divisible probability measures on -adic solenoids is solved under a certain natural condition.

  3. Simulation and dynamic characteristics of pneumatic solenoid valve used in EPB%气压式EPB用电磁阀的仿真与动态特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆渴; 王洪亮; 王显会

    2016-01-01

    The response speed of pneumatic solenoid valve affects the performance of the pneumatic electronic parking brake ( EPB ) system directly. The mathematical models of the solenoid valve including the mechanics model,the current model and the magnetism model are built,and the three models are simulated by using Matlab/Simulink. The primary factors influencing the valve performance and the dynamic characteristics are found. Some suggestions about structures are proposed to optimize the performance of the solenoid valve.%气压式EPB(电子驻车制动)系统电磁阀的响应速度直接影响系统的性能。通过建立气压式EPB用电磁阀机械系统、电系统和磁系统的数学模型,运用Matlab/Simulink对电磁阀进行仿真研究,得出影响电磁阀工作性能的主要因素和动态特性,从结构角度提出优化电磁阀性能的思路。

  4. MAGNETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  5. Latest News from the Magnet System

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Ruber; R. Pengo; J. Metselaar; J. Buskop; J.J. Rabbers

    2006-01-01

    Final Connections of the Central Solenoid In the days before Christmas 2005 the highest point of ATLAS was reached as the solenoid's control dewar was put in place on top of the supporting arch structure (HS) surrounding the Barrel Toroid. From the control dewar the solenoid is connected to the cryogenic and control systems as well as to the power supply. In January 2006 the joint work was completed between dewar and chimney, containing the cryogenic and superconducting connections to the solenoid. Meanwhile the commissioning of the cryogenic distribution system in the main ATLAS cavern (UX15) was completed, after which the final connections between the solenoid and its cryogenics and control system could be started. First the huge cryogenic transfer line was put in place between the cryogenic distribution system and control dewar. A team of specialized welders worked full speed to join all the liquid and gas helium lines according to the highest quality standards. After completion the same teams then install...

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  7. Driving Parameter Selection of High-speed Solenoid Valve for High-pressure Common Rail System%高压共轨系统高速电磁阀驱动参数优选方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白思春; 褚全红; 孟长江; 姜承赋; 贾利; 杨薇; 李晨; 苏莉; 陈鲜萍

    2012-01-01

    A method of selecting parameter for different solenoid valves was introduced,to ensure the quick opening, reliable contacting and rapid turn-off of solenoid valve in the high-pressure common rail system. By measuring the injection quantity on the injection pump test bed, the parameters of driving voltage, open-current and holding current for solenoid valve were determined. In addition, the method did not need to consider the complicated electric, magnetic and liquid factors in the system. With the method, the high-speed solenoid valve of a high-pressure common rail system was tested. The driving parameters were acquired by the optimization and verified through the steady test in the injection pump test bed. The result shows that the method can meet the engineering application requirements.%介绍了一种对不同电磁阀进行参数优选的方法,以保证高压共轨控制系统中电磁阀的快速开启、可靠吸合和快速关断.该方法通过在喷油泵试验台上测试喷油量,确定出电磁阀驱动电压、开启电流及维持电流参数,不需要考虑系统复杂的电、磁、液综合因素.应用该方法对某高压共轨部件高速电磁阀进行试验,优化出驱动参数,并在喷油泵试验台上进行了稳定性试验验证,结果表明该方法能够满足工程应用.

  8. Estimates of flow direction for calc-alkaline welded tuffs and paleomagnetic data reliability from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility measurements: Central San Juan Mountains, southwest Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, Brooks B.

    1982-07-01

    Flow directions are estimated from the measurement of the magnetic fabric of 106 samples, collected at 18 sites in four welded tuff units in the central San Juan Mountains of southern Colorado. The estimates assume that the tuffs generally flowed directly away from the extrusive vents and that the lineations of magnetic grains within the tuffs represent the flow direction at individual sites. Errors in the estimation may arise from topographic variation, rheomorphism (post-emplacement mass flow) within the tuff, and other factors. Magnetic lineation is defined as the site mean anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility maximum azimuth. A test on the flow directions for individual units is based on the projection of lineation azimuths and their intersection within or near the known source caldera for the tuff. This test is positive for the four units examined. Paleomagnetic results for these tuffs are probably reliable indicators of the geomagnetic field direction in southwest Colorado, during the time (28.2-26.5 Ma) of emplacement.

  9. Spin flipping a stored vertically polarized proton beam with an RF solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, R. A.; Blinov, B. B.; Chu, C. M.; Courant, E. D.; Crandell, D. A.; Kaufman, W. A.; Krisch, A. D.; Nurushev, T. S.; Ratner, L. G.; Wong, V. K.; Caussyn, D. D.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Ellison, T. J. P.; Lee, S. Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E. J.; Przewoski, B. von; Ohmori, C.

    1995-09-01

    A recent experiment in the IUCF cooler ring studied the spin flip of a stored vertically polarized 139 MeV proton beam. This spin flip was accomplished by using an RF solenoid to induce an artificial depolarizing resonance in the ring, and then varying the solenoid's frequency through this resonance value to induce spin flip. We found a polarization loss after multiple spin flips of about 0.00±0.05% per flip and also losses for very long flip times. This device will be useful for reducing systematic errors in polarized beam-internal target scattering asymmetry experiments by enabling experimenters to perform frequent beam polarization reversals in the course of the experiment.

  10. Construction of the Solenoid Spectrometer for Nuclear AstroPhysics (SSNAP) at Notre Dame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacob; Bardayan, Dan; Blankstein, Drew; Hall, Matthew; Hall, Oscar; Kolata, James; O'Malley, Patrick; Becchetti, Frederick; Blackmon, Jeffery; Pain, Steven

    2016-09-01

    The study of nucleon transfer reactions gives information about many nuclei involved in astrophysical processes. The design and use of new detector systems improves our ability to accurately characterize these nuclei. The Solenoid Spectrometer for Nuclear AstroPhysics (SSNAP) is a new helical orbit spectrometer being designed at the University of Notre Dame to study transfer reactions with high-energy light ion beams from the FN tandem accelerator. SSNAP incorporates a series of position-sensitive silicon detectors to be set on-axis inside the second TwinSol solenoid. SSNAP will be sensitive to light ions produced in different reactions and the charged-particle decay products from the exotic nuclei produced. Results of initial testing and future plans with this detector system will be shown in this presentation. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics.

  11. Performance Characterization of a Solenoid-type Gas Valve for the H- Magnetron Source at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa, A. [Fermilab; Bollinger, D. S. [Fermilab; Karns, P. R. [Fermilab

    2016-09-06

    The magnetron-style H- ion sources currently in operation at Fermilab use piezoelectric gas valves to function. This kind of gas valve is sensitive to small changes in ambient temperature, which affect the stability and performance of the ion source. This motivates the need to find an alternative way of feeding H2 gas into the source. A solenoid-type gas valve has been characterized in a dedicated off-line test stand to assess the feasibility of its use in the operational ion sources. H- ion beams have been extracted at 35 keV using this valve. In this study, the performance of the solenoid gas valve has been characterized measuring the beam current output of the magnetron source with respect to the voltage and pulse width of the signal applied to the gas valve.

  12. High luminosity interaction region design for collisions inside high field detector solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Milardi, Catia; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Sgamma, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    An innovatory interaction region has been recently conceived and realized on the Frascati DA{\\Phi}NE lepton collider. The concept of tight focusing and small crossing angle adopted to achieve high luminosity in multibunch collisions has evolved towards enhanced beam focusing at the interaction point with large horizontal crossing angle, thanks to a new compensation mechanism for the beam-beam resonances. The novel configuration has been tested with a small detector without solenoidal field yielding a remarkable improvement in terms of peak as well as integrated luminosity. The high luminosity interaction region has now been modified to host a large detector with a strong solenoidal field which significantly perturbs the beam optics introducing new design challenges in terms of interaction region optics design, beam transverse coupling control and beam stay clear requirements. Interaction region design criteria as well as the luminosity results relevant to the structure test are presented and discussed.

  13. Study of thermosiphon cooling scheme for the production solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanaraj, N.; Kashikhin, V.; Peterson, T.; Pronskikh, V.; Nicol, T.

    2014-01-01

    A thermosiphon cooling scheme is envisioned for the Production Solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The thermosiphon cooling is achieved by indirect cooling with helium at 4.7 K. The siphon tubes are welded to the solenoid outer structure. The anticipated heat loads in the solenoid is presented as well as the cooling scheme design. A thermal model using ANSYS to simulate the temperature gradient is presented. The thermal analysis also makes provisions for including the heat load generated in the coils and structures by the secondary radiation simulated using the MARS 15 code. The impact of the heat loads from supports on the solenoid cooling is studied. The thermosiphon cooling scheme is also validated using pertinent correlations to study flow reversals and the cooling regime.

  14. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors: Intrinsic emittance, space charge forces due to non-uniformities, RF and solenoid effects

    CERN Document Server

    Dowell, David H

    2016-01-01

    Advances in electron beam technology have made possible the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and electron microscopes. These devices have become valuable tools for basic research and applied science. An important technology related to xfels is the photocathode RF gun and injector. The invention of the RF gun and the developments of emittance compensation and beam matching were driving forces behind these new technologies. Achieving even brighter beams requires taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during emission and initial acceleration. In addition the bright beam is sensitive to optical aberrations in the injector's RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including beam properties due to cathode material properties, space charge effects close to the cathode and optical distortions of the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  15. Towards maintenance-free SOVs (solenoid operated valves). [For nuclear power plant use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rustagi, R. (Valcor Engineering Corp., Springfield, NJ (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Because most solenoid operated valves (SOVs) are being used in vital safety related systems in nuclear power plants, they must be shown to perform satisfactorily over 40 years of normal service plus one year into post-LOCA. Current practice in SOV design and manufacture, as described here, aims to minimize the need for maintenance and to make it simpler when it is necessary. (author).

  16. Evaluation and Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on Disrupted Beam in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toprek, Dragan; /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2008-12-18

    This paper presents calculations of detector solenoid effects on disrupted primary beam in the ILC 14 mrad extraction line. Particle tracking simulations are performed for evaluation of primary beam loss along the line as well as of beam distribution and polarization at Compton Interaction Point. The calculations are done both without and with solenoid compensation. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  1. Conceptual design study of the K-DEMO magnet system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keeman, E-mail: kkeeman@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sangjun; Park, Jong Sung; Lee, Chulhee; Im, Kihak; Kim, Hyung Chan; Lee, Gyung-Su [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Neilson, George; Brown, Thomas; Kessel, Charles; Titus, Peter; Zhai, Yuhu [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Perform a preliminary conceptual study for a steady-state Korean DEMO reactor. • Present a preliminary design of TF (toroidal field) magnet. • Present a preliminary design of CS (central solenoid) magnet. • Present a preliminary design of PF (toroidal field) magnet. - Abstract: As the ITER is being constructed, there is a growing anticipation for an earlier realization of fusion energy. A major design philosophy for the initiated conceptual design study for a steady-state Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) is engineering feasibility. A two-staged development plan is envisaged. K-DEMO is designed not only to demonstrate a net electricity generation and a self-sustained tritium cycle, but also to be used, in its initial stage, as a component test facility. Then, in its second stage, a major upgrade is carried out by replacing in-vessel components in order to show a net electricity generation on the order of 500 MWe. After a thorough 0-D system analysis, the major radius and minor radius are chosen to be 6.8 m and 2.1 m, respectively. In order to minimize wave deflection, a top-launch high frequency (>200 GHz) electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) system will be the key system for the current profile control. For matching the high frequency ECCD, a high toroidal field (TF) is required and can be achieved by using high current density Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting conductor. The peak magnetic field reaches to 16 T with the magnetic field at the plasma center above 7 T. Key features of the K-DEMO magnet system include the use of two TF coil winding packs, each of a different conductor design, to reduce the construction cost and save the space for the magnet structure material.

  2. Design and test of a superconducting magnet in a linear accelerator for an Accelerator Driven Subcritical System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Quanling, E-mail: pengql@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Fengyu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Heilongjiang 150006 (China); Wang, Ting [Beijing Huantong Special Equipment Co., LTD, Beijing 100192 (China); Yang, Xiangchen [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Anbin [Harbin Institute of Technology, Heilongjiang 150006 (China); Wei, Xiaotao [Beijing Huantong Special Equipment Co., LTD, Beijing 100192 (China); Gao, Yao; Hou, Zhenhua; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Haoshu [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-11-11

    A batch superconducting solenoid magnet for the ADS proton linear accelerator has been designed, fabricated, and tested in a vertical dewar in Sept. 2013. A total of ten superconducting magnets will be installed into two separate cryomodules. Each cryomodule contains six superconducting spoke RF cavities for beam acceleration and five solenoid magnets for beam focusing. The multifunction superconducting magnet contains a solenoid for beam focusing and two correctors for orbit correction. The design current for the solenoid magnet is 182 A. A quench performance test shows that the operating current of the solenoid magnet can reach above 300 A after natural quenching on three occasions during current ramping (260 A, 268 A, 308 A). The integrated field strength and leakage field at the nearby superconducting spoke cavities all meet the design requirements. The vertical test checked the reliability of the test dewar and the quench detection system. This paper presents the physical and mechanical design of the batch magnets, the quench detection technique, field measurements, and a discussion of the residual field resulting from persistent current effects.

  3. 一种用于自动变速器的比例电磁阀研究%Research on Proportional Solenoid Valve Used for Automatic Transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟飞; 陶刚; 陈慧岩

    2014-01-01

    介绍一种用于自动变速器的比例电磁阀结构,研究比例电磁阀的分析、设计方法及其稳态和动态特性。在结构分析的基础上,分析其工作原理,将比例电磁阀分为电场、磁场、机械和流体四部分,分析这四部分的内在耦合关系。建立各个部分的动态特性数学模型并进行耦合仿真分析,对比例电磁阀电磁特性进行研究,通过与试验结果对比,初步验证耦合仿真模型的正确性。通过计算分析电磁阀内部参量的动态变化特性,为优化电磁阀设计奠定基础。在液压部分中,进油口采用球阀,排油口采用喷嘴挡板阀,通过控制排油口的开度可以进行流量控制,间接控制油压输出。在比例电磁阀开启时,电磁力与弹簧力的总和与球阀的液压力相平衡的工作模式,使该比例电磁阀具有开关响应快、输入电流与输出油压线性关系好的特点。研究结果表明,该比例电磁阀阀芯位移0.2 mm ,开启响应时间在2 ms以内,油压建立在4 ms以内,适用于自动变速器换挡执行回路中。%The structure of a proportional solenoid valve for automatic transmission is introduced. The design, analysis methodology and dynamic performances of the valve are discussed. Based on the structural analysis of the valve, the operating principle is investigated. Four subsystems that are electric field, magnetic field, mechanical, and hydraulic of the proportional solenoid valve are divided, and their inherent coupling interactions are investigated. The mathematical model of the dynamic performance of the four subsystems is built separately and simulation analysis is carried out. The active process of the proportional solenoid valve is studied by combining with experimental results, verified the correctness of the coupling simulation model. It would be useful for proportional solenoid valve optimal design by analyzing the internal parameters dynamic

  4. Fast inversion of Zeeman line profiles using central moments. II. Stokes V moments and determination of vector magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mein, P.; Uitenbroek, H.; Mein, N.; Bommier, V.; Faurobert, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. In the case of unresolved solar structures or stray light contamination, inversion techniques using four Stokes parameters of Zeeman profiles cannot disentangle the combined contributions of magnetic and nonmagnetic areas to the observed Stokes I. Aims: In the framework of a two-component model atmosphere with filling factor f, we propose an inversion method restricting input data to Q , U, and V profiles, thus overcoming ambiguities from stray light and spatial mixing. Methods: The V-moments inversion (VMI) method uses shifts SV derived from moments of V-profiles and integrals of Q2, U2, and V2 to determine the strength B and inclination ψ of a magnetic field vector through least-squares polynomial fits and with very few iterations. Moment calculations are optimized to reduce data noise effects. To specify the model atmosphere of the magnetic component, an additional parameter δ, deduced from the shape of V-profiles, is used to interpolate between expansions corresponding to two basic models. Results: We perform inversions of HINODE SOT/SP data for inclination ranges 0 <ψ< 60° and 120 <ψ< 180° for the 630.2 nm Fe i line. A damping coefficient is fitted to take instrumental line broadening into account. We estimate errors from data noise. Magnetic field strengths and inclinations deduced from VMI inversion are compared with results from the inversion codes UNNOFIT and MERLIN. Conclusions: The VMI inversion method is insensitive to the dependence of Stokes I profiles on the thermodynamic structure in nonmagnetic areas. In the range of Bf products larger than 200 G, mean field strengths exceed 1000 G and there is not a very significant departure from the UNNOFIT results because of differences between magnetic and nonmagnetic model atmospheres. Further improvements might include additional parameters deduced from the shape of Stokes V profiles and from large sets of 3D-MHD simulations, especially for unresolved magnetic flux tubes.

  5. Magnetic Properties of Oil-gas-bearing Rocks of The Central Part of Dniper-donetsk Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuderavets, R.; Maksymchuk, V.; Gorodisky, Y.

    Small amplitude positive local delta F anomalies were revealed by the results of high- accuracy magnetic prospecting in the Dniper-Donets trought over a series of oil-gas- bearing structures. Their nature can be explained by lithofacial and epigenetic rock magnetic variations in the oxidized-reduced zones of carbon deposits. Though, there is no trustable experimental data on magnetic properties of rocks in these zones. To study peculiarities of lateral and vertical magnetic perceptability, mineral rock com- position distribution within oil-gas-bearing areas in Dniper-Donetsk trough a series of investigations of these characteristics have been conducted for productive and un- productive holes. In general, the magnetic perceptability of core from 19 holes, near oil-gas deposits and far from theirs as well were determined. A statistic analysis of the obfained cappa values was done, rock mineral composition in some holes was de- termined. The results make it possible to conclude: 1. The cut is composed mainly of terrigenous rocks and is characterized by a slight differentiation by the magnetic perceptability (0-150x10E-5Si) 2. Small values of rock magnetic perceptability (1- 3x10E-5Si) and dispersion for low Visean substage of low carbon with which oil-gas- bearing of the region under study is closely connected were determined. 3. Statistic analysis proved the existence of some types of cappa distribution within the hole in particular it differs within productive and unproductive formations. 4. Larger values of cappa and their dispersion in comparison with analogical deposits in productive formations, were revealed. 5. A series of secondary epigenic minerals: quartz, kaoli- nite, aragonite, ankerite, dolomite, pirite, hematite, siderite was determined in the de- posit zone and out of it. The largest amount of ironminerals (ankerite, pirite, hematite, siderite) was found in terrigeneous rocks (argillite) located over and under carbon de- posits. The analysis of the

  6. Adaptability of optimization concept in the context of cryogenic distribution for superconducting magnets of fusion machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Biswanath; Bhattacharya, Ritendra Nath; Vaghela, Hitensinh; Shah, Nitin Dineshkumar; Choukekar, Ketan; Badgujar, Satish

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic distribution system (CDS) plays a vital role for reliable operation of largescale fusion machines in a Tokamak configuration. Managing dynamic heat loads from the superconducting magnets, namely, toroidal field, poloidal field, central solenoid and supporting structure is the most important function of the CDS along with the static heat loads. Two concepts are foreseen for the configuration of the CDS: singular distribution and collective distribution. In the first concept, each magnet is assigned with one distribution box having its own sub-cooler bath. In the collective concept, it is possible to share one common bath for more than one magnet system. The case study has been performed with an identical dynamic heat load profile applied to both concepts in the same time domain. The choices of a combined system from the magnets are also part of the study without compromising the system functionality. Process modeling and detailed simulations have been performed for both the options using Aspen HYSYS®. Multiple plasma pulses per day have been considered to verify the residual energy deposited in the superconducting magnets at the end of the plasma pulse. Preliminary 3D modeling using CATIA® has been performed along with the first level of component sizing.

  7. Helium isotope investigation on magnetic reversal boundaries of loess-paleosol sequence at Luochuan, central Chinese Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Extraterrestrial particles have higher 3He/4He ratios than those of terrestrial sediments ( > 100 Ra versus < 0.03 Ra, where Ra is the 3He/4He ratio normalized to the atmospheric value of 1.4×10-6). The interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), which are very rich in 3He, continuously bombard the Earth and can accumulate in deposits. IDPs sedimentation rate changes can significantly influence 3He concentration in the Earth surface sediments. Since IDPs are not easy to detect in terrestrial deposits, measuring helium isotopes is a helpful approach to examine changes in IDPs. Helium concentration and helium isotopic composition magnetic substances and the quartz particles were examined for helium concentration and helium isotopic ratio. Results show that the 3He/4He ratio and the 3He concentrations of the magnetic substances are clearly higher than those of the bulk samples and the quartz particles, and, the 3He/4He ratio of the extracted magnetic substances is also higher than that of the average level of the Earth's crust. The higher helium content in the magnetic fractions can be explained by an influx of IDPs.

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  10. Radiofrequency hydrogen ion source with permanent magnets providing axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikawa, Kohei, E-mail: oikawa@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Saito, Yuta; Komizunai, Shota; Takahashi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Uniform axial magnetic field of about 70 G is applied to a radiofrequency (rf) hydrogen ion source by arrays of permanent magnets. The plasma density and electron temperature downstream of the source and near the magnetic filter are compared with those in the previously described ion source, where the axial field has been applied by two solenoids. The source is operated at ∼350 kHz and above 10 kW rf power with a field-effect-transistor-based invertor power supply in 1.5 Pa hydrogen. The results show that the plasma density of ∼10{sup 19} m{sup −3} near the source exit and ∼10{sup 18} m{sup −3} near the magnetic filter can be obtained, which are higher than those with the solenoids.

  11. Radiofrequency hydrogen ion source with permanent magnets providing axial magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Kohei; Saito, Yuta; Komizunai, Shota; Takahashi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira

    2014-02-01

    Uniform axial magnetic field of about 70 G is applied to a radiofrequency (rf) hydrogen ion source by arrays of permanent magnets. The plasma density and electron temperature downstream of the source and near the magnetic filter are compared with those in the previously described ion source, where the axial field has been applied by two solenoids. The source is operated at ∼350 kHz and above 10 kW rf power with a field-effect-transistor-based invertor power supply in 1.5 Pa hydrogen. The results show that the plasma density of ∼10(19) m(-3) near the source exit and ∼10(18) m(-3) near the magnetic filter can be obtained, which are higher than those with the solenoids.

  12. Magnetic Mineralogy as Indicator of dry Conditions in Lacustrine Sediments From Santa María del Oro, Nayarit, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, B.; Vazquez, G.; Rodriguez, A.

    2007-05-01

    Combined magnetic and geochemical analysis were conducted on laminated sediments from Santa Maria del Oro, a crater lake in Nayarit (Mexico), to build up a model of paleoenvironmental conditions for the late Holocene. The occurrence of a severe drought at the end of the archeological Classic period (100 - 900 AD) has been documented in sites of central Mexico (Zirahuen lake and Lerma basin), the Gulf of Mexico coast (Los Tuxtlas) and the Yucatan peninsula. The effects of this climatic event are considered to have stressed the social and political situation in the Yucatan area and other sites in Mesoamerica, and resulted in the "collapse" of the Maya civilization. Santa Maria del Oro sediments between ca. 600 - 1140 AD are characterized by repeated sequences of ocher silt laminae with high inorganic carbon content, authigenic siderite, and low concentration of SD magnetic minerals, followed upward by an increase of concentrations of fine grained SD and SP ferrimagnetic minerals in brown silt laminae. This sequence is considered to represent dissolution-precipitation cycles of magnetic minerals in low erosion, concentrated waters and anoxic water-sediment interface environments. Dissolution of magnetite occurs in reductive conditions, which are considered as warmer and dryer periods. Above the ocher silt, precipitation of fine grained magnetite occurs when conditions change to oxic environments. Ostracode C and O isotopy document a negative precipitation/evaporation balance during this time period.

  13. The link between turbulence, magnetic fields, filaments, and star formation in the Central Molecular Zone cloud G0.253+0.016

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, C; Longmore, S N; Kruijssen, J M D; Bally, J; Contreras, Y; Crocker, R M; Garay, G; Jackson, J M; Testi, L; Walsh, A J

    2016-01-01

    Star formation is primarily controlled by the interplay between gravity, turbulence, and magnetic fields. However, the turbulence and magnetic fields in molecular clouds near the Galactic Center may differ substantially from spiral-arm clouds. Here we determine the physical parameters of the central molecular zone (CMZ) cloud G0.253+0.016, its turbulence, magnetic field and filamentary structure. Using column-density maps based on dust-continuum emission observations with ALMA+Herschel, we identify filaments and show that at least one dense core is located along them. We measure the filament width W_fil=0.17$\\pm$0.08pc and the sonic scale {\\lambda}_sonic=0.15$\\pm$0.11pc of the turbulence, and find W_fil~{\\lambda}_sonic. A strong velocity gradient is seen in the HNCO intensity-weighted velocity maps obtained with ALMA+Mopra, which is likely caused by large-scale shearing of G0.253+0.016, producing a wide double-peaked velocity PDF. After subtracting the gradient to isolate the turbulent motions, we find a near...

  14. Central nervous system abnormalities on midline facial defects with hypertelorism detected by magnetic resonance image and computed tomography; Anomalias de sistema nervoso central em defeitos de linha media facial com hipertelorismo detectados por ressonancia magnetica e tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Vera Lucia Gil da Silva; Giffoni, Silvio David Araujo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dep. de Genetica Medica]. E-mail: vlopes@fcm.unicamp.br

    2006-10-15

    The aim of this study were to describe and to compare structural central nervous system (CNS) anomalies detected by magnetic resonance image (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in individuals affected by midline facial defects with hypertelorism (MFDH) isolated or associated with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The investigation protocol included dysmorphological examination, skull and facial X-rays, brain CT and/or MRI. We studied 24 individuals, 12 of them had an isolated form (Group I) and the others, MCA with unknown etiology (Group II). There was no significant difference between Group I and II and the results are presented in set. In addition to the several CNS anomalies previously described, MRI (n=18) was useful for detection of neuronal migration errors. These data suggested that structural CNS anomalies and MFDH seem to have an intrinsic embryological relationship, which should be taken in account during the clinical follow-up. (author)

  15. Mu2e Magnetic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehler, Marc [Fermilab; Tartaglia, Michael [Fermilab; Tompkins, John [Fermilab; Orozco, Charles [Illinois U., Urbana (main)

    2014-07-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to explore charged lepton flavor violation by searching for muon-to-electron conversion. The magnetic field generated by a system of solenoids is crucial for Mu2e and requires accurate characterization to detect any flaws and to produce a detailed field map. Stringent physics goals are driving magnetic field specifications for the Mu2e solenoids. A field mapper is being designed, which will produce detailed magnetic field maps. The uniform field region of the spectrometer volume requires the highest level of precision (1 Gauss per 1 Tesla). During commissioning, multiple magnetic field maps will be generated to verify proper alignment of all magnet coils, and to create the final magnetic field map. In order to design and build a precise field mapping system consisting of Hall and NRM probes, tolerances and precision for such a system need to be evaluated. In this paper we present a design for the Mu2e field mapping hardware, and discuss results from OPERA-3D simulations to specify parameters for Hall and NMR probes. We also present a fitting procedure for the analytical treatment of our expected magnetic measurements.

  16. Design and testing of focusing magnets for a compact electron linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qushan; Qin, Bin; Liu, Kaifeng; Liu, Xu; Fu, Qiang; Tan, Ping; Hu, Tongning; Pei, Yuanji

    2015-10-01

    Solenoid field errors have great influence on electron beam qualities. In this paper, design and testing of high precision solenoids for a compact electron linac is presented. We proposed an efficient and practical method to solve the peak field of the solenoid for relativistic electron beams based on the reduced envelope equation. Beam dynamics involving space charge force were performed to predict the focusing effects. Detailed optimization methods were introduced to achieve an ultra-compact configuration as well as high accuracy, with the help of the POISSON and OPERA packages. Efforts were attempted to restrain system errors in the off-line testing, which showed the short lens and the main solenoid produced a peak field of 0.13 T and 0.21 T respectively. Data analysis involving central and off axes was carried out and demonstrated that the testing results fitted well with the design.

  17. Study on a New Large Solid Angle Capture System for Surface Muon Using Sup erconducting Solenoids%大俘获立体角的内靶超导螺线管表面muon源的设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖冉; 刘艳芬; 许文贞; 谭宗泉; 成斌; 孔伟; 叶邦角

    2014-01-01

    高通量µ子源是国际上µ子科学研究的重要条件。在中国散裂中子源的高能质子应用区中,运用蒙特卡罗工具Geant4和G4beamline软件设计了使用内靶超导螺线管俘获高通量表面µ子的束线。与传统的分离靶和基于四极磁铁的收集系统相比,大孔径超导螺线管可以将收集效率提高两个量级。通过对不同靶材的粒子产率进行分析得出石墨是最佳靶材,然后比较俘获螺线管与束流的不同偏转角度下收集的表面µ的产率,提出了合理的较高产率的俘获和输运螺线管的设计方案,并与常规磁铁方案比较,最终在衰变螺线管端口的表面µ通量高达108/s。%High intense muons are required by many applications in muon science. A large acceptance channel for surface muons was designed at China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) using a superconducting solenoid and an internal target, which can provide a large solid angle to collect intense surface muons. Compared to conventional separate target and collection system based on quadrupole magnets, a superconducting solenoid with large aperture can collect two orders larger of surface muons. This device was simulated by Geant4 and G4beamline. By analyzing the surface muon production ratio produced by the process that protons bombard four different materials, we chose the graphite as the target material. Then comparing the intensity of surface muon by different angles between the axis of the capture solenoids and the proton beam line, we proposed the capture and transport solenoid system with higher muon production ratio. Finally, the yield of surface muon at the exit of decay solenoid can be up to 108/s.

  18. Status of the CMS magnet (MT17)

    CERN Document Server

    Hervé, A; Campi, D; Cannarsa, P; Fabbricatore, P; Feyzi, F; Gerwig, H; Grillet, J P; Horváth, I L; Kaftanov, V S; Kircher, F; Loveless, R; Maugain, J M; Perinic, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sbrissa, E; Smith, R P; Veillet, L

    2002-01-01

    The CMS experiment (Compact Muon Solenoid) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with a free bore of 6 m diameter and 12.5-m length, enclosed inside a 10 000-ton return yoke. The magnet will be assembled and tested in a surface hall at Point 5 of the LHC at the beginning of 2004 before being transferred by heavy lifting means to an experimental hall 90 m below ground level. The design and construction of the magnet is a common project of the CMS Collaboration. The task is organized by a CERN based group with strong technical and contractual participation from CEA Saclay, ETH Zurich, Fermilab, INFN Genova, ITEP Moscow, University of Wisconsin and CERN. The magnet project will be described, with emphasis on the present status of the fabrication. (15 refs).

  19. Comparing superconducting and permanent magnets for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, C. R. H.

    2016-01-01

    We compare the cost of a high temperature superconducting (SC) tape-based solenoidwith a permanent magnet (PM) Halbach cylinder for magnetic refrigeration.Assuming a five liter active magnetic regenerator volume, the price of each type ofmagnet is determined as a function of aspect ratio of the r......We compare the cost of a high temperature superconducting (SC) tape-based solenoidwith a permanent magnet (PM) Halbach cylinder for magnetic refrigeration.Assuming a five liter active magnetic regenerator volume, the price of each type ofmagnet is determined as a function of aspect ratio....... This factor decreases for increasing field strength, indicatingthat the superconducting solenoid could be suitable for high field, large coolingpower applications. ...

  20. Feasibility analysis of reciprocating magnetic heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, A. V.; Hartley, J. G.; Shelton, Sam V.; Smith, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    A reciprocating gadolinium core in a regeneration fluid column in the warm bore of a superconducting solenoidal magnet is considered for magnetic refrigeration in 3.517 MW (1000 ton) applications. A procedure is presented to minimize the amount of superconducting cable needed in the magnet design. Estimated system capital costs for an ideal magnetic refrigerator of this type become comparable to conventional chillers as the frequency of reciprocation approaches 10 Hertz. A 1-D finite difference analysis of a regenerator cycling at 0.027 Hertz is presented which exhibits some of the features seen in the experiments of G. V. Brown.

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  4. The Silicon Sensors for the Compact Muon Solenoid Tracker - Design and Qualification Procedure

    CERN Document Server

    Agram, Jean-Laurent; Assouak, Samia; Bergauer T.; Bilei, Gian Mario; Borrello, Laura; Brianzi, Mirko; Civinini, Carlo; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dinu, Nicoleta; Demaria, Natale; Feld, Lutz; Focardi, Ettore; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Forton, Eric; Furgeri, Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Honma, Alan; Juillot, Pierre; Kartashov, Dmitry; Krammer, Manfred; Macchiolo, Anna; Mannelli, Marcello; Messineo, Alberto; Migliore, Ernesto; Militaru, Otilia; Piasecki, Christian; Santinelli, Roberto; Sentenac, Daniel; Servoli, Leonello; Starodumov, Andrei; Tonelli, Guido; Wang, Jason

    2003-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN. Its inner tracking system consist of the world largest Silicon Strip Tracker (SST). In total it implements 24244 silicon sensors covering an area of 206 m^2. To construct a large system of this size and ensure its functionality for the full lifetime of ten years under LHC condition, the CMS collaboration developed an elaborate design and a detailed quality assurance program. This paper describes the strategy and shows first results on sensor qualification.

  5. Slice emittance measurement for photocathode RF gun with solenoid scanning and RF deflecting cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Huang, WenHui; Du, YingChao; Yan, LiXin; Tang, ChuanXiang

    2011-12-01

    The radiation of high-gain short-wavelength free-electron laser depends on the slice transverse emittance of the electron bunch. This essay introduces the method of slice emittance measurement, and shows the brief setup of this experiment using the solenoid scanning and RF deflecting cavity at Tsinghua University. The preliminary experimental results show that the slice rms emittance of the electron bunch generated by photocathode RF gun has considerable variations along the bunch and is typically less than 0.55 mm mrad for the laser rms radius of 0.4 mm.

  6. Slice emittance measurement for photocathode RF gun with solenoid scanning and RF deflecting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The radiation of high-gain short-wavelength free-electron laser depends on the slice transverse emittance of the electron bunch. This essay introduces the method of slice emittance measurement, and shows the brief setup of this experiment using the solenoid scanning and RF deflecting cavity at Tsinghua University. The preliminary experimental results show that the slice rms emittance of the electron bunch generated by photocathode RF gun has considerable variations along the bunch and is typically less than 0.55 mm mrad for the laser rms radius of 0.4 mm.

  7. Laser accelerated protons captured and transported by a pulse power solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris-Mog, T.; Harres, K.; Nürnberg, F.; Busold, S.; Bussmann, M.; Deppert, O.; Hoffmeister, G.; Joost, M.; Sobiella, M.; Tauschwitz, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Roth, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Using a pulse power solenoid, we demonstrate efficient capture of laser accelerated proton beams and the ability to control their large divergence angles and broad energy range. Simulations using measured data for the input parameters give inference into the phase-space and transport efficiencies of the captured proton beams. We conclude with results from a feasibility study of a pulse power compact achromatic gantry concept. Using a scaled target normal sheath acceleration spectrum, we present simulation results of the available spectrum after transport through the gantry.

  8. INVESTIGATION ON THE DYNAMIC RESPONSE PERFORMANCE OF A NOVEL THREE-WAY SOLENOID VALVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to meet the increasinglystrict emissionstandards andi mprove the perfor mance of diesel en-gines,using electronic control systemin diesel en-gines becomes more and more popular.In the com-mon-rail injection system of diesel engines,injec-tion ti ming and injection duration are controlled bythe solenoid valve.The perfor mance of common-rail injection systemis directly deter mined by thesolenoid valve[1-2].A novel high-speed three-waysolenoid valve used in the common-rail injectionsystem for DME powe...

  9. Self-consistent Kinetic Description of the Low-Pressure Solenoidal Inductively Coupled Argon Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛明; 王友年

    2005-01-01

    Using an one-dimensional slab model, we have studied the electron energy distribution, the anomalous skin effect, and power absorption in the solenoidal-inductively-coupled argon discharge under low pressures (≤1.33 Pa). The electron energy distribution function and rf electromagnetic field in the plasma are determined self-consistently by the linearized Bolztmann equation incorporating with the Maxwell equations. The numerical results show that, at low pressures, the electron energy distribution function exhibits a non-Maxwellian distribution with a long high-energy tail. The anomalous skin effect is greatly enhanced under low pressures and the negative power absorption is also obtained.

  10. Transport of intense proton beams in an induction linac by solenoid lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, W.; Choe, J. Y.; Uhm, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    In the proposed proton induction linac at NSWC, a 100 A and 3 μs proton beam is accelerated to 5 MeV through a series of accelerating gaps. This beam can be effectively focused by solenoid lenses in this low energy regime and can be transported by adjusting the focusing strength in each period. For the transport channel design to reduce the number of independently controlled lenses, a theory of matched beams in the space-charge dominated regime has been developed. This study can be applied to cost efficient designs of induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion and free electron lasers.

  11. The central part of CMS before closing in the Hall of Cessy at Point 5.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The solid steel yoke (red) comprising three concentric layers interspersed with muon chambers (silver) surround the superconducting solenoid (silver-coloured ring) and Hadron Calorimeter (gold-coloured). Inside the hadron calorimeter physicists and engineers are preparing the "field mapper", a device that measures the strength and uniformity of the magnetic field when CMS is closed.

  12. Leptomeningeal enhancement as a sole magnetic resonance imaging finding of secondary central nervous system vasculitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsida Bajrami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main radiological findings of central nervous system (CNS consist of multiple subcortical infarcts, parenchymal and leptomeningeal enhancement, petechial hemorrhages on MRI and multifocal caliber changes of the vessels on MRA and DSA. Solely or prominent leptomeningeal enhancement is rarely seen as an isolated manifestation of CNS. We report a case of intracerebral vasculitis secondary to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD showing leptomeningeal enhancement as a unique finding in routine contrast-enhanced cranial MRI and aimed to emphasize the importance of these finding in diagnosing CNS.

  13. High-resolution seismic-reflection and marine-magnetic data from offshore central California--San Gregorio to Point Sur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, Ray W.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Watt, Janet T.; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Allwardt, Parker; Triezenberg, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution seismic-reflection data on four surveys (S-N1-09-MB, S-15-10-NC, S-06-11-MB, and S-04-12-MB) and marine-magnetic data on one survey (S-06-11-MB) between 2009 and 2012, offshore of central California between San Gregorio and Point Sur. This work was supported in part by the California Seafloor Mapping Program. The survey areas span about 120 km of California's coast (including Monterey Bay). Most data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Parke Snavely. Cumulatively, approximately 1,410 km of single-channel seismic-reflection data were acquired, mainly using a SIG 2mille minisparker. About 44 km of data were collected simultaneously using an EdgeTech Chirp 512. Subbottom acoustic penetration spanned tens to several hundreds of meters, variable by location. Marine magnetic data were collected on approximately 460 km of track lines (mainly in southern Monterey Bay) using a Geometrics G882 cesium-vapor marine magnetometer. This report includes maps and navigation files of the surveyed transects, linked to Google Earth™ software, as well as digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y and JPEG formats. The images of bedrock, sediment deposits, and tectonic structure provide geologic information that is essential to hazard assessment, regional sediment management, and coastal and marine spatial planning at Federal, State and local levels, as well as to future research on the geomorphic, sedimentary, tectonic, and climatic record of central California.

  14. The B00 model coil in the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Anashkin, O P; Keilin, V E; Lysenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    A 1-m size model coil has been developed to investigate the transport properties of the three aluminum-stabilized superconductors used in the ATLAS magnets. The coil, named B00, is also used for debugging the cryogenic, power and control systems of the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility. The coil comprises two double pancakes made of the barrel toroid and end-cap toroid conductors and a single pancake made of the central solenoid conductor. The pancakes are placed inside an aluminum coil casing. The coil construction and cooling conditions are quite similar to the final design of the ATLAS magnets. The B00 coil is well equipped with various sensors to measure thermal and electrodynamic properties of the conductor inside the coils. Special attention has been paid to the study of the current diffusion process and the normal zone propagation in the ATLAS conductors and windings. Special pick-up coils have been made to measure the diffusion at different currents and magnetic field values. (6 refs).

  15. Superconducting Magnet with the Minimum Steel Yoke for the Hadron Future Circular Collider Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A.; Curé, B.; Dudarev, A.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Mentink, M.; Da Silva, H. Pais; Rolando, G.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Berriaud, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual design study of a hadron Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) with a center-of-mass energy of the order of 100 TeV in a new tunnel of 80-100 km circumference assumes the determination of the basic requirements for its detectors. A superconducting solenoid magnet of 12 m diameter inner bore with the central magnetic flux density of 6 T in combination with two superconducting dipole and two conventional toroid magnets is proposed for a FCC-hh experimental setup. The coil of 23.468 m long has seven 3.35 m long modules included into one cryostat. The steel yoke with a mass of 22.6 kt consists of two barrel layers of 0.5 m radial thickness, and the 0.7 m thick nose disk and four 0.6 m thick end-cap disks each side. The maximum outer diameter of the yoke is 17.7 m; the length is 62.6 m. The air gaps between the end-cap disks provide the installation of the muon chambers up to the pseudorapidity about \\pm 2.7. The superconducting dipole magnets allow measuring the charged particle momenta in the pseudora...

  16. Modeling the X-rays from the Central Compact Object PSR J1852+0040 in Kesteven 79: Evidence for a Strongly Magnetized Neutron Star

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2014-01-01

    I present modeling of the X-ray pulsations from the central compact object (CCO) PSR J1852+0040 in the Galactic supernova remnant Kesteven 79. In the context of thermal surface radiation from a rotating neutron star, a conventional polar cap model can reproduce the broad, large-amplitude X-ray pulse only with a "pencil plus fan" beam emission pattern, which is characteristic of strongly magnetized ($\\gtrsim$10^12 Gauss) neutron star atmospheres, substantially stronger than the ~10^10 Gauss external dipole field inferred from the pulsar spin-down rate. This discrepancy can be explained by an axially displaced dipole. For other beaming patterns, it is necessary to invoke high-aspect-ratio emitting regions that are greatly longitudinally elongated, possibly due to an extremely offset dipole. For all assumed emission models, the existence of strong internal magnetic fields ($\\gtrsim$10^14} Gauss) that preferentially channel internal heat to only a portion of the exterior is required to account for the implied hig...

  17. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  18. A study of cortical excitability, central motor conduction, and cortical inhibition using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with early frontotemporal and Alzheimer′s dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Degenerative cortical dementias affect several million people worldwide. Early diagnosis and categorization are essential for initiating appropriate pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment so that deterioration can be postponed, and disability adjusted life years can be saved both for the patient and for the caregiver. Therefore, an early, simple, noninvasive biomarker will serve as a boon. Patients and Methods: Patients who satisfied probable Alzheimer′s disease (AD or frontotemporal dementia (FTD using international consensus criteria for FTD and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-AD and Related Disorders Association criteria for AD were evaluated using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation with figure of eight coil and motor evoked potential from right first dorsal interossei. Resting threshold (MT, central motor conduction time (CMCT, and silent period (SP were evaluated. Results: Resting MT and SP are reduced in patients with Alzheimer′s disease whereas CMCT is prolonged in patients with FTD and SP is in the lower limit of normal in both conditions. Conclusion: The patterns of central motor conduction and MT are distinctly different in patients with early Alzheimer′s disease (AD and FTD.

  19. Chromatic, geometric and space charge effects on laser accelerated protons focused by a solenoid

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Omari, Husam; Hofmann, Ingo; Ratzinger, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We stud­ied nu­mer­i­cal­ly emit­tance and trans­mis­sion ef­fects by chro­mat­ic and ge­o­met­ric aber­ra­tions, with and with­out space charge, for a pro­ton beam be­hind a solenoid in the laser pro­ton ex­per­i­ment LIGHT at GSI. The TraceWin code was em­ployed using a field map for the solenoid and an ini­tial dis­tri­bu­tion with ex­po­nen­tial en­er­gy de­pen­dence close to the ex­per­i­ment. The re­sults show a strong ef­fect of chro­mat­ic, and a rel­a­tive­ly weak one of ge­o­met­ric...

  20. Estimation and measurement of flat or solenoidal coil inductance for radiofrequency NMR coil design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Jan K; DeVries, Jeffrey S; Sykes, Brian D

    2007-07-01

    The inductance of a radiofrequency coil determines its compatibility with a given NMR probe circuit. However, calculation (or estimation) of inductance for radiofrequency coils of dimensions suitable for use in an NMR probe is not trivial, particularly for flat-coils. A comparison of a number of formulae for calculation of inductance is presented through the use of a straightforward inductance measurement circuit. This technique relies upon instrumentation available in many NMR laboratories rather than upon more expensive and specialized instrumentation often utilized in the literature. Inductance estimation methods are suggested and validated for both flat-coils and solenoids. These have proven very useful for fabrication of a number of new coils in our laboratory for use in static solid-state NMR probes operating at (1)H frequencies of 300 and 600MHz. Solenoidal coils with very similar measured and estimated inductances having inner diameters from 1 to 5mm are directly compared as an example of the practical application of inductance estimation for interchange of coils within an existing solid-state NMR probe.

  1. Low-energy nuclear reactions with double-solenoid- based radioactive nuclear beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Valdir Guimarães

    2010-07-01

    The University of Notre Dame, USA (Becchetti et al, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Res. A505, 377 (2003)) and later the University of São Paulo, Brazil (Lichtenthaler et al, Eur. Phys. J. A25, S-01, 733 (2005)) adopted a system based on superconducting solenoids to produce low-energy radioactive nuclear beams. In these systems the solenoids act as thick lenses to collect, select, and focus the secondary beam into a scattering chamber. Many experiments with radioactive light particle beams (RNB) such as 6He, 7Be, 8Li, 8B have been performed at these two facilities. These low-energy RNB have been used to investigate low-energy reactions such as elastic scattering, transfer and breakup, providing useful information on the structure of light nuclei near the drip line and on astrophysics. Total reaction cross-sections, derived from elastic scattering analysis, have also been investigated for light system as a function of energy and the role of breakup of weakly bound or exotic nuclei is discussed.

  2. Magnetic response to applied electrostatic field in external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorno, T.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); University of Florida, Department of Physics, Gainesville, FL (United States); Gitman, D.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Shabad, A.E. [P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-15

    We show, within QED and other possible nonlinear theories, that a static charge localized in a finite domain of space becomes a magnetic dipole, if it is placed in an external (constant and homogeneous) magnetic field in the vacuum. The magnetic moment is quadratic in the charge, depends on its size and is parallel to the external field, provided the charge distribution is at least cylindrically symmetric. This magneto-electric effect is a nonlinear response of the magnetized vacuum to an applied electrostatic field. Referring to the simple example of a spherically symmetric applied field, the nonlinearly induced current and its magnetic field are found explicitly throughout the space; the pattern of the lines of force is depicted, both inside and outside the charge, which resembles that of a standard solenoid of classical magnetostatics. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic response to applied electrostatic field in external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Adorno, T C; Shabad, A E

    2014-01-01

    We show, within QED and other possible nonlinear theories, that a static charge localized in a finite domain of space becomes a magnetic dipole, if it is placed in an external (constant and homogeneous) magnetic field in the vacuum. The magnetic moment is quadratic in the charge, depends on its size and is parallel to the external field, provided the charge distribution is at least cylindrically symmetric. This magneto-electric effect is a nonlinear response of the magnetized vacuum to an applied electrostatic field. Referring to a simple example of a spherically-symmetric applied field, the nonlinearly induced current and its magnetic field are found explicitly throughout the space, the pattern of lines of force is depicted, both inside and outside the charge, which resembles that of a standard solenoid of classical magnetostatics.

  4. Age-Associated Reduction of Asymmetry in Human Central Auditory Function: A 1H-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianming Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of age on hemispheric asymmetry in the auditory cortex after pure tone stimulation. Ten young and 8 older healthy volunteers took part in this study. Two-dimensional multivoxel 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans were performed before and after stimulation. The ratios of N-acetylaspartate (NAA, glutamate/glutamine (Glx, and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA to creatine (Cr were determined and compared between the two groups. The distribution of metabolites between the left and right auditory cortex was also determined. Before stimulation, left and right side NAA/Cr and right side GABA/Cr were significantly lower, whereas right side Glx/Cr was significantly higher in the older group compared with the young group. After stimulation, left and right side NAA/Cr and GABA/Cr were significantly lower, whereas left side Glx/Cr was significantly higher in the older group compared with the young group. There was obvious asymmetry in right side Glx/Cr and left side GABA/Cr after stimulation in young group, but not in older group. In summary, there is marked hemispheric asymmetry in auditory cortical metabolites following pure tone stimulation in young, but not older adults. This reduced asymmetry in older adults may at least in part underlie the speech perception difficulties/presbycusis experienced by aging adults.

  5. Computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of a central neurocytoma; Computertomographische und magnetresonanztomographische Befunde beim zentralen Neurozytom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, M.; Jansen, O.; Haehnel, S.; Sartor, K. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Geletneky, K. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Neurochirurgische Klinik

    1998-05-01

    Purpose: Analysis of our CT and MRI findings in patients with central neurocytomas in comparison with the relevant literature. Results: All tumors originated in the roof of a lateral ventricle with participation of the pellucid septum and extended intraventricularly (5/5), showed cystic components (5/5), and took up contrast medium (5/5). Contrast medium uptake was visible in both CT and MRI. In contrast, only three of the 5 tumors revealed calcifications (3/5) and these were better visible in CT than in MRI, no pathological vessels were detected. Because of its multi-planar representations and better soft-tissue contrast, MRI was superior to CT for the exact determination of origin and position of the tumors. The small cystic, inhomogenous appearance in T{sub 2}-weighted images was considered to be an especially typical feature. Conclusions: The typical appearance of central neurocytomas in CT and MRI provides information for the differential diagnosis from other intraventricular tumors. The definitive diagnosis is provided by neuropathological evaluation. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Analyse eigener CT- und MRT-Befunde bei Patienten mit zentralen Neurozytomen im Vergleich zur einschlaegigen Literatur. Ergebnisse: Alle Tumoren nahmen ihren Ursprung vom Dach eines Seitenventrikels mit Beteiligung des Septum pellucidum und dehnten sich nach intraventrikulaer aus (5/5), zeigten zystische Anteile (5/5) und nahmen Kontrastmittel auf (5/5). Die KM-Aufnahme war in der CT und der MRT nachweisbar. Verkalkte Anteile zeigten dagegen nur drei der 5 Tumoren (3/5), dies war besser in der CT als in der MRT erkennbar, pathologische Gefaesse wurden nicht nachgewiesen (0/5). Aufgrund der multiplanaren Darstellung und des besseren Weichteilkontrasts war die MRT der CT ueberlegen bei der exakten Bestimmung von Tumorursprung und -lage. Als besonders typisch fanden wir das kleinsystische, inhomogene Erscheinungsbild auf T{sub 2}-gewichteten Aufnahmen. Schlussfolgerungen: Das typische

  6. 电喷系统高速电磁阀的仿真及响应分析%Simulation and Response Analysis of High-speed Solenoid Valve for EUI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜发荣; 黄娟

    2011-01-01

    The response of the high-speed solenoid valve, which is inside the EUI for a small heavy-fuel engine, is analyzed. The corresponding mathematical model is set up based on the circuit equation, the magnetic circuit equation and the dynamic equation. It is simulated by means of the SIMULINK tools in MATLAB environment.By comparing different results simulated in variable parameters and analyzing the main factors affecting the dynamic response, the final parameters are determined, even the stability and rapid response of the solenoid are gained. The simulation model which is considered the reluctance change of the core material is valuable for further research and development of the solenoid valve.%对某小型重油发动机电喷系统内部的高速电磁阀,进行了建模仿真与响应分析.先建立该高速电磁阀的数学模型,再用Matlab/Simulink对其仿真.通过对不同输入参数的仿真对比,分析影响电磁阀响应的主要因素,从而确定模型的各项参数,得到该电磁阀的稳定及快速响应.该仿真模型考虑了铁磁材料的磁阻及磁阻变化对电磁力的影响,对电磁阀的开发和研制具有一定的参考价值.

  7. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, S A; Blattnig, S R; Singleterry, R C; Westover, S C

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited.

  8. Magnetic suspension and balance system advanced study, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boom, R. W.; Abdelsalam, M. K.; Eyssa, Y. M.; Mcintosh, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    The design improvements for the system encompass 14 or 18 external superconductive coils mounted on a 8 x 8 foot wind tunnel, a superconductive model core magnet on a holmium mandrel to fit an F-16 model, model wings of permanent magnet material Nd2Fe14B, and fiber glass epoxy structure. The Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS) advanced design is confirmed by the successful construction and test of a full size superconductive model core solenoid with holmium mandrel. The solenoid is 75 cm long and 12.6 cm in diameter and produces 6.1 tesla for a hold time of 47 minutes. An integrated coil system design of a new compact configuration without specific coils for roll or pitch shows promise of simplicity; magnet reductions of 30 percent compared to the most recent 1985 design are possible.

  9. A magnetic guide for cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Richmond, J A; Cantwell, B P; Opat, G I

    1998-01-01

    We propose a novel method for guiding cold, neutral atoms using static magnetic fields. A theoretical study of the magnetic field produced by a tube consisting of two identical, interwound solenoids carrying equal but opposite currents is presented. This field is almost zero throughout the centre of the tube, but it increases with exponential rapidity as one approaches the walls formed by the current carrying wires. Hence, cold atoms passing through the tube may be reflected by magnetic mirror effects near the walls. Applying this technique to a free-falling cloud of magneto-optically cooled caesium atoms we hope to construct atomic guides to facilitate the manipulation of cold atomic beams.

  10. The Physics and Technology of Strong Magnetic Fields (Chapter 10),

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    capacitor bank was discharged. The solenoid was placed into a metal tube, which was equipped with a radial slot and an explosive surrounded by a ring...1) "Trap" of magnetic field; 2) Ring of explosive; 3) De- L_ l tonator; 4) Trigger; 5) Capacitor Iw bank . 3 ,. .,.’ . - *-’-- The strength of the...and the other, outside it. The initial magnetic field was monitored according to the magnitude of the discharge current of the capacitor bank ; a test

  11. MAGNETIC FIELD ANALYSIS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC VALVE TAKING HYSTERESIS INTO ACCOUNT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shengchang; Zhong Tingxiu; Xu Yangzeng; Shi Guanglin

    2003-01-01

    Predicting and optimizing of the high-speed solenoid on/off valve behavior requires an accurate model of the hysteresis loop of the magnetic material used. A ferromagnetic hysteresis model and a novel algorithm based on fixed-point technique to optimize the electromagnetic model are introduced. By utilizing a modified vector Preisach model of magnetic hysteresis and the global genetic optimization algorithm based on partial mapping cross method, the B-H relation loops are identified accurately.

  12. Magnetization reversal in ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, M; Fassbender, J; Hillebrands, B

    2000-01-01

    We report the switching properties of a thin magnetic film subject to an ultrashort, laterally localized magnetic field pulse, obtained by numerical investigations. The magnetization distribution in the film is calculated on a grid assuming Stoner-like coherent rotation within the grid square size. Perpendicularly and in-plane magnetized films exhibit a magnetization reversal due to a 4 ps magnetic field pulse. Outside the central region the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period. In this area the evolution of the magnetization during the field pulse does not depend strongly on magnetic damping and/or pulse shape. However, the final magnetization distribution is affected by the magnetic damping. Although the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period, the time needed for the relaxation of the magnetization to the equilibrium state is rather large. The influence of the different magnetic anisotropy contributions and the magnetic damping parameter enters into the magnetization ...

  13. Magnetic properties of the remagnetized Middle-Ordovician limestones of the Ponón Trehué Formation (San Rafael Block, central-western Argentina): Insights into the Permian widespread Sanrafaelic overprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.

    2016-10-01

    The widespread Sanrafaelic remagnetization reset most of the early Cambrian to mid-Ordovician carbonate platform of the Argentine Precordillera and the calcareous units of the San Rafael Block. We conducted a detailed rock-magnetic study on the Middle-Ordovician limestones of the Ponón Trehué Formation at both limbs of a tight anticline exposed in the San Rafael Block (Mendoza province, central-western Argentina) that are carriers of a syntectonic magnetization of Permian age. We found that the magnetic overprint in the Ponón Trehué Formation is carried by both pyrrhotite and magnetite, with goethite and subordinate haematite likely related to weathering. Hysteresis parameters, frequency dependence of magnetic susceptibility, Cisowski and modified Lowrie-Fuller tests suggest the presence of ultrafine particles of chemical origin. Demagnetization of natural remanent magnetization and of three-axis isothermal remanence confirm pyrrhotite and magnetite as important contributors to the remanence. Both minerals carry the same magnetic syntectonic component suggesting a coeval or nearly coeval remanence acquisition and therefore mineral formation. This and the results of the magnetic fabric analyses indicate an authigenic origin of the magnetic minerals during folding associated with the Sanrafaelic tectonic phase (ca. 280 Ma). Although the chemically active (oxidizing?) fluids expelled from the orogen as it developed in the early Permian is a viable explanation for the Sanrafaelic remagnetization, the role of the nearly coeval magmatism in Precordillera and the San Rafael Block remains to be properly evaluated.

  14. Selection of Solenoid Salve in Engineering Design%工程设计中电磁阀的选型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭丽; 李涛

    2012-01-01

    With safety instrument system being widely applied in petrochemical plant, solenoid valve's importance is self - evident as the execator of safety interlocking system. From the point of engineering design view, the selection and design of solenoid valve in engineering design and safety instrumentation system are explored by the introduction of classification, the advantage of low power solenoid valve,power consumption and allowable transmission distance of calculation, the ways of dual solenoid valve's pneumatic hook-up and so on.%随着安全仪表系统在石油化工装置的广泛应用,电磁阀作为控制安全联锁的执行者,起着非常重要的作用;从工程设计角度出发,通过介绍电磁阀分类,低功耗电磁阀的优势,电磁阀的功耗及允许传输距离的计算,双电磁阀气路的连接方式等,探讨电磁阀在工程设计中的选型特点以及在安全仪表系统中电磁阀的设计。

  15. Improving Code Quality of the Compact Muon Solenoid Electromagnetic Calorimeter Control Software to Increase System Maintainability

    CERN Multimedia

    Holme, Oliver; Dissertori, Günther; Djambazov, Lubomir; Lustermann, Werner; Zelepoukine, Serguei

    2013-01-01

    The Detector Control System (DCS) software of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN is designed primarily to enable safe and efficient operation of the detector during Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data-taking periods. Through a manual analysis of the code and the adoption of ConQAT [1], a software quality assessment toolkit, the CMS ECAL DCS team has made significant progress in reducing complexity and improving code quality, with observable results in terms of a reduction in the effort dedicated to software maintenance. This paper explains the methodology followed, including the motivation to adopt ConQAT, the specific details of how this toolkit was used and the outcomes that have been achieved. [1] ConQAT, Continuous Quality Assessment Toolkit; https://www.conqat.org/

  16. Derivation of armature displacement and movement disturbances from current and voltage measurements on solenoid operated valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louati, Iskander Alexandre [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany). Service Sector Germany

    2009-07-01

    As part of the electric drive mechanisms of the safety system in nuclear power plants safety related solenoid operated valves (SOVs) are subject to design control, commissioning tests and periodical in-service inspections. AREVA has developed and qualified many methods and tools that have been embedded into as software tools called DAM for diagnosis and evaluation of the valve performance according to the KTA requirements. In the special case of COVs tracing the electric measurements with ADAM helps to detect anomalies at the SOVs and esp. those related to disturbances of the armature moved. The disturbances to be tested are divided into electrical and mechanical disturbances: voltage insufficiency, switch chattering; degradation of spring load, friction collaterally to armature displacement, partial or total obstruction of the armature.

  17. Failure Scenarios and Mitigations and for the BaBar Superconducting Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, EunJoo; Candia, A.; Craddock, W.W.; Racine, M.; Weisend, J.G., II; /SLAC

    2005-12-13

    The cryogenic department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is responsible for the operation, troubleshooting, and upgrade of the 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid detector for the BABAR B-factory experiment. Events that disable the detector are rare but significantly impact the availability of the detector for physics research. As a result, a number of systems and procedures have been developed over time to minimize the downtime of the detector, for example improved control systems, improved and automatic backup systems, and spares for all major components. Together they can prevent or mitigate many of the failures experienced by the utilities, mechanical systems, controls and instrumentation. In this paper we describe various failure scenarios, their effect on the detector, and the modifications made to mitigate the effects of the failure. As a result of these modifications the reliability of the detector has increased significantly with only 3 shutdowns of the detector due to cryogenics systems over the last 2 years.

  18. The upgrade and re-validation of the Compact Muon Solenoid Electromagnetic Calorimeter Control System

    CERN Multimedia

    Holme, Oliver; Di Calafiori, Diogo; Dissertori, Günther; Djambazov, Lubomir; Jovanovic, Dragoslav; Lustermann, Werner; Zelepoukine, Serguei

    2013-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) is one of the sub-detectors of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Detector Control System (DCS) that has been developed and implemented for the CMS ECAL was deployed in accordance with the LHC schedule and has been supporting the CMS data-taking since LHC physics runs started in 2009. During these years, the control system has been regularly adapted according to operational experience and new requirements, always respecting the constraints imposed on significant changes to a running system. Several hardware and software upgrades and system extensions were therefore deferred to the first LHC Long Shutdown (LS1). This paper presents the main architectural differences between the system that supported the CMS ECAL during its first years and the new design for the coming physics runs after LS1. Details on the upgrade planning, including the certification methods performed in the CMS ECAL DCS laboratory facilities, repor...

  19. On the effects of solenoidal and compressive turbulence in prestellar cores

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, O; Hubber, D A

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an ensemble of SPH simulations that follow the evolution of prestellar cores for $0.2\\,{\\rm Myr}$. All the cores have the same mass, and start with the same radius, density profile, thermal and turbulent energy. Our purpose is to explore the consequences of varying the fraction of turbulent energy, $\\delta_\\mathrm{sol}$, that is solenoidal, as opposed to compressive; specifically we consider $\\delta_\\mathrm{sol}=1,\\,2/3,\\,1/3,\\,1/9\\;{\\rm and}\\;0$. For each value of $\\delta_\\mathrm{sol}$, we follow ten different realisations of the turbulent velocity field, in order also to have a measure of the stochastic variance blurring any systematic trends. With low $\\delta_\\mathrm{sol}(\\!1/3)$ disc fragmentation dominates and delivers relatively low mass stars. There are no discernible systematic trends in the multiplicity statistics obtained with different $\\delta_\\mathrm{sol}$.

  20. Analysing the Control Software of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Hwong, Yi-Ling; Willemse, Tim A C

    2011-01-01

    The control software of the CERN Compact Muon Solenoid experiment contains over 30,000 finite state machines. These state machines are organised hierarchically: commands are sent down the hierarchy and state changes are sent upwards. The sheer size of the system makes it virtually impossible to fully understand the details of its behaviour at the macro level. This is fuelled by unclarities that already exist at the micro level. We have solved the latter problem by formally describing the finite state machines in the mCRL2 process algebra. The translation has been implemented using the ASF+SDF meta-environment, and its correctness was assessed by means of simulations and visualisations of individual finite state machines and through formal verification of subsystems of the control software. Based on the formalised semantics of the finite state machines, we have developed dedicated tooling for checking properties that can be verified on finite state machines in isolation.

  1. Uncommon evolution of probable central nervous system histoplasmosis: from leptomeningitis to posterior fossa granuloma. A case report with magnetic resonance images; Evolucao incomum de provavel histoplasmose de sistema nervoso central: de leptomeningite para granuloma da fossa posterior. Relato de caso com imagens por ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrilho, Paulo Eduardo Mestrinelli; Alves, Orival [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana - UNIOESTE, Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Curso de Medicina. Disciplina de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: carrilho@certto.com.br; Budant, Manfredo [UNITOM - Unidade de Diagnostico por Imagem, Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Centro de Tomografia; Bozo, Marlon K.; Meirelles, Noel [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana - UNIOESTE, Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Curso de Medicina; Bueno, Alexandre Galvao [ANATOM - Instituto de Anatomia Patologica de Cascavel, PR (Brazil)

    2006-01-15

    We report a case of a young immunocompetent patient with probable central nervous system histoplasmosis with evolutive peculiar findings seen on magnetic resonance imaging. Leptomeningeal thickening was initially observed which subsequently became a posterior fossa granuloma. The diagnosis of fungal infection was only reached by histopathological study and the treatment was based on long term therapy with fluconazole wth good initial response. (author)

  2. SU-E-J-233: A Facility for Radiobiological Experiments in a Large Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlone, M; Heaton, R; Keller, H [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wouters, B [Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jaffray, D [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing medical linear accelerators with integrated image guidance by MRI. Less work has been done on the fundamental biology of cell survival in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to describe an experimental system capable of measuring cell survival response in the types of MRI-linac systems currently under development. Methods: We have integrated a cobalt irradiator with a solenoid magnet. The solenoid magnet has inner diameter of 10 cm. To enable measurement of the biological effects as a function of depth, we are utilizing the sliced gel technique, in which cells are embedded and fixed within a gelatin matrix. Irradiated cells at defined positions (sub mm resolution) can subsequently be recovered and assessed for cell survival or other biological effects. Results: The magnetic field profile in the solenoid has a peak magnetic field 36 cm below the top edge of the magnet bore and can be placed at and SAD of 100 cm. At a solenoid current of 35 A, the peak magnetic field is 0.25 T. The dose rate of the cobalt irradiator is 16 cGy/min at 100 cm SAD. EBT3 film was used to demonstrate the system functionality. It was irradiated at 1 cm depth at 100 cm SSD with a 4×4 field to 1.5 Gy in a 0.25 T magnetic field. The dose profile was similar between this film and the control exposure without magnetic field. Conclusion: Integrating a cobalt irradiator with a high field magnet is demonstrated. The magnetic field at the cobalt defining head was minimal and did not interfere with the functioning of this unit. Cell survival experiments can be reproduced exactly in the presence or absence of a magnetic field since a resistive magnet is used.

  3. Experimental investigation into the application of a magnetic dense medium cyclone in a production environment / Ilana Katinka Myburgh

    OpenAIRE

    Myburgh, Ilana Katinka

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic dense medium cyclone project was undertaken at Koingnaas Mine on a 250 mm diameter cyclone during 1998 and a 510 mm cyclone during 2000. The aim of the project was to evaluate the performance of a magnetic DM cyclone in a production environment. Previous test work on magnetic DM cyclones were conducted during 1995 and 1996 on small (100 mm) cyclones in a laboratory environment, with medium feed only. Solenoid position, magnetic field strength and medium inlet de...

  4. Superconducting magnet needs for the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompkins, J.C.; Kashikhin, Vl.; /Fermilab; Parker, B.; /Brookhaven; Palmer, M.A./; Clarke, J.A.; /Daresbury

    2007-06-01

    The ILC Reference Design Report was completed early in February 2007. The Magnet Systems Group was formed to translate magnetic field requirements into magnet designs and cost estimates for the Reference Design. As presently configured, the ILC will have more than 13,000 magnetic elements of which more than 2300 will be based on superconducting technology. This paper will describe the major superconducting magnet needs for the ILC as presently determined by the Area Systems Groups, responsible for beam line design, working with the Magnet Systems Group. The superconducting magnet components include Main Linac quadrupoles, Positron Source undulators, Damping Ring wigglers, a complex array of Final Focus superconducting elements in the Beam Delivery System, and large superconducting solenoids in the e{sup +} and e{sup -} Sources, and the Ring to Main Linac lines.

  5. [Development of RF coil of permanent magnet mini-magnetic resonance imager and mouse imaging experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shulian; Xie, Huantong; Chen, Wei; Wang, Guangxin; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Shiyu

    2014-10-01

    In the development of radio frequency (RF) coils for better quality of the mini-type permanent magnetic resonance imager for using in the small animal imaging, the solenoid RF coil has a special advantage for permanent magnetic system based on analyses of various types.of RF coils. However, it is not satisfied for imaging if the RF coils are directly used. By theoretical analyses of the magnetic field properties produced from the solenoid coil, the research direction was determined by careful studies to raise further the uniformity of the magnetic field coil, receiving coil sensitivity for signals and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The method had certain advantages and avoided some shortcomings of the other different coil types, such as, birdcage coil, saddle shaped coil and phased array coil by using the alloy materials (from our own patent). The RF coils were designed, developed and made for keeled applicable to permanent magnet-type magnetic resonance imager, multi-coil combination-type, single-channel overall RF receiving coil, and applied for a patent. Mounted on three instruments (25 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.5 T or 1.5 T, and 50 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.48 T), we performed experiments with mice, rats, and nude mice bearing tumors. The experimental results indicated that the RF receiving coil was fully applicable to the permanent magnet-type imaging system.

  6. Optimum coil shape for a given volume of conductor to obtain maximum central field in an air core solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper is an expansion of engineering notes prepared in 1961 to address the question of how to wind circular coils so as to obtain the maximum axial field with the minimum volume of conductor. At the time this was a germain question because of the advent of superconducting wires which were in very limited supply, and the rapid push for generation of very high fields, with little concern for uniformity.

  7. The CMS Magnetic Field Map Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, VI; Sarycheva, L I; Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Gaddi, A; Amapane, N; Gerwig, H; Andreev, V; Cure, B; Mulders, M; Loveless, R; Karimaki, V; Popescu, S; Herve, A

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive featuresinclude a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. During two major tests of the CMS magnet the magnetic flux density was measured inside the coil in a cylinder of 3.448 m diameter and 7 m length with a specially designed field-mapping pneumatic machine as well as in 140 discrete regions of the CMS yoke with NMR probes, 3-D Hall sensors and flux-loops. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet has been developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. A volume based representation of the magnetic field is used to provide the CMS simulation and reconstruction software with the magnetic field ...

  8. Computation of magnetic fields within source regions of ionospheric and magnetospheric currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engels, U.; Olsen, Nils

    1998-01-01

    A general method of computing the magnetic effect caused by a predetermined three-dimensional external current density is presented. It takes advantage of the representation of solenoidal vector fields in terms of toroidal and poloidal modes expressed by two independent series of spherical harmon...

  9. The role of functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the central nervous system injury and repair: new potentials for neuroprotection with Cerebrolysin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Menon, Preeti K; Lafuente, José Vicente; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Wang, Y Andrew; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Mössler, Herbert; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna

    2014-01-01

    Functionalized Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (FMIONPs) are being explored for the development of various biomedical applications, e.g., cancer chemotherapy and/or several other radiological or diagnostic purposes. However, the effects of these NPs per se on the central nervous system (CNS) injury or repair are not well known. This review deals with different aspects of FMIONPs in relation to brain function based on the current literature as well as our own investigation in animal models of CNS injuries. It appears that FMIONPs are innocuous when administered intravenously within the CNS under normal conditions. However, abnormal reactions to FMIONPs in the brain or spinal cord could be seen if they are combined with CNS injuries e.g., hyperthermia or traumatic insults to the brain or spinal cord. Thus, administration of FMIONPs in vivo following whole body hyperthermia (WBH) or a focal spinal cord injury (SCI) exacerbates cellular damage. Since FMIONPs could help in diagnostic purposes or enhance the biological effects of radiotherapy/chemotherapy it is likely that these NPs may have some adverse reaction as well under disease condition. Thus, under such situation, adjuvant therapy e.g., Cerebrolysin (Ever NeuroPharma, Austria), a suitable combination of several neurotrophic factors and active peptide fragments are the need of the hour to contain such cellular damages caused by the FMIONPs in vivo. Our observations show that co-administration of Cerebrolysin prevents the FMIONPs induced pathologies associated with CNS injuries. These observations support the idea that FMIONPs are safe for the CNS in disease conditions when co-administered with cerebrolysin. This indicates that cerebrolysin could be used as an adjunct therapy to prevent cellular damages in disease conditions where the use of FMIONPs is required for better efficacy e.g., cancer treatment.

  10. A prospective study of magnetic resonance imaging patterns of central nervous system infections in pediatric age group and young adults and their clinico-biochemical correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamini Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infections of the central nervous system (CNS are common and routinely encountered. Our aim was to evaluate the neuroimaging features of the various infections of the CNS so as to differentiate them from tumoral, vascular, and other entities that warrant a different line of therapy. Aims: Our aim was to analyze the biochemical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features in CNS infections. Settings and Design: This was a longitudinal, prospective study over a period of 1½ years. Subjects and Methods: We studied cerebrospinal fluid (CSF findings and MRI patterns in 27 patients of 0–20 years age group with clinical features of CNS infections. MRI was performed on MAGNETOM Avanto 18 Channel 1.5 Tesla MR machine by Siemens India Ltd. The MRI protocol consisted of diffusion-weighted and apparent diffusion coefficient imaging, turbo spin echo T2-weighted, spin echo T1-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR, and gradient-echo in axial, FLAIR in coronal, and T2-weighted in sagittal plane. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequence and MR spectroscopy were done whenever indicated. Results and Conclusions: We found that most of the children belong to 1–10 years age group. Fungal infections were uncommon, mean CSF adenosine deaminase values specific for tuberculosis and mean CSF glucose-lowered in pyogenic. Hemorrhagic involvement of thalamus with/without basal ganglia and brainstem involvement may indicate Japanese encephalitis or dengue encephalitis. Diffusion restriction or hemorrhage in not expected in the brainstem afflicted lesions of rabies. Congenital cytomegalovirus can cause cortical malformations. T1 hyperintensities with diffusion restriction may represent viral encephalitis. Lesions of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM may mimic viral encephalitis. Leptomeningeal enhancement is predominant in pyogenic meningitis. Basilar meningitis in the presence of tuberculomas is highly sensitive and specific for

  11. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  12. Superconducting Helical Snake Magnet for the AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Willen, Erich; Escallier, John; Ganetis, George; Ghosh, Arup; Gupta, Ramesh C; Harrison, Michael; Jain, Animesh K; Luccio, Alfredo U; MacKay, William W; Marone, Andrew; Muratore, Joseph F; Okamura, Masahiro; Plate, Stephen R; Roser, Thomas; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Wanderer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting helical magnet has been built for polarized proton acceleration in the Brookhaven AGS. This "partial Snake" magnet will help to reduce the loss of polarization of the beam due to machine resonances. It is a 3 T magnet some 1940 mm in magnetic length in which the dipole field rotates with a pitch of 0.2053 degrees/mm for 1154 mm in the center and a pitch of 0.3920 degrees/mm for 393 mm in each end. The coil cross-section is made of two slotted cylinders containing superconductor. In order to minimize residual offsets and deflections of the beam on its orbit through the Snake, a careful balancing of the coil parameters was necessary. In addition to the main helical coils, a solenoid winding was built on the cold bore tube inside the main coils to compensate for the axial component of the field that is experienced by the beam when it is off-axis in this helical magnet. Also, two dipole corrector magnets were placed on the same tube with the solenoid. A low heat leak cryostat was built so that t...

  13. Mechanical Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Toral, F

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about the mechanical design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, we give a brief review of the basic concepts and terms. In the following sections, we describe the particularities of the mechanical design of different types of superconducting accelerator magnets: solenoids, costheta, superferric, and toroids. Special attention is given to the pre-stress principle, which aims to avoid the appearance of tensile stresses in the superconducting coils. A case study on a compact superconducting cyclotron summarizes the main steps and the guidelines that should be followed for a proper mechanical design. Finally, we present some remarks on the measurement techniques.

  14. Vorticity, Shocks and Magnetic Fields in Subsonic, ICM-like Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, David H; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-01-01

    We analyze high resolution simulations of compressible, MHD turbulence with properties resembling conditions in galaxy clusters. The flow is driven to turbulence Mach number $\\mathcal{M}_t \\sim 1/2$ in an isothermal medium with an initially very weak, uniform seed magnetic field ($\\beta = P_g/P_B = 10^6$). Since cluster turbulence is likely to result from a mix of sheared (solenoidal) and compressive forcing processes, we examine the distinct turbulence properties for both cases. In one set of simulations velocity forcing is entirely solenoidal ($\

  15. Precise mapping of the magnetic field in the CMS barrel yoke using cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Aremenia); et al.,

    2010-03-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  16. Precise Mapping of the Magnetic Field in the CMS Barrel Yoke using Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; 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    2010-01-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  17. Measurement of the centrality dependence of the charged particle pseudorapidity distribution in lead-lead collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byatt, Tom; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cuneo, Stefano; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; de Saintignon, Paul; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Debbe, Ramiro; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Deile, Mario; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Dzahini, Daniel; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Ely, Robert; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Föhlisch, Florian; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouanère, Michel; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafström, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernandez, Carlos Medina; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmes, Alan; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasel, Olaf; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvasnicka, Ondrej; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Wing; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Lazzaro, Alfio; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Maß, Martin; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohn, Bjarte; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morone, Maria-Christina; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muijs, Sandra; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murakami, Koichi; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nožička, Miroslav; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Øye, Ola; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Onne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; 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